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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manufacturing flat glass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Methods of improving the surface flatness of thin glass sheets and silicon wafers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The manufacturing of high quality sheet glass has allowed for many technologies to advance to astonishing frontiers. With dimensions reaching ~ 3 x 3 m˛, sheet glass is pushing the envelope for producing massive size flat ...

Akilian, Mireille

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Metal and Glass Manufacturers Reduce Costs by Increasing Energy...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

in Process Heating Systems Process heating plays a key role in producing steel, aluminum, and glass and in manufacturing products made from these materials. Faced with...

3

Improving the diversity of manufacturing electroluminescent flat panel displays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Crystalline calcium thiogallate with a cerium dopant has been deposited by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) at temperatures below 600{degrees}C on a low cost glass substrate. An EL luminance of 1.05 fL was observed 40 volts above threshold at 60 Hz. This is more than an order of magnitude improvement over earlier crystalline-as-deposited thiogallate materials. These results pave the way for the use of MOCVD as a potential method for processing full color thin-film electroluminescent (TFEL) flat panel displays. The formation of the CaGa{sub 2}S{sub 4}:Ce phosphor requires precise control over a number of deposition parameters including flow rates, substrate temperature, and reactor pressure. The influence of these parameters will be discussed in terms of structure, uniformity, and TFEL device performance.

Moss, T.S.; Samuels, J.A.; Smith, D.C. [and others

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Horizontal non-contact slumping of flat glass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper continues the work of M. Akilian and A. Husseini on developing a noncontact glass slumping/shaping process. The shift from vertical slumping to horizontal slumping is implemented and various technologies required ...

Sung, Edward, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

System design and implementation for the glass panel alignment and sealing tool for flat panel displays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the system designed and fabricated for the National Center for Advanced Information Component Manufacturing (NCAICM) project number 9322-135. The system is a device capable of simultaneously aligning two glass plates and sealing them together with glass frit. The process development was divided into two phases. The first was thermal sealing in an ambient environment. The second was sealing a controlled environment in a vacuum.

Jordan, J.D.; Stromberg, P.G.; Kuszmaul, S.S.

1996-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

6

Advanced Manufacture of Second-Surface, Silvered Glass Reflectors for High-Performance, Low-Cost CSP Collector Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Advanced Manufacture of Second-Surface, Silvered Glass Reflectors for High-Performance, Low-Cost CSP Collector Systems

7

Method of manufacturing a glass parabolic-cylindrical solar collector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The method includes the following steps: (1) a microsheet of glass is drawn from a glass melt; (2) a reflective layer, such as silver, is deposited on one surface of the microsheet; (3) a first flexible backing layer, such as fiberglass, is bonded to the reflective layer; (4) the combination of the microsheet with the reflective layer and the first backing layer is formed over a mandrel which is preferably in the form of a parabolic cylinder; and (5) a honeycombed layer, with a second fiberglass backing layer, is then bonded to the first backing layer. The product produced by the steps 1-5 is then cured so that it retains the desired configuration; i.e. parabolic-cylindrical, after it is removed from the mandrel.

Deminet, C.

1980-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

8

Energy Saving Method of Manufacturing Ceramic Products from Fiber Glass Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. fiber glass industry disposes of more than 260,000 tons of industrial fiber glass waste in landfills annually. New technology is needed to reprocess this industrial waste into useful products. A low-cost energy-saving method of manufacturing ceramic tile from fiber glass waste was developed. The technology is based on sintering fiber glass waste at 700-900 degrees C to produce products which traditionally require firing temperatures of >1200 degrees C, or glass-melting temperatures >1500 degrees C. The process also eliminates other energy intensive processing steps, including mining and transportation of raw materials, spray-drying to produce granulated powder, drying pressed tile, and glazing. The technology completely transforms fiber glass waste into a dense ceramic product, so that all future environmental problems in the handling and disposal of the fibers is eliminated. The processing steps were developed and optimized to produce glossy and matte surface finishes for wall and floor tile applications. High-quality prototype tile samples were processed for demonstration and tile standards testing. A Market Assessment confirmed the market potential for tile products produced by the technology. Manufacturing equipment trials were successfully conducted for each step of the process. An industrial demonstration plant was designed, including equipment and operating cost analysis. A fiber glass manufacturer was selected as an industrial partner to commercialize the technology. A technology development and licensing agreement was completed with the industrial partner. Haun labs will continue working to transfer the technology and assist the industrial partner with commercialization beyond the DOE project.

Michael J. Haun

2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

9

A new Energy Saving method of manufacturing ceramic products from waste glass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report summarizes the activities of the DOE Inventions and Innovations sponsored project, ''A New Energy Saving Method of Manufacturing Ceramic Products from Waste Glass.'' The project involved an innovative method of lowering energy costs of manufacturing ceramic products by substituting traditional raw materials with waste glass. The processing method is based on sintering of glass powder at {approx}750 C to produce products which traditionally require firing temperatures of >1200 C, or glass-melting temperatures >1500 C. The key to the new method is the elimination of previous processing problems, which have greatly limited the use of recycled glass as a ceramic raw material. The technology is aligned with the DOE-OIT Glass Industry Vision and Roadmap, and offers significant energy savings and environmental benefits compared to current technologies. A U.S. patent (No. 6,340,650) covering the technology was issued on January 22, 2002. An international PCT Patent Application is pending with designations made for all PCT regions and countries. The goal of the project was to provide the basis for the design and construction of an energy-efficient manufacturing plant that can convert large volumes of waste glass into high-quality ceramic tile. The main objectives of the project were to complete process development and optimization; construct and test prototype samples; and conduct market analysis and commercialization planning. Two types of ceramic tile products were targeted by the project. The first type was developed during the first year (Phase I) to have a glazed-like finish for applications where slip resistance is not critical, such as wall tile. The processing method optimized in Phase I produces a glossy surface with a translucent appearance, without the extra glazing steps required in traditional tile manufacturing. The second type of product was developed during the second year (Phase II). This product was designed to have an unglazed appearance for applications requiring slip resistance, such as floor tile. The coarser matte finish of this product type was produced by modifying the basic process to include crystalline fillers and partial crystallization of the glass. Additional details of the project results are discussed in Section III.

Haun Labs

2002-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

10

Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Glass (NAICS 3272, 327993), January 2014 (MECS 2010)  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of Energy Low-TemperatureEnergyAll ManufacturingFood andGlass and Glass

11

Highly conductive electrolyte composites containing glass and ceramic, and method of manufacture  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrolyte composite is manufactured by pressurizing a mixture of sodium ion conductive glass and an ionically conductive compound at between 12,000 and 24,000 pounds per square inch to produce a pellet. The resulting pellet is then sintered at relatively lower temperatures (800--1200 C), for example 1000 C, than are typically required (1400 C) when fabricating single constituent ceramic electrolytes. The resultant composite is 100 percent conductive at 250 C with conductivity values of 2.5 to 4[times]10[sup [minus]2](ohm-cm)[sup [minus]1]. The matrix exhibits chemical stability against sodium for 100 hours at 250 to 300 C. 1 figure.

Hash, M.C.; Bloom, I.D.

1992-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

12

Highly conductive electrolyte composites containing glass and ceramic, and method of manufacture  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrolyte composite is manufactured by pressurizing a mixture of sodium ion conductive glass and an ionically conductive compound at between 12,000 and 24,000 pounds per square inch to produce a pellet. The resulting pellet is then sintered at relatively lower temperatures (800.degree. C.-1200.degree. C.), for example 1000.degree. C., than are typically required (1400.degree. C.) when fabricating single constituent ceramic electrolytes. The resultant composite is 100 percent conductive at 250.degree. C. with conductivity values of 2.5 to 4.times.10.sup.-2 (ohm-cm).sup.-1. The matrix exhibits chemical stability against sodium for 100 hours at 250.degree. to 300.degree. C.

Hash, Mark C. (Joliet, IL); Bloom, Ira D. (Bolingbrook, IL)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Manufacturing  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Flow of Materials through Industry Sustainable 1 Manufacturing 2 Technology Assessment 3 Contents 4 1. Introduction to the TechnologySystem ......

14

Comparison of radiation-induced transmission degradation of borosilicate crown optical glass from four different manufacturers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

glass. Our results show that whereas the glasses are optically similar before irradiation, they showComparison of radiation-induced transmission degradation of borosilicate crown optical glass from of Optics and Photonics/CREOL 4000 Central Florida Blvd. Orlando, FL 32816-2700, USA d SCK·CEN Belgian

Glebov, Leon

15

Sustainable Energy Solutions Task 4.1 Intelligent Manufacturing of Hybrid Carbon-Glass Fiber-Reinforced Composite Wind Turbine Blades  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

EXECUTIVE SUMARY In this subtask, the manufacturability of hybrid carbon-glass fiber-reinforced composite wind turbine blades using Vacuum-Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM) was investigated. The objective of this investigation was to study the VARTM process and its parameters to manufacture cost-effective wind turbine blades with no defects (mainly eliminate dry spots and reduce manufacturing time). A 2.5-dimensional model and a 3-dimensional model were developed to simulate mold filling and part curing under different conditions. These conditions included isothermal and non-isothermal filling, curing of the part during and after filling, and placement of injection gates at different locations. Results from this investigation reveal that the process can be simulated and also that manufacturing parameters can be optimized to eliminate dry spot formation and reduce the manufacturing time. Using computer-based models is a cost-effective way to simulate manufacturing of wind turbine blades. The approach taken herein allows the design of the wind blade manufacturing processes without physically running trial-and-error experiments that are expensive and time-consuming; especially for larger blades needed for more demanding environmental conditions. This will benefit the wind energy industry by reducing initial design and manufacturing costs which can later be passed down to consumers and consequently make the wind energy industry more competitive.

Janet M Twomey, PhD

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

16

MANUFACTURING Manufacturing and Biomanufacturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

process improvements to manufacturing. In addition, the critical national need area of Manufacturing hasMANUFACTURING Manufacturing and Biomanufacturing: Materials Advances and Critical Processes NATIONAL NEED The proposed topics within "Manufacturing and Biomanufacturing: Materials Advances

Magee, Joseph W.

17

Potential for energy conservation in the glass industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While the glass industry (flat glass, container glass, pressed and blown glass, and insulation fiber glass) has reduced its specific energy use (Btu/ton) by almost 30% since 1972, significant potential for further reduction still remains. State-of-the-art technologies are available which could lead to incremental improvements in glass industry energy productivity; however, these technologies must compete for capital with projects undertaken for other reasons (e.g., capacity expansion, equipment rebuild, labor cost reduction, product quality improvement, or compliance with environmental, health or safety regulations). Narrowing profit margins in the large tonnage segments of the glass industry in recent years and the fact that energy costs represent less than 25% of the value added in glass manufacture have combined to impede the widespread adoption of many state-of-the-art conservation technologies. Savings in energy costs alone have not provided the incentive to justify the capital expenditures required to realize the energy savings. Beyond implementation of state-of-the-art technologies, significant potential energy savings could accrue from advanced technologies which represent a radical departure from current glass making technology. Long-term research and development (R and D) programs, which address the technical and economic barriers associated with advanced, energy-conserving technologies, offer the opportunity to realize this energy-saving potential.

Garrett-Price, B.A.; Fassbender, A.G.; Bruno, G.A.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Glass Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. glass industry is comprised of four primary industry segments--flat glass, container glass, specialty glass, and fiberglass--which together consume $1.6 billion in energy annually. On average, energy costs in the U.S. glass industry account for around 14 percent of total glass production costs. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There is a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. glass industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, system, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. glass industry is provided along with a description of the major process steps in glass manufacturing. Expected savings in energy and energy-related costs are given for many energy efficiency measures, based on case study data from real-world applications in glass production facilities and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. glass industry reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of the measures--as well on as their applicability to different production practices--is needed to assess potential implementation of selected technologies at individual plants.

Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina; Masanet, Eric; Graus, Wina

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Graded index antireflective coatings for glass : final report, September 1978 - February 1982  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Glass compositions and process conditions by which broad band gradedindex antreflective films can be produced on glass surfaces have been developed. The end use for the treated glass sheet is as cover plates for flat plate ...

Haggerty, John Scarseth

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Advanced Manufacture of Reflectors  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Advance Manufacture of Reflectors fact sheet describes a SunShot Initiative project being conducted research team led by the University of Arizona, which is working to develop a novel method for shaping float glass. The technique developed by this research team can drastically reduce the time required for the shaping step. By enabling mass production of solar concentrating mirrors at high speed, this project should lead to improved performance and as much as a 40% reduction in manufacturing costs for reflectors made in very high volume.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manufacturing flat glass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Energy Saving Glass Lamination via Selective Radio Frequency Heating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project focused on advancing radio-frequency (RF) lamination technology closer to commercial implementation, in order to reduce the energy intensity of glass lamination by up to 90%. Lamination comprises a wide range of products including autoglass, architectural safety and innovative design glass, transparent armor (e.g. bullet proof glass), smart glass, mirrors, and encapsulation of photovoltaics. Lamination is also the fastest growing segment of glass manufacturing, with photovoltaics, architectural needs, and an anticipated transition to laminated side windows in vehicles. The state-of-the-art for glass lamination is to use autoclaves, which apply heat and uniform gas pressure to bond the laminates over the course of 1 to 18 hours. Laminates consist of layers of glass or other materials bonded with vinyl or urethane interlayers. In autoclaving, significant heat energy is lost heating the chamber, pressurized air, glass racks, and the glass. In RF lamination, the heat is generated directly in the vinyl interlayer, causing it to heat and melt quickly, in just 1 to 10 minutes, without significantly heating the glass or the equipment. The main purpose of this project was to provide evidence that low energy, rapid RF lamination quality met the same standards as conventionally autoclaved windows. The development of concepts for laminating curved glass with RF lamination was a major goal. Other primary goals included developing a stronger understanding of the lamination product markets described above, and to refine the potential benefits of commercial implementation. The scope of the project was to complete implementation concept studies in preparation for continuation into advanced development, pilot studies, and commercial implementation. The project consisted of 6 main tasks. The first dealt with lamination with poly-vinyl butyral (PVB) interlayers, which prior work had shown difficulties in achieving good quality laminates, working with Pilkington North America. The second task dealt with a study of current lamination processes in the various laminate industries, and development of concepts for integrating RF lamination into new or existing processes. The third task explored the use of a non-destructive technique for analyzing laminate adhesion with the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The fourth task focused on developing concepts for curved glass lamination using RF lamination. The fifth and sixth tasks together comprised an analysis of laminate product markets, ranking for applicability and commercialization potential, and the development of commercialization strategies for those products. In addition, throughout the project as new experimental data and conventional process data were obtained, the benefits analysis of RF lamination was refined. The goals of the project described above were achieved, positioning RF lamination for the next stage growth envisioned in the original Industrial Grand Challenge proposal. Working with Pilkington North America, lamination of flat autoglass with PVB was achieved, meeting all 16 stringent industry tests. In particular, PVB laminates made with RF lamination passed environmental tests including the high temperature, 120 C bake test, without significant formation of bubbles (defects). The adhesion of PVB to glass was measured using the pummel method. Adhesion values ranging from 1 to 7 out of 10 were obtained. The significant process parameters affecting the environmental and adhesion performance were identified through a designed experiment. Pre-lamination process variables including PVB storage humidity and the de-airing process (vacuum or nip rolling) were significant, as well as the level of pressure applied to the laminate during the RF process. Analysis of manufacturing with RF lamination equipment, based on the processes developed indicated that 3 RF presses could replace a typical auto-industry autoclave to achieve equal or greater throughput with possibly less capital cost and smaller footprint. Concepts for curved lamination identifying castable molds for

Allan, Shawn M.

2012-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

22

Energy Saving Glass Lamination via Selective Radio Frequency Heating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project focused on advancing radio-frequency (RF) lamination technology closer to commercial implementation, in order to reduce the energy intensity of glass lamination by up to 90%. Lamination comprises a wide range of products including autoglass, architectural safety and innovative design glass, transparent armor (e.g. bullet proof glass), smart glass, mirrors, and encapsulation of photovoltaics. Lamination is also the fastest growing segment of glass manufacturing, with photovoltaics, architectural needs, and an anticipated transition to laminated side windows in vehicles. The state-of-the-art for glass lamination is to use autoclaves, which apply heat and uniform gas pressure to bond the laminates over the course of 1 to 18 hours. Laminates consist of layers of glass or other materials bonded with vinyl or urethane interlayers. In autoclaving, significant heat energy is lost heating the chamber, pressurized air, glass racks, and the glass. In RF lamination, the heat is generated directly in the vinyl interlayer, causing it to heat and melt quickly, in just 1 to 10 minutes, without significantly heating the glass or the equipment. The main purpose of this project was to provide evidence that low energy, rapid RF lamination quality met the same standards as conventionally autoclaved windows. The development of concepts for laminating curved glass with RF lamination was a major goal. Other primary goals included developing a stronger understanding of the lamination product markets described above, and to refine the potential benefits of commercial implementation. The scope of the project was to complete implementation concept studies in preparation for continuation into advanced development, pilot studies, and commercial implementation. The project consisted of 6 main tasks. The first dealt with lamination with poly-vinyl butyral (PVB) interlayers, which prior work had shown difficulties in achieving good quality laminates, working with Pilkington North America. The second task dealt with a study of current lamination processes in the various laminate industries, and development of concepts for integrating RF lamination into new or existing processes. The third task explored the use of a non-destructive technique for analyzing laminate adhesion with the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The fourth task focused on developing concepts for curved glass lamination using RF lamination. The fifth and sixth tasks together comprised an analysis of laminate product markets, ranking for applicability and commercialization potential, and the development of commercialization strategies for those products. In addition, throughout the project as new experimental data and conventional process data were obtained, the benefits analysis of RF lamination was refined. The goals of the project described above were achieved, positioning RF lamination for the next stage growth envisioned in the original Industrial Grand Challenge proposal. Working with Pilkington North America, lamination of flat autoglass with PVB was achieved, meeting all 16 stringent industry tests. In particular, PVB laminates made with RF lamination passed environmental tests including the high temperature, 120 ���°C bake test, without significant formation of bubbles (defects). The adhesion of PVB to glass was measured using the pummel method. Adhesion values ranging from 1 to 7 out of 10 were obtained. The significant process parameters affecting the environmental and adhesion performance were identified through a designed experiment. Pre-lamination process variables including PVB storage humidity and the de-airing process (vacuum or nip rolling) were significant, as well as the level of pressure applied to the laminate during the RF process. Analysis of manufacturing with RF lamination equipment, based on the processes developed indicated that 3 RF presses could replace a typical auto-industry autoclave to achieve equal or greater throughput with possibly less capital cost and smaller footprint. Concepts for curved lamination id

Allan, Shawn M.; Baranova, Inessa; Poley, Joseph; Reis, Henrique

2012-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

23

Energy Saving Glass Lamination via Selective Radio-Frequency Heating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Inventions and Innovations program supported the technical and commercial research and development needed to elevate Ceralink's energy saving process for flat glass lamination from bench scale to a self-supporting technology with significant potential for growth. Radio-frequency heating was any un-explored option for laminating glass prior to this program. With significant commercial success through time and energy savings in the wood, paper, and plastics industries, RF heating was found to have significant promise for the energy intensive glass lamination industry. A major technical goal of the program was to demonstrate RF lamination across a wide range of laminate sizes and materials. This was successfully accomplished, dispelling many skeptics' concerns about the abilities of the technology. Ceralink laminated panels up to 2 ft x 3 ft, with four sets processed simultaneously, in a 3 minute cycle. All major categories of interlayer materials were found to work with RF lamination. In addition to laminating glass, other materials including photovoltaic silicon solar cells, light emitting diodes, metallized glass, plastics (acrylic and polycarbonate), and ceramics (alumina) were found compatible with the RF process. This opens up a wide range of commercial opportunities beyond the initially targeted automotive industry. The dramatic energy savings reported for RF lamination at the bench scale were found to be maintained through the scale up of the process. Even at 2 ft x 3 ft panel sizes, energy savings are estimated to be at least 90% compared to autoclaving or vacuum lamination. With targeted promotion through conference presentations, press releases and internet presence, RF lamination has gained significant attention, drawing large audiences at American Ceramic Society meetings. The commercialization success of the project includes the establishment of a revenue-generating business model for providing process development and demonstrations for potential RF lamination users. A path to industrial energy benefits and revenue through industrial equipment sales was established in a partnership with Thermex Thermatron, a manufacturer of RF equipment.

Shulman, Holly S.; Allan, Shawn M.

2009-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

24

Manufacturing technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Manufacturing Technologies Center is an integral part of Sandia National Laboratories, a multiprogram engineering and science laboratory, operated for the Department of Energy (DOE) with major facilities at Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Livermore, California. Our Center is at the core of Sandia`s Advanced Manufacturing effort which spans the entire product realization process.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Sealed glass coating of high temperature ceramic superconductors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and article of manufacture of a lead oxide based glass coating on a high temperature superconductor. The method includes preparing a dispersion of glass powders in a solution, applying the dispersion to the superconductor, drying the dispersion before applying another coating and heating the glass powder dispersion at temperatures below oxygen diffusion onset and above the glass melting point to form a continuous glass coating on the superconductor to establish compressive stresses which enhance the fracture strength of the superconductor.

Wu, Weite (Tainan, TW); Chu, Cha Y. (Garnerville, NY); Goretta, Kenneth C. (Downers Grove, IL); Routbort, Jules L. (Darien, IL)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Manufacturing technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The specific goals of the Manufacturing Technology thrust area are to develop an understanding of fundamental fabrication processes, to construct general purpose process models that will have wide applicability, to document our findings and models in journals, to transfer technology to LLNL programs, industry, and colleagues, and to develop continuing relationships with industrial and academic communities to advance our collective understanding of fabrication processes. Advances in four projects are described here, namely Design of a Precision Saw for Manufacturing, Deposition of Boron Nitride Films via PVD, Manufacturing and Coating by Kinetic Energy Metallization, and Magnet Design and Application.

Blaedel, K.L.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Is flat fair?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dynamic pricing holds out the promise of shifting peak demand as well as reducing overall demand. But it also raises thorny issues of fairness. All practical pricing systems involve tradeoffs between equity and efficiency. I examine the circumstances under which equity ought to be allowed to trump efficiency and whether or not this constitutes a defense of flat pricing. (author)

Bunzl, Martin

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

28

The Theoryof Maximally Flat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TRANSACTIONSON AUDIO AND ELECTROACOUSTICS, VOL. AU-20, NO. 3, AUGUST 1972 dynamic drag of the voice coil be made as flat as thedesigner'sconstraints permit. II. Theory Let the dc resistance of the voice coil, rl the mechanical re- sistance of the cone suspension, and SIthe suspension stiff- ness or spring

California at Berkeley, University of

29

Additive Manufacturing: Implications on Research and Manufacturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Additive Manufacturing: Implications on Research and Manufacturing With recent developments, etc.), additive manufacturing (AM) has the potential to become a transformative technology in innovation-based manufacturing. Agencies such as the Department of Defense, the National Science Foundation

Crawford, T. Daniel

30

In vitro and in vivo assessment of bioactive composite scaffolds fabricated via additive manufacturing technology.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Additive manufacturing (AM) technology was implemented together with new composite material comprising a synthetic materials, namely, polycaprolactone and bioactive glass with the ultimate aim of… (more)

Poh, Su Ping Patrina

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Advanced Manufacture of Reflectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main project objective has been to develop an advanced gravity sag method for molding large glass solar reflectors with either line or point focus, and with long or short focal length. The method involves taking standard sized squares of glass, 1.65 m x 1.65 m, and shaping them by gravity sag into precision steel molds. The method is designed for high volume manufacture when incorporated into a production line with separate pre-heating and cooling. The performance objectives for the self-supporting glass mirrors made by this project include mirror optical accuracy of 2 mrad root mean square (RMS), requiring surface slope errors <1 mrad rms, a target not met by current production of solar reflectors. Our objective also included development of new methods for rapidly shaping glass mirrors and coating them for higher reflectivity and soil resistance. Reflectivity of 95% for a glass mirror with anti-soil coating was targeted, compared to the present ~94% with no anti-soil coating. Our mirror cost objective is ~$20/m2 in 2020, a significant reduction compared to the present ~$35/m2 for solar trough mirrors produced for trough solar plants. During the first year a custom batch furnace was built to develop the method with high power radiative heating to simulate transfer of glass into a hot slumping zone in a production line. To preserve the original high polish of the float glass on both front and back surfaces, as required for a second surface mirror, the mold surface is machined to the required shape as grooves which intersect the glass at cusps, reducing the mold contact area to significantly less than 1%. The mold surface is gold-plated to reflect thermal radiation. Optical metrology of glass replicas made with the system has been carried out with a novel, custom-built test system. This test provides collimated, vertically-oriented parallel beams from a linear array of co-aligned lasers translated in a perpendicular direction across the reflector. Deviations of each reflected beam from the paraboloid focus give a direct measure of surface slope error. Key findings • A gravity sag method for large (2.5 m2) second surface glass solar reflectors has been developed and demonstrated to a uniquely high level of accuracy. Mirror surface slope accuracy of 0.65 mrad in one dimension, 0.85 mrad in 2 dimensions (point focus) has been demonstrated by commercial partner REhnu using this process. This accuracy exceeds by a factor of two current solar reflector accuracy. Our replicas meet the Sunshot accuracy objective of 2 mrad optical, which requires better than 1 mrad rms slope error. • Point-focus as well as line-focus mirrors have been demonstrated at 1.65 m x 1.65 m square – a unique capability. • The new process using simple molds is economical. The molds for the 1.65 m square reflectors are bent and machined steel plates on a counter-weighted flotation support. To minimize thermal coupling by radiative heat transfer, the mold surface is grooved and gilded. The molds are simple to manufacture, and have minimal thermal stresses and distortion in use. Lapping and bending techniques have been developed to obtain better than 1 mrad rms surface mold accuracy. Float glass is sagged into the molds by rapid radiative heating, using a custom high power (350 kW) furnace. The method of manufacture is well suited for small as well as large volume production, and as it requires little capital investment and no high technology, it could be used anywhere in the world to make solar concentrating reflectors. • A novel slope metrology method for full 1.65 aperture has been demonstrated, with 25 mm resolution across the face of the replicas. The method is null and therefore inherently accurate: it can easily be reproduced without high-tech equipment and does not need sophisticated calibration. We find by cross calibration with reference trough reflectors from RioGlass that our null-test laser system yields a measurement accuracy better than 0.4 mrad rms slope error. Our system is inexpensive and could have broad application for test

Angel, Roger [University of Arizona

2014-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

32

Kentish Flats Offshore Wind Farm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kentish Flats Offshore Wind Farm #12;By August 2005 the offshore wind farm at Kentish Flats plateau just outside the main Thames shipping lanes. The Kentish Flats wind farm will comprise 30 of the wind farm could be up to 90 MW. For the benefit of the environment The British Government has set

Firestone, Jeremy

33

Fuel Cell Manufacturing: American Energy and Manufacturing Competitive...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fuel Cell Manufacturing: American Energy and Manufacturing Competitiveness Summit Fuel Cell Manufacturing: American Energy and Manufacturing Competitiveness Summit Presentation on...

34

Flat | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublicIDAPowerPlantSitingConstruction.pdfNotify98.pdf Jump to:Siting.pdfFiskdale,Five StarFlash Steam512357°,Flat

35

Green Manufacturing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Green Manufacturing Initiative (GMI): The initiative provides a conduit between the university and industry to facilitate cooperative research programs of mutual interest to support green (sustainable) goals and efforts. In addition to the operational savings that greener practices can bring, emerging market demands and governmental regulations are making the move to sustainable manufacturing a necessity for success. The funding supports collaborative activities among universities such as the University of Michigan, Michigan State University and Purdue University and among 40 companies to enhance economic and workforce development and provide the potential of technology transfer. WMU participants in the GMI activities included 20 faculty, over 25 students and many staff from across the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences; the College of Arts and Sciences' departments of Chemistry, Physics, Biology and Geology; the College of Business; the Environmental Research Institute; and the Environmental Studies Program. Many outside organizations also contribute to the GMI's success, including Southwest Michigan First; The Right Place of Grand Rapids, MI; Michigan Department of Environmental Quality; the Michigan Department of Energy, Labor and Economic Growth; and the Michigan Manufacturers Technical Center.

Patten, John

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

36

Method of manufacturing large dish reflectors for a solar concentrator apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of manufacturing monolithic glass reflectors for concentrating sunlight in a solar energy system is disclosed. The method of manufacturing allows large monolithic glass reflectors to be made from float glass in order to realize significant cost savings on the total system cost for a solar energy system. The method of manufacture includes steps of heating a sheet of float glass positioned over a concave mold until the sheet of glass sags and stretches to conform to the shape of the mold. The edges of the dish-shaped glass are rolled for structural stiffening around the periphery. The dish-shaped glass is then silvered to create a dish-shaped mirror that reflects solar radiation to a focus. The surface of the mold that contacts the float glass preferably has a grooved surface profile comprising a plurality of cusps and concave valleys. This grooved profile minimizes the contact area and marring of the specular glass surface, reduces parasitic heat transfer into the mold and increases mold lifetime. The disclosed method of manufacture is capable of high production rates sufficiently fast to accommodate the output of a conventional float glass production line so that monolithic glass reflectors can be produced as quickly as a float glass production can make sheets of float glass to be used in the process.

Angel, Roger P (Tucson, AZ); Olbert, Blain H (Tucson, AZ)

2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

37

Faience and glass beads from the late Bronze Age shipwreck at Uluburun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shipwreck. iii v vi viii ix 1 1 4 5 15 15 17 49 67 70 78 80 82 85 85 87 92 94 vii CHAPTER V GLASS: MATERIAL AND MANUFACTURE?????????.. Glass Composition and Origins???????????????. Glass Manufacture and Trade...????????????????... 44 2.15 Faience melon bead KW 5174????????????????... 47 2.16 Small glass bead KW 1550?????????????????? 50 2.17 Concreted mass of small glass beads inside Canaanite jar KW 8???.. 52 2.18 Small glass beads inside Canaanite jar KW 8...

Ingram, Rebecca Suzanne

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

38

MECS 2006 - Glass | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of Energy Low-Temperature CombustionGlass MECS 2006 - Glass Manufacturing

39

Absolute calibration of optical flats  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention uses the phase shifting diffraction interferometer (PSDI) to provide a true point-by-point measurement of absolute flatness over the surface of optical flats. Beams exiting the fiber optics in a PSDI have perfect spherical wavefronts. The measurement beam is reflected from the optical flat and passed through an auxiliary optic to then be combined with the reference beam on a CCD. The combined beams include phase errors due to both the optic under test and the auxiliary optic. Standard phase extraction algorithms are used to calculate this combined phase error. The optical flat is then removed from the system and the measurement fiber is moved to recombine the two beams. The newly combined beams include only the phase errors due to the auxiliary optic. When the second phase measurement is subtracted from the first phase measurement, the absolute phase error of the optical flat is obtained.

Sommargren, Gary E.

2005-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

40

Sealed glass coating of high temperature ceramic superconductors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and article of manufacture of a lead oxide based glass coating on a high temperature superconductor is disclosed. The method includes preparing a dispersion of glass powders in a solution, applying the dispersion to the superconductor, drying the dispersion before applying another coating and heating the glass powder dispersion at temperatures below oxygen diffusion onset and above the glass melting point to form a continuous glass coating on the superconductor to establish compressive stresses which enhance the fracture strength of the superconductor. 8 figs.

Wu, W.; Chu, C.Y.; Goretta, K.C.; Routbort, J.L.

1995-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manufacturing flat glass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Department of Electrical Engineering Spring 2011 Glass Block Solar Collector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the sponsor. The collector incorporated a solar panel that charged a battery unit. The battery poweredPENNSTATE Department of Electrical Engineering Spring 2011 Glass Block Solar Collector Overview Pittsburgh Corning, a leading manufacturer of architectural glass blocks, wanted to incorporate a solar

Demirel, Melik C.

42

Advanced Manufacturing | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Better Buildings, Better Plants Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Combined Heat and Power Innovative Manufacturing Initiative National Network for Manufacturing Innovation...

43

Manufacturing Battle Creek  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computer simulation Facilities design Finite element analysis Green manufacturing Industrial materialsManufacturing Research Center Kalamazoo Battle Creek The College of Engineering and Applied Sciences The Supporting manufacturing industries by providing opportunities for collaboration with faculty

de Doncker, Elise

44

Metrics for Sustainable Manufacturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a system or process in maintaining a sustainable level of afor manufacturing processes to achieve truly sustainablesustainable phase of the automobile manufacturing process

Reich-Weiser, Corinne; Vijayaraghavan, Athulan; Dornfeld, David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Z .Thin Solid Films 315 1998 912 Patterning of a polysiloxane precursor to silicate glasses by microcontact  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Z .Thin Solid Films 315 1998 9­12 Letter Patterning of a polysiloxane precursor to silicate glasses. Introduction This paper describes a new method to generate mm-scale patterns of silicate glass on flat and non to silica. After removing the unreacted polymer and curing, a silicate glass pattern is produced. Z

Tien, Joe

46

Half-flat Quantum Hair  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By wrapping D3-branes over 3-cycles on a half-flat manifold we construct an effective supersymmetric black hole in the N=2 low-energy theory in four-dimensions. Specifically we find that the torsion cycles present in a half-flat compactification, corresponding to the mirror symmetric image of electric NS flux on a Calabi-Yau manifold, manifest in the half-flat black hole as quantum hair. We compute the electric and magnetic charges related to the quantum hair, and also the mass contribution to the effective black hole. We find that by wrapping a number of D3-branes equal to the order of the discrete group associated to the torsional part of the half-flat homology, the effective charge and mass terms vanishes. We compute the variation of entropy and the corresponding temperature associated with the lost of quantum hair. We also comment on the equivalence between canceling Freed-Witten anomaly and the assumption of self-duality for the 5-form field strength. Finally from a K-theoretical perspective, we compute the presence of discrete RR charge of D-branes wrapping torsional cycles in a half-flat manifold.

Hugo Garcia-Compean; Oscar Loaiza-Brito; Aldo Martinez-Merino; Roberto Santos-Silva

2013-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

47

High-Power Solid-State Lasers from a Laser Glass Perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advances in laser glass compositions and manufacturing have enabled a new class of high-energy/high-power (HEHP), petawatt (PW) and high-average-power (HAP) laser systems that are being used for fusion energy ignition demonstration, fundamental physics research and materials processing, respectively. The requirements for these three laser systems are different necessitating different glasses or groups of glasses. The manufacturing technology is now mature for melting, annealing, fabricating and finishing of laser glasses for all three applications. The laser glass properties of major importance for HEHP, PW and HAP applications are briefly reviewed and the compositions and properties of the most widely used commercial laser glasses summarized. Proposed advances in these three laser systems will require new glasses and new melting methods which are briefly discussed. The challenges presented by these laser systems will likely dominate the field of laser glass development over the next several decades.

Campbell, J H; Hayden, J S; Marker, A J

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

48

Facility overview for commercial application of selected Rocky Flats facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Facility Overview is to support the Rocky Flats Local Impacts Initiative`s Request for Interest, to solicit interest from commercial corporations for utilizing buildings 865 and 883, and the equipment contained within each building, for a commercial venture. In the following sections, this document describes the Rocky Flats Site, the buildings available for lease, the equipment within these buildings, the site services available to a tenant, the human resources available to support operations in buildings 865 and 883, and the environmental condition of the buildings and property. In addition, a brief description is provided of the work performed to date to explore the potential products that might be manufactured in Buildings 865 and 883, and the markets for these products.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

CRYSTALLIZATION IN MULTICOMPONENT GLASSES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In glass processing situations involving glass crystallization, various crystalline forms nucleate, grow, and dissolve, typically in a nonuniform temperature field of molten glass subjected to convection. Nuclear waste glasses are remarkable examples of multicomponent vitrified mixtures involving partial crystallization. In the glass melter, crystals form and dissolve during batch-to-glass conversion, melter processing, and product cooling. Crystals often agglomerate and sink, and they may settle at the melter bottom. Within the body of cooling glass, multiple phases crystallize in a non-uniform time-dependent temperature field. Self-organizing periodic distribution (the Liesegnang effect) is common. Various crystallization phenomena that occur in glass making are reviewed.

KRUGER AA; HRMA PR

2009-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

50

Next Generation Power Electronics National Manufacturing Innovation Institute  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Next Generation Power Electronics National Manufacturing Innovation Institute will focus on wide bandgap (WBG) semiconductors - the same materials used in LED light fixtures and many flat screen TVs. The Institute will use $70 million provided by the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Manufacturing Office to support and manage its programs over the next five years. This Institute is one of three new innovation hubs announced by President Obama in his 2013 State of the Union address and part of the National Network for Manufacturing Innovation (NNMI).

51

Energy implications of glass-container recycling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses the question of whether glass-container recycling actually saves energy. Glass-container production in 1991 was 10{sup 7} tons, with cullet making up about 30% of the input to manufacture. Two-thirds of the cullet is postconsumer waste; the remainder is in-house scrap (rejects). Most of the glass recycled is made into new containers. Total primary energy consumption includes direct process-energy use by the industry (adjusted to account for the efficiency of fuel production) plus fuel and raw-material transportation and production energies; the grand total for 1991 is estimated to be about 168 {times} 10{sup 12} Btu. The total primary energy use decreases as the percent of glass recycled rises, but the maximum energy saved is only about 13%. If distance to the landfill is kept fixed and that to the recovery facility multiplied by about eight, to 100 mi, a break-even point is reached, and recycling saves no energy. Previous work has shown that to save energy when using glass bottles, reuse is the clear choice. Recycling of glass does not save much energy or valuable raw material and does not reduce air or water pollution significantly. The most important impacts are the small reduction of waste sent to the landfill and increased production rates at glass plants.

Gaines, L.L.; Mintz, M.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

National Center for Advanced Information Components Manufacturing. Program summary report, Volume II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Center for Advanced Information Components Manufacturing focused on manufacturing research and development for flat panel displays, advanced lithography, microelectronics, and optoelectronics. This report provides an overview of the program, program history, summaries of the technical projects, and key program accomplishments.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

RRR Niobium Manufacturing Experience  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ATI Wah Chang has been manufacturing RRR niobium for more than 30 years using electron beam melting techniques. Fabricated forms include plate, sheet, foil, bar, rod and tubing. This paper provides manufacturing information.

Graham, Ronald A. [ATI Wah Chang, An Allegheny Technologies Company, Albany, Oregon 97321 (United States)

2007-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

54

Metrics for Sustainable Manufacturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for implementing green manufacturing”. Trans. of NAMRI/SME,the imple- mentation of green manufacturing, where a wedgemanufacturing scope of the assessment. While it is always important in the development of green

Reich-Weiser, Corinne; Vijayaraghavan, Athulan; Dornfeld, David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

A Materials Science Driven Pattern Generation Solution to Fracturing Computer Generated Glass for Films and Games  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

include some plastics like polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), laminated, toughened glasses, safety glasses, other ceramics, most non-metals, and some metals when subjected to low temperatures. Brittleness, ductility, malleability, plasticity, stiffness...]. Their formula accurately models the brittle materials tested: flat PMMA and glass plates of various thickness. The continuous line in Figure 26 (B) is n=1.7(V^)1/2, where n is the number of radial cracks. 26 II.3. Visual Effects Approaches to Fracturing...

Monroe, David Charles

2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

56

Graphene folding on flat substrates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a combined experimental-theoretical study of graphene folding on flat substrates. The structure and deformation of the folded graphene sheet are experimentally characterized by atomic force microscopy. The local graphene folding behaviors are interpreted based on nonlinear continuum mechanics modeling and molecular dynamics simulations. Our study on self-folding of a trilayer graphene sheet reports a bending stiffness of about 6.57?eV, which is about four times the reported values for monolayer graphene. Our results reveal that an intriguing free sliding phenomenon occurs at the interlayer van der Waals interfaces during the graphene folding process. This work demonstrates that it is a plausible venue to quantify the bending stiffness of graphene based on its self-folding conformation on flat substrates. The findings reported in this work are useful to a better understanding of the mechanical properties of graphene and in the pursuit of its applications.

Chen, Xiaoming; Zhao, Yadong; Ke, Changhong, E-mail: cke@binghamton.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, State University of New York at Binghamton, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States); Zhang, Liuyang; Wang, Xianqiao [College of Engineering, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602 (United States)

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

57

Hollings Manufacturing Extension Partnership: Delivering Measurable Results to Manufacturing Clients  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of services, from innovation strategies to process improvements to green manufacturing. MEP also worksHollings Manufacturing Extension Partnership: Delivering Measurable Results to Manufacturing Clients MEP · MANUFACTURING EXTENSION PARTNERSHIP NationalInstituteofStandardsandTechnology March2013

Perkins, Richard A.

58

All conformally flat pure radiation metrics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The complete class of conformally flat, pure radiation metrics is given, generalising the metric recently given by Wils.

S. Brian Edgar; Garry Ludwig

1996-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

59

Glass-silicon column  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A glass-silicon column that can operate in temperature variations between room temperature and about 450.degree. C. The glass-silicon column includes large area glass, such as a thin Corning 7740 boron-silicate glass bonded to a silicon wafer, with an electrode embedded in or mounted on glass of the column, and with a self alignment silicon post/glass hole structure. The glass/silicon components are bonded, for example be anodic bonding. In one embodiment, the column includes two outer layers of silicon each bonded to an inner layer of glass, with an electrode imbedded between the layers of glass, and with at least one self alignment hole and post arrangement. The electrode functions as a column heater, and one glass/silicon component is provided with a number of flow channels adjacent the bonded surfaces.

Yu, Conrad M.

2003-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

60

Enabling Manufacturing Research through Interoperability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sustainable or environmentally benign manufacturing processes andAND SUSTAINABLE FIGURE 8: LIFE-CYCLE OF MANUFACTURING PROCESSES (

Dornfeld, David; Wright, Paul; Helu, Moneer; Vijayaraghavan, Athulan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manufacturing flat glass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

CONTINUOUS ROLL-TO-ROLL SERPENTINE DEPOSITION FOR HIGH THROUGHPUT a-Si PV MANUFACTURING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a number of advantages in a fully automated high throughput PV module production plant [l-18--a significant problem in many glass substrate amorphous silicon alloy PV module manufacturing plants. ECDCONTINUOUS ROLL-TO-ROLL SERPENTINE DEPOSITION FOR HIGH THROUGHPUT a-Si PV MANUFACTURING M. Izu, H

Deng, Xunming

62

Windy Flats | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 South Place:ReferenceEdit JumpWill County,Windspire EnergyFlats Jump to:

63

Vacuum fusion bonding of glass plates  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved apparatus and method for vacuum fusion bonding of large, patterned glass plates. One or both glass plates are patterned with etched features such as microstructure capillaries and a vacuum pumpout moat, with one plate having at least one hole therethrough for communication with a vacuum pumpout fixture. High accuracy alignment of the plates is accomplished by a temporary clamping fixture until the start of the fusion bonding heat cycle. A complete, void-free fusion bond of seamless, full-strength quality is obtained through the plates; because the glass is heated well into its softening point and because of a large, distributed force that is developed that presses the two plates together from the difference in pressure between the furnace ambient (high pressure) and the channeling and microstructures in the plates (low pressure) due to the vacuum drawn. The apparatus and method may be used to fabricate microcapillary arrays for chemical electrophoresis; for example, any apparatus using a network of microfluidic channels embedded between plates of glass or similar moderate melting point substrates with a gradual softening point curve, or for assembly of glass-based substrates onto larger substrates, such as in flat panel display systems.

Swierkowski, Steve P. (Livermore, CA); Davidson, James C. (Livermore, CA); Balch, Joseph W. (Livermore, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Vacuum fusion bonding of glass plates  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved apparatus and method for vacuum fusion bonding of large, patterned glass plates. One or both glass plates are patterned with etched features such as microstructure capillaries and a vacuum pumpout moat, with one plate having at least one hole therethrough for communication with a vacuum pumpout fixture. High accuracy alignment of the plates is accomplished by a temporary clamping fixture until the start of the fusion bonding heat cycle. A complete, void-free fusion bond of seamless, full-strength quality is obtained through the plates; because the glass is heated well into its softening point and because of a large, distributed force that is developed that presses the two plates together from the difference in pressure between the furnace ambient (high pressure) and the channeling and microstructures in the plates (low pressure) due to the vacuum drawn. The apparatus and method may be used to fabricate microcapillary arrays for chemical electrophoresis; for example, any apparatus using a network of microfluidic channels embedded between plates of glass or similar moderate melting point substrates with a gradual softening point curve, or for assembly of glass-based substrates onto larger substrates, such as in flat panel display systems.

Swierkowski, Steve P. (Livermore, CA); Davidson, James C. (Livermore, CA); Balch, Joseph W. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Effects of Cerium Removal from Glass on Photovoltaic Module Performance and Stability: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some PV manufacturers use glass without Ce, which improves light transmission but can lower long-term stability; additional light transmission in 300-340-nm range can cause delamination ~3.8x faster.

Kempe, M. D.; Moricone, T.; Kilkenny, M.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Locating Chicago Manufacturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renaissance Council, is among the nation's leading public high schools focused on manufac- turing area's econ- omy, including how important manufacturing is to that economy, which manufac- turing

Illinois at Chicago, University of

67

Advanced Materials Manufacturing | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

existing manufacturing industries and result in creative new products. Stronger, more corrosion-resistant and lower cost steel alloys are being developed and commercialized to...

68

Manufacturing | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the production of clean energy technologies like electric vehicles, LED bulbs and solar panels. The Department is also working with manufacturers to increase their energy...

69

Acoustics by additive manufacturing:.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This study focuses on exploring the merging field of additive manufacturing and acoustics and introduces a new type of sound absorber which is regulating performance… (more)

Setaki, F.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

SSL Manufacturing Roadmap  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Report detailing DOE Solid-State Lighting Program activities to accelerate manufacturing improvements that reduce costs and enhance the quality of SSL products.

71

Additive Manufacturing: Going Mainstream  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Additive manufacturing, or 3D printing, is receiving attention from media, investment communities and governments around the world transforming it from obscurity to something to be talked about.

72

ITP Glass: Industrial Glass Bandwidth Analysis Final Report,...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Glass Industry; April, 2002 ITP Glass: Glass Industry Technology Roadmap; April 2002 ITP Glass: A Clear Vision for a Bright Future...

73

ITP Glass: Glass Industry of the Future: Energy and Environmental...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Glass Industry of the Future: Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Glass Industry; April, 2002 ITP Glass: Glass Industry of the Future: Energy and Environmental Profile of...

74

Transparent glass honeycomb structures for energy loss control. Final summary report, January 1976-October 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been demonstrated that properly-shaped glass honeycomb placed between a non-selective absorber and the coverglass of a flat plate solar collector gives collection efficiencies significantly higher than those of conventional flat plate units, even those with selective absorbers, collecting solar energy at temperatures required for heating and cooling buildings. Three basic glass honeycomb shapes were analyzed and tested: (1) thin-walled cylindrical glass tube honeycomb in square or hexagonal arrays, (2) corrugated thin glass sheets stacked peak-to-trough to form double-sinsuoid-shaped cells, and (3) flat thin glass sheets stacked to form long parallel slots. A continuous hot-rolling mill was used to corrugate commercial Micro-Sheet glass, thus demonstrating a key step needed for the commercialization of glass honeycomb fabrication. Experimental-scale (61 cm x 61 cm) collectors and collectors scaled-up in area were fabricated and tested outdoors to verify the analytical-numerical performance-prediction algorithms developed during the program. Optimization studies were made with respect to performance and cost to identify optimal shapes of sinusoidal-celled glass honeycombs which have high potential for mass production.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Ultrafast pulsed laser utilizing broad bandwidth laser glass  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ultrafast laser uses a Nd-doped phosphate laser glass characterized by a particularly broad emission bandwidth to generate the shortest possible output pulses. The laser glass is composed primarily of P.sub.2 O.sub.5, Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 and MgO, and possesses physical and thermal properties that are compatible with standard melting and manufacturing methods. The broad bandwidth laser glass can be used in modelocked oscillators as well as in amplifier modules.

Payne, Stephen A. (Castro Valley, CA); Hayden, Joseph S. (Clarks Summit, PA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Ultrafast pulsed laser utilizing broad bandwidth laser glass  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ultrafast laser uses a Nd-doped phosphate laser glass characterized by a particularly broad emission bandwidth to generate the shortest possible output pulses. The laser glass is composed primarily of P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and MgO, and possesses physical and thermal properties that are compatible with standard melting and manufacturing methods. The broad bandwidth laser glass can be used in modelocked oscillators as well as in amplifier modules. 7 figs.

Payne, S.A.; Hayden, J.S.

1997-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

77

MANUFACTURING & SERVICE OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MANUFACTURING & SERVICE OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT Vol. 14, No. 4, Fall 2012, pp. 495­511 ISSN 1523 research directions, expanding upon the key points raised by Green [Green LV (2012) The vital role of operations analysis in improving healthcare delivery. Manufacturing Service Oper. Management 14

Boucherie, Richard J.

78

MANUFACTURING & SERVICE OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;Green and Soares: Note Manufacturing & Service Operations Management 9(1), pp. 54­61, © 2007 INFORMS 55MANUFACTURING & SERVICE OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT Vol. 9, No. 1, Winter 2007, pp. 54­61 issn 1523-Dependent Waiting Time Probabilities in M t /M/s t Queuing Systems Linda V. Green Graduate School of Business

Soares, JoĂŁo LuĂ­s Cardoso

79

Metal and Glass Manufacturers Reduce Costs by Increasing Energy Efficiency  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Careerlumens_placard-green.eps More Documents &Small2011 DOETheNationalWeMessage fromin Process

80

Independent Oversight Review, Rocky Flats Environmental Technology...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

- March 2000 March 2000 Review of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Transportation Emergency Management Program This report provides the results of an independent...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manufacturing flat glass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Flat-Plate Photovoltaic Module Basics  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Flat-plate photovoltaic (PV) modules are made of several components, including the front surface materials, encapsulant, rear surface, and frame.

82

Manufacturing Renaissance: Return of manufacturing to western countries.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Manufacturing Renaissance, i.e. return of manufacturing to west, has been recently observed. This paper analyzes the patterns observed within each of the four main drivers… (more)

Kianian, Babak; Larsson, Tobias

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Manufacturing Licenses Available | Tech Transfer | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Deposition Manufacturing 201303127 Methods and Materials for Room Temperature Polymer Additive Manufacturing 201303140 Reactive Polymer Fused Deposition Manufacturing 201303151...

84

Turkey Flat Site Effects Test Area The Turkey-Flat strong motion "blind"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Turkey Flat Site Effects Test Area B B' A A' C C' The Turkey-Flat strong motion "blind" prediction experiment "Blind" Test Approach · Conduct high quality field and laboratory tests to characterize Geological Survey Turkey Flat, USA Site Effects Test Area: "Blind" Test of Predicted Ground Response

Oprsal, Ivo

85

"Technology Wedges" for Implementing Green Manufacturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

issues in green design and manufacturing." ManufacturingFOR IMPLEMENTING GREEN MANUFACTURING David Dornfeld BerkeleyCalifornia KEYWORDS Green Manufacturing, Technology,

Dornfeld, David; Wright, Paul

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Flat Directions and Baryogenesis in Supersymmetric Theories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Flat directions are a generic feature of supersymmetric theories. They are of cosmological interest because they can lead to coherent production of scalars. In the early universe such flat directions could be dangerous due to the potentially large energy density and the late decay of the associated scalars when they have only $1/M_p$ couplings (Polonyi problem). On the other hand, flat directions among the standard model fields can carry baryon number and lead to a possible mechanism for baryogenesis (Affleck Dine baryogenesis). When considering the cosmological consequences of the flat directions, it is important to take into account the soft potential with curvature of order the Hubble constant due to supersymmetry breaking in the early universe. In this talk, we discuss flat directions, their potential cosmological implications focusing on Affleck-Dine baryogenesis, and how the standard picture of their evolution must be modified in the presence of the large supersymmetry breaking in the early universe.

Lisa Randall

1995-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

87

MDF | Manufacturing Demonstration Facility | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MDF Working with MDF NTRC OLCF SNS Titanium robotic hand holding sphere fabricated using additive manufacturing Home | User Facilities | MDF MDF | Manufacturing Demonstration...

88

Innovative Technologies to Manufacture Hybrid Metal Foam/Composite Components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aim of this paper is to verify the technological feasibility to realize hybrid metal-foam/composite component and the mechanical performances of the final structure. The hybrid component is composed by a cylindrical core in aluminum foam, the most used between those commercially available, and an outer layer in epoxy/S2-glass, manufactured by filament winding technology.A set of experimental tests have been carried out, to the aim to estimate the improvement of the hybrid component characteristics, compared to the sum of the single components (metal foam cylinder and epoxy/S2-glass tube).

Carrino, L.; Durante, M.; Franchitti, S. [DIMP, University of Naples 'Federico II', P.le Tecchio, 80-80125 Naples (Italy); Sorrentino, L.; Tersigni, L. [DII, University of Cassino, Via G. Di Biasio, 43-03043 Cassino (Italy)

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

89

Survey of US Department of Defense Manufacturing Technology Program activities applicable to civilian manufacturing industries. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Intent of the survey was to identify and characterize activities potentially applicable to improving energy efficiency and overall productivity in the civilian manufacturing industries. The civilian industries emphasized were the general manufacturing industries (including fabricated metals, glass, machinery, paper, plastic, textile, and transportation equipment manufacturing) and the primary metals industries (including primary aluminum, copper, steel, and zinc production). The principal steps in the survey were to: develop overview taxonomies of the general manufacturing and primary metals industries as well as specific industry taxonomies; identify needs and opportunities for improving process energy efficiency and productivity in the industries included; identify federal programs, capabilities, and special technical expertise that might be relevant to industry's needs and opportunities; contact federal laboratories/facilities, through visits and other forms of inquiry; prepare formatted profiles (descriptions) potentially applicable work efforts; review findings with industry; and compile and evaluate industry responses.

Azimi, S.A.; Conrad, J.L.; Reed, J.E.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Method of forming crystalline silicon devices on glass  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is disclosed for fabricating single-crystal silicon microelectronic components on a silicon substrate and transferring same to a glass substrate. This is achieved by utilizing conventional silicon processing techniques for fabricating components of electronic circuits and devices on bulk silicon, wherein a bulk silicon surface is prepared with epitaxial layers prior to the conventional processing. The silicon substrate is bonded to a glass substrate and the bulk silicon is removed leaving the components intact on the glass substrate surface. Subsequent standard processing completes the device and circuit manufacturing. This invention is useful in applications requiring a transparent or insulating substrate, particularly for display manufacturing. Other applications include sensors, actuators, optoelectronics, radiation hard electronics, and high temperature electronics. 7 figures.

McCarthy, A.M.

1995-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

91

Method of forming crystalline silicon devices on glass  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for fabricating single-crystal silicon microelectronic components on a silicon substrate and transferring same to a glass substrate. This is achieved by utilizing conventional silicon processing techniques for fabricating components of electronic circuits and devices on bulk silicon, wherein a bulk silicon surface is prepared with epitaxial layers prior to the conventional processing. The silicon substrate is bonded to a glass substrate and the bulk silicon is removed leaving the components intact on the glass substrate surface. Subsequent standard processing completes the device and circuit manufacturing. This invention is useful in applications requiring a transparent or insulating substrate, particularly for display manufacturing. Other applications include sensors, actuators, optoelectronics, radiation hard electronics, and high temperature electronics.

McCarthy, Anthony M. (Menlo Park, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

CIMplementation™: Evaluating Manufacturing Automation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management and labor. In the new shop, ma~? agers will be unable to succeed unless thet earn the respect and cooperation of their I subordinates. Managers need to address th~ fear and resistance of manufacturing emPlofees before and during a transition.... Managers are becoming more interested in these methods, but they should be aware that implementing them will be a slow, complex task. This technology will require changes in manufacturing organization. This paper discusses changes required...

Krakauer, J.

93

Hollow spherical shell manufacture  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for making a hollow spherical shell of silicate glass composition in which an aqueous suspension of silicate glass particles and an immiscible liquid blowing agent is placed within the hollow spherical cavity of a porous mold. The mold is spun to reduce effective gravity to zero and to center the blowing agent, while being heated so as to vaporize the immiscible liquid and urge the water carrier of the aqueous suspension to migrate into the body of the mold, leaving a green shell compact deposited around the mold cavity. The green shell compact is then removed from the cavity, and is sintered for a time and a temperature sufficient to form a silicate glass shell of substantially homogeneous composition and uniform geometry.

O'Holleran, Thomas P. (Belleville, MI)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Hollow spherical shell manufacture  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is disclosed for making a hollow spherical shell of silicate glass composition in which an aqueous suspension of silicate glass particles and an immiscible liquid blowing agent is placed within the hollow spherical cavity of a porous mold. The mold is spun to reduce effective gravity to zero and to center the blowing agent, while being heated so as to vaporize the immiscible liquid and urge the water carrier of the aqueous suspension to migrate into the body of the mold, leaving a green shell compact deposited around the mold cavity. The green shell compact is then removed from the cavity, and is sintered for a time and a temperature sufficient to form a silicate glass shell of substantially homogeneous composition and uniform geometry. 3 figures.

O'Holleran, T.P.

1991-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

95

Diamond turning of glass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new research initiative will be undertaken to investigate the critical cutting depth concepts for single point diamond turning of brittle, amorphous materials. Inorganic glasses and a brittle, thermoset polymer (organic glass) are the principal candidate materials. Interrupted cutting tests similar to those done in earlier research are Ge and Si crystals will be made to obtain critical depth values as a function of machining parameters. The results will provide systematic data with which to assess machining performance on glasses and amorphous materials

Blackley, W.S.; Scattergood, R.O.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Rare Earth Phosphate Glass and Glass-Ceramic Proton Conductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

300-500°C. Doping rare earth phosphate glasses with Ce, andRare Earth Phosphate Glass and Glass-Ceramic Protonconductivity of alkaline-earth doped rare earth phosphate

De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Flat panel ferroelectric electron emission display system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device which can produce a bright, raster scanned or non-raster scanned image from a flat panel. Unlike many flat panel technologies, this device does not require ambient light or auxiliary illumination for viewing the image. Rather, this device relies on electrons emitted from a ferroelectric emitter impinging on a phosphor. This device takes advantage of a new electron emitter technology which emits electrons with significant kinetic energy and beam current density.

Sampayan, Stephen E. (Manteca, CA); Orvis, William J. (Livermore, CA); Caporaso, George J. (Livermore, CA); Wieskamp, Ted F. (Livermore, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

ATS materials/manufacturing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Materials/Manufacturing Technology subelement is a part of the base technology portion of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program. The work in this subelement is being performed predominantly by industry with assistance from national laboratories and universities. The projects in this subelement are aimed toward hastening the incorporation of new materials and components in gas turbines. Work is currently ongoing on thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), the scale-up of single crystal airfoil manufacturing technologies, materials characterization, and technology information exchange. This paper presents highlights of the activities during the past year. 12 refs., 24 figs., 4 tabs.

Karnitz, M.A.; Wright, I.G.; Ferber, M.K. [and others

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Archived Soil & Groundwater...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Rocky...

100

LM Records Handling System (LMRHS01) - Rocky Flats Environmental...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

LM Records Handling System (LMRHS01) - Rocky Flats Environmental Records Database, Office of Legacy Management LM Records Handling System (LMRHS01) - Rocky Flats Environmental...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manufacturing flat glass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

The Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology Project: Phase 1 subcontractors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Phase I portion of the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) Project, the problem identification phase, was completed in mid-1991. This work involved competitive bidding that was open to any US firm with existing manufacturing capabilities, regardless of material or module design. In early 1991, subcontracts were awarded to 22 of approximately 40 bidders. Each subcontract was funded at a level of up to $50,000 and a duration of three months. The problems identified by the research in this phase of the program represent opportunities for industrial participants to improve their manufacturing processes, reduce manufacturing costs, increase product performance, or develop a foundation for scaling up US-based manufacturing plant capacities. Many of these opportunities have since been detailed in the approaches that these organizations suggested for Phase 2 (the problem solution phase) research and development (R&D). It is not. anticipated that any additional Phase I solicitation will be issued because Phase I was intended to help the US Department of Energy (DOE) characterize the status and needs of the US photovoltaic (PV) industry and encourage the industry to examine and prioritize required manufacturing line improvements. Phase I subcontracted research included five subcontractors working on flat-plate crystalline silicon technology, eleven working on flat-plate thin-film modules (one in thin-film crystalline silicon, six in amorphous silicon. and four in polycrystalline thin films), six working on concentrator systems, and two working on general equipment/production options. (Two of the participants each worked in two areas).

Not Available

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

The Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology Project: Phase 1 subcontractors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Phase I portion of the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) Project, the problem identification phase, was completed in mid-1991. This work involved competitive bidding that was open to any US firm with existing manufacturing capabilities, regardless of material or module design. In early 1991, subcontracts were awarded to 22 of approximately 40 bidders. Each subcontract was funded at a level of up to $50,000 and a duration of three months. The problems identified by the research in this phase of the program represent opportunities for industrial participants to improve their manufacturing processes, reduce manufacturing costs, increase product performance, or develop a foundation for scaling up US-based manufacturing plant capacities. Many of these opportunities have since been detailed in the approaches that these organizations suggested for Phase 2 (the problem solution phase) research and development (R D). It is not. anticipated that any additional Phase I solicitation will be issued because Phase I was intended to help the US Department of Energy (DOE) characterize the status and needs of the US photovoltaic (PV) industry and encourage the industry to examine and prioritize required manufacturing line improvements. Phase I subcontracted research included five subcontractors working on flat-plate crystalline silicon technology, eleven working on flat-plate thin-film modules (one in thin-film crystalline silicon, six in amorphous silicon. and four in polycrystalline thin films), six working on concentrator systems, and two working on general equipment/production options. (Two of the participants each worked in two areas).

Not Available

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Defense HLW Glass Degradation Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to document the development of a model for calculating the release rate for radionuclides and other key elements from high-level radioactive waste (HLW) glasses under exposure conditions relevant to the performance of the repository. Several glass compositions are planned for the repository, some of which have yet to be identified (i.e., glasses from Hanford and Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory). The mechanism for glass dissolution is the same for these glasses and the glasses yet to be developed for the disposal of DOE wastes. All of these glasses will be of a quality consistent with the glasses used to develop this report.

D. Strachan

2004-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

104

Bio-Manufacturing: A Strategic clean energy manufacturing opportunity  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Breakout Session 1: New Developments and Hot Topics Session 1-A: Biomass and the U.S. Competitive Advantages for Manufacturing Clean Energy Products Libby Wayman, Director, EERE Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative

105

Development of Advanced CdTe Solar Cells Based on High Temperature Corning Glass Substrates: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-373  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NREL has developed advanced processes for CdTe solar cells, but because of the temperature limitations of conventional soda lime glass, many of these processes have not been transferred to manufacturing. Corning is developing high temperature substrate glasses that are believed to be manufacturable and will lead to lower $/watt modules costs. The purpose of this CRADA is to evaluate these glasses in the advanced NREL processes. In addition, the CRADA seeks to develop manufacturable processes for transparent conductive oxide layers based on cadmium stannate.

Barnes, T.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Process for Converting Waste Glass Fiber into Value Added Products, Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nature of the Event: Technology demonstration. The project successfully met all of its technical objectives. Albacem has signed an exclusive licensing agreement with Vitro Minerals Inc., a specialty minerals company, to commercialize the Albacem technology (website: www.vitrominerals.com). Location: The basic research for the project was conducted in Peoria, Illinois, and Atlanta, Georgia, with third-party laboratory verification carried out in Ontario, Canada. Pilot-scale trials (multi-ton) were conducted at a facility in South Carolina. Full-scale manufacturing facilities have been designed and are scheduled for construction by Vitro Minerals during 2006 at a location in the Georgia, North Carolina, and South Carolina tri-state area. The Technology: This technology consists of a process to eliminate solid wastes generated at glass fiber manufacturing facilities by converting them to value-added materials (VCAS Pozzolans) suitable for use in cement and concrete applications. This technology will help divert up to 250,000 tpy of discarded glass fiber manufacturing wastes into beneficial use applications in the concrete construction industry. This technology can also be used for processing glass fiber waste materials reclaimed from monofills at manufacturing facilities. The addition of take-back materials and reclamation from landfills can help supply over 500,000 tpy of glass fiber waste for processing into value added products. In the Albacem process, waste glass fiber is ground to a fine powder that effectively functions as a reactive pozzolanic admixture for use in portland ce¬ment-based building materials and products, such as concrete, mortars, terrazzo, tile, and grouts. Because the waste fiber from the glass manufacturing industry is vitreous, clean, and low in iron and alkalis, the resulting pozzolan is white in color and highly consistent in chemical composition. This white pozzolan, termed VCAS Pozzolan (for Vitreous Calcium-Alumino-Silicate). is especially suited for white concrete applications where it imparts desirable benefits such as increased long-term strength and improved long-term durability of concrete products. Two U.S. patents entitled have been issued to Albacem covering the technology. Third-party validation testing has confirmed that the pozzolanic product is an excellent, high performance material that conforms to a ASTM standards and improves the strength and durability of concrete. Currently, there are no known significant competing technologies to process glass fiber manufacturing by-products and con¬vert them into value-added products. Most glass fiber-forming and fabrication wastes continue to be disposed in landfills at significant costs and with associated negative environmental impact. It is estimated that in a typical glass fiber manufactur¬ing facility, 10-20% by weight of the processed glass material is sent for dis¬posal to a landfill. Today, supplementary ce¬menting materials or mineral admixtures are key to achieving strong and durable concrete. Recovered materials such as coal fly ash, ground granulated blast furnace slag and silica fume are widely accepted and used in concrete all over the world, espe¬cially in the construction of “high performance” structures such as massive dams, bridges, subway tunnels, etc. These min¬eral admixtures are not suitable for white concrete and light-colored architectural concrete applications. Converting waste glass fibers into a high performance white pozzolan would allow white concrete producers to gain from the same durability benefits currently realized by gray concrete producers. Description of the Benefit: Albacem’s technology will enable the glass fiber industry to eliminate nearly 100% of its glass fiber produc¬tion waste streams by converting them into viable value-added products. With this technology, the glass industry can prevent the landfilling of about 250,000 tons of waste glass fiber annually. Glass manufacturers will realize improved production efficiency by reducing process costs through the elimination of solid was

Hemmings, Raymond T.

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

107

Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Blake Marshall, AMO's lead for Additive Manufacturing Technologies, will provide an overview of current R&D activities in additive manufacturing and its application to fuel cell prototyping and...

108

Flat Spacetime Vacuum in Loop Quantum Gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We construct a state in the loop quantum gravity theory with zero cosmological constant, which should correspond to the flat spacetime vacuum solution. This is done by defining the loop transform coefficients of a flat connection wavefunction in the holomorphic representation which satisfies all the constraints of quantum General Relativity and it is peaked around the flat space triads. The loop transform coefficients are defined as spin foam state sum invariants of the spin networks embedded in the spatial manifold for the SU(2) quantum group. We also obtain an expression for the vacuum wavefunction in the triad represntation, by defining the corresponding spin networks functional integrals as SU(2) quantum group state sums.

A. Mikovic

2004-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

109

Bolt Manufacture: Process Selection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

file · Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) 3 D P i ti· 3-D Printing · Light Engineered Net Shaping (LENS Processes and Systems Prof. J.S. Colton © GIT 2009 20 #12;3D Printing Process (Soligen) ME 6222: Manufacturing Processes and Systems Prof. J.S. Colton © GIT 2009 21 #12;3D Printing Head (Soligen)3D Printing

Colton, Jonathan S.

110

Manufacturing High Temperature Systems  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of Energy Low-TemperatureEnergyAll ManufacturingFoodOctoberto DOE

111

Manufacturing Success Stories  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: AlternativeEnvironment, SafetyWater ConservationDepartmentEnergy Manufacturing Energy6

112

Baseline LAW Glass Formulation Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The major objective of the baseline glass formulation work was to develop and select glass formulations that are compliant with contractual and processing requirements for each of the LAW waste streams. Other objectives of the work included preparation and characterization of glasses with respect to the properties of interest, optimization of sulfate loading in the glasses, evaluation of ability to achieve waste loading limits, testing to demonstrate compatibility of glass melts with melter materials of construction, development of glass formulations to support ILAW qualification activities, and identification of glass formulation issues with respect to contract specifications and processing requirements.

Kruger, Albert A. [USDOE Office of River Protection, Richland, WA (United States); Mooers, Cavin [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab.; Bazemore, Gina [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Pegg, Ian L. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Hight, Kenneth [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Lai, Shan Tao [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Buechele, Andrew [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Rielley, Elizabeth [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Gan, Hao [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Muller, Isabelle S. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Cecil, Richard [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab

2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

113

Manufacturing Tech Team | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Manufacturing Tech Team Manufacturing Tech Team Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Industrial Efficiency and Energy Productivity Video Industrial efficiency and low-cost energy...

114

Leveraging Manufacturing for a Sustainable Future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Implementing Green Manufacturing”, NAMRI Trans. , 35,Strategies for Green Manufacturing,” Proc. 4th CIRPAnd, in specific green manufacturing? This will depend on

Dornfeld, David

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Sustainable Manufacturing – Greening Processes, Systems and Products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Strategies for Green Manufacturing, " Proceedings HighFH), Implementing green manufacturing, as the first stepASME, Evanston, IL, Green Manufacturing uk/sustainability/

Dornfeld, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Appropriate use of Green Manufacturing Frameworks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Implementing Green Manufacturing,” Trans. North AmericanAppropriate use of Green Manufacturing Frameworks C. Reich-for sustainable or green manufacturing systems and products,

Reich-Weiser, Corinne; Vijayaraghavan, Athulan; Dornfeld, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Establishing Greener Products and Manufacturing Processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for implementing green manufacturing,” Trans. North AmericaStrategies for Green Manufacturing,” Proc. of the 4th CIRPAppropriate Use of Green Manufacturing Frameworks,” Proc. of

Linke, Barbara; Huang, Yu-Chu; Dornfeld, David

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Establishing Greener Products and Manufacturing Processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Operation Strategies for Green Manufacturing, Proceedings ofSymposium on Green Manufacturing and Applications (ISGMAfor implementing green manufacturing. Transactions of NAMRI/

Linke, Barbara; Dornfeld, David; Huang, Yu-Chu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Innovative Manufacturing Initiative Recognition Day, Advanced...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Publications Innovative Manufacturing Initiative Recognition Day Advanced Manufacturing Office Overview Unlocking the Potential of Additive Manufacturing in the Fuel Cells Industry...

120

Precision and Energy Usage for Additive Manufacturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sustainability of additive manufacturing: measuring theCommittee F42 on Additive Manufacturing Technologies," TheASTM Committee F42 on Additive Manufacturing Technologies. -

Clemon, Lee; Sudradjat, Anton; Jaquez, Maribel; Krishna, Aditya; Rammah, Marwan; Dornfeld, David

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manufacturing flat glass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Leveraging Manufacturing for a Sustainable Future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2010): “Sustainable Manufacturing – Greening Processes,processes and systems) can play in creating a sustainablesustainable manufacturing as “the creation of manufacturing products that use materials and processes

Dornfeld, David

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Establishing Greener Products and Manufacturing Processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

D. , “Sustainable Manufacturing - Greening Processes,Avoid) Increase process efficiency Most sustainable (Improvesustainable manufacturing. 2 They highlighted research needs in four categories: i) manufacturing processes and

Linke, Barbara; Huang, Yu-Chu; Dornfeld, David

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Sustainable Manufacturing – Greening Processes, Systems and Products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mittels Sustainable Manufacturing - Greening Processes,Sustainable for manufacturing Manufacturing Cambridge, accessed processes,processes due to energy awareness and environmental consciousness create many opportunities for sustainable

Dornfeld, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Establishing Greener Products and Manufacturing Processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

D. , Sustainable Manufacturing – Greening Processes, Systemsor impact low Most  sustainable Increase process efficiencysustainable manufacturing [1]. They highlighted research needs in four categories: i) manufacturing processes and

Linke, Barbara; Dornfeld, David; Huang, Yu-Chu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Chemical tracking at the Rocky Flats Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

EG&G Rocky Flats, Inc., has developed a chemical tracking system to support compliance with the Emergency Planning and community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) at the Rocky Flats Plant. This system, referred to as the EPCRA Chemical Control system (ECCS), uses bar code technology to uniquely identify and track the receipt, distribution, and use of chemicals. Chemical inventories are conducted using hand-held electronic scanners to update a site wide chemical database on a VAX 6000 computer. Information from the ECCS supports preparation of the EPCRA Tier II and Form R reports on chemical storage and use.

Costain, D.B.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Metallic glass composition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A metallic glass alloy that is either iron-based or nickel-based or based on a mixture of iron and nickel, containing lesser amounts of elements selected from the group boron, silicon carbon and phosphorous to which is added an amount of a ductility enhancing element selected from the group cerium, lanthanum, praseodymium and neodymium sufficient to increase ductility of the metallic glass upon annealing.

Kroeger, Donald M. (Knoxville, TN); Koch, Carl C. (Raleigh, NC)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

DWPF GLASS BEADS AND GLASS FRIT TRANSPORT DEMONSTRATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DWPF is considering replacing irregularly shaped glass frit with spherical glass beads in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) process to decrease the yield stress of the melter feed (a non-Newtonian Bingham Plastic). Pilot-scale testing was conducted on spherical glass beads and glass frit to determine how well the glass beads would transfer when compared to the glass frit. Process Engineering Development designed and constructed the test apparatus to aid in the understanding and impacts that spherical glass beads may have on the existing DWPF Frit Transfer System. Testing was conducted to determine if the lines would plug with the glass beads and the glass frit slurry and what is required to unplug the lines. The flow loop consisted of vertical and horizontal runs of clear PVC piping, similar in geometry to the existing system. Two different batches of glass slurry were tested: a batch of 50 wt% spherical glass beads and a batch of 50 wt% glass frit in process water. No chemicals such as formic acid was used in slurry, only water and glass formers. The glass beads used for this testing were commercially available borosilicate glass of mesh size -100+200. The glass frit was Frit 418 obtained from DWPF and is nominally -45+200 mesh. The spherical glass beads did not have a negative impact on the frit transfer system. The transferring of the spherical glass beads was much easier than the glass frit. It was difficult to create a plug with glass bead slurry in the pilot transfer system. When a small plug occurred from setting overnight with the spherical glass beads, the plug was easy to displace using only the pump. In the case of creating a man made plug in a vertical line, by filling the line with spherical glass beads and allowing the slurry to settle for days, the plug was easy to remove by using flush water. The glass frit proved to be much more difficult to transfer when compared to the spherical glass beads. The glass frit impacted the transfer system to the point that the test apparatus had to be disassembled to dislodge the plugs created in the system.

Adamson, D; Bradley Pickenheim, B

2008-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

128

Development of a process control sensor for the glass industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was initiated to fill a need in the glass industry for a non-contact temperature sensor for glass melts. At present, the glass forming industry (e.g., bottle manufacture) consumes significant amounts of energy. Careful control of temperature at the point the bottle is molded is necessary to prevent the bottle from being rejected as out-of-specification. In general, the entire glass melting and conditioning process is designed to minimize this rejection rate, maximize throughput and thus control energy and production costs. This program focuses on the design, development and testing of an advanced optically based pyrometer for glass melts. The pyrometer operates simultaneously at four wavelengths; through analytical treatment of the signals, internal temperature profiles within the glass melt can be resolved. A novel multiplexer alloys optical signals from a large number of fiber-optic sensors to be collected and resolved by a single detector at a location remote from the process. This results in a significant cost savings on a per measurement point basis. The development program is divided into two phases. Phase 1 involves the construction of a breadboard version on the instrument and its testing on a pilot-scale furnace. In Phase 2, a prototype analyzer will be constructed and tested on a commercial forehearth. This report covers the Phase 1 activities.

Gardner, M.; Candee, A.; Kramlich, J.; Koppang, R.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Neal Lane: Science in a Flat World  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lane discusses the changes that have taken place in the world since World War II that have made it "flatter," referring to Thomas L. Friedman's book, The World is Flat. Friedman's main premise is that inexpensive telecommunications is bringing about unhampered international competition, the demise of economic stability, and a trend toward outsourcing services, such as computer programming, engineering and science research.

Neal Lane

2006-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

130

Actin Polymerization: Forcing Flat Faces Forward  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Actin Polymerization: Forcing Flat Faces Forward Arpita Upadhyaya1 and Alexander van Oudenaarden2 Actin polymerization has been shown to be sufficient to propel curved objects, for example beads polymerization forms the basis of numerous forms of cell motility. Actin is thought to polymerize at the leading

van Oudenaarden, Alexander

131

Neal Lane: Science in a Flat World  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Lane discusses the changes that have taken place in the world since World War II that have made it "flatter," referring to Thomas L. Friedman's book, The World is Flat. Friedman's main premise is that inexpensive telecommunications is bringing about unhampered international competition, the demise of economic stability, and a trend toward outsourcing services, such as computer programming, engineering and science research.

Neal Lane

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Hollings Manufacturing Extension Partnership: A Commercialization Collaborator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to process improvements to green manufacturing. MEP also works with partners at the state and federal levelsHollings Manufacturing Extension Partnership: A Commercialization Collaborator MEP · MANUFACTURING to successfully commercialize federal technologies #12;The Manufacturing Extension Partnership

Perkins, Richard A.

133

Posted 10/18/11 MANUFACTURING ENGINEER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

manufacturing processes in our Metal Fabrication and Assembly departments. Additional responsibilities includePosted 10/18/11 MANUFACTURING ENGINEER Kenall Manufacturing Gurnee, IL Kenall, a leading manufacturer of advanced lighting solutions for specialized environments, has exceptional opportunities

Heller, Barbara

134

Seminar Title: Additive Manufacturing Advanced Manufacturing of Polymer and Composite Components  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seminar Title: Additive Manufacturing ­ Advanced Manufacturing of Polymer and Composite Components Functionally Integrated Composite Structures, Augsburg, Germany ME Faculty Candidate Abstract: Additive Manufacturing ­ Advanced Manufacturing of Polymer and Composite Components Additive manufacturing technologies

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

135

Vacuum fusion bonded glass plates having microstructures thereon  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved apparatus and method for vacuum fusion bonding of large, patterned glass plates. One or both glass plates are patterned with etched features such as microstructure capillaries and a vacuum pumpout moat, with one plate having at least one hole therethrough for communication with a vacuum pumpout fixture. High accuracy alignment of the plates is accomplished by a temporary clamping fixture until the start of the fusion bonding heat cycle. A complete, void-free fusion bond of seamless, full-strength quality is obtained through the plates; because the glass is heated well into its softening point and because of a large, distributed force that is developed that presses the two plates together from the difference in pressure between the furnace ambient (high pressure) and the channeling and microstructures in the plates (low pressure) due to the vacuum drawn. The apparatus and method may be used to fabricate microcapillary arrays for chemical electrophoresis; for example, any apparatus using a network of microfluidic channels embedded between plates of glass or similar moderate melting point substrates with a gradual softening point curve, or for assembly of glass-based substrates onto larger substrates, such as in flat panel display systems.

Swierkowski, Steve P. (Livermore, CA); Davidson, James C. (Livermore, CA); Balch, Joseph W. (Livermore, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Manufacturing Demonstration Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and InterfacesAdministrationManufacturing - GE Appliances, ORNL

137

Industrial Scale Demonstration of Smart Manufacturing Achieving...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Scale Demonstration of Smart Manufacturing Achieving Transformational Energy Productivity Gains Industrial Scale Demonstration of Smart Manufacturing Achieving...

138

Industrial Scale Demonstration of Smart Manufacturing Achieving...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Scale Demonstration of Smart Manufacturing Achieving Transformational Energy Productivity Gains Development of an Open Architecture, Widely Applicable Smart Manufacturing...

139

Glass matrix armor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An armor system which utilizes glass. A plurality of constraint cells are mounted on a surface of a substrate, which is metal armor plate or a similar tough material, such that the cells almost completely cover the surface of the substrate. Each constraint cell has a projectile-receiving wall parallel to the substrate surface and has sides which are perpendicular to and surround the perimeter of the receiving wall. The cells are mounted such that, in one embodiment, the substrate surface serves as a sixth side or closure for each cell. Each cell has inside of it a plate, termed the front plate, which is parallel to and in contact with substantially all of the inside surface of the receiving wall. The balance of each cell is completely filled with a projectile-abrading material consisting of glass and a ceramic material and, in certain embodiments, a polymeric material. The glass may be in monolithic form or particles of ceramic may be dispersed in a glass matrix. The ceramic material may be in monolithic form or may be in the form of particles dispersed in glass or dispersed in said polymer.

Calkins, Noel C. (Los Alamos, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Flat Space Limit of (Higher-Spin) Cardy Formula  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this note I derive the flat space limit of the modified Cardy formula associated with inner horizons and show that it reproduces the correct Galilean conformal field theory counting of flat space cosmology microstates. l also determine the entropy of flat space cosmologies in flat space chiral gravity in this way. In addition, I derive a Cardy-like expression for flat space cosmologies with spin-3 charges and thus give a prediction for the corresponding Galilean conformal field theory counting of flat space cosmology microstates with spin-3 charges.

Max Riegler

2014-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manufacturing flat glass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Manufacturing consumption of energy 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides estimates on energy consumption in the manufacturing sector of the U.S. economy based on data from the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey. The sample used in this report represented about 250,000 of the largest manufacturing establishments which account for approximately 98 percent of U.S. economic output from manufacturing, and an expected similar proportion of manufacturing energy use. The amount of energy use was collected for all operations of each establishment surveyed. Highlights of the report include profiles for the four major energy-consuming industries (petroleum refining, chemical, paper, and primary metal industries), and an analysis of the effects of changes in the natural gas and electricity markets on the manufacturing sector. Seven appendices are included to provide detailed background information. 10 figs., 51 tabs.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Manufacturing consumption of energy 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides estimates on energy consumption in the manufacturing sector of the US economy. These estimates are based on data from the 1991 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS). This survey--administered by the Energy End Use and Integrated Statistics Division, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Energy Information Administration (EIA)--is the most comprehensive source of national-level data on energy-related information for the manufacturing industries.

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Radiation content of Conformally flat initial data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the radiation of energy and linear momentum emitted to infinity by the headon collision of binary black holes, starting from rest at a finite initial separation, in the extreme mass ratio limit. For these configurations we identify the radiation produced by the initially conformally flat choice of the three geometry. This identification suggests that the radiated energy and momentum of headon collisions will not be dominated by the details of the initial data for evolution of holes from initial proper separations $L_0\\geq7M$. For non-headon orbits, where the amount of radiation is orders of magnitude larger, the conformally flat initial data may provide a relative even better approximation.

C. O. Lousto; R. H. Price

2004-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

144

ITP Nanomanufacturing: Nanomanufacturing Portfolio: Manufacturing...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

More Documents & Publications Sustainable Nanomaterials Workshop Advanced Manufacturing Office, U.S. Department of Energy Nanocomposite Materials for Lithium-Ion Batteries...

145

Manufacturing Spotlight: Boosting American Competitiveness  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Find out how the Energy Department is helping bring new clean energy technologies to the marketplace and make manufacturing processes more energy efficient.

146

Manufacturing Demonstration Facility Technology Collaborations...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

from industry to assess applicability of new technologies that can reduce manufacturing energy intensity or produce new, energy-efficient products. As part of the technology...

147

Basic TRUEX process for Rocky Flats Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Generic TRUEX Model was used to develop a TRUEX process flowsheet for recovering the transuranics (Pu, Am) from a nitrate waste stream at Rocky Flats Plant. The process was designed so that it is relatively insensitive to changes in process feed concentrations and flow rates. Related issues are considered, including solvent losses, feed analysis requirements, safety, and interaction with an evaporator system for nitric acid recycle.

Leonard, R.A.; Chamberlain, D.B.; Dow, J.A.; Farley, S.E.; Nunez, L.; Regalbuto, M.C.; Vandegrift, G.F.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Whiskey Flats Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop,SaveWhiskey Flats Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search

149

Manufacture of ceramic tiles from fly ash  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to a process for forming glass-ceramic tiles. Fly ash containing organic material, metal contaminants, and glass forming materials is oxidized under conditions effective to combust the organic material and partially oxidize the metallic contaminants and the glass forming materials. The oxidized glass forming materials are vitrified to form a glass melt. This glass melt is then formed into tiles containing metallic contaminants. 6 figs.

Hnat, J.G.; Mathur, A.; Simpson, J.C.

1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

150

Remote geologic structural analysis of Yucca Flat  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Remote Geologic Analysis (RGA) system was developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to identify crustal structures that may affect seismic wave propagation from nuclear tests. Using automated methods, the RGA system identifies all valleys in a digital elevation model (DEM), fits three-dimensional vectors to valley bottoms, and catalogs all potential fracture or fault planes defined by coplanar pairs of valley vectors. The system generates a cluster hierarchy of planar features having greater-than-random density that may represent areas of anomalous topography manifesting structural control of erosional drainage development. Because RGA uses computer methods to identify zones of hypothesized control of topography, ground truth using a well-characterized test site was critical in our evaluation of RGA's characterization of inaccessible test sites for seismic verification studies. Therefore, we applied RGA to a study area centered on Yucca Flat at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and compared our results with both mapped geology and geologic structures and with seismic yield-magnitude models. This is the final report of PNL's RGA development project for peer review within the US Department of Energy Office of Arms Control (OAC) seismic-verification community. In this report, we discuss the Yucca Flat study area, the analytical basis of the RGA system and its application to Yucca Flat, the results of the analysis, and the relation of the analytical results to known topography, geology, and geologic structures. 41 refs., 39 figs., 2 tabs.

Foley, M.G.; Heasler, P.G.; Hoover, K.A. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Rynes, N.J. (Northern Illinois Univ., De Kalb, IL (United States)); Thiessen, R.L.; Alfaro, J.L. (Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States))

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Remote geologic structural analysis of Yucca Flat  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Remote Geologic Analysis (RGA) system was developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to identify crustal structures that may affect seismic wave propagation from nuclear tests. Using automated methods, the RGA system identifies all valleys in a digital elevation model (DEM), fits three-dimensional vectors to valley bottoms, and catalogs all potential fracture or fault planes defined by coplanar pairs of valley vectors. The system generates a cluster hierarchy of planar features having greater-than-random density that may represent areas of anomalous topography manifesting structural control of erosional drainage development. Because RGA uses computer methods to identify zones of hypothesized control of topography, ground truth using a well-characterized test site was critical in our evaluation of RGA`s characterization of inaccessible test sites for seismic verification studies. Therefore, we applied RGA to a study area centered on Yucca Flat at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and compared our results with both mapped geology and geologic structures and with seismic yield-magnitude models. This is the final report of PNL`s RGA development project for peer review within the US Department of Energy Office of Arms Control (OAC) seismic-verification community. In this report, we discuss the Yucca Flat study area, the analytical basis of the RGA system and its application to Yucca Flat, the results of the analysis, and the relation of the analytical results to known topography, geology, and geologic structures. 41 refs., 39 figs., 2 tabs.

Foley, M.G.; Heasler, P.G.; Hoover, K.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Rynes, N.J. [Northern Illinois Univ., De Kalb, IL (United States); Thiessen, R.L.; Alfaro, J.L. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Telephone Flat Geothermal Development...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Telephone Flat Geothermal Development Project Environmental Impact Statement Environmental Impact Report. Final: Comments and Responses to Comments Geothermal Technologies Legacy...

153

The Color Glass Condensate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We provide a broad overview of the theoretical status and phenomenological applications of the Color Glass Condensate effective field theory describing universal properties of saturated gluons in hadron wavefunctions that are extracted from deeply inelastic scattering and hadron-hadron collision experiments at high energies.

F. Gelis; E. Iancu; J. Jalilian-Marian; R. Venugopalan

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Converting Nested Algebra Expressions into Flat Algebra Expressions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Converting Nested Algebra Expressions into Flat Algebra Expressions JAN PAREDAENS University of Antwerp and DIRK VAN GUCHT Indiana University Nested relations generalize ordinary flat relations by allowing tuple values to be either atomic or set valued. The nested algebra is a generalization of the flat

Van Gucht, Dirk

155

Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Iron and Steel (NAICS  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of Energy Low-TemperatureEnergyAll ManufacturingFood andGlass and

156

Design for manufacturability Design verification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ITRS Design #12;Design · Design for manufacturability · Design verification #12;Design for Manufacturability · Architecture challenges · Logic and circuit challenges · Layout and physical design challenges · Expected to be the source of multiple DFM challenges · Invest in variability reduction or design

Patel, Chintan

157

Petrick Technology Trends Of Manufacturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;323 Petrick Technology Trends chapter 9 The Future Of Manufacturing Irene Petrick Technology Trends This chapter is a story about the future of manufacturing based on three predictions: · that firms sophisticated modeling and simulation of both new products and production processes; · that additive

158

Introduction Flattening the Earth Continuation procedure Flat Earth Numerical simulations Continuation from a flat to a round Earth model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction Flattening the Earth Continuation procedure Flat Earth Numerical simulations Continuation from a flat to a round Earth model in the coplanar orbit transfer problem M. Cerf1, T. Haberkorn, SADCO 2011, March 2nd M. Cerf, T. Haberkorn, E. Tr´elat Continuation from a flat to a round Earth model

Boyer, Edmond

159

Production of glass or glass-ceramic to metal seals with the application of pressure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a process for preparing a glass or glass-ceramic to metal seal comprising contacting the glass with the metal and heat-treating the glass and metal under conditions whereby the glass to metal seal is effected and, optionally, the glass is converted to a glass-ceramic, an improvement comprises carrying out the heat-treating step using hot isostatic pressing.

Kelly, Michael D. (West Alexandria, OH); Kramer, Daniel P. (Dayton, OH)

1987-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

160

Production of glass or glass-ceramic to metal seals with the application of pressure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a process for preparing a glass or glass-ceramic to metal seal comprising contacting the glass with the metal and heat-treating the glass and metal under conditions whereby the glass to metal seal is effected and, optionally, the glass is converted to a glass-ceramic, an improvement comprises carrying out the heat-treating step using hot isostatic pressing.

Kelly, M.D.; Kramer, D.P.

1985-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manufacturing flat glass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Flat space (higher spin) gravity with chemical potentials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We introduce flat space spin-3 gravity in the presence of chemical potentials and discuss some applications to flat space cosmology solutions, their entropy, free energy and flat space orbifold singularity resolution. Our results include flat space Einstein gravity with chemical potentials as special case. We discover novel types of phase transitions between flat space cosmologies with spin-3 hair and show that the branch that continuously connects to spin-2 gravity becomes thermodynamically unstable for sufficiently large temperature or spin-3 chemical potential.

Michael Gary; Daniel Grumiller; Max Riegler; Jan Rosseel

2014-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

162

Hollings Manufacturing Extension Partnership: A Commercialization Collaborator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of services, from innovation strategies to process improvements to green manufacturing. MEP also worksHollings Manufacturing Extension Partnership: A Commercialization Collaborator MEP · MANUFACTURING Manufacturing Extension Partnership (MEP) works with small and mid-sized U.S. manufacturers to help them create

163

Surface characterization of silica glass substrates treated by atomic hydrogen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Silica glass substrates with very flat surfaces were exposed to atomic hydrogen at different temperatures and durations. An atomic force microscope was used to measure root-mean-square (RMS) roughness and two-dimensional power spectral density (PSD). In the treatment with atomic hydrogen up to 900 °C, there was no significant change in the surface. By the treatment at 1000 °C, the changes in the RMS roughness and the PSD curves were observed. It was suggested that these changes were caused by etching due to reactions of atomic hydrogen with surface silica. By analysis based on the k-correlation model, it was found that the spatial frequency of the asperities became higher with an increase of the treatment time. Furthermore, the data showed that atomic hydrogen can flatten silica glass surfaces by controlling heat-treatment conditions. - Highlights: • Silica glass surface was treated by atomic hydrogen at various temperatures. • Surface roughness was measured by an atomic force microscope. • Roughness data were analyzed by two-dimensional power spectral density. • Atomic hydrogen can flatten silica glass surfaces.

Inoue, Hiroyuki [Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Masuno, Atsunobu, E-mail: masuno@iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Ishibashi, Keiji [Canon ANELVA Corporation, Asao-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 215-8550 (Japan); Tawarayama, Hiromasa [Kawazoe Frontier Technologies Corporation, Kuden 931-113, Sakae-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 247-0014 (Japan); Zhang, Yingjiu; Utsuno, Futoshi [Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Koya, Kazuo; Fujinoki, Akira [Shin Etsu Quartz Prod. Co., Ltd., Res and Applicat Lab, Fukushima 963-0725 (Japan); Kawazoe, Hiroshi [Kawazoe Frontier Technologies Corporation, Kuden 931-113, Sakae-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 247-0014 (Japan)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

164

Energy Conservation in Flat FRW Cosmology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The consequence of energy conservation in the flat Friedmannn-Robertson-Walker (FRW) cosmology is a strictly positive accelerating expansion. A mechanism is proposed for this expansion due to the effect of the attractive (negative) gravitational potential of matter as it is being included within the expanding horizon, and the offsetting work of metric expansion, which takes place at sub-luminal speed. In our semi-classical treatment, we deal with a quintic as the equation for the scale parameter. Implications for modeling the earliest parts of the primordial expansion are discussed.

Steven Maxson

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

165

Geometrical Wake of a Smooth Flat Collimator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A transverse geometrical wake generated by a beam passing through a smooth flat collimator with a gradually varying gap between the upper and lower walls is considered. Based on generalization of the approach recently developed for a smooth circular taper we reduce the electromagnetic problem of the impedance calculation to the solution of two much simpler static problems - a magnetostatic and an electrostatic ones. The solution shows that in the limit of not very large frequencies, the impedance increases with the ratio h/d where h is the width and d is the distance between the collimating jaws. Numerical results are presented for the NLC Post Linac collimator.

Stupakov, G.V.; /SLAC

2011-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

166

Caithness Shepherds Flat | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power Systems EngineeringDepartment of4 Federal6CleanCaithness Shepherds Flat Caithness Shepherds

167

Flat Ridge 2 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision has beenFfe2fb55-352f-473b-a2dd-50ae8b27f0a6Theoretical vs Actual DataNext 25 YearsFlat Ridge 2 Facility

168

Flat Ridge Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision has beenFfe2fb55-352f-473b-a2dd-50ae8b27f0a6Theoretical vs Actual DataNext 25 YearsFlat Ridge 2

169

Flat Water Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision has beenFfe2fb55-352f-473b-a2dd-50ae8b27f0a6Theoretical vs Actual DataNext 25 YearsFlat Ridge 2Wind Farm

170

Beryllium Manufacturing Processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is one of a number of reports that will be combined into a handbook on beryllium. Each report covers a specific topic. To-date, the following reports have been published: (1) Consolidation and Grades of Beryllium; (2) Mechanical Properties of Beryllium and the Factors Affecting these Properties; (3) Corrosion and Corrosion Protection of Beryllium; (4) Joining of Beryllium; (5) Atomic, Crystal, Elastic, Thermal, Nuclear, and other Properties of Beryllium; and (6) Beryllium Coating (Deposition) Processes and the Influence of Processing Parameters on Properties and Microstructure. The conventional method of using ingot-cast material is unsuitable for manufacturing a beryllium product. Beryllium is a highly reactive metal with a high melting point, making it susceptible to react with mold-wall materials forming beryllium compounds (BeO, etc.) that become entrapped in the solidified metal. In addition, the grain size is excessively large, being 50 to 100 {micro}m in diameter, while grain sizes of 15 {micro}m or less are required to meet acceptable strength and ductility requirements. Attempts at refining the as-cast-grain size have been unsuccessful. Because of the large grain size and limited slip systems, the casting will invariably crack during a hot-working step, which is an important step in the microstructural-refining process. The high reactivity of beryllium together with its high viscosity (even with substantial superheat) also makes it an unsuitable candidate for precision casting. In order to overcome these problems, alternative methods have been developed for the manufacturing of beryllium. The vast majority of these methods involve the use of beryllium powders. The powders are consolidated under pressure in vacuum at an elevated temperature to produce vacuum hot-pressed (VHP) blocks and vacuum hot-isostatic-pressed (HIP) forms and billets. The blocks (typically cylindrical), which are produced over a wide range of sizes (up to 183 cm dia. by 61 cm high), may be cut or machined into parts or be thermomechanically processed to develop the desired microstructure, properties, and shapes. Vacuum hot-isostatic pressing and cold-isostatic pressing (CIP) followed by sintering and possibly by a final HIP'ing (CIP/Sinter/HIP) are important in their use for the production of near net-shaped parts. For the same starting powder, a HIP'ed product will have less anisotropy than that obtained for a VHP'ed product. A schematic presentation illustrating the difference between VHP'ing and HIP'ing is shown in Figure I-1. The types of powders and the various beryllium grades produced from the consolidated powders and their ambient-temperature mechanical properties were presented in the consolidation report referred to above. Elevated-temperature properties and the effect of processing variables on mechanical properties are described in the mechanical properties report. Beryllium can also be deposited as coatings as well as freestanding forms. The microstructure, properties, and various methods used that are related to the deposition of beryllium are discussed in the report on beryllium coatings.

Goldberg, A

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

171

MANUFACTURING ACCELERATING THE INCORPORATION OF MATERIALS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MANUFACTURING ACCELERATING THE INCORPORATION OF MATERIALS ADVANCES INTO MANUFACTURING PROCESSES NATIONAL NEED The proposed topic "Accelerating the Incorporation of Materials Advances into Manufacturing organizations, leading researchers from academic institutions, and others. Materials performance is often

Magee, Joseph W.

172

Ghost condensate model of flat rotation curves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An effective action of ghost condensate with higher derivatives creates a source of gravity and mimics a dark matter in spiral galaxies. We present a spherically symmetric static solution of Einstein--Hilbert equations with the ghost condensate at large distances, where flat rotation curves are reproduced in leading order over small ratio of two energy scales characterizing constant temporal and spatial derivatives of ghost field: $\\mu_*^2$ and $\\mu_\\star^2$, respectively, with a hierarchy $\\mu_\\star\\ll \\mu_*$. We assume that a mechanism of hierarchy is provided by a global monopole in the center of galaxy. An estimate based on the solution and observed velocities of rotations in the asymptotic region of flatness, gives $\\mu_*\\sim 10^{19}$ GeV and the monopole scale in a GUT range $\\mu_\\star\\sim 10^{16}$ GeV, while a velocity of rotation $v_0$ is determined by the ratio: $ \\sqrt{2} v_0^2= \\mu_\\star^2/\\mu_*^2$. A critical acceleration is introduced and naturally evaluated of the order of Hubble rate, that represents the Milgrom's acceleration.

V. V. Kiselev

2005-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

173

Risk, media, and stigma at Rocky Flats  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Public responses to nuclear technologies are often strongly negative. Events, such as accidents or evidence of unsafe conditions at nuclear facilities, receive extensive and dramatic coverage by the news media. These news stories affect public perceptions of nuclear risks and the geographic areas near nuclear facilities. One result of these perceptions, avoidance behavior, is a form of technological stigma that leads to losses in property values near nuclear facilities. The social amplification of risk is a conceptual framework that attempts to explain how stigma is created through media transmission of information about hazardous places and public perceptions and decisions. This paper examines stigma associated with the US Department of energy`s Rocky Flats facility, a major production plant in the nation`s nuclear weapons complex, located near Denver, Colorado. This study, based upon newspaper analyses and a survey of Denver area residents, finds that the social amplification theory provides a reasonable framework for understanding the events and public responses that took place in regard to Rocky Flats during a 6-year period, beginning with an FBI raid of the facility in 1989.

Flynn, J.; Peters, E.; Mertz, C.K.; Slovic, P. [Decision Research, Eugene, OR (United States)] [Decision Research, Eugene, OR (United States)

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Analytical Plan for Roman Glasses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Roman glasses that have been in the sea or underground for about 1800 years can serve as the independent “experiment” that is needed for validation of codes and models that are used in performance assessment. Two sets of Roman-era glasses have been obtained for this purpose. One set comes from the sunken vessel the Iulia Felix; the second from recently excavated glasses from a Roman villa in Aquileia, Italy. The specimens contain glass artifacts and attached sediment or soil. In the case of the Iulia Felix glasses quite a lot of analytical work has been completed at the University of Padova, but from an archaeological perspective. The glasses from Aquileia have not been so carefully analyzed, but they are similar to other Roman glasses. Both glass and sediment or soil need to be analyzed and are the subject of this analytical plan. The glasses need to be analyzed with the goal of validating the model used to describe glass dissolution. The sediment and soil need to be analyzed to determine the profile of elements released from the glass. This latter need represents a significant analytical challenge because of the trace quantities that need to be analyzed. Both pieces of information will yield important information useful in the validation of the glass dissolution model and the chemical transport code(s) used to determine the migration of elements once released from the glass. In this plan, we outline the analytical techniques that should be useful in obtaining the needed information and suggest a useful starting point for this analytical effort.

Strachan, Denis M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Mueller, Karl T.; Schwantes, Jon M.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Heeren, Ronald M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Opportunities and Challenges to Sustainable Manufacturing and CMP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Implementing Green Manufacturing,” Trans. North AmericanBoyd, S. , LMAS Green Manufacturing Research Presentation,MANUFACTURING AND GREEN MANUFACTURING Sustainability is

Dornfeld, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Mixed polyanion glass cathodes: Iron phosphate vanadate glasses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mixed polyanion (MP) glasses have been investigated for use as cathodes in lithium ion batteries. MP glass cathodes are similar in composition to theoretically promising crystalline polyanionic (CP) cathodes (e.g., lithium cobalt phosphate, lithium manganese silicate), but with proper polyanion substitution, they can be designed to overcome the key shortcomings of CP cathodes, such as poor electrical conductivity and irreversible phase changes. Iron phosphate/vanadate glasses were chosen as a first demonstration of the MP glass concept. Polyanion substitution with vanadate was shown to improve the intercalation capacity of an iron phosphate glass from almost zero to full theoretical capacity. In addition, the MP glass cathodes also exhibited an unexpected second high-capacity electrochemical reaction. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) of cathodes from cells having different states of charge suggested that this second electrochemical reaction is a glass-state conversion reaction. With a first demonstration established, MP glass materials utilizing an intercalation and/or glass-state conversion reaction are promising candidates for future high-energy cathode research.

Kercher, Andrew K [ORNL; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine [ORNL; Carroll, Kyler J [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Kiggans Jr, James O [ORNL; Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL; Meisner, Roberta [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Boatner, Lynn A [ORNL; Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Additive Manufacturing Opportunities for Transportation | ornl...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Additive Manufacturing Opportunities for Transportation Mar 13 2015 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM Lonnie Love, Manufacturing Systems Research Group Transportation Science Seminar Series...

178

Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative: Increasing American Competitive...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

for a Clean Energy Manufacturing Innovation Institute related to composite materials and structures. The Manufacturing Demonstration Facility at Oak Ridge National...

179

Advanced Manufacturing Initiative Improves Turbine Blade Productivity...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Advanced Manufacturing Initiative Improves Turbine Blade Productivity Advanced Manufacturing Initiative Improves Turbine Blade Productivity May 20, 2011 - 2:56pm Addthis This is an...

180

A Management Strategy for Additive Manufacturing:.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The thesis is about a Management Strategy for Additive Manufacturing - how engineering change influences the NPD process through the adoption of new manufacturing technology.… (more)

Zahn, N.Z.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manufacturing flat glass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) Response...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) Response to Smart Grid RFI National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) Response to Smart Grid RFI The National Electrical...

182

Additive Manufacturing Cluster Strategy | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Additive Manufacturing Cluster Strategy SHARE Additive Manufacturing Cluster Strategy As the nation's premier research laboratory, ORNL is one of the world's most capable resources...

183

Welcome and Advanced Manufacturing Partnership (Text Version...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

200 school aged students go into this manufacturing demonstration facility and make 3D printing or other manufacturing parts. Design and make parts for their robots. For their...

184

Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering Mechatronics Engineering Minor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering Mechatronics Engineering Minor Students pursuing a BSc in mechanical or manufacturing engineering have experience and entrepreneurship. Mechatronics is the synergistic combination of mechanical

Calgary, University of

185

Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Incentive Program...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Incentive Program Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Incentive Program This is an interim final rule that establishes the...

186

Process systems engineering of continuous pharmaceutical manufacturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Continuous manufacturing offers a number of operational and financial benefits to pharmaceutical companies. This research examines the critical blending step for continuous pharmaceutical manufacturing and the characteristics ...

Abel, Matthew J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Understanding Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints, October...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

More Documents & Publications Understanding the 2010 Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints U.S. Manufacturing Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Analysis U.S....

188

Manufacturing System Design Framework Manual  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Previous Lean Aerospace Initiative research in factory operations had indicated that the greatest performance gains are realized when the manufacturing system is designed from the top down and from supplier to the customer. ...

Vaughn, Amanda

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Wind Energy Manufacturing Tax Incentive  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

With the passage of [http://www.arkansasenergy.org/media/261385/act736.pdf HB 2230 (2009)] in April 2009, the Arkansas Legislature expanded a tax incentive for manufacturers of windmill blades or...

190

Compositional threshold for Nuclear Waste Glass Durability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Within the composition space of glasses, a distinct threshold appears to exist that separates "good" glasses, i.e., those which are sufficiently durable, from "bad" glasses of a low durability. The objective of our research is to clarify the origin of this threshold by exploring the relationship between glass composition, glass structure and chemical durability around the threshold region.

Kruger, Albert A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Farooqi, Rahmatullah [Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology, (Korea, Republic of); Hrma, Pavel R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States), Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology, (Korea, Republic of)

2013-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

191

Tantalum ingots and flat mill products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The specification covers unalloyed tantalum in the following grades: R05200, unalloyed tantalum (vacuum-arc melt or electron-beam furnace melt); R05400, unalloyed tantalum (powder metallurgy consolidation); R05255, tantalum alloy (90% Ta to 10% W, vacuum-arc melt or electron-beam furnace melt). The tantalum can be in the form of ingot, bar, plate, sheet, or strip. The specification includes ordering information, manufacture, chemical requirements, tensile properties, dimensional tolerances, workmanship and finish, sampling, certification, marking and packaging. (JMT)

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Glass rupture disk  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A frangible rupture disk and mounting apparatus for use in blocking fluid flow, generally in a fluid conducting conduit such as a well casing, a well tubing string or other conduits within subterranean boreholes. The disk can also be utilized in above-surface pipes or tanks where temporary and controllable fluid blockage is required. The frangible rupture disk is made from a pre-stressed glass with controllable rupture properties wherein the strength distribution has a standard deviation less than approximately 5% from the mean strength. The frangible rupture disk has controllable operating pressures and rupture pressures.

Glass, S. Jill (Albuquerque, NM); Nicolaysen, Scott D. (Albuquerque, NM); Beauchamp, Edwin K. (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Glass | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdf Flash2006-53.pdf0.pdfCostAnalysis GeothermalEnergy GeothermalGetGlass and

194

Abstract--The current paper describes one-dimensional cutting stock model for joinery manufacturing. The joinery elements differ in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) in order to satisfy the demand for all joinery elements. Along with this, it is necessary to find in the production planning of many industries such as the metallurgy, plastics, paper, glass, furniture, textile elements have to be manufactured using blanks of single standard size. This demands developing of methods

Mustakerov, Ivan

195

EIS-0276: Rocky Flats Plutonium Storage, Golden, Colorado  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS analyzes DOE's proposed action to provide safe interim storage of approximately 10 metric tons of plutonium at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS).

196

2006 Annual Ecology Report for the Rocky Flats Site  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Ecology Report for the Rocky Flats Site Click on the links below to access different portions of the electronic annual report. 2006 Annual Report Sections Diffuse Knapweed...

197

Preliminary Notice of Violation , Rocky Flats Environmental Technology...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

deficiencies associated two events in March and April 1996 that resulted in the spread of contamination and personnel uptakes of radioactive material at the Rocky Flats...

198

POROUS WALL, HOLLOW GLASS MICROSPHERES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hollow Glass Microspheres (HGM) is not a new technology. All one has to do is go to the internet and Google{trademark} HGM. Anyone can buy HGM and they have a wide variety of uses. HGM are usually between 1 to 100 microns in diameter, although their size can range from 100 nanometers to 5 millimeters in diameter. HGM are used as lightweight filler in composite materials such as syntactic foam and lightweight concrete. In 1968 a patent was issued to W. Beck of the 3M{trademark} Company for 'Glass Bubbles Prepared by Reheating Solid Glass Particles'. In 1983 P. Howell was issued a patent for 'Glass Bubbles of Increased Collapse Strength' and in 1988 H. Marshall was issued a patent for 'Glass Microbubbles'. Now Google{trademark}, Porous Wall, Hollow Glass Microspheres (PW-HGMs), the key words here are Porous Wall. Almost every article has its beginning with the research done at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The Savannah River Site (SRS) where SRNL is located has a long and successful history of working with hydrogen and its isotopes for national security, energy, waste management and environmental remediation applications. This includes more than 30 years of experience developing, processing, and implementing special ceramics, including glasses for a variety of Department of Energy (DOE) missions. In the case of glasses, SRS and SRNL have been involved in both the science and engineering of vitreous or glass based systems. As a part of this glass experience and expertise, SRNL has developed a number of niches in the glass arena, one of which is the development of porous glass systems for a variety of applications. These porous glass systems include sol gel glasses, which include both xerogels and aerogels, as well as phase separated glass compositions, that can be subsequently treated to produce another unique type of porosity within the glass forms. The porous glasses can increase the surface area compared to 'normal glasses of a 1 to 2 order of magnitude, which can result in unique properties in areas such as hydrogen storage, gas transport, gas separations and purifications, sensors, global warming applications, new drug delivery systems and so on. One of the most interesting porous glass products that SRNL has developed and patented is Porous Wall, Hollow Glass Microspheres (PW-HGMs) that are being studied for many different applications. The European Patent Office (EPO) just recently notified SRS that the continuation-in-part patent application for the PW-HGMs has been accepted. The original patent, which was granted by the EPO on June 2, 2010, was validated in France, Germany and the United Kingdom. The microspheres produced are generally in the range of 2 to 100 microns, with a 1 to 2 micron wall. What makes the SRNL microspheres unique from all others is that the team in Figure 1 has found a way to induce and control porosity through the thin walls on a scale of 100 to 3000 {angstrom}. This is what makes the SRNL HW-HGMs one-of-a-kind, and is responsible for many of their unique properties and potential for various applications, including those in tritium storage, gas separations, H-storage for vehicles, and even a variety of new medical applications in the areas of drug delivery and MRI contrast agents. SRNL Hollow Glass Microspheres, and subsequent, Porous Wall, Hollow Glass Microspheres are fabricated using a flame former apparatus. Figure 2 is a schematic of the apparatus.

Sexton, W.

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

199

Method for forming silicon on a glass substrate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method by which single-crystal silicon microelectronics may be fabricated on glass substrates at unconventionally low temperatures. This is achieved by fabricating a thin film of silicon on glass and subsequently forming the doped components by a short wavelength (excimer) laser doping procedure and conventional patterning techniques. This method may include introducing a heavily boron doped etch stop layer on a silicon wafer using an excimer laser, which permits good control of the etch stop layer removal process. This method additionally includes dramatically reducing the remaining surface roughness of the silicon thin films after etching in the fabrication of silicon on insulator wafers by scanning an excimer laser across the surface of the silicon thin film causing surface melting, whereby the surface tension of the melt causes smoothing of the surface during recrystallization. Applications for this method include those requiring a transparent or insulating substrate, such as display manufacturing. Other applications include sensors, actuators, optoelectronics, radiation hard and high temperature electronics.

McCarthy, Anthony M. (Menlo Park, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Designing a National Network for Manufacturing Innovation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Designing a National Network for Manufacturing Innovation NNMI and The Additive Manufacturing Pilot Introduction · NNMI principles · Public NMMI Design · Pilot Institute on Additive Manufacturing #12;IMI Mission Process, such as Additive Manufacturing An Advanced Material ­ e.g. lightweight, low cost carbon fiber

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manufacturing flat glass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Aspects of the mechanics of metallic glasses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Metallic glasses are amorphous materials that possess unique mechanical properties, such as high tensile strengths and good fracture toughnesses. Also, since they are amorphous, metallic glasses exhibit a glass transition, ...

Henann, David Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Unclassified Source Term and Radionuclide Data for Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Frenchman Flat is one of several areas of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) used for underground nuclear testing (Figure 1-1). These nuclear tests resulted in groundwater contamination in the vicinity of the underground test areas. As a result, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) is currently conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) of the Frenchman Flat underground test areas. Since 1996, the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) has regulated NNSA/NSO corrective actions through the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' ([FFACO], 1996). Appendix VI of the FFACO agreement, ''Corrective Action Strategy'', was revised on December 7, 2000, and describes the processes that will be used to complete corrective actions, including those in the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project. The individual locations covered by the agreement are known as corrective action sites (CASs), which are grouped into corrective action units (CAUs). The UGTA CASs are grouped geographically into five CAUs: Frenchman Flat, Central Pahute Mesa, Western Pahute Mesa, Yucca Flat/Climax Mine, and Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain (Figure 1-1). These CAUs have distinctly different contaminant source, geologic, and hydrogeologic characteristics related to their location (FFACO, 1996). The Frenchman Flat CAU consists of 10 CASs located in the northern part of Area 5 and the southern part of Area 11 (Figure 1-1). This report documents the evaluation of the information and data available on the unclassified source term and radionuclide contamination for Frenchman Flat, CAU 98. The methodology used to estimate hydrologic source terms (HSTs) for the Frenchman Flat CAU is also documented. The HST of an underground nuclear test is the portion of the total inventory of radionuclides that is released over time into the groundwater following the test. The total residual inventory of radionuclides associated with one or more tests is known as the radiologic source term (RST). The RST is comprised of radionuclides in water, glass, or other phases or mineralogic forms. This evaluation was conducted in support of the development of a CAU contaminant transport model for the Frenchman Flat CAU.

Farnham, Irene

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Method of determining glass durability  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for determining one or more leachate concentrations of one or more components of a glass composition in an aqueous solution of the glass composition by identifying the components of the glass composition, including associated oxides, determining a preliminary glass dissolution estimator, .DELTA.G.sub.p, based upon the free energies of hydration for the component reactant species, determining an accelerated glass dissolution function, .DELTA.G.sub.a, based upon the free energy associated with weak acid dissociation, .DELTA.G.sub.a.sup.WA, and accelerated matrix dissolution at high pH, .DELTA.G.sub.a.sup.SB associated with solution strong base formation, and determining a final hydration free energy, .DELTA.G.sub.f. This final hydration free energy is then used to determine leachate concentrations for elements of interest using a regression analysis and the formula log.sub.10 (N C.sub.i (g/L))=a.sub.i +b.sub.i .DELTA.G.sub.f. The present invention also includes a method to determine whether a particular glass to be produced will be homogeneous or phase separated. The present invention is also directed to methods of monitoring and controlling processes for making glass using these determinations to modify the feedstock materials until a desired glass durability and homogeneity is obtained.

Jantzen, Carol Maryanne (Aiken, SC); Pickett, John Butler (Aiken, SC); Brown, Kevin George (Augusta, GA); Edwards, Thomas Barry (Aiken, SC)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Method of determining glass durability  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for determining one or more leachate concentrations of one or more components of a glass composition in an aqueous solution of the glass composition by identifying the components of the glass composition, including associated oxides, determining a preliminary glass dissolution estimator, {Delta}G{sub p}, based upon the free energies of hydration for the component reactant species, determining an accelerated glass dissolution function, {Delta}G{sub a}, based upon the free energy associated with weak acid dissociation, {Delta}G{sub a}{sup WA}, and accelerated matrix dissolution at high pH, {Delta}G{sub a}{sup SB} associated with solution strong base formation, and determining a final hydration free energy, {Delta}G{sub f}. This final hydration free energy is then used to determine leachate concentrations for elements of interest using a regression analysis and the formula log{sub 10}(N C{sub i}(g/L))=a{sub i} + b{sub i}{Delta}G{sub f}. The present invention also includes a method to determine whether a particular glass to be produced will be homogeneous or phase separated. The present invention is also directed to methods of monitoring and controlling processes for making glass using these determinations to modify the feedstock materials until a desired glass durability and homogeneity is obtained. 4 figs.

Jantzen, C.M.; Pickett, J.B.; Brown, K.G.; Edwards, T.B.

1998-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

205

Laboratory Waste Disposal HAZARDOUS GLASS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of in normal trash containers. Pasteur pipettes Other pipettes and tips (glass or plastic) Slides and cover bodies (without needles) Container: Sturdy and leakproof with Hazardous Glass label. Either: Plastic resistant, leakproof plastic carboy with green sharps label. Do not fill these containers completely. Leave

Sheridan, Jennifer

206

Refractory Glass Seals for SOFC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the critical challenges facing planar solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technology is the need for reliable sealing technology. Seals must exhibit long-term stability and mechanical integrity in the high temperature SOFC environment during normal and transient operation. Several different approaches for sealing SOFC stacks are under development, including glass or glass-ceramic seals, metallic brazes, and compressive seals. Among glass seals, rigid glass-ceramics, self-healing glass, and composite glass approaches have been investigated under the SECA Core Technology Program. The U.S. Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has developed the refractory glass approach in light of the fact that higher sealing temperatures (e.g., 930-1000 degrees C) may enhance the ultimate in-service bulk strength and electrical conductivity of contact materials, as well as the bonding strength between contact materials and adjacent SOFC components, such as interconnect coatings and electrodes. This report summarizes the thermal, chemical, mechanical, and electrical properties of the refractory sealing glass.

Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints (2006 MECS)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Energy and Carbon Footprints provide a mapping of energy from supply to end use in manufacturing. They show us where energy is used and lost—and where greenhouse gases (GHGs) are emitted. Footprints are available below for 15 manufacturing sectors (representing 94% of all manufacturing energy use) and for U.S. manufacturing as a whole. Analysis of these footprints is also available in the U.S. Manufacturing Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Analysis report.

208

Evaluation of Vitrification Processing Step for Rocky Flats Incinerator Ash  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1997, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) staff developed a processing option for incinerator ash at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Sites (RFETS). This work was performed with support from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Safe Sites of Colorado (SSOC). A description of the remediation needs for the RFETS incinerator ash is provided in a report summarizing the recommended processing option for treatment of the ash (Lucy et al. 1998). The recommended process flowsheet involves a calcination pretreatment step to remove carbonaceous material followed by a vitrification processing step for a mixture of glass tit and calcined incinerator ash. Using the calcination pretreatment step to remove carbonaceous material reduced process upsets for the vitrification step, allowed for increased waste loading in the final product, and improved the quality of the final product. Figure 1.1 illustrates the flow sheet for the recommended processing option for treatment of RFETS incinerator ash. In 1998, work at PNNL further developed the recommended flow sheet through a series of studies to better define the vitrification operating parameters and to address secondary processing issues (such as characterizing the offgas species from the calcination process). Because a prototypical rotary calciner was not available for use, studies to evaluate the offgas from the calcination process were performed using a benchtop rotary calciner and laboratory-scale equipment (Lucy et al. 1998). This report focuses on the vitrification process step after ash has been calcined. Testing with full-scale containers was performed using ash surrogates and a muffle furnace similar to that planned for use at RFETS. Small-scale testing was performed using plutonium-bearing incinerator ash to verify performance of the waste form. Ash was not obtained from RFETS because of transportation requirements to calcine the incinerator ash prior to shipment of the material. Because part of PNNL's work was to characterize the ash prior to calcination and to investigate the effect of calcination on product quality, representative material was obtained from LANL. Ash obtained from LANL was selected based on its similarity to that currently stored at RFETS. The plutonium-bearing ashes obtained from LANL are likely from a RFETS incinerator, but the exact origin was not identified.

Wigent, W.L.; Luey, J.K.; Scheele, R.D.; Li, H.

1999-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

209

Glass science tutorial: Lecture No. 7, Waste glass technology for Hanford  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the details of the waste glass tutorial session that was held to promote knowledge of waste glass technology and how this can be used at the Hanford Reservation. Topics discussed include: glass properties; statistical approach to glass development; processing properties of nuclear waste glass; glass composition and the effects of composition on durability; model comparisons of free energy of hydration; LLW glass structure; glass crystallization; amorphous phase separation; corrosion of refractories and electrodes in waste glass melters; and glass formulation for maximum waste loading.

Kruger, A.A.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

glass, adding ions to impart specific properties, enables them to manage the degradation rate of the glass, creating attractive and compliant scaffold materials. A variety...

211

INVENTORY FOR ELGAR COURT FLAT NO. BLOCK NO. ROOM NO.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INVENTORY FOR ELGAR COURT FLAT NO. BLOCK NO. ROOM NO. Staff on the Vale Village try to ensure and cleaned to a high standard. Please make sure that you complete this inventory and note down anything which seat x 1 Toilet roll holder x 1 INVENTORY FOR SHACKLETON FLAT NO: BLOCK NO: ROOM NO: NAME: TELEPHONE

Birmingham, University of

212

INVENTORY FOR ELGAR COURT FLAT NO. BLOCK NO. ROOM NO.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INVENTORY FOR ELGAR COURT FLAT NO. BLOCK NO. ROOM NO. Staff on the Vale Village try to ensure and cleaned to a high standard. Please make sure that you complete this inventory and note down anything which Toilet seat x 1 Toilet roll holder x 1 INVENTORY FOR MASON FLAT NO: BLOCK NO: ROOM NO: NAME: TELEPHONE

Birmingham, University of

213

INVENTORY FOR ELGAR COURT FLAT NO. BLOCK NO. ROOM NO.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INVENTORY FOR ELGAR COURT FLAT NO. BLOCK NO. ROOM NO. Staff on the Vale Village try to ensure and cleaned to a high standard. Please make sure that you complete this inventory and note down anything which holder x 1 INVENTORY FOR TENNIS COURT BLOCK NO: FLAT NO: ROOM NO: NAME: TELEPHONE EXT. NO: #12;How

Birmingham, University of

214

INVENTORY FOR ELGAR COURT FLAT NO. BLOCK NO. ROOM NO.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INVENTORY FOR ELGAR COURT FLAT NO. BLOCK NO. ROOM NO. Staff on the Vale Village try to ensure and cleaned to a high standard. Please make sure that you complete this inventory and note down anything which Toilet seat x 1 Toilet roll holder x 1 INVENTORY FOR ELGAR COURT FLAT NO: BLOCK NO: ROOM NO: NAME

Birmingham, University of

215

INVENTORY FOR ELGAR COURT FLAT NO. BLOCK NO. ROOM NO.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INVENTORY FOR ELGAR COURT FLAT NO. BLOCK NO. ROOM NO. Staff on the Vale Village try to ensure and cleaned to a high standard. Please make sure that you complete this inventory and note down anything which rail x 1 INVENTORY FOR MAPLE BANK FLAT NO: BLOCK NO: ROOM NO: NAME: TELEPHONE EXT. NO: #12;How

Birmingham, University of

216

Manufacturing for the Hydrogen Economy Manufacturing Research & Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to coordinate and leverage the current federal efforts focused on manufacturability issues such as low-cost of the hydrogen and fuel cell technologies needed to move the United States toward a future hydrogen economy of a hydrogen energy economy, moving from today's laboratory-scale fabrication technologies to high

217

Manufacturing Innovation in the DOE  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAX POLICIES7.pdfFuel2007Naval Reactors' Cyber SecurityManufacturingManufacturing

218

Sustainable Manufacturing via Multi-Scale, Physics-Based Process Modeling and Manufacturing-Informed Design, April 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Sustainable Manufacturing via Multi-Scale, Physics-Based Process Modeling and Manufacturing-Informed Design

219

Commercial Decommissioning at DOE's Rocky Flats  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due in large part to the number of nuclear facilities that make up the DOE complex, DOE-EM work has historically been paperwork intensive and driven by extensive regulations. Requirements for non-nuclear facilities are often grouped with those of nuclear facilities, driving up costs. Kaiser-Hill was interested in applying a commercial model to demolition of these facilities and wanted to apply necessary and sufficient standards to the work activities, but avoid applying unnecessary requirements. Faced with demolishing hundreds of uncontaminated or non-radiologically contaminated facilities, Kaiser-Hill has developed a subcontracting strategy to drastically reduce the cost of demolishing these facilities at Rocky Flats. Aiming to tailor the demolition approach of such facilities to more closely follow commercial practices, Kaiser-Hill recently released a Request for Proposals (RFP) for the demolition of the site's former central administration facility. The RFP significantly reduced requirements for compliance with specific DOE directives. Instead, the RFP required subcontractors to comply with health and safety requirements commonly found in the demolition of similar facilities in a commercial setting. This resulted in a number of bids from companies who have normally not bid on DOE work previously and at a reduced cost over previous approaches. This paper will discuss the details of this subcontracting strategy.

Freiboth, C.; Sandlin, N.; Schubert, A.; Hansen, S.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

220

The Critical Mass Laboratory at Rocky Flats  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Critical Mass Laboratory (CML) at Rocky Flats northwest of Denver, Colorado, was built in 1964 and commissioned to conduct nuclear experiments on January 28, 1965. It was built to attain more accurate and precise experimental data to ensure nuclear criticality safety at the plant than were previously possible. Prior to its construction, safety data were obtained from long extrapolations of subcritical data (called in situ experiments), calculated parameters from reactor engineering 'models', and a few other imprecise methods. About 1700 critical and critical-approach experiments involving several chemical forms of enriched uranium and plutonium were performed between then and 1988. These experiments included single units and arrays of fissile materials, reflected and 'bare' systems, and configurations with various degrees of moderation, as well as some containing strong neutron absorbers. In 1989, a raid by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) caused the plant as a whole to focus on 'resumption' instead of further criticality safety experiments. Though either not recognized or not admitted for a few years, that FBI raid did sound the death knell for the CML. The plant's optimistic goal of resumption evolved to one of deactivation, decommissioning, and plantwide demolition during the 1990s. The once-proud CML facility was finally demolished in April of 2002.

Rothe, Robert E

2003-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manufacturing flat glass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Fracture mechanics of cellular glass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cellular glasses are prime candidate materials for the structural substrate of mirrored glass for solar concentrator reflecting panels. These materials are brittle, however, and susceptible to mechanical failure from slow crack growth caused by a stress corrosion mechanism. The results are detailed of one part of a program established to develop improved cellular glasses and to characterize the behavior of these and commercially available materials. Commercial and developmental cellular glasses were tested and analyzed using standard testing techniques and models developed from linear fracture mechanics. Two models describing the fracture behavior of these materials are developed. Slow crack growth behavior in cellular glass was found to be more complex than that encountered in dense glasses or ceramics. The crack velocity was found to be strongly dependent upon water vapor transport to the tip of the moving crack. The existence of a static fatigue limit was not conclusively established, however, it is speculated that slow crack growth behavior in Region I may be slower, by orders of magnitude, than that found in dense glasses.

Zwissler, J.G.; Adams, M.A.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Significant opportunities exist for improving energy efficiency in U.S. manufacturing. A first step in realizing these opportunities is to identify how industry is using energy. Where does it come from? What form is it in? Where is it used? How much...

Brueske, S.; Lorenz, T.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Process for manufacturing multilayer capacitors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is directed to a method of manufacture of multilayer electrical components, especially capacitors, and components made by such a method. High capacitance dielectric materials and low cost metallizations layered with such dielectrics may be fabricated as multilayer electrical components by sintering the metallizations and the dielectrics during the fabrication process by application of microwave radiation.

Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Holcombe, Cressie E. (Knoxville, TN); Dykes, Norman L. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Additive manufacturing method of producing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Additive manufacturing method of producing silver or copper tracks on polyimide film Problem/stripping) using an additive process support by a novel bio- degradable photo-initiator package. technology. Building on previous work by Hoyd- Gigg Ng et al. [1,2], Heriot-Watt has developed an additive film

Painter, Kevin

225

Heat treating of manufactured components  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for heat treating manufactured components using microwave energy and microwave susceptor material is disclosed. The system typically includes an insulating vessel placed within a microwave applicator chamber. A moderating material is positioned inside the insulating vessel so that a substantial portion of the exterior surface of each component for heat treating is in contact with the moderating material.

Ripley, Edward B. (Knoxville, TN)

2012-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

226

Systems, Inc. Manufacturing Program Manager  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

70819 #12;Advanced Energy Systems, Inc. Outline ·Introduction ·Accomplishments Phase I ·Technical Approach - Second Year ·Manufacturing Schedule Assessment -Top Level Phase II #12;Advanced Energy Systems Design and FEA of 5 cell RF Cavity, He Vessel, Power Coupler, & Cryostat -Interfaces to external piping

227

A quantum kinematics for asymptotically flat spacetimes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We construct a quantum kinematics for asymptotically flat spacetimes based on the Koslowski-Sahlmann (KS) representation. The KS representation is a generalization of the representation underlying Loop Quantum Gravity (LQG) which supports, in addition to the usual LQG operators, the action of `background exponential operators' which are connection dependent operators labelled by `background' $su(2)$ electric fields. KS states have, in addition to the LQG state label corresponding to 1 dimensional excitations of the triad, a label corresponding to a `background' electric field which describes 3 dimensional excitations of the triad. Asymptotic behaviour in quantum theory is controlled through asymptotic conditions on the background electric fields which label the {\\em states} and the background electric fields which label the {\\em operators}. Asymptotic conditions on the triad are imposed as conditions on the background electric field state label while confining the LQG spin net graph labels to compact sets. We show that KS states can be realised as wave functions on a quantum configuration space of generalized connections and that the asymptotic behaviour of each such generalized connection is determined by that of the background electric fields which label the background exponential operators. Similar to the spatially compact case, the Gauss Law and diffeomorphism constraints are then imposed through Group Averaging techniques to obtain a large sector of gauge invariant states. It is shown that this sector supports a unitary action of the group of asymptotic rotations and translations and that, as anticipated by Friedman and Sorkin, for appropriate spatial topology, this sector contains states which display fermionic behaviour under $2\\pi$ rotations.

Miguel Campiglia; Madhavan Varadarajan

2014-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

228

Industrial Sector Energy Demand: Revisions for Non-Energy-Intensive Manufacturing (released in AEO2007)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

For the industrial sector, the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) analysis and projection efforts generally have focused on the energy-intensive industriesfood, bulk chemicals, refining, glass, cement, steel, and aluminumwhere energy cost averages 4.8% of annual operating cost. Detailed process flows and energy intensity indicators have been developed for narrowly defined industry groups in the energy-intensive manufacturing sector. The non-energy-intensive manufacturing industries, where energy cost averages 1.9% of annual operating cost, previously have received somewhat less attention, however. In Annual Energy Outlook 2006 (AEO), energy demand projections were provided for two broadly aggregated industry groups in the non-energy-intensive manufacturing sector: metal-based durables and other non-energy-intensive. In the AEO2006 projections, the two groups accounted for more than 50% of the projected increase in industrial natural gas consumption from 2004 to 2030.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Corrosion of Partially Crystallized Glasses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using existing data on corrosion of partially crystallized, simulated, high-level waste glasses, coefficients were introduced to evaluate the cumulative influence of secondary effects, such as residual stresses or concentration gradients on product consistency test response. As compared to predictions based solely on residual glass composition effects, the results showed that cristobalite, eucryptite, and nepheline had a higher-than-predicted impact on glass corrosion, while the effects of baddeleyite, hematite, calcium-zirconium silicate, and zircon were close to those predicted. The effects of acmite and lithium silicate were opposite to those expected based on their compositions. The analysis revealed important limitations of the databases currently available. Better understanding of corrosion phenomena will require quantitative composition data, microscopic characterization of pristine and corroded surfaces, and long-term tests with glass coupons or monoliths.

Hrma, Pavel R.; Riley, Brian J.; Vienna, John D.

2002-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

230

Glass Membrane For Controlled Diffusion Of Gases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A glass structure for controlled permeability of gases includes a glass vessel. The glass vessel has walls and a hollow center for receiving a gas. The glass vessel contains a metal oxide dopant formed with at least one metal selected from the group consisting of transition metals and rare earth metals for controlling diffusion of the gas through the walls of the glass vessel. The vessel releases the gas through its walls upon exposure to a radiation source.

Shelby, James E. (Alfred Station, NY); Kenyon, Brian E. (Pittsburgh, PA)

2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

231

Artisan Manufacturing: Order (2010-CW-0712)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE ordered Artisan Manufacturing Company, Inc., to pay a $5,000 civil penalty after finding Artisan Manufacturing had failed to certify that certain models of faucets comply with the applicable water conservation standard.

232

Goodman Manufacturing: Order (2012-CE-1509)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE ordered Goodman Manufacturing Company L.P. to pay an $8,000 civil penalty after finding Goodman Manufacturing had failed to certify that certain room air conditioners comply with the applicable energy conservation standard.

233

Goodman Manufacturing: Proposed Penalty (2011-SE-4301)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Goodman Manufacturing manufactured and distributed noncompliant basic model CPC180* commercial package air conditioners in the U.S.

234

Manufacturing Metallic Parts with Designed Mesostructure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Additive Manufacturing Laser Engineered Net Shaping Electron Beam Melting Williams, C. B., F. M. Mistree, D Additive Manufacturing © Christopher B. Williams Electron Beam Melting Electron Beam Melting Direct Metal

235

Mechanics and Design, Manufacturing Professor Hani Naguib  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Manufacturing What is Manufacturing? The transformation of materials. Apple Canada(Se12), Revenue: $5,067,109 9. CGI Group(Se12), Revenue: $4,786,857 10. Siemens Canada(Se12

236

Faculty Position in Mechanical Engineering Additive Manufacturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

using additive manufacturing in applications such as, but not limited to the net shape manufacture of) Promoting Well-Being, Finding Cures; (3) Building Communities, Expanding Opportunities; and (4) Harnessing

237

Montana Manufacturing Center www.mtmanufacturingcenter.com  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Montana Manufacturing Center www.mtmanufacturingcenter.com University Technical Assistance Program and wellness industry. Commenting on the strategy, Chief Opera- tions Officer and Six Sigma Green Belt Brad achieve that. NLI offers premier manufacturing and laboratories services (www

Dyer, Bill

238

Objective assessment of manufacturing technology investments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Amgen is a biotechnology company with manufacturing plants throughout the world. New manufacturing technologies are constantly being developed and implemented in order to address cost, quality, regulation, and competitive ...

Rothman, Craig Jeremy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Building Blocks for the Future of Manufacturing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for the Future of Manufacturing Building Blocks for the Future of Manufacturing Scott Smith 2011.05.04 Even though we grew up on opposite sides of the world, my colleague...

240

Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering Petroleum Engineering Minor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering for their petroleum engineering minor. As well, mechanical engineeringMechanical and Manufacturing Engineering Petroleum Engineering Minor The Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering offers a minor in petroleum engineering within the mechanical engineering major

Calgary, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manufacturing flat glass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

USA Manufacturing: Order (2013-CE-5336)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE ordered USA Manufacturing to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding USA Manufacturing had failed to certify that certain models of walk-in cooler and freezer components comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

242

Benefits and Barriers of Smart Manufacturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Decision makers in the industrial sector have only recently started to realize the potential of smart manufacturing to transform manufacturing. The potential gains in efficiency at the process and supply-chain level are still largely unknown...

Trombley, D.; Rogers, E.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Refrigerator Manufacturers: Order (2013-CE-5341)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE ordered Refrigerator Manufacturers, LLC to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Refrigerator Manufacturers had failed to certify that certain models of walk-in cooler and freezer components comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

244

BNFL Report Glass Formers Characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this task was to obtain powder property data on candidate glass former materials, sufficient to guide conceptual design and estimate the cost of glass former handling facilities as requested under Part B1 of BNFL Technical and Development Support. Twenty-nine glass forming materials were selected and obtained from vendors for the characterization of their physical properties, durability in caustic solution, and powder flow characteristics. A glass former was selected based on the characterization for each of the ten oxide classes required for Envelope A, B, and C mixtures. Three blends (A, B, and C) were prepared based on formulations provided by Vitreous State Laboratory and evaluated with the same methods employed for the glass formers. The properties obtained are presented in a series of attached Tables. It was determined that five of the ten glass formers, (kyanite, iron oxide, titania, zircon, and zinc oxide) have the potential to cause some level of solids f low problems. In addition, all of the blends may require consideration for their handling. A number of engineering considerations and recommendations were prepared based on the experimental findings, experience, and other process considerations. Recommendations for future testing are included. In conjunction with future work, it is recommended that a professional consultant be engaged to guide and assist with testing and design input.

Schumacher, R.F.

2000-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

245

BNFL Report Glass Formers Characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this task was to obtain powder property data on candidate glass former materials, sufficient to guide conceptual design and estimate the cost of glass former handling facilities as requested under Part B1 of BNFL Technical and Development Support. Twenty-nine glass forming materials were selected and obtained from vendors for the characterization of their physical properties, durability in caustic solution, and powder flow characteristics. A glass former was selected based on the characterization for each of the ten oxide classes required for Envelope A, B, and C mixtures. Three blends (A, B, and C) were prepared based on formulations provided by Vitreous State Laboratory and evaluated with the same methods employed for the glass formers. The properties obtained are presented in a series of attached Tables. It was determined that five of the ten glass formers, (kyanite, iron oxide, titania, zircon, and zinc oxide) have the potential to cause some level of solids f low problems. The problems might include arching or ratholing in the silo/hopper. In addition, all of the blends may require consideration for their handling.

Schumacher, R.F.

2000-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

246

Left invertibility, flatness and identifiability of switched linear dynamical systems: a framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Left invertibility, flatness and identifiability of switched linear dynamical systems: a framework invertibility and flatness, dynamical systems are structurally equivalent to some specific cryptographic invertibility, flatness and identifiability of discrete- time switched linear systems are investigated

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

247

Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Industrial Efficiency and...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Industrial Efficiency and Energy Productivity Video Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Industrial Efficiency and Energy Productivity Video Addthis Description Industrial...

248

Webinar: Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Video recording and text version of the webinar titled "Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells," originally presented on February 11, 2014.

249

Electromagnetic compatibility in semiconductor manufacturing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) causes problems in semiconductor manufacturing facilities that range from nuisances to major disruptions of production. In many instances, these issues are addressed in a reactionary rather than proactive manner by individuals who do not have the experience or the equipment necessary to combat EMI problems in a timely, cost effective manner. This approach leads to expensive retrofits, reduced equipment availability, long recovery times, and in some cases, line yield impacts. The goal of electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) in semiconductor manufacturing is to ensure that semiconductor process, metrology, and support equipment operate as intended without being affected by electromagnetic disturbances either transmitted through air (radiated interference), or transferred into the equipment via a conductive media (conducted interference). Rather than being neglected until serious issues arise, EMC should be considered in the early stages of facility design, in order to gain the most benefit at the lowest cost.

Montoya, J.A. [Intel Corp., Hillsboro, OR (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

250

Manufacturing of Plutonium Tensile Specimens  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Details workflow conducted to manufacture high density alpha Plutonium tensile specimens to support Los Alamos National Laboratory's science campaigns. Introduces topics including the metallurgical challenge of Plutonium and the use of high performance super-computing to drive design. Addresses the utilization of Abaqus finite element analysis, programmable computer numerical controlled (CNC) machining, as well as glove box ergonomics and safety in order to design a process that will yield high quality Plutonium tensile specimens.

Knapp, Cameron M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Advanced Manufacturing | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehiclesTankless orA BRIEF HISTORY OFEnergyAdvanced Manufacturing

252

Manufacturing Perspective | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of Energy Low-TemperatureEnergyAll ManufacturingFoodOctobertoPerspective

253

Excavating Chinese America in the Delta: Race and the historical archaeology of the Isleton Chinese American community  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

coin conglomerate foam foil glass (conglomerate) glass (ceramic conglomerate foam foil glass (flat) glass (Go piece)cloth coin conglomerate foam foil glass glass (flat) glass (

Fong, Kelly Nicole

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Sustainable Manufacturing via Multi-Scale, Physics-Based Process...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Manufacturing via Multi-Scale, Physics-Based Process Modeling and Manufacturing-Informed Design, April 2013 Sustainable Manufacturing via Multi-Scale, Physics-Based Process...

255

Machine Tool Design and Operation Strategies for Green Manufacturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Operation Strategies for Green Manufacturing Nancy DIAZ 1 ,to implement green manufacturing in machining includingopportunities to green manufacturing exist at all levels of

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

A Review of Engineering Research in Sustainable Manufacturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SWOT Anal- ysis for Green Manufacturing Strategy Selection,”Yung, K. L. , 2010, “Green Manufacturing Using IntegratedDornfeld, D. , 2013, Green Manufacturing: Fundamentals and

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Decision-Making to Reduce Manufacturing Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

how to think about green manufacturing and sustainability.for sustainable or green manufacturing is that it is not anthe implementation of green manufacturing, where a wedge

Reich-Weiser, Corinne

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

U.S. Advanced Manufacturing and Clean Energy Technology Challenges  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Manufacturing and Clean Energy Technology Challenges May 6, 2014 AMO Peer Review Mark Johnson Director Advanced Manufacturing Office www.manufacturing.energy.gov This presentation...

259

Additive Manufacturing in China: Aviation and Aerospace Applications (Part 2)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis May 2013 Additive Manufacturing in China: Aviationan overview of China’s additive manufacturing industry wasmilitary achievements in additive manufacturing. 2 Initial

ANDERSON, Eric

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

A Review of Engineering Research in Sustainable Manufacturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

shape part, e.g. , additive manufacturing, Transactions offace operations. Additive manufacturing of metal componentsenvironmen- tal merits of additive manufacturing relative to

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manufacturing flat glass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Contact Manufacturing Demonstration Facility Craig Blue, Ph.D...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Manufacturing Demonstration Facility Craig Blue, Ph.D. Director, Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (865) 574-4351 blueca@ornl.gov INNOVATIONS IN MANUFACTURING www.ornl.gov...

262

Low Temperature PEM Fuel Cell Manufacturing Needs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Low Temperature PEM Fuel Cell Manufacturing Needs Presented by Duarte Sousa, PE Manufacturing Fuel Cell Manhattan Project #12; Cost drivers were identified for the following: · MEA · Plates · Balance of Plant (BOP) · Fuel Processing Manufacturing Fuel Cell Project ­ Phase 1 Note that this presentation

263

Energy Manufacturing Matthew Realff and Steven Danyluk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Manufacturing Matthew Realff and Steven Danyluk Georgia Institute of Technology This white Foundation and held in Arlington VA, on March 24-25, 2009 on Energy Manufacturing. The workshop attendees participated in discussions and presented their views on energy manufacturing and the presentations

Das, Suman

264

8th Global Conference on Sustainable Manufacturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

manufacturing in the UAE · Potentials of renewables · Education for sustainability engineering · Green supply8th Global Conference on Sustainable Manufacturing Architecture for Sustainable Engineering for research institutes and industrial partners related to the area of sustainable manufacturing. It enables

Berlin,Technische Universität

265

Additive manufacturing of metallic tracks on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Additive manufacturing of metallic tracks on green ceramic/dielectrics Problem this technology microelectronics such as manufacture of LTCC ceramic/ Dielectric antenna and rapid PCB prototyping or repair (note: may require additional tooling/ set up time) · Rapid Prototyping & small scale manufacture

Painter, Kevin

266

e! Science News Semiconductor manufacturing technique holds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

arsenide chips manufactured in multilayer stacks: light sensors, high-speed transistors and solar cellse! Science News Semiconductor manufacturing technique holds promise for solar energy Published semiconductor manufacturing method pioneered at the University of Illinois, the future of solar energy just got

Rogers, John A.

267

ICME & MGI Big Area Additive Manufacturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ICME & MGI · Big Area Additive Manufacturing · Neutron Characterization for AM · Materials problems in additive manu- facturing (AM). Additive manufacturing, or three-dimensional (3-D) printing of the world's most advanced neu- tron facilities, the HFIR and SNS, to characterize additive manufactured

268

Pseudomonas fluorescens -A robust manufacturing platform  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pseudomonas fluorescens -A robust manufacturing platform Reprinted from July/August 2004 Speciality at efficient- ly transporting single chain antibodies and other mammalian-derived proteins. In addition production. Dowpharma, a contract manufacturing services unit of Dow Chemical, has developed a manufacturing

Lebendiker, Mario

269

Manufacturing Research & Development for Systems that will  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

focused on manufacturability issues such as low-cost, high-volume manufacturing systems, advanced to move the United States toward a future hydrogen economy. While many scientific, technical's laboratory-scale fabrication technologies to high-volume commercial manufacturing has been identified as one

270

EFFECTIVE STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING WITH ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

will be presented for components that can be processed by additive manufacturing (AM) or 3D printing. The origin structures. KEYWORDS : structural health monitoring methodology, 3D printing, additive manufacturing, fatigue, intelligent structure INTRODUCTION Additive manufacturing (AM), also known as 3D Printing or Rapid

Boyer, Edmond

271

atomically flat gold: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Flat(Tire1) Intact(Tire1) StartFinish Inflate(Tire1 Starner, Thad E. 147 Local and global instabilities in nanosize rectangular prismatic gold specimens R.C. Batra *, A.A....

272

Seismic rehabilitation of a reinforced concrete flat-slab structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effectiveness of seismic rehabilitation techniques used to eliminate punching shear failures was assessed for flat-slab structural systems. This type of retrofit was evaluated for a four-story reinforced concrete (RC) frame office building...

Jimenez, Laila Margarita

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Modified Ricci flow and asymptotically non-flat spaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The present work extends the application of a modified Ricci flow equation to an asymptotically non flat space, namely Marder's cylindrially symmetric space. It is found that the flow equation has a solution at least in a particular case.

Shubhayu Chatterjee; Narayan Banerjee

2013-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

274

Interacting holographic dark energy model in non-flat universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We employ the holographic model of interacting dark energy to obtain the equation of state for the holographic energy density in non-flat (closed) universe enclosed by the event horizon measured from the sphere of horizon named $L$.

M R Setare

2006-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

275

DOE's Former Rocky Flats Weapons Production Site to Become National...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Flats nuclear weapons production site to the Department of the Interior's (DOI) U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) for use as a National Wildlife Refuge. After more than a...

276

The Redshift Distribution of Flat-Spectrum Radio Sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The redshift distribution of flat-spectrum radio sources with 5 GHz flux densities S>5 mJy is a key component in using current radio lens surveys to probe the cosmological model. We have constructed the first flat-spectrum radio sample in the flux density range 3-20 mJy. Our new sample has 33 sources; we have determined the redshifts of 14 of these (42% complete). The low mean redshift, ~0.75, of our faintest sample needs to be confirmed by further observations to improve the sample completeness. We also increased the redshift completeness of several surveys of brighter flat-spectrum sources. While the mean redshift, ~1.1 of flat-spectrum samples fainter than 1 Jy is nearly constant, the fraction of the sources identifiable as quasars steadily drops from ~80% to ~10% as the flux density of the sources decreases.

J. A. Munoz; E. E. Falco; C. S. Kochanek; J. Lehar; E. Mediavilla

2003-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

277

Manufacturing  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of Energy Low-TemperatureEnergy Maine09 BalanceStorageReviewFlow of

278

Energy Saving Glass Lamination via Selective Radio Frequency Heating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ceralink Inc. developed FastFuse™, a rapid, new, energy saving process for lamination of glass and composites using radio frequency (RF) heating technology. The Inventions and Innovations program supported the technical and commercial research and development needed to elevate the innovation from bench scale to a self-supporting technology with significant potential for growth. The attached report provides an overview of the technical and commerical progress achieved for FastFuse™ during the course of the project. FastFuse™ has the potential to revolutionize the laminate manufacturing industries by replacing energy intensive, multi-step processes with an energy efficient, single-step process that allows higher throughput. FastFuse™ transmits RF energy directly into the interlayer to generate heat, eliminating the need to directly heat glass layers and the surrounding enclosures, such as autoclaves or vacuum systems. FastFuse™ offers lower start-up and energy costs (up to 90% or more reduction in energy costs), and faster cycles times (less than 5 minutes). FastFuse™ is compatible with EVA, TPU, and PVB interlayers, and has been demonstrated for glass, plastics, and multi-material structures such as photovoltaics and transparent armor.

Shawn M. Allan; Patricia M. Strickland; Holly S. Shulman

2009-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

279

Lithium Loaded Glass Fiber Neutron Detector Tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiation portal monitors used for interdiction of illicit materials at borders include highly sensitive neutron detection systems. The main reason for having neutron detection capability is to detect fission neutrons from plutonium. The currently deployed radiation portal monitors (RPMs) from Ludlum and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) use neutron detectors based upon 3He-filled gas proportional counters, which are the most common large neutron detector. There is a declining supply of 3He in the world and, thus, methods to reduce the use of this gas in RPMs with minimal changes to the current system designs and sensitivity to cargo-borne neutrons are being investigated. Four technologies have been identified as being currently commercially available, potential alternative neutron detectors to replace the use of 3He in RPMs. Reported here are the results of tests of the lithium-loaded glass fibers option. This testing measured the neutron detection efficiency and gamma ray rejection capabilities of a small system manufactured by Nucsafe (Oak Ridge, TN).

Ely, James H.; Erikson, Luke E.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Stromswold, David C.

2009-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

280

NREL Manufacturing R&D Workshop NREL H2/FC Manufacturing R&D Workshop  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

&D Workshop Fuel Cell Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) and Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) Manufacturing Lines and driving down the cost of fuel cell manufacturing through automation. What are the key technical Membrane Electrode Assembly Manufacturing Hypothetical Fuel Cell Manufacturing Platforms August 11, 2011

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manufacturing flat glass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Research on advanced photovoltaic manufacturing technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report outlines opportunities for significantly advancing the scale and economy of high-volume manufacturing of high-efficiency photovoltaic (PV) modules. We propose to pursue a concurrent effort to advance existing crystalline silicon module manufacturing technology and to implement thin film CuInSe{sub 2} (CIS) module manufacturing. This combination of commercial-scale manufacturing of high-efficiency crystalline silicon modules and of pilot-scale manufacturing of low-cost thin film CIS technology will support continued, rapid growth of the US PV industry.

Jester, T.; Eberspacher, C. (Siemens Solar Industries, Camarillo, CA (United States))

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Manufacturing Demonstration Facility Technology Collaborations for US Manufacturers in Advanced  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and InterfacesAdministrationManufacturing - GE Appliances, ORNL Low-Cost

283

Metrology Challenges for High Energy Density Science Target Manufacture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Currently, High Energy Density Science (HEDS) experiments are used to support and qualify predictive physics models. These models assume ideal conditions such as energy (input) and device (target) geometry. The experiments rely on precision targets constructed from components with dimensions in the millimeter range, while having micrometer-scale, functional features, including planar steps, sine waves, and step-joint geometry on hemispherical targets. Future target designs will likely have features and forms that rival or surpass current manufacturing and characterization capability. The dimensional metrology of these features is important for a number of reasons, including qualification of sub-components prior to assembly, quantification of critical features on the as-built assemblies and as a feedback mechanism for fabrication process development. Variations in geometry from part to part can lead to functional limitations, such as unpredictable instabilities during an experiment and the inability to assemble a target from poorly matched sub-components. Adding to the complexity are the large number and variety of materials, components, and shapes that render any single metrology technique difficult to use with low uncertainty. Common materials include metal and glass foams, doped transparent and opaque plastics and a variety of deposited and wrought metals. A suite of metrology tools and techniques developed to address the many critical issues relevant to the manufacture of HEDS targets including interferometry, x-ray radiography and contact metrology are presented including two sided interferometry for absolute thickness metrology and low force probe technology for micrometer feature coordinate metrology.

Seugling, R M; Bono, M J; Davis, P

2009-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

284

Clean Energy Manufacturing Innovation Institute for Composites...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

polymer composites. The Institute will target continuous or discontinuous, primarily carbon and glass fiber systems, with thermoset or thermoplastic resin materials. These...

285

HLW Glass Studies: Development of Crystal-Tolerant HLW Glasses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In our study, a series of lab-scale crucible tests were performed on designed glasses of different compositions to further investigate and simulate the effect of Cr, Ni, Fe, Al, Li, and RuO2 on the accumulation rate of spinel crystals in the glass discharge riser of the HLW melter. The experimental data were used to expand the compositional region covered by an empirical model developed previously (Matyáš et al. 2010b), improving its predictive performance. We also investigated the mechanism for agglomeration of particles and impact of agglomerates on accumulation rate. In addition, the TL was measured as a function of temperature and composition.

Matyas, Josef; Huckleberry, Adam R.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Lang, Jesse B.; Owen, Antionette T.; Kruger, Albert A.

2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

286

Glass and Glass Products (2010 MECS) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky LearningGet Assistance GetGiant ProteaseGlass and Glass Products

287

THE MASTER OF ENGINEERING IN MANUFACTURING ENGINEERING PROGRAM PLANNING SHEET  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Manufacturing ME 526 Simulation of Physical Processes ME 535 Green Manufacturing METHE MASTER OF ENGINEERING IN MANUFACTURING ENGINEERING PROGRAM PLANNING SHEET be at the 500 level or above. 1. Core Manufacturing Requirement ­ 24 credits

288

Ohio Advanced Energy Manufacturing Center  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The program goal of the Ohio Advanced Energy Manufacturing Center (OAEMC) is to support advanced energy manufacturing and to create responsive manufacturing clusters that will support the production of advanced energy and energy-efficient products to help ensure the nation's energy and environmental security. This goal cuts across a number of existing industry segments critical to the nation's future. Many of the advanced energy businesses are starting to make the transition from technology development to commercial production. Historically, this transition from laboratory prototypes through initial production for early adopters to full production for mass markets has taken several years. Developing and implementing manufacturing technology to enable production at a price point the market will accept is a key step. Since these start-up operations are configured to advance the technology readiness of the core energy technology, they have neither the expertise nor the resources to address manufacturing readiness issues they encounter as the technology advances toward market entry. Given the economic realities of today's business environment, finding ways to accelerate this transition can make the difference between success and failure for a new product or business. The advanced energy industry touches a wide range of industry segments that are not accustomed to working together in complex supply chains to serve large markets such as automotive and construction. During its first three years, the Center has catalyzed the communication between companies and industry groups that serve the wide range of advanced energy markets. The Center has also found areas of common concern, and worked to help companies address these concerns on a segment or industry basis rather than having each company work to solve common problems individually. EWI worked with three industries through public-private partnerships to sew together disparate segments helping to promote overall industry health. To aid the overall advanced energy industry, EWI developed and launched an Ohio chapter of the non-profit Advanced Energy Economy. In this venture, Ohio joins with six other states including Colorado, Connecticut, Illinois, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Vermont to help promote technologies that deliver energy that is affordable, abundant and secure. In a more specific arena, EWI's advanced energy group collaborated with the EWI-run Nuclear Fabrication Consortium to promote the nuclear supply chain. Through this project EWI has helped bring the supply chain up to date for the upcoming period of construction, and assisted them in understanding the demands for the next generation of facilities now being designed. In a more targeted manner, EWI worked with 115 individual advanced energy companies that are attempting to bring new technology to market. First, these interactions helped EWI develop an awareness of issues common to companies in different advanced energy sectors. By identifying and addressing common issues, EWI helps companies bring technology to market sooner and at a lower cost. These visits also helped EWI develop a picture of industry capability. This helped EWI provide companies with contacts that can supply commercial solutions to their new product development challenges. By providing assistance in developing supply chain partnerships, EWI helped companies bring their technology to market faster and at a lower cost than they might have been able to do by themselves. Finally, at the most granular level EWI performed dedicated research and development on new manufacturing processes for advanced energy. During discussions with companies participating in advanced energy markets, several technology issues that cut across market segments were identified. To address some of these issues, three crosscutting technology development projects were initiated and completed with Center support. This included reversible welds for batteries and high temperature heat exchangers. It also included a novel advanced weld trainer that EWI

Kimberly Gibson; Mark Norfolk

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

289

Flattening Scientific CCD Imaging Data with a Dome Flat Field System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe the flattening of scientific CCD imaging data using a dome flat field system. The system uses light emitting diodes (LEDs) to illuminate a carefully constructed dome flat field screen. LEDs have several advantages over more traditional illumination sources: they are available in a wide range of output wavelengths, are inexpensive, have a very long source lifetime, and are straightforward to control digitally. The circular dome screen is made of a material with Lambertian scattering properties that efficiently reflects light of a wide range of wavelengths and incident angles. We compare flat fields obtained using this new system with two types of traditionally-constructed flat fields: twilight sky flats and nighttime sky flats. Using photometric standard stars as illumination sources, we test the quality of each flat field by applying it to a set of standard star observations. We find that the dome flat field system produces flat fields that are superior to twilight or nighttime sky flats, particularly for photometric calibration. We note that a ratio of the twilight sky flat to the nighttime sky flat is flat to within the expected uncertainty; but since both of these flat fields are inferior to the dome flat, this common test is not an appropriate metric for testing a flat field. Rather, the only feasible and correct method for determining the appropriateness of a flat field is to use standard stars to measure the reproducibility of known magnitudes across the detector.

J. L. Marshall; D. L. DePoy

2005-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

290

Manufacturing method of photonic crystal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A manufacturing method of a photonic crystal is provided. In the method, a high-refractive-index material is conformally deposited on an exposed portion of a periodic template composed of a low-refractive-index material by an atomic layer deposition process so that a difference in refractive indices or dielectric constants between the template and adjacent air becomes greater, which makes it possible to form a three-dimensional photonic crystal having a superior photonic bandgap. Herein, the three-dimensional structure may be prepared by a layer-by-layer method.

Park, In Sung; Lee, Tae Ho; Ahn, Jin Ho; Biswas, Rana; Constant, Kristen P.; Ho, Kai-Ming; Lee, Jae-Hwang

2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

291

Method for manufacturing magnetohydrodynamic electrodes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of manufacturing electrodes for use in a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator is described comprising the steps of preparing a billet having a core of a first metal, a tubular sleeve of a second metal, and an outer sheath of an extrusile metal; evacuating the space between the parts of the assembled billet; extruding the billet; and removing the outer jacket. The extruded bar may be made into electrodes by cutting and bending to the shape required for an MHD channel frame. The method forms a bond between the first metal of the core and the second metal of the sleeve strong enough to withstand a hot and corrosive environment.

Killpatrick, D.H.; Thresh, H.R.

1980-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

292

Manufacturing Fuel Cell Manhattan Project  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of Energy Low-TemperatureEnergyAll ManufacturingFoodOctoberto DOE Fuel

293

Manufacturing Initiative | Clean Energy | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fund Las ConchasTrail5,722,326ManhattanEnergyManufacturing

294

Unclassified Source Term and Radionuclide Data for Corrective Action Unit 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the evaluation of the information and data available on the unclassified source term and radionuclide contamination for CAU 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine. The total residual inventory of radionuclides associated with one or more tests is known as the radiologic source term (RST). The RST is comprised of radionuclides in water, glass, or other phases or mineralogic forms. The hydrologic source term (HST) of an underground nuclear test is the portion of the total RST that is released into the groundwater over time following the test. In this report, the HST represents radionuclide release some time after the explosion and does not include the rapidly evolving mechanical, thermal, and chemical processes during the explosion. The CAU 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine has many more detonations and a wider variety of settings to consider compared to other CAUs. For instance, the source term analysis and evaluation performed for CAUs 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa and CAU 98: Frenchman Flat did not consider vadose zone attenuation because many detonations were located near or below the water table. However, the large number of Yucca Flat/Climax Mine tests and the location of many tests above the water table warrant a more robust analysis of the unsaturated zone.

Peter Martian

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Effect of furnace atmosphere on E-glass foaming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

oxy-fired furnaces. E-glass foams were generated in a fused-81.05.K 1. Introduction Glass foams generated in glass-that the stability of E-glass foam decreased with increasing

Kim, D. S.; Dutton, Bryan C.; Hrma, Pavel R.; Pilon, Laurent

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Structure glass technology : systems and applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Glass cannot compete with steel in terms of strength or durability, but it is the only structural material that offers the highly sought after qualities of translucency and transparency. The use of glass has evolved from ...

Leitch, Katherine K. (Katherine Kristen)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

The Huge, Blue, Jesus Glass Statue  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Later, I found a huge, blue, glass statue of Jesus stuffedOF CALIFORNIA RIVERSIDE The Huge, Blue, Jesus Glass Statue Aeyes as RED And wrote down BLUE for your hair. I had to fix

Robbins, Joanna

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Relativistic electromagnetic flat top solitons and their stability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The inclusion of ion response in the study of relativistically intense electromagnetic laser pulse propagation in plasma yields certain distinct varieties of single peak solitonic structures. A flat top slow moving structure (for which the various fields have a flat profile over a wide spatial range) is one such solution. A detailed characterization of these solutions along with the eigen spectrum of their formation in the parameter space has been presented. The evolution of this particular solution is studied in detail with the help of a coupled fluid Maxwell set of equations. The study shows that the flat top solution is unstable. The instability is characterized as the backward Brillouin instability for which the electron quiver velocity plays the role of the effective temperature.

Sundar, Sita; Das, Amita; Saxena, Vikrant; Kaw, Predhiman; Sen, Abhijit [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar-382428 (India)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

299

Heating-induced glass-glass and glass-liquid transformations in computer simulations of water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water exists in at least two families of glassy states, broadly categorized as the low-density (LDA) and high-density amorphous ice (HDA). Remarkably, LDA and HDA can be reversibly interconverted via appropriate thermodynamic paths, such as isothermal compression and isobaric heating, exhibiting first-order-like phase transitions. We perform out-of-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of glassy water using the ST2 model to study the evolution of LDA and HDA upon isobaric heating. Depending on pressure, glass-to-glass, glass-to-crystal, glass-to-vapor, as well as glass-to-liquid transformations are found. Specifically, heating LDA results in the following transformations, with increasing heating pressures: (i) LDA-to-vapor (sublimation), (ii) LDA-to-liquid (glass transition), (iii) LDA-to-HDA-to-liquid, (iv) LDA-to-HDA-to-liquid-to-crystal, and (v) LDA-to-HDA-to-crystal. Similarly, heating HDA results in the following transformations, with decreasing heating pressures: (a) HDA-to-crystal, (b) HDA-to-liquid-to-crystal, (c) HDA-to-liquid (glass transition), (d) HDA-to-LDA-to-liquid, and (e) HDA-to-LDA-to-vapor. A more complex sequence may be possible using lower heating rates. For each of these transformations, we determine the corresponding transformation temperature as function of pressure, and provide a P-T “phase diagram” for glassy water based on isobaric heating. Our results for isobaric heating dovetail with the LDA-HDA transformations reported for ST2 glassy water based on isothermal compression/decompression processes [Chiu et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 184504 (2013)]. The resulting phase diagram is consistent with the liquid-liquid phase transition hypothesis. At the same time, the glass phase diagram is sensitive to sample preparation, such as heating or compression rates. Interestingly, at least for the rates explored, our results suggest that the LDA-to-liquid (HDA-to-liquid) and LDA-to-HDA (HDA-to-LDA) transformation lines on heating are related, both being associated with the limit of kinetic stability of LDA (HDA)

Chiu, Janet; Giovambattista, Nicolas [Department of Physics, Brooklyn College of the City University of New York, Brooklyn, New York 11210 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Brooklyn College of the City University of New York, Brooklyn, New York 11210 (United States); Starr, Francis W. [Department of Physics, Wesleyan University, Middletown, Connecticut 06459 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Wesleyan University, Middletown, Connecticut 06459 (United States)

2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

300

Classification of oxide glasses: A polarizability approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A classification of binary oxide glasses has been proposed taking into account the values obtained on their refractive index-based oxide ion polarizability {alpha}{sub O2-}(n{sub 0}), optical basicity {lambda}(n{sub 0}), metallization criterion M(n{sub 0}), interaction parameter A(n{sub 0}), and ion's effective charges as well as O1s and metal binding energies determined by XPS. Four groups of oxide glasses have been established: glasses formed by two glass-forming acidic oxides; glasses formed by glass-forming acidic oxide and modifier's basic oxide; glasses formed by glass-forming acidic and conditional glass-forming basic oxide; glasses formed by two basic oxides. The role of electronic ion polarizability in chemical bonding of oxide glasses has been also estimated. Good agreement has been found with the previous results concerning classification of simple oxides. The results obtained probably provide good basis for prediction of type of bonding in oxide glasses on the basis of refractive index as well as for prediction of new nonlinear optical materials.

Dimitrov, Vesselin [Department of Silicate Technology, University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, 8 Kl. Ohridski Blvd., Sofia 1756 (Bulgaria); Komatsu, Takayuki [Department of Chemistry, The Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka-cho, Nagaoka-shi, Niigata-ken 940-2188 (Japan)]. E-mail: komatsu@chem.nagaokaut.ac.jp

2005-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manufacturing flat glass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

The corrosion behavior of DWPF glasses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors analyzed the corroded surfaces of reference glasses developed for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) to characterize their corrosion behavior. The corrosion mechanism of nuclear waste glasses must be known in order to provide source terms describing radionuclide release for performance assessment calculations. Different DWPF reference glasses were corroded under conditions that highlighted various aspects of the corrosion process and led to different extents of corrosion. The glasses corroded by similar mechanisms, and a phenomenological description of their corrosion behavior is presented here. The initial leaching of soluble glass components results in the formation of an amorphous gel layer on the glass surface. The gel layer is a transient phase that transforms into a layer of clay crystallites, which equilibrates with the solution as corrosion continues. The clay layer does not act as a barrier to either water penetration or glass dissolution, which continues beneath it, and may eventually separate from the glass. Solubility limits for glass components may be established by the eventual precipitation of secondary phases; thus, corrosion of the glass becomes controlled by the chemical equilibrium between the solution and the assemblage of secondary phases. In effect, the solution is an intermediate phase through which the glass transforms to an energetically more favorable assemblage of phases. Implications regarding the prediction of long-term glass corrosion behavior are discussed.

Ebert, W.L.; Bates, J.K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemical Technology Div.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

DURABLE GLASS FOR THOUSANDS OF YEARS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The durability of natural glasses on geological time scales and ancient glasses for thousands of years is well documented. The necessity to predict the durability of high level nuclear waste (HLW) glasses on extended time scales has led to various thermodynamic and kinetic approaches. Advances in the measurement of medium range order (MRO) in glasses has led to the understanding that the molecular structure of a glass, and thus the glass composition, controls the glass durability by establishing the distribution of ion exchange sites, hydrolysis sites, and the access of water to those sites. During the early stages of glass dissolution, a 'gel' layer resembling a membrane forms through which ions exchange between the glass and the leachant. The hydrated gel layer exhibits acid/base properties which are manifested as the pH dependence of the thickness and nature of the gel layer. The gel layer ages into clay or zeolite minerals by Ostwald ripening. Zeolite mineral assemblages (higher pH and Al{sup 3+} rich glasses) may cause the dissolution rate to increase which is undesirable for long-term performance of glass in the environment. Thermodynamic and structural approaches to the prediction of glass durability are compared versus Ostwald ripening.

Jantzen, C.

2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

303

Identifying the Bose glass phase  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introducing disorder into the Bose-Hubbard model at integer fillings leads to a Bose glass phase, along with the Mott insulator and superfluid phases. We suggest a new order parameter: the determinant of the one body density matrix, which is nonzero only within the Mott-insulator phase. Alongside the superfluid fraction, it is then possible to distinguish the three phases. The Bose glass phase is the only phase which has vanishing determinant and superfluid fraction. The vanishing of the determinant in the Bose glass phase occurs due to the partial fragmentation of the condensate into localized fragments, each with zero superfluid response, which implies the presence of unoccupied sites and hence the presence of lines of zeros in the one body density matrix. In the superfluid phase, the determinant vanish for another reason - due to the macroscopic occupation of a single particle state. Finally, we suggest the enhancement of the three body decay rate in the Bose glass phase, as an experimental indicator for the presence of localized fragments.

R. Pugatch; N. Bar-gill; N. Katz; E. Rowen; N. Davidson

2006-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

304

Wave interaction with a fixed vertical flat plate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Hydrofoil definition sketch. The sharp-edged gust problem and the problem of a step-wise cnange in the velocity perpendicular to the foil offers insight into the response of a foil subject to an oscillating fluid. A sharp-edged gust with an initial... forces on a thin flat plate with a standard hydrofoil thickness was determined experimentally in a two-dimensional wave tank. Non-dimensional parameters were plotted and used to evaluate the data. It was shown that lift can be generated on a flat...

Glover, Lanny Bruce

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Superintegrability in a non-conformally-flat space  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Superintegrable systems in two- and three-dimensional spaces of constant curvature have been extensively studied. From these, superintegrable systems in conformally flat spaces can be constructed by Staeckel transform. In this paper a method developed to establish the superintegrability of the Tremblay-Turbiner-Winternitz system in two dimensions is extended to higher dimensions and a superintegrable system on a non-conformally-flat four-dimensional space is found. In doing so, curvature corrections to the corresponding classical potential are found to be necessary. It is found that some subalgebras of the symmetry algebra close polynomially.

E. G. Kalnins; J. M. Kress; W. Miller Jr

2012-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

306

Interacting agegraphic dark energy models in non-flat universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A so-called "agegraphic dark energy" was recently proposed to explain the dark energy-dominated universe. In this Letter, we generalize the agegraphic dark energy models to the universe with spatial curvature in the presence of interaction between dark matter and dark energy. We show that these models can accommodate $w_D = -1 $ crossing for the equation of state of dark energy. In the limiting case of a flat universe, i.e. $k = 0$, all previous results of agegraphic dark energy in flat universe are restored.

Ahmad Sheykhi

2009-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

307

Industrial Scale Demonstration of Smart Manufacturing Achieving...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

TX National Center for Manufacturing Sciences Ann Arbor, MI Nimbis Services McLean, VA Praxair Tonawanda, NY Rockwell Automation Milwaukee, WI For additional information, please...

308

Manufacturing Ecosystems and Keystone Technologies (Text Version...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Culver, Special Assistant to Program Manager, Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) Kelly Visconti, AAAS Science & Technology Policy Fellow, AMO DR. LEO CHRISTODOULOU: I would...

309

Agenda: Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composite Manufacturing Workshop  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Blue Team B (Washington II & III) - Manufacturing Process Technology Facilitators - Kelly Visconti and Steve Sikirica; Note taker - Theresa Miller Red Team (Madison Room) -...

310

Manufacturing Demonstration Facility Workshop Videos | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

on March 12, 2012. Lauren Culver, Special Assistant to Program Manager, AMO, and Kelly Visconti, AAAS Science & Technology Policy Fellow, AMO, speaking at the Manufacturing...

311

Performance, Market and Manufacturing Constraints relevant to...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Constraints relevant to the Industrialization of Thermoelectric Devices Market pricing of thermoelectric raw materials and processing, cost of manufacture of devices and...

312

Energy & Manufacturing Workforce Training Topics List - Version...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

View this searchable list of the training programs in the areas of energy andor manufacturing. Information provided in this list includes: the subjects being taught, grantee,...

313

2010 Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints: Definitions...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Definitions and Assumptions 2010 Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints: Definitions and Assumptions This 13-page document defines key terms and details assumptions and...

314

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Manufacturing Demonstration Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Manufacturing Demonstration Facility Technology Collaborations | Proposal Guidelines Proposal Guidelines Proposals should be no more than 5 single...

315

Energy-Related Carbon Emissions in Manufacturing  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Energy-related carbon emissions in manufacturing analysis and issues related to the energy use, energy efficiency, and carbon emission indicators.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Supplemental Comments of the Plumbing Manufacturers Instititute...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Supplemental Comments of the Plumbing Manufacturers Instititute Regarding the Economic Impacts of the Proposed Definition of "Showerhead," Docket No. EERE-2010-BT-NOA-0016...

317

Renewable Energy Manufacturing Tax Credit (South Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

South Carolina offers a ten percent income tax credit to the manufacturers of renewable energy operations* for tax years 2010 through 2015.

318

Establishing Greener Products and Manufacturing Processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

KEYWORDS: Life Cycle Assessment, LCA, Green manufacturing,cycle phases, Life Cycle Assessment (LCA). The followingimpact. 2.2 Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) and Related Metrics

Linke, Barbara; Huang, Yu-Chu; Dornfeld, David

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Welcome and Advanced Manufacturing Partnership (Text Version)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This is a text version of the Welcome and Advanced Manufacturing Partnership video, originally presented on March 12, 2012 at the MDF Workshop held in Chicago, Illinois.

320

American Energy and Manufacturing Competitiveness Summit  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The American Energy and Manufacturing Competitiveness Summit will bring together leaders and perspectives from industry, government, academia, national laboratories, labor, and policy organizations...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manufacturing flat glass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Midwest Regional Summit...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composite Manufacturing Workshop Multimaterial Joining Workshop Characterization of Thermo-Mechanical Behaviors of Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS)...

322

Innovative Manufacturing Initiative Recognition Day, Advanced...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

infrastructure Education and training Policy EEREAMO Focus * Manufacturing in the US * GDP and employment enhancement * Energy efficiency and clean energy industry * Energy...

323

Manufacturing Barriers to High Temperature PEM Commercialization...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Barriers to High Temperature PEM Commercialization Presented at the NREL Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Manufacturing R&D Workshop in Washington, DC, August 11-12, 2011....

324

Manufacturing Ecosystems and Keystone Technologies (Text Version)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This is a text version of the Manufacturing Ecosystems and Keystone Technologies video, originally presented on March 12, 2012 at the MDF Workshop held in Chicago, Illinois.

325

Solar Manufacturing Incentive Grant (SMIG) Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Created in 1995 and administered jointly by the Virginia Department of Mines, Minerals and Energy, and the Virginia Economic Development Partnership, the Solar Manufacturing Incentive Grant (SMIG)...

326

Green Manufacturing Initiative Annual Report 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Green Manufacturing Initiative Annual Report 2010 Dr. John Patten Dr. David Meade May 3, 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Herman Miller Energy Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

de Doncker, Elise

327

Low Energy Ion Implantationin Semiconductor Manufacturing | U...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Low Energy Ion Implantation in Semiconductor Manufacturing Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of Nuclear Science...

328

2014 Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints: Definitions...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and Assumptions A number of key terms are used to interpret the manufacturing energy and carbon footprints. The terms associated with the energy footprint analysis are...

329

Project Profile: Improved Large Aperture Collector Manufacturing...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

feasibility demonstrations focused in three main areas: an aggressive manufacturing optimization of the collector sub-structures for lower input material costs & mechanized...

330

clean energy manufacturing | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

efforts across the DOE Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy's (EERE's) clean energy technology offices and Advanced Manufacturing Office, focusing on American...

331

Manufactured caverns in carbonate rock  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a process for manufacturing underground caverns suitable in one embodiment for storage of large volumes of gaseous or liquid materials. The method is an acid dissolution process that can be utilized to form caverns in carbonate rock formations. The caverns can be used to store large quantities of materials near transportation facilities or destination markets. The caverns can be used for storage of materials including fossil fuels, such as natural gas, refined products formed from fossil fuels, or waste materials, such as hazardous waste materials. The caverns can also be utilized for applications involving human access such as recreation or research. The method can also be utilized to form calcium chloride as a by-product of the cavern formation process.

Bruce, David A.; Falta, Ronald W.; Castle, James W.; Murdoch, Lawrence C.

2007-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

332

Wind Turbine Manufacturing Process Monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To develop a practical inline inspection that could be used in combination with automated composite material placement equipment to economically manufacture high performance and reliable carbon composite wind turbine blade spar caps. The approach technical feasibility and cost benefit will be assessed to provide a solid basis for further development and implementation in the wind turbine industry. The program is focused on the following technology development: (1) Develop in-line monitoring methods, using optical metrology and ultrasound inspection, and perform a demonstration in the lab. This includes development of the approach and performing appropriate demonstration in the lab; (2) Develop methods to predict composite strength reduction due to defects; and (3) Develop process models to predict defects from leading indicators found in the uncured composites.

Waseem Faidi; Chris Nafis; Shatil Sinha; Chandra Yerramalli; Anthony Waas; Suresh Advani; John Gangloff; Pavel Simacek

2012-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

333

A View of Manufacturing Through 3D Glasses | GE Global Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

from machining and casting technologies to materials science, welding, and yes, 3D printing. In the past few years, 3D printing, or additive as we call it in our labs, has...

334

EA-1645: Sage Electrochromics SageGlass High Volume Manufacturing Facility  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy CooperationRequirements Matrix U.S.7685 Vol. 76, No.5-FEB.Draft

335

A Vehicle Manufacturer’s Perspective on Higher-Octane Fuels  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Breakout Session 1C—Fostering Technology Adoption I: Building the Market for Renewables with High Octane Fuels A Vehicle Manufacturer’s Perspective on Higher-Octane Fuels Tom Leone, Technical Expert, Powertrain Evaluation and Analysis, Ford Motor Company

336

EVALUATION OF FLAT-PLATE PHOTOVOLTAIC THERMAL HYBRID SYSTEMS FOR SOLAR ENERGY UTILIZATION.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The technical and economic attractiveness of combined photovoltaic/thermal (PV/T) solar energy collectors was evaluated. The study was limited to flat-plate collectors since concentrating photovoltaic collectors require active cooling and thus are inherently PV/T collectors, the only decision being whether to use the thermal energy or to dump it. it was also specified at the outset that reduction in required roof area was not to be used as an argument for combining the collection of thermal and electrical energy into one module. Three tests of economic viability were identified, all of which PV/T must pass if it is to be considered a promising alternative: PV/T must prove to be competitive with photovoltaic-only, thermal-only, and side-by-side photovoltaic-plus-thermal collectors and systems. These three tests were applied to systems using low-temperature (unglazed) collectors and to systems using medium-temperature (glazed) collectors in Los Angeles, New York, and Tampa. For photovoltaics, the 1986 DOE cost goals were assumed to have been realized, and for thermal energy collection two technologies were considered: a current technology based on metal and glass, and a future technology based on thin-film plastics. The study showed that for medium-temperature applications PV/T is not an attractive option in any of the locations studied. For low-temperature applications, PV/T appears to be marginally attractive.

ANDREWS,J.W.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Unclassified Sources Term and Radionuclide Data for Corrective Action Unit 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the evaluation of the information and data available on the unclassified source term and radionuclide contamination for CAU 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine. The total residual inventory of radionuclides associated with one or more tests is known as the radiologic source term (RST). The RST is comprised of radionuclides in water, glass, or other phases or mineralogic forms. The hydrologic source term (HST) of an underground nuclear test is the portion of the total RST that is released into the groundwater over time following the test. In this report, the HST represents radionuclide release some time after the explosion and does not include the rapidly evolving mechanical, thermal, and chemical processes during the explosion. The CAU 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine has many more detonations and a wider variety of settings to consider compared to other CAUs. For instance, the source term analysis and evaluation performed for CAUs 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa and CAU 98: Frenchman Flat did not consider vadose zone attenuation because many detonations were located near or below the water table. However, the large number of Yucca Flat/Climax Mine tests and the location of many tests above the water table warrant a more robust analysis of the unsaturated zone. The purpose of this report is to develop and document conceptual models of the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine HST for use in implementing source terms for the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine models. This document presents future plans to incorporate the radionuclide attenuation mechanisms due to unsaturated/multiphase flow and transport within the Yucca Flat CAU scale modeling. The important processes that influence radionuclide migration for the unsaturated and saturated tests in alluvial, volcanic, and carbonate settings are identified. Many different flow and transport models developed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), including original modeling of multiphase flow and transport by the Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), are integrated to form a general understanding of how the RST relates to the HST. This report is unlike the Frenchman Flat source term analysis because it does not calculate the HST for each test. Instead, this work only identifies the important processes that must be considered when the CAU-transport modeling is performed.

Peter Martian

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Pressurized heat treatment of glass ceramic  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of producing a glass-ceramic having a specified thermal expansion value is disclosed. The method includes the step of pressurizing the parent glass material to a predetermined pressure during heat treatment so that the glass-ceramic produced has a specified thermal expansion value. Preferably, the glass-ceramic material is isostatically pressed. A method for forming a strong glass-ceramic to metal seal is also disclosed in which the glass-ceramic is fabricated to have a thermal expansion value equal to that of the metal. The determination of the thermal expansion value of a parent glass material placed in a high-temperature environment is also used to determine the pressure in the environment.

Kramer, D.P.

1984-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

339

Durability of Silicate Glasses: An Historical Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a short review of current theories of glass weathering, including glass dissolution, and hydrolysis of nuclear waste glasses, and leaching of historical glasses from an XAFS perspective. The results of various laboratory leaching experiments at different timescales (30 days to 12 years) are compared with results for historical glasses that were weathered by atmospheric gases and soil waters over 500 to 3000 years. Good agreement is found between laboratory experiments and slowly leached historical glasses, with a strong enrichment of metals at the water/gel interface. Depending on the nature of the transition elements originally dissolved in the melt, increasing elemental distributions are expected to increase with time for a given glass durability context.

Farges, Francois; /Museum Natl. Hist. Natur. /Stanford U., Geo. Environ. Sci.; Etcheverry, Marie-Pierre; /Marne la Vallee U.; Haddi, Amine; /Marne la Valle U.; Trocellier,; /Saclay; Curti, Enzo; /PSI, Villigen; Brown, Gordon E., Jr.; /SLAC, SSRL

2007-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

340

MANUFACTURING COMPLEXITY EVALUATION AT THE DESIGN STAGE FOR BOTH MACHINING AND LAYERED MANUFACTURING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and an additive process. Manufacturability indexes are calculated at the tool design stage, these indexes provide an accurate view of which areas of the tool will advantageously be machined or manufactured by an additiveMANUFACTURING COMPLEXITY EVALUATION AT THE DESIGN STAGE FOR BOTH MACHINING AND LAYERED

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manufacturing flat glass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Film cooling on a flat plate: investigating density  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study is an investigation of two specific effects on turbine blade film cooling. The effect of coolant to mainstream density ratio and upstream steps was studied. The studies were conducted on two flat plates with 4mm cylindrical film cooling...

Grizzle, Joshua Peter Fletcher

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

342

Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement implementation successes and challenges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On July 19, 1996 the US Department of Energy (DOE), State of Colorado (CDPHE), and US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) entered into an agreement called the Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement (RFCA) for the cleanup and closure of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS or Rocky Flats). Major elements of the agreement include: an Integrated Site-Wide Baseline; up to twelve significant enforceable milestones per year; agreed upon soil and water action levels and standards for cleanup; open space as the likely foreseeable land use; the plutonium and TRU waste removed by 2015; streamlined regulatory process; agreement with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) to coordinate activities; and a risk reduction focus. Successful implementation of RFCA requires a substantial effort by the parties to change their way of thinking about RFETS and meet the deliverables and commitments. Substantial progress toward Site closure through the implementation of RFCA has been accomplished in the short time since the signing, yet much remains to be done. Much can be learned from the Rocky Flats experience by other facilities in similar situations.

Shelton, D.C.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Avoidance of a Landau pole by flat contributions in QED  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We consider massless Quantum Electrodynamics in the momentum scheme and carry forward an approach based on Dyson–Schwinger equations to approximate both the ?-function and the renormalized photon self-energy (Yeats, 2011). Starting from the Callan–Symanzik equation, we derive a renormalization group (RG) recursion identity which implies a non-linear ODE for the anomalous dimension and extract a sufficient but not necessary criterion for the existence of a Landau pole. This criterion implies a necessary condition for QED to have no such pole. Solving the differential equation exactly for a toy model case, we integrate the corresponding RG equation for the running coupling and find that even though the ?-function entails a Landau pole it exhibits a flat contribution capable of decreasing its growth, in other cases possibly to the extent that such a pole is avoided altogether. Finally, by applying the recursion identity, we compute the photon propagator and investigate the effect of flat contributions on both spacelike and timelike photons. -- Highlights: •We present an approach to approximate both the ?-function and the photon self-energy. •We find a sufficient criterion for the self-energy to entail the existence of a Landau pole. •We study non-perturbative ‘flat’ contributions that emerge within the context of our approach. •We discuss a toy model and how it is affected by flat contributions.

Klaczynski, Lutz, E-mail: lutz.klaczynski@gmx.de [Department of Physics, Humboldt University Berlin, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Kreimer, Dirk, E-mail: kreimer@mathematik.hu-berlin.de [Alexander von Humboldt Chair in Mathematical Physics, Humboldt University, Berlin 12489 (Germany)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

344

Flatness of heavy chain systems Nicolas Petit 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.e. trolleys carrying a fixed length heavy chain that may carry a load, is addressed in the partial derivatives the homogeneous chain carrying a load, see equation (13). In [11] the flatness [3, 4] of heavy chain systems, i dimensional case. Under small angle approximations, these heavy chain systems are described by a 1D partial

345

NATURAL HERITAGE RESOURCES OF THE ROCKY FLATS ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY SITE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATURAL HERITAGE RESOURCES OF THE ROCKY FLATS ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY SITE AND THEIR CONSERVATION. Dr. Fred Harrington, Dr. Mark Bakeman, and Alison Deans of the Pawnee Natural History Society Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). The exclusion of the general public over the last 20 to 40 years has

346

Control of an industrial polymerization reactor using flatness *, P. Rouchona  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Control of an industrial polymerization reactor using flatness N. Petita, *, P. Rouchona , J the system under consideration is the lar- gest propylene polymerization plant in the world [15]. Originally and with precision to optimize profit. This critical issue arises in different polymerization processes, see

347

No Open or Flat Bouncing Cosmologies in Einstein Gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that bouncing open or flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmologies are inconsistent with worldsheet string theory to first approximation. Specifically, the Virasoro constraint translates to the null energy condition in spacetime at leading order in the alpha-prime expansion. Thus one must go beyond minimally-coupled Einstein gravity in order to find bounce solutions.

Parikh, Maulik K

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Interacting generalized Chaplygin gas model in non-flat universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We employ the generalized Chaplygin gas of interacting dark energy to obtain the equation of state for the generalized Chaplygin gas energy density in non-flat universe. By choosing a negative value for $B$ we see that $w_{\\rm \\Lambda}^{eff}< -1$, that corresponds to a universe dominated by phantom dark energy.

M R Setare

2007-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

349

Differentially Flat Trajectory Generation for a Dynamically Stable Mobile Robot  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the ballbot, a dynamically stable mobile robot which balances on a single spherical wheel. To this end, assumptions are made to form the system as differentially flat, and a method of deriving feasible trajectories, dynamically stable mobile robot. It is a human-sized robot that balances on a single spherical wheel

350

Mini-Course ECC'97, Brussels 8 FLAT SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mini-Course ECC'97, Brussels 8 FLAT SYSTEMS Ph. Martin R.M. Murray P. Rouchon Centre Automatique et Syst`emes, ´Ecole des Mines de Paris, 35 rue Saint-Honor´e, 77305 Fontainebleau, FRANCE. [martin. murray@indra.caltech.edu. Introduction Control systems are ubiquitous in modern technology. The use

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

351

Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Iron and Steel (NAICS 3311, 3312), January 2014 (MECS 2010)  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of Energy Low-TemperatureEnergyAll ManufacturingFood andGlass andIron and

352

Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Machinery (NAICS 333), January 2014 (MECS 2010)  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of Energy Low-TemperatureEnergyAll ManufacturingFood andGlass andIron

353

Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Petroleum Refining (NAICS 324110), January 2014 (MECS 2010)  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of Energy Low-TemperatureEnergyAll ManufacturingFood andGlass

354

Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Plastics (NAICS 326), January 2014 (MECS 2010)  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of Energy Low-TemperatureEnergyAll ManufacturingFood andGlassPlastics and

355

Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Textiles (NAICS 313-316), January 2014 (MECS 2010)  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of Energy Low-TemperatureEnergyAll ManufacturingFood andGlassPlastics

356

Composite Tube Trailer Design/Manufacturing Needs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

composite tube trailers and can, therefore, address issues with: ­ Design ­ Materials ­ Manufacturing in the system ­ Lower cost of carbon fiber ($/strength) ­ Identify material with lower net cost ($/strength) ­ Identify lower cost resin system (raw material & manufacture) ­ Reduce carbon fiber safety factor

357

Biologically inspired mutual synchronization of manufacturing machines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biologically inspired mutual synchronization of manufacturing machines Erjen Lefeber,a,1 , Herman machine is developed. This control system is based on a synchronization mechanism of enzymes replacing of a single turnover cycle. In manufacturing, batch machines serve several jobs simultaneously, e.g., heat

Armbruster, Dieter

358

A Global Assessment of Manufacturing: Economic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Global Assessment of Manufacturing: Economic Development, Energy Use, Carbon Emissions Keywords production, materials, closed loop, China, emerging economies Abstract We present in two parts an assessment of global manufacturing. In the first part, we review economic development, pollution, and carbon

Gutowski, Timothy

359

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING AND MANUFACTURING CHEMICAL ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING AND MANUFACTURING CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Objective Chemical Engineers manufacturing, etc. Now that students have a background on Chemical Engineers, it is time for the activity. Blue frosting e. Green frosting f. Pink frosting g. Purple frosting h. Sprinkle sorting i. Sprinkle

Provancher, William

360

Manufacturing Thomas W. Eagar, Guest Editor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Materials Manufacturing Thomas W. Eagar, Guest Editor The bt·h.n-ior of succl'ssful manufac- tunn;imos., t·m·ironment for mate- nab manufacturing changes, so too does our ml·a~un· ol matt·rials performance~·(·vt·r. as shown by Figure 1, there are sen·ral additional dimensions to perfor- mann·. In particular, successful

Eagar, Thomas W.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manufacturing flat glass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Proceedings: EPRI Manufactured Gas Plants 2003 Forum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The EPRI Manufactured Gas Plants 2003 Forum covered a range of topics related to remediation and management of former manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites, with emphasis on technological advances and current issues associated with site cleanup. In specific, the forum covered MGP coal-tar delineation, soil and groundwater remediation technologies, improvements in air monitoring, and ecological risk characterization/risk management tools.

None

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Evaluating Energy Efficiency Improvements in Manufacturing Processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and increasing awareness of "green" customers have brought energy efficient manufacturing on top of the agendaEvaluating Energy Efficiency Improvements in Manufacturing Processes Katharina Bunse1 , Julia Sachs kbunse@ethz.ch, sachsj@student.ethz.ch, mvodicka@ethz.ch Abstract. Global warming, rising energy prices

Boyer, Edmond

363

Watfactory Virtual Manufacturing Process Varying Inputs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with the virtual process: · Allows quick exploration (i.e. during a short course) of process improvement ideasWatfactory Virtual Manufacturing Process Machine 1 Machine 2 Machine 3 Stream 1 Machine B Stream 2 Inputs Can be Set by Stream z19, ..., z24 The Watfactory virtual process simulates a manufacturing

Zhu, Mu

364

Advanced Manufacturing Office (Formerly Industrial Technologies Program)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint, derived from 2006 MECS #12;Management Structure and Project Execution, aqueous-based processes). Develop broadly applicable, manufacturing processes that reduce energy intensity-value industries such as the renewable energy industry. Example materials include low-cost carbon fiber, low

365

Duracold Refrigeration Manufacturing: Order (2013-CE-5342)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE ordered Duracold Refrigeration Manufacturing Company, LLC to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Duracold Refrigeration Manufacturing had failed to certify that certain models of walk-in cooler and freezer components comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

366

Simulation Model Driven Engineering for Manufacturing Cell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simulation Model Driven Engineering for Manufacturing Cell Hironori Hibino1 , Toshihiro Inukai2 Abstract. In our research, the simulation model driven engineering for manufacturing cell (SMDE on the simulation model and to extend the range of control applications and simulation applications using the PC

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

367

NanoSIMS Imaging Alternation Layers of a Leached SON68 Glass Via A FIB-made Wedged Crater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Currently, nuclear wastes are commonly immobilized into glasses because of their long-term durability. Exposure to water for long periods of time, however, will eventually corrode the waste form and is the leading potential avenue for radionuclide release into the environment. Because such slow processes cannot be experimentally tested, the prediction of release requires a thorough understanding the mechanisms governing glass corrosion. In addition, due to the exceptional durability of glass, much of the testing must be performed on high-surface-area powders. A technique that can provide accurate compositional profiles with very precise depth resolution for non-flat samples would be a major benefit to the field. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) depth profiling is an excellent tool that has long been used to examine corrosion layers of glass. The roughness of the buried corrosion layers, however, causes the corresponding SIMS depth profiles to exhibit erroneously wide interfaces. In this study, NanoSIMS was used to image the cross-section of the corrosion layers of a leached SON68 glass sample. A wedged crater was prepared by a focused ion beam (FIB) instrument to obtain a 5× improvement in depth resolution for NanoSIMS measurements. This increase in resolution allowed us to confirm that the breakdown of the silica glass network is further from the pristine glass than a second dissolution front for boron, another glass former. The existence of these two distinct interfaces, separated by only ~20 nm distance in depth, was not apparent by traditional ToF-SIMS depth profiling but has been confirmed also by atom probe tomography. This novel sample geometry will be a major benefit to efficient NanoSIMS sampling of irregular interfaces at the nanometer scale that would otherwise be obscured within ToF-SIMS depth profiles.

Wang, Yi-Chung; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Neeway, James J.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Evans, James E.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Zhu, Zihua; Wei, Wei

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Lid heater for glass melter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A glass melter having a lid electrode for heating the glass melt radiantly. The electrode comprises a series of INCONEL 690 tubes running above the melt across the melter interior and through the melter walls and having nickel cores inside the tubes beginning where the tubes leave the melter interior and nickel connectors to connect the tubes electrically in series. An applied voltage causes the tubes to generate heat of electrical resistance for melting frit injected onto the melt. The cores limit heat generated as the current passes through the walls of the melter. Nickel bus connection to the electrical power supply minimizes heat transfer away from the melter that would occur if standard copper or water-cooled copper connections were used between the supply and the INCONEL 690 heating tubes.

Phillips, Terrance D. (617 Chestnut Ct., Aiken, SC 29803)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Lid heater for glass melter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A glass melter having a lid electrode for heating the glass melt radiantly. The electrode comprises a series of INCONEL 690 tubes running above the melt across the melter interior and through the melter walls and having nickel cores inside the tubes beginning where the tubes leave the melter interior and nickel connectors to connect the tubes electrically in series. An applied voltage causes the tubes to generate heat of electrical resistance for melting frit injected onto the melt. The cores limit heat generated as the current passes through the walls of the melter. Nickel bus connection to the electrical power supply minimizes heat transfer away from the melter that would occur if standard copper or water-cooled copper connections were used between the supply and the INCONEL 690 heating tubes. 3 figures.

Phillips, T.D.

1993-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

370

Melter Glass Removal and Dismantlement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been using vitrification processes to convert high-level radioactive waste forms into a stable glass for disposal in waste repositories. Vitrification facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) are converting liquid high-level waste (HLW) by combining it with a glass-forming media to form a borosilicate glass, which will ensure safe long-term storage. Large, slurry fed melters, which are used for this process, were anticipated to have a finite life (on the order of two to three years) at which time they would have to be replaced using remote methods because of the high radiation fields. In actuality the melters useable life spans have, to date, exceeded original life-span estimates. Initial plans called for the removal of failed melters by placing the melter assembly into a container and storing the assembly in a concrete vault on the vitrification plant site pending size-reduction, segregation, containerization, and shipment to appropriate storage facilities. Separate facilities for the processing of the failed melters currently do not exist. Options for handling these melters include (1) locating a facility to conduct the size-reduction, characterization, and containerization as originally planned; (2) long-term storing or disposing of the complete melter assembly; and (3) attempting to refurbish the melter and to reuse the melter assembly. The focus of this report is to look at methods and issues pertinent to size-reduction and/or melter refurbishment in particular, removing the glass as a part of a refurbishment or to reduce contamination levels (thus allowing for disposal of a greater proportion of the melter as low level waste).

Richardson, BS

2000-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

371

Method for forming silicon on a glass substrate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method by which single-crystal silicon microelectronics may be fabricated on glass substrates at unconventionally low temperatures. This is achieved by fabricating a thin film of silicon on glass and subsequently forming the doped components by a short wavelength (excimer) laser doping procedure and conventional patterning techniques. This method may include introducing a heavily boron doped etch stop layer on a silicon wafer using an excimer laser, which permits good control of the etch stop layer removal process. This method additionally includes dramatically reducing the remaining surface roughness of the silicon thin films after etching in the fabrication of silicon on insulator wafers by scanning an excimer laser across the surface of the silicon thin film causing surface melting, whereby the surface tension of the melt causes smoothing of the surface during recrystallization. Applications for this method include those requiring a transparent or insulating substrate, such as display manufacturing. Other applications include sensors, actuators, optoelectronics, radiation hard and high temperature electronics. 15 figs.

McCarthy, A.M.

1995-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

372

Next Generation Print-based Manufacturing for Photovoltaics and Solid State Lighting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the grand challenge of reducing our energy and carbon footprint, the development of renewable energy and energy efficient technologies offer a potential solution. Energy technologies can reduce our dependence on foreign oil as well as the energy consumed by the petroleum industry, the leading consumer of energy by a U.S. industry sector. Nonetheless, the manufacturing processes utilized to manufacture equipment for alternative energy technologies often involve energy-intensive processes. This undermines some of the advantages to moving to 'green' technologies in the first place. Our answer to the Industrial Technology Program's (ITP) Grand Challenge FOA was to develop a transformational low cost manufacturing process for plastic-based photovoltaics that will lower by over 50% both energy consumption and greenhouse emissions and offer a return-of-investment of over 20%. We demonstrated a Luminescent Solar Concentrator fabricated on a plastic acrylic substrate (i.e. no glass) that increases the power output of the PV cell by 2.2x with a 2% power efficiency as well as an LSC with a 7% power efficiency that increased the power output from the PV cells by 35%. S large area 20-inch x 60-inch building-integrated photovoltaic window was fabricated using contract manufacturing with a 4% power efficiency which improved the power output of the PV cell by over 50%. In addition, accelerated lifetimes of the luminescent material demonstrate lifetimes of 20-years.

Sue A. Carter

2012-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

373

Characterization of uranium in surface-waters collected at the Rocky Flats Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) is a Department of Energy (DOE) facility where plutonium and uranium components were manufactured for nuclear weapons. During plant operations radioactivity was inadvertently released into the environment. This study was initiated to characterize the uranium present in surface-waters at RFP. Three drainage basins and natural ephemeral streams transverse RFP. The Woman Creek drainage basin traverses and drains the southern portion of the site. The Rock Creek drainage basin drains the northwestern portion of the plant complex. The Walnut Creek drainage basin traverses the western, northern, and northeastern portions of the RFP site. Dams, detention ponds, diversion structures, and ditches have been constructed at RFP to control the release of plant discharges and surface (storm water) runoff. The ponds located downstream of the plant complex on North Walnut Creek are designated A-1 through A-4. Ponds on South Walnut Creek are designated B-1 through B-5. The ponds in the Woman Creek drainage basin are designated C-1 and C-2. Water samples were collected from each pond and the uranium was characterized by TIMS measurement techniques.

Efurd, D.W.; Rokop, D.J.; Aguilar, R.D.; Roensch, F.R.; Perrin, R.E.; Banar, J.C.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Neutron absorbing article and method for manufacture of such article  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A neutron absorbing article, preferably in long, thin, flat form , suitable for but not necessarily limited to use in storage racks for spent nuclear fuel at locations between volumes of such stored fuel, to absorb neutrons from said spent fuel and prevent uncontrolled nuclear reaction of the spent fuel material, is composed of finely divided boron carbide particles and a solid, irreversibly cured phenolic polymer, forming a continuous matrix about the boron carbide particles, in such proportions that at least 6% of b10 from the boron carbide content is present therein. The described articles withstand thermal cycling from repeated spent fuel insertions and removals, withstand radiation from said spent nuclear fuel over long periods of time without losing desirable neutron absorbing and physical properties, are sufficiently chemically inert to water so as to retain neutron absorbing properties if brought into contact with it, are not galvanically corrodible and are sufficiently flexible so as to withstand operational basis earthquake and safe shutdown earthquake seismic events, without loss of neutron absorbing capability and other desirable properties, when installed in storage racks for spent nuclear fuel. The disclosure also relates to a plurality of such neutron absorbing articles in a storage rack for spent nuclear fuel and to a method for the manufacture of the articles.

Hortman, M.T.; Mcmurtry, C.H.; Naum, R.G.; Owens, D.P.

1980-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

375

Case studies of the potential effects of carbon taxation on the stone, clay, and glass industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This case study focuses on the potential for a carbon tax ($25 and $100 per metric ton of carbon) to reduce energy use and associated carbon dioxide (CO[sub 2]) emissions in three subsectors of the stone, clay, and glass industry: hydraulic cement, glass and glass products, and other products. A conservation supply curve analysis found that (1) opportunities for reducing fossil fuel use in the subsectors are limited (15% reduction under $100 tax) and (2) the relationship between the tax and reduced CO[sub 2] emissions is nonlinear and diminishing. Because cement manufacturing produces a significant amount of CO[sub 2], this subsector was analyzed. A plant-level analysis found more opportunities to mitigate CO[sub 2] emissions; under a $100 tax, fossil fuel use would decrease 52%. (A conservative estimate lies between 15% and 52%). It also confirmed the nonlinear relationship, suggesting significant benefits could result from small taxes (32% reduction under $25 tax). A fuel share analysis found the cement industry could reduce carbon loading 11% under a $100 tax if gas were substituted for coal. Under a $100 tax, cement demand would decrease 17% and its price would increase 32%, a substantial increase for a material commodity. Overall, CO[sub 2] emissions from cement manufacturing would decrease 24--33% under a $100 tax and 10--18% under a $25 tax. Much of the decrease would result from the reduced demand for cement.

Bock, M.J.; Boyd, G.A. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Div.); Rosenbaum, D.I. (Nebraska Univ., Lincoln, NE (United States). Dept. of Economics); Ross, M.H. (Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics)

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Case studies of the potential effects of carbon taxation on the stone, clay, and glass industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This case study focuses on the potential for a carbon tax ($25 and $100 per metric ton of carbon) to reduce energy use and associated carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions in three subsectors of the stone, clay, and glass industry: hydraulic cement, glass and glass products, and other products. A conservation supply curve analysis found that (1) opportunities for reducing fossil fuel use in the subsectors are limited (15% reduction under $100 tax) and (2) the relationship between the tax and reduced CO{sub 2} emissions is nonlinear and diminishing. Because cement manufacturing produces a significant amount of CO{sub 2}, this subsector was analyzed. A plant-level analysis found more opportunities to mitigate CO{sub 2} emissions; under a $100 tax, fossil fuel use would decrease 52%. (A conservative estimate lies between 15% and 52%). It also confirmed the nonlinear relationship, suggesting significant benefits could result from small taxes (32% reduction under $25 tax). A fuel share analysis found the cement industry could reduce carbon loading 11% under a $100 tax if gas were substituted for coal. Under a $100 tax, cement demand would decrease 17% and its price would increase 32%, a substantial increase for a material commodity. Overall, CO{sub 2} emissions from cement manufacturing would decrease 24--33% under a $100 tax and 10--18% under a $25 tax. Much of the decrease would result from the reduced demand for cement.

Bock, M.J.; Boyd, G.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Div.; Rosenbaum, D.I. [Nebraska Univ., Lincoln, NE (United States). Dept. of Economics; Ross, M.H. [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Education for the ManufacturingEducation for the Manufacturing Industries of the FutureIndustries of the Future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Growth. Every $1.00 in manufactured goods generates an additional $1.43 worth of additional economic© ATI 2006 Education for the ManufacturingEducation for the Manufacturing Industries of the FutureIndustries of the Future presented to thepresented to the 2006 MIT Manufacturing Summit:2006 MIT Manufacturing Summit

Brock, David

378

Current status of the GLASS code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the current status of the Generalized Lattice Analysis SubSystem (GLASS) computer code and its supporting cross section libraries. GLASS was developed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in the early 1970's. The GLASS code has been instrumental in supporting safe Heavy Water Reactor (HWR) operations and predicting material production at SRS for more than 20 years. The Department of Energy Office of New Production Reactors (ONPR) program has chosen to use the GLASS code for the design of the HWR option of the New Production Reactor (NPR). A substantial body of validation calculations have been performed and additional validation calculations will be performed to qualify the new GLASS multigroup cross section libraries derived from the ENDF/B-5 and 6 nuclear data files. Several improvements to the code are in progress. Many other improvements are planned to bring GLASS up to modern physics and compute technology.

Hootman, H.E. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)); Honeck, H.C. (Computer Application Technology, Inc., Aiken, SC (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Current status of the GLASS code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the current status of the Generalized Lattice Analysis SubSystem (GLASS) computer code and its supporting cross section libraries. GLASS was developed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in the early 1970`s. The GLASS code has been instrumental in supporting safe Heavy Water Reactor (HWR) operations and predicting material production at SRS for more than 20 years. The Department of Energy Office of New Production Reactors (ONPR) program has chosen to use the GLASS code for the design of the HWR option of the New Production Reactor (NPR). A substantial body of validation calculations have been performed and additional validation calculations will be performed to qualify the new GLASS multigroup cross section libraries derived from the ENDF/B-5 and 6 nuclear data files. Several improvements to the code are in progress. Many other improvements are planned to bring GLASS up to modern physics and compute technology.

Hootman, H.E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Honeck, H.C. [Computer Application Technology, Inc., Aiken, SC (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

380

Reactive cluster model of metallic glasses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Though discovered more than a half century ago metallic glasses remain a scientific enigma. Unlike crystalline metals, characterized by short, medium, and long-range order, in metallic glasses short and medium-range order persist, though long-range order is absent. This fact has prompted research to develop structural descriptions of metallic glasses. Among these are cluster-based models that attribute amorphous structure to the existence of clusters that are incommensurate with crystalline periodicity. Not addressed, however, are the chemical factors stabilizing these clusters and promoting their interconnections. We have found that glass formers are characterized by a rich cluster chemistry that above the glass transformation temperature promotes exchange as well as static and vibronic sharing of atoms between clusters. The vibronic mechanism induces correlated motions between neighboring clusters and we hypothesize that the distance over which these motions are correlated mediates metallic glass stability and influences critical cooling rates.

Jones, Travis E. [Molecular Theory Group, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States) [Molecular Theory Group, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); School of Physics, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia); Miorelli, Jonathan; Eberhart, Mark E. [Molecular Theory Group, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)] [Molecular Theory Group, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manufacturing flat glass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

High Temperature Fuel Cell (Phosphoric Acid) Manufacturing R...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Fuel Cell (Phosphoric Acid) Manufacturing R&D High Temperature Fuel Cell (Phosphoric Acid) Manufacturing R&D Presented at the NREL Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Manufacturing R&D Workshop...

382

MECH 502: Advanced/Additive Manufacturing Engineering COURSE DESCRIPTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MECH 502: Advanced/Additive Manufacturing Engineering COURSE DESCRIPTION In this course you product development and innovation. You will develop a rich knowledge of additive manufacturing processes enabling advanced/additive manufacturing and personal fabrication. You will have the opportunity

Schumacher, Russ

383

Additive Manufacturing in China: Threats, Opportunities, and Developments (Part I)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

application of additive manufacturing in China’s aviationAnalysis May 2013 Additive Manufacturing in China: Threats,an overview of China’s additive manufacturing industry is

ANDERSON, Eric

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Faculty Position in Ultra High Precision Robotics & Manufacturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, manipulation and metrology systems targeting additive manufacturing; · New kinematics, quasi-perfect guidings, actuators, transmission systems, sensors and methods targeting ultra-high precision additive manufacturingFaculty Position in Ultra High Precision Robotics & Manufacturing at the Ecole Polytechnique

Candea, George

385

Plane-parallel waves as duals of the flat background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We give a classification of non-Abelian T-duals of the flat metric in D=4 dimensions with respect to the four-dimensional continuous subgroups of the Poincare group. After dualizing the flat background, we identify majority of dual models as conformal sigma models in plane-parallel wave backgrounds, most of them having torsion. We give their form in Brinkmann coordinates. We find, besides the plane-parallel waves, several diagonalizable curved metrics with nontrivial scalar curvature and torsion. Using the non-Abelian T-duality, we find general solution of the classical field equations for all the sigma models in terms of d'Alembert solutions of the wave equation.

Ladislav Hlavaty; Ivo Petr

2014-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

386

Polymer solidification of mixed wastes at the Rocky Flats Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Rocky Flats Plant is pursuing polymer solidification as a viable treatment option for several mixed waste streams that are subject to land disposal restrictions within the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act provisions. Tests completed to date using both surrogate and actual wastes indicate that polyethylene microencapsulation is a viable treatment option for several mixed wastes at the Rocky Flats Plant, including nitrate salts, sludges, and secondary wastes such as ash. Treatability studies conducted on actual salt waste demonstrated that the process is capable of producing waste forms that comply with all applicable regulatory criteria, including the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure. Tests have also been conducted to evaluate the feasibility of macroencapsulating certain debris wastes in polymers. Several methods and plastics have been tested for macroencapsulation, including post-consumer recycle and regrind polyethylene.

Faucette, A.M.; Logsdon, B.W.; Lucerna, J.J.; Yudnich, R.J.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Glass Property Data and Models for Estimating High-Level Waste Glass Volume  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes recent efforts to develop glass property models that can be used to help estimate the volume of high-level waste (HLW) glass that will result from vitrification of Hanford tank waste. The compositions of acceptable and processable HLW glasses need to be optimized to minimize the waste-form volume and, hence, to save cost. A database of properties and associated compositions for simulated waste glasses was collected for developing property-composition models. This database, although not comprehensive, represents a large fraction of data on waste-glass compositions and properties that were available at the time of this report. Glass property-composition models were fit to subsets of the database for several key glass properties. These models apply to a significantly broader composition space than those previously publised. These models should be considered for interim use in calculating properties of Hanford waste glasses.

Vienna, John D.; Fluegel, Alexander; Kim, Dong-Sang; Hrma, Pavel R.

2009-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

388

Process for preparing improved silvered glass mirrors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Glass mirrors having improved weathering properties are prepared by an improvement in the process for making the mirrors. The glass surface after it has been cleaned but before it is silvered, is contacted with a solution of lanthanide rare earths in addition to a sensitization solution of tin or palladium. The addition of the rare earths produces a mirror which has increased resistance to delamination of the silver from the glass surface in the presence of water.

Buckwalter, C.Q. Jr.

1980-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

389

Evaluation of tracking flat plate and concentrator PV systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Arizona Public Service Company has conducted side-by-side field tests of most of the leading tracking flat plate and concentrating PV technologies. The results verify the added value due to tracking, but show that additional reliability improvements are needed in most cases. Concentrator PV systems can be high performers in sunny regions. In addition, a novel inverter system design by Raytheon has demonstrated excellent performance and promises to be more reliable and have lower cost than competing technologies.

Lepley, T. [Phasor Energy Co., Phoenix, AZ (United States); Hammond, B.; Harris, A. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

390

DECOMMISSIONING CHALLENGES AT THE ROCKY FLATS ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a discussion of the demolition of the Building 788 cluster at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) in Golden, Colorado. The Building 788 Cluster was a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted storage facilities and ancillary structures. Topics covered include the methods employed for Project Planning, Regulatory Compliance, Waste Management, Hazard Identification, Radiological Controls, Risk Management, Field Implementation, and Cost Schedule control, and Lessons Learned and Project Closeout.

Dorr, K. A.; Hoover, J.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

391

Distributed Roughness Receptivity in a Flat Plate Boundary Layer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- Distributed Receptivity . . . . . 6 2. FACILITY DESCRIPTION - THE KLEBANOFF–SARIC WIND TUNNEL 11 2.1 Test Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 2.2 Fan and Motor... of this dissertation describes the Klebanoff–Saric Wind Tunnel facility, which was used for this experiment. Section 3 describes the experimental setup (roughness design and the flat plate model) and defines the metrics by which the flow field is decomposed...

Kuester, Matthew Scott

2014-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

392

Rocky Flats Plant Site Environmental Report: 1993 Highlights  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Rocky Flats Plant Site Environmental Report provides summary information on the plant`s environmental monitoring programs and the results recorded during 1993. The report contains a compliance summary, results of environmental monitoring and other related programs, a review of environmental remediation activities, information on external gamma radiation dose monitoring, and radiation dose estimates for the surrounding population. This section provides an overview of these topics and summarizes more comprehensive discussions found in the main text of this annual report.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

393

MEASURING THE JET POWER OF FLAT-SPECTRUM RADIO QUASARS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We use frequency-dependent position shifts of flat-spectrum radio cores to estimate the kinetic power of active galactic nucleus (AGN) jets. We find a correlation between the derived jet powers and AGN narrow-line luminosity, consistent with the well-known relation for radio galaxies and steep spectrum quasars. This technique can be applied to intrinsically weak jets even at high redshift.

Shabala, S. S.; Santoso, J. S. [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 37, Hobart, TAS 7001 (Australia); Godfrey, L. E. H. [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, Western Australia 6845 (Australia)

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

394

Denaturing Urea PAGE -Large Gel Preparation of Glass Plates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for short glass plate. Wear gloves. 3. Place long glass plate on 2 foam rectangles. Set up spacers and short32 Denaturing Urea PAGE - Large Gel Preparation of Glass Plates 1. Clean glass plates and comb pipette, add 5 drops of dichlorodimethylsilane (Aldrich D6,082-6) to 5 mls of acetone in diposable glass

Aris, John P.

395

Sex, dispersion and aggression in Western Sandpipers on the Bolivar Flats, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Flats, located on the Bolivar Peninsula, 4. 8 km northeast of Galveston, Texas. The wintering range of Western Sandpipers extends from California and North Carolina in the north, south to Peru and Surinam (AOU 1983). The Bolivar Flats, located...

Gordon, Lynn Marie

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

396

A Quantitative Study of the Impact of Additive Manufacturing in the Aircraft Spare Parts Supply Chain.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Additive manufacturing is a promising manufacturing technology which is finding its way into mainstream manufacturing industry. As compared to conventional manufacturing it has a number… (more)

Mokasdar, Abhiram S., M.S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

E-Print Network 3.0 - automated manufacturing systems Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by delighting the customers. IIMC Manufacturing Systems & Technology Manufacturing... in manufacturing, Awareness of green production and Big R in manufacturing IIT Automation &...

398

Compliant Glass Seals for SOFC Stacks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes results from experimental and modeling studies performed by participants in the Solid-State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Core Technology Program, which indicate that compliant glass-based seals offer a number of potential advantages over conventional seals based on de-vitrifying glasses, including reduced stresses during stack operation and thermal cycling, and the ability to heal micro-damage induced during thermal cycling. The properties and composition of glasses developed and/or investigated in these studies are reported, along with results from long-term (up to 5,800h) evaluations of seals based on a compliant glass containing ceramic particles or ceramic fibers.

Chou, Y. S.; Choi, Jung-Pyung; Xu, Wei; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Koeppel, Brian J.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Lara-Curzio, Edgar

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Asymptotically flat radiating solutions in third order Lovelock gravity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we present an exact spherically symmetric solution of third order Lovelock gravity in n dimensions which describes the gravitational collapse of a null dust fluid. This solution is asymptotically (anti-)de Sitter or flat depending on the choice of the cosmological constant. Using the asymptotically flat solution for n{>=}7 with a power-law form of the mass as a function of the null coordinate, we present a model for a gravitational collapse in which a null dust fluid radially injects into an initially flat and empty region. It is found that a naked singularity is inevitably formed whose strength is different for the n=7 and n{>=}8 cases. In the n=7 case, the limiting focusing condition for the strength of curvature singularity is satisfied. But for n{>=}8, the strength of curvature singularity depends on the rate of increase of mass of the spacetime. These considerations show that the third order Lovelock term weakens the strength of the curvature singularity.

Dehghani, M. H. [Physics Department and Biruni Observatory, College of Sciences, Shiraz University, Shiraz 71454 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Institute for Astrophysics and Astronomy of Maragha (RIAAM), Maragha (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Farhangkhah, N. [Physics Department and Biruni Observatory, College of Sciences, Shiraz University, Shiraz 71454 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

400

Map of mixed prairie grassland vegetation, Rocky Flats, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A color vegetation map at the scale of 1:12,000 of the area surrounding the Rocky Flats, Rockwell International Plant near Boulder, Colorado, provides a permanent record of baseline data which can be used to monitor changes in both vegetation and environment and thus to contribute to future land management and land-use policies. Sixteen mapping units based on species composition were identified, and characterized by two 10-m/sup 2/ vegetation stands each. These were grouped into prairie, pasture, and valley side on the basis of their species composition. Both the mapping units and these major groups were later confirmed by agglomerative clustering analysis of the 32 vegetation stands on the basis of species composition. A modified Bray and Curtis ordination was used to determine the environmental factor complexes controlling the distribution of vegetation at Rocky flats. Recommendations are made for future policies of environmental management and predictions of the response to environmental change of the present vegetation at the Rocky Flats site.

Clark, S J.V.; Webber, P J; Komarkova, V; Weber, W A

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manufacturing flat glass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Unlocking the Potential of Additive Manufacturing in the Fuel...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Manufacturing in the Fuel Cells Industry Download presentation slides from the DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar "Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells" held on...

402

EA-1834: Severstal Dearborn Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4: Severstal Dearborn Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Project in Dearborn, MI EA-1834: Severstal Dearborn Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Project in Dearborn,...

403

Celgard US Manufacturing Facilities Initiative for Lithium-ion...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Celgard US Manufacturing Facilities Initiative for Lithium-ion Battery Separator Celgard US Manufacturing Facilities Initiative for Lithium-ion...

404

Manufacturing Metrology for c-Si Module Reliability/Durabiltiy...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Manufacturing Metrology for c-Si Module ReliabilityDurabiltiy Manufacturing Metrology for c-Si Module ReliabilityDurabiltiy Presented at the PV Module Reliability Workshop,...

405

Join Us for the Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative's Western...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

resources, as well as best practices and cutting-edge technologies, to boost energy productivity across the entire U.S. manufacturing supply chain will make our manufacturing...

406

Manufacturing R&D of PEM Fuel Cells  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

for the Hydrogen Economy Manufacturing Research & Development of PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation Applications Background Material for the Manufacturing R&D Workshop to be...

407

Energy Use Loss and Opportunities Analysis: U.S. Manufacturing...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Use Loss and Opportunities Analysis: U.S. Manufacturing & Mining Energy Use Loss and Opportunities Analysis: U.S. Manufacturing & Mining energyuselossopportunitiesanalys...

408

DOE Initiates Enforcement Actions Against 4 Showerhead Manufacturers...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Against 4 Showerhead Manufacturers (Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty and Requests for Test Data Issued) DOE Initiates Enforcement Actions Against 4 Showerhead Manufacturers...

409

Letter from Plumbing Manufacturers Institute to Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Letter from Plumbing Manufacturers Institute to Department of Energy re: Ex Parte Communication More Documents & Publications Supplemental Comments of the Plumbing Manufacturers...

410

allergenic extract manufacturers: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tax applies to the sale of manufacturing aids such as dies, patterns, jigs and tooling used in the manufacturing process notwithstanding the fact that the property used in...

411

Wind Program Manufacturing Research Advances Processes and Reduces...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Wind Program Manufacturing Research Advances Processes and Reduces Costs Wind Program Manufacturing Research Advances Processes and Reduces Costs March 31, 2014 - 11:22am Addthis...

412

Local Program Helps Alabama Manufacturers Add Jobs, Reduce Waste...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Local Program Helps Alabama Manufacturers Add Jobs, Reduce Waste and Increase Profits Local Program Helps Alabama Manufacturers Add Jobs, Reduce Waste and Increase Profits April 8,...

413

Direct Hydrogen PEMFC Manufacturing Cost Estimation for Automotive...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Direct Hydrogen PEMFC Manufacturing Cost Estimation for Automotive Applications: Fuel Cell Tech Team Review Direct Hydrogen PEMFC Manufacturing Cost Estimation for Automotive...

414

Energy Department to Work with National Association of Manufacturers...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

to Work with National Association of Manufacturers to Increase Industrial Energy Efficiency Energy Department to Work with National Association of Manufacturers to Increase...

415

An exploration of materials and methods in manufacturing : shoreline membranes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis is an investigation into the design methodologies and ideologies of manufacturing processes specifically related to automotive design. The conceptualization, prototyping, testing, and manufacturing of cars is ...

Chin, Ryan C. C., 1974-

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Joint Fuel Cell Technologies and Advanced Manufacturing Webinar...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Joint Fuel Cell Technologies and Advanced Manufacturing Webinar Joint Fuel Cell Technologies and Advanced Manufacturing Webinar Presentation slides from the joint Fuel Cell...

417

20% Wind Energy by 2030 - Chapter 3: Manufacturing, Materials...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

3: Manufacturing, Materials, and Resources Summary Slides 20% Wind Energy by 2030 - Chapter 3: Manufacturing, Materials, and Resources Summary Slides Summary Slides for Chapter 3:...

418

Proceedings from the Wind Manufacturing Workshop: Achieving 20...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Proceedings from the Wind Manufacturing Workshop: Achieving 20% Wind Energy in the U.S. by 2030, May 2009 Proceedings from the Wind Manufacturing Workshop: Achieving 20% Wind...

419

Commonwealth Aluminum: Manufacturer Conducts Plant-Wide Energy...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Commonwealth Aluminum: Manufacturer Conducts Plant-Wide Energy Assessments at Two Aluminum Sheet Production Operations Commonwealth Aluminum: Manufacturer Conducts Plant-Wide...

420

Upcoming Webinar February 11: Additive Manufacturing for Fuel...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

February 11: Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells Upcoming Webinar February 11: Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells February 6, 2014 - 12:00am Addthis On Tuesday, February 11,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manufacturing flat glass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Webinar: Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells Webinar: Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells February 11, 2014 5:00PM to 6:00PM EST Online...

422

A Review of Engineering Research in Sustainable Manufacturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

focused on sustainable processes and systems. Despite recentto make their processes more sustainable, evaluating theirManufacturing Process Design for Sustainable Manufacturing,”

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

AMO Issues Request for Information on Clean Energy Manufacturing...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Request for Information on Clean Energy Manufacturing Topics, Including Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Applications AMO Issues Request for Information on Clean Energy Manufacturing Topics,...

424

Purdue, GE Collaborate On Advanced Manufacturing | GE Global...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the production side. For manufacturing operations the size of GE's, just a 1 percent improvement in manufacturing productivity would save 500 million." GE and Purdue have been...

425

Stronger Manufacturers' Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

2006 - 11:09am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -- To increase the energy efficiency of residential air conditioners, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has issued new manufacturing...

426

Cycle to Cycle Manufacturing Process Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Most manufacturing processes produce parts that can only be correctly measured after the process cycle has been completed. Even if in-process measurement and control is possible, it is often too expensive or complex to ...

Hardt, David E.

427

Sandia National Laboratories: Numerical Manufacturing And Design...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NuMAD (Numerical Manufacturing And Design) is an open-source software tool written in Matlab which simplifies the process of creating a three-dimensional model of a wind turbine...

428

Steam System Improvements at a Manufacturing Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BWX Technologies, Naval Nuclear Fuel Division (NNFD) is a manufacturing company with a steam system consisting of two Babcock & Wilcox boilers and approximately 350 steam traps. The steam system is used to produce and distribute steam for space...

Compher, J.; Morcom, B.

429

Goodman Manufacturing: Noncompliance Determination (2011-SE-4301)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to Goodman Manufacturing finding that model CPC180XXX3BXXXAA (CPC180*) of commercial package air conditioner does not comport with the energy conservation standards.

430

Requirements & Status for Volume Fuel Cell Manufacturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Requirements & Status for Volume Fuel Cell Manufacturing DOE Hydrogen Program, Washington, DC July ­Eliminate components, parts and process steps ­Standardize core components across products ­Standardize non-core

431

4D printing : towards biomimetic additive manufacturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inherent across all scales in Nature's material systems are multiple design dimensions, the existences of which are products of both evolution and environment. In human manufacturing where design must be preconceived and ...

Tsai, Elizabeth Yinling

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Cost Effective Cooling Strategies for Manufacturing Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

there are many similarities. In addition to the above environmental conditions for the process/machines and workers, cost effective design of manufacturing facilities must also address maintainability, sanitation, durability, energy conservation and budgetary...

Kumar, R.

433

Lane Electric Cooperative- Manufactured Homes Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Lane Electric Cooperative offers customers an incentive for buying a new EnergyStar manufactured home. These properties must be within the eligible service area and must be a permanent residence....

434

Energy-Efficient Appliance Manufacturing Tax Credit  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

'''''Note: This tax credit expired at the end of 2011. The American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 retroactively renewed this tax credit for certain appliances manufactured in 2012 and 2013. '''''

435

Photographic lens manufacturing and production technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An investigation was conducted to determine the methods and processes required for the manufacture of photographic objective lenses. Production of photographic lenses requires incredible precision in the melting, mixing, ...

Kubaczyk, Daniel Mark

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Analyzing sampling methodologies in semiconductor manufacturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis describes work completed during an internship assignment at Intel Corporation's process development and wafer fabrication manufacturing facility in Santa Clara, California. At the highest level, this work relates ...

Anthony, Richard M. (Richard Morgan), 1971-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Advanced Manufacturing Partnership | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and cost-shared R&D projects, supporting manufacturing infrastructure, and facilitating job creation. These actions save energy and provide benefits to U.S. industry and the...

438

Clean Energy Technology Device Manufacturers' Credits (Delaware)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Qualified manufacturers can apply for a tax break equal to 75% of the corporation income tax. The incentive is an increase from the Investment and Employment Credit Against Corporation Income Tax,...

439

Refrigerator Manufacturers: Proposed Penalty (2013-CE-5341)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Refrigerator Manufacturers, LLC failed to certify a variety of walk-in cooler or freezer components as compliant with the applicable energy conservation standards.

440

Introduction and Motivation Structural Model for Laminated Glass Beams Conclusions and Outlook of Laminated Glass Structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Components of Crystalline Solar Modules back sheet or glass encapsulant electrical conductor crystalline solar cells encapsulant front glass Reference: Schulze, S.-H.; Pander, M.; Naumenko, K.; Altenbach, H and Motivation Components of Thin Film Solar Modules back sheet or glass encapsulant electrical conductor thin

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manufacturing flat glass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Utilizing Daylighting Controls in a Manufacturing Facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Utilizing Daylighting Controls in a Manufacturing Facility Som S. Shrestha Dr. Gregory M. Maxwell PhD Candidate Associate Professor som@iastate.edu gmaxwell@iastate.edu Iowa State University Ames, IA ABSTRACT Opportunities exist... to reduce artificial lighting in manufacturing facilities which have skylights and/or fenestration that provide sufficient quantities of daylight to the work space. Using photometric sensors to measure the illuminance in the space, artificial lights can...

Shrestha, S. S.; Maxwell, G. M.

442

Energetic additive manufacturing process with feed wire  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for additive manufacture by energetic wire deposition is described. A source wire is fed into a energy beam generated melt-pool on a growth surface as the melt-pool moves over the growth surface. This process enables the rapid prototyping and manufacture of fully dense, near-net shape components, as well as cladding and welding processes. Alloys, graded materials, and other inhomogeneous materials can be grown using this process.

Harwell, Lane D. (Albuquerque, NM); Griffith, Michelle L. (Albuquerque, NM); Greene, Donald L. (Corrales, NM); Pressly, Gary A. (Sandia Park, NM)

2000-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

443

Manufacturing Demonstration Facilities Workshop, March 12, 2012  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of Energy Low-TemperatureEnergy Maine09ManufacturingManufacturing

444

Thermal response of a flat heat pipe sandwich structure to a localized heat flux  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermal response of a flat heat pipe sandwich structure to a localized heat flux G. Carbajal a , C The temperature distribution across a flat heat pipe sandwich structure, subjected to an intense localized thermal to the evaporator side of the flat heat pipe, while the condenser side was cooled via natural convective

Wadley, Haydn

445

MCM-C Multichip Module Manufacturing Guide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T) provides complete microcircuit capabilities from design layout through manufacturing and final electrical testing. Manufacturing and testing capabilities include design layout, electrical and mechanical computer simulation and modeling, circuit analysis, component analysis, network fabrication, microelectronic assembly, electrical tester design, electrical testing, materials analysis, and environmental evaluation. This document provides manufacturing guidelines for multichip module-ceramic (MCM-C) microcircuits. Figure 1 illustrates an example MCM-C configuration with the parts and processes that are available. The MCM-C technology is used to manufacture microcircuits for electronic systems that require increased performance, reduced volume, and higher density that cannot be achieved by the standard hybrid microcircuit or printed wiring board technologies. The guidelines focus on the manufacturability issues that must be considered for low-temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC) network fabrication and MCM assembly and the impact that process capabilities have on the overall MCM design layout and product yield. Prerequisites that are necessary to initiate the MCM design layout include electrical, mechanical, and environmental requirements. Customer design data can be accepted in many standard electronic file formats. Other requirements include schedule, quantity, cost, classification, and quality level. Design considerations include electrical, network, packaging, and producibility; and deliverables include finished product, drawings, documentation, and electronic files.

Blazek, R.J.; Kautz, D.R.; Galichia, J.V.

2000-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

446

Sporting Good Manufacturing Company: Optimal Manufacturing and Shipping Cost Through Linear Programming Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Figure 15: Example Transshipment Model.............................................................................. 18 vi List of Principal Symbols and Nomenclature SGMC Sporting Good Manufacturing Company LP Linear Programming CEO Chief... Executive Officer COO Chief Operation Officer PKR Pakistani Rupees EMGT Engineering Management O.F. Objective Function A i No. of bats manufactured in factory i; where i = k, l BB i No. of Stumps manufactured in factory i; where i = k, l C i No...

Malik, Ejaz

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

447

Uncertainty analysis of the SWEPP PAN assay system for glass waste (content codes 440, 441 and 442)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

INEL is being used as a temporary storage facility for transuranic waste generated by the Nuclear Weapons program at the Rocky Flats Plant. Currently, there is a large effort in progress to prepare to ship this waste to WIPP. In order to meet the TRU Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan nondestructive assay compliance requirements and quality assurance objectives, it is necessary to determine the total uncertainty of the radioassay results produced by the Stored Waste Examination Pilot Plant (SWEPP) Passive Action Neutron (PAN) radioassay system. This paper discusses a modified statistical sampling and verification approach used to determine the total uncertainty of SWEPP PAN measurements for glass waste (content codes 440, 441, and 442) contained in 208 liter drums. In the modified statistical sampling and verification approach, the total performance of the SWEPP PAN nondestructive assay system for specifically selected waste conditions is simulated using computer models. A set of 100 cases covering the known conditions exhibited in glass waste was compiled using a combined statistical sampling and factorial experimental design approach. Parameter values assigned in each simulation were derived from reviews of approximately 100 real-time radiography video tapes of RFP glass waste drums, results from previous SWEPP PAN measurements on glass waste drums, and shipping data from RFP where the glass waste was generated. The data in the 100 selected cases form the multi-parameter input to the simulation model. The reported plutonium masses from the simulation model are compared with corresponding input masses. From these comparisons, the bias and total uncertainty associated with SWEPP PAN measurements on glass waste drums are estimated. The validity of the simulation approach is verified by comparing simulated output against results from calibration measurements using known plutonium sources and two glass waste calibration drums.

Blackwood, L.G.; Harker, Y.D.; Meachum, T.R.; Yoon, W.Y.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Wooden wind turbine blade manufacturing process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A wooden wind turbine blade is formed by laminating wood veneer in a compression mold having the exact curvature needed for one side of the blade, following which the other side of the blade is ground flat along its length but twisted with respect to the blade axis.

Coleman, Clint (Warren, VT)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Small Manufacturer Strategic Decision Making Assistance Tool (SMSDM): a Case Study of a Small Oklahoma Manufacturer.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The propose was to design an informative analytical tool for small Oklahoma manufacturing firms that would assist in their strategic planning and decision making processes.… (more)

Robertson, William D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Glass Concrete Thin Sheets Reinforced with Prestressed Aramid Fabrics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Glass Concrete Thin Sheets Reinforced with Prestressed Aramid Fabrics Gregor Vilkner Submitted Glass Concrete Thin Sheets Reinforced with Prestressed Aramid Fabrics Gregor Vilkner Thin sheet concrete presented in this work explored the possibilities of prestressing thin sheet glass concrete products

Meyer, Christian

451

SRNL POROUS WALL GLASS MICROSPHERES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has developed a new medium for storage of hydrogen and other gases. This involves fabrication of thin, Porous Walled, Hollow Glass Microspheres (PW-HGMs), with diameters generally in the range of 1 to several hundred microns. What is unique about the glass microballons is that porosity has been induced and controlled within the thin, one micron thick walls, on the scale of 10 to several thousand Angstroms. This porosity results in interesting properties including the ability to use these channels to fill the microballons with special absorbents and other materials, thus providing a contained environment even for reactive species. Gases can now enter the microspheres and be retained on the absorbents, resulting in solid-state and contained storage of even reactive species. Also, the porosity can be altered and controlled in various ways, and even used to filter mixed gas streams within a system. SRNL is involved in about a half dozen different programs involving these PW-HGMs and an overview of some of these activities and results emerging are presented.

Wicks, G; Leung Heung, L; Ray Schumacher, R

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

452

Sealing glasses for titanium and titanium alloys  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Glass compositions containing CaO, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, B/sub 2/O/sub 3/, SrO and BaO of various combinations of mole % are provided. These compositions are capable of forming stable glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys, for use in components such as seals for battery headers.

Brow, R.K.; Watkins, R.D.

1988-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

453

Sealing glasses for titanium and titanium alloys  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Glass compositions containing CaO, Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, B.sub.2 O.sub.3, SrO and BaO of various combinations of mole % are provided. These compositions are capable of forming stable glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys, for use in components such as seals for battery headers.

Brow, Richard K. (Albuquerque, NM); Watkins, Randall D. (Albuquerque, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Monitoring and analyzing waste glass compositions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device and method are described for determining the viscosity of a fluid, preferably molten glass. The apparatus and method use the velocity of rising bubbles, preferably helium bubbles, within the molten glass to determine the viscosity of the molten glass. The bubbles are released from a tube positioned below the surface of the molten glass so that the bubbles pass successively between two sets of electrodes, one above the other, that are continuously monitoring the conductivity of the molten glass. The measured conductivity will change as a bubble passes between the electrodes enabling an accurate determination of when a bubble has passed between the electrodes. The velocity of rising bubbles can be determined from the time interval between a change in conductivity of the first electrode pair and the second, upper electrode pair. The velocity of the rise of the bubbles in the glass melt is used in conjunction with other physical characteristics, obtained by known methods, to determine the viscosity of the glass melt fluid and, hence, glass quality. 2 figures.

Schumacher, R.F.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Radiation Induced Nanocrystal Formation in Metallic Glasses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The irradiation of metallic glasses to induce nanocrystallization was studied in two metallic glass compositions, Cu50Zr45Ti5 and Zr55Cu30Al10Ni5. Atomic mobility was described using a model based on localized excess free volume due to displace...

Carter, Jesse

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

456

Eyeglass lens made of glass (radiopaque)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fig. 9-1 Eyeglass lens made of glass (radiopaque) and frame made of metal (radiopaque). #12;Fig. 9-2 Eyeglass lens made of glass (radiopaque) and frame made of plastic (radiolucent). #12;Fig. 9-3 Metal frame of eyeglasses (radiopaque). The eyeglass lens is made of plastic (radiolucent). #12;Fig. 9-4 Cotton roll

457

Viscous Glass Sealants for SOFC Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two series of silicate glasses that contain gallium as the primary critical component have been identified and optimized for viscous sealing of solid oxide fuel cells operating from 650 to 850°C. Both series of glass sealants crystallize partially upon heat treatment and yield multiphase microstructures that allow viscous flow at temperatures as low as 650°C. A fully amorphous sealant was also developed by isolating, synthesizing and testing a silicate glass of the same composition as the remnant glassy phase in one of the two glass series. Of ~40 glasses tested for longer than 500 hours, a set of 5 glasses has been further tested for up to 1000h in air, wet hydrogen, and against both yttria-stabilized zirconia and aluminized stainless steel. In some cases the testing times reached 2000h. The reactivity testing has provided new insight into the effects of Y, Zr, and Al on bulk and surface crystallization in boro-gallio-silicate glasses, and demonstrated that at least 5 of the newly-developed glasses are viable viscous sealants.

Scott Misture

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

458

Accelerated commercialization program for materials and components. Solar sheet glass: an example of materials commercialization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SERI Accelerated Commercialization Program for Materials and Components is designed to serve as a catalyst in promoting technological change through the introduction of new materials into solar technologies. This report focuses on technological diffusion of advances in materials technology from the developer to the manufacturers of solar equipment. It provides an overview and understanding of the problems encountered in the private sector in trying to advance technological change and discusses a program designed to facilitate this change. Using as example of solar sheet glass, this report describes the process by which sample quantities of new materials are sent to solar equipment manufacturers for appliations testing. It also describes other materials that might undergo testing in a similar way. The entire program is an example of how government and industry can work together to accomplish common goals.

Livingston, R.; Butler, B.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Glass heat pipe evacuated tube solar collector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A glass heat pipe is adapted for use as a solar energy absorber in an evacuated tube solar collector and for transferring the absorbed solar energy to a working fluid medium or heat sink for storage or practical use. A capillary wick is formed of granular glass particles fused together by heat on the inside surface of the heat pipe with a water glass binder solution to enhance capillary drive distribution of the thermal transfer fluid in the heat pipe throughout the entire inside surface of the evaporator portion of the heat pipe. Selective coatings are used on the heat pipe surface to maximize solar absorption and minimize energy radiation, and the glass wick can alternatively be fabricated with granular particles of black glass or obsidian.

McConnell, Robert D. (Lakewood, CO); Vansant, James H. (Tracy, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Gaseous Sulfate Solubility in Glass: Experimental Method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sulfate solubility in glass is a key parameter in many commercial glasses and nuclear waste glasses. This report summarizes key publications specific to sulfate solubility experimental methods and the underlying physical chemistry calculations. The published methods and experimental data are used to verify the calculations in this report and are expanded to a range of current technical interest. The calculations and experimental methods described in this report will guide several experiments on sulfate solubility and saturation for the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Enhanced Waste Glass Models effort. There are several tables of sulfate gas equilibrium values at high temperature to guide experimental gas mixing and to achieve desired SO3 levels. This report also describes the necessary equipment and best practices to perform sulfate saturation experiments for molten glasses. Results and findings will be published when experimental work is finished and this report is validated from the data obtained.

Bliss, Mary

2013-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manufacturing flat glass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Heat capacity at the glass transition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A fundamental problem of glass transition is to explain the jump of heat capacity at the glass transition temperature $T_g$ without asserting the existence of a distinct solid glass phase. This problem is also common to other disordered systems, including spin glasses. We propose that if $T_g$ is defined as the temperature at which the liquid stops relaxing at the experimental time scale, the jump of heat capacity at $T_g$ follows as a necessary consequence due to the change of system's elastic, vibrational and thermal properties. In this picture, we discuss time-dependent effects of glass transition, and identify three distinct regimes of relaxation. Our approach explains widely observed logarithmic increase of $T_g$ with the quench rate and the correlation of heat capacity jump with liquid fragility.

Kostya Trachenko; Vadim Brazhkin

2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

462

A consortium approach to glass furnace modeling.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using computational fluid dynamics to model a glass furnace is a difficult task for any one glass company, laboratory, or university to accomplish. The task of building a computational model of the furnace requires knowledge and experience in modeling two dissimilar regimes (the combustion space and the liquid glass bath), along with the skill necessary to couple these two regimes. Also, a detailed set of experimental data is needed in order to evaluate the output of the code to ensure that the code is providing proper results. Since all these diverse skills are not present in any one research institution, a consortium was formed between Argonne National Laboratory, Purdue University, Mississippi State University, and five glass companies in order to marshal these skills into one three-year program. The objective of this program is to develop a fully coupled, validated simulation of a glass melting furnace that may be used by industry to optimize the performance of existing furnaces.

Chang, S.-L.; Golchert, B.; Petrick, M.

1999-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

463

Titanium sealing glasses and seals formed therefrom  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Alkaline-earth lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions containing CaO, La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in various combinations of mole-% are provided. These sealing-glass compositions are useful for forming hermetic glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys that have a high aqueous durability for component or device applications requiring exposure to moisture, water or body fluids. Particular applications of the titanium sealing-glass compositions include forming glass-to-metal seals for lithium batteries and implanted biomedical devices (e.g. batteries, pacemakers, defibrillators, pumps). 2 figs.

Brow, R.K.; McCollister, H.L.; Phifer, C.C.; Day, D.E.

1997-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

464

Titanium sealing glasses and seals formed therefrom  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Alkaline-earth lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions containing CaO, La.sub.2 O.sub.3, B.sub.2 O.sub.3, TiO.sub.2 and Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 in various combinations of mole-% are provided. These sealing-glass compositions are useful for forming hermetic glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys that have a high aqueous durability for component or device applications requiring exposure to moisture, water or body fluids. Particular applications of the titanium sealing-glass compositions include forming glass-to-metal seals for lithium batteries and implanted biomedical devices (e.g. batteries, pacemakers, defibrillators, pumps).

Brow, Richard K. (Albuquerque, NM); McCollister, Howard L. (Albuquerque, NM); Phifer, Carol C. (Albuquerque, NM); Day, Delbert E. (Rolla, MO)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Bioactive glass coatings for orthopedic metallic implants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to develop bioactive glass coatings for metallic orthopedic implants. A new family of glasses in the SiO2-Na2O-K2O-CaO-MgO-P2O5 system has been synthesized and characterized. The glass properties (thermal expansion, softening and transformation temperatures, density and hardness) are in line with the predictions of established empirical models. The optimized firing conditions to fabricate coatings on Ti-based and Co-Cr alloys have been determined and related to the glass properties and the interfacial reactions. Excellent adhesion to alloys has been achieved through the formation of 100-200 nm thick interfacial layers (Ti5Si3 on Ti-based alloys and CrOx on Co-Cr). Finally, glass coatings, approximately 100 mu m thick, have been fabricated onto commercial Ti alloy-based dental implants.

Lopez-Esteban, Sonia; Saiz, Eduardo; Fujino, Sigheru; Oku, Takeo; Suganuma, Katsuaki; Tomsia, Antoni P.

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

466

andesitic glass comparison: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

applications. - Int. J. Solids & Struct. 49 and Motivation Components of Thin Film Solar Modules back sheet or glass encapsulant electrical conductor thin 59 Glass Forming...

467

ajakirja stained glass: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

applications. - Int. J. Solids & Struct. 49 and Motivation Components of Thin Film Solar Modules back sheet or glass encapsulant electrical conductor thin 122 Glass Forming...

468

Glass-like thermal conductivity in high efficiency thermoelectric...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Glass-like thermal conductivity in high efficiency thermoelectric materials Glass-like thermal conductivity in high efficiency thermoelectric materials Discusses strategies to...

469

Rocky Flats Neutron Detector Testing at Valduc, France  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent program requirements of the US Department of Energy/NNSA have led to a need for a criticality accident alarm system to be installed at a newly activated facility. The Criticality Safety Group of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was able to recover and store for possible future use approximately 200 neutron criticality detectors and 20 master alarm panels from the former Rocky Flats Plant in Golden, Colorado when the plant was closed. The Criticality Safety Group participated in a facility analysis and evaluation, the engineering design and review process, as well as the refurbishment, testing, and recalibration of the Rocky Flats criticality alarm system equipment to be used in the new facility. In order to demonstrate the functionality and survivability of the neutron detectors to the effects of an actual criticality accident, neutron detector testing was performed at the French CEA Valduc SILENE reactor from October 7 to October 19, 2010. The neutron detectors were exposed to three criticality events or pulses generated by the SILENE reactor. The first excursion was performed with a bare or unshielded reactor, and the second excursion was made with a lead shielded/reflected reactor, and the third excursion with a polyethylene reflected core. These tests of the Rocky Flats neutron detectors were performed as a part of the 2010 Criticality Accident Alarm System Benchmark Measurements at the SILENE Reactor. The principal investigators for this series of experiments were Thomas M. Miller and John C. Wagner of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, with Nicolas Authier and Nathalie Baclet of CEA Valduc. Several other organizations were also represented, including the Y-12 National Security Complex, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, CEA Saclay, and Babcock International Group.

Kim, S S; Dulik, G M

2011-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

470

Faculty Position in Multi-scale Manufacturing Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-precision additive manufacturing technologies; · multi-scale micro-precision manufacturing; · high throughput. Christian Enz Search Committee Chair E-mail: manufacturing-search@epfl.ch For additional information on EPFLFaculty Position in Multi-scale Manufacturing Technologies at the Ecole polytechnique fédérale de

Psaltis, Demetri

471

Accepted Manuscript Sustainable manufacturing: Evaluation and Modeling of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in additive manufacturing Florent Le Bourhisa · Olivier Kerbrata Jean-Yves Hascoeta · Pascal Mognola Accepted of manufacturing processes where great amounts of energy and materials are being consumed. Nowadays, additive manufacturing technologies such as Direct Additive Laser Manufac- turing allow us to manufacture functional

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

472

Introduction! Low Cost, High Volume, Scale-up Photovoltaic Manufacturing!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction! Low Cost, High Volume, Scale-up Photovoltaic Manufacturing! Prof. Shreyes Melkote, Manufacturing Research Center, Georgia Institute of Technology Photovoltaics (PV) will be part of the energy mix volume PV manufacturing, therefore to reduce manufacturing cost and accelerate PV use. ! q Silicon wafer

Das, Suman

473

Entanglement entropy in Galilean conformal field theories and flat holography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the analytical calculation of entanglement entropy for a class of two dimensional field theories governed by the symmetries of the Galilean conformal algebra, thus providing a rare example of such an exact computation. These field theories are the putative holographic duals to theories of gravity in three-dimensional asymptotically flat spacetimes. We provide a check of our field theory answers by an analysis of geodesics. We also exploit the Chern-Simons formulation of three-dimensional gravity and adapt recent proposals of calculating entanglement entropy by Wilson lines in this context to find an independent confirmation of our results from holography.

Arjun Bagchi; Rudranil Basu; Daniel Grumiller; Max Riegler

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

474

East Flat Rock, North Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump37. It is classified asThis article is aAg Products JumpFarmingdale, NewFlat

475

ROCKY FLATS CLOSURE PROJECT EM, AUG 2006 | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power Systems Engineering Research and DevelopmentDepartmentinBattery TechnologyJanuaryROCKY FLATS

476

Deep Resistivity Structure of Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nevada.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) at their Nevada Site Office are addressing groundwater contamination resulting from historical underground nuclear testing through the Environmental Management program and, in particular, the Underground Test Area project. One issue of concern is the nature of the somewhat poorly constrained pre Tertiary geology and its effects on ground-water flow in the area adjacent to a nuclear test. Ground water modelers would like to know more about the hydrostratigraphy and geologic structure to support a hydrostratigraphic framework model that is under development for the Yucca Flat Corrective Action Unit (CAU). During 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey, supported by the DOE and NNSA-NSO, collected and processed data from 51 magnetotelluric (MT) and audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) stations at the Nevada Test Site in and near Yucca Flat to assist in characterizing the pre-Tertiary geology in that area. The primary purpose was to refine the character, thickness, and lateral extent of pre Tertiary confining units. In particular, a major goal has been to define the upper clastic confining unit (late Devonian – Mississippian-age siliciclastic rocks assigned to the Eleana Formation and Chainman Shale) in the Yucca Flat area. The MT and AMT data have been released in separate USGS Open File Reports. The Nevada Test Site magnetotelluric data interpretation presented in this report includes the results of detailed two-dimensional (2 D) resistivity modeling for each profile (including alternative interpretations) and gross inferences on the three dimensional (3 D) character of the geology beneath each station. The character, thickness, and lateral extent of the Chainman Shale and Eleana Formation that comprise the Upper Clastic Confining Unit are generally well determined in the upper 5 km. Inferences can be made regarding the presence of the Lower Clastic Confining Unit at depths below 5 km. Large fault structures such as the CP Thrust fault, the Carpetbag fault, and the Yucca fault that cross Yucca Flat are also discernable as are other smaller faults. The subsurface electrical resistivity distribution and inferred geologic structures determined by this investigation should help constrain the hydrostratigraphic framework model that is under development.

Theodore H. Asch, Brian D. Rodriguez; Jay A. Sampson; Erin L. Wallin; and Jackie M. Williams.

2006-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

477

Big Flats, Wisconsin: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin: Energy ResourcesJersey: EnergyBerthoud,Biodiesel Place:Forge07.Daddy sFlats,

478

Windy Flats(3Q09 portion) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 South Place:ReferenceEdit JumpWill County,Windspire EnergyFlats Jump

479

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Rocky Flats SOG  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545*. . : '* FEB 1972.SOG Rocky Flats Site,

480

Development of Commercial Technology for Thin Film Silicon Solar Cells on Glass: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-209  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NREL has conducted basic research relating to high efficiency, low cost, thin film silicon solar cell design and the method of making solar cells. Two patents have been issued to NREL in the above field. In addition, specific process and metrology tools have been developed by NREL. Applied Optical Sciences Corp. (AOS) has expertise in the manufacture of solar cells and has developed its own unique concentrator technology. AOS wants to complement its solar cell expertise and its concentrator technology by manufacturing flat panel thin film silicon solar cell panels. AOS wants to take NREL's research to the next level, using it to develop commercially viable flat pane, thin film silicon solar cell panels. Such a development in equipment, process, and metrology will likely produce the lowest cost solar cell technology for both commercial and residential use. NREL's fundamental research capability and AOS's technology and industrial background are complementary to achieve this product development.

Sopori, B.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manufacturing flat glass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Simultaneous Tolerance Synthesis for Manufacturing and Quality B. Ye, Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to component dimension i CT total cost of manufacturing and quality Cpi capability index of last process, and quality, for the sake of achieving a minimal total cost and reducing lead-time. However, in existing workSimultaneous Tolerance Synthesis for Manufacturing and Quality B. Ye, Department of Industrial

Salustri, Filippo A.

482

Glass for sealing lithium cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Glass compositions resistant to corrosion by lithium cell electrolyte and having an expansion coefficient of 45 to 85 x 10/sup -70/C/sup -1/ have been made with SiO/sub 2/, 25 to 55% by weight; B/sub 2/O/sub 3/, 5 to 12%; Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, 12 to 35%; CaO, 5 to 15%; MgO, 5 to 15%; SrO, 0 to 10%; and La/sub 2/O/sub 3/, 0 to 5%. Preferred compositions within that range contain 3 to 8% SrO and 0.5 to 2.5% La/sub 2/O/sub 3/.

Leedecke, C.J.

1981-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

483

Solid oxide fuel cell having a glass composite seal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A solid oxide fuel cell stack having a plurality of cassettes and a glass composite seal disposed between the sealing surfaces of adjacent cassettes, thereby joining the cassettes and providing a hermetic seal therebetween. The glass composite seal includes an alkaline earth aluminosilicate (AEAS) glass disposed about a viscous glass such that the AEAS glass retains the viscous glass in a predetermined position between the first and second sealing surfaces. The AEAS glass provides geometric stability to the glass composite seal to maintain the proper distance between the adjacent cassettes while the viscous glass provides for a compliant and self-healing seal. The glass composite seal may include fibers, powders, and/or beads of zirconium oxide, aluminum oxide, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), or mixtures thereof, to enhance the desirable properties of the glass composite seal.

De Rose, Anthony J.; Mukerjee, Subhasish; Haltiner, Jr., Karl Jacob

2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

484

Advanced Blade Manufacturing Project - Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The original scope of the project was to research improvements to the processes and materials used in the manufacture of wood-epoxy blades, conduct tests to qualify any new material or processes for use in blade design and subsequently build and test six blades using the improved processes and materials. In particular, ABM was interested in reducing blade cost and improving quality. In addition, ABM needed to find a replacement material for the mature Douglas fir used in the manufacturing process. The use of mature Douglas fir is commercially unacceptable because of its limited supply and environmental concerns associated with the use of mature timber. Unfortunately, the bankruptcy of FloWind in June 1997 and a dramatic reduction in AWT sales made it impossible for ABM to complete the full scope of work. However, sufficient research and testing were completed to identify several promising changes in the blade manufacturing process and develop a preliminary design incorporating these changes.

POORE, ROBERT Z.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

HGMS: Glasses and Nanocomposites for Hydrogen Storage.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary goal of this project is to fabricate and investigate different glass systems and glass-derived nanocrystalline composite materials. These glass-based, two-phased materials will contain nanocrystals that can attract hydrogen and be of potential interest as hydrogen storage media. The glass materials with intrinsic void spaces that are able to precipitate functional nanocrystals capable to attract hydrogen are of particular interest. Proposed previously, but never practically implemented, one of promising concepts for storing hydrogen are micro-containers built of glass and shaped into hollow microspheres. The project expanded this concept to the exploration of glass-derived nanocrystalline composites as potential hydrogen storage media. It is known that the most desirable materials for hydrogen storage do not interact chemically with hydrogen and possess a high surface area to host substantial amounts of hydrogen. Glasses are built of disordered networks with ample void spaces that make them permeable to hydrogen even at room temperature. Glass-derived nanocrystalline composites (two-phased materials), combination of glasses (networks with ample voids) and functional nanocrystals (capable to attract hydrogen), appear to be promising candidates for hydrogen storage media. Key advantages of glass materials include simplicity of preparation, flexibility of composition, chemical durability, non-toxicity and mechanical strength, as well as low production costs and environmental friendliness. This project encompasses a fundamental research into physics and chemistry of glasses and nanocrystalline composite materials, derived from glass. Studies are aimed to answer questions essential for considering glass-based materials and composites as potential hydrogen storage media. Of particular interest are two-phased materials that combine glasses with intrinsic voids spaces for physisorption of hydrogen and nanocrystals capable of chemisorption. This project does not directly address any hydrogen storage technical barriers or targets in terms of numbers. Specifically, hydrogen sorption and desorption tests or kinetics measurements were not part of the project scope. However, the insights gained from these studies could help to answer fundamental questions necessary for considering glass-based materials as hydrogen storage media and could be applied indirectly towards the DOE hydrogen storage technical targets such as system weight and volume, system cost and energy density. Such questions are: Can specific macro-crystals, proven to attract hydrogen when in a macroscopic form (bulk), be nucleated in glass matrices as nanocrystals to create two-phased materials? What are suitable compositions that enable to synthetize glass-based, two-phase materials with nanocrystals that can attract hydrogen via surface or bulk interactions? What are the limits of controlling the microstructure of these materials, especially limits for nanocrystals density and size? Finally, from a technological point of view, the fabrication of glass-derived nanocomposites that we explore is a very simple, fast and inexpensive process that does not require costly or specialized equipment which is an important factor for practical applications.

Lipinska, Kris [PI] [PI; Hemmers, Oliver

2013-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

486

Geologic and geotechnical assessment RFETS Building 371, Rocky Flats, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the review and evaluation of the geological, geotechnical and geophysical data supporting the design basis analysis for the Rocky Flats Environmental Test Site (RFETS) Building 371. The primary purpose of the geologic and geotechnical reviews and assessments described herein are to assess the adequacy of the crustal and near surface rock and soil model used in the seismic analysis of Building 371. This review was requested by the RFETS Seismic Evaluation Program. The purpose was to determine the adequacy of data to support the design basis for Building 371, with respect to seismic loading. The objectives required to meet this goal were to: (1) review techniques used to gather data (2) review analysis and interpretations of the data; and (3) make recommendations to gather additional data if required. Where there were questions or inadequacies in data or interpretation, recommendations were made for new data that will support the design basis analysis and operation of Building 371. In addition, recommendations are provided for a geologic and geophysical assessment for a new facility at the Rocky Flats Site.

Maryak, M.E.; Wyatt, D.E.; Bartlett, S.F.; Lewis, M.R.; Lee, R.C.

1995-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

487

Using Surface Impedance for Calculating Wakefields in Flat Geometry  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

Beginning with Maxwell's equations and assuming only that the wall interaction can be approximated by a surface impedance, we derive formulas for the generalized longitudinal and transverse impedance in flat geometry, from which the wakefields can also be obtained. From the generalized impedances, by taking the proper limits, we obtain the normal longitudinal, dipole, and quad impedances in flat geometry. These equations can be applied to any surface impedance, such as the known dc, ac, and anomalous skin models of wall resistance, a model of wall roughness, or one for a pipe with small, periodic corrugations. We show that, for the particular case of dc wall resistance, the longitudinal impedance obtained here agrees with a known result in the literature, a result that was derived from a very general formula by Henke and Napoly. As concrete example, we apply our results to representative beam and machine parameters in the undulator region of LCLS-II and estimate the impact of the transverse wakes on the machine performance.

Bane, Karl; Stupakov, Gennady

2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology, Phase 1, Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines the cost-effective manufacture of dendritic-web-based photovoltaic modules. It explains how process changes can increase production and reduce manufacturing costs. Long-range benefits of these improved processes are also discussed. Problems are identified that could impede increasing production and reducing costs; approaches to solve these problems are presented. These approaches involve web growth throughput, cell efficiency, process yield, silicon use, process control, automation, and module efficiency. Also discussed are the benefits of bifacial module design, unique to the dendritic web process.

Easoz, J.R.; Herlocher, R.H. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States))

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Micro-Machining ME 4210: Manufacturing Processes & Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a phosphosilicate glass (PSG) spacer later; (b) etching of the spacer layer; (C) deposition of polysilicon; (d

Colton, Jonathan S.

490

Wind Energy & Manufacturing | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop,SaveWhiskey Flats Geothermal Area JumpTurboPower

491

Dynamics and rheology of active glasses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Within the framework of mode-coupling theory, we present a simple model for describing dense assemblies of active (self-propelled) spherical colloidal particles. For isotropic suspensions, we demonstrate that the glass transition is shifted to higher volume fraction by the addition of activity, in agreement with recent Brownian dynamics simulations. Activity-induced changes in the static structure factor of the fluid are predicted. The mechanical response of an active glass to applied strain is shown to be softer than the corresponding passive glass; both the nonergodicity parameter and the yield stress reduce with increasing activity.

T. F. F. Farage; J. M. Brader

2014-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

492

SLUDGE BATCH 7B GLASS VARIABILITY STUDY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is preparing to initiate processing Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b). In support of the upcoming processing, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provided a recommendation to utilize Frits 418 with a 6% Na{sub 2}O addition (26 wt% Na{sub 2}O in sludge) and 702 with a 4% Na{sub 2}O addition (24 wt% Na{sub 2}O in sludge) to process SB7b. This recommendation was based on assessments of the compositional projections for SB7b available at the time from the Savannah River Remediation (SRR). To support qualification of SB7b, SRNL executed a variability study to assess the applicability of the current durability models for SB7b. The durability models were assessed over the expected composition range of SB7b, including potential caustic additions, combined with Frits 702 and 418 over a 32-40% waste loading (WL) range. Thirty four glasses were selected based on Frits 418 and 702 coupled with the sludge projections with an additional 4-6% Na{sub 2}O to reflect the potential caustic addition. Six of these glasses, based on average nominal sludge compositions including the appropriate caustic addition, were developed for both Frit 418 and Frit 702 at 32, 36 and 40% WL to provide coverage in the center of the anticipated SB7b glass region. All glasses were fabricated and characterized using chemical composition analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the Product Consistency Test (PCT). To comply with the DWPF Glass Product Control Program, a total of thirty four glasses were fabricated to assess the applicability of the current DWPF PCCS durability models. Based on the measured PCT response, all of the glasses were acceptable with respect to the Environmental Assessment (EA) benchmark glass regardless of thermal history. The NL[B] values of the SB7b variability study glasses were less than 1.99 g/L as compared to 16.695 g/L for EA. A small number of the D-optimally selected 'outer layer' extreme vertices (EV) glasses were not predictable using the current Product Composition Control System (PCCS) models for durability, but were acceptable compared to the EA glass when tested. These glasses fell outside of the lower 95% confidence band, which demonstrates conservatism in the model. A few of the glasses fell outside of the upper 95% confidence band; however, these particular glasses have normalized release values that were much lower than the values of EA and should be of no practical concern. Per the requirements of the DWPF Glass Product Control Program, the PCCS durability models have been shown to be applicable to the SB7b sludge system with a range of Na{sub 2}O concentrations blended with Frits 418 or 702. PCT results from the glasses fabricated as part of the variability study were shown to be predictable by the current DWPF PCCS models and/or acceptable with respect to the EA benchmark glass regardless of thermal history or compositional view.

Johnson, F.; Edwards, T.

2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

493

Electron beam related manufacturing technology development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the defense community, certain uranium-alloy components have been manufactured by methods which generate large quantities of uranium bearing waste. Our estimates show that these components can be fabricated by vapor deposition and reduce waste generation by more than an order of magnitude. We present results from a series of uranium-alloy vapor deposition tests designed to produce samples of free-standing structures. Both flat plate and cylindrical shells were produced. The deposits were fully dense, defect free and displayed a high quality surface finish. The uranium-alloy was co-evaporated from a single source. Bulk chemistry specifications for the material were met, although some residual variation in chemistry was observed in sample cross sections. After heat treatment, the vapor deposited samples exhibited tensile properties similar to conventional ingot processed material.

Anklam, T.M.

1995-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

494

Electron beam related manufacturing technology development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the defense community, certain uranium-alloy components have been manufactured by methods which generate large quantities of uranium bearing waste. The authors estimates show that these components can be fabricated by vapor deposition and reduce waste generation by more than an order of magnitude. They present results from a series of uranium-alloy vapor deposition tests designed to produce samples of free-standing structures. Both flat plate and cylindrical shells were produced. The deposits were fully dense, defect free and displayed a high quality surface finish. The uranium-alloy was co-evaporated from a single source. Bulk chemistry specifications for the material were met, although some residual variation in chemistry was observed in sample cross sections. After heat treatment, the vapor deposited samples exhibited tensile properties similar to conventional ingot processed material.

Anklam, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

495

Manufacturing improvements in the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology Project (PVMaT) is a government/industry research and development (R and D) partnership between the US federal government (through the US Department of Energy [DOE]) and members of the US PV industry. The goals of PVMaT are to help the US PV industry improve module manufacturing processes and equipment; accelerate manufacturing cost reductions for PV modules, balance-of-systems components, and integrated systems; increase commercial product performance and reliability; and enhance the investment opportunities for substantial scale-ups of US-based PV manufacturing plant capacities. The approach for PVMaT has been to cost-share risk taking by industry as it explores new manufacturing options and ideas for improved PV modules and other components, advances system and product integration, and develops new system designs, all of which will lead to overall reduced system life-cycle costs for reliable PV end products. The PVMaT Phase 4A module manufac turing R and D projects are just being completed, and initial results for the work directed primarily to module manufacture are reported in this paper. Fourteen new Phase 5A subcontracts have also just been awarded, and planned R and D areas for the ten focused on module manufacture are described. Finally, government funding, subcontractor cost-sharing, and a comparison of the relative efforts by PV technology throughout the PVMaT project are presented.

Witt, C.E.; Mitchell, R.L.; Thomas, H.P.; Symko, M.I. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); King, R. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Ruby, D.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Glass/polymer composites and methods of making  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to new glass/polymer composites and methods for making them. More specifically, the invention is glass/polymer composites having phases that are at the molecular level and thereby practicably indistinguishable. The invention further discloses making molecular phase glass/polymer composites by mixing a glass and a polymer in a compatible solvent.

Samuels, W. D. (Richland, WA); Exarhos, Gregory J. (Richland, WA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Thin optic surface analysis for high resolution X-ray telescopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The art of glass developed throughout the years has covered artifacts ranging from crude ornaments to high precision optics used in flat panel displays, hard disk drives, and x-ray telescopes. Methods for manufacturing ...

Akilian, Mireille

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Thermal neutron shield and method of manufacture  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermal neutron shield comprising boron shielding panels with a high percentage of the element Boron. The panel is least 46% Boron by weight which maximizes the effectiveness of the shielding against thermal neutrons. The accompanying method discloses the manufacture of boron shielding panels which includes enriching the pre-cursor mixture with varying grit sizes of Boron Carbide.

Metzger, Bert Clayton; Brindza, Paul Daniel

2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

499

Thermal neutron shield and method of manufacture  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermal neutron shield comprising concrete with a high percentage of the element Boron. The concrete is least 54% Boron by weight which maximizes the effectiveness of the shielding against thermal neutrons. The accompanying method discloses the manufacture of Boron loaded concrete which includes enriching the concrete mixture with varying grit sizes of Boron Carbide.

Brindza, Paul Daniel; Metzger, Bert Clayton

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

500

REMEDIAT1NG AT MANUFACTURED GAS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, comhusti- hle gas manufactured Pfrom coke, coal, and oil 1 served as the major gas- eous fuel for urban for the three primary gas production meth- ods: coal carbonization, carbureted water gas production, and oil gas, and metals. Tar resid- uals were produced from the vola- tiIe component of bituminous coals in coal

Peters, Catherine A.