Sample records for manufacturing flat glass

  1. Methods of improving the surface flatness of thin glass sheets and silicon wafers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akilian, Mireille

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The manufacturing of high quality sheet glass has allowed for many technologies to advance to astonishing frontiers. With dimensions reaching ~ 3 x 3 m˛, sheet glass is pushing the envelope for producing massive size flat ...

  2. Metal and Glass Manufacturers Reduce Costs by Increasing Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Metal and Glass Manufacturers Reduce Costs by Increasing Energy Efficiency in Process Heating Systems Metal and Glass Manufacturers Reduce Costs by Increasing Energy Efficiency in...

  3. Improving the diversity of manufacturing electroluminescent flat panel displays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moss, T.S.; Samuels, J.A.; Smith, D.C. [and others

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Crystalline calcium thiogallate with a cerium dopant has been deposited by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) at temperatures below 600{degrees}C on a low cost glass substrate. An EL luminance of 1.05 fL was observed 40 volts above threshold at 60 Hz. This is more than an order of magnitude improvement over earlier crystalline-as-deposited thiogallate materials. These results pave the way for the use of MOCVD as a potential method for processing full color thin-film electroluminescent (TFEL) flat panel displays. The formation of the CaGa{sub 2}S{sub 4}:Ce phosphor requires precise control over a number of deposition parameters including flow rates, substrate temperature, and reactor pressure. The influence of these parameters will be discussed in terms of structure, uniformity, and TFEL device performance.

  4. Horizontal non-contact slumping of flat glass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sung, Edward, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper continues the work of M. Akilian and A. Husseini on developing a noncontact glass slumping/shaping process. The shift from vertical slumping to horizontal slumping is implemented and various technologies required ...

  5. Standard specification for architectural flat glass clad polycarbonate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This specification covers the quality requirements for cut sizes of glass clad polycarbonate (GCP) for use in buildings as security, detention, hurricane/cyclic wind-resistant, and blast and ballistic-resistant glazing applications. 1.2 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  6. System design and implementation for the glass panel alignment and sealing tool for flat panel displays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, J.D.; Stromberg, P.G.; Kuszmaul, S.S.

    1996-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the system designed and fabricated for the National Center for Advanced Information Component Manufacturing (NCAICM) project number 9322-135. The system is a device capable of simultaneously aligning two glass plates and sealing them together with glass frit. The process development was divided into two phases. The first was thermal sealing in an ambient environment. The second was sealing a controlled environment in a vacuum.

  7. Poly(methylmethacrylate) adsorption onto flat substrates of glass and silica: Influence of water traces in solvent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berquier, J. [Laboratoire CNRS-Saint-Gobain (UMR 125) 39, Quai Lucien Lefranc, F-93303 Aubervilliers Cedex

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The adsorbed amount of PMMA on flat glass and silica is measured by infrared external reflection. The effect on PMMA adsorption of water traces in solvent is emphasized: the adsorbed amount increases with the water concentration. Flat glass and silica are compared: on contrary of what is expected, adsorbed amount on glass is higher than on silica. This result is interpreted as due to the difference of behaviour between glass and silica with respect to water adsorption. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Advanced Manufacture of Second-Surface, Silvered Glass Reflectors for High-Performance, Low-Cost CSP Collector Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Advanced Manufacture of Second-Surface, Silvered Glass Reflectors for High-Performance, Low-Cost CSP Collector Systems

  9. Economic manufacturing of bulk metallic glass compositions by microalloying

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Chain T.

    2003-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of making a bulk metallic glass composition includes the steps of:a. providing a starting material suitable for making a bulk metallic glass composition, for example, BAM-11; b. adding at least one impurity-mitigating dopant, for example, Pb, Si, B, Sn, P, to the starting material to form a doped starting material; and c. converting the doped starting material to a bulk metallic glass composition so that the impurity-mitigating dopant reacts with impurities in the starting material to neutralize deleterious effects of the impurities on the formation of the bulk metallic glass composition.

  10. Multi-cusp ion source for doping process of flat panel display manufacturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Inouchi, Yutaka, E-mail: inouchi-yutaka@nissin.co.jp; Matsumoto, Takeshi; Dohi, Shojiro; Tanii, Masahiro; Takahashi, Genki; Nishimura, Ippei; Tatemichi, Junichi; Konishi, Masashi; Naito, Masao [FPD Machine Business Center, Nissin Ion Equipment Co., Ltd., Shiga 528-0068 (Japan)] [FPD Machine Business Center, Nissin Ion Equipment Co., Ltd., Shiga 528-0068 (Japan)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We developed a multi-cusp ion source for Nissin ion doping system iG5 which is used in low temperature poly-crystalline silicon processes for flat panel display (FPD) manufacturing. In this ion source, BF{sub 3} or PH{sub 3} diluted H{sub 2} plasmas are produced and large area ribbon ion beams are extracted. In general, ion ratio of B{sup +} in BF{sub 3} plasma is much smaller than BF{sub 2}{sup +} in multi-cusp ion sources. We developed a new method to increase B{sup +} ratio and obtained mass analyzed B{sup +} target current of 130 mA. We employed newly improved multi-slot type electrodes for the beam extraction system and obtained stable beams with the uniformity of below 3%. In BF{sub 3} plasmas, several undesirable metal fluorides are produced in the plasma chamber and deposited on the electrode system, which cause glitches and poor beam uniformity. We introduce several cleaning methods.

  11. Method of manufacturing a glass parabolic-cylindrical solar collector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deminet, C.

    1980-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The method includes the following steps: (1) a microsheet of glass is drawn from a glass melt; (2) a reflective layer, such as silver, is deposited on one surface of the microsheet; (3) a first flexible backing layer, such as fiberglass, is bonded to the reflective layer; (4) the combination of the microsheet with the reflective layer and the first backing layer is formed over a mandrel which is preferably in the form of a parabolic cylinder; and (5) a honeycombed layer, with a second fiberglass backing layer, is then bonded to the first backing layer. The product produced by the steps 1-5 is then cured so that it retains the desired configuration; i.e. parabolic-cylindrical, after it is removed from the mandrel.

  12. Energy Saving Method of Manufacturing Ceramic Products from Fiber Glass Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael J. Haun

    2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. fiber glass industry disposes of more than 260,000 tons of industrial fiber glass waste in landfills annually. New technology is needed to reprocess this industrial waste into useful products. A low-cost energy-saving method of manufacturing ceramic tile from fiber glass waste was developed. The technology is based on sintering fiber glass waste at 700-900 degrees C to produce products which traditionally require firing temperatures of >1200 degrees C, or glass-melting temperatures >1500 degrees C. The process also eliminates other energy intensive processing steps, including mining and transportation of raw materials, spray-drying to produce granulated powder, drying pressed tile, and glazing. The technology completely transforms fiber glass waste into a dense ceramic product, so that all future environmental problems in the handling and disposal of the fibers is eliminated. The processing steps were developed and optimized to produce glossy and matte surface finishes for wall and floor tile applications. High-quality prototype tile samples were processed for demonstration and tile standards testing. A Market Assessment confirmed the market potential for tile products produced by the technology. Manufacturing equipment trials were successfully conducted for each step of the process. An industrial demonstration plant was designed, including equipment and operating cost analysis. A fiber glass manufacturer was selected as an industrial partner to commercialize the technology. A technology development and licensing agreement was completed with the industrial partner. Haun labs will continue working to transfer the technology and assist the industrial partner with commercialization beyond the DOE project.

  13. A new Energy Saving method of manufacturing ceramic products from waste glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haun Labs

    2002-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report summarizes the activities of the DOE Inventions and Innovations sponsored project, ''A New Energy Saving Method of Manufacturing Ceramic Products from Waste Glass.'' The project involved an innovative method of lowering energy costs of manufacturing ceramic products by substituting traditional raw materials with waste glass. The processing method is based on sintering of glass powder at {approx}750 C to produce products which traditionally require firing temperatures of >1200 C, or glass-melting temperatures >1500 C. The key to the new method is the elimination of previous processing problems, which have greatly limited the use of recycled glass as a ceramic raw material. The technology is aligned with the DOE-OIT Glass Industry Vision and Roadmap, and offers significant energy savings and environmental benefits compared to current technologies. A U.S. patent (No. 6,340,650) covering the technology was issued on January 22, 2002. An international PCT Patent Application is pending with designations made for all PCT regions and countries. The goal of the project was to provide the basis for the design and construction of an energy-efficient manufacturing plant that can convert large volumes of waste glass into high-quality ceramic tile. The main objectives of the project were to complete process development and optimization; construct and test prototype samples; and conduct market analysis and commercialization planning. Two types of ceramic tile products were targeted by the project. The first type was developed during the first year (Phase I) to have a glazed-like finish for applications where slip resistance is not critical, such as wall tile. The processing method optimized in Phase I produces a glossy surface with a translucent appearance, without the extra glazing steps required in traditional tile manufacturing. The second type of product was developed during the second year (Phase II). This product was designed to have an unglazed appearance for applications requiring slip resistance, such as floor tile. The coarser matte finish of this product type was produced by modifying the basic process to include crystalline fillers and partial crystallization of the glass. Additional details of the project results are discussed in Section III.

  14. Highly conductive electrolyte composites containing glass and ceramic, and method of manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hash, M.C.; Bloom, I.D.

    1992-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrolyte composite is manufactured by pressurizing a mixture of sodium ion conductive glass and an ionically conductive compound at between 12,000 and 24,000 pounds per square inch to produce a pellet. The resulting pellet is then sintered at relatively lower temperatures (800--1200 C), for example 1000 C, than are typically required (1400 C) when fabricating single constituent ceramic electrolytes. The resultant composite is 100 percent conductive at 250 C with conductivity values of 2.5 to 4[times]10[sup [minus]2](ohm-cm)[sup [minus]1]. The matrix exhibits chemical stability against sodium for 100 hours at 250 to 300 C. 1 figure.

  15. Highly conductive electrolyte composites containing glass and ceramic, and method of manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hash, Mark C. (Joliet, IL); Bloom, Ira D. (Bolingbrook, IL)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrolyte composite is manufactured by pressurizing a mixture of sodium ion conductive glass and an ionically conductive compound at between 12,000 and 24,000 pounds per square inch to produce a pellet. The resulting pellet is then sintered at relatively lower temperatures (800.degree. C.-1200.degree. C.), for example 1000.degree. C., than are typically required (1400.degree. C.) when fabricating single constituent ceramic electrolytes. The resultant composite is 100 percent conductive at 250.degree. C. with conductivity values of 2.5 to 4.times.10.sup.-2 (ohm-cm).sup.-1. The matrix exhibits chemical stability against sodium for 100 hours at 250.degree. to 300.degree. C.

  16. NREL Manufacturing R&D Workshop NREL H2/FC Manufacturing R&D Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trimming · Automated Dispensing · X-ray Wind PMD has built components for the wind industry focused In the following areas: · Blade Manufacturing · Tower component design and detailing · Tower component machining-part solar assemblies · Chip Placement ­ high speed and high precision · Curing · Flat glass material

  17. Sustainable Energy Solutions Task 4.1 Intelligent Manufacturing of Hybrid Carbon-Glass Fiber-Reinforced Composite Wind Turbine Blades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janet M Twomey, PhD

    2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    EXECUTIVE SUMARY In this subtask, the manufacturability of hybrid carbon-glass fiber-reinforced composite wind turbine blades using Vacuum-Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM) was investigated. The objective of this investigation was to study the VARTM process and its parameters to manufacture cost-effective wind turbine blades with no defects (mainly eliminate dry spots and reduce manufacturing time). A 2.5-dimensional model and a 3-dimensional model were developed to simulate mold filling and part curing under different conditions. These conditions included isothermal and non-isothermal filling, curing of the part during and after filling, and placement of injection gates at different locations. Results from this investigation reveal that the process can be simulated and also that manufacturing parameters can be optimized to eliminate dry spot formation and reduce the manufacturing time. Using computer-based models is a cost-effective way to simulate manufacturing of wind turbine blades. The approach taken herein allows the design of the wind blade manufacturing processes without physically running trial-and-error experiments that are expensive and time-consuming; especially for larger blades needed for more demanding environmental conditions. This will benefit the wind energy industry by reducing initial design and manufacturing costs which can later be passed down to consumers and consequently make the wind energy industry more competitive.

  18. MANUFACTURING Manufacturing and Biomanufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Joseph W.

    process improvements to manufacturing. In addition, the critical national need area of Manufacturing hasMANUFACTURING Manufacturing and Biomanufacturing: Materials Advances and Critical Processes NATIONAL NEED The proposed topics within "Manufacturing and Biomanufacturing: Materials Advances

  19. Evacuated flat-plate solar collectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whittemore, P.G.

    1981-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A structural support system is disclosed for use in an evacuated, flat-plate, solar collector to eliminate the problem of stress fractures in a glass cover plate. Nonlinearly spaced supports are used within the collector to dampen vibrations in the glass cover and to prevent overdeflection before buckling or stress fractures occur.

  20. ME 4210: Manufacturing Processes and Engineering -Prof. J.S. Colton GIT 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colton, Jonathan S.

    float glass process · Bottle manufacture ­ Codd bottles ­ Ramune bottles #12;ME 4210: Manufacturing a system for keeping fizzy drinks in bottles with a glass marble stopper. · When the bottle is filledME 4210: Manufacturing Processes and Engineering - Prof. J.S. Colton © GIT 2011 1 Glass Manufacture

  1. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Glass Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina; Masanet, Eric; Graus, Wina

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. glass industry is comprised of four primary industry segments--flat glass, container glass, specialty glass, and fiberglass--which together consume $1.6 billion in energy annually. On average, energy costs in the U.S. glass industry account for around 14 percent of total glass production costs. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There is a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. glass industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, system, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. glass industry is provided along with a description of the major process steps in glass manufacturing. Expected savings in energy and energy-related costs are given for many energy efficiency measures, based on case study data from real-world applications in glass production facilities and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. glass industry reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of the measures--as well on as their applicability to different production practices--is needed to assess potential implementation of selected technologies at individual plants.

  2. Graded index antireflective coatings for glass : final report, September 1978 - February 1982

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haggerty, John Scarseth

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Glass compositions and process conditions by which broad band gradedindex antreflective films can be produced on glass surfaces have been developed. The end use for the treated glass sheet is as cover plates for flat plate ...

  3. Film Formation Mechanism in Glass Lubrication by Polymer Latex Dispersions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    coatings by tin dioxide resulting in glass bottle lubrication was investigated on flat glass. The anchoring contacts between glass bottles on production lines and transport affect both their mechanical strength and visual aspect. To improve their scratch resistance and prevent surface damage, glass bottles

  4. Advanced Manufacture of Reflectors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Advance Manufacture of Reflectors fact sheet describes a SunShot Initiative project being conducted research team led by the University of Arizona, which is working to develop a novel method for shaping float glass. The technique developed by this research team can drastically reduce the time required for the shaping step. By enabling mass production of solar concentrating mirrors at high speed, this project should lead to improved performance and as much as a 40% reduction in manufacturing costs for reflectors made in very high volume.

  5. Glass Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shortland, Andrew

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Late Bronze Age glasses. Journal of Archaeological Science781 - 789. Turner, W.E.S. 1954 Studies in ancient glassesand glass making processes. Part I: Crucibles and melting

  6. Glass needs for a growing photovoltaics industry

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Burrows, Keith; Fthenakis, Vasilis

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the projected growth in photovoltaics, the demand for glass for the solar industry will far exceed the current supply, and thousands of new float-glass plants will have to be built to meet its needs over the next 20 years. Such expansion will provide an opportunity for the solar industry to obtain products better suited to their needs, such as low-iron glass and borosilicate glass at the lowest possible price. While there are no significant technological hurdles that would prevent the flat glass industry from meeting the solar industry’s projected needs, to do so will require advance planning and substantialmore »investments.« less

  7. Glass needs for a growing photovoltaics industry

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Burrows, Keith [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Fthenakis, Vasilis [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the projected growth in photovoltaics, the demand for glass for the solar industry will far exceed the current supply, and thousands of new float-glass plants will have to be built to meet its needs over the next 20 years. Such expansion will provide an opportunity for the solar industry to obtain products better suited to their needs, such as low-iron glass and borosilicate glass at the lowest possible price. While there are no significant technological hurdles that would prevent the flat glass industry from meeting the solar industry’s projected needs, to do so will require advance planning and substantial investments.

  8. THROUGH THICKNESS LASER JOINING OF CONTINUOUS GLASS FIBER FABRIC REINFORCEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Y. Lawrence

    THROUGH THICKNESS LASER JOINING OF CONTINUOUS GLASS FIBER FABRIC REINFORCEMENT Paper Number 405 Huade Tan, Gen Satoh, Y. Lawrence Yao Manufacturing Research Laboratory Department of Mechanical and propagation is a major failure mode in structural composite applications. Manufacturing induced fiber

  9. Energy Saving Glass Lamination via Selective Radio Frequency Heating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allan, Shawn M.; Baranova, Inessa; Poley, Joseph; Reis, Henrique

    2012-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This project focused on advancing radio-frequency (RF) lamination technology closer to commercial implementation, in order to reduce the energy intensity of glass lamination by up to 90%. Lamination comprises a wide range of products including autoglass, architectural safety and innovative design glass, transparent armor (e.g. bullet proof glass), smart glass, mirrors, and encapsulation of photovoltaics. Lamination is also the fastest growing segment of glass manufacturing, with photovoltaics, architectural needs, and an anticipated transition to laminated side windows in vehicles. The state-of-the-art for glass lamination is to use autoclaves, which apply heat and uniform gas pressure to bond the laminates over the course of 1 to 18 hours. Laminates consist of layers of glass or other materials bonded with vinyl or urethane interlayers. In autoclaving, significant heat energy is lost heating the chamber, pressurized air, glass racks, and the glass. In RF lamination, the heat is generated directly in the vinyl interlayer, causing it to heat and melt quickly, in just 1 to 10 minutes, without significantly heating the glass or the equipment. The main purpose of this project was to provide evidence that low energy, rapid RF lamination quality met the same standards as conventionally autoclaved windows. The development of concepts for laminating curved glass with RF lamination was a major goal. Other primary goals included developing a stronger understanding of the lamination product markets described above, and to refine the potential benefits of commercial implementation. The scope of the project was to complete implementation concept studies in preparation for continuation into advanced development, pilot studies, and commercial implementation. The project consisted of 6 main tasks. The first dealt with lamination with poly-vinyl butyral (PVB) interlayers, which prior work had shown difficulties in achieving good quality laminates, working with Pilkington North America. The second task dealt with a study of current lamination processes in the various laminate industries, and development of concepts for integrating RF lamination into new or existing processes. The third task explored the use of a non-destructive technique for analyzing laminate adhesion with the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The fourth task focused on developing concepts for curved glass lamination using RF lamination. The fifth and sixth tasks together comprised an analysis of laminate product markets, ranking for applicability and commercialization potential, and the development of commercialization strategies for those products. In addition, throughout the project as new experimental data and conventional process data were obtained, the benefits analysis of RF lamination was refined. The goals of the project described above were achieved, positioning RF lamination for the next stage growth envisioned in the original Industrial Grand Challenge proposal. Working with Pilkington North America, lamination of flat autoglass with PVB was achieved, meeting all 16 stringent industry tests. In particular, PVB laminates made with RF lamination passed environmental tests including the high temperature, 120 ���°C bake test, without significant formation of bubbles (defects). The adhesion of PVB to glass was measured using the pummel method. Adhesion values ranging from 1 to 7 out of 10 were obtained. The significant process parameters affecting the environmental and adhesion performance were identified through a designed experiment. Pre-lamination process variables including PVB storage humidity and the de-airing process (vacuum or nip rolling) were significant, as well as the level of pressure applied to the laminate during the RF process. Analysis of manufacturing with RF lamination equipment, based on the processes developed indicated that 3 RF presses could replace a typical auto-industry autoclave to achieve equal or greater throughput with possibly less capital cost and smaller footprint. Concepts for curved lamination id

  10. Energy Saving Glass Lamination via Selective Radio Frequency Heating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allan, Shawn M.

    2012-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This project focused on advancing radio-frequency (RF) lamination technology closer to commercial implementation, in order to reduce the energy intensity of glass lamination by up to 90%. Lamination comprises a wide range of products including autoglass, architectural safety and innovative design glass, transparent armor (e.g. bullet proof glass), smart glass, mirrors, and encapsulation of photovoltaics. Lamination is also the fastest growing segment of glass manufacturing, with photovoltaics, architectural needs, and an anticipated transition to laminated side windows in vehicles. The state-of-the-art for glass lamination is to use autoclaves, which apply heat and uniform gas pressure to bond the laminates over the course of 1 to 18 hours. Laminates consist of layers of glass or other materials bonded with vinyl or urethane interlayers. In autoclaving, significant heat energy is lost heating the chamber, pressurized air, glass racks, and the glass. In RF lamination, the heat is generated directly in the vinyl interlayer, causing it to heat and melt quickly, in just 1 to 10 minutes, without significantly heating the glass or the equipment. The main purpose of this project was to provide evidence that low energy, rapid RF lamination quality met the same standards as conventionally autoclaved windows. The development of concepts for laminating curved glass with RF lamination was a major goal. Other primary goals included developing a stronger understanding of the lamination product markets described above, and to refine the potential benefits of commercial implementation. The scope of the project was to complete implementation concept studies in preparation for continuation into advanced development, pilot studies, and commercial implementation. The project consisted of 6 main tasks. The first dealt with lamination with poly-vinyl butyral (PVB) interlayers, which prior work had shown difficulties in achieving good quality laminates, working with Pilkington North America. The second task dealt with a study of current lamination processes in the various laminate industries, and development of concepts for integrating RF lamination into new or existing processes. The third task explored the use of a non-destructive technique for analyzing laminate adhesion with the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The fourth task focused on developing concepts for curved glass lamination using RF lamination. The fifth and sixth tasks together comprised an analysis of laminate product markets, ranking for applicability and commercialization potential, and the development of commercialization strategies for those products. In addition, throughout the project as new experimental data and conventional process data were obtained, the benefits analysis of RF lamination was refined. The goals of the project described above were achieved, positioning RF lamination for the next stage growth envisioned in the original Industrial Grand Challenge proposal. Working with Pilkington North America, lamination of flat autoglass with PVB was achieved, meeting all 16 stringent industry tests. In particular, PVB laminates made with RF lamination passed environmental tests including the high temperature, 120 C bake test, without significant formation of bubbles (defects). The adhesion of PVB to glass was measured using the pummel method. Adhesion values ranging from 1 to 7 out of 10 were obtained. The significant process parameters affecting the environmental and adhesion performance were identified through a designed experiment. Pre-lamination process variables including PVB storage humidity and the de-airing process (vacuum or nip rolling) were significant, as well as the level of pressure applied to the laminate during the RF process. Analysis of manufacturing with RF lamination equipment, based on the processes developed indicated that 3 RF presses could replace a typical auto-industry autoclave to achieve equal or greater throughput with possibly less capital cost and smaller footprint. Concepts for curved lamination identifying castable molds for

  11. Energy Saving Glass Lamination via Selective Radio-Frequency Heating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shulman, Holly S.; Allan, Shawn M.

    2009-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This Inventions and Innovations program supported the technical and commercial research and development needed to elevate Ceralink's energy saving process for flat glass lamination from bench scale to a self-supporting technology with significant potential for growth. Radio-frequency heating was any un-explored option for laminating glass prior to this program. With significant commercial success through time and energy savings in the wood, paper, and plastics industries, RF heating was found to have significant promise for the energy intensive glass lamination industry. A major technical goal of the program was to demonstrate RF lamination across a wide range of laminate sizes and materials. This was successfully accomplished, dispelling many skeptics' concerns about the abilities of the technology. Ceralink laminated panels up to 2 ft x 3 ft, with four sets processed simultaneously, in a 3 minute cycle. All major categories of interlayer materials were found to work with RF lamination. In addition to laminating glass, other materials including photovoltaic silicon solar cells, light emitting diodes, metallized glass, plastics (acrylic and polycarbonate), and ceramics (alumina) were found compatible with the RF process. This opens up a wide range of commercial opportunities beyond the initially targeted automotive industry. The dramatic energy savings reported for RF lamination at the bench scale were found to be maintained through the scale up of the process. Even at 2 ft x 3 ft panel sizes, energy savings are estimated to be at least 90% compared to autoclaving or vacuum lamination. With targeted promotion through conference presentations, press releases and internet presence, RF lamination has gained significant attention, drawing large audiences at American Ceramic Society meetings. The commercialization success of the project includes the establishment of a revenue-generating business model for providing process development and demonstrations for potential RF lamination users. A path to industrial energy benefits and revenue through industrial equipment sales was established in a partnership with Thermex Thermatron, a manufacturer of RF equipment.

  12. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Glass Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Adaptive Control of Glass Bottle http://www.brainwave.com/die. Forming machines for glass bottles pre-shape the gob byUK) manufactures white flint glass bottles mainly used for

  13. Sealed glass coating of high temperature ceramic superconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, Weite (Tainan, TW); Chu, Cha Y. (Garnerville, NY); Goretta, Kenneth C. (Downers Grove, IL); Routbort, Jules L. (Darien, IL)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and article of manufacture of a lead oxide based glass coating on a high temperature superconductor. The method includes preparing a dispersion of glass powders in a solution, applying the dispersion to the superconductor, drying the dispersion before applying another coating and heating the glass powder dispersion at temperatures below oxygen diffusion onset and above the glass melting point to form a continuous glass coating on the superconductor to establish compressive stresses which enhance the fracture strength of the superconductor.

  14. Glass balls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    There is a building with 100 floors in it, and glass balls, and an integer k with the following property. If one drops a glass ball from the floor number k or higher, ...

  15. Glass Transition in Confined Geometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon Lang; Vitalie Botan; Martin Oettel; David Hajnal; Thomas Franosch; Rolf Schilling

    2010-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Extending mode-coupling theory, we elaborate a microscopic theory for the glass transition of liquids confined between two parallel flat hard walls. The theory contains the standard MCT equations in bulk and in two dimensions as limiting cases and requires as input solely the equilibrium density profile and the structure factors of the fluid in confinement. We evaluate the phase diagram as a function of the distance of the plates for the case of a hard sphere fluid and obtain an oscillatory behavior of the glass transtion line as a result of the structural changes related to layering.

  16. Is flat fair?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bunzl, Martin

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Dynamic pricing holds out the promise of shifting peak demand as well as reducing overall demand. But it also raises thorny issues of fairness. All practical pricing systems involve tradeoffs between equity and efficiency. I examine the circumstances under which equity ought to be allowed to trump efficiency and whether or not this constitutes a defense of flat pricing. (author)

  17. Additive Manufacturing: Implications on Research and Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    Additive Manufacturing: Implications on Research and Manufacturing With recent developments, etc.), additive manufacturing (AM) has the potential to become a transformative technology in innovation-based manufacturing. Agencies such as the Department of Defense, the National Science Foundation

  18. Kentish Flats Offshore Wind Farm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Kentish Flats Offshore Wind Farm #12;By August 2005 the offshore wind farm at Kentish Flats plateau just outside the main Thames shipping lanes. The Kentish Flats wind farm will comprise 30 of the wind farm could be up to 90 MW. For the benefit of the environment The British Government has set

  19. Advanced Manufacture of Reflectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Angel, Roger [University of Arizona

    2014-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The main project objective has been to develop an advanced gravity sag method for molding large glass solar reflectors with either line or point focus, and with long or short focal length. The method involves taking standard sized squares of glass, 1.65 m x 1.65 m, and shaping them by gravity sag into precision steel molds. The method is designed for high volume manufacture when incorporated into a production line with separate pre-heating and cooling. The performance objectives for the self-supporting glass mirrors made by this project include mirror optical accuracy of 2 mrad root mean square (RMS), requiring surface slope errors <1 mrad rms, a target not met by current production of solar reflectors. Our objective also included development of new methods for rapidly shaping glass mirrors and coating them for higher reflectivity and soil resistance. Reflectivity of 95% for a glass mirror with anti-soil coating was targeted, compared to the present ~94% with no anti-soil coating. Our mirror cost objective is ~$20/m2 in 2020, a significant reduction compared to the present ~$35/m2 for solar trough mirrors produced for trough solar plants. During the first year a custom batch furnace was built to develop the method with high power radiative heating to simulate transfer of glass into a hot slumping zone in a production line. To preserve the original high polish of the float glass on both front and back surfaces, as required for a second surface mirror, the mold surface is machined to the required shape as grooves which intersect the glass at cusps, reducing the mold contact area to significantly less than 1%. The mold surface is gold-plated to reflect thermal radiation. Optical metrology of glass replicas made with the system has been carried out with a novel, custom-built test system. This test provides collimated, vertically-oriented parallel beams from a linear array of co-aligned lasers translated in a perpendicular direction across the reflector. Deviations of each reflected beam from the paraboloid focus give a direct measure of surface slope error. Key findings • A gravity sag method for large (2.5 m2) second surface glass solar reflectors has been developed and demonstrated to a uniquely high level of accuracy. Mirror surface slope accuracy of 0.65 mrad in one dimension, 0.85 mrad in 2 dimensions (point focus) has been demonstrated by commercial partner REhnu using this process. This accuracy exceeds by a factor of two current solar reflector accuracy. Our replicas meet the Sunshot accuracy objective of 2 mrad optical, which requires better than 1 mrad rms slope error. • Point-focus as well as line-focus mirrors have been demonstrated at 1.65 m x 1.65 m square – a unique capability. • The new process using simple molds is economical. The molds for the 1.65 m square reflectors are bent and machined steel plates on a counter-weighted flotation support. To minimize thermal coupling by radiative heat transfer, the mold surface is grooved and gilded. The molds are simple to manufacture, and have minimal thermal stresses and distortion in use. Lapping and bending techniques have been developed to obtain better than 1 mrad rms surface mold accuracy. Float glass is sagged into the molds by rapid radiative heating, using a custom high power (350 kW) furnace. The method of manufacture is well suited for small as well as large volume production, and as it requires little capital investment and no high technology, it could be used anywhere in the world to make solar concentrating reflectors. • A novel slope metrology method for full 1.65 aperture has been demonstrated, with 25 mm resolution across the face of the replicas. The method is null and therefore inherently accurate: it can easily be reproduced without high-tech equipment and does not need sophisticated calibration. We find by cross calibration with reference trough reflectors from RioGlass that our null-test laser system yields a measurement accuracy better than 0.4 mrad rms slope error. Our system is inexpensive and could have broad application for test

  20. Bio-Manufacturing: A Strategic clean energy manufacturing opportunity

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Better Plants Challenge Manufacturing R&D Facilities Manufacturing Demonstration Facility Manufacturing Institutes National Additive Manufacturing Innovation Institute - Pilot Now...

  1. Fuel Cell Manufacturing: American Energy and Manufacturing Competitive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Cell Manufacturing: American Energy and Manufacturing Competitiveness Summit Fuel Cell Manufacturing: American Energy and Manufacturing Competitiveness Summit Presentation on...

  2. Diesel prices flat

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management FermiDavidDiesel prices continueU.S.Diesel prices flat The

  3. Diesel prices flat nationally

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management FermiDavidDiesel prices continueU.S.Diesel prices flat

  4. Flat | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to:ar-80m.pdfFillmore County,and WildlifeFlash Steam PowerFlat Jump to:

  5. Method of manufacturing large dish reflectors for a solar concentrator apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Angel, Roger P (Tucson, AZ); Olbert, Blain H (Tucson, AZ)

    2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of manufacturing monolithic glass reflectors for concentrating sunlight in a solar energy system is disclosed. The method of manufacturing allows large monolithic glass reflectors to be made from float glass in order to realize significant cost savings on the total system cost for a solar energy system. The method of manufacture includes steps of heating a sheet of float glass positioned over a concave mold until the sheet of glass sags and stretches to conform to the shape of the mold. The edges of the dish-shaped glass are rolled for structural stiffening around the periphery. The dish-shaped glass is then silvered to create a dish-shaped mirror that reflects solar radiation to a focus. The surface of the mold that contacts the float glass preferably has a grooved surface profile comprising a plurality of cusps and concave valleys. This grooved profile minimizes the contact area and marring of the specular glass surface, reduces parasitic heat transfer into the mold and increases mold lifetime. The disclosed method of manufacture is capable of high production rates sufficiently fast to accommodate the output of a conventional float glass production line so that monolithic glass reflectors can be produced as quickly as a float glass production can make sheets of float glass to be used in the process.

  6. Through a glass darkly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, James E

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Closeup Through a glass darklyThrough a glass darkly James E. Hall Keywords: AKAP2; AQP0;Medicine Closeup Through a glass darkly GLUT1 Glucose

  7. Green Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patten, John

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Green Manufacturing Initiative (GMI): The initiative provides a conduit between the university and industry to facilitate cooperative research programs of mutual interest to support green (sustainable) goals and efforts. In addition to the operational savings that greener practices can bring, emerging market demands and governmental regulations are making the move to sustainable manufacturing a necessity for success. The funding supports collaborative activities among universities such as the University of Michigan, Michigan State University and Purdue University and among 40 companies to enhance economic and workforce development and provide the potential of technology transfer. WMU participants in the GMI activities included 20 faculty, over 25 students and many staff from across the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences; the College of Arts and Sciences' departments of Chemistry, Physics, Biology and Geology; the College of Business; the Environmental Research Institute; and the Environmental Studies Program. Many outside organizations also contribute to the GMI's success, including Southwest Michigan First; The Right Place of Grand Rapids, MI; Michigan Department of Environmental Quality; the Michigan Department of Energy, Labor and Economic Growth; and the Michigan Manufacturers Technical Center.

  8. Direction of CRT waste glass processing: Electronics recycling industry communication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, Julia R., E-mail: mueller.143@osu.edu [Ohio State University, William G. Lowrie Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, OH (United States) and University of Queensland, School of Chemical Engineering (Australia) and Ohio State University, Materials Science and Engineering, OH (United States); Boehm, Michael W. [University of Queensland, School of Chemical Engineering (Australia); Drummond, Charles [Ohio State University, Materials Science and Engineering, OH (United States)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Given a large flow rate of CRT glass {approx}10% of the panel glass stream will be leaded. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The supply of CRT waste glass exceeded demand in 2009. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recyclers should use UV-light to detect lead oxide during the separation process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recycling market analysis techniques and results are given for CRT glass. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Academic initiatives and the necessary expansion of novel product markets are discussed. - Abstract: Cathode Ray Tube, CRT, waste glass recycling has plagued glass manufacturers, electronics recyclers and electronics waste policy makers for decades because the total supply of waste glass exceeds demand, and the formulations of CRT glass are ill suited for most reuse options. The solutions are to separate the undesirable components (e.g. lead oxide) in the waste and create demand for new products. Achieving this is no simple feat, however, as there are many obstacles: limited knowledge of waste glass composition; limited automation in the recycling process; transportation of recycled material; and a weak and underdeveloped market. Thus one of the main goals of this paper is to advise electronic glass recyclers on how to best manage a diverse supply of glass waste and successfully market to end users. Further, this paper offers future directions for academic and industry research. To develop the recommendations offered here, a combination of approaches were used: (1) a thorough study of historic trends in CRT glass chemistry; (2) bulk glass collection and analysis of cullet from a large-scale glass recycler; (3) conversations with industry members and a review of potential applications; and (4) evaluation of the economic viability of specific uses for recycled CRT glass. If academia and industry can solve these problems (for example by creating a database of composition organized by manufacturer and glass source) then the reuse of CRT glass can be increased.

  9. Cleanup at Rocky Flats

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t zManufacturing: U.S. Competitiveness2 P

  10. Sealed glass coating of high temperature ceramic superconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, W.; Chu, C.Y.; Goretta, K.C.; Routbort, J.L.

    1995-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and article of manufacture of a lead oxide based glass coating on a high temperature superconductor is disclosed. The method includes preparing a dispersion of glass powders in a solution, applying the dispersion to the superconductor, drying the dispersion before applying another coating and heating the glass powder dispersion at temperatures below oxygen diffusion onset and above the glass melting point to form a continuous glass coating on the superconductor to establish compressive stresses which enhance the fracture strength of the superconductor. 8 figs.

  11. Flat Oval Spiral Duct Deflection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daugherty, Matthew

    2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    , because it has less flat surfaces than rectangular duct. Flat oval can be fit in tight places because of its similar aspect ratio to rectangular duct. [23] 2.6 Duct Selection and Application All ducts are required to be sealed, but leakage testing...

  12. Absolute calibration of optical flats

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    2005-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention uses the phase shifting diffraction interferometer (PSDI) to provide a true point-by-point measurement of absolute flatness over the surface of optical flats. Beams exiting the fiber optics in a PSDI have perfect spherical wavefronts. The measurement beam is reflected from the optical flat and passed through an auxiliary optic to then be combined with the reference beam on a CCD. The combined beams include phase errors due to both the optic under test and the auxiliary optic. Standard phase extraction algorithms are used to calculate this combined phase error. The optical flat is then removed from the system and the measurement fiber is moved to recombine the two beams. The newly combined beams include only the phase errors due to the auxiliary optic. When the second phase measurement is subtracted from the first phase measurement, the absolute phase error of the optical flat is obtained.

  13. Z .Thin Solid Films 315 1998 912 Patterning of a polysiloxane precursor to silicate glasses by microcontact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tien, Joe

    Z .Thin Solid Films 315 1998 9­12 Letter Patterning of a polysiloxane precursor to silicate glasses. Introduction This paper describes a new method to generate mm-scale patterns of silicate glass on flat and non to silica. After removing the unreacted polymer and curing, a silicate glass pattern is produced. Z

  14. Thermal modeling of bottle glass pressing P. Kagan and R.M.M. Mattheij

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

    Thermal modeling of bottle glass pressing P. Kagan and R.M.M. Mattheij CASA, Technical University: Glass pressing, thermal modeling, finite elements 1 Introduction In bottle manufacturing, a gob in time are used to model incompressible creeping flow of molten glass with temperature dependent

  15. ITP Glass: Industrial Glass Bandwidth Analysis Final Report,...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    industrialbandwidth.pdf More Documents & Publications ITP Glass: Glass Industry of the Future: Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Glass Industry; April, 2002 ITP Glass:...

  16. High-Power Solid-State Lasers from a Laser Glass Perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, J H; Hayden, J S; Marker, A J

    2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Advances in laser glass compositions and manufacturing have enabled a new class of high-energy/high-power (HEHP), petawatt (PW) and high-average-power (HAP) laser systems that are being used for fusion energy ignition demonstration, fundamental physics research and materials processing, respectively. The requirements for these three laser systems are different necessitating different glasses or groups of glasses. The manufacturing technology is now mature for melting, annealing, fabricating and finishing of laser glasses for all three applications. The laser glass properties of major importance for HEHP, PW and HAP applications are briefly reviewed and the compositions and properties of the most widely used commercial laser glasses summarized. Proposed advances in these three laser systems will require new glasses and new melting methods which are briefly discussed. The challenges presented by these laser systems will likely dominate the field of laser glass development over the next several decades.

  17. Manufacturing Innovation in the DOE

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Robert McEwan GE America Makes The National Accelerator for Additive Manufacturing & 3D Printing Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) manufacturing.energy.gov 13 Manufacturing...

  18. Development of a failure prediction model for heat-treated glass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ditsworth, Jay Morgan

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    plate deflection and the presence of nickel sulfide stones are two problems associated with the use of heat-treated glass. Both of these problems are be- yond the scope of this thesis but warrant brief discussions. Excessive lateral deflection can... stresses along the edges to become a problem during large changes in glass temperature (Beason 1992). Nickel sulfide impurities in glass plates are a significant problem associated with tempered glass. During the manufacturing process, nickel sulfide...

  19. ITP Glass: Glass Industry of the Future: Energy and Environmental...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    glass2002profile.pdf More Documents & Publications ITP Glass: Industrial Glass Bandwidth Analysis Final Report, August 2007 ITP Glass: A Clear Vision for a Bright Future ITP Glass:...

  20. CRYSTALLIZATION IN MULTICOMPONENT GLASSES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KRUGER AA; HRMA PR

    2009-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In glass processing situations involving glass crystallization, various crystalline forms nucleate, grow, and dissolve, typically in a nonuniform temperature field of molten glass subjected to convection. Nuclear waste glasses are remarkable examples of multicomponent vitrified mixtures involving partial crystallization. In the glass melter, crystals form and dissolve during batch-to-glass conversion, melter processing, and product cooling. Crystals often agglomerate and sink, and they may settle at the melter bottom. Within the body of cooling glass, multiple phases crystallize in a non-uniform time-dependent temperature field. Self-organizing periodic distribution (the Liesegnang effect) is common. Various crystallization phenomena that occur in glass making are reviewed.

  1. Half-flat Quantum Hair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hugo Garcia-Compean; Oscar Loaiza-Brito; Aldo Martinez-Merino; Roberto Santos-Silva

    2013-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    By wrapping D3-branes over 3-cycles on a half-flat manifold we construct an effective supersymmetric black hole in the N=2 low-energy theory in four-dimensions. Specifically we find that the torsion cycles present in a half-flat compactification, corresponding to the mirror symmetric image of electric NS flux on a Calabi-Yau manifold, manifest in the half-flat black hole as quantum hair. We compute the electric and magnetic charges related to the quantum hair, and also the mass contribution to the effective black hole. We find that by wrapping a number of D3-branes equal to the order of the discrete group associated to the torsional part of the half-flat homology, the effective charge and mass terms vanishes. We compute the variation of entropy and the corresponding temperature associated with the lost of quantum hair. We also comment on the equivalence between canceling Freed-Witten anomaly and the assumption of self-duality for the 5-form field strength. Finally from a K-theoretical perspective, we compute the presence of discrete RR charge of D-branes wrapping torsional cycles in a half-flat manifold.

  2. Energy implications of glass-container recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaines, L.L.; Mintz, M.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report addresses the question of whether glass-container recycling actually saves energy. Glass-container production in 1991 was 10{sup 7} tons, with cullet making up about 30% of the input to manufacture. Two-thirds of the cullet is postconsumer waste; the remainder is in-house scrap (rejects). Most of the glass recycled is made into new containers. Total primary energy consumption includes direct process-energy use by the industry (adjusted to account for the efficiency of fuel production) plus fuel and raw-material transportation and production energies; the grand total for 1991 is estimated to be about 168 {times} 10{sup 12} Btu. The total primary energy use decreases as the percent of glass recycled rises, but the maximum energy saved is only about 13%. If distance to the landfill is kept fixed and that to the recovery facility multiplied by about eight, to 100 mi, a break-even point is reached, and recycling saves no energy. Previous work has shown that to save energy when using glass bottles, reuse is the clear choice. Recycling of glass does not save much energy or valuable raw material and does not reduce air or water pollution significantly. The most important impacts are the small reduction of waste sent to the landfill and increased production rates at glass plants.

  3. Administration of IV Tylenol (Glass Bottle) IV Acetaminophen ( Tylenol) is clinically appropriate when an antipyretic is indicated or in cases where

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    Administration of IV Tylenol (Glass Bottle) IV Acetaminophen ( Tylenol) is clinically appropriate and rectal suppositories for most patients. Since the manufacturer provided bottle of IV Tylenol (OFIRMEV

  4. SHEPHERDS FLAT | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSARDevelopmental Assignment |SHEPHERDS FLAT SHEPHERDS FLAT

  5. NEWS & VIEWS Glass dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weeks, Eric R.

    NEWS & VIEWS Glass dynamics Diverging views on glass transition Gregory B. mc.mckenna@ttu.edu T he glass transition is one of the most intriguing phenomena in the world of soft condensed matter. Despite decades of study, many aspects of the behaviour of glass-forming liquids remain elusive

  6. Reidemeister torsion for flat superconnections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abad, Camilo Arias

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use higher parallel transport -- more precisely, the integration A_{infty}-functor constructed by Block-Smith and Arias Abad-Schaetz -- to define Reidemeister torsion for flat superconnections. We hope that the combinatorial Reidemeister torsion coincides with the analytic torsion defined by Mathai and Wu, thus permitting for a generalization of the Cheeger-Mueller Theorem.

  7. Glass-silicon column

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, Conrad M.

    2003-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A glass-silicon column that can operate in temperature variations between room temperature and about 450.degree. C. The glass-silicon column includes large area glass, such as a thin Corning 7740 boron-silicate glass bonded to a silicon wafer, with an electrode embedded in or mounted on glass of the column, and with a self alignment silicon post/glass hole structure. The glass/silicon components are bonded, for example be anodic bonding. In one embodiment, the column includes two outer layers of silicon each bonded to an inner layer of glass, with an electrode imbedded between the layers of glass, and with at least one self alignment hole and post arrangement. The electrode functions as a column heater, and one glass/silicon component is provided with a number of flow channels adjacent the bonded surfaces.

  8. Flat-to-Flat Solder Seal Andrey Elagin1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    To practice 8x8" seals we start from good parts with no scavenging Cu Scavenging Problem #12;11 Seal #1 A complete LAPPD glass tile except for an aluminum photo-cathode top seal by compression on a viton o Recipe for Ceramic Package Copper well is brazed into the ceramic body and filled with indium alloy (In

  9. National Center for Advanced Information Components Manufacturing. Program summary report, Volume II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Center for Advanced Information Components Manufacturing focused on manufacturing research and development for flat panel displays, advanced lithography, microelectronics, and optoelectronics. This report provides an overview of the program, program history, summaries of the technical projects, and key program accomplishments.

  10. Vacuum fusion bonding of glass plates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swierkowski, Steve P. (Livermore, CA); Davidson, James C. (Livermore, CA); Balch, Joseph W. (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved apparatus and method for vacuum fusion bonding of large, patterned glass plates. One or both glass plates are patterned with etched features such as microstructure capillaries and a vacuum pumpout moat, with one plate having at least one hole therethrough for communication with a vacuum pumpout fixture. High accuracy alignment of the plates is accomplished by a temporary clamping fixture until the start of the fusion bonding heat cycle. A complete, void-free fusion bond of seamless, full-strength quality is obtained through the plates; because the glass is heated well into its softening point and because of a large, distributed force that is developed that presses the two plates together from the difference in pressure between the furnace ambient (high pressure) and the channeling and microstructures in the plates (low pressure) due to the vacuum drawn. The apparatus and method may be used to fabricate microcapillary arrays for chemical electrophoresis; for example, any apparatus using a network of microfluidic channels embedded between plates of glass or similar moderate melting point substrates with a gradual softening point curve, or for assembly of glass-based substrates onto larger substrates, such as in flat panel display systems.

  11. Vacuum fusion bonding of glass plates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swierkowski, Steve P. (Livermore, CA); Davidson, James C. (Livermore, CA); Balch, Joseph W. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved apparatus and method for vacuum fusion bonding of large, patterned glass plates. One or both glass plates are patterned with etched features such as microstructure capillaries and a vacuum pumpout moat, with one plate having at least one hole therethrough for communication with a vacuum pumpout fixture. High accuracy alignment of the plates is accomplished by a temporary clamping fixture until the start of the fusion bonding heat cycle. A complete, void-free fusion bond of seamless, full-strength quality is obtained through the plates; because the glass is heated well into its softening point and because of a large, distributed force that is developed that presses the two plates together from the difference in pressure between the furnace ambient (high pressure) and the channeling and microstructures in the plates (low pressure) due to the vacuum drawn. The apparatus and method may be used to fabricate microcapillary arrays for chemical electrophoresis; for example, any apparatus using a network of microfluidic channels embedded between plates of glass or similar moderate melting point substrates with a gradual softening point curve, or for assembly of glass-based substrates onto larger substrates, such as in flat panel display systems.

  12. Graphene folding on flat substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Xiaoming; Zhao, Yadong; Ke, Changhong, E-mail: cke@binghamton.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, State University of New York at Binghamton, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States); Zhang, Liuyang; Wang, Xianqiao [College of Engineering, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602 (United States)

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a combined experimental-theoretical study of graphene folding on flat substrates. The structure and deformation of the folded graphene sheet are experimentally characterized by atomic force microscopy. The local graphene folding behaviors are interpreted based on nonlinear continuum mechanics modeling and molecular dynamics simulations. Our study on self-folding of a trilayer graphene sheet reports a bending stiffness of about 6.57?eV, which is about four times the reported values for monolayer graphene. Our results reveal that an intriguing free sliding phenomenon occurs at the interlayer van der Waals interfaces during the graphene folding process. This work demonstrates that it is a plausible venue to quantify the bending stiffness of graphene based on its self-folding conformation on flat substrates. The findings reported in this work are useful to a better understanding of the mechanical properties of graphene and in the pursuit of its applications.

  13. Effects of Cerium Removal from Glass on Photovoltaic Module Performance and Stability: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kempe, M. D.; Moricone, T.; Kilkenny, M.

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Some PV manufacturers use glass without Ce, which improves light transmission but can lower long-term stability; additional light transmission in 300-340-nm range can cause delamination ~3.8x faster.

  14. RRR Niobium Manufacturing Experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, Ronald A. [ATI Wah Chang, An Allegheny Technologies Company, Albany, Oregon 97321 (United States)

    2007-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    ATI Wah Chang has been manufacturing RRR niobium for more than 30 years using electron beam melting techniques. Fabricated forms include plate, sheet, foil, bar, rod and tubing. This paper provides manufacturing information.

  15. The Advanced Manufacturing Partnership

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Suman

    ;ve Manufacturing Technologies (led by Dow, Honeywell and MIT) Manufacturing Ins;tutes (led, Honeywell and MIT GOALS § To launch public-private ini:a:ves to advance transforma

  16. All conformally flat pure radiation metrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Brian Edgar; Garry Ludwig

    1996-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The complete class of conformally flat, pure radiation metrics is given, generalising the metric recently given by Wils.

  17. Manufacturing Battle Creek

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Doncker, Elise

    to the manufacturing sector in Western Michigan. In addition to serving as director of the MRC, Dr. Patten is alsoManufacturing Research Center Kalamazoo Battle Creek The College of Engineering and Applied Sciences The Supporting manufacturing industries by providing opportunities for collaboration with faculty

  18. Transparent glass honeycomb structures for energy loss control. Final summary report, January 1976-October 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been demonstrated that properly-shaped glass honeycomb placed between a non-selective absorber and the coverglass of a flat plate solar collector gives collection efficiencies significantly higher than those of conventional flat plate units, even those with selective absorbers, collecting solar energy at temperatures required for heating and cooling buildings. Three basic glass honeycomb shapes were analyzed and tested: (1) thin-walled cylindrical glass tube honeycomb in square or hexagonal arrays, (2) corrugated thin glass sheets stacked peak-to-trough to form double-sinsuoid-shaped cells, and (3) flat thin glass sheets stacked to form long parallel slots. A continuous hot-rolling mill was used to corrugate commercial Micro-Sheet glass, thus demonstrating a key step needed for the commercialization of glass honeycomb fabrication. Experimental-scale (61 cm x 61 cm) collectors and collectors scaled-up in area were fabricated and tested outdoors to verify the analytical-numerical performance-prediction algorithms developed during the program. Optimization studies were made with respect to performance and cost to identify optimal shapes of sinusoidal-celled glass honeycombs which have high potential for mass production.

  19. Ultrafast pulsed laser utilizing broad bandwidth laser glass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Payne, Stephen A. (Castro Valley, CA); Hayden, Joseph S. (Clarks Summit, PA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrafast laser uses a Nd-doped phosphate laser glass characterized by a particularly broad emission bandwidth to generate the shortest possible output pulses. The laser glass is composed primarily of P.sub.2 O.sub.5, Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 and MgO, and possesses physical and thermal properties that are compatible with standard melting and manufacturing methods. The broad bandwidth laser glass can be used in modelocked oscillators as well as in amplifier modules.

  20. Ultrafast pulsed laser utilizing broad bandwidth laser glass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Payne, S.A.; Hayden, J.S.

    1997-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrafast laser uses a Nd-doped phosphate laser glass characterized by a particularly broad emission bandwidth to generate the shortest possible output pulses. The laser glass is composed primarily of P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and MgO, and possesses physical and thermal properties that are compatible with standard melting and manufacturing methods. The broad bandwidth laser glass can be used in modelocked oscillators as well as in amplifier modules. 7 figs.

  1. Glass Working, Use and Discard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholson, Paul

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Beck, Horace C. 1934 Glass before 1500 BC. Ancient Egypt7 - 21. Cooney, John 1960 Glass sculpture in ancient Egypt.Journal of Glass Studies 2, pp. 10 - 43. 1976 Glass.

  2. Process design and emission properties of gated n polycrystalline silicon field emitter arrays for flat-panel display applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jong Duk

    poly-Si field emitter technology on an insulating substrate such as a glass panel, because each cathode for flat-panel display applications Hyung Soo Uh Inter-University Semiconductor Research Center and School of 1.2 m under the vacuum pressure of 3 10 9 Torr. The same anode current was obtained at 80 V from c

  3. Windy Flats | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 Wind Project Jump to:WilsonIIa extension Jump to:Flats Jump

  4. Improved manufacturing techniques for RF and laser hardening of missile domes. Phase I. Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pawlewicz, W.T.; Mann, I.B.; Martin, P.M.; Hays, D.D.; Graybeal, A.G.

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes key results and accomplishements during the first year of a Manufacturing Methods and Technology project to adapt an existing Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) optical coating capability developed for high-power fusion-laser applications to the case of rf and laser hardening of plastic missile domes used by the US Army (MICOM). The primary objective of the first year's work was to demonstrate rf hardening of Hellfire and Copperhead 1.06-micron missile domes by use of transparent conductive Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) coatings. The project thus involved adaptation of a coating material and process developed for flat glass components used in fusion lasers to the case of hemispherical or conical heat-sensitive plastic domes used on laser-guided missiles. Specific ITO coating property goals were an electrical sheet resistance of 10 Ohms/square, a coated-dome transmission of 80% or more at 1.06 micron wavelength (compared to 90% for a bare dome), and good adhesion. The sheet resistance goal of 10 Ohms/square was expected to result in an rf attenuation of 30 dB at the frequencies of importance.

  5. Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Archived Soil & Groundwater...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    - Industrial Area Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site - Mound Plume Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site - Solar Ponds More Documents & Publications Miamisburg...

  6. Manufacturing | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the production of clean energy technologies like electric vehicles, LED bulbs and solar panels. The Department is also working with manufacturers to increase their energy...

  7. Locating Chicago Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    Renaissance Council, is among the nation's leading public high schools focused on manufac- turing area's econ- omy, including how important manufacturing is to that economy, which manufac- turing

  8. Advanced Materials Manufacturing | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    existing manufacturing industries and result in creative new products. Stronger, more corrosion-resistant and lower cost steel alloys are being developed and commercialized to...

  9. Metal and Glass Manufacturers Reduce Costs by Increasing Energy Efficiency

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOil & GasTechnicalMeetingand NorthernMessaging Strategiesin Process

  10. Method of forming crystalline silicon devices on glass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCarthy, A.M.

    1995-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed for fabricating single-crystal silicon microelectronic components on a silicon substrate and transferring same to a glass substrate. This is achieved by utilizing conventional silicon processing techniques for fabricating components of electronic circuits and devices on bulk silicon, wherein a bulk silicon surface is prepared with epitaxial layers prior to the conventional processing. The silicon substrate is bonded to a glass substrate and the bulk silicon is removed leaving the components intact on the glass substrate surface. Subsequent standard processing completes the device and circuit manufacturing. This invention is useful in applications requiring a transparent or insulating substrate, particularly for display manufacturing. Other applications include sensors, actuators, optoelectronics, radiation hard electronics, and high temperature electronics. 7 figures.

  11. Method of forming crystalline silicon devices on glass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Anthony M. (Menlo Park, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for fabricating single-crystal silicon microelectronic components on a silicon substrate and transferring same to a glass substrate. This is achieved by utilizing conventional silicon processing techniques for fabricating components of electronic circuits and devices on bulk silicon, wherein a bulk silicon surface is prepared with epitaxial layers prior to the conventional processing. The silicon substrate is bonded to a glass substrate and the bulk silicon is removed leaving the components intact on the glass substrate surface. Subsequent standard processing completes the device and circuit manufacturing. This invention is useful in applications requiring a transparent or insulating substrate, particularly for display manufacturing. Other applications include sensors, actuators, optoelectronics, radiation hard electronics, and high temperature electronics.

  12. Caithness Shepherds Flat | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Flat, which commenced operations in September 2012, is one of the world's largest wind farms. Technology The DOE guarantee was issued under the Financial Institution...

  13. Reduction of Glass Surface Reflectance by Ion Beam Surface Modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Spitzer

    2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report for DOE contract DE-EE0000590. The purpose of this work was to determine the feasibility of the reduction of the reflection from the front of solar photovoltaic modules. Reflection accounts for a power loss of approximately 4%. A solar module having an area of one square meter with an energy conversion efficiency of 18% generates approximately 180 watts. If reflection loss can be eliminated, the power output can be increased to 187 watts. Since conventional thin-film anti-reflection coatings do not have sufficient environmental stability, we investigated the feasibility of ion beam modification of the glass surface to obtain reduction of reflectance. Our findings are generally applicable to all solar modules that use glass encapsulation, as well as commercial float glass used in windows and other applications. Ion implantation of argon, fluorine, and xenon into commercial low-iron soda lime float glass, standard float glass, and borosilicate glass was studied by implantation, annealing, and measurement of reflectance. The three ions all affected reflectance. The most significant change was obtained by argon implantation into both low-iron and standard soda-lime glass. In this way samples were formed with reflectance lower than can be obtained with a single-layer coatings of magnesium fluoride. Integrated reflectance was reduced from 4% to 1% in low-iron soda lime glass typical of the glass used in solar modules. The reduction of reflectance of borosilicate glass was not as large; however borosilicate glass is not typically used in flat plate solar modules. Unlike conventional semiconductor ion implantation doping, glass reflectance reduction was found to be tolerant to large variations in implant dose, meaning that the process does not require high dopant uniformity. Additionally, glass implantation does not require mass analysis. Simple, high current ion implantation equipment can be developed for this process; however, before the process can be employed on full scale solar modules, equipment must be developed for ion implanting large sheets of glass. A cost analysis shows that the process can be economical. Our finding is that the reduction of reflectance by ion beam surface modification is technically and economically feasible. The public will benefit directly from this work by the improvement of photovoltaic module efficiency, and indirectly by the greater understanding of the modification of glass surfaces by ion beams.

  14. Diamond turning of glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blackley, W.S.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new research initiative will be undertaken to investigate the critical cutting depth concepts for single point diamond turning of brittle, amorphous materials. Inorganic glasses and a brittle, thermoset polymer (organic glass) are the principal candidate materials. Interrupted cutting tests similar to those done in earlier research are Ge and Si crystals will be made to obtain critical depth values as a function of machining parameters. The results will provide systematic data with which to assess machining performance on glasses and amorphous materials

  15. Turkey Flat Site Effects Test Area The Turkey-Flat strong motion "blind"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oprsal, Ivo

    Turkey Flat Site Effects Test Area B B' A A' C C' The Turkey-Flat strong motion "blind" prediction experiment "Blind" Test Approach · Conduct high quality field and laboratory tests to characterize Geological Survey Turkey Flat, USA Site Effects Test Area: "Blind" Test of Predicted Ground Response

  16. Rare Earth Phosphate Glass and Glass-Ceramic Proton Conductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    300-500°C. Doping rare earth phosphate glasses with Ce, andRare Earth Phosphate Glass and Glass-Ceramic Protonconductivity of alkaline-earth doped rare earth phosphate

  17. Manufacturing Licenses Available | Tech Transfer | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Deposition Manufacturing 201303127 Methods and Materials for Room Temperature Polymer Additive Manufacturing 201303140 Reactive Polymer Fused Deposition Manufacturing 201303151...

  18. Innovative Technologies to Manufacture Hybrid Metal Foam/Composite Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carrino, L.; Durante, M.; Franchitti, S. [DIMP, University of Naples 'Federico II', P.le Tecchio, 80-80125 Naples (Italy); Sorrentino, L.; Tersigni, L. [DII, University of Cassino, Via G. Di Biasio, 43-03043 Cassino (Italy)

    2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this paper is to verify the technological feasibility to realize hybrid metal-foam/composite component and the mechanical performances of the final structure. The hybrid component is composed by a cylindrical core in aluminum foam, the most used between those commercially available, and an outer layer in epoxy/S2-glass, manufactured by filament winding technology.A set of experimental tests have been carried out, to the aim to estimate the improvement of the hybrid component characteristics, compared to the sum of the single components (metal foam cylinder and epoxy/S2-glass tube).

  19. Bosonic condensation in a flat energy band

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baboux, F; Jacqmin, T; Biondi, M; Lemaître, A; Gratiet, L Le; Sagnes, I; Schmidt, S; Türeci, H E; Amo, A; Bloch, J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flat bands are non-dispersive energy bands made of fully degenerate quantum states. Such bands are expected to support emergent phenomena with extraordinary spatial and temporal structures, as they strongly enhance the effect of any perturbation induced by disorder, dissipation or interactions. However, flat bands usually appear at energies above the ground state, preventing their study in systems in thermodynamic equilibrium. Here we use cavity polaritons to circumvent this issue. We engineer a flat band in a frustrated lattice of micro-pillar optical cavities. By taking advantage of the non-hermiticity of our system, we achieve for the first time bosonic condensation in a flat band. This allows revealing the peculiar effect of disorder in such band: The condensate fragments into highly localized modes, reflecting the elementary eigenstates produced by geometric frustration. This non-hermitian engineering of a bosonic flat band condensate offers a novel approach to studying coherent phases of light and matte...

  20. Survey of US Department of Defense Manufacturing Technology Program activities applicable to civilian manufacturing industries. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azimi, S.A.; Conrad, J.L.; Reed, J.E.

    1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intent of the survey was to identify and characterize activities potentially applicable to improving energy efficiency and overall productivity in the civilian manufacturing industries. The civilian industries emphasized were the general manufacturing industries (including fabricated metals, glass, machinery, paper, plastic, textile, and transportation equipment manufacturing) and the primary metals industries (including primary aluminum, copper, steel, and zinc production). The principal steps in the survey were to: develop overview taxonomies of the general manufacturing and primary metals industries as well as specific industry taxonomies; identify needs and opportunities for improving process energy efficiency and productivity in the industries included; identify federal programs, capabilities, and special technical expertise that might be relevant to industry's needs and opportunities; contact federal laboratories/facilities, through visits and other forms of inquiry; prepare formatted profiles (descriptions) potentially applicable work efforts; review findings with industry; and compile and evaluate industry responses.

  1. Rare Earth Phosphate Glass and Glass-Ceramic Proton Conductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Jonghe, Lutgard C.; Ray, Hannah L.; Wang, Ruigang

    2008-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The structure and conductivity of cerium and lanthanum phosphate glasses and glass-ceramics were investigated. The effects of varying the metal to phosphate ratio in the glasses, doping LaP3O9 glasses with Ce, and recrystallization of CeP3O9 glasses, on the glasses' microstructure and total conductivity were investigated using XRD, SEM, and AC impedance techniques. Strong increases in conductivity occurred when the glasses were recrystallized: the conductivity of a cerium metaphosphate glass increased conductivity after recrystallization from 10-7.5 S/cm to 10-6 S/cm at 400oC.

  2. Manufacturing Demonstration Facility Technology Collaborations...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    advanced manufacturing and materials technologies for commercial applications related to additive manufacturing or carbon fiber and composites will have the highest likelihood of...

  3. Innovative Manufacturing Initiative Recognition Day

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Innovative Manufacturing Initiative (IMI) Recognition Day (held in Washington, DC on June 20, 2012) showcased IMI projects selected by the Energy Department to help American manufacturers...

  4. Defense HLW Glass Degradation Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Strachan

    2004-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to document the development of a model for calculating the release rate for radionuclides and other key elements from high-level radioactive waste (HLW) glasses under exposure conditions relevant to the performance of the repository. Several glass compositions are planned for the repository, some of which have yet to be identified (i.e., glasses from Hanford and Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory). The mechanism for glass dissolution is the same for these glasses and the glasses yet to be developed for the disposal of DOE wastes. All of these glasses will be of a quality consistent with the glasses used to develop this report.

  5. CIMplementation™: Evaluating Manufacturing Automation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krakauer, J.

    management and labor. In the new shop, ma~? agers will be unable to succeed unless thet earn the respect and cooperation of their I subordinates. Managers need to address th~ fear and resistance of manufacturing emPlofees before and during a transition.... Managers are becoming more interested in these methods, but they should be aware that implementing them will be a slow, complex task. This technology will require changes in manufacturing organization. This paper discusses changes required...

  6. Measurement uncertainty in surface flatness measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. L. Thang

    2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Flatness of a plate is a parameter has been put under consideration for long time. Factors influencing the accuracy of this parameter have been recognized and examined carefully but placed scatterringly. Beside that those reports have not been always in harmonization with Guide for expression of uncertainty measurement (GUM). Furthermore, mathematical equations describing clearly the flatness measurement have not been seen in those reports also. We have collected those influencing factors for systematic reference purpose, re-written the equation describing the profile measurement of the plate topography, and proposed an equation for flatness determination. An illustrative numerical example will be also shown.

  7. Hollow spherical shell manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Holleran, Thomas P. (Belleville, MI)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for making a hollow spherical shell of silicate glass composition in which an aqueous suspension of silicate glass particles and an immiscible liquid blowing agent is placed within the hollow spherical cavity of a porous mold. The mold is spun to reduce effective gravity to zero and to center the blowing agent, while being heated so as to vaporize the immiscible liquid and urge the water carrier of the aqueous suspension to migrate into the body of the mold, leaving a green shell compact deposited around the mold cavity. The green shell compact is then removed from the cavity, and is sintered for a time and a temperature sufficient to form a silicate glass shell of substantially homogeneous composition and uniform geometry.

  8. Hollow spherical shell manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Holleran, T.P.

    1991-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is disclosed for making a hollow spherical shell of silicate glass composition in which an aqueous suspension of silicate glass particles and an immiscible liquid blowing agent is placed within the hollow spherical cavity of a porous mold. The mold is spun to reduce effective gravity to zero and to center the blowing agent, while being heated so as to vaporize the immiscible liquid and urge the water carrier of the aqueous suspension to migrate into the body of the mold, leaving a green shell compact deposited around the mold cavity. The green shell compact is then removed from the cavity, and is sintered for a time and a temperature sufficient to form a silicate glass shell of substantially homogeneous composition and uniform geometry. 3 figures.

  9. Glass, Brian 1 BRIAN DANIEL GLASS, M.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maddox, W. Todd

    Glass, Brian 1 BRIAN DANIEL GLASS, M.A. University Department of Psychology, A8000 The University of Texas at Austin Austin, TX 78712 (512) 232-2883 e-mail: glass@mail.utexas.edu EDUCATION 2006 ­ Cognitive include: Designing and constructing experiments, statistical #12;Glass, Brian 2 analysis, manuscript

  10. Glass, Brian 1 BRIAN DANIEL GLASS, M.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maddox, W. Todd

    Glass, Brian 1 BRIAN DANIEL GLASS, M.A. University Department of Psychology, A8000 The University Making, The University of Texas at Austin #12;Glass, Brian 2 Duties include: Designing and constructing, constructing, and running experiments, statistical analysis. JOURNAL PUBLICATIONS Glass, B. D., Chotibut, T

  11. Glass, Brian 1 BRIAN DANIEL GLASS, M.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maddox, W. Todd

    Glass, Brian 1 BRIAN DANIEL GLASS, M.A. University Department of Psychology, A8000 The University of Categorization and Decision Making, The University of Texas at Austin #12;Glass, Brian 2 Duties include: Programming, constructing, and running experiments, statistical analysis. JOURNAL PUBLICATIONS Glass, B. D

  12. Development of Advanced CdTe Solar Cells Based on High Temperature Corning Glass Substrates: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-373

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, T.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL has developed advanced processes for CdTe solar cells, but because of the temperature limitations of conventional soda lime glass, many of these processes have not been transferred to manufacturing. Corning is developing high temperature substrate glasses that are believed to be manufacturable and will lead to lower $/watt modules costs. The purpose of this CRADA is to evaluate these glasses in the advanced NREL processes. In addition, the CRADA seeks to develop manufacturable processes for transparent conductive oxide layers based on cadmium stannate.

  13. AdS/Ricci-flat correspondence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco M. Caldarelli; Joan Camps; Blaise Goutéraux; Kostas Skenderis

    2014-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a comprehensive analysis of the AdS/Ricci-flat correspondence, a map between a class of asymptotically locally AdS spacetimes and a class of Ricci-flat spacetimes. We provide a detailed derivation of the map, discuss a number of extensions and apply it to a number of important examples, such as AdS on a torus, AdS black branes and fluids/gravity metrics. In particular, the correspondence links the hydrodynamic regime of asymptotically flat black $p$-branes or the Rindler fluid with that of AdS. It implies that this class of Ricci-flat spacetimes inherits from AdS a generalized conformal symmetry and has a holographic structure. We initiate the discussion of holography by analyzing how the map acts on boundary conditions and holographic 2-point functions.

  14. Manufacturing Demonstration Facilities Workshop Agenda, March...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Manufacturing Demonstration Facility Workshop Critical Materials Workshop Agenda Innovative Manufacturing Initiatives Recognition Day...

  15. LM Records Handling System (LMRHS01) - Rocky Flats Environmental...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Rocky Flats Environmental Records Database, Office of Legacy Management LM Records Handling System (LMRHS01) - Rocky Flats Environmental Records Database, Office of Legacy...

  16. The Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology Project: Phase 1 subcontractors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Phase I portion of the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) Project, the problem identification phase, was completed in mid-1991. This work involved competitive bidding that was open to any US firm with existing manufacturing capabilities, regardless of material or module design. In early 1991, subcontracts were awarded to 22 of approximately 40 bidders. Each subcontract was funded at a level of up to $50,000 and a duration of three months. The problems identified by the research in this phase of the program represent opportunities for industrial participants to improve their manufacturing processes, reduce manufacturing costs, increase product performance, or develop a foundation for scaling up US-based manufacturing plant capacities. Many of these opportunities have since been detailed in the approaches that these organizations suggested for Phase 2 (the problem solution phase) research and development (R&D). It is not. anticipated that any additional Phase I solicitation will be issued because Phase I was intended to help the US Department of Energy (DOE) characterize the status and needs of the US photovoltaic (PV) industry and encourage the industry to examine and prioritize required manufacturing line improvements. Phase I subcontracted research included five subcontractors working on flat-plate crystalline silicon technology, eleven working on flat-plate thin-film modules (one in thin-film crystalline silicon, six in amorphous silicon. and four in polycrystalline thin films), six working on concentrator systems, and two working on general equipment/production options. (Two of the participants each worked in two areas).

  17. The Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology Project: Phase 1 subcontractors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Phase I portion of the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) Project, the problem identification phase, was completed in mid-1991. This work involved competitive bidding that was open to any US firm with existing manufacturing capabilities, regardless of material or module design. In early 1991, subcontracts were awarded to 22 of approximately 40 bidders. Each subcontract was funded at a level of up to $50,000 and a duration of three months. The problems identified by the research in this phase of the program represent opportunities for industrial participants to improve their manufacturing processes, reduce manufacturing costs, increase product performance, or develop a foundation for scaling up US-based manufacturing plant capacities. Many of these opportunities have since been detailed in the approaches that these organizations suggested for Phase 2 (the problem solution phase) research and development (R D). It is not. anticipated that any additional Phase I solicitation will be issued because Phase I was intended to help the US Department of Energy (DOE) characterize the status and needs of the US photovoltaic (PV) industry and encourage the industry to examine and prioritize required manufacturing line improvements. Phase I subcontracted research included five subcontractors working on flat-plate crystalline silicon technology, eleven working on flat-plate thin-film modules (one in thin-film crystalline silicon, six in amorphous silicon. and four in polycrystalline thin films), six working on concentrator systems, and two working on general equipment/production options. (Two of the participants each worked in two areas).

  18. Baseline LAW Glass Formulation Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruger, Albert A. [USDOE Office of River Protection, Richland, WA (United States); Mooers, Cavin [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab.; Bazemore, Gina [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Pegg, Ian L. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Hight, Kenneth [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Lai, Shan Tao [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Buechele, Andrew [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Rielley, Elizabeth [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Gan, Hao [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Muller, Isabelle S. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Cecil, Richard [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab

    2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The major objective of the baseline glass formulation work was to develop and select glass formulations that are compliant with contractual and processing requirements for each of the LAW waste streams. Other objectives of the work included preparation and characterization of glasses with respect to the properties of interest, optimization of sulfate loading in the glasses, evaluation of ability to achieve waste loading limits, testing to demonstrate compatibility of glass melts with melter materials of construction, development of glass formulations to support ILAW qualification activities, and identification of glass formulation issues with respect to contract specifications and processing requirements.

  19. Super ionic conductive glass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Susman, Sherman (Park Forest, IL); Volin, Kenneth J. (Fort Collins, CO)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ionically conducting glass for use as a solid electrolyte in a power or secondary cell containing an alkali metal-containing anode and a cathode separated by an alkali metal ion conducting glass having an ionic transference number of unity and the general formula: A.sub.1+x D.sub.2-x/3 Si.sub.x P.sub.3-x O.sub.12-2x/3, wherein A is a network modifier for the glass and is an alkali metal of the anode, D is an intermediate for the glass and is selected from the class consisting of Zr, Ti, Ge, Al, Sb, Be, and Zn and X is in the range of from 2.25 to 3.0. Of the alkali metals, Na and Li are preferred and of the intermediate, Zr, Ti and Ge are preferred.

  20. Manufacturing Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Manufacturing Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. The Manufacturing Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) focuses on developing methods and technologies that will assist manufacturers of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies, as well as other renewable energy technologies, to scale up their manufacturing capabilities to volumes that meet DOE and industry targets. Specifically, the manufacturing activity is currently focused on developing and validating quality control techniques to assist manufacturers of low temperature and high temperature fuel cells in the transition from low to high volume production methods for cells and stacks. Capabilities include initial proof-of-concept studies through prototype system development and in-line validation. Existing diagnostic capabilities address a wide range of materials, including polymer films, carbon and catalyst coatings, carbon fiber papers and wovens, and multi-layer assemblies of these materials, as well as ceramic-based materials in pre- or post-fired forms. Work leading to the development of non-contact, non-destructive techniques to measure critical dimensional and functional properties of fuel cell and other materials, and validation of those techniques on the continuous processing line. This work will be supported by materials provided by our partners. Looking forward, the equipment in the laboratory is set up to be modified and extended to provide processing capabilities such as coating, casting, and deposition of functional layers, as well as associated processes such as drying or curing. In addition, continuous processes are used for components of organic and thin film photovoltaics (PV) as well as battery technologies, so synergies with these important areas will be explored.

  1. ATS materials/manufacturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karnitz, M.A.; Wright, I.G.; Ferber, M.K. [and others

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Materials/Manufacturing Technology subelement is a part of the base technology portion of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program. The work in this subelement is being performed predominantly by industry with assistance from national laboratories and universities. The projects in this subelement are aimed toward hastening the incorporation of new materials and components in gas turbines. Work is currently ongoing on thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), the scale-up of single crystal airfoil manufacturing technologies, materials characterization, and technology information exchange. This paper presents highlights of the activities during the past year. 12 refs., 24 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Manufacturing Success Stories

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction to EnergyDepartment of EnergyManagementORNL isManufacturingManufacturing6

  3. DWPF GLASS BEADS AND GLASS FRIT TRANSPORT DEMONSTRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamson, D; Bradley Pickenheim, B

    2008-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    DWPF is considering replacing irregularly shaped glass frit with spherical glass beads in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) process to decrease the yield stress of the melter feed (a non-Newtonian Bingham Plastic). Pilot-scale testing was conducted on spherical glass beads and glass frit to determine how well the glass beads would transfer when compared to the glass frit. Process Engineering Development designed and constructed the test apparatus to aid in the understanding and impacts that spherical glass beads may have on the existing DWPF Frit Transfer System. Testing was conducted to determine if the lines would plug with the glass beads and the glass frit slurry and what is required to unplug the lines. The flow loop consisted of vertical and horizontal runs of clear PVC piping, similar in geometry to the existing system. Two different batches of glass slurry were tested: a batch of 50 wt% spherical glass beads and a batch of 50 wt% glass frit in process water. No chemicals such as formic acid was used in slurry, only water and glass formers. The glass beads used for this testing were commercially available borosilicate glass of mesh size -100+200. The glass frit was Frit 418 obtained from DWPF and is nominally -45+200 mesh. The spherical glass beads did not have a negative impact on the frit transfer system. The transferring of the spherical glass beads was much easier than the glass frit. It was difficult to create a plug with glass bead slurry in the pilot transfer system. When a small plug occurred from setting overnight with the spherical glass beads, the plug was easy to displace using only the pump. In the case of creating a man made plug in a vertical line, by filling the line with spherical glass beads and allowing the slurry to settle for days, the plug was easy to remove by using flush water. The glass frit proved to be much more difficult to transfer when compared to the spherical glass beads. The glass frit impacted the transfer system to the point that the test apparatus had to be disassembled to dislodge the plugs created in the system.

  4. MANUFACTURING & SERVICE OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiang, Wei-yu Kevin

    an upstream firm, as a result of charging a wholesale price above the marginal cost, induces its intermediary Dynamics and Channel Efficiency in Durable Product Pricing and Distribution Wei-yu Kevin Chiang College the single-period vertical price interaction in a manufacturer­retailer dyad to a multi- period setting

  5. Bolt Manufacture: Process Selection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colton, Jonathan S.

    file · Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) 3 D P i ti· 3-D Printing · Light Engineered Net Shaping (LENS Processes and Systems Prof. J.S. Colton © GIT 2009 20 #12;3D Printing Process (Soligen) ME 6222: Manufacturing Processes and Systems Prof. J.S. Colton © GIT 2009 21 #12;3D Printing Head (Soligen)3D Printing

  6. Rocky Flats Compliance Program; Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) established the Office of Technology Development (EM-50) (OTD) as an element of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) in November 1989. The primary objective of the Office of Technology Development, Rocky Flats Compliance Program (RFCP), is to develop altemative treatment technologies for mixed low-level waste (wastes containing both hazardous and radioactive components) to use in bringing the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) into compliance with Federal and state regulations and agreements. Approximately 48,000 cubic feet of untreated low-level mixed waste, for which treatment has not been specified, are stored at the RFP. The cleanup of the Rocky Flats site is driven by agreements between DOE, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Colorado Department of Health (CDH). Under these agreements, a Comprehensive Treatment and Management Plan (CTMP) was drafted to outline the mechanisms by which RFP will achieve compliance with the regulations and agreements. This document describes DOE`s strategy to treat low-level mixed waste to meet Land Disposal Restrictions and sets specific milestones related to the regulatory aspects of technology development. These milestones detail schedules for the development of technologies to treat all of the mixed wastes at the RFP. Under the Federal Facilities Compliance Act (FFCA), the CTMP has been incorporated into Rocky Flats Plant Conceptual Site Treatment Plan (CSTP). The CSTP will become the Rocky Flats Plant site Treatment Plan in 1995 and will supersede the CTMP.

  7. The Seduction of the Glass Box

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ackerly, Katie

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Visual, and Spatial Effects of Glass, New York: PrincetonBauten, Perspektiven (Glass Architects: Concepts, Buildings,Taking a Second Look: Glass Pavilion at Broadfield House in

  8. Glass blowing on a wafer level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eklund, E. Jesper; Shkel, Andrei M.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    E. Shelby, Introduction to Glass Science and Technology. :Properties of Corning Glasses [Online]. Available: http://1981. [15] R. H. Doremus, Glass Science. New York: Wiley,

  9. Bio-Manufacturing: A Strategic clean energy manufacturing opportunity

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 1: New Developments and Hot Topics Session 1-A: Biomass and the U.S. Competitive Advantages for Manufacturing Clean Energy Products Libby Wayman, Director, EERE Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative

  10. Vacuum fusion bonded glass plates having microstructures thereon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swierkowski, Steve P. (Livermore, CA); Davidson, James C. (Livermore, CA); Balch, Joseph W. (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved apparatus and method for vacuum fusion bonding of large, patterned glass plates. One or both glass plates are patterned with etched features such as microstructure capillaries and a vacuum pumpout moat, with one plate having at least one hole therethrough for communication with a vacuum pumpout fixture. High accuracy alignment of the plates is accomplished by a temporary clamping fixture until the start of the fusion bonding heat cycle. A complete, void-free fusion bond of seamless, full-strength quality is obtained through the plates; because the glass is heated well into its softening point and because of a large, distributed force that is developed that presses the two plates together from the difference in pressure between the furnace ambient (high pressure) and the channeling and microstructures in the plates (low pressure) due to the vacuum drawn. The apparatus and method may be used to fabricate microcapillary arrays for chemical electrophoresis; for example, any apparatus using a network of microfluidic channels embedded between plates of glass or similar moderate melting point substrates with a gradual softening point curve, or for assembly of glass-based substrates onto larger substrates, such as in flat panel display systems.

  11. Glass matrix armor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Calkins, Noel C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An armor system which utilizes glass. A plurality of constraint cells are mounted on a surface of a substrate, which is metal armor plate or a similar tough material, such that the cells almost completely cover the surface of the substrate. Each constraint cell has a projectile-receiving wall parallel to the substrate surface and has sides which are perpendicular to and surround the perimeter of the receiving wall. The cells are mounted such that, in one embodiment, the substrate surface serves as a sixth side or closure for each cell. Each cell has inside of it a plate, termed the front plate, which is parallel to and in contact with substantially all of the inside surface of the receiving wall. The balance of each cell is completely filled with a projectile-abrading material consisting of glass and a ceramic material and, in certain embodiments, a polymeric material. The glass may be in monolithic form or particles of ceramic may be dispersed in a glass matrix. The ceramic material may be in monolithic form or may be in the form of particles dispersed in glass or dispersed in said polymer.

  12. Chemical tracking at the Rocky Flats Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Costain, D.B.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EG&G Rocky Flats, Inc., has developed a chemical tracking system to support compliance with the Emergency Planning and community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) at the Rocky Flats Plant. This system, referred to as the EPCRA Chemical Control system (ECCS), uses bar code technology to uniquely identify and track the receipt, distribution, and use of chemicals. Chemical inventories are conducted using hand-held electronic scanners to update a site wide chemical database on a VAX 6000 computer. Information from the ECCS supports preparation of the EPCRA Tier II and Form R reports on chemical storage and use.

  13. Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Blake Marshall, AMO's lead for Additive Manufacturing Technologies, will provide an overview of current R&D activities in additive manufacturing and its application to fuel cell prototyping and...

  14. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Automobile Manufacturers...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Automobile Manufacturers The Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers, Inc. is a trade association composed of 10 car and light truck manufacturers with about 600,000...

  15. Precision and Energy Usage for Additive Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clemon, Lee; Sudradjat, Anton; Jaquez, Maribel; Krishna, Aditya; Rammah, Marwan; Dornfeld, David

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sustainability of additive manufacturing: measuring theCommittee F42 on Additive Manufacturing Technologies," TheASTM Committee F42 on Additive Manufacturing Technologies. -

  16. Innovative Manufacturing Initiative Recognition Day, Advanced...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Publications Innovative Manufacturing Initiative Recognition Day Advanced Manufacturing Office Overview Unlocking the Potential of Additive Manufacturing in the Fuel Cells Industry...

  17. Precision and Energy Usage for Additive Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clemon, Lee; Sudradjat, Anton; Jaquez, Maribel; Krishna, Aditya; Rammah, Marwan; Dornfeld, David

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hague, "Sustainability of additive manufacturing: measuringASTM Committee F42 on Additive Manufacturing Technologies,"ASTM Committee F42 on Additive Manufacturing Technologies. -

  18. clean energy manufacturing | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative The Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative is a strategic integration and commitment of manufacturing efforts across the DOE Office of Energy...

  19. ITP Nanomanufacturing: Nanomanufacturing Portfolio: Manufacturing...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ITP Nanomanufacturing: Nanomanufacturing Portfolio: Manufacturing Processes and Applications to Accelerate Commercial Use of Nanomaterials, January 2011 ITP Nanomanufacturing:...

  20. Glass | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdf Flash2006-52.pdf0.pdfDepartmentCounselGlass Coating Makes Solar Panels MoreGlass

  1. Neal Lane: Science in a Flat World

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neal Lane

    2006-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Lane discusses the changes that have taken place in the world since World War II that have made it "flatter," referring to Thomas L. Friedman's book, The World is Flat. Friedman's main premise is that inexpensive telecommunications is bringing about unhampered international competition, the demise of economic stability, and a trend toward outsourcing services, such as computer programming, engineering and science research.

  2. Neal Lane: Science in a Flat World

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Neal Lane

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lane discusses the changes that have taken place in the world since World War II that have made it "flatter," referring to Thomas L. Friedman's book, The World is Flat. Friedman's main premise is that inexpensive telecommunications is bringing about unhampered international competition, the demise of economic stability, and a trend toward outsourcing services, such as computer programming, engineering and science research.

  3. Laboratory Waste Disposal HAZARDOUS GLASS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Laboratory Waste Disposal HAZARDOUS GLASS Items that could cut or puncture skin or trash- can without any treatment. Hazardous Glass and Plastic: Items that can puncture, cut or scratch if disposed of in normal trash containers. Pasteur pipettes Other pipettes and tips (glass or plastic) Slides and cover

  4. Seminar Title: Additive Manufacturing Advanced Manufacturing of Polymer and Composite Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    Seminar Title: Additive Manufacturing ­ Advanced Manufacturing of Polymer and Composite Components Manufacturing ­ Advanced Manufacturing of Polymer and Composite Components Additive manufacturing technologies Functionally Integrated Composite Structures, Augsburg, Germany ME Faculty Candidate Abstract: Additive

  5. The Color Glass Condensate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Gelis; E. Iancu; J. Jalilian-Marian; R. Venugopalan

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide a broad overview of the theoretical status and phenomenological applications of the Color Glass Condensate effective field theory describing universal properties of saturated gluons in hadron wavefunctions that are extracted from deeply inelastic scattering and hadron-hadron collision experiments at high energies.

  6. Posted 10/18/11 MANUFACTURING ENGINEER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    manufacturing processes in our Metal Fabrication and Assembly departments. Additional responsibilities includePosted 10/18/11 MANUFACTURING ENGINEER Kenall Manufacturing Gurnee, IL Kenall, a leading manufacturer of advanced lighting solutions for specialized environments, has exceptional opportunities

  7. Faculty Position in Mechanical Engineering Additive Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faculty Position in Mechanical Engineering Additive Manufacturing University of Kansas of additive manufacturing. Exceptional candidates with outstanding qualifications could be considered using additive manufacturing in applications such as, but not limited to the net shape manufacture of

  8. Flat Space Limit of (Higher-Spin) Cardy Formula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Max Riegler

    2014-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In this note I derive the flat space limit of the modified Cardy formula associated with inner horizons and show that it reproduces the correct Galilean conformal field theory counting of flat space cosmology microstates. l also determine the entropy of flat space cosmologies in flat space chiral gravity in this way. In addition, I derive a Cardy-like expression for flat space cosmologies with spin-3 charges and thus give a prediction for the corresponding Galilean conformal field theory counting of flat space cosmology microstates with spin-3 charges.

  9. Industrial Scale Demonstration of Smart Manufacturing Achieving...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Scale Demonstration of Smart Manufacturing Achieving Transformational Energy Productivity Gains Development of an Open Architecture, Widely Applicable Smart Manufacturing...

  10. Industrial Scale Demonstration of Smart Manufacturing Achieving...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Scale Demonstration of Smart Manufacturing Achieving Transformational Energy Productivity Gains Industrial Scale Demonstration of Smart Manufacturing Achieving...

  11. Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Midwest Regional Summit...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Midwest Regional Summit: Lightweighting Breakout Session Summary Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Midwest Regional Summit: Lightweighting...

  12. Manufacturing Demonstration Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9Novemberutilities and aHistoricMannManufacturing

  13. Radiation content of Conformally flat initial data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. O. Lousto; R. H. Price

    2004-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the radiation of energy and linear momentum emitted to infinity by the headon collision of binary black holes, starting from rest at a finite initial separation, in the extreme mass ratio limit. For these configurations we identify the radiation produced by the initially conformally flat choice of the three geometry. This identification suggests that the radiated energy and momentum of headon collisions will not be dominated by the details of the initial data for evolution of holes from initial proper separations $L_0\\geq7M$. For non-headon orbits, where the amount of radiation is orders of magnitude larger, the conformally flat initial data may provide a relative even better approximation.

  14. Basic TRUEX process for Rocky Flats Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonard, R.A.; Chamberlain, D.B.; Dow, J.A.; Farley, S.E.; Nunez, L.; Regalbuto, M.C.; Vandegrift, G.F.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Generic TRUEX Model was used to develop a TRUEX process flowsheet for recovering the transuranics (Pu, Am) from a nitrate waste stream at Rocky Flats Plant. The process was designed so that it is relatively insensitive to changes in process feed concentrations and flow rates. Related issues are considered, including solvent losses, feed analysis requirements, safety, and interaction with an evaporator system for nitric acid recycle.

  15. Manufacture of ceramic tiles from fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hnat, James G. (Collegeville, PA); Mathur, Akshay (Tampa, FL); Simpson, James C. (Perkiomenville, PA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a process for forming glass-ceramic tiles. Fly ash containing organic material, metal contaminants, and glass forming materials is oxidized under conditions effective to combust the organic material and partially oxidize the metallic contaminants and the glass forming materials. The oxidized glass forming materials are vitrified to form a glass melt. This glass melt is then formed into tiles containing metallic contaminants.

  16. Manufacture of ceramic tiles from fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hnat, J.G.; Mathur, A.; Simpson, J.C.

    1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a process for forming glass-ceramic tiles. Fly ash containing organic material, metal contaminants, and glass forming materials is oxidized under conditions effective to combust the organic material and partially oxidize the metallic contaminants and the glass forming materials. The oxidized glass forming materials are vitrified to form a glass melt. This glass melt is then formed into tiles containing metallic contaminants. 6 figs.

  17. Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Telephone Flat Geothermal Development...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Telephone Flat Geothermal Development Project Environmental Impact Statement Environmental Impact Report. Final: Comments and Responses to Comments Geothermal Technologies Legacy...

  18. Remote geologic structural analysis of Yucca Flat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, M.G.; Heasler, P.G.; Hoover, K.A. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Rynes, N.J. (Northern Illinois Univ., De Kalb, IL (United States)); Thiessen, R.L.; Alfaro, J.L. (Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States))

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Remote Geologic Analysis (RGA) system was developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to identify crustal structures that may affect seismic wave propagation from nuclear tests. Using automated methods, the RGA system identifies all valleys in a digital elevation model (DEM), fits three-dimensional vectors to valley bottoms, and catalogs all potential fracture or fault planes defined by coplanar pairs of valley vectors. The system generates a cluster hierarchy of planar features having greater-than-random density that may represent areas of anomalous topography manifesting structural control of erosional drainage development. Because RGA uses computer methods to identify zones of hypothesized control of topography, ground truth using a well-characterized test site was critical in our evaluation of RGA's characterization of inaccessible test sites for seismic verification studies. Therefore, we applied RGA to a study area centered on Yucca Flat at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and compared our results with both mapped geology and geologic structures and with seismic yield-magnitude models. This is the final report of PNL's RGA development project for peer review within the US Department of Energy Office of Arms Control (OAC) seismic-verification community. In this report, we discuss the Yucca Flat study area, the analytical basis of the RGA system and its application to Yucca Flat, the results of the analysis, and the relation of the analytical results to known topography, geology, and geologic structures. 41 refs., 39 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Remote geologic structural analysis of Yucca Flat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, M.G.; Heasler, P.G.; Hoover, K.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Rynes, N.J. [Northern Illinois Univ., De Kalb, IL (United States); Thiessen, R.L.; Alfaro, J.L. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Remote Geologic Analysis (RGA) system was developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to identify crustal structures that may affect seismic wave propagation from nuclear tests. Using automated methods, the RGA system identifies all valleys in a digital elevation model (DEM), fits three-dimensional vectors to valley bottoms, and catalogs all potential fracture or fault planes defined by coplanar pairs of valley vectors. The system generates a cluster hierarchy of planar features having greater-than-random density that may represent areas of anomalous topography manifesting structural control of erosional drainage development. Because RGA uses computer methods to identify zones of hypothesized control of topography, ground truth using a well-characterized test site was critical in our evaluation of RGA`s characterization of inaccessible test sites for seismic verification studies. Therefore, we applied RGA to a study area centered on Yucca Flat at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and compared our results with both mapped geology and geologic structures and with seismic yield-magnitude models. This is the final report of PNL`s RGA development project for peer review within the US Department of Energy Office of Arms Control (OAC) seismic-verification community. In this report, we discuss the Yucca Flat study area, the analytical basis of the RGA system and its application to Yucca Flat, the results of the analysis, and the relation of the analytical results to known topography, geology, and geologic structures. 41 refs., 39 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Manufacturing consumption of energy 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides estimates on energy consumption in the manufacturing sector of the US economy. These estimates are based on data from the 1991 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS). This survey--administered by the Energy End Use and Integrated Statistics Division, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Energy Information Administration (EIA)--is the most comprehensive source of national-level data on energy-related information for the manufacturing industries.

  1. Control of an industrial polymerization reactor using flatness *, P. Rouchona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Control of an industrial polymerization reactor using flatness N. Petita, *, P. Rouchona , J polypropylene reactor. This is the first industrial process-controller to use the so-called flatness property tank reactor; Control; Flatness; Industrial application 1. Introduction The aim of this paper

  2. NATURAL HERITAGE RESOURCES OF THE ROCKY FLATS ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY SITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NATURAL HERITAGE RESOURCES OF THE ROCKY FLATS ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY SITE AND THEIR CONSERVATION Methods 3 Rocky Flats Conservation Site Description 10 Walnut Creek Conservation Site Description 22 Rocky Flats Conservation Site 16 Table 3: Known Natural Elements in the Walnut Creek Conservation Site 23

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: wind manufacturing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at the Wind Energy Manufacturing Laboratory-a joint effort of researchers from TPI Composites, a Scottsdale, Arizona-based company that operates a turbine blade factory in...

  4. Manufacturing Spotlight: Boosting American Competitiveness

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Find out how the Energy Department is helping bring new clean energy technologies to the marketplace and make manufacturing processes more energy efficient.

  5. Manufacturing Demonstration Facility Workshop Videos

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Session recordings from the Manufacturing Demonstration Facility Workshop held in Chicago, Illinois, on March 12, 2012, and simultaneously broadcast as a webinar.

  6. Wireless technology for integrated manufacturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manges, W.W.; Allgood, G.O.; Shourbaji, A.A.

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the ground breaking work in Oak Ridge facilities that now leads us to the brink of the wireless revolution in manufacturing. The focus is on solving tough technological problems necessary for success and addressing the critical issues of throughput, security, reliability, and robustness in applying wireless technology to manufacturing processes. Innovative solutions to these problems are highlighted through detailed designs and testbed implementations that demonstrate key concepts. The DOE-Oak Ridge complex represented by the Oak Ridge Centers for Manufacturing Technologies (ORCMT) continues to develop these technologies and will continue to focus on solving tough manufacturing problems.

  7. Solar collector manufacturing activity 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The report presents national and State-level data on the U.S. solar thermal collector and photovoltaic cell and module manufacturing industry.

  8. Analytical Plan for Roman Glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strachan, Denis M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Mueller, Karl T.; Schwantes, Jon M.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Heeren, Ronald M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Roman glasses that have been in the sea or underground for about 1800 years can serve as the independent “experiment” that is needed for validation of codes and models that are used in performance assessment. Two sets of Roman-era glasses have been obtained for this purpose. One set comes from the sunken vessel the Iulia Felix; the second from recently excavated glasses from a Roman villa in Aquileia, Italy. The specimens contain glass artifacts and attached sediment or soil. In the case of the Iulia Felix glasses quite a lot of analytical work has been completed at the University of Padova, but from an archaeological perspective. The glasses from Aquileia have not been so carefully analyzed, but they are similar to other Roman glasses. Both glass and sediment or soil need to be analyzed and are the subject of this analytical plan. The glasses need to be analyzed with the goal of validating the model used to describe glass dissolution. The sediment and soil need to be analyzed to determine the profile of elements released from the glass. This latter need represents a significant analytical challenge because of the trace quantities that need to be analyzed. Both pieces of information will yield important information useful in the validation of the glass dissolution model and the chemical transport code(s) used to determine the migration of elements once released from the glass. In this plan, we outline the analytical techniques that should be useful in obtaining the needed information and suggest a useful starting point for this analytical effort.

  9. Cost and Energy Consumption Optimization of Product Manufacture in a Flexible Manufacturing System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diaz, Nancy; Dornfeld, David

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Product Manufacture in a Flexible Manufacturing System Nancypart production under flexible process routings is studiedMachining; Cost; Energy; Flexible Manufacturing INTRODUCTION

  10. Mixed polyanion glass cathodes: Iron phosphate vanadate glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kercher, Andrew K [ORNL; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine [ORNL; Carroll, Kyler J [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Kiggans Jr, James O [ORNL; Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL; Meisner, Roberta [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Boatner, Lynn A [ORNL; Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixed polyanion (MP) glasses have been investigated for use as cathodes in lithium ion batteries. MP glass cathodes are similar in composition to theoretically promising crystalline polyanionic (CP) cathodes (e.g., lithium cobalt phosphate, lithium manganese silicate), but with proper polyanion substitution, they can be designed to overcome the key shortcomings of CP cathodes, such as poor electrical conductivity and irreversible phase changes. Iron phosphate/vanadate glasses were chosen as a first demonstration of the MP glass concept. Polyanion substitution with vanadate was shown to improve the intercalation capacity of an iron phosphate glass from almost zero to full theoretical capacity. In addition, the MP glass cathodes also exhibited an unexpected second high-capacity electrochemical reaction. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) of cathodes from cells having different states of charge suggested that this second electrochemical reaction is a glass-state conversion reaction. With a first demonstration established, MP glass materials utilizing an intercalation and/or glass-state conversion reaction are promising candidates for future high-energy cathode research.

  11. Introduction Flattening the Earth Continuation procedure Flat Earth Numerical simulations Continuation from a flat to a round Earth model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Introduction Flattening the Earth Continuation procedure Flat Earth Numerical simulations Continuation from a flat to a round Earth model in the coplanar orbit transfer problem M. Cerf1, T. Haberkorn, SADCO 2011, March 2nd M. Cerf, T. Haberkorn, E. Tr´elat Continuation from a flat to a round Earth model

  12. Weihai Blue Star Glass Holding Co Ltd aka Shandong Lanxing Glass...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Weihai Blue Star Glass Holding Co Ltd aka Shandong Lanxing Glass Group Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Weihai Blue Star Glass Holding Co Ltd (aka Shandong Lanxing Glass...

  13. Glass Ceiling or Glass Elevator: Are Voters Biased in Favor of Women Candidates in California Elections?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abney, Ronni Marie; Peterson, Rolfe Daus

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    10.2202/1944-4370.1103 Abney and Peterson: Glass Ceilingor Glass Elevator Table 7A. Positive Gender Bias ModelAbney and Peterson: Glass Ceiling or Glass Elevator Huddy,

  14. The GLASS CHAIR Edited by Manuel Heitor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    The GLASS CHAIR Edited by Manuel Heitor IST Press, 2000 #12;Collaborative Design of... The GLASS the glass chair, but also for the numerous discussions on glass production processes. And last · Carmo Valente Chapter 4. GLASS: BEAUTY WITH STRENGTH Sushil Kumar Mendiratta Chapter 5. The IDEA

  15. Method for heating a glass sheet

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boaz, Premakaran Tucker (Livonia, MI)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for heating a glass sheet includes the steps of heating a glass sheet to a first predetermined temperature and applying microwave energy to the glass sheet to heat the glass sheet to at least a second predetermined temperature to allow the glass sheet to be formed.

  16. Method for heating a glass sheet

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boaz, P.T.

    1998-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for heating a glass sheet includes the steps of heating a glass sheet to a first predetermined temperature and applying microwave energy to the glass sheet to heat the glass sheet to at least a second predetermined temperature to allow the glass sheet to be formed. 5 figs.

  17. Compositional threshold for Nuclear Waste Glass Durability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruger, Albert A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Farooqi, Rahmatullah [Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology, (Korea, Republic of); Hrma, Pavel R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States), Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology, (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the composition space of glasses, a distinct threshold appears to exist that separates "good" glasses, i.e., those which are sufficiently durable, from "bad" glasses of a low durability. The objective of our research is to clarify the origin of this threshold by exploring the relationship between glass composition, glass structure and chemical durability around the threshold region.

  18. Petrick Technology Trends Of Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;323 Petrick Technology Trends chapter 9 The Future Of Manufacturing Irene Petrick Technology Trends This chapter is a story about the future of manufacturing based on three predictions: · that firms sophisticated modeling and simulation of both new products and production processes; · that additive

  19. Color Glass Condensate and Glasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francois Gelis

    2010-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In this talk, I review the Color Glass Condensate theory of gluon saturation, and its application to the early stages of heavy ion collisions.

  20. Out of Bounds Additive Manufacturing Christopher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    #12;Out of Bounds Additive Manufacturing Christopher Holshouser, Clint Newell, and Sid Palas, Tenn. The Big Area Additive Manufacturing system has the potential to manufacture parts completely) are working on an additive manufacturing (AM) system (Big Area Additive Manufacturing, or BAAM) capable

  1. Geometrical Wake of a Smooth Flat Collimator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stupakov, G.V.; /SLAC

    2011-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A transverse geometrical wake generated by a beam passing through a smooth flat collimator with a gradually varying gap between the upper and lower walls is considered. Based on generalization of the approach recently developed for a smooth circular taper we reduce the electromagnetic problem of the impedance calculation to the solution of two much simpler static problems - a magnetostatic and an electrostatic ones. The solution shows that in the limit of not very large frequencies, the impedance increases with the ratio h/d where h is the width and d is the distance between the collimating jaws. Numerical results are presented for the NLC Post Linac collimator.

  2. DHS Flat Stanley Project | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,Office of Policy, OAPM | DepartmentI Office of ENERGY Science SLAC SiteDHS Flat

  3. Flat Ridge 2 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 NoEuropeStrat.pdfInactive JumpFirst Wind (Formerly(RedirectedFlat

  4. Rocky Flats resumes shipments to WIPP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonantNovember 15 toAdvancesRock Physics ofRocky Flats

  5. POROUS WALL, HOLLOW GLASS MICROSPHERES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sexton, W.

    2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Hollow Glass Microspheres (HGM) is not a new technology. All one has to do is go to the internet and Google{trademark} HGM. Anyone can buy HGM and they have a wide variety of uses. HGM are usually between 1 to 100 microns in diameter, although their size can range from 100 nanometers to 5 millimeters in diameter. HGM are used as lightweight filler in composite materials such as syntactic foam and lightweight concrete. In 1968 a patent was issued to W. Beck of the 3M{trademark} Company for 'Glass Bubbles Prepared by Reheating Solid Glass Particles'. In 1983 P. Howell was issued a patent for 'Glass Bubbles of Increased Collapse Strength' and in 1988 H. Marshall was issued a patent for 'Glass Microbubbles'. Now Google{trademark}, Porous Wall, Hollow Glass Microspheres (PW-HGMs), the key words here are Porous Wall. Almost every article has its beginning with the research done at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The Savannah River Site (SRS) where SRNL is located has a long and successful history of working with hydrogen and its isotopes for national security, energy, waste management and environmental remediation applications. This includes more than 30 years of experience developing, processing, and implementing special ceramics, including glasses for a variety of Department of Energy (DOE) missions. In the case of glasses, SRS and SRNL have been involved in both the science and engineering of vitreous or glass based systems. As a part of this glass experience and expertise, SRNL has developed a number of niches in the glass arena, one of which is the development of porous glass systems for a variety of applications. These porous glass systems include sol gel glasses, which include both xerogels and aerogels, as well as phase separated glass compositions, that can be subsequently treated to produce another unique type of porosity within the glass forms. The porous glasses can increase the surface area compared to 'normal glasses of a 1 to 2 order of magnitude, which can result in unique properties in areas such as hydrogen storage, gas transport, gas separations and purifications, sensors, global warming applications, new drug delivery systems and so on. One of the most interesting porous glass products that SRNL has developed and patented is Porous Wall, Hollow Glass Microspheres (PW-HGMs) that are being studied for many different applications. The European Patent Office (EPO) just recently notified SRS that the continuation-in-part patent application for the PW-HGMs has been accepted. The original patent, which was granted by the EPO on June 2, 2010, was validated in France, Germany and the United Kingdom. The microspheres produced are generally in the range of 2 to 100 microns, with a 1 to 2 micron wall. What makes the SRNL microspheres unique from all others is that the team in Figure 1 has found a way to induce and control porosity through the thin walls on a scale of 100 to 3000 {angstrom}. This is what makes the SRNL HW-HGMs one-of-a-kind, and is responsible for many of their unique properties and potential for various applications, including those in tritium storage, gas separations, H-storage for vehicles, and even a variety of new medical applications in the areas of drug delivery and MRI contrast agents. SRNL Hollow Glass Microspheres, and subsequent, Porous Wall, Hollow Glass Microspheres are fabricated using a flame former apparatus. Figure 2 is a schematic of the apparatus.

  6. Surface plasmon resonance assisted rapid laser joining of glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zolotovskaya, Svetlana A.; Tang, Guang; Abdolvand, Amin, E-mail: a.abdolvand@dundee.ac.uk [School of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4HN (United Kingdom); Wang, Zengbo [School of Electronic Engineering, Bangor University, Bangor LL57 1UT (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Rapid and strong joining of clear glass to glass containing randomly distributed embedded spherical silver nanoparticles upon nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation (?40?ns and repetition rate of 100?kHz) at 532?nm is demonstrated. The embedded silver nanoparticles were ?30–40?nm in diameter, contained in a thin surface layer of ?10??m. A joint strength of 12.5?MPa was achieved for a laser fluence of only ?0.13?J/cm{sup 2} and scanning speed of 10?mm/s. The bonding mechanism is discussed in terms of absorption of the laser energy by nanoparticles and the transfer of the accumulated localised heat to the surrounding glass leading to the local melting and formation of a strong bond. The presented technique is scalable and overcomes a number of serious challenges for a widespread adoption of laser-assisted rapid joining of glass substrates, enabling applications in the manufacture of microelectronic devices, sensors, micro-fluidic, and medical devices.

  7. Method for forming silicon on a glass substrate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Anthony M. (Menlo Park, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method by which single-crystal silicon microelectronics may be fabricated on glass substrates at unconventionally low temperatures. This is achieved by fabricating a thin film of silicon on glass and subsequently forming the doped components by a short wavelength (excimer) laser doping procedure and conventional patterning techniques. This method may include introducing a heavily boron doped etch stop layer on a silicon wafer using an excimer laser, which permits good control of the etch stop layer removal process. This method additionally includes dramatically reducing the remaining surface roughness of the silicon thin films after etching in the fabrication of silicon on insulator wafers by scanning an excimer laser across the surface of the silicon thin film causing surface melting, whereby the surface tension of the melt causes smoothing of the surface during recrystallization. Applications for this method include those requiring a transparent or insulating substrate, such as display manufacturing. Other applications include sensors, actuators, optoelectronics, radiation hard and high temperature electronics.

  8. Efficient Breach Theory Through the Looking Glass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Barry E.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass (Signet 1960).Theory Through the Looking Glass such an award a put by theTheory Through the Looking Glass Consider also the hoary

  9. Aspects of the mechanics of metallic glasses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henann, David Lee

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Metallic glasses are amorphous materials that possess unique mechanical properties, such as high tensile strengths and good fracture toughnesses. Also, since they are amorphous, metallic glasses exhibit a glass transition, ...

  10. Ghost condensate model of flat rotation curves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. V. Kiselev

    2005-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An effective action of ghost condensate with higher derivatives creates a source of gravity and mimics a dark matter in spiral galaxies. We present a spherically symmetric static solution of Einstein--Hilbert equations with the ghost condensate at large distances, where flat rotation curves are reproduced in leading order over small ratio of two energy scales characterizing constant temporal and spatial derivatives of ghost field: $\\mu_*^2$ and $\\mu_\\star^2$, respectively, with a hierarchy $\\mu_\\star\\ll \\mu_*$. We assume that a mechanism of hierarchy is provided by a global monopole in the center of galaxy. An estimate based on the solution and observed velocities of rotations in the asymptotic region of flatness, gives $\\mu_*\\sim 10^{19}$ GeV and the monopole scale in a GUT range $\\mu_\\star\\sim 10^{16}$ GeV, while a velocity of rotation $v_0$ is determined by the ratio: $ \\sqrt{2} v_0^2= \\mu_\\star^2/\\mu_*^2$. A critical acceleration is introduced and naturally evaluated of the order of Hubble rate, that represents the Milgrom's acceleration.

  11. Risk, media, and stigma at Rocky Flats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flynn, J.; Peters, E.; Mertz, C.K.; Slovic, P. [Decision Research, Eugene, OR (United States)] [Decision Research, Eugene, OR (United States)

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Public responses to nuclear technologies are often strongly negative. Events, such as accidents or evidence of unsafe conditions at nuclear facilities, receive extensive and dramatic coverage by the news media. These news stories affect public perceptions of nuclear risks and the geographic areas near nuclear facilities. One result of these perceptions, avoidance behavior, is a form of technological stigma that leads to losses in property values near nuclear facilities. The social amplification of risk is a conceptual framework that attempts to explain how stigma is created through media transmission of information about hazardous places and public perceptions and decisions. This paper examines stigma associated with the US Department of energy`s Rocky Flats facility, a major production plant in the nation`s nuclear weapons complex, located near Denver, Colorado. This study, based upon newspaper analyses and a survey of Denver area residents, finds that the social amplification theory provides a reasonable framework for understanding the events and public responses that took place in regard to Rocky Flats during a 6-year period, beginning with an FBI raid of the facility in 1989.

  12. Quinary metallic glass alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lin, Xianghong (Pasadena, CA); Johnson, William L. (Pasadena, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At least quinary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10.sup.3 K/s. Such alloys comprise zirconium and/or hafnium in the range of 45 to 65 atomic percent, titanium and/or niobium in the range of 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, and aluminum and/or zinc in the range of 5 to 15 atomic percent. The balance of the alloy compositions comprise copper, iron, and cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is constrained such that the atomic percentage of iron is less than 10 percent. Further, the ratio of copper to nickel and/or cobalt is in the range of from 1:2 to 2:1. The alloy composition formula is: (Zr,Hf).sub.a (Al,Zn).sub.b (Ti,Nb).sub.c (Cu.sub.x Fe.sub.y (Ni,Co).sub.z).sub.d wherein the constraints upon the formula are: a ranges from 45 to 65 atomic percent, b ranges from 5 to 15 atomic percent, c ranges from 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, d comprises the balance, d.multidot.y is less than 10 atomic percent, and x/z ranges from 0.5 to 2.

  13. Quinary metallic glass alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lin, X.; Johnson, W.L.

    1998-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    At least quinary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10{sup 3}K/s. Such alloys comprise zirconium and/or hafnium in the range of 45 to 65 atomic percent, titanium and/or niobium in the range of 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, and aluminum and/or zinc in the range of 5 to 15 atomic percent. The balance of the alloy compositions comprise copper, iron, and cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is constrained such that the atomic percentage of iron is less than 10 percent. Further, the ratio of copper to nickel and/or cobalt is in the range of from 1:2 to 2:1. The alloy composition formula is: (Zr,Hf){sub a}(Al,Zn){sub b}(Ti,Nb){sub c}(Cu{sub x}Fe{sub y}(Ni,Co){sub z}){sub d} wherein the constraints upon the formula are: a ranges from 45 to 65 atomic percent, b ranges from 5 to 15 atomic percent, c ranges from 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, d comprises the balance, d{hor_ellipsis}y is less than 10 atomic percent, and x/z ranges from 0.5 to 2.

  14. MANUFACTURING ACCELERATING THE INCORPORATION OF MATERIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Joseph W.

    MANUFACTURING ACCELERATING THE INCORPORATION OF MATERIALS ADVANCES INTO MANUFACTURING PROCESSES NATIONAL NEED The proposed topic "Accelerating the Incorporation of Materials Advances into Manufacturing organizations, leading researchers from academic institutions, and others. Materials performance is often

  15. Refractory Glass Seals for SOFC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the critical challenges facing planar solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technology is the need for reliable sealing technology. Seals must exhibit long-term stability and mechanical integrity in the high temperature SOFC environment during normal and transient operation. Several different approaches for sealing SOFC stacks are under development, including glass or glass-ceramic seals, metallic brazes, and compressive seals. Among glass seals, rigid glass-ceramics, self-healing glass, and composite glass approaches have been investigated under the SECA Core Technology Program. The U.S. Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has developed the refractory glass approach in light of the fact that higher sealing temperatures (e.g., 930-1000 degrees C) may enhance the ultimate in-service bulk strength and electrical conductivity of contact materials, as well as the bonding strength between contact materials and adjacent SOFC components, such as interconnect coatings and electrodes. This report summarizes the thermal, chemical, mechanical, and electrical properties of the refractory sealing glass.

  16. Method of determining glass durability

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jantzen, C.M.; Pickett, J.B.; Brown, K.G.; Edwards, T.B.

    1998-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for determining one or more leachate concentrations of one or more components of a glass composition in an aqueous solution of the glass composition by identifying the components of the glass composition, including associated oxides, determining a preliminary glass dissolution estimator, {Delta}G{sub p}, based upon the free energies of hydration for the component reactant species, determining an accelerated glass dissolution function, {Delta}G{sub a}, based upon the free energy associated with weak acid dissociation, {Delta}G{sub a}{sup WA}, and accelerated matrix dissolution at high pH, {Delta}G{sub a}{sup SB} associated with solution strong base formation, and determining a final hydration free energy, {Delta}G{sub f}. This final hydration free energy is then used to determine leachate concentrations for elements of interest using a regression analysis and the formula log{sub 10}(N C{sub i}(g/L))=a{sub i} + b{sub i}{Delta}G{sub f}. The present invention also includes a method to determine whether a particular glass to be produced will be homogeneous or phase separated. The present invention is also directed to methods of monitoring and controlling processes for making glass using these determinations to modify the feedstock materials until a desired glass durability and homogeneity is obtained. 4 figs.

  17. Method of determining glass durability

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jantzen, Carol Maryanne (Aiken, SC); Pickett, John Butler (Aiken, SC); Brown, Kevin George (Augusta, GA); Edwards, Thomas Barry (Aiken, SC)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for determining one or more leachate concentrations of one or more components of a glass composition in an aqueous solution of the glass composition by identifying the components of the glass composition, including associated oxides, determining a preliminary glass dissolution estimator, .DELTA.G.sub.p, based upon the free energies of hydration for the component reactant species, determining an accelerated glass dissolution function, .DELTA.G.sub.a, based upon the free energy associated with weak acid dissociation, .DELTA.G.sub.a.sup.WA, and accelerated matrix dissolution at high pH, .DELTA.G.sub.a.sup.SB associated with solution strong base formation, and determining a final hydration free energy, .DELTA.G.sub.f. This final hydration free energy is then used to determine leachate concentrations for elements of interest using a regression analysis and the formula log.sub.10 (N C.sub.i (g/L))=a.sub.i +b.sub.i .DELTA.G.sub.f. The present invention also includes a method to determine whether a particular glass to be produced will be homogeneous or phase separated. The present invention is also directed to methods of monitoring and controlling processes for making glass using these determinations to modify the feedstock materials until a desired glass durability and homogeneity is obtained.

  18. Glass science tutorial: Lecture No. 7, Waste glass technology for Hanford

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruger, A.A.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the details of the waste glass tutorial session that was held to promote knowledge of waste glass technology and how this can be used at the Hanford Reservation. Topics discussed include: glass properties; statistical approach to glass development; processing properties of nuclear waste glass; glass composition and the effects of composition on durability; model comparisons of free energy of hydration; LLW glass structure; glass crystallization; amorphous phase separation; corrosion of refractories and electrodes in waste glass melters; and glass formulation for maximum waste loading.

  19. Lead phosphate glass compositions for optical components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sales, Brian C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Boatner, Lynn A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A lead phosphate glass to which has been added indium oxide or scandium oe to improve chemical durability and provide a lead phosphate glass with good optical properties.

  20. Glass Ceramic Formulation Data Package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crum, Jarrod V.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; McCloy, John S.; Vienna, John D.; Chung, Chul-Woo

    2012-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A glass ceramic waste form is being developed for treatment of secondary waste streams generated by aqueous reprocessing of commercial used nuclear fuel (Crum et al. 2012b). The waste stream contains a mixture of transition metals, alkali, alkaline earths, and lanthanides, several of which exceed the solubility limits of a single phase borosilicate glass (Crum et al. 2009; Caurant et al. 2007). A multi-phase glass ceramic waste form allows incorporation of insoluble components of the waste by designed crystallization into durable heat tolerant phases. The glass ceramic formulation and processing targets the formation of the following three stable crystalline phases: (1) powellite (XMoO4) where X can be (Ca, Sr, Ba, and/or Ln), (2) oxyapatite Yx,Z(10-x)Si6O26 where Y is alkaline earth, Z is Ln, and (3) lanthanide borosilicate (Ln5BSi2O13). These three phases incorporate the waste components that are above the solubility limit of a single-phase borosilicate glass. The glass ceramic is designed to be a single phase melt, just like a borosilicate glass, and then crystallize upon slow cooling to form the targeted phases. The slow cooling schedule is based on the centerline cooling profile of a 2 foot diameter canister such as the Hanford High-Level Waste canister. Up to this point, crucible testing has been used for glass ceramic development, with cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) targeted as the ultimate processing technology for the waste form. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) will conduct a scaled CCIM test in FY2012 with a glass ceramic to demonstrate the processing behavior. This Data Package documents the laboratory studies of the glass ceramic composition to support the CCIM test. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) measured melt viscosity, electrical conductivity, and crystallization behavior upon cooling to identify a processing window (temperature range) for melter operation and cooling profiles necessary to crystallize the targeted phases in the waste form.

  1. Abstract--The current paper describes one-dimensional cutting stock model for joinery manufacturing. The joinery elements differ in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mustakerov, Ivan

    ) in order to satisfy the demand for all joinery elements. Along with this, it is necessary to find in the production planning of many industries such as the metallurgy, plastics, paper, glass, furniture, textile elements have to be manufactured using blanks of single standard size. This demands developing of methods

  2. Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Incentive Program...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Incentive Program Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Incentive Program This is an interim final rule that establishes the...

  3. Additive Manufacturing Cluster Strategy | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Additive Manufacturing Cluster Strategy SHARE Additive Manufacturing Cluster Strategy As the nation's premier research laboratory, ORNL is one of the world's most capable resources...

  4. Advanced Qualification of Additive Manufacturing Workshop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Events Additive Manufacturing Workshop Poster Abstract Submission - deadline July 10, 2015 Advanced Qualification of Additive Manufacturing Materials using in situ sensors,...

  5. Welcome and Advanced Manufacturing Partnership (Text Version...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    200 school aged students go into this manufacturing demonstration facility and make 3D printing or other manufacturing parts. Design and make parts for their robots. For their...

  6. National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) Response...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) Response to Smart Grid RFI National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) Response to Smart Grid RFI The National Electrical...

  7. Technologies Enabling Agile Manufacturing (TEAM) ? an ORCMT...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technologies Enabling Agile Manufacturing (TEAM) - An ORCMT success story Technologies Enabling Agile Manufacturing (TEAM) was one of the larger programs to come from the...

  8. Alternative Energy Product Manufacturers Tax Credit | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Revenue Provider New Mexico Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department The Alternative Energy Product Manufacturers tax credit may be claimed for manufacturing...

  9. Industrial Activities at DOE: Efficiency, Manufacturing, Process...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Materials R&D More Documents & Publications Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composite Manufacturing Workshop Advanced Manufacturing Office Overview Microwave and Radio Frequency Workshop...

  10. Additive Manufacturing Opportunities for Transportation | ornl...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Additive Manufacturing Opportunities for Transportation Mar 13 2015 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM Lonnie Love, Manufacturing Systems Research Group Transportation Science Seminar Series...

  11. Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative: Increasing American Competitive...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for a Clean Energy Manufacturing Innovation Institute related to composite materials and structures. The Manufacturing Demonstration Facility at Oak Ridge National...

  12. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Manufacturability...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Manufacturability Study and Scale-Up for Large Format Lithium Ion Batteries Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Manufacturability Study and Scale-Up for Large Format...

  13. Advanced Manufacturing Initiative Improves Turbine Blade Productivity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Manufacturing Initiative Improves Turbine Blade Productivity Advanced Manufacturing Initiative Improves Turbine Blade Productivity May 20, 2011 - 2:56pm Addthis This is an...

  14. Manufacturing Barriers to High Temperature PEM Commercialization...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Barriers to High Temperature PEM Commercialization Manufacturing Barriers to High Temperature PEM Commercialization Presented at the NREL Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Manufacturing R&D...

  15. 2010 Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints: Definitions...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    key terms and details assumptions and references used in the Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints (2010 MECS) Definitions and Assumptions for the Manufacturing Energy and...

  16. Understanding Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints, October...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    More Documents & Publications Understanding the 2010 Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints U.S. Manufacturing Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Analysis Cement...

  17. Process systems engineering of continuous pharmaceutical manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abel, Matthew J

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Continuous manufacturing offers a number of operational and financial benefits to pharmaceutical companies. This research examines the critical blending step for continuous pharmaceutical manufacturing and the characteristics ...

  18. Database and Interim Glass Property Models for Hanford HLW Glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrma, Pavel R.; Piepel, Gregory F.; Vienna, John D.; Cooley, Scott K.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Russell, Renee L.

    2001-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a methodology for an increase in the efficiency and a decrease in the cost of vitrifying high-level waste (HLW) by optimizing HLW glass formulation. This methodology consists in collecting and generating a database of glass properties that determine HLW glass processability and acceptability and relating these properties to glass composition. The report explains how the property-composition models are developed, fitted to data, used for glass formulation optimization, and continuously updated in response to changes in HLW composition estimates and changes in glass processing technology. Further, the report reviews the glass property-composition literature data and presents their preliminary critical evaluation and screening. Finally the report provides interim property-composition models for melt viscosity, for liquidus temperature (with spinel and zircon primary crystalline phases), and for the product consistency test normalized releases of B, Na, and Li. Models were fitted to a subset of the screened database deemed most relevant for the current HLW composition region.

  19. Deputy Director, Advanced Manufacturing Office

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position is located in the Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO), within the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). EERE leads the U.S. Department of Energy's efforts to...

  20. Wind Energy Manufacturing Tax Incentive

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    With the passage of [http://www.arkansasenergy.org/media/261385/act736.pdf HB 2230 (2009)] in April 2009, the Arkansas Legislature expanded a tax incentive for manufacturers of windmill blades or...

  1. Manufacturing System Design Framework Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaughn, Amanda

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous Lean Aerospace Initiative research in factory operations had indicated that the greatest performance gains are realized when the manufacturing system is designed from the top down and from supplier to the customer. ...

  2. CFL Manufacturers: ENERGY STAR Letters

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE issued letters to 25 manufacturers of compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) involving various models after PEARL Cycle 9 testing indicated that the models do not meet the ENERGY STAR specification and, therefore, are disqualified from the ENERGY STAR Program.

  3. A Topological Glass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jean-Pierre Eckmann

    2007-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose and study a model with glassy behavior. The state space of the model is given by all triangulations of a sphere with $n$ nodes, half of which are red and half are blue. Red nodes want to have 5 neighbors while blue ones want 7. Energies of nodes with different numbers of neighbors are supposed to be positive. The dynamics is that of flipping the diagonal of two adjacent triangles, with a temperature dependent probability. We show that this system has an approach to a steady state which is exponentially slow, and show that the stationary state is unordered. We also study the local energy landscape and show that it has the hierarchical structure known from spin glasses. Finally, we show that the evolution can be described as that of a rarefied gas with spontaneous generation of particles and annihilating collisions.

  4. Tantalum ingots and flat mill products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The specification covers unalloyed tantalum in the following grades: R05200, unalloyed tantalum (vacuum-arc melt or electron-beam furnace melt); R05400, unalloyed tantalum (powder metallurgy consolidation); R05255, tantalum alloy (90% Ta to 10% W, vacuum-arc melt or electron-beam furnace melt). The tantalum can be in the form of ingot, bar, plate, sheet, or strip. The specification includes ordering information, manufacture, chemical requirements, tensile properties, dimensional tolerances, workmanship and finish, sampling, certification, marking and packaging. (JMT)

  5. flats for rent 2 | 3 How to find private

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    .lettingweb.com/student-flats-heriot-watt-university www.citylets.co.uk www.landlordaccreditationscotland.com www.espc.com www.rightmove.co.uk www

  6. EIS-0276: Rocky Flats Plutonium Storage, Golden, Colorado

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes DOE's proposed action to provide safe interim storage of approximately 10 metric tons of plutonium at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS).

  7. 2006 Annual Ecology Report for the Rocky Flats Site

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Ecology Report for the Rocky Flats Site Click on the links below to access different portions of the electronic annual report. 2006 Annual Report Sections Diffuse Knapweed...

  8. Evaluation of Vitrification Processing Step for Rocky Flats Incinerator Ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wigent, W.L.; Luey, J.K.; Scheele, R.D.; Li, H.

    1999-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1997, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) staff developed a processing option for incinerator ash at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Sites (RFETS). This work was performed with support from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Safe Sites of Colorado (SSOC). A description of the remediation needs for the RFETS incinerator ash is provided in a report summarizing the recommended processing option for treatment of the ash (Lucy et al. 1998). The recommended process flowsheet involves a calcination pretreatment step to remove carbonaceous material followed by a vitrification processing step for a mixture of glass tit and calcined incinerator ash. Using the calcination pretreatment step to remove carbonaceous material reduced process upsets for the vitrification step, allowed for increased waste loading in the final product, and improved the quality of the final product. Figure 1.1 illustrates the flow sheet for the recommended processing option for treatment of RFETS incinerator ash. In 1998, work at PNNL further developed the recommended flow sheet through a series of studies to better define the vitrification operating parameters and to address secondary processing issues (such as characterizing the offgas species from the calcination process). Because a prototypical rotary calciner was not available for use, studies to evaluate the offgas from the calcination process were performed using a benchtop rotary calciner and laboratory-scale equipment (Lucy et al. 1998). This report focuses on the vitrification process step after ash has been calcined. Testing with full-scale containers was performed using ash surrogates and a muffle furnace similar to that planned for use at RFETS. Small-scale testing was performed using plutonium-bearing incinerator ash to verify performance of the waste form. Ash was not obtained from RFETS because of transportation requirements to calcine the incinerator ash prior to shipment of the material. Because part of PNNL's work was to characterize the ash prior to calcination and to investigate the effect of calcination on product quality, representative material was obtained from LANL. Ash obtained from LANL was selected based on its similarity to that currently stored at RFETS. The plutonium-bearing ashes obtained from LANL are likely from a RFETS incinerator, but the exact origin was not identified.

  9. Designing a National Network for Manufacturing Innovation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Designing a National Network for Manufacturing Innovation NNMI and The Additive Manufacturing Pilot Introduction · NNMI principles · Public NMMI Design · Pilot Institute on Additive Manufacturing #12;IMI Mission Process, such as Additive Manufacturing An Advanced Material ­ e.g. lightweight, low cost carbon fiber

  10. Reinforced glass beamsReinforced glass beamsg Auteur Dr. Christian LOUTER 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reinforced glass beamsReinforced glass beamsg EDCE Auteur Dr. Christian LOUTER 1 ENAC/EDCE 2011In contemporary architecture glass is increasinglyIn contemporary architecture glass is increasingly applied for structural components such as beamsapplied for structural components such as beams. However glass

  11. Crystallization during processing of nuclear waste glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrma, Pavel R.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In glass processing situations involving glass crystallization, various crystalline forms nucleate, grow, and dissolve, typically in a nonuniform temperature field of molten glass subjected to convection. Nuclear waste glasses are remarkable examples of multicomponent vitrified mixtures involving partial crystallization. In the glass melter, crystals form and dissolve during batch-to-glass conversion, melter processing, and product cooling. Crystals often agglomerate and sink, and they may settle at the melter bottom. Within the body of cooling glass, multiple phases crystallize in a non-uniform time-dependent temperature field. Self-organizing periodic distribution (the Liesegnang effect) is common. Various crystallization phenomena that occur in glassmaking are reviewed.

  12. Corrosion of Partially Crystallized Glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrma, Pavel R.; Riley, Brian J.; Vienna, John D.

    2002-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Using existing data on corrosion of partially crystallized, simulated, high-level waste glasses, coefficients were introduced to evaluate the cumulative influence of secondary effects, such as residual stresses or concentration gradients on product consistency test response. As compared to predictions based solely on residual glass composition effects, the results showed that cristobalite, eucryptite, and nepheline had a higher-than-predicted impact on glass corrosion, while the effects of baddeleyite, hematite, calcium-zirconium silicate, and zircon were close to those predicted. The effects of acmite and lithium silicate were opposite to those expected based on their compositions. The analysis revealed important limitations of the databases currently available. Better understanding of corrosion phenomena will require quantitative composition data, microscopic characterization of pristine and corroded surfaces, and long-term tests with glass coupons or monoliths.

  13. INVENTORY FOR ELGAR COURT FLAT NO. BLOCK NO. ROOM NO.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    INVENTORY FOR ELGAR COURT FLAT NO. BLOCK NO. ROOM NO. Staff on the Vale Village try to ensure and cleaned to a high standard. Please make sure that you complete this inventory and note down anything which seat x 1 Toilet roll holder x 1 INVENTORY FOR SHACKLETON FLAT NO: BLOCK NO: ROOM NO: NAME: TELEPHONE

  14. INVENTORY FOR ELGAR COURT FLAT NO. BLOCK NO. ROOM NO.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    INVENTORY FOR ELGAR COURT FLAT NO. BLOCK NO. ROOM NO. Staff on the Vale Village try to ensure and cleaned to a high standard. Please make sure that you complete this inventory and note down anything which Toilet seat x 1 Toilet roll holder x 1 INVENTORY FOR MASON FLAT NO: BLOCK NO: ROOM NO: NAME: TELEPHONE

  15. INVENTORY FOR ELGAR COURT FLAT NO. BLOCK NO. ROOM NO.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    INVENTORY FOR ELGAR COURT FLAT NO. BLOCK NO. ROOM NO. Staff on the Vale Village try to ensure and cleaned to a high standard. Please make sure that you complete this inventory and note down anything which holder x 1 INVENTORY FOR TENNIS COURT BLOCK NO: FLAT NO: ROOM NO: NAME: TELEPHONE EXT. NO: #12;How

  16. INVENTORY FOR ELGAR COURT FLAT NO. BLOCK NO. ROOM NO.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    INVENTORY FOR ELGAR COURT FLAT NO. BLOCK NO. ROOM NO. Staff on the Vale Village try to ensure and cleaned to a high standard. Please make sure that you complete this inventory and note down anything which Toilet seat x 1 Toilet roll holder x 1 INVENTORY FOR ELGAR COURT FLAT NO: BLOCK NO: ROOM NO: NAME

  17. INVENTORY FOR ELGAR COURT FLAT NO. BLOCK NO. ROOM NO.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    INVENTORY FOR ELGAR COURT FLAT NO. BLOCK NO. ROOM NO. Staff on the Vale Village try to ensure and cleaned to a high standard. Please make sure that you complete this inventory and note down anything which rail x 1 INVENTORY FOR MAPLE BANK FLAT NO: BLOCK NO: ROOM NO: NAME: TELEPHONE EXT. NO: #12;How

  18. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints (2006 MECS)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy and Carbon Footprints provide a mapping of energy from supply to end use in manufacturing. They show us where energy is used and lost—and where greenhouse gases (GHGs) are emitted. Footprints are available below for 15 manufacturing sectors (representing 94% of all manufacturing energy use) and for U.S. manufacturing as a whole. Analysis of these footprints is also available in the U.S. Manufacturing Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Analysis report.

  19. Glass Membrane For Controlled Diffusion Of Gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shelby, James E. (Alfred Station, NY); Kenyon, Brian E. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A glass structure for controlled permeability of gases includes a glass vessel. The glass vessel has walls and a hollow center for receiving a gas. The glass vessel contains a metal oxide dopant formed with at least one metal selected from the group consisting of transition metals and rare earth metals for controlling diffusion of the gas through the walls of the glass vessel. The vessel releases the gas through its walls upon exposure to a radiation source.

  20. BNFL Report Glass Formers Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schumacher, R.F.

    2000-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this task was to obtain powder property data on candidate glass former materials, sufficient to guide conceptual design and estimate the cost of glass former handling facilities as requested under Part B1 of BNFL Technical and Development Support. Twenty-nine glass forming materials were selected and obtained from vendors for the characterization of their physical properties, durability in caustic solution, and powder flow characteristics. A glass former was selected based on the characterization for each of the ten oxide classes required for Envelope A, B, and C mixtures. Three blends (A, B, and C) were prepared based on formulations provided by Vitreous State Laboratory and evaluated with the same methods employed for the glass formers. The properties obtained are presented in a series of attached Tables. It was determined that five of the ten glass formers, (kyanite, iron oxide, titania, zircon, and zinc oxide) have the potential to cause some level of solids f low problems. In addition, all of the blends may require consideration for their handling. A number of engineering considerations and recommendations were prepared based on the experimental findings, experience, and other process considerations. Recommendations for future testing are included. In conjunction with future work, it is recommended that a professional consultant be engaged to guide and assist with testing and design input.

  1. BNFL Report Glass Formers Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schumacher, R.F.

    2000-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this task was to obtain powder property data on candidate glass former materials, sufficient to guide conceptual design and estimate the cost of glass former handling facilities as requested under Part B1 of BNFL Technical and Development Support. Twenty-nine glass forming materials were selected and obtained from vendors for the characterization of their physical properties, durability in caustic solution, and powder flow characteristics. A glass former was selected based on the characterization for each of the ten oxide classes required for Envelope A, B, and C mixtures. Three blends (A, B, and C) were prepared based on formulations provided by Vitreous State Laboratory and evaluated with the same methods employed for the glass formers. The properties obtained are presented in a series of attached Tables. It was determined that five of the ten glass formers, (kyanite, iron oxide, titania, zircon, and zinc oxide) have the potential to cause some level of solids f low problems. The problems might include arching or ratholing in the silo/hopper. In addition, all of the blends may require consideration for their handling.

  2. Commercial Decommissioning at DOE's Rocky Flats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freiboth, C.; Sandlin, N.; Schubert, A.; Hansen, S.

    2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Due in large part to the number of nuclear facilities that make up the DOE complex, DOE-EM work has historically been paperwork intensive and driven by extensive regulations. Requirements for non-nuclear facilities are often grouped with those of nuclear facilities, driving up costs. Kaiser-Hill was interested in applying a commercial model to demolition of these facilities and wanted to apply necessary and sufficient standards to the work activities, but avoid applying unnecessary requirements. Faced with demolishing hundreds of uncontaminated or non-radiologically contaminated facilities, Kaiser-Hill has developed a subcontracting strategy to drastically reduce the cost of demolishing these facilities at Rocky Flats. Aiming to tailor the demolition approach of such facilities to more closely follow commercial practices, Kaiser-Hill recently released a Request for Proposals (RFP) for the demolition of the site's former central administration facility. The RFP significantly reduced requirements for compliance with specific DOE directives. Instead, the RFP required subcontractors to comply with health and safety requirements commonly found in the demolition of similar facilities in a commercial setting. This resulted in a number of bids from companies who have normally not bid on DOE work previously and at a reduced cost over previous approaches. This paper will discuss the details of this subcontracting strategy.

  3. The Critical Mass Laboratory at Rocky Flats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothe, Robert E

    2003-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Critical Mass Laboratory (CML) at Rocky Flats northwest of Denver, Colorado, was built in 1964 and commissioned to conduct nuclear experiments on January 28, 1965. It was built to attain more accurate and precise experimental data to ensure nuclear criticality safety at the plant than were previously possible. Prior to its construction, safety data were obtained from long extrapolations of subcritical data (called in situ experiments), calculated parameters from reactor engineering 'models', and a few other imprecise methods. About 1700 critical and critical-approach experiments involving several chemical forms of enriched uranium and plutonium were performed between then and 1988. These experiments included single units and arrays of fissile materials, reflected and 'bare' systems, and configurations with various degrees of moderation, as well as some containing strong neutron absorbers. In 1989, a raid by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) caused the plant as a whole to focus on 'resumption' instead of further criticality safety experiments. Though either not recognized or not admitted for a few years, that FBI raid did sound the death knell for the CML. The plant's optimistic goal of resumption evolved to one of deactivation, decommissioning, and plantwide demolition during the 1990s. The once-proud CML facility was finally demolished in April of 2002.

  4. Excavating Chinese America in the Delta: Race and the historical archaeology of the Isleton Chinese American community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fong, Kelly Nicole

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    coin conglomerate foam foil glass (conglomerate) glass (ceramic conglomerate foam foil glass (flat) glass (Go piece)cloth coin conglomerate foam foil glass glass (flat) glass (

  5. Energy Saving Glass Lamination via Selective Radio Frequency Heating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shawn M. Allan; Patricia M. Strickland; Holly S. Shulman

    2009-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Ceralink Inc. developed FastFuse™, a rapid, new, energy saving process for lamination of glass and composites using radio frequency (RF) heating technology. The Inventions and Innovations program supported the technical and commercial research and development needed to elevate the innovation from bench scale to a self-supporting technology with significant potential for growth. The attached report provides an overview of the technical and commerical progress achieved for FastFuse™ during the course of the project. FastFuse™ has the potential to revolutionize the laminate manufacturing industries by replacing energy intensive, multi-step processes with an energy efficient, single-step process that allows higher throughput. FastFuse™ transmits RF energy directly into the interlayer to generate heat, eliminating the need to directly heat glass layers and the surrounding enclosures, such as autoclaves or vacuum systems. FastFuse™ offers lower start-up and energy costs (up to 90% or more reduction in energy costs), and faster cycles times (less than 5 minutes). FastFuse™ is compatible with EVA, TPU, and PVB interlayers, and has been demonstrated for glass, plastics, and multi-material structures such as photovoltaics and transparent armor.

  6. Microwires fabricated by glass-coated melt spinning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Y. Y.; Li, H.; Hao, H. Y.; Li, M.; Zhang, Y. [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, No. 30, Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100083 (China)] [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, No. 30, Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100083 (China); Liaw, P. K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-2200 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-2200 (United States)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The glass-coated melt spinning method offers a route for the manufacture of metal filaments with a few micrometers in diameter in a single operation directly from the melt. Cobalt-based amorphous wires, Cu-15.0 atomic percent (at. %) Sn shape-memory wires, and Ni{sub 2}MnGa (atomic percent) ferromagnetic wires were successfully produced by this method. The cobalt-based amorphous wire is flexible, and Cu-15.0 at. % Sn shape-memory wires have the tensile elongation of 14%. However, because of chemical reaction with glass and oxidation, it is hard to make Cu–Al–Ni shape-memory wires and Ni–Nb–Sn amorphous wires. Conditions for preparing these materials were summarized, and the differences of the solidification processes among glass-coated amorphous cobalt-based wires, Cu-15.0 at. % Sn shape-memory wires, and Ni{sub 2}MnGa wires were analyzed and discussed.

  7. Natural analogues of nuclear waste glass corrosion.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Ebert, W.L.; Luo, J.S.

    1999-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This report reviews and summarizes studies performed to characterize the products and processes involved in the corrosion of natural glasses. Studies are also reviewed and evaluated on how well the corrosion of natural glasses in natural environments serves as an analogue for the corrosion of high-level radioactive waste glasses in an engineered geologic disposal system. A wide range of natural and experimental corrosion studies has been performed on three major groups of natural glasses: tektite, obsidian, and basalt. Studies of the corrosion of natural glass attempt to characterize both the nature of alteration products and the reaction kinetics. Information available on natural glass was then compared to corresponding information on the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses, specifically to resolve two key questions: (1) whether one or more natural glasses behave similarly to nuclear waste glasses in laboratory tests, and (2) how these similarities can be used to support projections of the long-term corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The corrosion behavior of basaltic glasses was most similar to that of nuclear waste glasses, but the corrosion of tektite and obsidian glasses involves certain processes that also occur during the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The reactions and processes that control basalt glass dissolution are similar to those that are important in nuclear waste glass dissolution. The key reaction of the overall corrosion mechanism is network hydrolysis, which eventually breaks down the glass network structure that remains after the initial ion-exchange and diffusion processes. This review also highlights some unresolved issues related to the application of an analogue approach to predicting long-term behavior of nuclear waste glass corrosion, such as discrepancies between experimental and field-based estimates of kinetic parameters for basaltic glasses.

  8. Power Quality from the Manufacturer’s Standpoint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McEachern, A.

    Power quality is an unstable field (if you'll pardon the double meaning). It's in its infancy; there isn't general agreement on much, not even terminology. As an instrument manufacturer in the field, I'm particularly concerned with two philosophical...

  9. Manufacturing for the Hydrogen Economy Manufacturing Research & Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to coordinate and leverage the current federal efforts focused on manufacturability issues such as low-cost of the hydrogen and fuel cell technologies needed to move the United States toward a future hydrogen economy of a hydrogen energy economy, moving from today's laboratory-scale fabrication technologies to high

  10. Lithium Loaded Glass Fiber Neutron Detector Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ely, James H.; Erikson, Luke E.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Stromswold, David C.

    2009-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation portal monitors used for interdiction of illicit materials at borders include highly sensitive neutron detection systems. The main reason for having neutron detection capability is to detect fission neutrons from plutonium. The currently deployed radiation portal monitors (RPMs) from Ludlum and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) use neutron detectors based upon 3He-filled gas proportional counters, which are the most common large neutron detector. There is a declining supply of 3He in the world and, thus, methods to reduce the use of this gas in RPMs with minimal changes to the current system designs and sensitivity to cargo-borne neutrons are being investigated. Four technologies have been identified as being currently commercially available, potential alternative neutron detectors to replace the use of 3He in RPMs. Reported here are the results of tests of the lithium-loaded glass fibers option. This testing measured the neutron detection efficiency and gamma ray rejection capabilities of a small system manufactured by Nucsafe (Oak Ridge, TN).

  11. Industrial Sector Energy Demand: Revisions for Non-Energy-Intensive Manufacturing (released in AEO2007)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the industrial sector, the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) analysis and projection efforts generally have focused on the energy-intensive industriesfood, bulk chemicals, refining, glass, cement, steel, and aluminumwhere energy cost averages 4.8% of annual operating cost. Detailed process flows and energy intensity indicators have been developed for narrowly defined industry groups in the energy-intensive manufacturing sector. The non-energy-intensive manufacturing industries, where energy cost averages 1.9% of annual operating cost, previously have received somewhat less attention, however. In Annual Energy Outlook 2006 (AEO), energy demand projections were provided for two broadly aggregated industry groups in the non-energy-intensive manufacturing sector: metal-based durables and other non-energy-intensive. In the AEO2006 projections, the two groups accounted for more than 50% of the projected increase in industrial natural gas consumption from 2004 to 2030.

  12. Glass-Coated Beryllium Mirrors for the LHCb RICH1 Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barber, G J; Cameron, W; D'Ambrosio, C; Frei, C; Harnew, N; Head, R; Khimitch, Y P; Khmelnikov, V A; Loveridge, P W; Metlica, F; Obraztsov, V F; Piedigrossi, D; Sizenev, V; Kompozit Joint Stock Company, Moscow, Russia; Szczypka, P M; Ullaland, O; Vygosky, E; Websdale, D M

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design, manufacture and testing of lightweight glass-coated beryllium spherical converging mirrors for the RICH1 detector of LHCb are described. The mirrors need to be lightweight to minimize the material budget and fluorocarbon-compatible to avoid degradation in the RICH1 C4F10 gas radiator. Results of the optical measurements for the small-sized prototypes and for the first full-sized prototype mirror are reported.

  13. Nano-structured self-cleaning superhydrophobic glass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Jin Yeol

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    5. Optically transparent glass with vertically alignedcomposition of biosoluble glass fiber” Korean ApplicationS. Jin, “Optically Transparent Glass with Vertically Aligned

  14. Micro-Continuum Modeling of Nuclear Waste Glass Corrosion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steefel, Carl

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    21. Grambow, B. (2006). Nuclear waste glasses – How durable?Continuum Modeling of Nuclear Waste Glass Corrosion AugustContinuum Modeling of Nuclear Waste Glass Corrosion Prepared

  15. A quantum kinematics for asymptotically flat spacetimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miguel Campiglia; Madhavan Varadarajan

    2014-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct a quantum kinematics for asymptotically flat spacetimes based on the Koslowski-Sahlmann (KS) representation. The KS representation is a generalization of the representation underlying Loop Quantum Gravity (LQG) which supports, in addition to the usual LQG operators, the action of `background exponential operators' which are connection dependent operators labelled by `background' $su(2)$ electric fields. KS states have, in addition to the LQG state label corresponding to 1 dimensional excitations of the triad, a label corresponding to a `background' electric field which describes 3 dimensional excitations of the triad. Asymptotic behaviour in quantum theory is controlled through asymptotic conditions on the background electric fields which label the {\\em states} and the background electric fields which label the {\\em operators}. Asymptotic conditions on the triad are imposed as conditions on the background electric field state label while confining the LQG spin net graph labels to compact sets. We show that KS states can be realised as wave functions on a quantum configuration space of generalized connections and that the asymptotic behaviour of each such generalized connection is determined by that of the background electric fields which label the background exponential operators. Similar to the spatially compact case, the Gauss Law and diffeomorphism constraints are then imposed through Group Averaging techniques to obtain a large sector of gauge invariant states. It is shown that this sector supports a unitary action of the group of asymptotic rotations and translations and that, as anticipated by Friedman and Sorkin, for appropriate spatial topology, this sector contains states which display fermionic behaviour under $2\\pi$ rotations.

  16. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brueske, S.; Lorenz, T.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant opportunities exist for improving energy efficiency in U.S. manufacturing. A first step in realizing these opportunities is to identify how industry is using energy. Where does it come from? What form is it in? Where is it used? How much...

  17. Additive manufacturing method of producing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    Additive manufacturing method of producing silver or copper tracks on polyimide film Problem/stripping) using an additive process support by a novel bio- degradable photo-initiator package. technology. Building on previous work by Hoyd- Gigg Ng et al. [1,2], Heriot-Watt has developed an additive film

  18. Manufacture of finely divided carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, D.G.

    1980-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Finely divided carbon is manufactured by a process producing a gaseous stream containing carbon monoxide by reacting coal and air in a slagging ash gasifier, separating carbon monoxide from the gaseous mixture, and disproportionating the carbon monoxide to produce finely divided carbon and carbon dioxide, the latter of which is recycled to the gasifier.

  19. Optimizing Manufactured Housing Energy Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGinley, W. M.; Jones, A.; Turner, C.; Chandra, S.; Beal, D.; Parker, D. S.; Moyer, N.; McIlvaine, J.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In partnership with the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC), two manufactured homes were located on North Carolina A&T State University's campus in Greensboro, NC and used in a side-by-side energy consumption comparison. One of the homes was built...

  20. Process for manufacturing multilayer capacitors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Holcombe, Cressie E. (Knoxville, TN); Dykes, Norman L. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is directed to a method of manufacture of multilayer electrical components, especially capacitors, and components made by such a method. High capacitance dielectric materials and low cost metallizations layered with such dielectrics may be fabricated as multilayer electrical components by sintering the metallizations and the dielectrics during the fabrication process by application of microwave radiation.

  1. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brueske, S.; Lorenz, T.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant opportunities exist for improving energy efficiency in U.S. manufacturing. A first step in realizing these opportunities is to identify how industry is using energy. Where does it come from? What form is it in? Where is it used? How much...

  2. Chern-Simons classes of flat connections on supermanifolds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JN Iyer; Un Iyer

    2007-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In this note we define Chern-Simons classes of a superconnection $D+L$ on a complex supervector bundle $E$ such that $D$ is flat and preserves the grading, and $L$ is an odd endomorphism of $E$ on a supermanifold. As an application we obtain a definition of Chern-Simons classes of a (not necessarily flat) morphism between flat vector bundles on a smooth manifold. We extend Reznikov's theorem on triviality of these classes when the manifold is a compact K\\"ahler manifold or a smooth complex quasi--projective variety, in degrees > 1.

  3. Chern-Simons classes of flat connections on supermanifolds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iyer, JN

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this note we define Chern-Simons classes of a superconnection $D+L$ on a complex supervector bundle $E$ such that $D$ is flat and preserves the grading, and $L$ is an odd endomorphism of $E$ on a supermanifold. As an application we obtain a definition of Chern-Simons classes of a (not necessarily flat) morphism between flat vector bundles on a smooth manifold. We extend Reznikov's theorem on triviality of these classes when the manifold is a compact K\\"ahler manifold or a smooth complex quasi--projective variety, in degrees > 1.

  4. HLW Glass Studies: Development of Crystal-Tolerant HLW Glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matyas, Josef; Huckleberry, Adam R.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Lang, Jesse B.; Owen, Antionette T.; Kruger, Albert A.

    2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    In our study, a series of lab-scale crucible tests were performed on designed glasses of different compositions to further investigate and simulate the effect of Cr, Ni, Fe, Al, Li, and RuO2 on the accumulation rate of spinel crystals in the glass discharge riser of the HLW melter. The experimental data were used to expand the compositional region covered by an empirical model developed previously (Matyáš et al. 2010b), improving its predictive performance. We also investigated the mechanism for agglomeration of particles and impact of agglomerates on accumulation rate. In addition, the TL was measured as a function of temperature and composition.

  5. Glass and Glass Products (2010 MECS) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdf Flash2006-52.pdf0.pdfDepartmentCounselGlass Coating Makes Solar Panels MoreGlass and

  6. Flat plate puncture test convergence study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snow, Spencer (Idaho National Laboratories); Ammerman, Douglas James; Molitoris, David (Westinghouse); Tso, Chi-Fung (ARUP); Yaksh, Mike (NAC International)

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ASME Task Group on Computational Mechanics for Explicit Dynamics is investigating the types of finite element models needed to accurately solve various problems that occur frequently in cask design. One type of problem is the 1-meter impact onto a puncture spike. The work described in this paper considers this impact for a relatively thin-walled shell, represented as a flat plate. The effects of mesh refinement, friction coefficient, material models, and finite element code will be discussed. The actual punch, as defined in the transport regulations, is 15 cm in diameter with a corner radius of no more than 6 mm. The punch used in the initial part of this study has the same diameter, but has a corner radius of 25 mm. This more rounded punch was used to allow convergence of the solution with a coarser mesh. A future task will be to investigate the effect of having a punch with a smaller corner radius. The 25-cm thick type 304 stainless steel plate that represents the cask wall is 1 meter in diameter and has added mass on the edge to represent the remainder of the cask. The amount of added mass to use was calculated using Nelm's equation, an empirically derived relationship between weight, wall thickness, and ultimate strength that prevents punch through. The outer edge of the plate is restrained so that it can only move in the direction parallel to the axis of the punch. Results that are compared include the deflection at the edge of the plate, the deflection at the center of the plate, the plastic strains at radius r=50 cm and r=100 cm , and qualitatively, the distribution of plastic strains. The strains of interest are those on the surface of the plate, not the integration point strains. Because cask designers are using analyses of this type to determine if shell will puncture, a failure theory, including the effect of the tri-axial nature of the stress state, is also discussed. The results of this study will help to determine what constitutes an adequate finite element model for analyzing the puncture hypothetical accident.

  7. Seismic rehabilitation of a reinforced concrete flat-slab structure 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jimenez, Laila Margarita

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effectiveness of seismic rehabilitation techniques used to eliminate punching shear failures was assessed for flat-slab structural systems. This type of retrofit was evaluated for a four-story reinforced concrete (RC) ...

  8. DOE's Former Rocky Flats Weapons Production Site to Become National...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Flats nuclear weapons production site to the Department of the Interior's (DOI) U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) for use as a National Wildlife Refuge. After more than a...

  9. atomically flat gold: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Flat(Tire1) Intact(Tire1) StartFinish Inflate(Tire1 Starner, Thad E. 147 Local and global instabilities in nanosize rectangular prismatic gold specimens R.C. Batra *, A.A....

  10. Modified Ricci flow and asymptotically non-flat spaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shubhayu Chatterjee; Narayan Banerjee

    2013-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The present work extends the application of a modified Ricci flow equation to an asymptotically non flat space, namely Marder's cylindrially symmetric space. It is found that the flow equation has a solution at least in a particular case.

  11. Artisan Manufacturing: Order (2010-CW-0712)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Artisan Manufacturing Company, Inc., to pay a $5,000 civil penalty after finding Artisan Manufacturing had failed to certify that certain models of faucets comply with the applicable water conservation standard.

  12. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Manufacturing Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Manufacturing Overview Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Manufacturing R Reserved. 3 The Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Electrochemistry #12;Copyright © 2011 Versa Power Systems. All Rights

  13. Manufacturing Metallic Parts with Designed Mesostructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Additive Manufacturing Laser Engineered Net Shaping Electron Beam Melting Williams, C. B., F. M. Mistree, D Additive Manufacturing © Christopher B. Williams Electron Beam Melting Electron Beam Melting Direct Metal

  14. Mechanics and Design, Manufacturing Professor Hani Naguib

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Manufacturing What is Manufacturing? The transformation of materials. Apple Canada(Se12), Revenue: $5,067,109 9. CGI Group(Se12), Revenue: $4,786,857 10. Siemens Canada(Se12

  15. Clean Energy Manufacturing Incentive Grant Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Clean energy manufacturer" is defined as a biofuel producer, a manufacturer of renewable energy or nuclear equipment/products, or "products used for energy conservation, storage, or grid efficie...

  16. Clean Energy Manufacturing Incentive Program (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In April 2011, Virginia created the Clean Energy Manufacturing Incentive Grant Program. The program is meant to replace the [http://en.openei.org/wiki/Solar_Manufacturing_Incentive_Grant_%28SMIG%29...

  17. Arnold Schwarzenegger HIGH-VOLUME MANUFACTURING FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor HIGH-VOLUME MANUFACTURING FOR LOW-COST, FLEXIBLE SOLAR CELL Prepared-VOLUME MANUFACTURING FOR LOW-COST, FLEXIBLE SOLAR CELL EISG AWARDEE InterPhases Research 166 N. Moorpark Rd. Suite 204

  18. USA Manufacturing: Order (2013-CE-5336)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered USA Manufacturing to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding USA Manufacturing had failed to certify that certain models of walk-in cooler and freezer components comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  19. Goodman Manufacturing: Order (2012-CE-1509)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Goodman Manufacturing Company L.P. to pay an $8,000 civil penalty after finding Goodman Manufacturing had failed to certify that certain room air conditioners comply with the applicable energy conservation standard.

  20. Goodman Manufacturing: Proposed Penalty (2011-SE-4301)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Goodman Manufacturing manufactured and distributed noncompliant basic model CPC180* commercial package air conditioners in the U.S.

  1. Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering Petroleum Engineering Minor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering for their petroleum engineering minor. As well, mechanical engineeringMechanical and Manufacturing Engineering Petroleum Engineering Minor The Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering offers a minor in petroleum engineering within the mechanical engineering major

  2. INFORMATION SYSTEMS SUPPORT FOR MANUFACTURING PROCESSES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    activities. The feature overlapping of production planning and quality control between both systems raises and distribution (Merrit1999) and have extend their scope to support quality control and production tracking: Manufacturing Enterprises, Enterprise Resource Planning, Manufacturing Execution Systems, Discrete Processes

  3. Objective assessment of manufacturing technology investments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothman, Craig Jeremy

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Amgen is a biotechnology company with manufacturing plants throughout the world. New manufacturing technologies are constantly being developed and implemented in order to address cost, quality, regulation, and competitive ...

  4. Refrigerator Manufacturers: Order (2013-CE-5341)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Refrigerator Manufacturers, LLC to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Refrigerator Manufacturers had failed to certify that certain models of walk-in cooler and freezer components comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  5. Creation and sustainment of manufacturing technology roadmaps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grillon, Louis S

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Manufacturing technology roadmaps align manufacturing capability development to product development and the driving business need. Roadmaps allow an executable business strategy to be communicated to all levels of an ...

  6. A Review of Engineering Research in Sustainable Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    shape part, e.g. , additive manufacturing, Transactions offace operations. Additive manufacturing of metal componentsenvironmen- tal merits of additive manufacturing relative to

  7. Additive Manufacturing in China: Aviation and Aerospace Applications (Part 2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANDERSON, Eric

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis May 2013 Additive Manufacturing in China: Aviationan overview of China’s additive manufacturing industry wasmilitary achievements in additive manufacturing. 2 Initial

  8. Manufacturing Fuel Cell Manhattan Project | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Manufacturing Fuel Cell Manhattan Project Manufacturing Fuel Cell Manhattan Project The Office of Naval Research recently sponsored and completed the Manufacturing Fuel Cell...

  9. Additive Manufacturing in China: Aviation and Aerospace Applications (Part 2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANDERSON, Eric

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bulletin Analysis May 2013 Additive Manufacturing in China:an overview of China’s additive manufacturing industry wasmilitary achievements in additive manufacturing. 2 Initial

  10. Worldwide Energy and Manufacturing USA Inc formerly Worldwide...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    USA Inc formerly Worldwide Manufacturing USA Jump to: navigation, search Name: Worldwide Energy and Manufacturing USA Inc (formerly Worldwide Manufacturing USA) Place: San Bruno,...

  11. Effect of furnace atmosphere on E-glass foaming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, D. S.; Dutton, Bryan C.; Hrma, Pavel R.; Pilon, Laurent

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    oxy-fired furnaces. E-glass foams were generated in a fused-81.05.K 1. Introduction Glass foams generated in glass-that the stability of E-glass foam decreased with increasing

  12. Webinar: Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video recording and text version of the webinar titled "Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells," originally presented on February 11, 2014.

  13. FY 2011 Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies, LLC,...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies, LLC, PER Summary | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the...

  14. Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Industrial Efficiency and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industrial Efficiency and Energy Productivity Video Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Industrial Efficiency and Energy Productivity Video Addthis Description Industrial...

  15. FY 2009 Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies, LLC,...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies, LLC, PER Summary | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the...

  16. FY 2010 Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies, LLC,...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies, LLC, PER Summary | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the...

  17. FY 2007 Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies, LLC,...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies, LLC, PER Summary | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the...

  18. FY 2008 Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies, LLC,...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies, LLC, PER Summary | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the...

  19. FY 2006 Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies, LLC,...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies, LLC, PER Summary | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the...

  20. Clean Energy Manufacturing Innovation Institute for Composite...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Fuel Cell Technologies Research, Development, and Demonstrations Funding Opportunity Announcement Webinar Slides Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composite Manufacturing Workshop...

  1. The Conservation of Seventeenth Century Archaeological Glass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arcak, Cory

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    is the only chance for the objects survival. Though glass is considered one of the most stable archaeological materials, noninvasive, reversible treatments are not always possible given the level of deterioration glass objects undergo within the archaeological...

  2. The Huge, Blue, Jesus Glass Statue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robbins, Joanna

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Later, I found a huge, blue, glass statue of Jesus stuffedOF CALIFORNIA RIVERSIDE The Huge, Blue, Jesus Glass Statue Aeyes as RED And wrote down BLUE for your hair. I had to fix

  3. Structure glass technology : systems and applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leitch, Katherine K. (Katherine Kristen)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Glass cannot compete with steel in terms of strength or durability, but it is the only structural material that offers the highly sought after qualities of translucency and transparency. The use of glass has evolved from ...

  4. Crystallization in High-Level Waste Glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrma, Pavel R. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Dane R Spearing, Gary L Smith, SK Sundaram

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This review outlines important aspects of crystallization in HLW glasses, such as equilibrium, nucleation, growth, and dissolution. The impact of crystallization on continuous melters and the chemical durability of high-level waste glass are briefly discussed.

  5. Flat Lens Criterion by Small-Angle Phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ott, Peter; Lezec, Henri J; Chau, Kenneth J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that a classical imaging criterion based on angular dependence of small-angle phase can be applied to any system composed of planar, uniform media to determine if it is a flat lens capable of forming a real paraxial image and to estimate the image location. The real paraxial image location obtained by this method shows agreement with past demonstrations of far-field flat-lens imaging and can even predict the location of super-resolved images in the near-field. The generality of this criterion leads to several new predictions: flat lenses for transverse-electric polarization using dielectric layers, a broadband flat lens working across the ultraviolet-visible spectrum, and a flat lens configuration with an image plane located up to several wavelengths from the exit surface. These predictions are supported by full-wave simulations. Our work shows that small-angle phase can be used as a generic metric to categorize and design flat lenses.

  6. Pseudomonas fluorescens -A robust manufacturing platform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebendiker, Mario

    Pseudomonas fluorescens -A robust manufacturing platform Reprinted from July/August 2004 Speciality at efficient- ly transporting single chain antibodies and other mammalian-derived proteins. In addition production. Dowpharma, a contract manufacturing services unit of Dow Chemical, has developed a manufacturing

  7. Additive manufacturing of metallic tracks on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    Additive manufacturing of metallic tracks on green ceramic/dielectrics Problem this technology (note: may require additional tooling/ set up time) · Rapid Prototyping & small scale manufacture microelectronics such as manufacture of LTCC ceramic/ Dielectric antenna and rapid PCB prototyping or repair

  8. ICME & MGI Big Area Additive Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ICME & MGI · Big Area Additive Manufacturing · Neutron Characterization for AM · Materials problems in additive manu- facturing (AM). Additive manufacturing, or three-dimensional (3-D) printing of the world's most advanced neu- tron facilities, the HFIR and SNS, to characterize additive manufactured

  9. Energy Manufacturing Matthew Realff and Steven Danyluk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Suman

    Energy Manufacturing Matthew Realff and Steven Danyluk Georgia Institute of Technology This white Foundation and held in Arlington VA, on March 24-25, 2009 on Energy Manufacturing. The workshop attendees participated in discussions and presented their views on energy manufacturing and the presentations

  10. EFFECTIVE STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING WITH ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    will be presented for components that can be processed by additive manufacturing (AM) or 3D printing. The origin structures. KEYWORDS : structural health monitoring methodology, 3D printing, additive manufacturing, fatigue, intelligent structure INTRODUCTION Additive manufacturing (AM), also known as 3D Printing or Rapid

  11. Manufacturing Research & Development for Systems that will

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    focused on manufacturability issues such as low-cost, high-volume manufacturing systems, advanced to move the United States toward a future hydrogen economy. While many scientific, technical's laboratory-scale fabrication technologies to high-volume commercial manufacturing has been identified as one

  12. Glass Transition and the Coulomb Gap in Electron Glasses M. Muller and L. B. Ioffe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Markus

    Glass Transition and the Coulomb Gap in Electron Glasses M. Mu¨ller and L. B. Ioffe Department December 2004) We establish the connection between the presence of a glass phase and the appearance correlations in a systematic way, we show that in the case of strong disorder a continuous glass transition

  13. Manufacturing of Plutonium Tensile Specimens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, Cameron M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Details workflow conducted to manufacture high density alpha Plutonium tensile specimens to support Los Alamos National Laboratory's science campaigns. Introduces topics including the metallurgical challenge of Plutonium and the use of high performance super-computing to drive design. Addresses the utilization of Abaqus finite element analysis, programmable computer numerical controlled (CNC) machining, as well as glove box ergonomics and safety in order to design a process that will yield high quality Plutonium tensile specimens.

  14. Method for automatically evaluating a transition from a batch manufacturing technique to a lean manufacturing technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ivezic, Nenad; Potok, Thomas E.

    2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for automatically evaluating a manufacturing technique comprises the steps of: receiving from a user manufacturing process step parameters characterizing a manufacturing process; accepting from the user a selection for an analysis of a particular lean manufacturing technique; automatically compiling process step data for each process step in the manufacturing process; automatically calculating process metrics from a summation of the compiled process step data for each process step; and, presenting the automatically calculated process metrics to the user. A method for evaluating a transition from a batch manufacturing technique to a lean manufacturing technique can comprise the steps of: collecting manufacturing process step characterization parameters; selecting a lean manufacturing technique for analysis; communicating the selected lean manufacturing technique and the manufacturing process step characterization parameters to an automatic manufacturing technique evaluation engine having a mathematical model for generating manufacturing technique evaluation data; and, using the lean manufacturing technique evaluation data to determine whether to transition from an existing manufacturing technique to the selected lean manufacturing technique.

  15. Heating-induced glass-glass and glass-liquid transformations in computer simulations of water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiu, Janet; Giovambattista, Nicolas [Department of Physics, Brooklyn College of the City University of New York, Brooklyn, New York 11210 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Brooklyn College of the City University of New York, Brooklyn, New York 11210 (United States); Starr, Francis W. [Department of Physics, Wesleyan University, Middletown, Connecticut 06459 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Wesleyan University, Middletown, Connecticut 06459 (United States)

    2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Water exists in at least two families of glassy states, broadly categorized as the low-density (LDA) and high-density amorphous ice (HDA). Remarkably, LDA and HDA can be reversibly interconverted via appropriate thermodynamic paths, such as isothermal compression and isobaric heating, exhibiting first-order-like phase transitions. We perform out-of-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of glassy water using the ST2 model to study the evolution of LDA and HDA upon isobaric heating. Depending on pressure, glass-to-glass, glass-to-crystal, glass-to-vapor, as well as glass-to-liquid transformations are found. Specifically, heating LDA results in the following transformations, with increasing heating pressures: (i) LDA-to-vapor (sublimation), (ii) LDA-to-liquid (glass transition), (iii) LDA-to-HDA-to-liquid, (iv) LDA-to-HDA-to-liquid-to-crystal, and (v) LDA-to-HDA-to-crystal. Similarly, heating HDA results in the following transformations, with decreasing heating pressures: (a) HDA-to-crystal, (b) HDA-to-liquid-to-crystal, (c) HDA-to-liquid (glass transition), (d) HDA-to-LDA-to-liquid, and (e) HDA-to-LDA-to-vapor. A more complex sequence may be possible using lower heating rates. For each of these transformations, we determine the corresponding transformation temperature as function of pressure, and provide a P-T “phase diagram” for glassy water based on isobaric heating. Our results for isobaric heating dovetail with the LDA-HDA transformations reported for ST2 glassy water based on isothermal compression/decompression processes [Chiu et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 184504 (2013)]. The resulting phase diagram is consistent with the liquid-liquid phase transition hypothesis. At the same time, the glass phase diagram is sensitive to sample preparation, such as heating or compression rates. Interestingly, at least for the rates explored, our results suggest that the LDA-to-liquid (HDA-to-liquid) and LDA-to-HDA (HDA-to-LDA) transformation lines on heating are related, both being associated with the limit of kinetic stability of LDA (HDA)

  16. The corrosion behavior of DWPF glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebert, W.L.; Bates, J.K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemical Technology Div.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors analyzed the corroded surfaces of reference glasses developed for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) to characterize their corrosion behavior. The corrosion mechanism of nuclear waste glasses must be known in order to provide source terms describing radionuclide release for performance assessment calculations. Different DWPF reference glasses were corroded under conditions that highlighted various aspects of the corrosion process and led to different extents of corrosion. The glasses corroded by similar mechanisms, and a phenomenological description of their corrosion behavior is presented here. The initial leaching of soluble glass components results in the formation of an amorphous gel layer on the glass surface. The gel layer is a transient phase that transforms into a layer of clay crystallites, which equilibrates with the solution as corrosion continues. The clay layer does not act as a barrier to either water penetration or glass dissolution, which continues beneath it, and may eventually separate from the glass. Solubility limits for glass components may be established by the eventual precipitation of secondary phases; thus, corrosion of the glass becomes controlled by the chemical equilibrium between the solution and the assemblage of secondary phases. In effect, the solution is an intermediate phase through which the glass transforms to an energetically more favorable assemblage of phases. Implications regarding the prediction of long-term glass corrosion behavior are discussed.

  17. High-Temperature Viscosity of Commercial Glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrma, Pavel R.

    2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Arrhenius models were developed for glass viscosity within the processing temperature of six types of commercial glasses: low-expansion-borosilicate glasses, E glasses, fiberglass wool glasses, TV panel glasses, container glasses, and float glasses. Both local models (for each of the six glass types) and a global model (for the composition region of commercial glasses, i.e., the six glass types taken together) are presented. The models are based on viscosity data previously obtained with rotating spindle viscometers within the temperature range between 900 C and 1550 C; the viscosity varied from 1 Pa?s to 750 Pa?s. First-order models were applied to relate Arrhenius coefficients to the mass fractions of 15 components: SiO2, TiO2, ZrO2, Al2O3, Fe2O3, B2O3, MgO, CaO, SrO, BaO, PbO, ZnO, Li2O, Na2O, K2O. The R2 is 0.98 for the global model and ranges from .097 to 0.99 for the six local models. The models are recommended for glasses containing 42 to 84 mass% SiO2 to estimate viscosities or temperatures at a constant viscosity for melts within both the temperature range from 1100 C to 1550 C and viscosity range from 5 to 400 Pa?s.

  18. DURABLE GLASS FOR THOUSANDS OF YEARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jantzen, C.

    2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The durability of natural glasses on geological time scales and ancient glasses for thousands of years is well documented. The necessity to predict the durability of high level nuclear waste (HLW) glasses on extended time scales has led to various thermodynamic and kinetic approaches. Advances in the measurement of medium range order (MRO) in glasses has led to the understanding that the molecular structure of a glass, and thus the glass composition, controls the glass durability by establishing the distribution of ion exchange sites, hydrolysis sites, and the access of water to those sites. During the early stages of glass dissolution, a 'gel' layer resembling a membrane forms through which ions exchange between the glass and the leachant. The hydrated gel layer exhibits acid/base properties which are manifested as the pH dependence of the thickness and nature of the gel layer. The gel layer ages into clay or zeolite minerals by Ostwald ripening. Zeolite mineral assemblages (higher pH and Al{sup 3+} rich glasses) may cause the dissolution rate to increase which is undesirable for long-term performance of glass in the environment. Thermodynamic and structural approaches to the prediction of glass durability are compared versus Ostwald ripening.

  19. Flattening Scientific CCD Imaging Data with a Dome Flat Field System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. L. Marshall; D. L. DePoy

    2005-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the flattening of scientific CCD imaging data using a dome flat field system. The system uses light emitting diodes (LEDs) to illuminate a carefully constructed dome flat field screen. LEDs have several advantages over more traditional illumination sources: they are available in a wide range of output wavelengths, are inexpensive, have a very long source lifetime, and are straightforward to control digitally. The circular dome screen is made of a material with Lambertian scattering properties that efficiently reflects light of a wide range of wavelengths and incident angles. We compare flat fields obtained using this new system with two types of traditionally-constructed flat fields: twilight sky flats and nighttime sky flats. Using photometric standard stars as illumination sources, we test the quality of each flat field by applying it to a set of standard star observations. We find that the dome flat field system produces flat fields that are superior to twilight or nighttime sky flats, particularly for photometric calibration. We note that a ratio of the twilight sky flat to the nighttime sky flat is flat to within the expected uncertainty; but since both of these flat fields are inferior to the dome flat, this common test is not an appropriate metric for testing a flat field. Rather, the only feasible and correct method for determining the appropriateness of a flat field is to use standard stars to measure the reproducibility of known magnitudes across the detector.

  20. Metrology Challenges for High Energy Density Science Target Manufacture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seugling, R M; Bono, M J; Davis, P

    2009-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, High Energy Density Science (HEDS) experiments are used to support and qualify predictive physics models. These models assume ideal conditions such as energy (input) and device (target) geometry. The experiments rely on precision targets constructed from components with dimensions in the millimeter range, while having micrometer-scale, functional features, including planar steps, sine waves, and step-joint geometry on hemispherical targets. Future target designs will likely have features and forms that rival or surpass current manufacturing and characterization capability. The dimensional metrology of these features is important for a number of reasons, including qualification of sub-components prior to assembly, quantification of critical features on the as-built assemblies and as a feedback mechanism for fabrication process development. Variations in geometry from part to part can lead to functional limitations, such as unpredictable instabilities during an experiment and the inability to assemble a target from poorly matched sub-components. Adding to the complexity are the large number and variety of materials, components, and shapes that render any single metrology technique difficult to use with low uncertainty. Common materials include metal and glass foams, doped transparent and opaque plastics and a variety of deposited and wrought metals. A suite of metrology tools and techniques developed to address the many critical issues relevant to the manufacture of HEDS targets including interferometry, x-ray radiography and contact metrology are presented including two sided interferometry for absolute thickness metrology and low force probe technology for micrometer feature coordinate metrology.

  1. Manufacturing

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    674 Academy Press. Washington, DC. 675 Pre. 2014. SimaPro Database Manual - Methods Library (2.7). Available at: www.pre- 676 sustainability.comdownload...

  2. Manufacturing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetterEconomyDr.Energy UniversityOversightFlow of Materials

  3. Research on advanced photovoltaic manufacturing technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jester, T.; Eberspacher, C. (Siemens Solar Industries, Camarillo, CA (United States))

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report outlines opportunities for significantly advancing the scale and economy of high-volume manufacturing of high-efficiency photovoltaic (PV) modules. We propose to pursue a concurrent effort to advance existing crystalline silicon module manufacturing technology and to implement thin film CuInSe{sub 2} (CIS) module manufacturing. This combination of commercial-scale manufacturing of high-efficiency crystalline silicon modules and of pilot-scale manufacturing of low-cost thin film CIS technology will support continued, rapid growth of the US PV industry.

  4. Clean Energy Manufacturing Innovation Institute for Composites...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    composites. The Institute will target continuous or discontinuous, primarily carbon and glass fiber systems, with thermoset or thermoplastic resin materials. These types of...

  5. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Chemical Manufacturing...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    chemicals, forest products (such as paper and wood products), glass, metal casting, petroleum and coal products, and steel. As soon as the current briefs are available, we...

  6. Unclassified Source Term and Radionuclide Data for Corrective Action Unit 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter Martian

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the evaluation of the information and data available on the unclassified source term and radionuclide contamination for CAU 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine. The total residual inventory of radionuclides associated with one or more tests is known as the radiologic source term (RST). The RST is comprised of radionuclides in water, glass, or other phases or mineralogic forms. The hydrologic source term (HST) of an underground nuclear test is the portion of the total RST that is released into the groundwater over time following the test. In this report, the HST represents radionuclide release some time after the explosion and does not include the rapidly evolving mechanical, thermal, and chemical processes during the explosion. The CAU 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine has many more detonations and a wider variety of settings to consider compared to other CAUs. For instance, the source term analysis and evaluation performed for CAUs 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa and CAU 98: Frenchman Flat did not consider vadose zone attenuation because many detonations were located near or below the water table. However, the large number of Yucca Flat/Climax Mine tests and the location of many tests above the water table warrant a more robust analysis of the unsaturated zone.

  7. Manufacturing Demonstration Facility Technology Collaborations for US Manufacturers in Advanced

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9Novemberutilities and aHistoricMannManufacturing

  8. Disclination-mediated thermo-optical response in nematic glass sheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carl D. Modes; Kaushik Bhattacharya; Mark Warner

    2010-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Nematic solids respond strongly to changes in ambient heat or light, significantly differently parallel and perpendicular to the director. This phenomenon is well characterized for uniform director fields, but not for defect textures. We analyze the elastic ground states of a nematic glass in the membrane approximation as a function of temperature for some disclination defects with an eye towards reversibly inducing three-dimensional shapes from flat sheets of material, at the nano-scale all the way to macroscopic objects, including non-developable surfaces. The latter offers a new paradigm to actuation via switchable stretch in thin systems.

  9. Manufacturability Study and Scale-Up for Large Format Lithium...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    integrators - Original equipment manufacturers * Development of processes, process optimization, manufacturing schemes, materials improvements, diagnostics, and production yield...

  10. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint Definitions and Assumptions...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    More Documents & Publications Understanding Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints, October 2012 2010 Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints: Definitions...

  11. Recirculation bubbler for glass melter apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guerrero, Hector (Evans, GA); Bickford, Dennis (Folly Beach, SC)

    2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas bubbler device provides enhanced recirculation of molten glass within a glass melter apparatus. The bubbler device includes a tube member disposed within a pool of molten glass contained in the melter. The tube member includes a lower opening through which the molten glass enters and upper slots disposed close to (above or below) the upper surface of the pool of molten glass and from which the glass exits. A gas (air) line is disposed within the tube member and extends longitudinally thereof. A gas bubble distribution device, which is located adjacent to the lower end of the tube member and is connected to the lower end of the gas line, releases gas through openings therein so as to produce gas bubbles of a desired size in the molten glass and in a distributed pattern across the tube member.

  12. FROM FLAT DIRECT MODELS TO SEGMENTAL CRF MODELS Geoffrey Zweig and Patrick Nguyen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, Galen

    the SCRF is better suited. Index Terms-- Flat Direct Model, Segmental CRF, Voice Search, Speech Recognition

  13. Ohio Advanced Energy Manufacturing Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimberly Gibson; Mark Norfolk

    2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The program goal of the Ohio Advanced Energy Manufacturing Center (OAEMC) is to support advanced energy manufacturing and to create responsive manufacturing clusters that will support the production of advanced energy and energy-efficient products to help ensure the nation's energy and environmental security. This goal cuts across a number of existing industry segments critical to the nation's future. Many of the advanced energy businesses are starting to make the transition from technology development to commercial production. Historically, this transition from laboratory prototypes through initial production for early adopters to full production for mass markets has taken several years. Developing and implementing manufacturing technology to enable production at a price point the market will accept is a key step. Since these start-up operations are configured to advance the technology readiness of the core energy technology, they have neither the expertise nor the resources to address manufacturing readiness issues they encounter as the technology advances toward market entry. Given the economic realities of today's business environment, finding ways to accelerate this transition can make the difference between success and failure for a new product or business. The advanced energy industry touches a wide range of industry segments that are not accustomed to working together in complex supply chains to serve large markets such as automotive and construction. During its first three years, the Center has catalyzed the communication between companies and industry groups that serve the wide range of advanced energy markets. The Center has also found areas of common concern, and worked to help companies address these concerns on a segment or industry basis rather than having each company work to solve common problems individually. EWI worked with three industries through public-private partnerships to sew together disparate segments helping to promote overall industry health. To aid the overall advanced energy industry, EWI developed and launched an Ohio chapter of the non-profit Advanced Energy Economy. In this venture, Ohio joins with six other states including Colorado, Connecticut, Illinois, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Vermont to help promote technologies that deliver energy that is affordable, abundant and secure. In a more specific arena, EWI's advanced energy group collaborated with the EWI-run Nuclear Fabrication Consortium to promote the nuclear supply chain. Through this project EWI has helped bring the supply chain up to date for the upcoming period of construction, and assisted them in understanding the demands for the next generation of facilities now being designed. In a more targeted manner, EWI worked with 115 individual advanced energy companies that are attempting to bring new technology to market. First, these interactions helped EWI develop an awareness of issues common to companies in different advanced energy sectors. By identifying and addressing common issues, EWI helps companies bring technology to market sooner and at a lower cost. These visits also helped EWI develop a picture of industry capability. This helped EWI provide companies with contacts that can supply commercial solutions to their new product development challenges. By providing assistance in developing supply chain partnerships, EWI helped companies bring their technology to market faster and at a lower cost than they might have been able to do by themselves. Finally, at the most granular level EWI performed dedicated research and development on new manufacturing processes for advanced energy. During discussions with companies participating in advanced energy markets, several technology issues that cut across market segments were identified. To address some of these issues, three crosscutting technology development projects were initiated and completed with Center support. This included reversible welds for batteries and high temperature heat exchangers. It also included a novel advanced weld trainer that EWI

  14. Manufacturing method of photonic crystal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Park, In Sung; Lee, Tae Ho; Ahn, Jin Ho; Biswas, Rana; Constant, Kristen P.; Ho, Kai-Ming; Lee, Jae-Hwang

    2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A manufacturing method of a photonic crystal is provided. In the method, a high-refractive-index material is conformally deposited on an exposed portion of a periodic template composed of a low-refractive-index material by an atomic layer deposition process so that a difference in refractive indices or dielectric constants between the template and adjacent air becomes greater, which makes it possible to form a three-dimensional photonic crystal having a superior photonic bandgap. Herein, the three-dimensional structure may be prepared by a layer-by-layer method.

  15. Method for manufacturing magnetohydrodynamic electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Killpatrick, D.H.; Thresh, H.R.

    1980-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of manufacturing electrodes for use in a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator is described comprising the steps of preparing a billet having a core of a first metal, a tubular sleeve of a second metal, and an outer sheath of an extrusile metal; evacuating the space between the parts of the assembled billet; extruding the billet; and removing the outer jacket. The extruded bar may be made into electrodes by cutting and bending to the shape required for an MHD channel frame. The method forms a bond between the first metal of the core and the second metal of the sleeve strong enough to withstand a hot and corrosive environment.

  16. Process for manufacturing tantalum capacitors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Holcombe, Cressie E. (Knoxville, TN); Dykes, Norman L. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for manufacturing tantalum capacitors in which microwave energy is used to sinter a tantalum powder compact in order to achieve higher surface area and improved dielectric strength. The process comprises cold pressing tantalum powder with organic binders and lubricants to form a porous compact. After removal of the organics, the tantalum compact is heated to 1300.degree. to 2000.degree. C. by applying microwave radiation. Said compact is then anodized to form a dielectric oxide layer and infiltrated with a conductive material such as MnO.sub.2. Wire leads are then attached to form a capacitor to said capacitor is hermetically packaged to form the finished product.

  17. Process for manufacturing tantalum capacitors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, R.J.; Holcombe, C.E.; Dykes, N.L.

    1993-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for manufacturing tantalum capacitors in which microwave energy is used to sinter a tantalum powder compact in order to achieve higher surface area and improved dielectric strength. The process comprises cold pressing tantalum powder with organic binders and lubricants to form a porous compact. After removal of the organics, the tantalum compact is heated to 1,300 to 2,000 C by applying microwave radiation. Said compact is then anodized to form a dielectric oxide layer and infiltrated with a conductive material such as MnO[sub 2]. Wire leads are then attached to form a capacitor to said capacitor is hermetically packaged to form the finished product.

  18. Sandia Energy - Manufacturing Supply Chain

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand RequirementsCoatingsUltra-High-VoltagePowerUpdates Techno-EconomicLaunchManufacturing

  19. Manufacturing Innovation in the DOE

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOil & Gas »ofMarketingSmartManufacturing Innovation in the DOE

  20. Manufacturing R&D

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311, 3312), October 2012 (MECS 2006)R&D The Manufacturing

  1. NanoSIMS Imaging Alternation Layers of a Leached SON68 Glass Via A FIB-made Wedged Crater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yi-Chung; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Neeway, James J.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Evans, James E.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Zhu, Zihua; Wei, Wei

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, nuclear wastes are commonly immobilized into glasses because of their long-term durability. Exposure to water for long periods of time, however, will eventually corrode the waste form and is the leading potential avenue for radionuclide release into the environment. Because such slow processes cannot be experimentally tested, the prediction of release requires a thorough understanding the mechanisms governing glass corrosion. In addition, due to the exceptional durability of glass, much of the testing must be performed on high-surface-area powders. A technique that can provide accurate compositional profiles with very precise depth resolution for non-flat samples would be a major benefit to the field. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) depth profiling is an excellent tool that has long been used to examine corrosion layers of glass. The roughness of the buried corrosion layers, however, causes the corresponding SIMS depth profiles to exhibit erroneously wide interfaces. In this study, NanoSIMS was used to image the cross-section of the corrosion layers of a leached SON68 glass sample. A wedged crater was prepared by a focused ion beam (FIB) instrument to obtain a 5× improvement in depth resolution for NanoSIMS measurements. This increase in resolution allowed us to confirm that the breakdown of the silica glass network is further from the pristine glass than a second dissolution front for boron, another glass former. The existence of these two distinct interfaces, separated by only ~20 nm distance in depth, was not apparent by traditional ToF-SIMS depth profiling but has been confirmed also by atom probe tomography. This novel sample geometry will be a major benefit to efficient NanoSIMS sampling of irregular interfaces at the nanometer scale that would otherwise be obscured within ToF-SIMS depth profiles.

  2. Projective flatness in the quantisation of bosons and fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siye Wu

    2010-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We compare the quantisation of linear systems of bosons and fermions. We recall the appearance of projectively flat connection and results on parallel transport in the quantisation of bosons. We then discuss pre-quantisation and quantisation of fermions using the calculus of fermionic variables. We then define a natural connection on the bundle of Hilbert spaces and show that it is projectively flat. This identifies, up to a phase, equivalent spinor representations constructed by various polarisations. We introduce the concept of metaplectic correction for fermions and show that the bundle of corrected Hilbert spaces is naturally flat. We then show that the parallel transport in the bundle of Hilbert spaces along a geodesic is the rescaled projection or the Bogoliubov transformation provided that the geodesic lies within the complement of a cut locus. Finally, we study the bundle of Hilbert spaces when there is a symmetry.

  3. Lid heater for glass melter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, T.D.

    1993-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A glass melter having a lid electrode for heating the glass melt radiantly. The electrode comprises a series of INCONEL 690 tubes running above the melt across the melter interior and through the melter walls and having nickel cores inside the tubes beginning where the tubes leave the melter interior and nickel connectors to connect the tubes electrically in series. An applied voltage causes the tubes to generate heat of electrical resistance for melting frit injected onto the melt. The cores limit heat generated as the current passes through the walls of the melter. Nickel bus connection to the electrical power supply minimizes heat transfer away from the melter that would occur if standard copper or water-cooled copper connections were used between the supply and the INCONEL 690 heating tubes. 3 figures.

  4. Lid heater for glass melter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Terrance D. (617 Chestnut Ct., Aiken, SC 29803)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A glass melter having a lid electrode for heating the glass melt radiantly. The electrode comprises a series of INCONEL 690 tubes running above the melt across the melter interior and through the melter walls and having nickel cores inside the tubes beginning where the tubes leave the melter interior and nickel connectors to connect the tubes electrically in series. An applied voltage causes the tubes to generate heat of electrical resistance for melting frit injected onto the melt. The cores limit heat generated as the current passes through the walls of the melter. Nickel bus connection to the electrical power supply minimizes heat transfer away from the melter that would occur if standard copper or water-cooled copper connections were used between the supply and the INCONEL 690 heating tubes.

  5. Glass Transition, Cooperativity and Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salez, Thomas; Dalnoki-Veress, Kari; Raphaël, Elie; Forrest, James A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a minimal theory of glass formation based on the physical ideas of molecular crowding and resultant cooperative motion, and address the effects of free interfaces on dynamics. First, we obtain a simple scaling expression for the diverging number of particles taking part in bulk cooperative relaxation as the system approaches kinetic arrest, and in doing so provide a robust derivation of the Adam and Gibbs description of cooperative dynamics. Then, by including thermal expansivity of the material, the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann relation is derived. Moreover, we predict a temperature-dependent expression for the cooperative length $\\xi$ of bulk relaxation, and explore the influence of sample boundaries on the glassy dynamics when the system size becomes comparable to $\\xi$. The theory is in full agreement with measurements of the glass transition temperature of thin polystyrene films. This agreement comes with two adjustable parameters, the critical interparticle distance and the Vogel temperature. Alth...

  6. Color Glass Condensate and Glasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Gelis

    2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the Color Glass Condensate effective theory, that describes the gluon content of a high energy hadron or nucleus, in the saturation regime. The emphasis is put on applications to high energy heavy ion collisions. After describing initial state factorization, we discuss the Glasma phase, that precedes the formation of an equilibrated quark-gluon plasma. We end this review with a presentation of recent developments in the study of the isotropization and thermalization of the quark-gluon plasma.

  7. Melter Glass Removal and Dismantlement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richardson, BS

    2000-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been using vitrification processes to convert high-level radioactive waste forms into a stable glass for disposal in waste repositories. Vitrification facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) are converting liquid high-level waste (HLW) by combining it with a glass-forming media to form a borosilicate glass, which will ensure safe long-term storage. Large, slurry fed melters, which are used for this process, were anticipated to have a finite life (on the order of two to three years) at which time they would have to be replaced using remote methods because of the high radiation fields. In actuality the melters useable life spans have, to date, exceeded original life-span estimates. Initial plans called for the removal of failed melters by placing the melter assembly into a container and storing the assembly in a concrete vault on the vitrification plant site pending size-reduction, segregation, containerization, and shipment to appropriate storage facilities. Separate facilities for the processing of the failed melters currently do not exist. Options for handling these melters include (1) locating a facility to conduct the size-reduction, characterization, and containerization as originally planned; (2) long-term storing or disposing of the complete melter assembly; and (3) attempting to refurbish the melter and to reuse the melter assembly. The focus of this report is to look at methods and issues pertinent to size-reduction and/or melter refurbishment in particular, removing the glass as a part of a refurbishment or to reduce contamination levels (thus allowing for disposal of a greater proportion of the melter as low level waste).

  8. Method for heating, forming and tempering a glass sheet

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boaz, Premakaran Tucker (Livonia, MI); Sitzman, Gary W. (Walled Lake, MI)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for heating, forming and tempering a glass sheet including the steps of heating at least one glass sheet to at least a first predetermined temperature, applying microwave energy to the glass sheet to heat the glass sheet to at least a second predetermined temperature, forming the glass sheet to a predetermined configuration, and cooling an outer surface of the glass sheet to at least a third predetermined temperature to temper the glass sheet.

  9. Method for heating, forming and tempering a glass sheet

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boaz, P.T.; Sitzman, G.W.

    1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for heating, forming and tempering a glass sheet is disclosed including the steps of heating at least one glass sheet to at least a first predetermined temperature, applying microwave energy to the glass sheet to heat the glass sheet to at least a second predetermined temperature, forming the glass sheet to a predetermined configuration, and cooling an outer surface of the glass sheet to at least a third predetermined temperature to temper the glass sheet. 2 figs.

  10. Method for forming silicon on a glass substrate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCarthy, A.M.

    1995-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A method by which single-crystal silicon microelectronics may be fabricated on glass substrates at unconventionally low temperatures. This is achieved by fabricating a thin film of silicon on glass and subsequently forming the doped components by a short wavelength (excimer) laser doping procedure and conventional patterning techniques. This method may include introducing a heavily boron doped etch stop layer on a silicon wafer using an excimer laser, which permits good control of the etch stop layer removal process. This method additionally includes dramatically reducing the remaining surface roughness of the silicon thin films after etching in the fabrication of silicon on insulator wafers by scanning an excimer laser across the surface of the silicon thin film causing surface melting, whereby the surface tension of the melt causes smoothing of the surface during recrystallization. Applications for this method include those requiring a transparent or insulating substrate, such as display manufacturing. Other applications include sensors, actuators, optoelectronics, radiation hard and high temperature electronics. 15 figs.

  11. Superintegrability in a non-conformally-flat space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. G. Kalnins; J. M. Kress; W. Miller Jr

    2012-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Superintegrable systems in two- and three-dimensional spaces of constant curvature have been extensively studied. From these, superintegrable systems in conformally flat spaces can be constructed by Staeckel transform. In this paper a method developed to establish the superintegrability of the Tremblay-Turbiner-Winternitz system in two dimensions is extended to higher dimensions and a superintegrable system on a non-conformally-flat four-dimensional space is found. In doing so, curvature corrections to the corresponding classical potential are found to be necessary. It is found that some subalgebras of the symmetry algebra close polynomially.

  12. A View of Manufacturing Through 3D Glasses | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from machining and casting technologies to materials science, welding, and yes, 3D printing. In the past few years, 3D printing, or additive as we call it in our labs, has...

  13. EA-1645: Sage Electrochromics SageGlass High Volume Manufacturing Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S.ContaminationJuly 2011D APPENDIX D9Construction and OperationTransferin

  14. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Glass (NAICS 3272, 327993), January 2014 (MECS 2010)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment

  15. Unclassified Sources Term and Radionuclide Data for Corrective Action Unit 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter Martian

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the evaluation of the information and data available on the unclassified source term and radionuclide contamination for CAU 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine. The total residual inventory of radionuclides associated with one or more tests is known as the radiologic source term (RST). The RST is comprised of radionuclides in water, glass, or other phases or mineralogic forms. The hydrologic source term (HST) of an underground nuclear test is the portion of the total RST that is released into the groundwater over time following the test. In this report, the HST represents radionuclide release some time after the explosion and does not include the rapidly evolving mechanical, thermal, and chemical processes during the explosion. The CAU 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine has many more detonations and a wider variety of settings to consider compared to other CAUs. For instance, the source term analysis and evaluation performed for CAUs 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa and CAU 98: Frenchman Flat did not consider vadose zone attenuation because many detonations were located near or below the water table. However, the large number of Yucca Flat/Climax Mine tests and the location of many tests above the water table warrant a more robust analysis of the unsaturated zone. The purpose of this report is to develop and document conceptual models of the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine HST for use in implementing source terms for the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine models. This document presents future plans to incorporate the radionuclide attenuation mechanisms due to unsaturated/multiphase flow and transport within the Yucca Flat CAU scale modeling. The important processes that influence radionuclide migration for the unsaturated and saturated tests in alluvial, volcanic, and carbonate settings are identified. Many different flow and transport models developed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), including original modeling of multiphase flow and transport by the Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), are integrated to form a general understanding of how the RST relates to the HST. This report is unlike the Frenchman Flat source term analysis because it does not calculate the HST for each test. Instead, this work only identifies the important processes that must be considered when the CAU-transport modeling is performed.

  16. Status of Fuel Development and Manufacturing for Space Nuclear Reactors at BWX Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carmack, W.J.; Husser, D.L.; Mohr, T.C.; Richardson, W.C. [BWX Technologies, PO Box 785, Lynchburg, VA 24505-0785 (United States)

    2004-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    New advanced nuclear space propulsion systems will soon seek a high temperature, stable fuel form. BWX Technologies Inc (BWXT) has a long history of fuel manufacturing. UO2, UCO, and UCx have been fabricated at BWXT for various US and international programs. Recent efforts at BWXT have focused on establishing the manufacturing techniques and analysis capabilities needed to provide a high quality, high power, compact nuclear reactor for use in space nuclear powered missions. To support the production of a space nuclear reactor, uranium nitride has recently been manufactured by BWXT. In addition, analytical chemistry and analysis techniques have been developed to provide verification and qualification of the uranium nitride production process. The fabrication of a space nuclear reactor will require the ability to place an unclad fuel form into a clad structure for assembly into a reactor core configuration. To this end, BWX Technologies has reestablished its capability for machining, GTA welding, and EB welding of refractory metals. Specifically, BWX Technologies has demonstrated GTA welding of niobium flat plate and EB welding of niobium and Nb-1Zr tubing. In performing these demonstration activities, BWX Technologies has established the necessary infrastructure to manufacture UO2, UCx, or UNx fuel, components, and complete reactor assemblies in support of space nuclear programs.

  17. EVALUATION OF FLAT-PLATE PHOTOVOLTAIC THERMAL HYBRID SYSTEMS FOR SOLAR ENERGY UTILIZATION.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ANDREWS,J.W.

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technical and economic attractiveness of combined photovoltaic/thermal (PV/T) solar energy collectors was evaluated. The study was limited to flat-plate collectors since concentrating photovoltaic collectors require active cooling and thus are inherently PV/T collectors, the only decision being whether to use the thermal energy or to dump it. it was also specified at the outset that reduction in required roof area was not to be used as an argument for combining the collection of thermal and electrical energy into one module. Three tests of economic viability were identified, all of which PV/T must pass if it is to be considered a promising alternative: PV/T must prove to be competitive with photovoltaic-only, thermal-only, and side-by-side photovoltaic-plus-thermal collectors and systems. These three tests were applied to systems using low-temperature (unglazed) collectors and to systems using medium-temperature (glazed) collectors in Los Angeles, New York, and Tampa. For photovoltaics, the 1986 DOE cost goals were assumed to have been realized, and for thermal energy collection two technologies were considered: a current technology based on metal and glass, and a future technology based on thin-film plastics. The study showed that for medium-temperature applications PV/T is not an attractive option in any of the locations studied. For low-temperature applications, PV/T appears to be marginally attractive.

  18. Case studies of the potential effects of carbon taxation on the stone, clay, and glass industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bock, M.J.; Boyd, G.A. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Div.); Rosenbaum, D.I. (Nebraska Univ., Lincoln, NE (United States). Dept. of Economics); Ross, M.H. (Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics)

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This case study focuses on the potential for a carbon tax ($25 and $100 per metric ton of carbon) to reduce energy use and associated carbon dioxide (CO[sub 2]) emissions in three subsectors of the stone, clay, and glass industry: hydraulic cement, glass and glass products, and other products. A conservation supply curve analysis found that (1) opportunities for reducing fossil fuel use in the subsectors are limited (15% reduction under $100 tax) and (2) the relationship between the tax and reduced CO[sub 2] emissions is nonlinear and diminishing. Because cement manufacturing produces a significant amount of CO[sub 2], this subsector was analyzed. A plant-level analysis found more opportunities to mitigate CO[sub 2] emissions; under a $100 tax, fossil fuel use would decrease 52%. (A conservative estimate lies between 15% and 52%). It also confirmed the nonlinear relationship, suggesting significant benefits could result from small taxes (32% reduction under $25 tax). A fuel share analysis found the cement industry could reduce carbon loading 11% under a $100 tax if gas were substituted for coal. Under a $100 tax, cement demand would decrease 17% and its price would increase 32%, a substantial increase for a material commodity. Overall, CO[sub 2] emissions from cement manufacturing would decrease 24--33% under a $100 tax and 10--18% under a $25 tax. Much of the decrease would result from the reduced demand for cement.

  19. Case studies of the potential effects of carbon taxation on the stone, clay, and glass industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bock, M.J.; Boyd, G.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Div.; Rosenbaum, D.I. [Nebraska Univ., Lincoln, NE (United States). Dept. of Economics; Ross, M.H. [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This case study focuses on the potential for a carbon tax ($25 and $100 per metric ton of carbon) to reduce energy use and associated carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions in three subsectors of the stone, clay, and glass industry: hydraulic cement, glass and glass products, and other products. A conservation supply curve analysis found that (1) opportunities for reducing fossil fuel use in the subsectors are limited (15% reduction under $100 tax) and (2) the relationship between the tax and reduced CO{sub 2} emissions is nonlinear and diminishing. Because cement manufacturing produces a significant amount of CO{sub 2}, this subsector was analyzed. A plant-level analysis found more opportunities to mitigate CO{sub 2} emissions; under a $100 tax, fossil fuel use would decrease 52%. (A conservative estimate lies between 15% and 52%). It also confirmed the nonlinear relationship, suggesting significant benefits could result from small taxes (32% reduction under $25 tax). A fuel share analysis found the cement industry could reduce carbon loading 11% under a $100 tax if gas were substituted for coal. Under a $100 tax, cement demand would decrease 17% and its price would increase 32%, a substantial increase for a material commodity. Overall, CO{sub 2} emissions from cement manufacturing would decrease 24--33% under a $100 tax and 10--18% under a $25 tax. Much of the decrease would result from the reduced demand for cement.

  20. Sandia National Laboratories: Advanced Manufacturing Initiative

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Manufacturing Initiative (AMI) is a multiple-year, 3-way collaboration among TPI Composites, Iowa State University, and Sandia National Laboratories. The goal of this...

  1. Welcome and Advanced Manufacturing Partnership (Text Version)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a text version of the Welcome and Advanced Manufacturing Partnership video, originally presented on March 12, 2012 at the MDF Workshop held in Chicago, Illinois.

  2. 2014 Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints: Definitions...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Assumptions A number of key terms are used to interpret the manufacturing energy and carbon footprints. The terms associated with the energy footprint analysis are...

  3. Green Manufacturing Initiative Annual Report 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Doncker, Elise

    Green Manufacturing Initiative Annual Report 2010 Dr. John Patten Dr. David Meade May 3, 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Herman Miller Energy Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

  4. Tank Manufacturing, Testing, Deployment and Field Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum on September 27 - 29, 2010, in Beijing, China. ihfpvnewhouse.pdf More Documents & Publications Fuel Tank Manufacturing, Testing,...

  5. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints Scope

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    involves one or more of the following activities: (1) fractionation; (2) straight distillation of crude oil; and (3) cracking. 325 - Chemical Manufacturing The Chemical...

  6. Solar Manufacturing Incentive Grant (SMIG) Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Created in 1995 and administered jointly by the Virginia Department of Mines, Minerals and Energy, and the Virginia Economic Development Partnership, the Solar Manufacturing Incentive Grant (SMIG)...

  7. President Obama's National Network for Manufacturing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    material, to digital methods that use "additive" technologies. Often referred to as 3D printing, additive manufacturing is a way of making products and components of almost any...

  8. Advanced Battery Manufacturing Facilities and Equipment Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Equipment Program Advanced Battery Manufacturing Facilities and Equipment Program AVTA: 2010 Honda Civic HEV with Experimental Ultra Lead Acid Battery Testing Results...

  9. MANUFACTURING LOGISTICS RESEARCH: TAXONOMY AND DIRECTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, David

    MANUFACTURING LOGISTICS RESEARCH: TAXONOMY AND DIRECTIONS S. DAVID WU Lehigh University, Bethlehem formed in the workshop. To convey this vision we suggest a taxonomy that characterizes research problems

  10. Energy & Manufacturing Workforce Training Topics List - Version...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    View this searchable list of the training programs in the areas of energy andor manufacturing. Information provided in this list includes: the subjects being taught, grantee,...

  11. Manufacturing Ecosystems and Keystone Technologies (Text Version)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a text version of the Manufacturing Ecosystems and Keystone Technologies video, originally presented on March 12, 2012 at the MDF Workshop held in Chicago, Illinois.

  12. American Energy and Manufacturing Competitiveness Summit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The American Energy and Manufacturing Competitiveness Summit will bring together leaders and perspectives from industry, government, academia, national laboratories, labor, and policy organizations...

  13. Low Energy Ion Implantationin Semiconductor Manufacturing | U...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Low Energy Ion Implantation in Semiconductor Manufacturing Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of Nuclear Science...

  14. Natural Fiber Composites: Retting, Preform Manufacture & Molding

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Retting, Preform Manufacture & Molding (Start:06.22.07) PI: Jim Holbery Presenter: Mark Smith Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Wednesday, February 27, 2008 This presentation...

  15. Energy-Related Carbon Emissions in Manufacturing

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy-related carbon emissions in manufacturing analysis and issues related to the energy use, energy efficiency, and carbon emission indicators.

  16. Oak Ridge Centers for Manufacturing Technology ? testimonials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that the program did save jobs and did create opportunities for the American manufac- turing industry to grow and to continue to operate because of the tough manufacturing...

  17. Renewable Energy Manufacturing Tax Credit (South Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    South Carolina offers a ten percent income tax credit to the manufacturers of renewable energy operations* for tax years 2010 through 2015.

  18. Performance, Market and Manufacturing Constraints relevant to...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Constraints relevant to the Industrialization of Thermoelectric Devices Market pricing of thermoelectric raw materials and processing, cost of manufacture of devices and...

  19. Innovative Manufacturing Initiative Recognition Day, Advanced...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Thrust Advanced Manufacturing Office Identify timely, high-impact, foundational clean energy technologies with the potential to transform energy use and accelerate their...

  20. New Sensor Network Technology Increases Manufacturing Efficiency...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Increases Manufacturing Efficiency April 11, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis EERE supported Eaton Corporation in the development and successful deployment of an electric motor...

  1. Advanced Materials and Manufacturing | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and characterization of ceramic materials for energy-related applications Process Development and Scale-up Program Argonne's Materials Synthesis and Manufacturing Research and...

  2. Company Name Tax Credit* Manufacturing Facility's

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    new, distributed, utility-scale hydropower projects, as well as for retrofitting dams and irrigation canals. With more than 2 million in 48C Advanced Energy Manufacturing Tax...

  3. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Automobile Manufacturers...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resources & Links Software Tools DOE BestPractices Software Tools DOE BestPractices offers a range of software tools and databases that help manufacturers assess their plant's...

  4. Establishing Greener Products and Manufacturing Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linke, Barbara; Huang, Yu-Chu; Dornfeld, David

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    KEYWORDS: Life Cycle Assessment, LCA, Green manufacturing,cycle phases, Life Cycle Assessment (LCA). The followingimpact. 2.2 Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) and Related Metrics

  5. Project Profile: Improved Large Aperture Collector Manufacturing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    feasibility demonstrations focused in three main areas: an aggressive manufacturing optimization of the collector sub-structures for lower input material costs & mechanized...

  6. Sandia National Laboratories: Materials & Manufacturing Reliability...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials & Manufacturing Reliability Program Biofouling Studies on Sandia's Marine Hydrokinetic Coatings Initiated at PNNL's Sequim Bay On June 26, 2014, in Energy, Materials...

  7. A Vehicle Manufacturer’s Perspective on Higher-Octane Fuels

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 1C—Fostering Technology Adoption I: Building the Market for Renewables with High Octane Fuels A Vehicle Manufacturer’s Perspective on Higher-Octane Fuels Tom Leone, Technical Expert, Powertrain Evaluation and Analysis, Ford Motor Company

  8. Combining Representations from Manufacturing, Machine Planning, and Manufacturing Resource Planning (MRP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Diane J.

    -time controller. The controller uses four matrices: Fv and Sv describe ordering constraints between plan by allowing limited production capacity Inputs to Control System Researchers studying issues in intelligentCombining Representations from Manufacturing, Machine Planning, and Manufacturing Resource Planning

  9. ITP Glass: Industrial Glass Bandwidth Analysis Final Report, August 2007 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking of BlytheDepartment of Energy IRS Issuesof the U.S. Glass

  10. Scaling attractors for quintessence in flat universe with cosmological term

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. V. Kiselev

    2007-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    For evolution of flat universe, we classify late time and future attractors with scaling behavior of scalar field quintessence in the case of potential, which, at definite values of its parameters and initial data, corresponds to exact scaling in the presence of cosmological constant.

  11. Distributed Roughness Receptivity in a Flat Plate Boundary Layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuester, Matthew Scott

    2014-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    for the three different unit Reynolds num- ber test conditions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 3.4 Spanwise uniformity of boundary layer integral quantities at x = 870 mm for low unit Reynolds number test condition... with the distributed roughness configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 3.5 Differential pressure across the flat plate leading edge. . . . . . . . . . 25 3.6 Roughness patch (k = 1 mm), before windowing . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 3...

  12. Film cooling on a flat plate: investigating density

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grizzle, Joshua Peter Fletcher

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This study is an investigation of two specific effects on turbine blade film cooling. The effect of coolant to mainstream density ratio and upstream steps was studied. The studies were conducted on two flat plates with 4mm cylindrical film cooling...

  13. Avoidance of a Landau pole by flat contributions in QED

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klaczynski, Lutz, E-mail: lutz.klaczynski@gmx.de [Department of Physics, Humboldt University Berlin, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Kreimer, Dirk, E-mail: kreimer@mathematik.hu-berlin.de [Alexander von Humboldt Chair in Mathematical Physics, Humboldt University, Berlin 12489 (Germany)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider massless Quantum Electrodynamics in the momentum scheme and carry forward an approach based on Dyson–Schwinger equations to approximate both the ?-function and the renormalized photon self-energy (Yeats, 2011). Starting from the Callan–Symanzik equation, we derive a renormalization group (RG) recursion identity which implies a non-linear ODE for the anomalous dimension and extract a sufficient but not necessary criterion for the existence of a Landau pole. This criterion implies a necessary condition for QED to have no such pole. Solving the differential equation exactly for a toy model case, we integrate the corresponding RG equation for the running coupling and find that even though the ?-function entails a Landau pole it exhibits a flat contribution capable of decreasing its growth, in other cases possibly to the extent that such a pole is avoided altogether. Finally, by applying the recursion identity, we compute the photon propagator and investigate the effect of flat contributions on both spacelike and timelike photons. -- Highlights: •We present an approach to approximate both the ?-function and the photon self-energy. •We find a sufficient criterion for the self-energy to entail the existence of a Landau pole. •We study non-perturbative ‘flat’ contributions that emerge within the context of our approach. •We discuss a toy model and how it is affected by flat contributions.

  14. Flatness of heavy chain systems Nicolas Petit 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .e. trolleys carrying a fixed length heavy chain that may carry a load, is addressed in the partial derivatives the homogeneous chain carrying a load, see equation (13). In [11] the flatness [3, 4] of heavy chain systems, i dimensional case. Under small angle approximations, these heavy chain systems are described by a 1D partial

  15. Flatness-based control of an irrigation canal using SCADA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -time irrigation operations using a supervision, control, and data acquisition (SCADA) system with automatic centralized controller. Irrigation canals can be viewed and modeled as delay systems since it takes timeFlatness-based control of an irrigation canal using SCADA Tarek Rabbani, Simon Munier, David

  16. Glass Property Data and Models for Estimating High-Level Waste Glass Volume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vienna, John D.; Fluegel, Alexander; Kim, Dong-Sang; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2009-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes recent efforts to develop glass property models that can be used to help estimate the volume of high-level waste (HLW) glass that will result from vitrification of Hanford tank waste. The compositions of acceptable and processable HLW glasses need to be optimized to minimize the waste-form volume and, hence, to save cost. A database of properties and associated compositions for simulated waste glasses was collected for developing property-composition models. This database, although not comprehensive, represents a large fraction of data on waste-glass compositions and properties that were available at the time of this report. Glass property-composition models were fit to subsets of the database for several key glass properties. These models apply to a significantly broader composition space than those previously publised. These models should be considered for interim use in calculating properties of Hanford waste glasses.

  17. Process for preparing improved silvered glass mirrors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buckwalter, C.Q. Jr.

    1980-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Glass mirrors having improved weathering properties are prepared by an improvement in the process for making the mirrors. The glass surface after it has been cleaned but before it is silvered, is contacted with a solution of lanthanide rare earths in addition to a sensitization solution of tin or palladium. The addition of the rare earths produces a mirror which has increased resistance to delamination of the silver from the glass surface in the presence of water.

  18. Wind Turbine Manufacturing Process Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waseem Faidi; Chris Nafis; Shatil Sinha; Chandra Yerramalli; Anthony Waas; Suresh Advani; John Gangloff; Pavel Simacek

    2012-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    To develop a practical inline inspection that could be used in combination with automated composite material placement equipment to economically manufacture high performance and reliable carbon composite wind turbine blade spar caps. The approach technical feasibility and cost benefit will be assessed to provide a solid basis for further development and implementation in the wind turbine industry. The program is focused on the following technology development: (1) Develop in-line monitoring methods, using optical metrology and ultrasound inspection, and perform a demonstration in the lab. This includes development of the approach and performing appropriate demonstration in the lab; (2) Develop methods to predict composite strength reduction due to defects; and (3) Develop process models to predict defects from leading indicators found in the uncured composites.

  19. Manufactured caverns in carbonate rock

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bruce, David A.; Falta, Ronald W.; Castle, James W.; Murdoch, Lawrence C.

    2007-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a process for manufacturing underground caverns suitable in one embodiment for storage of large volumes of gaseous or liquid materials. The method is an acid dissolution process that can be utilized to form caverns in carbonate rock formations. The caverns can be used to store large quantities of materials near transportation facilities or destination markets. The caverns can be used for storage of materials including fossil fuels, such as natural gas, refined products formed from fossil fuels, or waste materials, such as hazardous waste materials. The caverns can also be utilized for applications involving human access such as recreation or research. The method can also be utilized to form calcium chloride as a by-product of the cavern formation process.

  20. 68 Glass Technology Vol. 45 No. 2 April 2004 Proc. VII Symp. on Crystallisation in Glasses and Liquids, Sheffield, 69 July 2003 Proc. VII Symp. on Crystallisation in Glasses and Liquids, Sheffield, 69 July 2003 Glass Technol., 2004, 45, 6870

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheffield, University of

    68 Glass Technology Vol. 45 No. 2 April 2004 Proc. VII Symp. on Crystallisation in Glasses and Liquids, Sheffield, 6­9 July 2003 Proc. VII Symp. on Crystallisation in Glasses and Liquids, Sheffield, 6­9 July 2003 Glass Technol., 2004, 45, 68­70 The behaviour of a simulant Magnox waste glass

  1. Radiation Characteristics of Glass Containing Gas Bubbles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilon, Laurent; Viskanta, Raymond

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    B. L. Drolen, “Thermal radiation in particulate media withRadiation Characteristics of Glass Containing Gas Bubblesthermophysical properties and radiation characteristics of

  2. Compliant Glass Seals for SOFC Stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, Y. S.; Choi, Jung-Pyung; Xu, Wei; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Koeppel, Brian J.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Lara-Curzio, Edgar

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes results from experimental and modeling studies performed by participants in the Solid-State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Core Technology Program, which indicate that compliant glass-based seals offer a number of potential advantages over conventional seals based on de-vitrifying glasses, including reduced stresses during stack operation and thermal cycling, and the ability to heal micro-damage induced during thermal cycling. The properties and composition of glasses developed and/or investigated in these studies are reported, along with results from long-term (up to 5,800h) evaluations of seals based on a compliant glass containing ceramic particles or ceramic fibers.

  3. High-Temperature Viscosity Of Commercial Glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrma, Pavel R.; See, Clem A.; Lam, Oanh P.; Minister, Kevin B.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Viscosity was measured for six types of commercial glasses: low-expansion-borosilicate glasses, E glasses, fiberglass wool glasses, TV panel glasses, container glasses, and float glasses. Viscosity data were obtained with rotating spindle viscometers within the temperature range between 900°C and 1550°C; the viscosity varied from 1 Pa?s to 750 Pa?s. Arrhenius coefficients were calculated for individual glasses and linear models were applied to relate them to the mass fractions of 11 major components (SiO2, CaO, Na2O, Al2O3, B2O3, BaO, SrO, K2O, MgO, PbO, and ZrO2) and 12 minor components (Fe2O3, ZnO, Li2O, TiO2, CeO2, F, Sb2O3, Cr2O3, As2O3, MnO2, SO3, and Co3O4). The models are recommended for glasses containing 42 to 84 mass% SiO2 to estimate viscosities or temperatures at a constant viscosity for melts within both the temperature range from 1100°C to 1550°C and viscosity range from 10 to 400 Pa?s.

  4. Waste Glass Corrosion: Some Open Questions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrma, Pavel R.; Vienna, John D.; Yeager, John D.

    2003-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An equation for time evolution of glass corrosion in a closed system is proposed. Examples of fitting this equation to vapor-hydration test (VHT) and product consistency test data are shown. It is argued that the stage of accelerated corrosion of waste glass is a temporary spike caused by a transition to a different mechanism (not associated solely with high-alumina content in glass) and followed by slower steady corrosion. The effect of temperature and glass composition on the VHT rate of corrosion is evaluated. Results of different corrosion tests are compared. Progress towards a frame-indifferent rate equation is outlined.

  5. Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Working at ALS Beamline 8.3.2, researchers from Berkeley Lab and the Imperial College London have created bioactive glass scaffolds that mirror nature's efficient materials. The...

  6. MANUFACTURING COMPLEXITY EVALUATION AT THE DESIGN STAGE FOR BOTH MACHINING AND LAYERED MANUFACTURING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and an additive process. Manufacturability indexes are calculated at the tool design stage, these indexes provide an accurate view of which areas of the tool will advantageously be machined or manufactured by an additiveMANUFACTURING COMPLEXITY EVALUATION AT THE DESIGN STAGE FOR BOTH MACHINING AND LAYERED

  7. Next Generation Print-based Manufacturing for Photovoltaics and Solid State Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sue A. Carter

    2012-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    For the grand challenge of reducing our energy and carbon footprint, the development of renewable energy and energy efficient technologies offer a potential solution. Energy technologies can reduce our dependence on foreign oil as well as the energy consumed by the petroleum industry, the leading consumer of energy by a U.S. industry sector. Nonetheless, the manufacturing processes utilized to manufacture equipment for alternative energy technologies often involve energy-intensive processes. This undermines some of the advantages to moving to 'green' technologies in the first place. Our answer to the Industrial Technology Program's (ITP) Grand Challenge FOA was to develop a transformational low cost manufacturing process for plastic-based photovoltaics that will lower by over 50% both energy consumption and greenhouse emissions and offer a return-of-investment of over 20%. We demonstrated a Luminescent Solar Concentrator fabricated on a plastic acrylic substrate (i.e. no glass) that increases the power output of the PV cell by 2.2x with a 2% power efficiency as well as an LSC with a 7% power efficiency that increased the power output from the PV cells by 35%. S large area 20-inch x 60-inch building-integrated photovoltaic window was fabricated using contract manufacturing with a 4% power efficiency which improved the power output of the PV cell by over 50%. In addition, accelerated lifetimes of the luminescent material demonstrate lifetimes of 20-years.

  8. Draining our Glass: An Energy and Heat Characterization of Google Glass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhong, Lin

    Draining our Glass: An Energy and Heat Characterization of Google Glass Robert LiKamWa, Zhen Wang, such as hands-free video chat and web search. However, its shape also hampers its potential: (1) battery size characterizing the Glass system. Others have documented technical specifica- tions [22], privacy, security

  9. Introduction and Motivation Structural Model for Laminated Glass Beams Conclusions and Outlook of Laminated Glass Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Components of Crystalline Solar Modules back sheet or glass encapsulant electrical conductor crystalline solar cells encapsulant front glass Reference: Schulze, S.-H.; Pander, M.; Naumenko, K.; Altenbach, H and Motivation Components of Thin Film Solar Modules back sheet or glass encapsulant electrical conductor thin

  10. Asymptotically flat gravitating spinor field solutions. Step 2 - the compatibility of Dirac equations in a curve and a flat spaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Dzhunushaliev

    2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the fact that a spin connection is defined to an accuracy of a vector it is shown that the spin connection should be modified in such a manner that Dirac equation in a curve space would be compatible with Dirac equation in a flat space.

  11. Proceedings: EPRI Manufactured Gas Plants 2003 Forum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The EPRI Manufactured Gas Plants 2003 Forum covered a range of topics related to remediation and management of former manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites, with emphasis on technological advances and current issues associated with site cleanup. In specific, the forum covered MGP coal-tar delineation, soil and groundwater remediation technologies, improvements in air monitoring, and ecological risk characterization/risk management tools.

  12. Manufacturing Thomas W. Eagar, Guest Editor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eagar, Thomas W.

    Materials Manufacturing Thomas W. Eagar, Guest Editor The bt·h.n-ior of succl'ssful manufac- tunn;imos., t·m·ironment for mate- nab manufacturing changes, so too does our ml·a~un· ol matt·rials performance~·(·vt·r. as shown by Figure 1, there are sen·ral additional dimensions to perfor- mann·. In particular, successful

  13. Evaluating Energy Efficiency Improvements in Manufacturing Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Evaluating Energy Efficiency Improvements in Manufacturing Processes Katharina Bunse1 , Julia Sachs kbunse@ethz.ch, sachsj@student.ethz.ch, mvodicka@ethz.ch Abstract. Global warming, rising energy prices and increasing awareness of "green" customers have brought energy efficient manufacturing on top of the agenda

  14. Composite Tube Trailer Design/Manufacturing Needs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    composite tube trailers and can, therefore, address issues with: ­ Design ­ Materials ­ Manufacturing in the system ­ Lower cost of carbon fiber ($/strength) ­ Identify material with lower net cost ($/strength) ­ Identify lower cost resin system (raw material & manufacture) ­ Reduce carbon fiber safety factor

  15. Duracold Refrigeration Manufacturing: Order (2013-CE-5342)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Duracold Refrigeration Manufacturing Company, LLC to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Duracold Refrigeration Manufacturing had failed to certify that certain models of walk-in cooler and freezer components comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  16. Characterization of uranium in surface-waters collected at the Rocky Flats Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Efurd, D.W.; Rokop, D.J.; Aguilar, R.D.; Roensch, F.R.; Perrin, R.E.; Banar, J.C.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) is a Department of Energy (DOE) facility where plutonium and uranium components were manufactured for nuclear weapons. During plant operations radioactivity was inadvertently released into the environment. This study was initiated to characterize the uranium present in surface-waters at RFP. Three drainage basins and natural ephemeral streams transverse RFP. The Woman Creek drainage basin traverses and drains the southern portion of the site. The Rock Creek drainage basin drains the northwestern portion of the plant complex. The Walnut Creek drainage basin traverses the western, northern, and northeastern portions of the RFP site. Dams, detention ponds, diversion structures, and ditches have been constructed at RFP to control the release of plant discharges and surface (storm water) runoff. The ponds located downstream of the plant complex on North Walnut Creek are designated A-1 through A-4. Ponds on South Walnut Creek are designated B-1 through B-5. The ponds in the Woman Creek drainage basin are designated C-1 and C-2. Water samples were collected from each pond and the uranium was characterized by TIMS measurement techniques.

  17. Agile manufacturing from a statistical perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Easterling, R.G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). New Initiatives Dept.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of agile manufacturing is to provide the ability to quickly realize high-quality, highly-customized, in-demand products at a cost commensurate with mass production. More broadly, agility in manufacturing, or any other endeavor, is defined as change-proficiency; the ability to thrive in an environment of unpredictable change. This report discusses the general direction of the agile manufacturing initiative, including research programs at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the Department of Energy, and other government agencies, but focuses on agile manufacturing from a statistical perspective. The role of statistics can be important because agile manufacturing requires the collection and communication of process characterization and capability information, much of which will be data-based. The statistical community should initiate collaborative work in this important area.

  18. Radiative Heat Transfer in Enhanced Hydrogen Outgassing of Glass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kitamura, Rei; Pilon, Laurent

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    transport in a machinable glass-ceramic”, Journal of Non-in soda-lime-silicate glasses by reaction with hydrogen”,1971. [16] I. Fanderlik, Glass Science and Technology, Vol.

  19. Chapter 6 Simulations of Amorphous Polyethylene Glass Transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    112 Chapter 6 Simulations of Amorphous Polyethylene Glass Transition 6.1 Introduction Amorphous and characterized. Although various macroscopic properties around and below the glass transition temperature have been extensively investigated experimentally, the phenomena of glass transition and relaxation

  20. Manufacturing fuel-switching capability, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Historically, about one-third of all energy consumed in the United States has been used by manufacturers. About one-quarter of manufacturing energy is used as feedstocks and raw material inputs that are converted into nonenergy products; the remainder is used for its energy content. During 1988, the most recent year for which data are available, manufacturers consumed 15.5 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) of energy to produce heat and power and to generate electricity. The manufacturing sector also has widespread capabilities to switch from one fuel to another for either economic or emergency reasons. There are numerous ways to define fuel switching. For the purposes of the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), fuel switching is defined as the capability to substitute one energy source for another within 30 days with no significant modifications to the fuel-consuming equipment, while keeping production constant. Fuel-switching capability allows manufacturers substantial flexibility in choosing their mix of energy sources. The consumption of a given energy source can be maximized if all possible switching into that energy source takes place. The estimates in this report are based on data collected on the 1988 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), Forms 846 (A through C). The EIA conducts this national sample survey of manufacturing energy consumption on a triennial basis. The MECS is the only comprehensive source of national-level data on energy-related information for the manufacturing industries. The MECS was first conducted in 1986 to collect data for 1985. This report presents information on the fuel-switching capabilities of manufacturers in 1988. This report is the second of a series based on the 1988 MECS. 8 figs., 31 tabs.

  1. SRNL POROUS WALL GLASS MICROSPHERES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wicks, G; Leung Heung, L; Ray Schumacher, R

    2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has developed a new medium for storage of hydrogen and other gases. This involves fabrication of thin, Porous Walled, Hollow Glass Microspheres (PW-HGMs), with diameters generally in the range of 1 to several hundred microns. What is unique about the glass microballons is that porosity has been induced and controlled within the thin, one micron thick walls, on the scale of 10 to several thousand Angstroms. This porosity results in interesting properties including the ability to use these channels to fill the microballons with special absorbents and other materials, thus providing a contained environment even for reactive species. Gases can now enter the microspheres and be retained on the absorbents, resulting in solid-state and contained storage of even reactive species. Also, the porosity can be altered and controlled in various ways, and even used to filter mixed gas streams within a system. SRNL is involved in about a half dozen different programs involving these PW-HGMs and an overview of some of these activities and results emerging are presented.

  2. The quantum Biroli-Mézard model: glass transition and superfluidity in a quantum lattice glass model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laura Foini; Guilhem Semerjian; Francesco Zamponi

    2011-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the quantum version of a lattice model whose classical counterpart captures the physics of structural glasses. We discuss the role of quantum fluctuations in such systems and in particular their interplay with the amorphous order developed in the glass phase. We show that quantum fluctuations might facilitate the formation of the glass at low enough temperature. We also show that the glass transition becomes a first-order transition between a superfluid and an insulating glass at very low temperature, and is therefore accompanied by phase coexistence between superfluid and glassy regions.

  3. Neutron absorbing article and method for manufacture of such article

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hortman, M.T.; Mcmurtry, C.H.; Naum, R.G.; Owens, D.P.

    1980-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron absorbing article, preferably in long, thin, flat form , suitable for but not necessarily limited to use in storage racks for spent nuclear fuel at locations between volumes of such stored fuel, to absorb neutrons from said spent fuel and prevent uncontrolled nuclear reaction of the spent fuel material, is composed of finely divided boron carbide particles and a solid, irreversibly cured phenolic polymer, forming a continuous matrix about the boron carbide particles, in such proportions that at least 6% of b10 from the boron carbide content is present therein. The described articles withstand thermal cycling from repeated spent fuel insertions and removals, withstand radiation from said spent nuclear fuel over long periods of time without losing desirable neutron absorbing and physical properties, are sufficiently chemically inert to water so as to retain neutron absorbing properties if brought into contact with it, are not galvanically corrodible and are sufficiently flexible so as to withstand operational basis earthquake and safe shutdown earthquake seismic events, without loss of neutron absorbing capability and other desirable properties, when installed in storage racks for spent nuclear fuel. The disclosure also relates to a plurality of such neutron absorbing articles in a storage rack for spent nuclear fuel and to a method for the manufacture of the articles.

  4. Method for heating and forming a glass sheet

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boaz, Premakaran Tucker (Livonia, MI)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for heating and forming a glass sheet includes the steps of heating a glass sheet to at least a first predetermined temperature, applying microwave energy to the glass sheet to heat the glass sheet to at least a second predetermined temperature, cooling an outer surface of the glass sheet to at least a third predetermined temperature and forming the glass sheet using forming rollers to a predetermined configuration.

  5. Direct conversion of halogen-containing wastes to borosilicate glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Rudolph, J.C.

    1996-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Glass has become a preferred waste form worldwide for radioactive wastes: however, there are limitations. Halogen-containing wastes can not be converted to glass because halogens form poor-quality waste glasses. Furthermore, halides in glass melters often form second phases that create operating problems. A new waste vitrification process, the Glass Material Oxidation and dissolution System (GMODS), removes these limitations by converting halogen-containing wastes into borosilicate glass and a secondary, clean, sodium-halide stream.

  6. Education for the ManufacturingEducation for the Manufacturing Industries of the FutureIndustries of the Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brock, David

    Growth. Every $1.00 in manufactured goods generates an additional $1.43 worth of additional economic© ATI 2006 Education for the ManufacturingEducation for the Manufacturing Industries of the FutureIndustries of the Future presented to thepresented to the 2006 MIT Manufacturing Summit:2006 MIT Manufacturing Summit

  7. Proceedings of the 1998 NSF Design and Manufacturing Grantees Conferences Manufacturing Logistics Workshop: A Summary of Research Directions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, David

    Proceedings of the 1998 NSF Design and Manufacturing Grantees Conferences Manufacturing Logistics Louis A. Martin-Vega Lehigh University Abstract: A workshop sponsored by NSF on Manufacturing Logistics for Manufacturing Logistics was defined. In this paper, we summarize future research directions in manufacturing

  8. Viscous Glass Sealants for SOFC Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Misture

    2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Two series of silicate glasses that contain gallium as the primary critical component have been identified and optimized for viscous sealing of solid oxide fuel cells operating from 650 to 850°C. Both series of glass sealants crystallize partially upon heat treatment and yield multiphase microstructures that allow viscous flow at temperatures as low as 650°C. A fully amorphous sealant was also developed by isolating, synthesizing and testing a silicate glass of the same composition as the remnant glassy phase in one of the two glass series. Of ~40 glasses tested for longer than 500 hours, a set of 5 glasses has been further tested for up to 1000h in air, wet hydrogen, and against both yttria-stabilized zirconia and aluminized stainless steel. In some cases the testing times reached 2000h. The reactivity testing has provided new insight into the effects of Y, Zr, and Al on bulk and surface crystallization in boro-gallio-silicate glasses, and demonstrated that at least 5 of the newly-developed glasses are viable viscous sealants.

  9. Monitoring and analyzing waste glass compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schumacher, Ray F. (Aiken, SC)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A device and method for determining the viscosity of a fluid, preferably molten glass. The apparatus and method uses the velocity of rising bubbles, preferably helium bubbles, within the molten glass to determine the viscosity of the molten glass. The bubbles are released from a tube positioned below the surface of the molten glass so that the bubbles pass successively between two sets of electrodes, one above the other, that are continuously monitoring the conductivity of the molten glass. The measured conductivity will change as a bubble passes between the electrodes enabling an accurate determination of when a bubble has passed between the electrodes. The velocity of rising bubbles can be determined from the time interval between a change in conductivity of the first electrode pair and the second, upper electrode pair. The velocity of the rise of the bubbles in the glass melt is used in conjunction with other physical characteristics, obtained by known methods, to determine the viscosity of the glass melt fluid and, hence, glass quality.

  10. Radiation Induced Nanocrystal Formation in Metallic Glasses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Jesse

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The irradiation of metallic glasses to induce nanocrystallization was studied in two metallic glass compositions, Cu50Zr45Ti5 and Zr55Cu30Al10Ni5. Atomic mobility was described using a model based on localized excess free volume due to displace...

  11. Monitoring and analyzing waste glass compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schumacher, R.F.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A device and method are described for determining the viscosity of a fluid, preferably molten glass. The apparatus and method use the velocity of rising bubbles, preferably helium bubbles, within the molten glass to determine the viscosity of the molten glass. The bubbles are released from a tube positioned below the surface of the molten glass so that the bubbles pass successively between two sets of electrodes, one above the other, that are continuously monitoring the conductivity of the molten glass. The measured conductivity will change as a bubble passes between the electrodes enabling an accurate determination of when a bubble has passed between the electrodes. The velocity of rising bubbles can be determined from the time interval between a change in conductivity of the first electrode pair and the second, upper electrode pair. The velocity of the rise of the bubbles in the glass melt is used in conjunction with other physical characteristics, obtained by known methods, to determine the viscosity of the glass melt fluid and, hence, glass quality. 2 figures.

  12. Sealing glasses for titanium and titanium alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brow, Richard K. (Albuquerque, NM); Watkins, Randall D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Glass compositions containing CaO, Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, B.sub.2 O.sub.3, SrO and BaO of various combinations of mole % are provided. These compositions are capable of forming stable glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys, for use in components such as seals for battery headers.

  13. Sealing glasses for titanium and titanium alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brow, R.K.; Watkins, R.D.

    1988-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Glass compositions containing CaO, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, B/sub 2/O/sub 3/, SrO and BaO of various combinations of mole % are provided. These compositions are capable of forming stable glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys, for use in components such as seals for battery headers.

  14. Eyeglass lens made of glass (radiopaque)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fig. 9-1 Eyeglass lens made of glass (radiopaque) and frame made of metal (radiopaque). #12;Fig. 9-2 Eyeglass lens made of glass (radiopaque) and frame made of plastic (radiolucent). #12;Fig. 9-3 Metal frame of eyeglasses (radiopaque). The eyeglass lens is made of plastic (radiolucent). #12;Fig. 9-4 Cotton roll

  15. Rapid prototyping applications for manufacturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atwood, C.L.; Maguire, M.C.; Pardo, B.T.; Bryce, E.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent advances in stereolithography and selective laser sintering have had a significant impact on the overall quality of parts produced using these rapid prototyping processes. The development and implementation of 3D System`s QuickCast{sup TM} resin and software for building investment casting patterns have proven to be major steps toward fabricating highly accurate patterns with very good surface finishes. As participants in the Beta test program for QuickCast{sup TM} resin and software, we experienced a steep learning curve and were able to build accurate parts in a short period of time. It is now possible using this technology to produce highly accurate prototype parts as well as acceptable first article and small lot size production parts. We use the Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) process to fabricate prototype wax patterns for investment casting. DTM Corporation recently introduced the use of their polycarbonate material for fabricating investment casting patterns. The polycarbonate material is processed significantly faster with improved strength, dimensional stability, and without a support structure during the build process. Sandia is currently changing from investment casting wax to polycarbonate for the fabrication of investment casting patterns using the SLS process. This report will focus on our successes with these new materials from the standpoints of application, accuracy, surface finish, and post processing. Also presented will be examples of parts manufactured by these processes. 6 refs., 10 figs.

  16. California: Energy-Efficient Glass Saves Energy Costs, Increases...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy-Efficient Glass Saves Energy Costs, Increases Personal Comfort California: Energy-Efficient Glass Saves Energy Costs, Increases Personal Comfort April 18, 2013 - 12:00am...

  17. Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Glass Mountain Area (Cumming...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Glass Mountain Area (Cumming And Mackie, 2007) Exploration Activity Details Location Glass...

  18. Glass-like thermal conductivity in high efficiency thermoelectric...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Glass-like thermal conductivity in high efficiency thermoelectric materials Glass-like thermal conductivity in high efficiency thermoelectric materials Discusses strategies to...

  19. Modeling Interfacial Glass-Water Reactions: Recent Advances and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Modeling Interfacial Glass-Water Reactions: Recent Advances and Current Limitations. Modeling Interfacial Glass-Water Reactions: Recent Advances and Current Limitations. Abstract:...

  20. China Glass Solar aka CG Solar formerly Weihai Bluestar Terra...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    China Glass Solar aka CG Solar formerly Weihai Bluestar Terra Photovoltaic Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: China Glass Solar (aka CG Solar, formerly Weihai Bluestar Terra...

  1. aluminum hlw glasses: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    applications. - Int. J. Solids & Struct. 49 and Motivation Components of Thin Film Solar Modules back sheet or glass encapsulant electrical conductor thin 122 Glass Forming...

  2. andesitic glass comparison: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    applications. - Int. J. Solids & Struct. 49 and Motivation Components of Thin Film Solar Modules back sheet or glass encapsulant electrical conductor thin 59 Glass Forming...

  3. ajakirja stained glass: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    applications. - Int. J. Solids & Struct. 49 and Motivation Components of Thin Film Solar Modules back sheet or glass encapsulant electrical conductor thin 122 Glass Forming...

  4. Gaseous Sulfate Solubility in Glass: Experimental Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bliss, Mary

    2013-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Sulfate solubility in glass is a key parameter in many commercial glasses and nuclear waste glasses. This report summarizes key publications specific to sulfate solubility experimental methods and the underlying physical chemistry calculations. The published methods and experimental data are used to verify the calculations in this report and are expanded to a range of current technical interest. The calculations and experimental methods described in this report will guide several experiments on sulfate solubility and saturation for the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Enhanced Waste Glass Models effort. There are several tables of sulfate gas equilibrium values at high temperature to guide experimental gas mixing and to achieve desired SO3 levels. This report also describes the necessary equipment and best practices to perform sulfate saturation experiments for molten glasses. Results and findings will be published when experimental work is finished and this report is validated from the data obtained.

  5. Titanium sealing glasses and seals formed therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brow, Richard K. (Albuquerque, NM); McCollister, Howard L. (Albuquerque, NM); Phifer, Carol C. (Albuquerque, NM); Day, Delbert E. (Rolla, MO)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Alkaline-earth lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions containing CaO, La.sub.2 O.sub.3, B.sub.2 O.sub.3, TiO.sub.2 and Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 in various combinations of mole-% are provided. These sealing-glass compositions are useful for forming hermetic glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys that have a high aqueous durability for component or device applications requiring exposure to moisture, water or body fluids. Particular applications of the titanium sealing-glass compositions include forming glass-to-metal seals for lithium batteries and implanted biomedical devices (e.g. batteries, pacemakers, defibrillators, pumps).

  6. A consortium approach to glass furnace modeling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, S.-L.; Golchert, B.; Petrick, M.

    1999-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Using computational fluid dynamics to model a glass furnace is a difficult task for any one glass company, laboratory, or university to accomplish. The task of building a computational model of the furnace requires knowledge and experience in modeling two dissimilar regimes (the combustion space and the liquid glass bath), along with the skill necessary to couple these two regimes. Also, a detailed set of experimental data is needed in order to evaluate the output of the code to ensure that the code is providing proper results. Since all these diverse skills are not present in any one research institution, a consortium was formed between Argonne National Laboratory, Purdue University, Mississippi State University, and five glass companies in order to marshal these skills into one three-year program. The objective of this program is to develop a fully coupled, validated simulation of a glass melting furnace that may be used by industry to optimize the performance of existing furnaces.

  7. Glass heat pipe evacuated tube solar collector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McConnell, Robert D. (Lakewood, CO); Vansant, James H. (Tracy, CA)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A glass heat pipe is adapted for use as a solar energy absorber in an evacuated tube solar collector and for transferring the absorbed solar energy to a working fluid medium or heat sink for storage or practical use. A capillary wick is formed of granular glass particles fused together by heat on the inside surface of the heat pipe with a water glass binder solution to enhance capillary drive distribution of the thermal transfer fluid in the heat pipe throughout the entire inside surface of the evaporator portion of the heat pipe. Selective coatings are used on the heat pipe surface to maximize solar absorption and minimize energy radiation, and the glass wick can alternatively be fabricated with granular particles of black glass or obsidian.

  8. Titanium sealing glasses and seals formed therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brow, R.K.; McCollister, H.L.; Phifer, C.C.; Day, D.E.

    1997-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Alkaline-earth lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions containing CaO, La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in various combinations of mole-% are provided. These sealing-glass compositions are useful for forming hermetic glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys that have a high aqueous durability for component or device applications requiring exposure to moisture, water or body fluids. Particular applications of the titanium sealing-glass compositions include forming glass-to-metal seals for lithium batteries and implanted biomedical devices (e.g. batteries, pacemakers, defibrillators, pumps). 2 figs.

  9. Heat capacity at the glass transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostya Trachenko; Vadim Brazhkin

    2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A fundamental problem of glass transition is to explain the jump of heat capacity at the glass transition temperature $T_g$ without asserting the existence of a distinct solid glass phase. This problem is also common to other disordered systems, including spin glasses. We propose that if $T_g$ is defined as the temperature at which the liquid stops relaxing at the experimental time scale, the jump of heat capacity at $T_g$ follows as a necessary consequence due to the change of system's elastic, vibrational and thermal properties. In this picture, we discuss time-dependent effects of glass transition, and identify three distinct regimes of relaxation. Our approach explains widely observed logarithmic increase of $T_g$ with the quench rate and the correlation of heat capacity jump with liquid fragility.

  10. Asymptotically flat black holes with scalar hair: a review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlos A. R. Herdeiro; Eugen Radu

    2015-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the status of black hole solutions with non-trivial scalar fields but no gauge fields, in four dimensional asymptotically flat space-times, reviewing both classical results and recent developments. We start by providing a simple illustration on the physical difference between black holes in electro-vacuum and scalar-vacuum. Next, we review no-scalar-hair theorems. In particular, we detail an influential theorem by Bekenstein and stress three key assumptions: 1) the type of scalar field equation; 2) the spacetime symmetry inheritance by the scalar field; 3) an energy condition. Then, we list regular (on and outside the horizon), asymptotically flat BH solutions with scalar hair, organizing them by the assumption which is violated in each case and distinguishing primary from secondary hair. We provide a table summary of the state of the art.

  11. Asymptotically flat black holes with scalar hair: a review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herdeiro, Carlos A R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the status of black hole solutions with non-trivial scalar fields but no gauge fields, in four dimensional asymptotically flat space-times, reviewing both classical results and recent developments. We start by providing a simple illustration on the physical difference between black holes in electro-vacuum and scalar-vacuum. Next, we review no-scalar-hair theorems. In particular, we detail an influential theorem by Bekenstein and stress three key assumptions: 1) the type of scalar field equation; 2) the spacetime symmetry inheritance by the scalar field; 3) an energy condition. Then, we list regular (on and outside the horizon), asymptotically flat BH solutions with scalar hair, organizing them by the assumption which is violated in each case and distinguishing primary from secondary hair. We provide a table summary of the state of the art.

  12. Plane-parallel waves as duals of the flat background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ladislav Hlavaty; Ivo Petr

    2014-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We give a classification of non-Abelian T-duals of the flat metric in D=4 dimensions with respect to the four-dimensional continuous subgroups of the Poincare group. After dualizing the flat background, we identify majority of dual models as conformal sigma models in plane-parallel wave backgrounds, most of them having torsion. We give their form in Brinkmann coordinates. We find, besides the plane-parallel waves, several diagonalizable curved metrics with nontrivial scalar curvature and torsion. Using the non-Abelian T-duality, we find general solution of the classical field equations for all the sigma models in terms of d'Alembert solutions of the wave equation.

  13. Accelerated commercialization program for materials and components. Solar sheet glass: an example of materials commercialization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livingston, R.; Butler, B.

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The SERI Accelerated Commercialization Program for Materials and Components is designed to serve as a catalyst in promoting technological change through the introduction of new materials into solar technologies. This report focuses on technological diffusion of advances in materials technology from the developer to the manufacturers of solar equipment. It provides an overview and understanding of the problems encountered in the private sector in trying to advance technological change and discusses a program designed to facilitate this change. Using as example of solar sheet glass, this report describes the process by which sample quantities of new materials are sent to solar equipment manufacturers for appliations testing. It also describes other materials that might undergo testing in a similar way. The entire program is an example of how government and industry can work together to accomplish common goals.

  14. Additive Manufacturing in China: Threats, Opportunities, and Developments (Part I)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANDERSON, Eric

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wang Huaming Laser additive manufacturing (LAM) Huanglaser metal deposition (LMD), a type of additive manufacturing,Manufacturing Center) http://mat.hust.edu.cn:8080/3d/ Wuhan Yu Shengshi Selective laser

  15. MECH 502: Advanced/Additive Manufacturing Engineering COURSE DESCRIPTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schumacher, Russ

    MECH 502: Advanced/Additive Manufacturing Engineering COURSE DESCRIPTION In this course you product development and innovation. You will develop a rich knowledge of additive manufacturing processes enabling advanced/additive manufacturing and personal fabrication. You will have the opportunity

  16. Faculty Position in Ultra High Precision Robotics & Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Candea, George

    , manipulation and metrology systems targeting additive manufacturing; · New kinematics, quasi-perfect guidings, actuators, transmission systems, sensors and methods targeting ultra-high precision additive manufacturingFaculty Position in Ultra High Precision Robotics & Manufacturing at the Ecole Polytechnique

  17. Additive Manufacturing in China: Threats, Opportunities, and Developments (Part I)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANDERSON, Eric

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    application of additive manufacturing in China’s aviationAnalysis May 2013 Additive Manufacturing in China: Threats,an overview of China’s additive manufacturing industry is

  18. Additive Manufacturing in China: Threats, Opportunities, and Developments (Part I)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANDERSON, Eric

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    examine the application of additive manufacturing in China’sBulletin Analysis May 2013 Additive Manufacturing in China:an overview of China’s additive manufacturing industry is

  19. High Temperature Fuel Cell (Phosphoric Acid) Manufacturing R...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Cell (Phosphoric Acid) Manufacturing R&D High Temperature Fuel Cell (Phosphoric Acid) Manufacturing R&D Presented at the NREL Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Manufacturing R&D Workshop...

  20. Wave interaction with a fixed vertical flat plate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glover, Lanny Bruce

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Science in Ocean Engineering and graduated with merit in 1979. Commissioned an Ensign in the United States Navy he was selected for the Navy's Nuclear Power Program. After completing formal navy training he served onboard the USS TRUXTUN (CGN-35...) Andrew C. Vastano (Member) December )985 ABSTRACT wave Interaction with a Fixed Vertical Flat Plate. (December 1985) Lenny Bruce Glover, B. S. , United States Naval Academy Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. John B. Herbich The lift and drag...

  1. The Xi-transform for conformally flat space-time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George Sparling

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Xi-transform is a new spinor transform arising naturally in Einstein's general relativity. Here the example of conformally flat space-time is discussed in detail. In particular it is shown that for this case, the transform coincides with two other naturally defined transforms: one a two-variable transform on the Lie group SU(2, C), the other a transform on the space of null split octaves. The key properties of the transform are developed.

  2. DECOMMISSIONING CHALLENGES AT THE ROCKY FLATS ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorr, K. A.; Hoover, J.

    2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a discussion of the demolition of the Building 788 cluster at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) in Golden, Colorado. The Building 788 Cluster was a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted storage facilities and ancillary structures. Topics covered include the methods employed for Project Planning, Regulatory Compliance, Waste Management, Hazard Identification, Radiological Controls, Risk Management, Field Implementation, and Cost Schedule control, and Lessons Learned and Project Closeout.

  3. Evaluation of tracking flat plate and concentrator PV systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lepley, T. [Phasor Energy Co., Phoenix, AZ (United States); Hammond, B.; Harris, A. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Arizona Public Service Company has conducted side-by-side field tests of most of the leading tracking flat plate and concentrating PV technologies. The results verify the added value due to tracking, but show that additional reliability improvements are needed in most cases. Concentrator PV systems can be high performers in sunny regions. In addition, a novel inverter system design by Raytheon has demonstrated excellent performance and promises to be more reliable and have lower cost than competing technologies.

  4. Rocky Flats Plant Site Environmental Report: 1993 Highlights

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Rocky Flats Plant Site Environmental Report provides summary information on the plant`s environmental monitoring programs and the results recorded during 1993. The report contains a compliance summary, results of environmental monitoring and other related programs, a review of environmental remediation activities, information on external gamma radiation dose monitoring, and radiation dose estimates for the surrounding population. This section provides an overview of these topics and summarizes more comprehensive discussions found in the main text of this annual report.

  5. Manufacturing Facility Opened Using EERE-Supported Low-Cost Fuel...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Manufacturing Facility Opened Using EERE-Supported Low-Cost Fuel Cell Manufacturing Methods Manufacturing Facility Opened Using EERE-Supported Low-Cost Fuel Cell Manufacturing...

  6. Progress of DOE Materials, Manufacturing Process R&D, and ARRA...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of DOE Materials, Manufacturing Process R&D, and ARRA Battery Manufacturing Grants Progress of DOE Materials, Manufacturing Process R&D, and ARRA Battery Manufacturing Grants 2011...

  7. Flat-response x-ray-diode-detector development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tirsell, G.

    1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report we discuss the design of an improved sub-nanosecond flat response x-ray diode detector needed for ICF diagnostics. This device consists of a high Z cathode and a complex filter tailored to flatten the response so that the total x-ray energy below 1.5 keV can be measured using a single detector. Three major problems have become evident as a result of our work with the original LLNL design including deviation from flatness due to a peak in the response below 200 eV, saturation at relatively low x-ray fluences, and long term gold cathode instability. We are investigating grazing incidence reflection to reduce the response below 200 eV, new high Z cathode materials for long term stability, and a new complex filter for improved flatness. Better saturation performance will require a modified XRD detector under development with reduced anode to cathode spacing and increased anode bias voltage.

  8. Asymptotically flat radiating solutions in third order Lovelock gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dehghani, M. H. [Physics Department and Biruni Observatory, College of Sciences, Shiraz University, Shiraz 71454 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Institute for Astrophysics and Astronomy of Maragha (RIAAM), Maragha (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Farhangkhah, N. [Physics Department and Biruni Observatory, College of Sciences, Shiraz University, Shiraz 71454 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we present an exact spherically symmetric solution of third order Lovelock gravity in n dimensions which describes the gravitational collapse of a null dust fluid. This solution is asymptotically (anti-)de Sitter or flat depending on the choice of the cosmological constant. Using the asymptotically flat solution for n{>=}7 with a power-law form of the mass as a function of the null coordinate, we present a model for a gravitational collapse in which a null dust fluid radially injects into an initially flat and empty region. It is found that a naked singularity is inevitably formed whose strength is different for the n=7 and n{>=}8 cases. In the n=7 case, the limiting focusing condition for the strength of curvature singularity is satisfied. But for n{>=}8, the strength of curvature singularity depends on the rate of increase of mass of the spacetime. These considerations show that the third order Lovelock term weakens the strength of the curvature singularity.

  9. Breaking Barriers in Polymer Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Love, Lonnie J [ORNL; Duty, Chad E [ORNL; Post, Brian K [ORNL; Lind, Randall F [ORNL; Lloyd, Peter D [ORNL; Kunc, Vlastimil [ORNL; Peter, William H [ORNL; Blue, Craig A [ORNL

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Additive Manufacturing (AM) enables the creation of complex structures directly from a computer-aided design (CAD). There are limitations that prevent the technology from realizing its full potential. AM has been criticized for being slow and expensive with limited build size. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed a large scale AM system that improves upon each of these areas by more than an order of magnitude. The Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) system directly converts low cost pellets into a large, three-dimensional part at a rate exceeding 25 kg/h. By breaking these traditional barriers, it is possible for polymer AM to penetrate new manufacturing markets.

  10. Solid oxide fuel cell having a glass composite seal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    De Rose, Anthony J.; Mukerjee, Subhasish; Haltiner, Jr., Karl Jacob

    2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid oxide fuel cell stack having a plurality of cassettes and a glass composite seal disposed between the sealing surfaces of adjacent cassettes, thereby joining the cassettes and providing a hermetic seal therebetween. The glass composite seal includes an alkaline earth aluminosilicate (AEAS) glass disposed about a viscous glass such that the AEAS glass retains the viscous glass in a predetermined position between the first and second sealing surfaces. The AEAS glass provides geometric stability to the glass composite seal to maintain the proper distance between the adjacent cassettes while the viscous glass provides for a compliant and self-healing seal. The glass composite seal may include fibers, powders, and/or beads of zirconium oxide, aluminum oxide, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), or mixtures thereof, to enhance the desirable properties of the glass composite seal.

  11. 2014-07-08 Issuance: ASRAC Manufactured Housing Working Group...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    4-07-08 Issuance: ASRAC Manufactured Housing Working Group; Notice of Membership 2014-07-08 Issuance: ASRAC Manufactured Housing Working Group; Notice of Membership This document...

  12. DOE's Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Manufacturing Sub-Program...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE's Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Manufacturing Sub-Program DOE's Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Manufacturing Sub-Program Presented at the NREL Hydrogen and Fuel Cell...

  13. Unlocking the Potential of Additive Manufacturing in the Fuel...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Manufacturing in the Fuel Cells Industry Download presentation slides from the DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar "Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells" held on...

  14. An exploration of materials and methods in manufacturing : shoreline membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chin, Ryan C. C., 1974-

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis is an investigation into the design methodologies and ideologies of manufacturing processes specifically related to automotive design. The conceptualization, prototyping, testing, and manufacturing of cars is ...

  15. AMO Industry Day Workshop on Upcoming Smart Manufacturing FOA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AMO will host an Industry Day workshop to explain the concept, vision, and technology needs associated with support for a Clean Energy Manufacturing Innovation Institute on Smart Manufacturing.

  16. Celebrating Two Years of Building America's Clean Energy Manufacturing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Manufacturing Office to print the car chassis using a new machine called Big Area Additive Manufacturing. We're building collaborative facilities where experts can work...

  17. U.S. Advanced Manufacturing and Clean Energy Technology Challenges

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Technical Assistance 12 Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO): Purpose Laser Processing for Additive Manufacturing Carbon Fiber from Microwave Assisted Plasma Process AMO's Purpose...

  18. Contact Manufacturing Demonstration Facility Craig Blue, Ph.D...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    capacity, jobs for American workers and regional economic development. Technology Areas * Additive Manufacturing utilizing a broad range of direct manufacturing technologies,...

  19. Sustainable Manufacturing via Multi-Scale, Physics-Based Process...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    present opportunities to improve casting, forging, stamping, extrusion, assembly, and additive manufacturing processes. The U.S. manufacturing supply base will benefit from...

  20. Upcoming Webinar February 11: Additive Manufacturing for Fuel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    February 11: Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells Upcoming Webinar February 11: Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells February 6, 2014 - 12:00am Addthis On Tuesday, February 11,...

  1. 20% Wind Energy by 2030 - Chapter 3: Manufacturing, Materials...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    3: Manufacturing, Materials, and Resources Summary Slides 20% Wind Energy by 2030 - Chapter 3: Manufacturing, Materials, and Resources Summary Slides Summary Slides for Chapter 3:...

  2. Wind Program Manufacturing Research Advances Processes and Reduces...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Wind Program Manufacturing Research Advances Processes and Reduces Costs Wind Program Manufacturing Research Advances Processes and Reduces Costs March 31, 2014 - 11:22am Addthis...

  3. Design for manufacturability with regular fabrics in digital integrated circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gazor, Mehdi (Seyed Mehdi)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrated circuit design is limited by manufacturability. As devices scale down, sensitivity to process variation increases dramatically, making design for manufacturability a critical concern. Designers must identify the ...

  4. Letter from Plumbing Manufacturers Institute to Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Letter from Plumbing Manufacturers Institute to Department of Energy re: Ex Parte Communication More Documents & Publications Supplemental Comments of the Plumbing Manufacturers...

  5. automobile part manufacturers: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tax applies to the sale of manufacturing aids such as dies, patterns, jigs and tooling used in the manufacturing process notwithstanding the fact that the property used in...

  6. allergenic extract manufacturers: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tax applies to the sale of manufacturing aids such as dies, patterns, jigs and tooling used in the manufacturing process notwithstanding the fact that the property used in...

  7. alloy pv manufacturing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tax applies to the sale of manufacturing aids such as dies, patterns, jigs and tooling used in the manufacturing process notwithstanding the fact that the property used in...

  8. american manufacturing research: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    hardships suffered by the unemployed. unknown authors 2003-01-01 4 Manufacturing for the Hydrogen Economy Manufacturing Research & Development Energy Storage, Conversion and...

  9. Electric Drive Component Manufacturing: Magna E-Car Systems of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Electric Drive Component Manufacturing: Magna E-Car Systems of America, Inc. Electric Drive Component Manufacturing: Magna E-Car Systems...

  10. 2.852 Manufacturing Systems Analysis, Spring 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gershwin, Stanley

    This course deals with the following topics: Models of manufacturing systems, including transfer lines and flexible manufacturing systems; Calculation of performance measures, including throughput, in-process inventory, ...

  11. DOE Initiates Enforcement Actions Against 4 Showerhead Manufacturers...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Against 4 Showerhead Manufacturers (Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty and Requests for Test Data Issued) DOE Initiates Enforcement Actions Against 4 Showerhead Manufacturers...

  12. AMO Requests Technical Topics Suitable for a Manufacturing Innovation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Innovation Institute AMO Requests Technical Topics Suitable for a Manufacturing Innovation Institute April 17, 2014 - 12:23pm Addthis The Advanced Manufacturing Office...

  13. Celgard US Manufacturing Facilities Initiative for Lithium-ion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Celgard US Manufacturing Facilities Initiative for Lithium-ion Battery Separator Celgard US Manufacturing Facilities Initiative for Lithium-ion...

  14. Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composite Manufacturing - RFI Part 2...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    1056 More Documents & Publications Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composite Manufacturing Workshop Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composite Manufacturing - RFI DE-FOA-0000980: Summary of...

  15. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Penn Salt Manufacturing...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Salt Manufacturing Co Whitemarsh Research Laboratories - PA 20 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: PENN SALT MANUFACTURING CO., WHITEMARSH RESEARCH LABORATORIES (PA.20) Eliminated from...

  16. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Titanium Alloys Manufacturing...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Manufacturing Co Div of National Lead of Ohio - NY 41 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: TITANIUM ALLOYS MANUFACTURING CO., DIV. OF NATIONAL LEAD OF OHIO (NY.41) Eliminated from...

  17. Join Us for the Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative's Western...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    resources, as well as best practices and cutting-edge technologies, to boost energy productivity across the entire U.S. manufacturing supply chain will make our manufacturing...

  18. Energy Use Loss and Opportunities Analysis: U.S. Manufacturing...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Use Loss and Opportunities Analysis: U.S. Manufacturing & Mining Energy Use Loss and Opportunities Analysis: U.S. Manufacturing & Mining energyuselossopportunitiesanalysis.pdf...

  19. Joint Fuel Cell Technologies and Advanced Manufacturing Webinar...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Joint Fuel Cell Technologies and Advanced Manufacturing Webinar Joint Fuel Cell Technologies and Advanced Manufacturing Webinar Presentation slides from the joint Fuel Cell...

  20. Direct Hydrogen PEMFC Manufacturing Cost Estimation for Automotive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Direct Hydrogen PEMFC Manufacturing Cost Estimation for Automotive Applications: Fuel Cell Tech Team Review Direct Hydrogen PEMFC Manufacturing Cost Estimation for Automotive...