Sample records for manufacturers provide wind

  1. Wind Turbine Manufacturing Process Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waseem Faidi; Chris Nafis; Shatil Sinha; Chandra Yerramalli; Anthony Waas; Suresh Advani; John Gangloff; Pavel Simacek

    2012-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    To develop a practical inline inspection that could be used in combination with automated composite material placement equipment to economically manufacture high performance and reliable carbon composite wind turbine blade spar caps. The approach technical feasibility and cost benefit will be assessed to provide a solid basis for further development and implementation in the wind turbine industry. The program is focused on the following technology development: (1) Develop in-line monitoring methods, using optical metrology and ultrasound inspection, and perform a demonstration in the lab. This includes development of the approach and performing appropriate demonstration in the lab; (2) Develop methods to predict composite strength reduction due to defects; and (3) Develop process models to predict defects from leading indicators found in the uncured composites.

  2. Proceedings from the Wind Manufacturing Workshop: Achieving 20...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Proceedings from the Wind Manufacturing Workshop: Achieving 20% Wind Energy in the U.S. by 2030, May 2009 Proceedings from the Wind Manufacturing Workshop: Achieving 20% Wind...

  3. Wind Program Manufacturing Research Advances Processes and Reduces...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Wind Program Manufacturing Research Advances Processes and Reduces Costs Wind Program Manufacturing Research Advances Processes and Reduces Costs March 31, 2014 - 11:22am Addthis...

  4. Wind Turbine Manufacturers in the United States: Locations and Local Impacts (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tegen, S.

    2010-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Suzanne Tegen's presentation about U.S. wind energy manufacturing (presented at WINDPOWER 2010 in Dallas) provides information about challenges to modeling renewables; wind energy's economic "ripple effect"; case studies about wind-related manufacturing in Colorado, Iowa, Ohio, and Indiana; manufacturing maps for the Great Lakes region, Arkansas, and the United States; sample job announcements; and U.S. Treasury Grant 1603 funding.

  5. Wind power manufacturing and supply chain summit USA.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, Roger Ray

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The area of wind turbine component manufacturing represents a business opportunity in the wind energy industry. Modern wind turbines can provide large amounts of electricity, cleanly and reliably, at prices competitive with any other new electricity source. Over the next twenty years, the US market for wind power is expected to continue to grow, as is the domestic content of installed turbines, driving demand for American-made components. Between 2005 and 2009, components manufactured domestically grew eight-fold to reach 50 percent of the value of new wind turbines installed in the U.S. in 2009. While that growth is impressive, the industry expects domestic content to continue to grow, creating new opportunities for suppliers. In addition, ever-growing wind power markets around the world provide opportunities for new export markets.

  6. Wind Energy Manufacturing Tax Incentive

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    With the passage of [http://www.arkansasenergy.org/media/261385/act736.pdf HB 2230 (2009)] in April 2009, the Arkansas Legislature expanded a tax incentive for manufacturers of windmill blades or...

  7. 20% Wind Energy by 2030 - Chapter 3: Manufacturing, Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3: Manufacturing, Materials, and Resources Summary Slides 20% Wind Energy by 2030 - Chapter 3: Manufacturing, Materials, and Resources Summary Slides Summary Slides for Chapter 3:...

  8. Alternative Energy Provides a Second Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    This report provides information for communities and other interested stakeholders about the development of wind energy at former mining sites. Local governments, residents and organizations may be interested in creating renewable energy resources and new economic opportunities at these sites. The report describes the mechanics of wind energy, details the various wind technology options, explores wind energy’s environmental, economic and social impacts at mining sites, and provides case studies and next steps to help get projects in place.

  9. U.S. Offshore Wind Manufacturing and Supply Chain Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, Bruce Duncan [Navigant Consulting, Inc.

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the report is to provide an assessment of the domestic supply chain and manufacturing infrastructure supporting the U.S. offshore wind market. The report provides baseline information and develops a strategy for future development of the supply chain required to support projected offshore wind deployment levels. A brief description of each of the key chapters includes: » Chapter 1: Offshore Wind Plant Costs and Anticipated Technology Advancements. Determines the cost breakdown of offshore wind plants and identifies technical trends and anticipated advancements in offshore wind manufacturing and construction. » Chapter 2: Potential Supply Chain Requirements and Opportunities. Provides an organized, analytical approach to identifying and bounding the uncertainties associated with a future U.S. offshore wind market. It projects potential component-level supply chain needs under three demand scenarios and identifies key supply chain challenges and opportunities facing the future U.S. market as well as current suppliers of the nation’s land-based wind market. » Chapter 3: Strategy for Future Development. Evaluates the gap or competitive advantage of adding manufacturing capacity in the U.S. vs. overseas, and evaluates examples of policies that have been successful . » Chapter 4: Pathways for Market Entry. Identifies technical and business pathways for market entry by potential suppliers of large-scale offshore turbine components and technical services. The report is intended for use by the following industry stakeholder groups: (a) Industry participants who seek baseline cost and supplier information for key component segments and the overall U.S. offshore wind market (Chapters 1 and 2). The component-level requirements and opportunities presented in Section 2.3 will be particularly useful in identifying market sizes, competition, and risks for the various component segments. (b) Federal, state, and local policymakers and economic development agencies, to assist in identifying policies with low effort and high impact (Chapter 3). Section 3.3 provides specific policy examples that have been demonstrated to be effective in removing barriers to development. (c) Current and potential domestic suppliers in the offshore wind market, in evaluating areas of opportunity and understanding requirements for participation (Chapter 4). Section 4.4 provides a step-by-step description of the qualification process that suppliers looking to sell components into a future U.S. offshore wind market will need to follow.

  10. High Wind Penetration Impact on U.S. Wind Manufacturing Capacity and Critical Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laxson, A.; Hand, M. M.; Blair, N.

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study used two different models to analyze a number of alternative scenarios of annual wind power capacity expansion to better understand the impacts of high levels of wind generated electricity production on wind energy manufacturing and installation rates.

  11. Manufactured Home Testing in Simulated and Naturally Occurring High Winds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. D. Richins; T. K. Larson

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A typical double-wide manufactured home was tested in simulated and naturally occurring high winds to understand structural behavior and improve performance during severe windstorms. Seven (7) lateral load tests were conducted on a double-wide manufactured home at a remote field test site in Wyoming. An extensive instrumentation package monitored the overall behavior of the home and collected data vital to validating computational software for the manufactured housing industry. The tests were designed to approach the design load of the home without causing structural damage, thus allowing the behavior of the home to be accessed when the home was later exposed to high winds (to 80-mph). The data generally show near-linear initial system response with significant non-linear behavior as the applied loads increase. Load transfer across the marriage line is primarily compression. Racking, while present, is very small. Interface slip and shear displacement along the marriage line are nearly insignificant. Horizontal global displacements reached 0.6 inch. These tests were designed primarily to collect data necessary to calibrate a desktop analysis and design software tool, MHTool, under development at the Idaho National Laboratory specifically for manufactured housing. Currently available analysis tools are, for the most part, based on methods developed for “stick built” structures and are inappropriate for manufactured homes. The special materials utilized in manufactured homes, such as rigid adhesives used in the connection of the sheathing materials to the studs, significantly alter the behavior of manufactured homes under lateral loads. Previous full scale tests of laterally loaded manufactured homes confirm the contention that conventional analysis methods are not applicable. System behavior dominates the structural action of manufactured homes and its prediction requires a three dimensional analysis of the complete unit, including tiedowns. This project was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, US Department of Housing and Urban Development, and the Manufactured Housing Institute. The results of this research can lead to savings in annual losses of life and property by providing validated information to enable the advancement of code requirements and by developing engineering software that can predict and optimize wind resistance.

  12. U.S. Wind Manufacturing: Taller Hub Heights to Access Higher...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    U.S. Wind Manufacturing: Taller Hub Heights to Access Higher Wind Resources and Lower Cost of Energy U.S. Wind Manufacturing: Taller Hub Heights to Access Higher Wind Resources and...

  13. U.S. Wind Energy Manufacturing and Supply Chain: A Competitiveness Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fullenkamp, Patrick H; Holody, Diane S

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the project was to develop a greater understanding of the key factors determining wind energy component manufacturing costs and pricing on a global basis in order to enhance the competitiveness of U.S. manufacturers, and to reduce installed systems cost. Multiple stakeholders including DOE, turbine OEMs, and large component manufactures will all benefit by better understanding the factors determining domestic competitiveness in the emerging offshore and next generation land-based wind industries. Major objectives of this project were to: 1. Carry out global cost and process comparisons for 5MW jacket foundations, blades, towers, and permanent magnet generators; 2. Assess U.S. manufacturers’ competitiveness and potential for cost reduction; 3. Facilitate informed decision-making on investments in U.S. manufacturing; 4. Develop an industry scorecard representing the readiness of the U.S. manufacturers’ to produce components for the next generations of wind turbines, nominally 3MW land-based and 5MW offshore; 5. Disseminate results through the GLWN Wind Supply Chain GIS Map, a free website that is the most comprehensive public database of U.S. wind energy suppliers; 6. Identify areas and develop recommendations to DOE on potential R&D areas to target for increasing domestic manufacturing competitiveness, per DOE’s Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative (CEMI). Lists of Deliverables 1. Cost Breakdown Competitive Analyses of four product categories: tower, jacket foundation, blade, and permanent magnet (PM) generator. The cost breakdown for each component includes a complete Bill of Materials with net weights; general process steps for labor; and burden adjusted by each manufacturer for their process categories of SGA (sales general and administrative), engineering, logistics cost to a common U.S. port, and profit. 2. Value Stream Map Competitiveness Analysis: A tool that illustrates both information and material flow from the point of getting a customer order at the manufacturing plant; to the orders being forwarded by the manufacturing plant to the material suppliers; to the material being received at the manufacturing plant and processed through the system; to the final product being shipped to the Customer. 3. Competitiveness Scorecard: GLWN developed a Wind Industry Supply Chain Scorecard that reflects U.S. component manufacturers’ readiness to supply the next generation wind turbines, 3MW and 5MW, for land-based and offshore applications. 4. Wind Supply Chain Database & Map: Expand the current GLWN GIS Wind Supply Chain Map to include offshore elements. This is an on-line, free access, wind supply chain map that provides a platform for identifying active and emerging suppliers for the land-based and offshore wind industry, including turbine component manufacturers and wind farm construction service suppliers.

  14. Manufacturing Development of the NCSX Modular Coil Windings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chrzanowsk, J. H.; Fogarty, P. J.; Heitzenroeder, P. J.; Meighan, T.; Nelson, B.; Raftopoulos, S.; Williamson, D.

    2005-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The modular coils on the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) present a number of significant engineering challenges due to their complex shapes, requirements for high dimensional accuracy and the high current density required in the modular coils due to space constraints. In order to address these challenges, an R&D program was established to develop the conductor, insulation scheme, manufacturing techniques, and procedures. A prototype winding named Twisted Racetrack Coil (TRC) was of particular importance in dealing with these challenges. The TRC included a complex shaped winding form, conductor, insulation scheme, leads and termination, cooling system and coil clamps typical of the modular coil design. Even though the TRC is smaller in size than a modular coil, its similar complex geometry provided invaluable information in developing the final design, metrology techniques and development of manufacturing procedures. In addition a discussion of the development of the copper rope conductor including "Keystoning" concerns; the epoxy impregnation system (VPI) plus the tooling and equipment required to manufacture the modular coils will be presented.

  15. Small Business Week 2011: Meyer Tool and Manufacturing provides...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Week 2011: Meyer Tool and Manufacturing provides NNSA with technical engineering, professional services | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr...

  16. Exploring the Wind Manufacturing Map | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    growth in domestic manufacturing has increased the percentage of U.S.-built wind turbines installed in the United States from 35 percent in 2005-2006 to nearly 70 percent...

  17. Tax Credit for Manufacturers of Small Wind Turbines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    '''''Note: After a 2 year moratorium on all state tax credits, this credit may be claimed for tax year 2012 and subsequent tax years, for small wind turbines manufactured on or after July 1, 2012.'...

  18. Wind turbine composite blade manufacturing : the need for understanding defect origins, prevalence, implications and reliability.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cairns, Douglas S. (Montana State University, Bozeman, MT); Riddle, Trey (Montana State University, Bozeman, MT); Nelson, Jared (Montana State University, Bozeman, MT)

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Renewable energy is an important element in the US strategy for mitigating our dependence on non-domestic oil. Wind energy has emerged as a viable and commercially successful renewable energy source. This is the impetus for the 20% wind energy by 2030 initiative in the US. Furthermore, wind energy is important on to enable a global economy. This is the impetus for such rapid, recent growth. Wind turbine blades are a major structural element of a wind turbine blade. Wind turbine blades have near aerospace quality demands at commodity prices; often two orders of magnitude less cost than a comparable aerospace structure. Blade failures are currently as the second most critical concern for wind turbine reliability. Early blade failures typically occur at manufacturing defects. There is a need to understand how to quantify, disposition, and mitigate manufacturing defects to protect the current wind turbine fleet, and for the future. This report is an overview of the needs, approaches, and strategies for addressing the effect of defects in wind turbine blades. The overall goal is to provide the wind turbine industry with a hierarchical procedure for addressing blade manufacturing defects relative to wind turbine reliability.

  19. Supply Chain and Blade Manufacturing Considerations in the Global Wind Industry (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James, T.; Goodrich, A.

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This briefing provides an overview of supply chain developments in the global wind industry and a detailed assessment of blade manufacturing considerations for U.S. end-markets. The report discusses the international trade flows of wind power equipment, blade manufacturing and logistical costs, and qualitative issues that often influence factory location decisions. To help guide policy and research and development strategy decisions, this report offers a comprehensive perspective of both quantitative and qualitative factors that affect selected supply chain developments in the growing wind power industry.

  20. Wind Manufacturing Facilities | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and MaterialsWenjun DengWISPWind Industry Soars to New1 WindWind

  1. Wooden wind turbine blade manufacturing process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coleman, Clint (Warren, VT)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A wooden wind turbine blade is formed by laminating wood veneer in a compression mold having the exact curvature needed for one side of the blade, following which the other side of the blade is ground flat along its length but twisted with respect to the blade axis.

  2. American Wind Manufacturing | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Ownedof EnergyAdvanced Biofuels |National Wind Technology Center -1 of 9

  3. Distributed Wind All-State Policy Summit and Strategies for Manufactur...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    from manufacturers, grant administrators from state and federal agencies, and political operatives with small wind experience will host question and answer panels and lead...

  4. EVALUATION OF HAND LAY-UP AND RESIN TRANSFER MOLDING IN COMPOSITE WIND TURBINE BLADE MANUFACTURING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EVALUATION OF HAND LAY-UP AND RESIN TRANSFER MOLDING IN COMPOSITE WIND TURBINE BLADE MANUFACTURING..........................................................................................................1 Hand Lay-up in Turbine Blade Fabrication

  5. Manufacturing Defects Common to Composite Wind Turbine Blades: Effects of Defects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    uni-directional wind turbine fiber-reinforced composite material with an epoxy resin were utilized of wind turbine blades have essentially dictated the use of low cost fiberglass composite materials. Even1 Manufacturing Defects Common to Composite Wind Turbine Blades: Effects of Defects Jared W. Nelson

  6. Proof-of-Concept Manufacturing and Testing of Composite Wind Generator Blades Made by HCBMP (High Compression Bladder Molded Prepreg)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William C. Leighty; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

    2005-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Proof-of-Concept Manufacturing and Testing of Composite Wind Generator Blades Made by HCBMP (High Compression Bladder Molded Prepreg)

  7. National Wind Tecnology Center Provides Dual Axis Resonant Blade Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Felker, Fort

    2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL's Structural Testing Laboratory at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) provides experimental laboratories, computer facilities for analytical work, space for assembling components and turbines for atmospheric testing as well as office space for industry researchers. Fort Felker, center director at the NWTC, discusses NREL's state-of-the-art structural testing capabilities and shows a flapwise and edgewise blade test in progress.

  8. National Wind Tecnology Center Provides Dual Axis Resonant Blade Testing

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Felker, Fort

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL's Structural Testing Laboratory at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) provides experimental laboratories, computer facilities for analytical work, space for assembling components and turbines for atmospheric testing as well as office space for industry researchers. Fort Felker, center director at the NWTC, discusses NREL's state-of-the-art structural testing capabilities and shows a flapwise and edgewise blade test in progress.

  9. Energy Report: U.S. Wind Energy Production and Manufacturing...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    seventy percent of the equipment installed at U.S. wind farms last year - including wind turbines and components like towers, blades, gears, and generators - is now from domestic...

  10. Providing Minute-to-Minute Regulation from Wind Plants: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirby, B.; Milligan, M.; Ela, E.

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we extend the previous analysis using time series data from existing wind plants, system loads, and regulation and energy markets.

  11. A Minnesota Blizzard Provides Insight into Utility-Scale Wind...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Wakes September 12, 2014 - 11:22am Addthis A blurry, black and white photo of wind turbines in a blizzard. Jiarong Hong can hardly wait for Minnesota's harsh winters to...

  12. Wind Manufacturing and Supply Chain | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataCombinedDepartment ofCareers »BatteriesVehiclesAboutMayEmissions inWind

  13. Miracle Wind Power Components Manufacture Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpenWende New Energy Co LtdInformationMidwestMinster Wind Jump

  14. Sandia National Laboratories: Wind Energy Manufacturing Lab Helps Engineers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmitted for USMaterialsthe Goal of H2FIRST ProjectImprove Wind

  15. Optical fibers go nano The manufacture of nanowires from optical fibers provides the longest, most uniform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optical fibers go nano The manufacture of nanowires from optical fibers provides the longest, most uniform and robust nanowires. Most important, the low optical loss associated to small surface roughness and high homogeneity allows the use of nanowires for optical applications and opens the way to a host

  16. Eldora-New Providence Schools Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision has beenFfe2fb55-352f-473b-a2dd-50ae8b27f0a6 No revisionWind, Transportation TopicsElEldora,

  17. Fixed-Speed and Variable-Slip Wind Turbines Providing Spinning Reserves to the Grid: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Singh, M.; Gevorgian, V.

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the level of wind penetration increases, wind turbine technology must move from merely generating power from wind to taking a role in supporting the bulk power system. Wind turbines should have the capability to provide inertial response and primary frequency (governor) response so they can support the frequency stability of the grid. To provide governor response, wind turbines should be able to generate less power than the available wind power and hold the rest in reserve, ready to be accessed as needed. This paper explores several ways to control wind turbine output to enable reserve-holding capability. This paper focuses on fixed-speed (also known as Type 1) and variable-slip (also known as Type 2) turbines.

  18. Manufacturing

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Flow of Materials through Industry Sustainable 1 Manufacturing 2 Technology Assessment 3 Contents 4 1. Introduction to the TechnologySystem ......

  19. Impacts of Providing Inertial Response on Dynamic Loads of Wind Turbine Drivetrains: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Girsang, I. P.; Dhupia, J.; Singh, M.; Gevorgian, V.; Muljadi, E.; Jonkman, J.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There has been growing demand from the power industry for wind power plants to support power system operations. One such requirement is for wind turbines to provide ancillary services in the form of inertial response. When the grid frequency drops, it is essential for wind turbine generators (WTGs) to inject kinetic energy stored in their inertia into the grid to help arrest the frequency decline. However, the impacts of inertial response on the structural loads of the wind turbine have not been given much attention. To bridge this gap, this paper utilizes a holistic model for both fixed-speed and variable-speed WTGs by integrating the aeroelastic wind turbine model in FAST, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, with the electromechanical drivetrain model in SimDriveline and SimPowerSystems.

  20. From Manufacturing Green Office Furniture to providing Sustainable Workplace Services: A necessary change in practices, tools and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 From Manufacturing Green Office Furniture to providing Sustainable Workplace Services company in office furniture like Steelcase is moving its business from manufacturing physical products. After this statement, we stress the issues raised by the shift from a current state of green product

  1. Development of a Web-based Emissions Reduction Calculator for Green Power Purchases from Texas Wind Energy Providers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Z.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Gilman, D.; Haberl, J.; Culp, C.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DEVELOPMENT OF A WEB-BASED, EMISSIONS REDUCTION CALCULATOR FOR GREEN POWER PURCHASES FROM TEXAS WIND ENERGY PROVIDERS Zi Liu, Ph.D. Research Engineer Jeff S. Haberl, Ph.D., P.E. Professor/Assc. Director Juan... that have been developed to calculate the emissions reductions from electricity provided by wind energy providers in the Texas ERCOT region, including an analysis of actual hourly wind power generated from a wind turbine in Randall County, Texas...

  2. Wind energy bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This bibliography is designed to help the reader search for information on wind energy. The bibliography is intended to help several audiences, including engineers and scientists who may be unfamiliar with a particular aspect of wind energy, university researchers who are interested in this field, manufacturers who want to learn more about specific wind topics, and librarians who provide information to their clients. Topics covered range from the history of wind energy use to advanced wind turbine design. References for wind energy economics, the wind energy resource, and environmental and institutional issues related to wind energy are also included.

  3. Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Wind Turbine Manufacturer...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    MOU FINAL5-31-08.doc 20% Wind Energy by 2030: Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply 2012 & 2013 Offshore Wind Market & Economic Analysis Reports...

  4. Energy Dept. Reports: U.S. Wind Energy Production and Manufacturing...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Technologies Market Report, technical and design innovation allowing for larger wind turbines with longer, lighter blades has steadily improved wind turbine performance and has...

  5. Sustainable Energy Solutions Task 4.1 Intelligent Manufacturing of Hybrid Carbon-Glass Fiber-Reinforced Composite Wind Turbine Blades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janet M Twomey, PhD

    2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    EXECUTIVE SUMARY In this subtask, the manufacturability of hybrid carbon-glass fiber-reinforced composite wind turbine blades using Vacuum-Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM) was investigated. The objective of this investigation was to study the VARTM process and its parameters to manufacture cost-effective wind turbine blades with no defects (mainly eliminate dry spots and reduce manufacturing time). A 2.5-dimensional model and a 3-dimensional model were developed to simulate mold filling and part curing under different conditions. These conditions included isothermal and non-isothermal filling, curing of the part during and after filling, and placement of injection gates at different locations. Results from this investigation reveal that the process can be simulated and also that manufacturing parameters can be optimized to eliminate dry spot formation and reduce the manufacturing time. Using computer-based models is a cost-effective way to simulate manufacturing of wind turbine blades. The approach taken herein allows the design of the wind blade manufacturing processes without physically running trial-and-error experiments that are expensive and time-consuming; especially for larger blades needed for more demanding environmental conditions. This will benefit the wind energy industry by reducing initial design and manufacturing costs which can later be passed down to consumers and consequently make the wind energy industry more competitive.

  6. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    some wind turbine manufacturers experienced blade andwind turbine manufacturers: Vestas (nacelles, blades, and

  7. U.S. Wind Energy Manufacturing and Supply Chain: A Competitiveness...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    plant assets and focusing manpower resources in the process to eliminate lag times in infusion, molding and downstream processes. The wind turbine blade industry should continue...

  8. Wind Power Career Chat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document will teach students about careers in the wind energy industry. Wind energy, both land-based and offshore, is expected to provide thousands of new jobs in the next several decades. Wind energy companies are growing rapidly to meet America's demand for clean, renewable, and domestic energy. These companies need skilled professionals. Wind power careers will require educated people from a variety of areas. Trained and qualified workers manufacture, construct, operate, and manage wind energy facilities. The nation will also need skilled researchers, scientists, and engineers to plan and develop the next generation of wind energy technologies.

  9. 20% Wind Energy by 2030 - Chapter 2: Wind Turbine Technology...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    20% Wind Energy by 2030: Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply U.S. Offshore Wind Manufacturing and Supply Chain Development Wind Program Accomplishments...

  10. MODEL REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS TO PROVIDE ENERGY AND OTHER ATTRIBUTES FROM AN OFFSHORE WIND POWER PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeremy Firestone; Dawn Kurtz Crompton

    2011-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a model RFP for new generation. The 'base' RFP is for a single-source offshore wind RFP. Required modifications are noted should a state or utility seek multi-source bids (e.g., all renewables or all sources). The model is premised on proposals meeting threshold requirements (e.g., a MW range of generating capacity and a range in terms of years), RFP issuer preferences (e.g., likelihood of commercial operation by a date certain, price certainty, and reduction in congestion), and evaluation criteria, along with a series of plans (e.g., site, environmental effects, construction, community outreach, interconnection, etc.). The Model RFP places the most weight on project risk (45%), followed by project economics (35%), and environmental and social considerations (20%). However, if a multi-source RFP is put forward, the sponsor would need to either add per-MWh technology-specific, life-cycle climate (CO2), environmental and health impact costs to bid prices under the 'Project Economics' category or it should increase the weight given to the 'Environmental and Social Considerations' category.

  11. U.S. Wind Energy Manufacturing and Supply Chain: A Competitiveness Analysis

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment of Dept. of Energy, Office ofNuclear WeaponstoU.S.0:Wind Energy

  12. Revealing the Hidden Value that the Federal Investment Tax Credit and Treasury Cash Grant Provide To Community Wind Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    it realize the full potential of wind’s temporary ability tobase, community wind has the potential to tap into aof community wind belies its potential significance to the

  13. Wind Turbine Safety and Function Test Report for the Gaia-Wind 11-kW Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huskey, A.; Bowen, A.; Jager, D.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This test was conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Independent Testing project. This project was established to help reduce the barriers to wind energy expansion by providing independent testing results for small wind turbines (SWT). In total, four turbines were tested at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) as a part of this project. Safety and function testing is one of up to five tests performed on the turbines, including power performance, duration, noise, and power-quality tests. The results of the testing provide the manufacturers with reports that can be used for small wind turbine certification. The test equipment includes a Gaia-Wind 11-kW wind turbine mounted on an 18-m monopole tower. Gaia-Wind Ltd. manufactured the turbine in Denmark. The system was installed by the NWTC site operations group with guidance and assistance from Gaia-Wind.

  14. MANUFACTURING Manufacturing and Biomanufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Joseph W.

    process improvements to manufacturing. In addition, the critical national need area of Manufacturing hasMANUFACTURING Manufacturing and Biomanufacturing: Materials Advances and Critical Processes NATIONAL NEED The proposed topics within "Manufacturing and Biomanufacturing: Materials Advances

  15. Wind for Schools Project Curriculum Brief (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) 20% Wind Energy by 2030 report recommends expanding education to ensure a trained workforce to meet the projected growth of the wind industry and deployment. Although a few U.S. higher education institutions offer wind technology education programs, most are found in community and technical colleges, resulting in a shortage of programs preparing highly skilled graduates for wind industry careers. Further, the United States lags behind Europe (which has more graduate programs in wind technology design and manufacturing) and is in danger of relinquishing the economic benefits of domestic production of wind turbines and related components and services to European countries. DOE's Wind Powering America initiative launched the Wind for Schools project to develop a wind energy knowledge base among future leaders of our communities, states, and nation while raising awareness about wind energy's benefits. This fact sheet provides an overview of wind energy curricula as it relates to the Wind for Schools project.

  16. Revealing the Hidden Value that the Federal Investment Tax Credit and Treasury Cash Grant Provide To Community Wind Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark A.

    2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Although the global financial crisis of 2008/2009 has slowed wind power development in general, the crisis has, in several respects, been a blessing in disguise for community wind project development in the United States. For xample, the crisis-induced slowdown in the broader commercial wind market has, for the first time since 2004, created slack in the supply chain, creating an opportunity for shovel-ready community wind projects to finally proceed towards onstruction. Many such projects had been forced to wait on the sidelines as the commercial wind boom of 2005-2008 consumed virtually all available resources needed to complete a wind project (e.g., turbines, cranes, contractors).

  17. Wind Turbine Safety and Function Test Report for the Mariah Windspire Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huskey, A.; Bowen, A.; Jager, D.

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This test was conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Independent Testing project. This project was established to help reduce the barriers to wind energy expansion by providing independent testing results for small wind turbines (SWT). In total, five turbines were tested at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) as a part of this project. Safety and function testing is one of up to five tests performed on the turbines, including power performance, duration, noise, and power-quality tests. NWTC testing results provide manufacturers with reports that may be used to meet part of small wind turbine certification requirements. The test equipment includes a Mariah Windspire wind turbine mounted on a monopole tower. L&E Machine manufactured the turbine in the United States. The inverter was manufactured separately by Technology Driven Products in the United States. The system was installed by the NWTC site operations group with guidance and assistance from Mariah Power.

  18. Manufacturing Battle Creek

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Doncker, Elise

    Computer simulation Facilities design Finite element analysis Green manufacturing Industrial materialsManufacturing Research Center Kalamazoo Battle Creek The College of Engineering and Applied Sciences The Supporting manufacturing industries by providing opportunities for collaboration with faculty

  19. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wind turbine manufacturers: Vestas (nacelles, blades, and towersWind turbine transactions differ in the services offered (e.g. , whether towers

  20. 20% Wind Energy By 2030 Meeting The Challenges Proceedings of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    from the Wind Manufacturing Workshop: Achieving 20% Wind Energy in the U.S. by 2030, May 2009 U.S. Offshore Wind Manufacturing and Supply Chain Development Offshore Wind Projects...

  1. WINDExchange Webinar: Economic Impacts of Offshore Wind: Market...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    WINDExchange Webinar: Economic Impacts of Offshore Wind: Market, Manufacturing, and Jobs WINDExchange Webinar: Economic Impacts of Offshore Wind: Market, Manufacturing, and Jobs...

  2. Wind Integration, Transmission, and Resource Assessment andCharacteri...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    & Publications Wind Integration, Transmission, and Resource Assessment and Characterization Projects Offshore Wind Projects Testing, Manufacturing, and Component Development...

  3. The Political Economy of Wind Power in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swanson, Ryan Landon

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Building a national wind turbine industry: experiences fromthe world‘s largest manufacturer of wind turbines. 1 Inthe world‘s installed wind turbines were erected in China,

  4. RRR Niobium Manufacturing Experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, Ronald A. [ATI Wah Chang, An Allegheny Technologies Company, Albany, Oregon 97321 (United States)

    2007-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    ATI Wah Chang has been manufacturing RRR niobium for more than 30 years using electron beam melting techniques. Fabricated forms include plate, sheet, foil, bar, rod and tubing. This paper provides manufacturing information.

  5. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, Ryan H.; Bolinger, Mark; Barbose, G.; Mills, A.; Rosa, A.; Porter, K.; Fink, S.; Tegen, S.; Musial, W.; Oteri, F.; Heimiller, D.; Rberts, B.; Belyeu, K.; Stimmel, R.

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. wind industry experienced a banner year in 2008, again surpassing even optimistic growth projections from years past. At the same time, the last year has been one of upheaval, with the global financial crisis impacting near-term growth prospects for the wind industry, and with federal policy changes enacted to push the industry towards continued aggressive expansion. This rapid pace of development has made it difficult to keep up with trends in the marketplace. Yet, the need for timely, objective information on the industry and its progress has never been greater. This report - the third of an ongoing annual series - attempts to meet this need by providing a detailed overview of developments and trends in the U.S. wind power market, with a particular focus on 2008. As with previous editions, this report begins with an overview of key wind power installation-related trends: trends in wind capacity growth in the U.S., how that growth compares to other countries and generation sources, the amount and percentage of wind in individual states and serving specific utilities, and the quantity of proposed wind capacity in various interconnection queues in the United States. Next, the report covers an array of wind industry trends, including developments in turbine manufacturer market share, manufacturing and supply-chain investments, wind turbine and wind project size, project financing developments, and trends among wind power developers, project owners, and power purchasers. The report then turns to a discussion of wind project price, cost, and performance trends. In so doing, it reviews the price of wind power in the United States, and how those prices compare to the cost of fossil-fueled generation, as represented by wholesale power prices. It also describes trends in installed wind project costs, wind turbine transaction prices, project performance, and operations and maintenance expenses. Next, the report examines other policy and market factors impacting the domestic wind power market, including federal and state policy drivers, transmission issues, and grid integration. Finally, the report concludes with a preview of possible near- to medium-term market developments. This version of the Annual Report updates data presented in the previous editions, while highlighting key trends and important new developments from 2008. New to this edition is an executive summary of the report and an expanded final section on near- to medium-term market development. The report concentrates on larger-scale wind applications, defined here as individual turbines or projects that exceed 50 kW in size. The U.S. wind power sector is multifaceted, however, and also includes smaller, customer-sited wind turbines used to power the needs of residences, farms, and businesses. Data on these applications are not the focus of this report, though a brief discussion on Distributed Wind Power is provided on page 4. Much of the data included in this report were compiled by Berkeley Lab, and come from a variety of sources, including the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA), the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC). The Appendix provides a summary of the many data sources used in the report. Data on 2008 wind capacity additions in the United States are based on information provided by AWEA; some minor adjustments to those data may be expected. In other cases, the data shown here represent only a sample of actual wind projects installed in the United States; furthermore, the data vary in quality. As such, emphasis should be placed on overall trends, rather than on individual data points. Finally, each section of this document focuses on historical market information, with an emphasis on 2008; with the exception of the final section, the report does not seek to forecast future trends.

  6. Manufacturing Industrial Development for the Alternative Energy Systems-Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Chuck Ryan, National Center for Manufacturing Sciences; Dr. Dawn White, Accio Energy; Mr. Duncan Pratt, General Electric Global Research

    2013-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    NCMS identified and developed critical manufacturing technology assessments vital to the affordable manufacturing of alternative-energy systems. NCMS leveraged technologies from other industrial sectors and worked with our extensive member organizations to provide DOE with two projects with far-reaching impact on the generation of wind energy. In the response for a call for project ideas, 26 project teams submitted ideas. Following a detailed selection criteria, two projects were chosen for development: Advanced Manufacturing for Modular Electro-kinetic (E-K) Wind Energy Conversion Technology - The goal of this project was to demonstrate that a modular wind energy technology based on electrohydrodynamic wind energy principles and employing automotive heritage high volume manufacturing techniques and modular platform design concepts can result in significant cost reductions for wind energy systems at a range of sizes from 100KW to multi-MW. During this program, the Accio/Boeing team made major progress on validating the EHD wind energy technology as commercially viable in the wind energy sector, and moved along the manufacturing readiness axis with a series of design changes that increased net system output. Hybrid Laser Arc Welding for Manufacture of Wind Towers - The goal of this research program was to reduce the cost of manufacturing wind towers through the introduction of hybrid laser arc welding (HLAW) into the supply chain for manufacturing wind towers. HLAW has the potential to enhance productivity while reducing energy consumption to offset the foreign low-cost labor advantage and thereby enhance U.S. competitiveness. HLAW technology combines laser welding and arc welding to produce an energy efficient, high productivity, welding process for heavy manufacturing. This process leverages the ability of a laser to produce deep weld penetration and the ability of gas metal arc welding (GMAW) to deposit filler material, thereby producing stable, high quality, welds on joints with gaps and mismatches typical of those seen in heavy manufacturing. Wind towers utilize varying thicknesses of steel throughout their structures to meet the mechanical load requirements while keeping material costs low. A typical tower might have as many as twelve different material thicknesses. Joining each thickness requires a unique joint design and welding approach to enable the management of quality, productivity, and mechanical properties. In this program, laser joining of materials with thicknesses ranging from 12mm to 35mm were evaluated against the standard quality and mechanical requirements for General Electric wind tower components. The joining processes demonstrated showed the ability to meet key requirements with the appropriate process controls in place.

  7. Duration Test Report for the Ventera VT10 Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, J.; Huskey, A.; Jager, D.; Hur, J.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was established to help reduce the barriers of wind energy expansion by providing independent testing results for small wind turbines. Five turbines were tested at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) as a part of round one of this project. Duration testing is one of up to five tests that may be performed on the turbines, including power performance, safety and function, noise, and power quality. Test results will provide manufacturers with reports that can be used to fulfill part of the requirements for small wind turbine certification. The test equipment included a grid-connected Ventera Energy Corporation VT10 wind turbine mounted on an 18.3-m (60-ft) self-supporting lattice tower manufactured by Rohn.

  8. Sandia National Laboratories: wind manufacturing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systems controller systems Scaled Windwhite LED

  9. Wind Turbine Generator System Duration Test Report for the Gaia-Wind 11 kW Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huskey, A.; Bowen, A.; Jager, D.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This test was conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Independent Testing project. This project was established to help reduce the barriers of wind energy expansion by providing independent testing results for small turbines. In total, five turbines are being tested at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NRELs) National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) as a part of this project. Duration testing is one of up to five tests that may be performed on the turbines, including power performance, safety and function, noise, and power quality tests. The results of the testing will provide the manufacturers with reports that may be used for small wind turbine certification. The test equipment includes a Gaia-Wind 11 kW wind turbine mounted on an 18 m monopole tower. Gaia-Wind Ltd. manufactured the turbine in Denmark, although the company is based in Scotland. The system was installed by the NWTC Site Operations group with guidance and assistance from Gaia-Wind.

  10. Wind Energy Sales Tax Exemption

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wind-energy conversion systems used as electric-power sources are exempt from Minnesota's sales tax. Materials used to manufacture, install, construct, repair or replace wind-energy systems also...

  11. Green Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patten, John

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Green Manufacturing Initiative (GMI): The initiative provides a conduit between the university and industry to facilitate cooperative research programs of mutual interest to support green (sustainable) goals and efforts. In addition to the operational savings that greener practices can bring, emerging market demands and governmental regulations are making the move to sustainable manufacturing a necessity for success. The funding supports collaborative activities among universities such as the University of Michigan, Michigan State University and Purdue University and among 40 companies to enhance economic and workforce development and provide the potential of technology transfer. WMU participants in the GMI activities included 20 faculty, over 25 students and many staff from across the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences; the College of Arts and Sciences' departments of Chemistry, Physics, Biology and Geology; the College of Business; the Environmental Research Institute; and the Environmental Studies Program. Many outside organizations also contribute to the GMI's success, including Southwest Michigan First; The Right Place of Grand Rapids, MI; Michigan Department of Environmental Quality; the Michigan Department of Energy, Labor and Economic Growth; and the Michigan Manufacturers Technical Center.

  12. wind engineering & natural disaster mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denham, Graham

    wind engineering & natural disaster mitigation #12;wind engineering & natural disaster mitigation Investment WindEEE Dome at Advanced Manufacturing Park $31million Insurance Research Lab for Better Homes $8million Advanced Facility for Avian Research $9million #12;wind engineering & natural disaster mitigation

  13. Wind turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abe, M.

    1982-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The improvement in a wind turbine comprises providing a tower with a freely liftable mount and adapting a nacelle which is fitted with a propeller windwheel consisting of a plurality of rotor blades and provided therein with means for conversion of wind energy to be shifted onto said mount attached to the tower. In case of a violent wind storm, the nacelle can be lowered down to the ground to protect the rotor blades from breakage due to the force of the wind. Required maintenance and inspection of the nacelle and replacement of rotor blades can be safely carried out on the ground.

  14. Wind Power Today

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind Power Today is an annual publication that provides an overview of the wind energy research conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program.

  15. Wind Power Today

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind Power Today is an annual publication that provides an overview of the wind energy research conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program.

  16. Landmark Report Analyzes Current State of U.S. Offshore Wind Industry (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New report assesses offshore wind industry, offshore wind resource, technology challenges, economics, permitting procedures, and potential risks and benefits. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently published a new report that analyzes the current state of the offshore wind energy industry, Large-Scale Offshore Wind Power in the United States. It provides a broad understanding of the offshore wind resource, and details the associated technology challenges, economics, permitting procedures, and potential risks and benefits of developing this clean, domestic, renewable resource. The United States possesses large and accessible offshore wind energy resources. The availability of these strong offshore winds close to major U.S. coastal cities significantly reduces power transmission issues. The report estimates that U.S. offshore winds have a gross potential generating capacity four times greater than the nation's present electric capacity. According to the report, developing the offshore wind resource along U.S. coastlines and in the Great Lakes would help the nation: (1) Achieve 20% of its electricity from wind by 2030 - Offshore wind could supply 54 gigawatts of wind capacity to the nation's electrical grid, increasing energy security, reducing air and water pollution, and stimulating the domestic economy. (2) Provide clean power to its coastal demand centers - Wind power emits no carbon dioxide (CO2) and there are plentiful winds off the coasts of 26 states. (3) Revitalize its manufacturing sector - Building 54 GW of offshore wind energy facilities would generate an estimated $200 billion in new economic activity, and create more than 43,000 permanent, well-paid technical jobs in manufacturing, construction, engineering, operations and maintenance. NREL's report concludes that the development of the nation's offshore wind resources can provide many potential benefits, and with effective research, policies, and commitment, offshore wind energy can play a vital role in future U.S. energy markets.

  17. AWEA Wind Project Operations and Maintenance and Safety Seminar

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The AWEA Wind Project O&M and Safety Seminar is designed for owners, operators, turbine manufactures, material suppliers, wind technicians, managers, supervisors, engineers, and occupational...

  18. Mid-Atlantic Regional Wind Energy Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Courtney Lane

    2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    As the Department of Energy stated in its 20% Wind Energy by 2030 report, there will need to be enhanced outreach efforts on a national, state, regional, and local level to communicate wind development opportunities, benefits and challenges to a diverse set of stakeholders. To help address this need, PennFuture was awarded funding to create the Mid-Atlantic Regional Wind Energy Institute to provide general education and outreach on wind energy development across Maryland, Virginia, Delaware, Pennsylvania and West Virginia. Over the course of the two-year grant period, PennFuture used its expertise on wind energy policy and development in Pennsylvania and expanded it to other states in the Mid-Atlantic region. PennFuture accomplished this through reaching out and establishing connections with policy makers, local environmental groups, health and economic development organizations, and educational institutions and wind energy developers throughout the Mid-Atlantic region. PennFuture conducted two regional wind educational forums that brought together wind industry representatives and public interest organizations from across the region to discuss and address wind development in the Mid-Atlantic region. PennFuture developed the agenda and speakers in collaboration with experts on the ground in each state to help determine the critical issue to wind energy in each location. The sessions focused on topics ranging from the basics of wind development; model ordinance and tax issues; anti-wind arguments and counter points; wildlife issues and coalition building. In addition to in-person events, PennFuture held three webinars on (1) Generating Jobs with Wind Energy; (2) Reviving American Manufacturing with Wind Power; and (3) Wind and Transmission. PennFuture also created a web page for the institute (http://www.midatlanticwind.org) that contains an online database of fact sheets, research reports, sample advocacy letters, top anti-wind claims and information on how to address them, wind and wildlife materials and sample model ordinances. Video and presentations from each in-person meeting and webinar recordings are also available on the site. At the end of the two-year period, PennFuture has accomplished its goal of giving a unified voice and presence to wind energy advocates in the Mid-Atlantic region. We educated a broad range of stakeholders on the benefits of wind energy and gave them the tools to help make a difference in their states. We grew a database of over 500 contacts and hope to continue the discussion and work around the importance of wind energy in the region.

  19. Part of the Climate Change Problem . . . and the Solution? Chinese-Made Wind Power Technology and Opportunities for Dissemination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Joanna I.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial  Scale  Wind  Turbines  in  Canada. ”  April Development of China?s Wind Turbine  Manufacturing Industry duties  on  importing wind turbine components.   13   “

  20. PowerJet Wind Turbine Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartlett, Raymond J

    2008-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    PROJECT OBJECTIVE The PowerJet wind turbine overcomes problems characteristic of the small wind turbines that are on the market today by providing reliable output at a wide range of wind speeds, durability, silent operation at all wind speeds, and bird-safe operation. Prime Energy�s objective for this project was to design and integrate a generator with an electrical controller and mechanical controls to maximize the generation of electricity by its wind turbine. The scope of this project was to design, construct and test a mechanical back plate to control rotational speed in high winds, and an electronic controller to maximize power output and to assist the base plate in controlling rotational speed in high winds. The test model will continue to operate beyond the time frame of the project, with the ultimate goal of manufacturing and marketing the PowerJet worldwide. Increased Understanding of Electronic & Mechanical Controls Integrated With Electricity Generator The PowerJet back plate begins to open as wind speed exceeds 13.5 mps. The pressure inside the turbine and the turbine rotational speed are held constant. Once the back plate has fully opened at approximately 29 mps, the controller begins pulsing back to the generator to limit the rotational speed of the turbine. At a wind speed in excess of 29 mps, the controller shorts the generator and brings the turbine to a complete stop. As the wind speed subsides, the controller releases the turbine and it resumes producing electricity. Data collection and instrumentation problems prevented identification of the exact speeds at which these events occur. However, the turbine, controller and generator survived winds in excess of 36 mps, confirming that the two over-speed controls accomplished their purpose. Technical Effectiveness & Economic Feasibility Maximum Electrical Output The output of electricity is maximized by the integration of an electronic controller and mechanical over-speed controls designed and tested during the course of this project. The output exceeds that of the PowerJet�s 3-bladed counterparts (see Appendix). Durability All components of the PowerJet turbine assembly�including the electronic and mechanical controls designed, manufactured and field tested during the course of this project�proved to be durable through severe weather conditions, with constant operation and no interruption in energy production. Low Cost Materials for the turbine, generator, tower, charge controllers and ancillary parts are available at reasonable prices. Fabrication of these parts is also readily available worldwide. The cost of assembling and installing the turbine is reduced because it has fewer parts and requires less labor to manufacture and assemble, making it competitively priced compared with turbines of similar output manufactured in the U.S. and Europe. The electronic controller is the unique part to be included in the turbine package. The controllers can be manufactured in reasonably-sized production runs to keep the cost below $250 each. The data logger and 24 sensors are for research only and will be unnecessary for the commercial product. Benefit To Public The PowerJet wind-electric system is designed for distributed wind generation in 3 and 4 class winds. This wind turbine meets DOE�s requirements for a quiet, durable, bird-safe turbine that eventually can be deployed as a grid-connected generator in urban and suburban settings. Results As described more fully below and illustrated in the Appendices, the goals and objectives outlined in 2060 SOPO were fully met. Electronic and mechanical controls were successfully designed, manufactured and integrated with the generator. The turbine, tower, controllers and generators operated without incident throughout the test period, surviving severe winter and summer weather conditions such as extreme temperatures, ice and sustained high winds. The electronic controls were contained in weather-proof electrical boxes and the elec

  1. Wind Power Outlook 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    anon.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The brochure, expected to be updated annually, provides the American Wind Energy Association's (AWAE's) up-to-date assessment of the wind industry. It provides a summary of the state of wind power in the U.S., including the challenges and opportunities facing the industry. It provides summary information on the growth of the industry, policy-related factors such as the federal wind energy production tax credit status, comparisons with natural gas, and public views on wind energy.

  2. Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Blake Marshall, AMO's lead for Additive Manufacturing Technologies, will provide an overview of current R&D activities in additive manufacturing and its application to fuel cell prototyping and...

  3. Wind for Schools (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, I.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the United States dramatically expands wind energy deployment, the industry is challenged with developing a skilled workforce and addressing public resistance. Wind Powering America's Wind for Schools project addresses these issues by developing Wind Application Centers (WACs) at universities; WAC students assist in implementing school wind turbines and participate in wind courses, by installing small wind turbines at community "host" schools, by implementing teacher training with interactive curricula at each host school. This poster provides an overview of the first two years of the Wind for Schools project, primarily supporting activities in Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, Montana, and Idaho.

  4. Wind Resource Maps (Postcard)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America initiative provides high-resolution wind maps and estimates of the wind resource potential that would be possible from development of the available windy land areas after excluding areas unlikely to be developed. This postcard is a marketing piece that stakeholders can provide to interested parties; it will guide them to Wind Powering America's online wind energy resource maps.

  5. Tutorial of Wind Turbine Control for Supporting Grid Frequency through Active Power Control: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aho, J.; Buckspan, A.; Laks, J.; Fleming, P.; Jeong, Y.; Dunne, F.; Churchfield, M.; Pao, L.; Johnson, K.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As wind energy becomes a larger portion of the world's energy portfolio and wind turbines become larger and more expensive, wind turbine control systems play an ever more prominent role in the design and deployment of wind turbines. The goals of traditional wind turbine control systems are maximizing energy production while protecting the wind turbine components. As more wind generation is installed there is an increasing interest in wind turbines actively controlling their power output in order to meet power setpoints and to participate in frequency regulation for the utility grid. This capability will be beneficial for grid operators, as it seems possible that wind turbines can be more effective at providing some of these services than traditional power plants. Furthermore, establishing an ancillary market for such regulation can be beneficial for wind plant owner/operators and manufacturers that provide such services. In this tutorial paper we provide an overview of basic wind turbine control systems and highlight recent industry trends and research in wind turbine control systems for grid integration and frequency stability.

  6. 10th Annual Small Wind Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This conference is designed for small wind professionals, including installers, manufacturers, dealers, distributors, educators, and advocates. The conference features presentations, exhibits,...

  7. Methods of making wind turbine rotor blades

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Livingston, Jamie T. (Pensacola, FL); Burke, Arthur H. E. (Gulf Breeze, FL); Bakhuis, Jan Willem (Nijverdal, NL); Van Breugel, Sjef (Enschede, NL); Billen, Andrew (Daarlerveen, NL)

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of manufacturing a root portion of a wind turbine blade includes, in an exemplary embodiment, providing an outer layer of reinforcing fibers including at least two woven mats of reinforcing fibers, providing an inner layer of reinforcing fibers including at least two woven mats of reinforcing fibers, and positioning at least two bands of reinforcing fibers between the inner and outer layers, with each band of reinforcing fibers including at least two woven mats of reinforcing fibers. The method further includes positioning a mat of randomly arranged reinforcing fibers between each pair of adjacent bands of reinforcing fibers, introducing a polymeric resin into the root potion of the wind turbine blade, infusing the resin through the outer layer, the inner layer, each band of reinforcing fibers, and each mat of random reinforcing fibers, and curing the resin to form the root portion of the wind turbine blade.

  8. Sandia National Laboratories: Numerical Manufacturing And Design...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NuMAD (Numerical Manufacturing And Design) is an open-source software tool written in Matlab which simplifies the process of creating a three-dimensional model of a wind turbine...

  9. Clean Energy Manufacturing: U.S. Competitiveness and State Policy Strategies (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The capital intensive nature of clean energy technologies suggests that manufacturing clean energy equipment has the potential to support state and local economic development efforts. However, manufacturing siting decisions tend to be complex and multi-variable decision processes that require in-depth knowledge of specific markets, the logistical requirements of a given technology, and insight into global clean tech trends. This presentation highlights the potential of manufacturing in supporting economic development opportunities while also providing examples of the financial considerations affecting manufacturing facility siting decisions for wind turbine blades and solar PV. The presentation also includes discussion of other more qualitative drivers of facility siting decisions as gleaned from NREL industry interviews and discusses strategies state and local policymakers may employee to bolster their chances of successfully attracting clean energy manufacturers to their localities.

  10. Manufacturing technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Manufacturing Technologies Center is an integral part of Sandia National Laboratories, a multiprogram engineering and science laboratory, operated for the Department of Energy (DOE) with major facilities at Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Livermore, California. Our Center is at the core of Sandia`s Advanced Manufacturing effort which spans the entire product realization process.

  11. Wind Wildlife Research Meeting X

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The biennial Wind Wildlife Research Meeting provides an internationally recognized forum for researchers and wind-wildlife stakeholders to hear contributed papers, view research posters, and listen...

  12. Wind Energy Resources and Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides a brief overview of wind energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply wind energy within the Federal sector.

  13. Wind Power Today, 2010, Wind and Water Power Program (WWPP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind Power Today is an annual publication that provides an overview of the wind energy research conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy Wind and Water Power Program.

  14. Surpassing Expectations: State of the U.S. Wind Power Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark A

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wind turbine and component manufacturing facilities opened or announced in 2007 are three owned by major international turbine manufacturers: Vestas (blades

  15. Manufacturing technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaedel, K.L.

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The specific goals of the Manufacturing Technology thrust area are to develop an understanding of fundamental fabrication processes, to construct general purpose process models that will have wide applicability, to document our findings and models in journals, to transfer technology to LLNL programs, industry, and colleagues, and to develop continuing relationships with industrial and academic communities to advance our collective understanding of fabrication processes. Advances in four projects are described here, namely Design of a Precision Saw for Manufacturing, Deposition of Boron Nitride Films via PVD, Manufacturing and Coating by Kinetic Energy Metallization, and Magnet Design and Application.

  16. Wind Economic Development (Postcard)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America initiative provides information on the economic development benefits of wind energy. This postcard is a marketing piece that stakeholders can provide to interested parties; it will guide them to the economic development benefits section on the Wind Powering America website.

  17. Wind energy information guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book is divided into nine chapters. Chapters 1--8 provide background and annotated references on wind energy research, development, and commercialization. Chapter 9 lists additional sources of printed information and relevant organizations. Four indices provide alphabetical access to authors, organizations, computer models and design tools, and subjects. A list of abbreviations and acronyms is also included. Chapter topics include: introduction; economics of using wind energy; wind energy resources; wind turbine design, development, and testing; applications; environmental issues of wind power; institutional issues; and wind energy systems development.

  18. Safety and Function Test Report for the SWIFT Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendoza, I.; Hur, J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This test was conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Independent Testing project. This project was established to help reduce the barriers of wind energy expansion by providing independent testing results for small turbines. Three turbines where selected for testing at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) as a part of round two of the Small Wind Turbine Independent Testing project. Safety and Function testing is one of up to 5 tests that may be performed on the turbines. Other tests include power performance, duration, noise, and power quality. The results of the testing will provide the manufacturers with reports that may be used for small wind turbine certification.

  19. Duration Test Report for the SWIFT Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendoza, I.; Hur, J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This test was conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Independent Testing project. This project was established to help reduce the barriers of wind energy expansion by providing independent testing results for small turbines. Three turbines where selected for testing at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) as a part of round two of the Small Wind Turbine Independent Testing project. Duration testing is one of up to 5 tests that may be performed on the turbines. Other tests include power performance, safety and function, noise, and power quality. The results of the testing will provide the manufacturers with reports that may be used for small wind turbine certification.

  20. Wind Technologies and Evolving Opportunities (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robi Robichaud

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation provides an overview of wind energy research being conducted at the National Wind Technology Center, market and technology trends in wind energy, and opportunities for wind technology.

  1. Additive Manufacturing: Implications on Research and Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    Additive Manufacturing: Implications on Research and Manufacturing With recent developments, etc.), additive manufacturing (AM) has the potential to become a transformative technology in innovation-based manufacturing. Agencies such as the Department of Defense, the National Science Foundation

  2. Part of the Climate Change Problem . . . and the Solution? Chinese-Made Wind Power Technology and Opportunities for Dissemination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Joanna I.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the building of wind farms  with  turbines  manufactured tender  for  a  100  MW  wind  farm  located  in  Huilai, wind  turbines  in  its  wind  farm  projects.   Policy 

  3. Vertical axis wind turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kato, Y.; Seki, K.; Shimizu, Y.

    1981-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind turbines are largely divided into vertical axis wind turbines and propeller (Horizontal axis) wind turbines. The present invention discloses a vertical axis high speed wind turbine provided with a starting and braking control system. This vertical axis wind turbine is formed by having blades of a proper airfoil fitted to respective supporting arms provided radially from a vertical rotary axis by keeping the blade span-wise direction in parallel with the axis and being provided with a low speed control windmill in which the radial position of each operating piece varies with a centrifugal force produced by the rotation of the vertical rotary axis.

  4. Vertical axis wind turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kato, Y.; Seki, K.; Shimizu, Y.

    1981-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind turbines are largely divided into vertical axis wind turbines and propeller (Horizontal axis) wind turbines. The present invention discloses a vertical axis high speed wind turbine provided with rotational speed control systems. This vertical axis wind turbine is formed by having blades of a proper airfoil fitted to respective supporting arms provided radially from a vertical rotating shaft by keeping the blade span-wise direction in parallel with the shaft and being provided with aerodynamic control elements operating manually or automatically to control the rotational speed of the turbine.

  5. National Skills Assessment of the U.S. Wind Industry in 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levanthal, M.; Tegen, S.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A robust workforce is essential to developing domestic wind power projects, including manufacturing, siting, operations, maintenance, and research capabilities. The purpose of our research is to better understand today's domestic wind workforce, projected workforce needs as the industry grows, and how existing and new programs can meet the wind industry's future education and training needs. Results presented in this report provide the first published investigation into the detailed makeup of the wind energy workforce, educational infrastructure and training needs of the wind industry. Insights from this research into the domestic wind workforce will allow the private sector, educational institutions, and federal and state governmental organizations to make workforce-related decisions based on the current employment and training data and future projections in this report.

  6. Manufacturing consumption of energy 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides estimates on energy consumption in the manufacturing sector of the U.S. economy based on data from the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey. The sample used in this report represented about 250,000 of the largest manufacturing establishments which account for approximately 98 percent of U.S. economic output from manufacturing, and an expected similar proportion of manufacturing energy use. The amount of energy use was collected for all operations of each establishment surveyed. Highlights of the report include profiles for the four major energy-consuming industries (petroleum refining, chemical, paper, and primary metal industries), and an analysis of the effects of changes in the natural gas and electricity markets on the manufacturing sector. Seven appendices are included to provide detailed background information. 10 figs., 51 tabs.

  7. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints (2006 MECS)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy and Carbon Footprints provide a mapping of energy from supply to end use in manufacturing. They show us where energy is used and lost—and where greenhouse gases (GHGs) are emitted. Footprints are available below for 15 manufacturing sectors (representing 94% of all manufacturing energy use) and for U.S. manufacturing as a whole. Analysis of these footprints is also available in the U.S. Manufacturing Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Analysis report.

  8. Wind power outlook 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    anon.

    2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual brochure provides the American Wind Energy Association's up-to-date assessment of the wind industry in the United States. This 2006 general assessment shows positive signs of growth, use and acceptance of wind energy as a vital component of the U.S. energy mix.

  9. Manufacturing consumption of energy 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides estimates on energy consumption in the manufacturing sector of the US economy. These estimates are based on data from the 1991 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS). This survey--administered by the Energy End Use and Integrated Statistics Division, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Energy Information Administration (EIA)--is the most comprehensive source of national-level data on energy-related information for the manufacturing industries.

  10. Fuel Cell Manufacturing: American Energy and Manufacturing Competitive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Cell Manufacturing: American Energy and Manufacturing Competitiveness Summit Fuel Cell Manufacturing: American Energy and Manufacturing Competitiveness Summit Presentation on...

  11. Dynamic Models for Wind Turbines and Wind Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, M.; Santoso, S.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this report was to develop universal manufacturer-independent wind turbine and wind power plant models that can be shared, used, and improved without any restrictions by project developers, manufacturers, and engineers. Manufacturer-specific models of wind turbines are favored for use in wind power interconnection studies. While they are detailed and accurate, their usages are limited to the terms of the non-disclosure agreement, thus stifling model sharing. The primary objective of the work proposed is to develop universal manufacturer-independent wind power plant models that can be shared, used, and improved without any restrictions by project developers, manufacturers, and engineers. Each of these models includes representations of general turbine aerodynamics, the mechanical drive-train, and the electrical characteristics of the generator and converter, as well as the control systems typically used. To determine how realistic model performance is, the performance of one of the models (doubly-fed induction generator model) has been validated using real-world wind power plant data. This work also documents selected applications of these models.

  12. Wind turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cheney, Jr., Marvin C. (Glastonbury, CT)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A wind turbine of the type having an airfoil blade (15) mounted on a flexible beam (20) and a pitch governor (55) which selectively, torsionally twists the flexible beam in response to wind turbine speed thereby setting blade pitch, is provided with a limiter (85) which restricts unwanted pitch change at operating speeds due to torsional creep of the flexible beam. The limiter allows twisting of the beam by the governor under excessive wind velocity conditions to orient the blades in stall pitch positions, thereby preventing overspeed operation of the turbine. In the preferred embodiment, the pitch governor comprises a pendulum (65,70) which responds to changing rotor speed by pivotal movement, the limiter comprising a resilient member (90) which engages an end of the pendulum to restrict further movement thereof, and in turn restrict beam creep and unwanted blade pitch misadjustment.

  13. Analysis of Transportation and Logistics Challenges Affecting the Deployment of Larger Wind Turbines: Summary of Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cotrell, J.; Stehly, T.; Johnson, J.; Roberts, J. O.; Parker, Z.; Scott, G.; Heimiller, D.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is relatively little literature that characterizes transportation and logistics challenges and the associated effects on U.S. wind markets. The objectives of this study were to identify the transportation and logistics challenges, assess the associated impacts, and provide recommendations for strategies and specific actions to address the challenges. The authors primarily relied on interviews with wind industry project developers, original equipment manufacturers, and transportation and logistics companies to obtain the information and industry perspectives needed for this study. They also reviewed published literature on trends and developments in increasing wind turbine size, logistics, and transportation issues.

  14. Wind Powering America Webinar Series (Postcard), Wind Powering America (WPA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind Powering America offers a free monthly webinar series that provides expert information on today?s key wind energy topics. This postcard is an outreach tool that provides a brief description of the webinars as well as the URL.

  15. Wind derivatives: hedging wind risk:.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoyer, S.A.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Wind derivatives are financial contracts that can be used to hedge or mitigate wind risk. In this thesis, the focus was on pricing these wind… (more)

  16. Managing Wind Power Forecast Uncertainty in Electric Grids.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauch, Brandon Keith

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Electricity generated from wind power is both variable and uncertain. Wind forecasts provide valuable information for wind farm management, but they are not perfect. Chapter… (more)

  17. Strengthening America's Energy Security with Offshore Wind (Fact Sheet) (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet provides a brief description of offshore wind energy development in the U.S. and DOE's Wind Program offshore wind R&D activities.

  18. Wind Power: How Much, How Soon, and At What Cost?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2007. "Utility Wind Integration and Operating Impact Statethat the integration of 20% wind into US electricity marketsand integration costs, Figure 8 provides a supply curve for wind

  19. Surpassing Expectations: State of the U.S. Wind Power Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark A

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    States, new large-scale wind turbines were installed in 18The average size of wind turbines installed in the Uniteddominant manufacturer of wind turbines supplying the U.S.

  20. Comparison of Wind-Turbine Aeroelastic Codes Used for Certification: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buhl, M. L., Jr.; Manjock, A.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL created aeroelastic simulators for horizontal-axis wind turbines accepted by Germanischer Lloyd (GL) WindEnergie GmbH for manufacturers to use for on-shore wind turbine certification.

  1. Wind Electrolysis: Hydrogen Cost Optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saur, G.; Ramsden, T.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a hydrogen production cost analysis of a collection of optimized central wind based water electrolysis production facilities. The basic modeled wind electrolysis facility includes a number of low temperature electrolyzers and a co-located wind farm encompassing a number of 3MW wind turbines that provide electricity for the electrolyzer units.

  2. Astraeus Wind Modifies Manufacturing in Michigan | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    14, 2010 - 3:35pm Addthis Lindsay Gsell When the assembly line was introduced to the automobile industry, everything changed. Cars were produced in less time with fewer errors, and...

  3. Wind Energy & Manufacturing | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop,SaveWhiskey Flats Geothermal Area JumpTurboPower

  4. Community Wind: Once Again Pushing the Envelope of Project Finance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    bolinger, Mark A.

    2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In the United States, the 'community wind' sector - loosely defined here as consisting of relatively small utility-scale wind power projects that sell power on the wholesale market and that are developed and owned primarily by local investors - has historically served as a 'test bed' or 'proving grounds' for up-and-coming wind turbine manufacturers that are trying to break into the U.S. wind power market. For example, community wind projects - and primarily those located in the state of Minnesota - have deployed the first U.S. installations of wind turbines from Suzlon (in 2003), DeWind (2008), Americas Wind Energy (2008) and later Emergya Wind Technologies (2010), Goldwind (2009), AAER/Pioneer (2009), Nordic Windpower (2010), Unison (2010), and Alstom (2011). Thus far, one of these turbine manufacturers - Suzlon - has subsequently achieved some success in the broader U.S. wind market as well. Just as it has provided a proving grounds for new turbines, so too has the community wind sector served as a laboratory for experimentation with innovative new financing structures. For example, a variation of one of the most common financing arrangements in the U.S. wind market today - the special allocation partnership flip structure (see Figure 1 in Section 2.1) - was first developed by community wind projects in Minnesota more than a decade ago (and is therefore sometimes referred to as the 'Minnesota flip' model) before being adopted by the broader wind market. More recently, a handful of community wind projects built over the past year have been financed via new and creative structures that push the envelope of wind project finance in the U.S. - in many cases, moving beyond the now-standard partnership flip structures involving strategic tax equity investors. These include: (1) a 4.5 MW project in Maine that combines low-cost government debt with local tax equity, (2) a 25.3 MW project in Minnesota using a sale/leaseback structure, (3) a 10.5 MW project in South Dakota financed by an intrastate offering of both debt and equity, (4) a 6 MW project in Washington state that taps into New Markets Tax Credits using an 'inverted' or 'pass-through' lease structure, and (5) a 9 MW project in Oregon that combines a variety of state and federal incentives and loans with unconventional equity from high-net-worth individuals. In most cases, these are first-of-their-kind structures that could serve as useful examples for other projects - both community and commercial wind alike. This report describes each of these innovative new financing structures in some detail, using a case-study approach. The purpose is twofold: (1) to disseminate useful information on these new financial structures, most of which are widely replicable; and (2) to highlight the recent policy changes - many of them temporary unless extended - that have facilitated this innovation. Although the community wind market is currently only a small sub-sector of the U.S. wind market - as defined here, less than 2% of the overall market at the end of 2009 (Wiser and Bolinger 2010) - its small size belies its relevance to the broader market. As such, the information provided in this report has relevance beyond its direct application to the community wind sector. The next two sections of this report briefly summarize how most community wind projects in the U.S. have been financed historically (i.e., prior to this latest wave of innovation) and describe the recent federal policy changes that have enabled a new wave of financial innovation to occur, respectively. Section 4 contains brief case studies of how each of the five projects mentioned above were financed, noting the financial significance of each. Finally, Section 5 concludes by distilling a number of general observations or pertinent lessons learned from the experiences of these five projects.

  5. Bassett Mechanical Explores Mid-size Wind Market | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    48C tax credit and as a result plans to further expand into wind tower manufacturing and carbon capture and storage markets. Bassett concentrates in three primary...

  6. New Wind Test Facilities Open in Colorado and South Carolina...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Clemson facility in North Charleston is ideal for testing the larger multi-megawatt wind turbines that both the United States and international manufacturers are developing for...

  7. Innovative company brings wind jobs to South Dakota | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to producing wind turbine blades. | Photo courtesy of Energetx Composites. Energetx Composites: Retooling Manufacturing, Creating Michigan Jobs Idahoans Saving Green by Going Green...

  8. Development of Eastern Regional Wind Resource and Wind Plant Output Datasets: March 3, 2008 -- March 31, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brower, M.

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to provide wind resource inputs to the Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study.

  9. Wind energy applications guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    anon.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The brochure is an introduction to various wind power applications for locations with underdeveloped transmission systems, from remote water pumping to village electrification. It includes an introductory section on wind energy, including wind power basics and system components and then provides examples of applications, including water pumping, stand-alone systems for home and business, systems for community centers, schools, and health clinics, and examples in the industrial area. There is also a page of contacts, plus two specific example applications for a wind-diesel system for a remote station in Antarctica and one on wind-diesel village electrification in Russia.

  10. Wind Energy Development as an Economic Development Strategy for Rural Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nancy Bowen-ellzey

    Why does wind development make sense for rural areas? In many rural areas, utility scale wind energy developments can be a great way to expand and grow the economy through direct investment and job creation, in addition to significant potential spinoff development activities. Because of renewable state standards and incentives, including the Federal Production Tax Credit (PTC) and the Ohio SB 232 (which levels the playing field for wind projects by setting a property tax ceiling), more wind companies view Ohio as a new and exciting market for investment. Siting requirements for wind are also prevalent in Ohio, including good transmission lines and available land and wind resources. Ohio also has a skilled workforce that can construct and provide maintenance on wind systems as well as manufacture component parts for the industry. Utility Wind Basics Utility scale wind developments are large “wind farms ” that generate 5 megawatts per hour or greater. They are governed by the Ohio Power Siting Board (OPSB) under provisions found in House Bill 562, 2008

  11. Proceedings from the Wind Manufacturing Workshop: Achieving 20% Wind Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Careerlumens_placard-green.epsEnergy1.pdfMarket |21,-Committee Meeting425ofAugust 19, 2014Effects

  12. Sustainable Energy Solutions Task 3.0:Life-Cycle Database for Wind Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janet M Twomey, PhD

    2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The benefits of wind energy had previously been captured in the literature at an overview level with relatively low transparency or ability to understand the basis for that information. This has limited improvement and decision-making to larger questions such as wind versus other electrical sources (such as coal-fired plants). This research project has established a substantially different approach which is to add modular, high granularity life cycle inventory (lci) information that can be used by a wide range of decision-makers, seeking environmental improvement. Results from this project have expanded the understanding and evaluation of the underlying factors that can improve both manufacturing processes and specifically wind generators. The use of life cycle inventory techniques has provided a uniform framework to understand and compare the full range of environmental improvement in manufacturing, hence the concept of green manufacturing. In this project, the focus is on 1. the manufacturing steps that transform materials and chemicals into functioning products 2. the supply chain and end-of-life influences of materials and chemicals used in industry Results have been applied to wind generators, but also impact the larger U.S. product manufacturing base. For chemicals and materials, this project has provided a standard format for each lci that contains an overview and description, a process flow diagram, detailed mass balances, detailed energy of unit processes, and an executive summary. This is suitable for integration into other life cycle databases (such as that at NREL), so that broad use can be achieved. The use of representative processes allows unrestricted use of project results. With the framework refined in this project, information gathering was initiated for chemicals and materials in wind generation. Since manufacturing is one of the most significant parts of the environmental domain for wind generation improvement, this project research has developed a fundamental approach. The emphasis was place on individual unit processes as an organizing framework to understand the life cycle of manufactured products. The rearrangement of unit processes provides an efficient and versatile means of understanding improved manufactured products such as wind generators. The taxonomy and structure of unit process lci were developed in this project. A series of ten unit process lci were developed to sample the major segments of the manufacturing unit process taxonomy. Technical and economic effectiveness has been a focus of the project research in Task three. The use of repeatable modules for the organization of information on environmental improvement has a long term impact. The information developed can be used and reused in a variety of manufacturing plants and for a range of wind generator sizes and designs. Such a modular approach will lower the cost of life cycle analysis, that is often asked questions of carbon footprint, environmental impact, and sustainability. The use of a website for dissemination, linked to NREL, adds to the economic benefit as more users have access to the lci information. Benefit to the public has been achieved by a well-attended WSU conference, as well as presentations for the Kansas Wind Energy Commission. Attendees represented public interests, land owners, wind farm developers, those interested in green jobs, and industry. Another benefit to the public is the start of information flow from manufacturers that can inform individuals about products.

  13. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Characterization of Manufacturing Defects Common to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Common to Composite Wind Turbine Blades: Flaw Characterization Trey W. Riddle1 , Douglas S. Cairns2 of wind turbine blade manufactures, repair companies, wind farm operators and third party investigators has directed the focus of this investigation on types of flaws commonly found in wind turbine blades

  14. Wind energy systems information user study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belew, W.W.; Wood, B.L.; Marle, T.L.; Reinhardt, C.L.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the results of a series of telephone interviews with potential users of information on wind energy conversion. These interviews, part of a larger study covering nine different solar technologies, attempted to identify: the type of information each distinctive group of information users needed, and the best way of getting information to that group. Groups studied include: wind energy conversion system researchers; wind energy conversion system manufacturer representatives; wind energy conversion system distributors; wind turbine engineers; utility representatives; educators; county agents and extension service agents; and wind turbine owners.

  15. Wind energy conversion system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Longrigg, Paul (Golden, CO)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The wind energy conversion system includes a wind machine having a propeller connected to a generator of electric power, the propeller rotating the generator in response to force of an incident wind. The generator converts the power of the wind to electric power for use by an electric load. Circuitry for varying the duty factor of the generator output power is connected between the generator and the load to thereby alter a loading of the generator and the propeller by the electric load. Wind speed is sensed electro-optically to provide data of wind speed upwind of the propeller, to thereby permit tip speed ratio circuitry to operate the power control circuitry and thereby optimize the tip speed ratio by varying the loading of the propeller. Accordingly, the efficiency of the wind energy conversion system is maximized.

  16. An overview of DOE`s wind turbine development programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laxson, A; Dodge, D; Flowers, L [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Loose, R; Goldman, P [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of technologically advanced, higher efficiency wind turbines continues to be a high priority activity of the US wind industry. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting and sponsoring a range of programs aimed at assisting the wind industry with system design, development, and testing. The overall goal is to develop systems that can compete with conventional electric generation for $.05/kWh at 5.8 m/s (13 mph sites) by the mid-1990s and with fossil-fuel-based generators for $.04/kWh at 5.8 m/s sites by the year 2000. These goals will be achieved through several programs. The Value Engineered Turbine Program will promote the rapid development of US capability to manufacture wind turbines with known and well documented records of performance, cost, and reliability, to take advantage of near-term market opportunities. The Advanced Wind Turbine Program will assist US industry to develop and integrate innovative technologies into utility-grade wind turbines for the near-term (mid 1990s) and to develop a new generation of turbines for the year 2000. The collaborative Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)/DOE Utility Wind Turbine Performance Verification Program will deploy and evaluate commercial-prototype wind turbines in typical utility operating environments, to provide a bridge between development programs currently underway and commercial purchases of utility-grade wind turbines. A number of collaborative efforts also will help develop a range of small systems optimized to work in a diesel hybrid environment to provide electricity for smaller non-grid-connected applications.

  17. DOE Offers Conditional Commitment to Cape Wind Offshore Wind...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Secretary Ernest Moniz. The proposed Cape Wind project would use 3.6-MW offshore wind turbines that would provide a majority of the electricity needed for Cape Cod, Nantucket,...

  18. Wind for Schools: A Wind Powering America Project (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, I.

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This brochure provides an overview of Wind Powering America's Wind for Schools Project, including a description of the project, the participants, funding sources, the basic configurations, and how interested parties can become involved.

  19. Wind for Schools: A Wind Powering America Project (Alaska) (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This brochure provides an overview of Wind Powering America's Wind for Schools Project, including a description of the project, the participants, funding sources, the basic configurations, and how interested parties can become involved.

  20. Wind Energy Information Guide 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    anon.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The guide provides a list of contact information and Web site addresses for resources that provide a range of general and technical information about wind energy, including general information, wind and renewable energy, university programs and research institutes, international wind energy associations and others.

  1. Field Testing: Independent, Accredited Testing and Validation for the Wind Industry (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes the field testing capabilities at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). NREL's specialized facilities and personnel at the NWTC provide the U.S. wind industry with scientific and engineering support that has proven critical to the development of wind energy for U.S. energy needs. The NWTC's specialized field-testing capabilities have evolved over 30 years of continuous support by the U.S. Department of Energy Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program and long standing industry partnerships. The NWTC provides wind industry manufacturers, developers, and operators with turbine and component testing all in one convenient location. Although industry utilizes sophisticated modeling tools to design and optimize turbine configurations, there are always limitations in modeling capabilities, and testing is a necessity to ensure performance and reliability. Designs require validation and testing is the only way to determine if there are flaws. Prototype testing is especially important in capturing manufacturing flaws that might require fleet-wide retrofits. The NWTC works with its industry partners to verify the performance and reliability of wind turbines that range in size from 400 Watts to 3 megawatts. Engineers conduct tests on components and full-scale turbines in laboratory environments and in the field. Test data produced from these tests can be used to validate turbine design codes and simulations that further advance turbine designs.

  2. 20% Wind Energy by 2030

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This analysis explores one clearly defined scenario for providing 20% of our nations electricity demand with wind energy by 2030 and contrasts it to a scenario of no new wind power capacity.

  3. Commercial Scale Wind Incentive Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Trust of Oregon’s Commercial Scale Wind offering provides resources and cash incentives to help communities, businesses land owners, and government entities install wind turbine systems up...

  4. WIND ENERGY Wind Energ. (2014)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peinke, Joachim

    WIND ENERGY Wind Energ. (2014) Published online in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary Correspondence M. Wächter, ForWind-Center for Wind Energy Research, Institute of Physics, Carl Von Ossietzky on the operation of wind energy converters (WECs) imposing different risks especially in terms of highly dynamic

  5. Energy & Manufacturing Workforce Training Topics List - Version...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    View this searchable list of the training programs in the areas of energy andor manufacturing. Information provided in this list includes: the subjects being taught, grantee,...

  6. Providence Heights Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExploration JumpSanyalTempWellhead JumpCapabilities" Showing881582°,Heights

  7. Advanced Manufacturing | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Better Buildings, Better Plants Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Combined Heat and Power Innovative Manufacturing Initiative National Network for Manufacturing Innovation...

  8. Wind: wind power density maps at 50 m above ground and 1km resolution...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    PDF maps of Eastern China wind mapping. (Purpose): To provide information on the wind resource potential in eastern China. Includes maps of full mapping region, and 15...

  9. Small Wind Information (Postcard)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America initiative maintains a website section devoted to information about small wind turbines for homeowners, ranchers, and small businesses. This postcard is a marketing piece that stakeholders can provide to interested parties; it will guide them to this online resource.

  10. The Wind Integration National Dataset (WIND) toolkit (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caroline Draxl: NREL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Regional wind integration studies require detailed wind power output data at many locations to perform simulations of how the power system will operate under high penetration scenarios. The wind datasets that serve as inputs into the study must realistically reflect the ramping characteristics, spatial and temporal correlations, and capacity factors of the simulated wind plants, as well as being time synchronized with available load profiles.As described in this presentation, the WIND Toolkit fulfills these requirements by providing a state-of-the-art national (US) wind resource, power production and forecast dataset.

  11. Wind Powering America Podcasts, Wind Powering America (WPA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind Powering America and the National Association of Farm Broadcasters produce a series of radio interviews featuring experts discussing wind energy topics. The interviews are aimed at a rural stakeholder audience and are available as podcasts. On the Wind Powering America website, you can access past interviews on topics such as: Keys to Local Wind Energy Development Success, What to Know about Installing a Wind Energy System on Your Farm, and Wind Energy Development Can Revitalize Rural America. This postcard is a marketing piece that stakeholders can provide to interested parties; it will guide them to this online resource for podcast episodes.

  12. Metrics for Sustainable Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reich-Weiser, Corinne; Vijayaraghavan, Athulan; Dornfeld, David

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a system or process in maintaining a sustainable level of afor manufacturing processes to achieve truly sustainablesustainable phase of the automobile manufacturing process

  13. AWEA Small Wind Turbine Global Market Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leu, Tzong-Shyng "Jeremy"

    Displaced Carbon Dioxide 17 Building-Mounted Turbines 17 Manufacturing 18 The Global Market 21 Solar Summary Table 1 #12;4 | AMERICAn WInD EnERGy ASSOCIATIOn Based on a 2010 AWEA survey of manufacturers and standardized interconnection regulations, and the appropriation and allocation of federal research

  14. MANUFACTURING COMPLEXITY EVALUATION AT THE DESIGN STAGE FOR BOTH MACHINING AND LAYERED MANUFACTURING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and an additive process. Manufacturability indexes are calculated at the tool design stage, these indexes provide an accurate view of which areas of the tool will advantageously be machined or manufactured by an additiveMANUFACTURING COMPLEXITY EVALUATION AT THE DESIGN STAGE FOR BOTH MACHINING AND LAYERED

  15. Wind Resource Assessment of Gujarat (India)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Draxl, C.; Purkayastha, A.; Parker, Z.

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    India is one of the largest wind energy markets in the world. In 1986 Gujarat was the first Indian state to install a wind power project. In February 2013, the installed wind capacity in Gujarat was 3,093 MW. Due to the uncertainty around existing wind energy assessments in India, this analysis uses the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to simulate the wind at current hub heights for one year to provide more precise estimates of wind resources in Gujarat. The WRF model allows for accurate simulations of winds near the surface and at heights important for wind energy purposes. While previous resource assessments published wind power density, we focus on average wind speeds, which can be converted to wind power densities by the user with methods of their choice. The wind resource estimates in this study show regions with average annual wind speeds of more than 8 m/s.

  16. Wind Power Today: Building a New Energy Future, Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program 2009 (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind Power Today is an annual publication that provides an overview of the wind energy research conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program.

  17. Manufacture of thermoelectric generator structures by fiber drawing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McIntyre, Timothy J; Simpson, John T; West, David L

    2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of manufacturing a thermoelectric generator via fiber drawing and corresponding or associated thermoelectric generator devices are provided.

  18. WIND ENERGY Wind Energ. (2014)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the near wake. In conclusion, WiTTS performs satisfactorily in the rotor region of wind turbine wakes under neutral stability. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. KEYWORDS wind turbine wake; wake model; self in wind farms along several rows and columns. Because wind turbines generate wakes that propagate downwind

  19. Wind Turbine Blockset General Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wind Turbine Blockset in Saber General Overview and Description of the Models Florin Iov, Adrian Turbine Blockset in Saber Abstract. This report presents a new developed Saber Toolbox for wind turbine, optimize and design wind turbines". The report provides a quick overview of the Saber and then explains

  20. Model Wind Ordinance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ''Note: This model ordinance was designed to provide guidance to local governments that wish to develop their own siting rules for wind turbines. While it was developed as part of a cooperative...

  1. County Wind Ordinance Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    [http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/pub/09-10/bill/asm/ab_0001-0050/ab_45_bill_200... Assembly Bill 45] of 2009 authorized counties to adopt ordinances to provide for the installation of small wind systems ...

  2. Utility Wind Integration Group Distributed Wind/Solar Interconnection Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This two-day workshop will answer your questions about interconnecting wind and solar plants and other distributed generation applications to electric distribution systems while providing insight...

  3. New England Wind Forum: A Wind Powering America Project, Newsletter #5 -- January 2010, Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program (WHTP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grace, R. C.; Gifford, J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind Powering America program launched the New England Wind Forum (NEWF) in 2005 to provide a single comprehensive source of up-to-date, Web-based information on a broad array of wind energy issues pertaining to New England. The NEWF newsletter provides New England stakeholders with updates on wind energy development in the region. In addition to regional updates, Issue #5 offers an interview with Angus King, former governor of Maine and co-founder of Independence Wind.

  4. Power and Frequency Control as it Relates to Wind-Powered Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lacommare, Kristina S H

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of large amounts of wind power production might requirewill be satisfactory as wind power provides an increasing64   7.2   Wind Power in Relation to System

  5. Henan Mingdu Wind Power Co Ltd aka He Nan Ming Du Feng Dian Limited...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Company) Place: Jiaozuo, Henan Province, China Sector: Wind energy Product: Wind turbine blades provider. References: Henan Mingdu Wind Power Co Ltd (aka He Nan Ming Du Feng...

  6. Wind Farm

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The wind farm in Greensburg, Kansas, was completed in spring 2010, and consists of ten 1.25 megawatt (MW) wind turbines that supply enough electricity to power every house, business, and municipal...

  7. Wasted Wind

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    why turbulent airflows are causing power losses and turbine failures in America's wind farms-and what to do about it April 1, 2014 Wasted Wind This aerial photo of Denmark's Horns...

  8. Wind Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers wind energy at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting, held on November 18-19, 2009.

  9. New England Wind Forum: A Wind Powering America Project - Newsletter #6 - September 2010, (NEWF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grace, R.; Gifford, J.; Leeds, T.; Bauer, S.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind Powering America program launched the New England Wind Forum (NEWF) in 2005 to provide a single comprehensive source of up-to-date, Web-based information on a broad array of wind energy issues pertaining to New England. The NEWF newsletter provides New England stakeholders with updates on wind energy development in the region.

  10. Wind motor applications for transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lysenko, G.P.; Grigoriev, B.V.; Karpin, K.B. [Moscow Aviation Inst. (Russian Federation)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Motion equation for a vehicle equipped with a wind motor allows, taking into account the drag coefficients, to determine the optimal wind drag velocity in the wind motor`s plane, and hence, obtain all the necessary data for the wind wheel blades geometrical parameters definition. This optimal drag velocity significantly differs from the flow drag velocity which determines the maximum wind motor power. Solution of the motion equation with low drag coefficients indicates that the vehicle speed against the wind may be twice as the wind speed. One of possible transportation wind motor applications is its use on various ships. A ship with such a wind motor may be substantially easier to steer, and if certain devices are available, may proceed in autonomous control mode. Besides, it is capable of moving within narrow fairways. The cruise speed of a sailing boat and wind-motored ship were compared provided that the wind velocity direction changes along a harmonic law with regard to the motion direction. Mean dimensionless speed of the wind-motored ship appears to be by 20--25% higher than that of a sailing boat. There was analyzed a possibility of using the wind motors on planet rovers in Mars or Venus atmospheric conditions. A Mars rover power and motor system has been assessed for the power level of 3 kW.

  11. Western Wind and Solar Integration Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GE Energy

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a full description of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS) and its findings.

  12. Workforce Development and Wind for Schools (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newcomb, C.; Baring-Gould, I.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the United States dramatically expands wind energy deployment, the industry is faced with the need to quickly develop a skilled workforce and to address public acceptance. Wind Powering America's Wind for Schools project addresses these challenges. This poster, produced for the American Wind Energy Association's annual WINDPOWER conference, provides an overview of the project, including objectives, methods, and results.

  13. Paul S. Veers Wind Energy Technology Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    Paul S. Veers Wind Energy Technology Department Sandia National Laboratories Thursday, April 8th 3 Y WIND ENERGY SEMINAR SERIES Wind energy is a growing electricity source around the world, providing. The rapid expansion of wind is largely due to its relative similarity in levelized cost of energy to fossil

  14. Wind Powering America's Wind for Schools Project: Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, I.; Newcomb, C.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy, Wind Powering America, Wind for Schools project. It outlines teacher-training activities and curriculum development; discusses the affiliate program that allows school districts and states to replicate the program; and contains reports that provide an update on activities and progress in the 11 states in which the Wind for Schools project operates.

  15. Land-Based Wind Turbine Transportation and Logistics Barriers and Their Effects on U.S. Wind Markets (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cotrell, J.; Stehly, T.; Johnson, J.; Roberts, J.O.; Parker, Z.; Scott, G.; Heimiller, D.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The average size of land based wind turbines installed in the United States has increased dramatically over time. As a result wind turbines are facing new transportation and logistics barriers that limit the size of utility scale land based wind turbines that can be deployed in the United States. Addressing these transportation and logistics barriers will allow for even further increases in U.S. turbine size using technologies under development for offshore markets. These barriers are important because larger taller turbines have been identified as a path to reducing the levelized cost of energy for electricity. Additionally, increases in turbine size enable the development of new low and moderate speed markets in the U.S. In turn, wind industry stakeholder support, market stability, and ultimately domestic content and manufacturing competitiveness are potentially affected. In general there is very little recent literature that characterizes transportation and logistics barriers and their effects on U.S. wind markets and opportunities. Accordingly, the objective of this paper is to report the results of a recent NREL study that identifies the barriers, assesses their impact and provides recommendations for strategies and specific actions.

  16. Wind shear for large wind turbine generators at selected tall tower sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, D.L.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the study described in this report is to examine the nature of wind shear profiles and their variability over the height of large horizontal-axis wind turbines and to provide information on wind shear relevant to the design and opertion of large wind turbines. Wind turbine fatigue life and power quality are related through the forcing functions on the blade to the shapes of the wind shear profiles and their fluctuations over the disk of rotation.

  17. Advanced Wind Turbine Controls Reduce Loads (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL's National Wind Technology Center provides the world's only dedicated turbine controls testing platforms.

  18. Metrics for Sustainable Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reich-Weiser, Corinne; Vijayaraghavan, Athulan; Dornfeld, David

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for implementing green manufacturing”. Trans. of NAMRI/SME,the imple- mentation of green manufacturing, where a wedgemanufacturing scope of the assessment. While it is always important in the development of green

  19. 2013 Wind Technologies Market Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, R.; Bolinger, M.; Barbose, G.; Darghouth, N.; Hoen, B.; Mills, A.; Weaver, S.; Porter, K.; Buckley, M.; Oteri, F.; Tegen, S.

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual report provides a detailed overview of developments and trends in the U.S. wind power market, with a particular focus on 2013. This 2013 edition updates data presented in previous editions while highlighting key trends and important new developments. The report includes an overview of key installation-related trends; trends in wind power capacity growth; how that growth compares to other countries and generation sources; the amount and percentage of wind energy in individual states; the status of offshore wind power development and the quantity of proposed wind power capacity in various interconnection queues in the United States.

  20. PROGRESS OF WIND ENERGY TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bar?? Özerdem

    This paper provides an overview of the progress of wind energy technology, along with the current status of wind power worldwide. Over the period of 2000-2012 grid-connected installed wind power has increased by a factor of more than 16. Due to the fast growth in wind market, wind turbine technology has developed different design approaches during this period. In addition to this, issues such as power grid integration, environmental impact, and economics are studied and discussed briefly in this paper, as well.

  1. LIDAR Wind Speed Measurements of Evolving Wind Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simley, E.; Pao, L. Y.

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems are able to measure the speed of incoming wind before it interacts with a wind turbine rotor. These preview wind measurements can be used in feedforward control systems designed to reduce turbine loads. However, the degree to which such preview-based control techniques can reduce loads by reacting to turbulence depends on how accurately the incoming wind field can be measured. Past studies have assumed Taylor's frozen turbulence hypothesis, which implies that turbulence remains unchanged as it advects downwind at the mean wind speed. With Taylor's hypothesis applied, the only source of wind speed measurement error is distortion caused by the LIDAR. This study introduces wind evolution, characterized by the longitudinal coherence of the wind, to LIDAR measurement simulations to create a more realistic measurement model. A simple model of wind evolution is applied to a frozen wind field used in previous studies to investigate the effects of varying the intensity of wind evolution. LIDAR measurements are also evaluated with a large eddy simulation of a stable boundary layer provided by the National Center for Atmospheric Research. Simulation results show the combined effects of LIDAR errors and wind evolution for realistic turbine-mounted LIDAR measurement scenarios.

  2. CgWind: A high-order accurate simulation tool for wind turbines and wind farms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chand, K K; Henshaw, W D; Lundquist, K A; Singer, M A

    2010-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    CgWind is a high-fidelity large eddy simulation (LES) tool designed to meet the modeling needs of wind turbine and wind park engineers. This tool combines several advanced computational technologies in order to model accurately the complex and dynamic nature of wind energy applications. The composite grid approach provides high-quality structured grids for the efficient implementation of high-order accurate discretizations of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. Composite grids also provide a natural mechanism for modeling bodies in relative motion and complex geometry. Advanced algorithms such as matrix-free multigrid, compact discretizations and approximate factorization will allow CgWind to perform highly resolved calculations efficiently on a wide class of computing resources. Also in development are nonlinear LES subgrid-scale models required to simulate the many interacting scales present in large wind turbine applications. This paper outlines our approach, the current status of CgWind and future development plans.

  3. Posted 5/10/12 Manufacturing /Process Engineer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    . Plymouth Tube Company is committed to providing products and services that meet or exceed customers to improve safety, quality, and manufacturing efficiency throughout the manufacturing area. Utilization, reduce cycle times, improve productivity, create and find capacity, improve process reliability

  4. MODELING WIND TURBINES IN THE GRIDLAB-D SOFTWARE ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuller, J.C.; Schneider, K.P.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, the rapid expansion of wind power has resulted in a need to more accurately model the effects of wind penetration on the electricity infrastructure. GridLAB-D is a new simulation environment developed for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by the Pacifi c Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in cooperation with academic and industrial partners. GridLAB-D was originally written and designed to help integrate end-use smart grid technologies, and it is currently being expanded to include a number of other technologies, including distributed energy resources (DER). The specifi c goal of this project is to create a preliminary wind turbine generator (WTG) model for integration into GridLAB-D. As wind power penetration increases, models are needed to accurately study the effects of increased penetration; this project is a beginning step at examining these effects within the GridLAB-D environment. Aerodynamic, mechanical and electrical power models were designed to simulate the process by which mechanical power is extracted by a wind turbine and converted into electrical energy. The process was modeled using historic atmospheric data, collected over a period of 30 years as the primary energy input. This input was then combined with preliminary models for synchronous and induction generators. Additionally, basic control methods were implemented, using either constant power factor or constant power modes. The model was then compiled into the GridLAB-D simulation environment, and the power outputs were compared against manufacturers’ data and then a variation of the IEEE 4 node test feeder was used to examine the model’s behavior. Results showed the designs were suffi cient for a prototype model and provided output power similar to the available manufacturers’ data. The prototype model is designed as a template for the creation of new modules, with turbine-specifi c parameters to be added by the user.

  5. The Production Phase for the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) Modular Coil Winding Forms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heitzenroeder, P.; Brown, T.; Neilson, G.; Malinowski, F.; Sutton, L.; Nelson, B.; Williamson, D.; Horton, N.; Goddard, B.; Edwards, J.; Bowling, K.; Hatzilias, K.

    2005-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The production phase for the NCSX modular coil winding forms has been underway for approximately one year as of this date. This is the culmination of R&D efforts performed in 2001-4. The R&D efforts included limited manufacturing studies while NCSX was in its conceptual design phase followed by more detailed manufacturing studies by two teams which included the fabrication of full scale prototypes. This provided the foundation necessary for the production parts to be produced under a firm price and schedule contract that was issued in September 2004. This paper will describe the winding forms, the production team and team management, details of the production process, and the achievements for the first year.

  6. Pitch-controlled variable-speed wind turbine generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C.P.

    2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind energy is a viable option to complement other types of pollution-free generation. In the early development of wind energy, the majority of wind turbines were operated at constant speed. Recently, the number of variable-speed wind turbines installed in wind farms has increased and more wind turbine manufacturers are making variable-speed wind turbines. This paper covers the operation of variable-speed wind turbines with pitch control. The system the authors considered is controlled to generate maximum energy while minimizing loads. The maximization of energy was only carried out on a static basis and only drive train loads were considered as a constraint. In medium wind speeds, the generator and power converter control the wind turbine to capture maximum energy from the wind. In the high wind speed region, the wind turbine is controlled to maintain the aerodynamic power produced by the wind turbine. Two methods to adjust the aerodynamic power were investigated: pitch control and generator load control, both of which are employed to control the operation of the wind turbine. The analysis and simulation shows that the wind turbine can be operated at its optimum energy capture while minimizing the load on the wind turbine for a wide range of wind speeds.

  7. Wind Energy Teachers Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    anon.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This guide, created by the American Wind Association, with support from the U.S. Department of Energy, is a learning tool about wind energy targeted toward grades K-12. The guide provides teacher information, ideas for sparking children's and students' interest, suggestions for activities to undertake in and outside the classroom, and research tools for both teachers and students. Also included is an additional resources section.

  8. Elastomeric member and method of manufacture therefor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoppie, L.O.

    1985-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An energy storage device is disclosed consisting of a stretched elongated elastomeric member disposed within a tubular housing, which elastomeric member is adapted to be torsionally stressed to store energy. The elastomeric member is configured in the relaxed state with a uniform diameter body section, and transition end sections, attached to rigid end piece assemblies of a lesser diameter. The profile and deflection characteristic of the transition sections are such that upon stretching of the elastomeric member, a substantially uniform diameter assembly results, to minimize the required volume of the surrounding housing. Each of the transition sections are received within and bonded to a woven wire mesh sleeve having helical windings at a particular helix angle to control the deflection of the transition section. Each sleeve also contracts with the contraction of the associated transition section to maintain the bond therebetween. During manufacture, the sleeves are forced against a forming surface and bonded to the associated transition section to provide the correct profile and helix angle. 12 figs.

  9. Elastomeric member and method of manufacture therefor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoppie, Lyle O. (Birmingham, MI)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An energy storage device (10) is disclosed consisting of a stretched elongated elastomeric member (16) disposed within a tubular housing (14), which elastomeric member (16) is adapted to be torsionally stressed to store energy. The elastomeric member (16) is configured in the relaxed state with a uniform diameter body section (74), and transition end sections (76, 78), attached to rigid end piece assemblies (22, 24) of a lesser diameter. The profile and deflection characteristic of the transition sections (76, 78) are such that upon stretching of the elastomeric member (16), a substantially uniform diameter assembly results, to minimize the required volume of the surrounding housing (14). Each of the transition sections (76, 78) are received within and bonded to a woven wire mesh sleeve (26, 28) having helical windings at a particular helix angle to control the deflection of the transition section. Each sleeve (26, 28) also contracts with the contraction of the associated transition section to maintain the bond therebetween. During manufacture, the sleeves (26, 28) are forced against a forming surface and bonded to the associated transition section (76, 78) to provide the correct profile and helix angle.

  10. Hollings Manufacturing Extension Partnership: Delivering Measurable Results to Manufacturing Clients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perkins, Richard A.

    of services, from innovation strategies to process improvements to green manufacturing. MEP also worksHollings Manufacturing Extension Partnership: Delivering Measurable Results to Manufacturing Clients MEP · MANUFACTURING EXTENSION PARTNERSHIP NationalInstituteofStandardsandTechnology March2013

  11. Financial Innovation Among the Community Wind Sector in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark

    2011-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In the relatively brief history of utility-scale wind generation, the 'community wind' sector - defined here as consisting of relatively small utility-scale wind power projects that are at least partly owned by one or more members of the local community - has played a vitally important role as a 'test bed' or 'proving ground' for wind turbine manufacturers. In the 1980s and 1990s, for example, Vestas and other now-established European wind turbine manufacturers relied heavily on community wind projects in Scandinavia and Germany to install - and essentially field-test - new turbine designs. The fact that orders from community wind projects seldom exceeded more than a few turbines at a time enabled the manufacturers to correct any design flaws or manufacturing defects fairly rapidly, and without the risk of extensive (and expensive) serial defects that can accompany larger orders. Community wind has been slower to take root in the United States - the first such projects were installed in the state of Minnesota around the year 2000. Just as in Europe, however, the community wind sector in the U.S. has similarly served as a proving ground - but in this case for up-and-coming wind turbine manufacturers that are trying to break into the broader U.S. wind power market. For example, community wind projects have deployed the first U.S. installations of wind turbines from Suzlon (in 2003), DeWind (2008), Americas Wind Energy (2008) and later Emergya Wind Technologies (2010),1 Goldwind (2009), AAER/Pioneer (2009), Nordic Windpower (2010), Unison (2010), and Alstom (2011). Just as it has provided a proving ground for new turbines, so too has the community wind sector in the United States served as a laboratory for experimentation with innovative new financing structures. For example, a variation of one of the most common financing arrangements in the U.S. wind market today - the 'partnership flip structure' - was first developed by community wind projects in Minnesota more than a decade ago (and is therefore sometimes referred to as the 'Minnesota flip' model) before being adapted by the broader wind market. More recently, a handful of community wind projects built in the United States over the past year have been financed via new and creative structures that push the envelope of wind project finance in the U.S. - in many cases, moving beyond the now-standard partnership flip structures. These projects include: (1) a 4.5 MW project in Maine that combines low-cost government debt with local tax equity, (2) a 25.3 MW project in Minnesota using a sale/leaseback structure, (3) a 10.5 MW project in South Dakota financed by an intrastate offering of both debt and equity, (4) a 6 MW project in Washington state that taps into 'New Markets Tax Credits' using an 'inverted' or 'pass-through' lease structure, and (5) a 9 MW project in Oregon that combines a variety of state and federal incentives and loans with unconventional equity from high-net-worth individuals. In most cases, these are first-of-their-kind financing structures that could serve as useful examples for other projects - both community and commercial wind alike. This new wave of financial innovation occurring in the community wind sector has been facilitated by policy changes, most of them recent. Most notably, the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 ('the Recovery Act') enables, for a limited time, wind power (and other types of) projects to elect either a 30% investment tax credit ('ITC') or a 30% cash grant (the 'Section 1603 grant') in lieu of the federal incentive that has historically been available to wind projects in the U.S. - a 10-year production tax credit ('PTC'). This flexibility, in turn, enables wind power projects to pursue lease financing for the first time - leasing is not possible under the PTC. Because they are based on a project's cost rather than energy generation, the 30% ITC and Section 1603 grant also reduce performance risk relative to the PTC - this, too, is an important enabler of lease financing. Finally, by providing a cash rather than ta

  12. Expedited Permitting of Grid-Scale Wind Energy Development (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Maine's Expedited Permitting of Grid-Scale Wind Energy Development statue provides an expedited permitting pathway for proposed wind developments in certain designated locations, known as expedited...

  13. Securing Clean, Domestic, Affordable Energy with Wind (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet provides a brief description of the Wind Energy Market and describes the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Program research and development efforts.

  14. Analysis of Mesoscale Model Data for Wind Integration (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, M.; Elliott, D.; Lew, D.; Corbus, D.; Scott, G.; Haymes, S.; Wan, Y. H.

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Supports examination of implications of national 20% wind vision, and provides input to integration and transmission studies for operational impact of large penetrations of wind on the grid.

  15. Cost of quality tradeoffs in manufacturing process and inspection strategy selection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaklouta, Hadi

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In today's highly competitive markets manufacturers must provide high quality products to survive. Manufacturers can achieve higher levels of quality by changing their manufacturing process and/or by product inspection ...

  16. Wind forces on isolated and grouped mobile homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldham, Gary Albert

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The roof is required by the Mobile Home Manufacturers Association's construction stand- ards to withstand an uplift wind load that is only 60X of the hori- zontal wind load. Therefore, if a mobile home is subjected to de- sign maximum wind speeds... to be vul- nerable to wind loads. The vulnerability of mobile homes to high winds can be attested by numerous reports of mobile home damage as a result of hurricane 1-4 and tornadic winds. The homes are damaged by being turned over, sliding into other...

  17. Wind shear climatology for large wind turbine generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, D.L.; Wendell, L.L.; Heflick, S.K.

    1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climatological wind shear analyses relevant to the design and operation of multimegawatt wind turbines are provided. Insight is provided for relating the wind experienced by a rotating blade in a shear flow to the analysis results. A simple analysis of the wind experienced by a rotating blade for three types of wind shear profiles under steady-state conditions is presented in graphical form. Comparisons of the magnitude and frequency of the variations in 1) the wind sensed by a single blade element, 2) the sum, and 3) the difference of the winds sensed by opposite blade elements show strong sensitivity to profile shape. These three items represent forcing functions that can be related to 1) flatwise bending moment, 2) torque on the shaft, and 3) teeter angle. A computer model was constructed to simulate rotational sampling of 10-s sampled winds from a tall tower for three different types of large wind turbines. Time series produced by the model indicated that the forcing functions on a rotating blade vary according to the shear profile encountered during each revolution as opposed to a profile derived from average wind conditions, e.g., hourly average winds. An analysis scheme was developed to establish a climatology of wind shear profiles derived from 10-s sampled winds and hourly average winds measured over a one-year period at several levels on a tall tower. Because of the sensitivity of the forcing function variability to profile shape, the analyses performed and presented are in the form of joint frequency distributions of velocity differences of the the top-to-hub versus the hub-to-bottom portion of disks of rotation for the three turbine configurations.

  18. Reduced vibration motor winding arrangement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slavik, C.J.; Rhudy, R.G.; Bushman, R.E.

    1997-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An individual phase winding arrangement having a sixty electrical degree phase belt width for use with a three phase motor armature includes a delta connected phase winding portion and a wye connected phase winding portion. Both the delta and wye connected phase winding portions have a thirty electrical degree phase belt width. The delta and wye connected phase winding portions are each formed from a preselected number of individual coils each formed, in turn, from an unequal number of electrical conductor turns in the approximate ratio of {radical}3. The individual coils of the delta and wye connected phase winding portions may either be connected in series or parallel. This arrangement provides an armature winding for a three phase motor which retains the benefits of the widely known and utilized thirty degree phase belt concept, including improved mmf waveform and fundamental distribution factor, with consequent reduced vibrations and improved efficiency. 4 figs.

  19. Advanced Blade Manufacturing Project - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    POORE, ROBERT Z.

    1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The original scope of the project was to research improvements to the processes and materials used in the manufacture of wood-epoxy blades, conduct tests to qualify any new material or processes for use in blade design and subsequently build and test six blades using the improved processes and materials. In particular, ABM was interested in reducing blade cost and improving quality. In addition, ABM needed to find a replacement material for the mature Douglas fir used in the manufacturing process. The use of mature Douglas fir is commercially unacceptable because of its limited supply and environmental concerns associated with the use of mature timber. Unfortunately, the bankruptcy of FloWind in June 1997 and a dramatic reduction in AWT sales made it impossible for ABM to complete the full scope of work. However, sufficient research and testing were completed to identify several promising changes in the blade manufacturing process and develop a preliminary design incorporating these changes.

  20. Enabling Manufacturing Research through Interoperability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dornfeld, David; Wright, Paul; Helu, Moneer; Vijayaraghavan, Athulan

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sustainable or environmentally benign manufacturing processes andAND SUSTAINABLE FIGURE 8: LIFE-CYCLE OF MANUFACTURING PROCESSES (

  1. Advanced Manufacturing Partnership | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and cost-shared R&D projects, supporting manufacturing infrastructure, and facilitating job creation. These actions save energy and provide benefits to U.S. industry and the...

  2. High wind evaluation in the Southern Ocean Xiaojun Yuan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khatiwala, Samar

    1 High wind evaluation in the Southern Ocean Xiaojun Yuan Lamont-Doherty of Earth Observatory based scatterometer instruments provide crucial surface wind measurements with high resolution over winds at high wind bands because these regions host the strongest wind fields at the ocean surface

  3. Yaw dynamics of horizontal axis wind turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, A.C. (Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States))

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Designers of a horizontal axis wind turbine yaw mechanism are faced with a difficult decision. They know that if they elect to use a yaw- controlled rotor then the system will suffer increased initial cost and increased inherent maintenance and reliability problems. On the other hand, if they elect to allow the rotor to freely yaw they known they will have to account for unknown and random, though bounded, yaw rates. They will have a higher-risk design to trade-off against the potential for cost savings and reliability improvement. The risk of a yaw-free system could be minimized if methods were available for analyzing and understanding yaw behavior. The complexity of yaw behavior has, until recently, discouraged engineers from developing a complete yaw analysis method. The objectives of this work are to (1) provide a fundamental understanding of free-yaw mechanics and the design concepts most effective at eliminating yaw problems, and (2) provide tested design tools and guidelines for use by free-yaw wind systems manufacturers. The emphasis is on developing practical and sufficiently accurate design methods.

  4. 2010 Cost of Wind Energy Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tegen, S.; Hand, M.; Maples, B.; Lantz, E.; Schwabe, P.; Smith, A.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a detailed description of NREL's levelized cost of wind energy equation, assumptions and results in 2010, including historical cost trends and future projections for land-based and offshore utility-scale wind.

  5. DOE Seeking Proposals to Advance Distributed Wind Turbine Technology...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Project (CIP). The CIP aims to help U.S. manufacturers of small and mid-sized wind turbines with rotor swept areas up to 1,000 square meters improve their turbine designs and...

  6. Locating Chicago Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    Renaissance Council, is among the nation's leading public high schools focused on manufac- turing area's econ- omy, including how important manufacturing is to that economy, which manufac- turing

  7. Advanced Materials Manufacturing | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    existing manufacturing industries and result in creative new products. Stronger, more corrosion-resistant and lower cost steel alloys are being developed and commercialized to...

  8. Manufacturing | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the production of clean energy technologies like electric vehicles, LED bulbs and solar panels. The Department is also working with manufacturers to increase their energy...

  9. Acoustics by additive manufacturing:.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Setaki, F.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??This study focuses on exploring the merging field of additive manufacturing and acoustics and introduces a new type of sound absorber which is regulating performance… (more)

  10. SSL Manufacturing Roadmap

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Report detailing DOE Solid-State Lighting Program activities to accelerate manufacturing improvements that reduce costs and enhance the quality of SSL products.

  11. Additive Manufacturing: Going Mainstream

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Additive manufacturing, or 3D printing, is receiving attention from media, investment communities and governments around the world transforming it from obscurity to something to be talked about.

  12. Stellar Winds on the Main-Sequence I: Wind Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnstone, C P; Lüftinger, T; Toth, G; Brott, I

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aims: We develop a method for estimating the properties of stellar winds for low-mass main-sequence stars between masses of 0.4 and 1.1 solar masses at a range of distances from the star. Methods: We use 1D thermal pressure driven hydrodynamic wind models run using the Versatile Advection Code. Using in situ measurements of the solar wind, we produce models for the slow and fast components of the solar wind. We consider two radically different methods for scaling the base temperature of the wind to other stars: in Model A, we assume that wind temperatures are fundamentally linked to coronal temperatures, and in Model B, we assume that the sound speed at the base of the wind is a fixed fraction of the escape velocity. In Paper II of this series, we use observationally constrained rotational evolution models to derive wind mass loss rates. Results: Our model for the solar wind provides an excellent description of the real solar wind far from the solar surface, but is unrealistic within the solar corona. We run ...

  13. 20% Wind Energy 20% Wind Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Warren B.

    (government, industry, utilities, NGOs) Analyzes wind's potential contributions to energy security, economic · Transmission a challenge #12;Wind Power Class Resource Potential Wind Power Density at 50 m W/m 2 Wind Speed20% Wind Energy by 2030 20% Wind Energy by 2030 #12;Presentation and Objectives Overview Background

  14. Wind Energy Leasing Handbook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    Wind Energy Leasing Handbook Wind Energy Leasing Handbook E-1033 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension?..................................................................................................................... 31 What do wind developers consider in locating wind energy projects?............................................................................................ 37 How do companies and individuals invest in wind energy projects?....................................................................

  15. Critical materials research needed to secure U.S. manufacturing, officials say

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Department officials said yesterday that developing alternatives to critical materials, like rare earth metals used in solar panels and wind turbines, is crucial to American manufacturing stability and can help the United States circumvent global market pressures.

  16. DOE Collegiate Wind Competition (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, J.

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation for the January Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach webinar outlines the expanded need for workers in the wind industry and provides an overview of the DOE Wind Competition (to be held in May 2014) and the guiding principles of the competition.

  17. MANUFACTURING & SERVICE OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boucherie, Richard J.

    MANUFACTURING & SERVICE OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT Vol. 14, No. 4, Fall 2012, pp. 495­511 ISSN 1523 research directions, expanding upon the key points raised by Green [Green LV (2012) The vital role of operations analysis in improving healthcare delivery. Manufacturing Service Oper. Management 14

  18. MANUFACTURING & SERVICE OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soares, JoĂŁo LuĂ­s Cardoso

    ;Green and Soares: Note Manufacturing & Service Operations Management 9(1), pp. 54­61, © 2007 INFORMS 55MANUFACTURING & SERVICE OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT Vol. 9, No. 1, Winter 2007, pp. 54­61 issn 1523-Dependent Waiting Time Probabilities in M t /M/s t Queuing Systems Linda V. Green Graduate School of Business

  19. Wind load reduction for heliostats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterka, J.A.; Hosoya, N.; Bienkiewicz, B.; Cermak, J.E.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of wind-tunnel tests supported through the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) by the Office of Solar Thermal Technology of the US Department of Energy as part of the SERI research effort on innovative concentrators. As gravity loads on drive mechanisms are reduced through stretched-membrane technology, the wind-load contribution of the required drive capacity increases in percentage. Reduction of wind loads can provide economy in support structure and heliostat drive. Wind-tunnel tests have been directed at finding methods to reduce wind loads on heliostats. The tests investigated primarily the mean forces, moments, and the possibility of measuring fluctuating forces in anticipation of reducing those forces. A significant increase in ability to predict heliostat wind loads and their reduction within a heliostat field was achieved.

  20. Compensation Packages Wind Energy Easements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lease Agreement

    to provide rural landowners with information about the wind industry, which was just beginning to emerge in the Midwest and Great Plains. In particular, we focused on land leases and wind energy easements because such agreements provided the primary means for farmers to participate in wind energy development. Since then, the U.S. wind industry has grown dramatically, with commercial-scale installations in more than 30 states and the expectation of a record year for new installations in 2005. As wind energy development has spread, the knowledge base among landowners and rural communities has grown, and options for local participation have increased substantially. With more options and information sources on wind basics available, we believed this was the right time for Windustry to revisit our work on what continues to be the principal means for landowners to participate in wind development: land leases and wind energy easements. This work addresses the ever more sophisticated questions landowners have raised about hosting wind turbines, and also begins to define good practices for developers as many new companies, large and small, enter the industry. Our primary goals are:

  1. President Announces New Public-Private Manufacturing Innovation...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    a consortium of leading companies that includes some of the world's leading wide-bandgap semiconductor manufacturers, leading materials providers, and critical end-users such as...

  2. Engineering innovation to reduce wind power COE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammerman, Curtt Nelson [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    There are enough wind resources in the US to provide 10 times the electric power we currently use, however wind power only accounts for 2% of our total electricity production. One of the main limitations to wind use is cost. Wind power currently costs 5-to-8 cents per kilowatt-hour, which is more than twice the cost of electricity generated by burning coal. Our Intelligent Wind Turbine LDRD Project is applying LANL's leading-edge engineering expertise in modeling and simulation, experimental validation, and advanced sensing technologies to challenges faced in the design and operation of modern wind turbines.

  3. Wind for Schools: Developing Education Programs to Train the Next Generation of the Wind Energy Workforce

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, I.; Flowers, L.; Kelly, M.; Barnett, L.; Miles, J.

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides an overview of the Wind for Schools project elements, including a description of host and collegiate school curricula developed for wind energy and the status of the current projects. The paper also provides focused information on how schools, regions, or countries can become involved or implement similar projects to expand the social acceptance and understanding of wind energy.

  4. Wind Energy Benefits, Wind Powering America (WPA) (Fact Sheet...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Benefits, Wind Powering America (WPA) (Fact Sheet), Wind And Water Power Program (WWPP) Wind Energy Benefits, Wind Powering America (WPA) (Fact Sheet), Wind And Water Power...

  5. Wind Energy Facility Reliability and Maintenance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, Yu

    Wind Energy Facility Reliability and Maintenance Eunshin Byon, Lewis Ntaimo, Chanan Singh and Yu related to wind energy facility reliability and mainte- nance focused more on qualitative aspects. In this chapter, we provide a comprehensive account of the existing research regarding wind energy facility

  6. Manufacturing Renaissance: Return of manufacturing to western countries.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kianian, Babak; Larsson, Tobias

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Manufacturing Renaissance, i.e. return of manufacturing to west, has been recently observed. This paper analyzes the patterns observed within each of the four main drivers… (more)

  7. 7,511,624 Wind Energy Overview: Device for monitoring the balance and integrity of wind turbine blades either in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    turbine blades either in service or as a quality control step in the manufacturing process Researchers oscillations (including imbalances and tracking variations) in wind turbine blades. This technology was tested covering the RPM rate of any wind turbine blade. This invention directly targets the operational monitoring

  8. Utilizing Daylighting Controls in a Manufacturing Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shrestha, S. S.; Maxwell, G. M.

    Utilizing Daylighting Controls in a Manufacturing Facility Som S. Shrestha Dr. Gregory M. Maxwell PhD Candidate Associate Professor som@iastate.edu gmaxwell@iastate.edu Iowa State University Ames, IA ABSTRACT Opportunities exist... to reduce artificial lighting in manufacturing facilities which have skylights and/or fenestration that provide sufficient quantities of daylight to the work space. Using photometric sensors to measure the illuminance in the space, artificial lights can...

  9. Wind Energy and Power System Operations: A Review of Wind Integration Studies to Date

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeCesaro, J.; Porter, K.

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides an overview of the challenges associated with wind integration and summarizes the findings of the wind integration studies conducted over the course of the past five years.

  10. Wind: wind power density GIS data at 50m above ground and 1km...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    file, 50 m wind power density for eastern China. (Purpose): To provide information on the wind resource potential in eastern China. Values range from 0 to 3079 Wm2. (Supplemental...

  11. Manufacturing Licenses Available | Tech Transfer | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Deposition Manufacturing 201303127 Methods and Materials for Room Temperature Polymer Additive Manufacturing 201303140 Reactive Polymer Fused Deposition Manufacturing 201303151...

  12. Ris-R-1330(EN) Wind Turbine Power Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .1 Background 8 2.2 Problems 8 2.3 Input by the Manufacturers 9 2.4 Methods 10 2.4.1Method A 10 2.4.1.1 Site.2 Experiences from production assessments - The Questionable On-site Power Curve Measurement 4.2.1Background wind speed 5.7 Types of wind speed sensors 35 5.7.1Vector scalar wind speed cup anemometer 35 5

  13. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that includes wind turbine towers. 2011 Wind TechnologiesSets Other Wind Turbine Components Towers Wind-Poweredselected wind turbine components includes towers as well as

  14. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that includes wind turbine towers. 2010 Wind TechnologiesImports : Other Wind Turbine Components Towers Wind-Poweredselected wind turbine components includes towers as well as

  15. "Technology Wedges" for Implementing Green Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dornfeld, David; Wright, Paul

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    issues in green design and manufacturing." ManufacturingFOR IMPLEMENTING GREEN MANUFACTURING David Dornfeld BerkeleyCalifornia KEYWORDS Green Manufacturing, Technology,

  16. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the impacts of wind on load-following and unit commitmentto a few minutes; load-following – tens of minutes to a fewreserves, to provide load following. Conversely, the higher

  17. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2011. North America Wind Energy Market Forecast: 2011–2025.study. Regions with fast energy markets, for example, changea sub-hourly, real-time energy market providing centralized,

  18. Energy from Offshore Wind: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musial, W.; Butterfield, S.; Ram, B.

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides an overview of the nascent offshore wind energy industry including a status of the commercial offshore industry and the technologies that will be needed for full market development.

  19. Model Wind Energy Facility Ordinance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: This model ordinance was designed to provide guidance to local governments that wish to develop their own siting rules for wind turbines. While it was developed as part of a cooperative...

  20. Estimating the Wind Resource in Uttarakhand: Comparison of Dynamic Downscaling with Doppler Lidar Wind Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lundquist, J. K.; Pukayastha, A.; St. Martin, C.; Newsom, R.

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous estimates of the wind resources in Uttarakhand, India, suggest minimal wind resources in this region. To explore whether or not the complex terrain in fact provides localized regions of wind resource, the authors of this study employed a dynamic down scaling method with the Weather Research and Forecasting model, providing detailed estimates of winds at approximately 1 km resolution in the finest nested simulation.

  1. Balancing of Wind Power.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ülker, Muhammed Akif

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?? In the future, renewable energy share, especially wind power share, in electricity generation is expected to increase. Due to nature of the wind, wind… (more)

  2. Energy 101: Wind Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    See how wind turbines generate clean electricity from the power of the wind. Highlighted are the various parts and mechanisms of a modern wind turbine.

  3. Energy 101: Wind Turbines

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    See how wind turbines generate clean electricity from the power of the wind. Highlighted are the various parts and mechanisms of a modern wind turbine.

  4. NREL: Wind Research - Events

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Events Below are upcoming events related to wind energy technology. January 2015 2015 Wind Energy Systems Engineering Workshop January 14 - 15, 2015 Boulder, CO The third NREL Wind...

  5. Wind power and Wind power and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wind power and the CDM #12; Wind power and the CDM Emerging practices in developing wind power 2005 Jyoti P. Painuly, Niels-Erik Clausen, Jørgen Fenhann, Sami Kamel and Romeo Pacudan #12; WIND POWER AND THE CDM Emerging practices in developing wind power projects for the Clean Development Mechanism Energy

  6. MDF | Manufacturing Demonstration Facility | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MDF Working with MDF NTRC OLCF SNS Titanium robotic hand holding sphere fabricated using additive manufacturing Home | User Facilities | MDF MDF | Manufacturing Demonstration...

  7. Wind for Schools Project Power System Brief

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet provides an overview of the system components of a Wind Powering America Wind for Schools project. Wind Powering America's (WPA's) Wind for Schools project uses a basic system configuration for each school project. The system incorporates a single SkyStream(TM) wind turbine, a 70-ft guyed tower, disconnect boxes at the base of the turbine and at the school, and an interconnection to the school's electrical system. A detailed description of each system component is provided in this document.

  8. TOWARDS LIFE-CYCLE MANAGEMENT OF WIND TURBINES BASED ON STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    TOWARDS LIFE-CYCLE MANAGEMENT OF WIND TURBINES BASED ON STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING K. Smarsly1) strategies can enable wind turbine manufacturers, owners, and operators to precisely schedule maintenance behavior of wind turbines and to reduce (epistemic) uncertainty. Both the resistance parameters

  9. innovati nNREL Innovations Contribute to an Award-Winning Small Wind Turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    innovati nNREL Innovations Contribute to an Award-Winning Small Wind Turbine The Skystream 3.7 wind turbine is the result of a decade-long collaboration between the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Southwest Windpower, a commercially successful small wind turbine manufacturer. NREL drew

  10. AIAA-2003-0694 QUANTIFICATION OF PROCESSING PARAMETERS FOR WIND TURBINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AIAA-2003-0694 QUANTIFICATION OF PROCESSING PARAMETERS FOR WIND TURBINE BLADES Douglas Cairns, John of processing techniques and can be useful to wind turbine blade manufacturers to prepare processing conditions-3]. This is a consequence of the typical material architectures that are used in wind turbine blades. Figure 1

  11. CIMplementation™: Evaluating Manufacturing Automation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krakauer, J.

    management and labor. In the new shop, ma~? agers will be unable to succeed unless thet earn the respect and cooperation of their I subordinates. Managers need to address th~ fear and resistance of manufacturing emPlofees before and during a transition.... Managers are becoming more interested in these methods, but they should be aware that implementing them will be a slow, complex task. This technology will require changes in manufacturing organization. This paper discusses changes required...

  12. Property Tax Assessment for Commercial Wind Farms

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pennsylvania enacted legislation in November 2006 providing that wind turbines and related equipment (including towers and foundations) may not be counted by tax assessors when setting property...

  13. Solar and Wind Easements and Rights Laws

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Nevada's general statutes provide owners of solar and wind energy systems protection against restrictions that would otherwise prevent them from installing these systems on their property. NRS §...

  14. Title of the paper: A new DFM approach to combine machining and additive manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Title of the paper: A new DFM approach to combine machining and additive manufacturing Authors approach to combine machining and additive manufacturing 1. Introduction In order to stay competitive, technical improvements in additive manufacturing processes provide the opportunity to manufacture real

  15. MCM-C Multichip Module Manufacturing Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blazek, R.J.; Kautz, D.R.; Galichia, J.V.

    2000-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T) provides complete microcircuit capabilities from design layout through manufacturing and final electrical testing. Manufacturing and testing capabilities include design layout, electrical and mechanical computer simulation and modeling, circuit analysis, component analysis, network fabrication, microelectronic assembly, electrical tester design, electrical testing, materials analysis, and environmental evaluation. This document provides manufacturing guidelines for multichip module-ceramic (MCM-C) microcircuits. Figure 1 illustrates an example MCM-C configuration with the parts and processes that are available. The MCM-C technology is used to manufacture microcircuits for electronic systems that require increased performance, reduced volume, and higher density that cannot be achieved by the standard hybrid microcircuit or printed wiring board technologies. The guidelines focus on the manufacturability issues that must be considered for low-temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC) network fabrication and MCM assembly and the impact that process capabilities have on the overall MCM design layout and product yield. Prerequisites that are necessary to initiate the MCM design layout include electrical, mechanical, and environmental requirements. Customer design data can be accepted in many standard electronic file formats. Other requirements include schedule, quantity, cost, classification, and quality level. Design considerations include electrical, network, packaging, and producibility; and deliverables include finished product, drawings, documentation, and electronic files.

  16. Wind energy systems: program summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Federal Wind Energy Program (FWEP) was initiated to provide focus, direction and funds for the development of wind power. Each year a summary is prepared to provide the American public with an overview of government sponsored activities in the FWEP. This program summary describes each of the Department of Energy's (DOE) current wind energy projects initiated or renewed during FY 1979 (October 1, 1978 through September 30, 1979) and reflects their status as of April 30, 1980. The summary highlights on-going research, development and demonstration efforts and serves as a record of progress towards the program objectives. It also provides: the program's general management structure; review of last year's achievements; forecast of expected future trends; documentation of the projects conducted during FY 1979; and list of key wind energy publications.

  17. ISET-Wind-Index Assessment of the Annual Available Wind Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berthold Hahn; Kurt Rohrig

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Particularly in years with wind speeds that are clearly below average, dissatisfaction of operators and even liquidity problems are sparked through the unexpected low annual power production. An objective standard for the evaluation of the respective “wind year ” is required for the internal estimation of the performance of wind farms, and for justification to share owners and banks. The annual wind conditions are composed from such a multitude of meteorological situations, differing from location to location, that the available wind energy at every individual location develops totally differently. A single code is therefore not sufficient to describe the “wind year ” in Germany and, moreover, the evaluation of annual available wind energy must be carried out separately for the smallest areas possible. With the support of the Gothaer Rückversicherungen AG, a procedure has been developed at ISET which provides the proportion of the respective annual available wind energy, in relation to the long-term average available wind energy, for each 10 km x 10 km sized plan area in Germany. This amount, the ISET-Wind-Index, is founded on wind measurements at locations that are typical for wind energy use and therefore presents an objective standard. The measurement grid is part of the “Scientific Measurement and Evaluation Programme ” (WMEP), which accompanies the “250 MW Wind ” project of the German Federal Ministry for Economy and Labour. The ISET-Wind-Index, which will be regularly updated, provides an objective standard for the estimation of annual available

  18. Upstream Measurements of Wind Profiles with Doppler Lidar for Improved Wind Energy Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodney Frehlich

    2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    New upstream measurements of wind profiles over the altitude range of wind turbines will be produced using a scanning Doppler lidar. These long range high quality measurements will provide improved wind power forecasts for wind energy integration into the power grid. The main goal of the project is to develop the optimal Doppler lidar operating parameters and data processing algorithms for improved wind energy integration by enhancing the wind power forecasts in the 30 to 60 minute time frame, especially for the large wind power ramps. Currently, there is very little upstream data at large wind farms, especially accurate wind profiles over the full height of the turbine blades. The potential of scanning Doppler lidar will be determined by rigorous computer modeling and evaluation of actual Doppler lidar data from the WindTracer system produced by Lockheed Martin Coherent Technologies, Inc. of Louisville, Colorado. Various data products will be investigated for input into numerical weather prediction models and statistically based nowcasting algorithms. Successful implementation of the proposed research will provide the required information for a full cost benefit analysis of the improved forecasts of wind power for energy integration as well as the added benefit of high quality wind and turbulence information for optimal control of the wind turbines at large wind farms.

  19. Meteorological aspects of siting large wind turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hiester, T.R.; Pennell, W.T.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report, which focuses on the meteorological aspects of siting large wind turbines (turbines with a rated output exceeding 100 kW), has four main goals. The first is to outline the elements of a siting strategy that will identify the most favorable wind energy sites in a region and that will provide sufficient wind data to make responsible economic evaluations of the site wind resource possible. The second is to critique and summarize siting techniques that were studied in the Department of Energy (DOE) Wind Energy Program. The third goal is to educate utility technical personnel, engineering consultants, and meteorological consultants (who may have not yet undertaken wind energy consulting) on meteorological phenomena relevant to wind turbine siting in order to enhance dialogues between these groups. The fourth goal is to minimize the chances of failure of early siting programs due to insufficient understanding of wind behavior.

  20. System-Wide Emissions Implications of Increased Wind Power Penetration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    and ramifications of wind power providing 20% of U.S. electricity by 2030.1 Wind energy is advantageous becauseSystem-Wide Emissions Implications of Increased Wind Power Penetration Lauren Valentino,, Viviana of incorporating wind energy into the electric power system. We present a detailed emissions analysis based

  1. Cambridge Danehy Park Wind Turbine Preliminary Project Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge Danehy Park Wind Turbine Preliminary Project Assessment Overview MIT Wind Energy Projects 4 / 25 2.5 / 25 Rated Wind Speed (m/s) 13 10 14.5 ~15 12 The above turbines were chosen to provide, several recent studies examining birds and wind turbines have observed that most birds usually avoid

  2. Manufacturing method of photonic crystal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Park, In Sung; Lee, Tae Ho; Ahn, Jin Ho; Biswas, Rana; Constant, Kristen P.; Ho, Kai-Ming; Lee, Jae-Hwang

    2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A manufacturing method of a photonic crystal is provided. In the method, a high-refractive-index material is conformally deposited on an exposed portion of a periodic template composed of a low-refractive-index material by an atomic layer deposition process so that a difference in refractive indices or dielectric constants between the template and adjacent air becomes greater, which makes it possible to form a three-dimensional photonic crystal having a superior photonic bandgap. Herein, the three-dimensional structure may be prepared by a layer-by-layer method.

  3. Energy harvesting to power sensing hardware onboard wind turbine blade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Clinton P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schichting, Alexander D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Quellette, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Faringolt, Kevin M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind turbines are becoming a larger source of renewable energy in the United States. However, most of the designs are geared toward the weather conditions seen in Europe. Also, in the United States, manufacturers have been increasing the length of the turbine blades, often made of composite materials, to maximize power output. As a result of the more severe loading conditions in the United States and the material level flaws in composite structures, blade failure has been a more common occurrence in the U.S. than in Europe. Therefore, it is imperative that a structural health monitoring system be incorporated into the design of the wind turbines in order to monitor flaws before they lead to a catastrophic failure. Due to the rotation of the turbine and issues related to lightning strikes, the best way to implement a structural health monitoring system would be to use a network of wireless sensor nodes. In order to provide power to these sensor nodes, piezoelectric, thermoelectric and photovoltaic energy harvesting techniques are examined on a cross section of a CX-100 wind turbine blade in order to determine the feasibility of powering individual nodes that would compose the sensor network.

  4. Wind for Schools Project Power System Brief, Wind Powering America Fact Sheet Series

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, I.

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind Powering America's (WPA's) Wind for Schools project uses a basic system configuration for each school project. The system incorporates a single SkyStream wind turbine, a 70-ft guyed tower, disconnect boxes at the base of the turbine and at the school, and an interconnection to the school's electrical system. This document provides a detailed description of each system component.

  5. Advanced Manufacture of Reflectors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Advance Manufacture of Reflectors fact sheet describes a SunShot Initiative project being conducted research team led by the University of Arizona, which is working to develop a novel method for shaping float glass. The technique developed by this research team can drastically reduce the time required for the shaping step. By enabling mass production of solar concentrating mirrors at high speed, this project should lead to improved performance and as much as a 40% reduction in manufacturing costs for reflectors made in very high volume.

  6. ATS materials/manufacturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karnitz, M.A.; Wright, I.G.; Ferber, M.K. [and others

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Materials/Manufacturing Technology subelement is a part of the base technology portion of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program. The work in this subelement is being performed predominantly by industry with assistance from national laboratories and universities. The projects in this subelement are aimed toward hastening the incorporation of new materials and components in gas turbines. Work is currently ongoing on thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), the scale-up of single crystal airfoil manufacturing technologies, materials characterization, and technology information exchange. This paper presents highlights of the activities during the past year. 12 refs., 24 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Wide Area Wind Field Monitoring Status & Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan Marchant; Jed Simmons

    2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume-scanning elastic has been investigated as a means to derive 3D dynamic wind fields for characterization and monitoring of wind energy sites. An eye-safe volume-scanning lidar system was adapted for volume imaging of aerosol concentrations out to a range of 300m. Reformatting of the lidar data as dynamic volume images was successfully demonstrated. A practical method for deriving 3D wind fields from dynamic volume imagery was identified and demonstrated. However, the natural phenomenology was found to provide insufficient aerosol features for reliable wind sensing. The results of this study may be applicable to wind field measurement using injected aerosol tracers.

  8. TMCC WIND RESOURCE ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turtle Mountain Community College

    2003-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    North Dakota has an outstanding resource--providing more available wind for development than any other state. According to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) studies, North Dakota alone has enough energy from good wind areas, those of wind power Class 4 and higher, to supply 36% of the 1990 electricity consumption of the entire lower 48 states. At present, no more than a handful of wind turbines in the 60- to 100-kilowatt (kW) range are operating in the state. The first two utility-scale turbines were installed in North Dakota as part of a green pricing program, one in early 2002 and the second in July 2002. Both turbines are 900-kW wind turbines. Two more wind turbines are scheduled for installation by another utility later in 2002. Several reasons are evident for the lack of wind development. One primary reason is that North Dakota has more lignite coal than any other state. A number of relatively new minemouth power plants are operating in the state, resulting in an abundance of low-cost electricity. In 1998, North Dakota generated approximately 8.2 million megawatt-hours (MWh) of electricity, largely from coal-fired plants. Sales to North Dakota consumers totaled only 4.5 million MWh. In addition, the average retail cost of electricity in North Dakota was 5.7 cents per kWh in 1998. As a result of this surplus and the relatively low retail cost of service, North Dakota is a net exporter of electricity, selling approximately 50% to 60% of the electricity produced in North Dakota to markets outside the state. Keeping in mind that new electrical generation will be considered an export commodity to be sold outside the state, the transmission grid that serves to export electricity from North Dakota is at or close to its ability to serve new capacity. The markets for these resources are outside the state, and transmission access to the markets is a necessary condition for any large project. At the present time, technical assessments of the transmission network indicate that the ability to add and carry wind capacity outside of the state is limited. Identifying markets, securing long-term contracts, and obtaining a transmission path to export the power are all major steps that must be taken to develop new projects in North Dakota.

  9. Advanced Manufacture of Reflectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Angel, Roger [University of Arizona

    2014-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The main project objective has been to develop an advanced gravity sag method for molding large glass solar reflectors with either line or point focus, and with long or short focal length. The method involves taking standard sized squares of glass, 1.65 m x 1.65 m, and shaping them by gravity sag into precision steel molds. The method is designed for high volume manufacture when incorporated into a production line with separate pre-heating and cooling. The performance objectives for the self-supporting glass mirrors made by this project include mirror optical accuracy of 2 mrad root mean square (RMS), requiring surface slope errors <1 mrad rms, a target not met by current production of solar reflectors. Our objective also included development of new methods for rapidly shaping glass mirrors and coating them for higher reflectivity and soil resistance. Reflectivity of 95% for a glass mirror with anti-soil coating was targeted, compared to the present ~94% with no anti-soil coating. Our mirror cost objective is ~$20/m2 in 2020, a significant reduction compared to the present ~$35/m2 for solar trough mirrors produced for trough solar plants. During the first year a custom batch furnace was built to develop the method with high power radiative heating to simulate transfer of glass into a hot slumping zone in a production line. To preserve the original high polish of the float glass on both front and back surfaces, as required for a second surface mirror, the mold surface is machined to the required shape as grooves which intersect the glass at cusps, reducing the mold contact area to significantly less than 1%. The mold surface is gold-plated to reflect thermal radiation. Optical metrology of glass replicas made with the system has been carried out with a novel, custom-built test system. This test provides collimated, vertically-oriented parallel beams from a linear array of co-aligned lasers translated in a perpendicular direction across the reflector. Deviations of each reflected beam from the paraboloid focus give a direct measure of surface slope error. Key findings • A gravity sag method for large (2.5 m2) second surface glass solar reflectors has been developed and demonstrated to a uniquely high level of accuracy. Mirror surface slope accuracy of 0.65 mrad in one dimension, 0.85 mrad in 2 dimensions (point focus) has been demonstrated by commercial partner REhnu using this process. This accuracy exceeds by a factor of two current solar reflector accuracy. Our replicas meet the Sunshot accuracy objective of 2 mrad optical, which requires better than 1 mrad rms slope error. • Point-focus as well as line-focus mirrors have been demonstrated at 1.65 m x 1.65 m square – a unique capability. • The new process using simple molds is economical. The molds for the 1.65 m square reflectors are bent and machined steel plates on a counter-weighted flotation support. To minimize thermal coupling by radiative heat transfer, the mold surface is grooved and gilded. The molds are simple to manufacture, and have minimal thermal stresses and distortion in use. Lapping and bending techniques have been developed to obtain better than 1 mrad rms surface mold accuracy. Float glass is sagged into the molds by rapid radiative heating, using a custom high power (350 kW) furnace. The method of manufacture is well suited for small as well as large volume production, and as it requires little capital investment and no high technology, it could be used anywhere in the world to make solar concentrating reflectors. • A novel slope metrology method for full 1.65 aperture has been demonstrated, with 25 mm resolution across the face of the replicas. The method is null and therefore inherently accurate: it can easily be reproduced without high-tech equipment and does not need sophisticated calibration. We find by cross calibration with reference trough reflectors from RioGlass that our null-test laser system yields a measurement accuracy better than 0.4 mrad rms slope error. Our system is inexpensive and could have broad application for test

  10. Simulation of winds as seen by a rotating vertical axis wind turbine blade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George, R.L.

    1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this report is to provide turbulent wind analyses relevant to the design and testing of Vertical Axis Wind Turbines (VAWT). A technique was developed for utilizing high-speed turbulence wind data from a line of seven anemometers at a single level to simulate the wind seen by a rotating VAWT blade. Twelve data cases, representing a range of wind speeds and stability classes, were selected from the large volume of data available from the Clayton, New Mexico, Vertical Plane Array (VPA) project. Simulations were run of the rotationally sampled wind speed relative to the earth, as well as the tangential and radial wind speeds, which are relative to the rotating wind turbine blade. Spectral analysis is used to compare and assess wind simulations from the different wind regimes, as well as from alternate wind measurement techniques. The variance in the wind speed at frequencies at or above the blade rotation rate is computed for all cases, and is used to quantitatively compare the VAWT simulations with Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine (HAWT) simulations. Qualitative comparisons are also made with direct wind measurements from a VAWT blade.

  11. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bywaters, Garrett; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Jesse, Stowell; Costin, Daniel

    2006-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  12. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bywaters, Garrett; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Stowell, Jesse; Costin, Daniel

    2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  13. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bywaters, Garrett Lee; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Stowell, Jesse; Costin, Daniel

    2006-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  14. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bywaters, Garrett; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Jesse, Stowell; Costin, Daniel

    2007-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  15. MODEL REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS TO PROVIDE ENERGY AND OTHER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    MODEL REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS TO PROVIDE ENERGY AND OTHER ATTRIBUTES FROM AN OFFSHORE WIND POWER Gallagher for their comments and suggestions. #12;2 Model Request for Proposals to Provide Energy and other..............................................................................................................14 #12;3 Model Request for Proposals to Provide Energy and other Attributes from an Offshore Wind

  16. Development of High Temperature Capacitor Technology and Manufacturing Capability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the Development of High Temperature Capacitor Technology and Manufacturing Capability program was to mature a production-ready supply chain for reliable 250°C FPE (fluorinated polyester) film capacitors by 2011. These high-temperature film capacitors enable both the down hole drilling and aerospace industries by enabling a variety of benefits including: ? Deeper oil exploration in higher temperature and pressure environments ? Enabling power electronic and control equipment to operate in higher temperature environments ? Enabling reduced cooling requirements of electronics ? Increasing reliability and life of capacitors operating below rated temperature ? Enabling capacitors to handle higher electrical losses without overheating. The key challenges to bringing the FPE film capacitors to market have been manufacturing challenges including: ? FPE Film is difficult to handle and wind, resulting in poor yields ? Voltage breakdown strength decreases when the film is wound into capacitors (~70% decrease) ? Encapsulation technologies must be improved to enable higher temperature operation ? Manufacturing and test cycle time is very long As a direct result of this program most of the manufacturing challenges have been met. The FPE film production metalization and winding yield has increased to over 82% from 70%, and the voltage breakdown strength of the wound capacitors has increased 270% to 189 V/?m. The high temperature packaging concepts are showing significant progress including promising results for lead attachments and hermetic packages at 200°C and non-hermetic packages at 250°C. Manufacturing and test cycle time will decrease as the market for FPE capacitors develops.

  17. National Wind Technology Center (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This overview fact sheet is one in a series of information fact sheets for the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). Wind energy is one of the fastest growing electricity generation sources in the world. NREL's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), the nation's premier wind energy technology research facility, fosters innovative wind energy technologies in land-based and offshore wind through its research and testing facilities and extends these capabilities to marine hydrokinetic water power. Research and testing conducted at the NWTC offers specialized facilities and personnel and provides technical support critical to the development of advanced wind energy systems. From the base of a system's tower to the tips of its blades, NREL researchers work side-by-side with wind industry partners to increase system reliability and reduce wind energy costs. The NWTC's centrally located research and test facilities at the foot of the Colorado Rockies experience diverse and robust wind patterns ideal for testing. The NWTC tests wind turbine components, complete wind energy systems and prototypes from 400 watts to multiple megawatts in power rating.

  18. Wind Technologies & Evolving Opportunities (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robichaud, R.

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation covers opportunities for wind technology; wind energy market trends; an overview of the National Wind Technology Center near Boulder, Colorado; wind energy price and cost trends; wind turbine technology improvements; and wind resource characterization improvements.

  19. Implications of a PTC Extension on U.S. Wind Deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.; Steinberg, D.; Mendelsohn, M.; Zinaman, O.; James, T.; Porro, G.; Hand, M.; Mai, T.; Logan, J.; Heeter, J.; Bird, L.

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This analysis explores the potential effects of wind production tax credit expiration and various extension scenarios on future wind deployment with the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS), a model of the U.S. electricity sector. The analysis does not estimate the potential implications on government tax revenue associated with the PTC. Key findings include: Under a scenario in which the PTC is not extended and all other policies remain unchanged, wind capacity additions are expected to be between 3 and 5 GW per year from 2013-2020; PTC extension options that ramp-down from the current level to zero-credit by year-end 2022 appear to be insufficient to support deployment at the recent historical average; Extending the PTC at its historical level may provide the best opportunity to support deployment consistent with recent levels across a range of potential market conditions; it therefore may also provide the best opportunity to sustain wind power installation and manufacturing sector at current levels.

  20. A National Offshore Wind Strategy: Creating an Offshore Wind...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    A National Offshore Wind Strategy: Creating an Offshore Wind Energy Industry in the United States A National Offshore Wind Strategy: Creating an Offshore Wind Energy Industry in...

  1. Wind pro?le assessment for wind power purposes.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sointu, Iida

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Preliminary estimation of wind speed at the wind turbine hub height is critically important when planning new wind farms. Wind turbine power output is proportional… (more)

  2. Wind Powering America Webinar: Wind Power Economics: Past, Present...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Wind Powering America Webinar: Wind Power Economics: Past, Present, and Future Trends Wind Powering America Webinar: Wind Power Economics: Past, Present, and Future Trends November...

  3. Community Wind Handbook/Understand Your Wind Resource and Conduct...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wind Resource and Conduct a Preliminary Estimate < Community Wind Handbook Jump to: navigation, search WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHCommunity Wind Handbook...

  4. 2015 Iowa Wind Power Conference and Iowa Wind Energy Association...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2015 Iowa Wind Power Conference and Iowa Wind Energy Association Midwest Regional Energy Job Fair 2015 Iowa Wind Power Conference and Iowa Wind Energy Association Midwest Regional...

  5. Variability of wind power near Oklahoma City and implications for siting of wind turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kessler, E.; Eyster, R.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data from five sites near Oklahoma City were examined to assess wind power availability. Wind turbines of identical manufacture were operated at three of the sites, one of which was also equipped with anemometers on a 100-ft tower. Comprehensive anemometric data were available from the other two sites. The study indicates that the average wind speed varies substantially over Oklahoma's rolling plains, which have often been nominally regarded as flat for purposes of wind power generation. Average wind differences may be as much as 5 mph at 20 ft above ground level, and 7 mph at 100 ft above ground level for elevation differences of about 200 ft above mean sea level, even in the absence of substantial features of local terrain. Local altitude above mean sea level seems to be as influential as the shape of local terrain in determining the average wind speed. The wind turbine used at a meteorologically instrumented site in the study produced the power expected from it for the wind regime in which it was situated. The observed variations of local wind imply variations in annual kWh of as much as a factor of four between identical turbines located at similar heights above ground level in shallow valleys and on hilltops or elevated extended flat areas. 17 refs., 39 figs., 11 tabs.

  6. Methods and apparatus for rotor load control in wind turbines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moroz, Emilian Mieczyslaw

    2006-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A wind turbine having a rotor, at least one rotor blade, and a plurality of generators, of which a first generator is configured to provide power to an electric grid and a second generator is configured to provide power to the wind turbine during times of grid loss. The wind turbine is configured to utilize power provided by the second generator to reduce loads on the wind turbine during times of grid loss.

  7. Building a New Energy Future with Wind Power (Revised) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind and Water Power Program's wind power research activities.

  8. Wind Power Development in the United States: Current Progress, Future Trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    also concludes that the integration of 20% wind into U.S.and integration costs, Figure 4 provides a supply curve for wind

  9. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wind turbine components (specifically, generators, bladeschangers. ” Wind turbine components such as blades, towers,17%). Wind turbine component exports (towers, blades,

  10. Bio-Manufacturing: A Strategic clean energy manufacturing opportunity

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 1: New Developments and Hot Topics Session 1-A: Biomass and the U.S. Competitive Advantages for Manufacturing Clean Energy Products Libby Wayman, Director, EERE Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative

  11. Wind Integration Datasets from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Wind Integration Datasets provide time-series wind data for 2004, 2005, and 2006. They are intended to be used by energy professionals such as transmission planners, utility planners, project developers, and university researchers, helping them to perform comparisons of sites and estimate power production from hypothetical wind plants. NREL cautions that the information from modeled data may not match wind resource information shown on NREL;s state wind maps as they were created for different purposes and using different methodologies.

  12. Wind: wind power density maps at 50 m above ground and 400m resolution...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    maps of Sri Lanka (Purpose):HTMLREMOVEDHTMLREMOVEDTo provide information on the wind resource potential within Sri Lanka, with supplemental information on political...

  13. Wind: wind power density maps at 50m above ground and 1km resolution...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    density for Ghana. (Purpose):HTMLREMOVEDHTMLREMOVEDTo provide information on the wind resource potential in Ghana. Data and Resources Download MapsZIP Download Maps More...

  14. Wind: wind power density GIS data at 50m above ground and 400m...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    density for Sri Lanka (Purpose):HTMLREMOVEDHTMLREMOVEDTo provide information on the wind resource potential within Sri Lanka and selected offshore areas (Supplemental...

  15. Wind: wind power density GIS data at 50m above ground and 1km...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    IMAGEGRID command. (Purpose):HTMLREMOVEDHTMLREMOVEDTo provide information on the wind resource potential in Cuba. Values range from 0 to 547. (Supplemental Information):...

  16. Wind: wind power density maps at 50 m above ground and 1km resolution...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    density for Cuba. (Purpose):HTMLREMOVEDHTMLREMOVEDTo provide information on the wind resource potential in Cuba. Data and Resources Download MapsZIP Download Maps More...

  17. Wind: wind power density GIS data at 50m above ground and 1km...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for Central America (Purpose):HTMLREMOVEDHTMLREMOVEDTo provide information on the wind resource potential within the following countries in Central America: Belize, El...

  18. Wind: wind power density maps at 50m above ground and 1km resolution...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Central America. (Purpose):HTMLREMOVEDHTMLREMOVEDTo provide information on the wind resource potential within the following countries in Central America: Belize, El...

  19. EPAct at One Event - Clipper Wind Manufacturing Facility | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: TopEnergy DOEDealingVehicle1:EnergyDecemberof Energy87:EPAct 2005Energy

  20. Shenyang Tianxiang Wind Equipments Manufacturing Co Ltd | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpenWende New EnergyAnatoliaSciraShenhua Guohua EnergyTendo

  1. Wind Program Manufacturing Research Advances Processes and Reduces Costs |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment of Energyof Energy This webinar is part of the U.S.The

  2. Wind Energy In America: Supporting Our Manufacturers | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Owned SmallOf TheViolations | Department of EnergyisWilliam Bryan,PerryEnergy

  3. U.S. Offshore Wind Manufacturing and Supply Chain Development

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    transferability for entrants inexperienced with other offshore markets (e.g., oil and gas) poses risk to investment should consistent demand fail to develop. (1) See Table 2-3...

  4. Indian Wind Turbine Manufacturers Association | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpen EnergyBoard"Starting a newIGUSLLC

  5. Iskra Wind Turbine Manufacturers Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpen EnergyBoard"StartingInteruniversity MicroTN

  6. Nordex Dongying Wind Power Equipment Manufacturing Co Ltd | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpenWende New Energy CoFirst SecondTianjing Shenzhou

  7. Nordex Yinchuan Wind Power Equipment Manufacturing Co Ltd | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpenWende New Energy CoFirst SecondTianjing ShenzhouInformation

  8. Recovery Act Incentives for Wind Energy Equipment Manufacturing |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergyDepartmentEnergy DataRemediated | Department of EnergyDepartment

  9. Property:WindTurbineManufacturer | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExploration JumpSanyalTempWellhead JumpCapabilities" Showing 25 pages using

  10. 20% Wind Energy by 2030 - Chapter 3: Manufacturing, Materials, and

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' Research PetroleumDepartmentWomen17.2 (June 2004) 1 CostQuarterly Report|

  11. Hebei Yeelong Wind Power Equipment Manufacturing Co Ltd | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpen EnergyBoard" form.Guizhou New MaterialHanHawiOpen

  12. Recovery Act Incentives for Wind Energy Equipment Manufacturing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L dDepartment ofList?Department09 Section 9990 RecoverDepartment2009,

  13. U.S. Offshore Wind Manufacturing and Supply Chain Development

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment of Dept. of Energy, Office ofNuclear Weapons StrategyU.S. Offshore

  14. Ohio Advanced Energy Manufacturing Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimberly Gibson; Mark Norfolk

    2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The program goal of the Ohio Advanced Energy Manufacturing Center (OAEMC) is to support advanced energy manufacturing and to create responsive manufacturing clusters that will support the production of advanced energy and energy-efficient products to help ensure the nation's energy and environmental security. This goal cuts across a number of existing industry segments critical to the nation's future. Many of the advanced energy businesses are starting to make the transition from technology development to commercial production. Historically, this transition from laboratory prototypes through initial production for early adopters to full production for mass markets has taken several years. Developing and implementing manufacturing technology to enable production at a price point the market will accept is a key step. Since these start-up operations are configured to advance the technology readiness of the core energy technology, they have neither the expertise nor the resources to address manufacturing readiness issues they encounter as the technology advances toward market entry. Given the economic realities of today's business environment, finding ways to accelerate this transition can make the difference between success and failure for a new product or business. The advanced energy industry touches a wide range of industry segments that are not accustomed to working together in complex supply chains to serve large markets such as automotive and construction. During its first three years, the Center has catalyzed the communication between companies and industry groups that serve the wide range of advanced energy markets. The Center has also found areas of common concern, and worked to help companies address these concerns on a segment or industry basis rather than having each company work to solve common problems individually. EWI worked with three industries through public-private partnerships to sew together disparate segments helping to promote overall industry health. To aid the overall advanced energy industry, EWI developed and launched an Ohio chapter of the non-profit Advanced Energy Economy. In this venture, Ohio joins with six other states including Colorado, Connecticut, Illinois, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Vermont to help promote technologies that deliver energy that is affordable, abundant and secure. In a more specific arena, EWI's advanced energy group collaborated with the EWI-run Nuclear Fabrication Consortium to promote the nuclear supply chain. Through this project EWI has helped bring the supply chain up to date for the upcoming period of construction, and assisted them in understanding the demands for the next generation of facilities now being designed. In a more targeted manner, EWI worked with 115 individual advanced energy companies that are attempting to bring new technology to market. First, these interactions helped EWI develop an awareness of issues common to companies in different advanced energy sectors. By identifying and addressing common issues, EWI helps companies bring technology to market sooner and at a lower cost. These visits also helped EWI develop a picture of industry capability. This helped EWI provide companies with contacts that can supply commercial solutions to their new product development challenges. By providing assistance in developing supply chain partnerships, EWI helped companies bring their technology to market faster and at a lower cost than they might have been able to do by themselves. Finally, at the most granular level EWI performed dedicated research and development on new manufacturing processes for advanced energy. During discussions with companies participating in advanced energy markets, several technology issues that cut across market segments were identified. To address some of these issues, three crosscutting technology development projects were initiated and completed with Center support. This included reversible welds for batteries and high temperature heat exchangers. It also included a novel advanced weld trainer that EWI

  15. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and K. Porter. 2011. Wind Power and Electricity Markets.41 6. Wind Power Priceat Various Levels of Wind Power Capacity Penetration Wind

  16. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prepared for the Utility Wind Integration Group. Arlington,Arizona Public Service Wind Integration Cost Impact Study.an Order Revising the Wind Integration Rate for Wind Powered

  17. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2010. SPP WITF Wind Integration Study. Little Rock,an Order Revising the Wind Integration Rate for Wind PoweredPacifiCorp. 2010. 2010 Wind Integration Study. Portland,

  18. On the Fatigue Analysis of Wind Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutherland, Herbert J.

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modern wind turbines are fatigue critical machines that are typically used to produce electrical power from the wind. Operational experiences with these large rotating machines indicated that their components (primarily blades and blade joints) were failing at unexpectedly high rates, which led the wind turbine community to develop fatigue analysis capabilities for wind turbines. Our ability to analyze the fatigue behavior of wind turbine components has matured to the point that the prediction of service lifetime is becoming an essential part of the design process. In this review paper, I summarize the technology and describe the ''best practices'' for the fatigue analysis of a wind turbine component. The paper focuses on U.S. technology, but cites European references that provide important insights into the fatigue analysis of wind turbines.

  19. SeaWinds Wind Retrieval Quality Assessment David G. Long, Andrew S . Fletcher, and David W. Draper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    SeaWinds Wind Retrieval Quality Assessment David G. Long, Andrew S . Fletcher, and David W. Draper.edu,fletchas@ee.byu.edu,draperd@ee.byu.edu 801-378-4884, FAX: 801-37a-6586 ABSTRACT The SeaWinds on QuikScat scatterometer is the first winds. In this paper we provide an assessment of the reliability of the SeaWinds ambiguity selection

  20. Western Wind Strategy: Addressing Critical Issues for Wind Deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas Larson; Thomas Carr

    2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the Western Wind Strategy project was to help remove critical barriers to wind development in the Western Interconnection. The four stated objectives of this project were to: (1) identify the barriers, particularly barriers to the operational integration of renewables and barriers identified by load-serving entities (LSEs) that will be buying wind generation, (2) communicate the barriers to state officials, (3) create a collaborative process to address those barriers with the Western states, utilities and the renewable industry, and (4) provide a role model for other regions. The project has been on the forefront of identifying and informing state policy makers and utility regulators of critical issues related to wind energy and the integration of variable generation. The project has been a critical component in the efforts of states to push forward important reforms and innovations that will enable states to meet their renewable energy goals and lower the cost to consumers of integrating variable generation.

  1. Is the Weibull distribution really suited for wind statistics modeling and wind power evaluation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drobinski, Philippe

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind speed statistics is generally modeled using the Weibull distribution. This distribution is convenient since it fully characterizes analytically with only two parameters (the shape and scale parameters) the shape of distribution and the different moments of the wind speed (mean, standard deviation, skewness and kurtosis). This distribution is broadly used in the wind energy sector to produce maps of wind energy potential. However, the Weibull distribution is based on empirical rather than physical justification and might display strong limitations for its applications. The philosophy of this article is based on the modeling of the wind components instead of the wind speed itself. This provides more physical insights on the validity domain of the Weibull distribution as a possible relevant model for wind statistics and the quantification of the error made by using such a distribution. We thereby propose alternative expressions of more suited wind speed distribution.

  2. Wind Power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and MaterialsWenjun DengWISPWind Industry Soars to New1Wind Power

  3. Wind Power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert SouthwestTechnologies | Blandine Jerome Careers at WIPPCompletes aboutWind Energy

  4. U.S. Manufacturing Energy Use and Loss: The Big Picture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brueske, S.; Sabouni, R.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A first step in realizing industrial energy efficiency opportunities is to understand how industry is using, and losing, energy. The U.S. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints provide a reliable macro-scale reference for manufacturing energy...

  5. An Analysis of Wind Power Development in the Town of Hull, MA, Appendix 2: LaCapra Financial Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, Christopher

    2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The financial analysis and summary results presented in this document represent a first cut at an economic assessment of the proposed Hull Offshore Wind Project. Wind turbine price increases have outpaced the materials and labor price pressures faced by nonrenewable power plant developers due to increased demands on a limited pool of turbine manufacturers and offshore installation companies. Moreover, given the size of the proposed offshore facility, it may be difficult to contract with turbine manufacturers and/or foundation companies given the size and scope of competing worldwide demand. The results described in this report assume that such conditions will not significantly impact the prices that will have to be received from the output of the project; rather, the project size may require as a prerequisite that Hull be able to piggyback on other offshore efforts. The financial estimates provided here necessarily feature a range due to uncertainty in a number of project assumptions as well as overall uncertainty in offshore wind costs. Nevertheless, taken together, the analysis provides a ballpark revenue requirement of approximately $157/MWh for the municipal financing option, with higher estimates possible assuming escalation in costs to levels higher than assumed here.

  6. Role of the DAPIA in the manufactured housing process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balistocky, S.; Lee, A.D.; Onisko, S.A.

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the function of Design Approval Primary Inspection Agencies (DAPIAs) and provides some insights into the design approval process for manufacturing housing units. DAPIAs play a key role in assuring that the designs for manufactured housing units are in compliance with HUD's Manufactured Housing Constructing and Safety Standards. There are five DAPIAs performing plan checks and design reviews for the manufacturing operating in the Pacific Northwest region. The costs to a manufacturer for DAPIA services ranges from $100 to $250 to approve modifications to existing designs and $700 to $1200 to approve a totally new design. Each DAPIA indicated that they would be willing to work with BPA in some way to assist manufacturers produce units which can achieve MCS levels. They would be available for energy design consultation on an informal basis. In addition they would be willing to consider formal certifications of MCS designs if BPA develops evaluation criteria which they can apply.

  7. Bolt Manufacture: Process Selection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colton, Jonathan S.

    file · Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) 3 D P i ti· 3-D Printing · Light Engineered Net Shaping (LENS Processes and Systems Prof. J.S. Colton © GIT 2009 20 #12;3D Printing Process (Soligen) ME 6222: Manufacturing Processes and Systems Prof. J.S. Colton © GIT 2009 21 #12;3D Printing Head (Soligen)3D Printing

  8. Manufacturing High Temperature Systems

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of Energy Low-TemperatureEnergyAll ManufacturingFoodOctoberto DOE

  9. Manufacturing Success Stories

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: AlternativeEnvironment, SafetyWater ConservationDepartmentEnergy Manufacturing Energy6

  10. EK 131/132 module: Introduction to Wind Energy MW 3-5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EK 131/132 module: Introduction to Wind Energy MW 3-5 Course. This course provides an overview of wind turbine technology and energy concepts. The question of whether wind. Students will measure personal energy use and analyze wind turbine data from the Museum of Science's wind

  11. Manufacturing Tech Team | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Manufacturing Tech Team Manufacturing Tech Team Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Industrial Efficiency and Energy Productivity Video Industrial efficiency and low-cost energy...

  12. Leveraging Manufacturing for a Sustainable Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dornfeld, David

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Implementing Green Manufacturing”, NAMRI Trans. , 35,Strategies for Green Manufacturing,” Proc. 4th CIRPAnd, in specific green manufacturing? This will depend on

  13. Sustainable Manufacturing – Greening Processes, Systems and Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dornfeld, David

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strategies for Green Manufacturing, " Proceedings HighFH), Implementing green manufacturing, as the first stepASME, Evanston, IL, Green Manufacturing uk/sustainability/

  14. Appropriate use of Green Manufacturing Frameworks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reich-Weiser, Corinne; Vijayaraghavan, Athulan; Dornfeld, David

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Implementing Green Manufacturing,” Trans. North AmericanAppropriate use of Green Manufacturing Frameworks C. Reich-for sustainable or green manufacturing systems and products,

  15. Establishing Greener Products and Manufacturing Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linke, Barbara; Huang, Yu-Chu; Dornfeld, David

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for implementing green manufacturing,” Trans. North AmericaStrategies for Green Manufacturing,” Proc. of the 4th CIRPAppropriate Use of Green Manufacturing Frameworks,” Proc. of

  16. Establishing Greener Products and Manufacturing Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linke, Barbara; Dornfeld, David; Huang, Yu-Chu

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operation Strategies for Green Manufacturing, Proceedings ofSymposium on Green Manufacturing and Applications (ISGMAfor implementing green manufacturing. Transactions of NAMRI/

  17. Innovative Manufacturing Initiative Recognition Day, Advanced...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Publications Innovative Manufacturing Initiative Recognition Day Advanced Manufacturing Office Overview Unlocking the Potential of Additive Manufacturing in the Fuel Cells Industry...

  18. Precision and Energy Usage for Additive Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clemon, Lee; Sudradjat, Anton; Jaquez, Maribel; Krishna, Aditya; Rammah, Marwan; Dornfeld, David

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sustainability of additive manufacturing: measuring theCommittee F42 on Additive Manufacturing Technologies," TheASTM Committee F42 on Additive Manufacturing Technologies. -

  19. Leveraging Manufacturing for a Sustainable Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dornfeld, David

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2010): “Sustainable Manufacturing – Greening Processes,processes and systems) can play in creating a sustainablesustainable manufacturing as “the creation of manufacturing products that use materials and processes

  20. Establishing Greener Products and Manufacturing Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linke, Barbara; Huang, Yu-Chu; Dornfeld, David

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    D. , “Sustainable Manufacturing - Greening Processes,Avoid) Increase process efficiency Most sustainable (Improvesustainable manufacturing. 2 They highlighted research needs in four categories: i) manufacturing processes and

  1. Sustainable Manufacturing – Greening Processes, Systems and Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dornfeld, David

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mittels Sustainable Manufacturing - Greening Processes,Sustainable for manufacturing Manufacturing Cambridge, accessed processes,processes due to energy awareness and environmental consciousness create many opportunities for sustainable

  2. Establishing Greener Products and Manufacturing Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linke, Barbara; Dornfeld, David; Huang, Yu-Chu

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    D. , Sustainable Manufacturing – Greening Processes, Systemsor impact low Most  sustainable Increase process efficiencysustainable manufacturing [1]. They highlighted research needs in four categories: i) manufacturing processes and

  3. Manufactured Home Energy Audit user`s manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Manufactured Home Energy Audit (MHEA) is a software tool that predicts manufactured home energy consumption and recommends weatherization retrofit measures. It was developed to assist local weatherization agencies working with the US Department of Energy (DOE) Weatherization Assistance Program. Whether new or experienced, employed within or outside the Weatherization Assistance Program, all users can benefit from incorporating MHEA into their manufactured home weatherization programs. DOE anticipates that the state weatherization assistance programs that incorporate MHEA into their programs will find significant growth in the energy and cost savings achieved from manufactured home weatherization. The easy-to-use MHEA displays a colorful, graphical interface for entering simple inputs and provides understandable, usable results. The user enters information about the manufactured home construction, heating equipment, cooling equipment, and weather site. MHEA then calculates annual energy consumption using a simplified building energy analysis technique. MHEA stands apart from other building energy analysis tools in many ways. Calculations incorporated into the computer code specifically address manufactured home heating and cooling load trends. The retrofit measures evaluated by MHEA are all applicable to manufactured homes. Help messages describe common manufactured home weatherization practices as well as provide hints on how to install retrofit measures. These and other features help make MHEA easy to use when evaluating energy consumption and the effects of weatherization retrofit measures for manufactured homes.

  4. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, R.; Bolinger, M.

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. wind power industry experienced yet another record year in 2009, once again surpassing even optimistic growth projections from years past. At the same time, 2009 was a year of upheaval, with the global financial crisis impacting the wind power industry and with federal policy changes enacted to push the industry toward continued aggressive expansion. The year 2010, meanwhile, is anticipated to be one of some retrenchment, with expectations for fewer wind power capacity additions than seen in 2009. The rapid pace of development and change within the industry has made it difficult to keep up with trends in the marketplace, yet the need for timely, objective information on the industry and its progress has never been greater. This report - the fourth in an ongoing annual series - attempts to meet this need by providing a detailed overview of developments and trends in the United States wind power market, with a particular focus on 2009.

  5. Mass Transfer by Stellar Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boffin, Henri M J

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I review the process of mass transfer in a binary system through a stellar wind, with an emphasis on systems containing a red giant. I show how wind accretion in a binary system is different from the usually assumed Bondi-Hoyle approximation, first as far as the flow's structure is concerned, but most importantly, also for the mass accretion and specific angular momentum loss. This has important implications on the evolution of the orbital parameters. I also discuss the impact of wind accretion, on the chemical pollution and change in spin of the accreting star. The last section deals with observations and covers systems that most likely went through wind mass transfer: barium and related stars, symbiotic stars and central stars of planetary nebulae (CSPN). The most recent observations of cool CSPN progenitors of barium stars, as well as of carbon-rich post-common envelope systems, are providing unique constraints on the mass transfer processes.

  6. Wind resource assessment and siting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bortz, S.A. (IIT Research Inst., Chicago, IL); Fieldhouse, I.; Budenholzer, R.A.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this program was to investigate the feasibility of employing wind power as a possible energy source to the New Hampshire power grid. Wind data was obtained from the New Hampshire State Forestry Service, the State Climatologist as well as other miscellaneous sources. Data on power generation and the power grid system was received from the Public Service Company of New Hampshire. Using this information as a data base, siting studies were made which indicated that there was a potential for a wind energy system in New Hampshire. Costs of fossil fuel generated power were compared to estimated wind generated production costs of electric energy fed into the Public Service Company of New Hampshire lines for various potential WECS sites. Based on the data and analysis provided in this study, it appears that WECS can be usefully developed in New Hampshire which would result in significant savings in fuel oil consumption.

  7. IntroductionIntroduction The use of small scale vertical axis wind turbinesThe use of small scale vertical axis wind turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullis, Stephen

    IntroductionIntroduction The use of small scale vertical axis wind turbinesThe use of small scale vertical axis wind turbines (VAWT) is being studied at McMaster University using(VAWT) is being studied at McMaster University using a prototype wind turbine provided bya prototype wind turbine provided

  8. Coastal Ohio Wind Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorsevski, Peter; Afjeh, Abdollah; Jamali, Mohsin; Bingman, Verner

    2014-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Coastal Ohio Wind Project intends to address problems that impede deployment of wind turbines in the coastal and offshore regions of Northern Ohio. The project evaluates different wind turbine designs and the potential impact of offshore turbines on migratory and resident birds by developing multidisciplinary research, which involves wildlife biology, electrical and mechanical engineering, and geospatial science. Firstly, the project conducts cost and performance studies of two- and three-blade wind turbines using a turbine design suited for the Great Lakes. The numerical studies comprised an analysis and evaluation of the annual energy production of two- and three-blade wind turbines to determine the levelized cost of energy. This task also involved wind tunnel studies of model wind turbines to quantify the wake flow field of upwind and downwind wind turbine-tower arrangements. The experimental work included a study of a scaled model of an offshore wind turbine platform in a water tunnel. The levelized cost of energy work consisted of the development and application of a cost model to predict the cost of energy produced by a wind turbine system placed offshore. The analysis found that a floating two-blade wind turbine presents the most cost effective alternative for the Great Lakes. The load effects studies showed that the two-blade wind turbine model experiences less torque under all IEC Standard design load cases considered. Other load effects did not show this trend and depending on the design load cases, the two-bladed wind turbine showed higher or lower load effects. The experimental studies of the wake were conducted using smoke flow visualization and hot wire anemometry. Flow visualization studies showed that in the downwind turbine configuration the wake flow was insensitive to the presence of the blade and was very similar to that of the tower alone. On the other hand, in the upwind turbine configuration, increasing the rotor blade angle of attack reduced the wake size and enhanced the vortices in the flow downstream of the turbine-tower compared with the tower alone case. Mean and rms velocity distributions from hot wire anemometer data confirmed that in a downwind configuration, the wake of the tower dominates the flow, thus the flow fields of a tower alone and tower-turbine combinations are nearly the same. For the upwind configuration, the mean velocity shows a narrowing of the wake compared with the tower alone case. The downwind configuration wake persisted longer than that of an upwind configuration; however, it was not possible to quantify this difference because of the size limitation of the wind tunnel downstream of the test section. The water tunnel studies demonstrated that the scale model studies could be used to adequately produce accurate motions to model the motions of a wind turbine platform subject to large waves. It was found that the important factors that affect the platform is whether the platform is submerged or surface piercing. In the former, the loads on the platform will be relatively reduced whereas in the latter case, the structure pierces the wave free surface and gains stiffness and stability. The other important element that affects the movement of the platform is depth of the sea in which the wind turbine will be installed. Furthermore, the wildlife biology component evaluated migratory patterns by different monitoring systems consisting of marine radar, thermal IR camera and acoustic recorders. The types of radar used in the project are weather surveillance radar and marine radar. The weather surveillance radar (1988 Doppler), also known as Next Generation Radar (NEXRAD), provides a network of weather stations in the US. Data generated from this network were used to understand general migratory patterns, migratory stopover habitats, and other patterns caused by the effects of weather conditions. At a local scale our marine radar was used to complement the datasets from NEXRAD and to collect additional monitoring parameters such as passage rates, flight paths, flight directi

  9. Hurricane Katrina Wind Investigation Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desjarlais, A. O.

    2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This investigation of roof damage caused by Hurricane Katrina is a joint effort of the Roofing Industry Committee on Weather Issues, Inc. (RICOWI) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory/U.S. Department of Energy (ORNL/DOE). The Wind Investigation Program (WIP) was initiated in 1996. Hurricane damage that met the criteria of a major windstorm event did not materialize until Hurricanes Charley and Ivan occurred in August 2004. Hurricane Katrina presented a third opportunity for a wind damage investigation in August 29, 2005. The major objectives of the WIP are as follows: (1) to investigate the field performance of roofing assemblies after major wind events; (2) to factually describe roofing assembly performance and modes of failure; and (3) to formally report results of the investigations and damage modes for substantial wind speeds The goal of the WIP is to perform unbiased, detailed investigations by credible personnel from the roofing industry, the insurance industry, and academia. Data from these investigations will, it is hoped, lead to overall improvement in roofing products, systems, roofing application, and durability and a reduction in losses, which may lead to lower overall costs to the public. This report documents the results of an extensive and well-planned investigative effort. The following program changes were implemented as a result of the lessons learned during the Hurricane Charley and Ivan investigations: (1) A logistics team was deployed to damage areas immediately following landfall; (2) Aerial surveillance--imperative to target wind damage areas--was conducted; (3) Investigation teams were in place within 8 days; (4) Teams collected more detailed data; and (5) Teams took improved photographs and completed more detailed photo logs. Participating associations reviewed the results and lessons learned from the previous investigations and many have taken the following actions: (1) Moved forward with recommendations for new installation procedures; (2) Updated and improved application guidelines and manuals from associations and manufacturers; (3) Launched certified product installer programs; and (4) Submitted building code changes to improve product installation. Estimated wind speeds at the damage locations came from simulated hurricane models prepared by Applied Research Associates of Raleigh, North Carolina. A dynamic hurricane wind field model was calibrated to actual wind speeds measured at 12 inland and offshore stations. The maximum estimated peak gust wind speeds in Katrina were in the 120-130 mph range. Hurricane Katrina made landfall near Grand Isle, Louisiana, and traveled almost due north across the city of New Orleans. Hurricane winds hammered the coastline from Houma, Louisiana, to Pensacola, Florida. The severe flooding problems in New Orleans made it almost impossible for the investigating teams to function inside the city. Thus the WIP investigations were all conducted in areas east of the city. The six teams covered the coastal areas from Bay Saint Louis, Mississippi, on the west to Pascagoula, Mississippi, on the east. Six teams involving a total of 25 persons documented damage to both low slope and steep slope roofing systems. The teams collected specific information on each building examined, including type of structure (use or occupancy), wall construction, roof type, roof slope, building dimensions, roof deck, insulation, construction, and method of roof attachment. In addition, the teams noted terrain exposure and the estimated wind speeds at the building site from the Katrina wind speed map. With each team member assigned a specific duty, they described the damage in detail and illustrated important features with numerous color photos. Where possible, the points of damage initiation were identified and damage propagation described. Because the wind speeds in Katrina at landfall, where the investigations took place, were less than code-specified design speeds, one would expect roof damage to be minimal. One team speculated that damage to all roofs in the area they examined was les

  10. Simulation and Optimization of Wind Farm Operations under Stochastic Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byon, Eunshin

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    generation model, wind speed model, and maintenance model. We provide practical insights gained by examining di erent maintenance strategies. To the best of our knowledge, our simulation model is the rst discrete-event simulation model for wind farm...

  11. Solar and Wind Easements and Local Option Rights Laws

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Minnesota law provides for the creation of solar and wind easements for solar and wind-energy systems. As in many other states, these easements are voluntary contracts. However, unlike similar...

  12. Applications of Systems Engineering to the Research, Design, and Development of Wind Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dykes, K.; Meadows, R.; Felker, F.; Graf, P.; Hand, M.; Lunacek, M.; Michalakes, J.; Moriarty, P.; Musial, W.; Veers, P.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper surveys the landscape of systems engineering methods and current wind modeling capabilities to assess the potential for development of a systems engineering to wind energy research, design, and development. Wind energy has evolved from a small industry in a few countries to a large international industry involving major organizations in the manufacturing, development, and utility sectors. Along with this growth, significant technology innovation has led to larger turbines with lower associated costs of energy and ever more complex designs for all major subsystems - from the rotor, hub, and tower to the drivetrain, electronics, and controls. However, as large-scale deployment of the technology continues and its contribution to electricity generation becomes more prominent, so have the expectations of the technology in terms of performance and cost. For the industry to become a sustainable source of electricity, innovation in wind energy technology must continue to improve performance and lower the cost of energy while supporting seamless integration of wind generation into the electric grid without significant negative impacts on local communities and environments. At the same time, issues associated with wind energy research, design, and development are noticeably increasing in complexity. The industry would benefit from an integrated approach that simultaneously addresses turbine design, plant design and development, grid interaction and operation, and mitigation of adverse community and environmental impacts. These activities must be integrated in order to meet this diverse set of goals while recognizing trade-offs that exist between them. While potential exists today to integrate across different domains within the wind energy system design process, organizational barriers such as different institutional objectives and the importance of proprietary information have previously limited a system level approach to wind energy research, design, and development. To address these challenges, NREL has embarked on an initiative to evaluate how methods of systems engineering can be applied to the research, design and development of wind energy systems. Systems engineering is a field within engineering with a long history of research and application to complex technical systems in domains such as aerospace, automotive, and naval architecture. As such, the field holds potential for addressing critical issues that face the wind industry today. This paper represents a first step for understanding this potential through a review of systems engineering methods as applied to related technical systems. It illustrates how this might inform a Wind Energy Systems Engineering (WESE) approach to the research, design, and development needs for the future of the industry. Section 1 provides a brief overview of systems engineering and wind as a complex system. Section 2 describes these system engineering methods in detail. Section 3 provides an overview of different types of design tools for wind energy with emphasis on NREL tools. Finally, Section 4 provides an overview of the role and importance of software architecture and computing to the use of systems engineering methods and the future development of any WESE programs. Section 5 provides a roadmap of potential research integrating systems engineering research methodologies and wind energy design tools for a WESE framework.

  13. Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 4. The Northeast region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pickering, K.E.; Vilardo, J.M.; Schakenbach, J.T.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This atlas of the wind energy resource is composed of introductory and background information, a regional summary of the wind resource, and assessments of the wind resource in each state of the region. Background is presented on how the wind resource is assessed and on how the results of the assessment should be interpreted. A description of the wind resource on a regional scale is then given. The results of the wind energy assessments for each state are assembled in this chapter into an overview and summary of the various features of the regional wind energy resource. An introduction and outline are provided for in the descriptions of the wind resource given for each state. Assessments for individual states are presented. The state wind energy resources are described in greater detail than is the regional wind energy resource, and features of selected stations are discussed. This preface outlines the use and interpretation of the information found in the state chapters.

  14. Lake Michigan Offshore Wind Feasibility Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boezaart, Arnold [GVSU; Edmonson, James [GVSU; Standridge, Charles [GVSU; Pervez, Nahid [GVSU; Desai, Neel [University of Michigan; Williams, Bruce [University of Delaware; Clark, Aaron [GVSU; Zeitler, David [GVSU; Kendall, Scott [GVSU; Biddanda, Bopi [GVSU; Steinman, Alan [GVSU; Klatt, Brian [Michigan State University; Gehring, J. L. [Michigan State University; Walter, K. [Michigan State University; Nordman, Erik E. [GVSU

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project was to conduct the first comprehensive offshore wind assessment over Lake Michigan and to advance the body of knowledge needed to support future commercial wind energy development on the Great Lakes. The project involved evaluation and selection of emerging wind measurement technology and the permitting, installation and operation of the first mid-lake wind assessment meteorological (MET) facilities in Michigan’s Great Lakes. In addition, the project provided the first opportunity to deploy and field test floating LIDAR and Laser Wind Sensor (LWS) technology, and important research related equipment key to the sitting and permitting of future offshore wind energy development in accordance with public participation guidelines established by the Michigan Great Lakes Wind Council (GLOW). The project created opportunities for public dialogue and community education about offshore wind resource management and continued the dialogue to foster Great Lake wind resource utilization consistent with the focus of the GLOW Council. The technology proved to be effective, affordable, mobile, and the methods of data measurement accurate. The public benefited from a substantial increase in knowledge of the wind resources over Lake Michigan and gained insights about the potential environmental impacts of offshore wind turbine placements in the future. The unique first ever hub height wind resource assessment using LWS technology over water and development of related research data along with the permitting, sitting, and deployment of the WindSentinel MET buoy has captured public attention and has helped to increase awareness of the potential of future offshore wind energy development on the Great Lakes. Specifically, this project supported the acquisition and operation of a WindSentinel (WS) MET wind assessment buoy, and associated research for 549 days over multiple years at three locations on Lake Michigan. Four research objectives were defined for the project including to: 1) test and validate floating LIDAR technology; 2) collect and access offshore wind data; 3) detect and measure bird and bat activity over Lake Michigan; 4) conduct an over water sound propagation study; 5) prepare and offer a college course on offshore energy, and; 6) collect other environmental, bathometric, and atmospheric data. Desk-top research was performed to select anchorage sites and to secure permits to deploy the buoy. The project also collected and analyzed data essential to wind industry investment decision-making including: deploying highly mobile floating equipment to gather offshore wind data; correlating offshore wind data with conventional on-shore MET tower data; and performing studies that can contribute to the advancement and deployment of offshore wind technologies. Related activities included: • Siting, permitting, and deploying an offshore floating MET facility; • Validating the accuracy of floating LWS using near shoreline cup anemometer MET instruments; • Assessment of laser pulse technology (LIDAR) capability to establish hub height measurement of wind conditions at multiple locations on Lake Michigan; • Utilizing an extended-season (9-10 month) strategy to collect hub height wind data and weather conditions on Lake Michigan; • Investigation of technology best suited for wireless data transmission from distant offshore structures; • Conducting field-validated sound propagation study for a hypothetical offshore wind farm from shoreline locations; • Identifying the presence or absence of bird and bat species near wind assessment facilities; • Identifying the presence or absence of benthic and pelagic species near wind assessment facilities; All proposed project activities were completed with the following major findings: • Floating Laser Wind Sensors are capable of high quality measurement and recordings of wind resources. The WindSentinel presented no significant operational or statistical limitations in recording wind data technology at a at a high confidence level as compared to traditional an

  15. More information about the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative is available online

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;Global manufacturing capacity for wind turbines has doubled since 2008, and worldwide installations of wind power reached new highs in 2012, adding more than 46 GW of capacity to electric grids (BNEF 2013 support in many markets and the magnitude of deployment opportunities can fluctuate significantly

  16. Assessment of research needs for wind turbine rotor materials technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind-driven power systems is a renewable energy technology that is still in the early stages of development. Wind power plants installed in early 1980s suffered structural failures chiefly because of incomplete understanding of wind forces (turbulent), in some cases because of poor product quality. Failures of rotor blades are now somewhat better understood. This committee has examined the experience base accumulated by wind turbines and the R and D programs sponsored by DOE. It is concluded that a wind energy system such as is described is within the capability of engineering practice; however because of certain gaps in knowledge, and the presence of only one major integrated manufacturer of wind power machines in the USA, a DOE R and D investment is still required.

  17. 2014 Sandia Wind Turbine Blade Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Energy Department's Sandia National Laboratories will host its 2014 Sandia Wind Turbine Blade Workshop at the Marriott Pyramid North in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The workshop provides a unique, blade focused collaborative forum that will bring together wind energy leaders from industry, academia, and government. Stay tuned for updates. Information regarding past Wind Workshops can be found at: http://windworkshops.sandia.gov/.

  18. Small Wind Research Turbine: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corbus, D.; Meadors, M.

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Small Wind Research Turbine (SWRT) project was initiated to provide reliable test data for model validation of furling wind turbines and to help understand small wind turbine loads. This report will familiarize the user with the scope of the SWRT test and support the use of these data. In addition to describing all the testing details and results, the report presents an analysis of the test data and compares the SWRT test data to simulation results from the FAST aeroelastic simulation model.

  19. The new Wind Technology Test Center is the only facility in the nation capable of testing wind turbine blades up to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    turbine blades up to 90 meters in length. A critical factor to wind turbine design and development is the ability to test new designs, components, and materials. In addition, wind turbine blade manufacturers are required to test their blades as part of the turbine certification process. The National Renewable Energy

  20. Commonwealth Wind Incentive Program – Micro Wind Initiative

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Through the Commonwealth Wind Incentive Program – Micro Wind Initiative the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC) offers rebates of up to $4/W with a maximum of $130,000 for design and...

  1. Guide to Using the WIND Toolkit Validation Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lieberman-Cribbin, W.; Draxl, C.; Clifton, A.

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to the U.S. Department of Energy's goal of using 20% wind energy by 2030, the Wind Integration National Dataset (WIND) Toolkit was created to provide information on wind speed, wind direction, temperature, surface air pressure, and air density on more than 126,000 locations across the United States from 2007 to 2013. The numerical weather prediction model output, gridded at 2-km and at a 5-minute resolution, was further converted to detail the wind power production time series of existing and potential wind facility sites. For users of the dataset it is important that the information presented in the WIND Toolkit is accurate and that errors are known, as then corrective steps can be taken. Therefore, we provide validation code written in R that will be made public to provide users with tools to validate data of their own locations. Validation is based on statistical analyses of wind speed, using error metrics such as bias, root-mean-square error, centered root-mean-square error, mean absolute error, and percent error. Plots of diurnal cycles, annual cycles, wind roses, histograms of wind speed, and quantile-quantile plots are created to visualize how well observational data compares to model data. Ideally, validation will confirm beneficial locations to utilize wind energy and encourage regional wind integration studies using the WIND Toolkit.

  2. Module Handbook Specialisation Wind Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habel, Annegret

    of Wind Turbines Module name: Wind potential, Aerodynamics & Loading of Wind Turbines Section Classes Evaluation of Wind Energy Potential Wind turbine Aerodynamics Static and dynamic Loading of Wind turbines Wind turbine Aerodynamics Static and dynamic Loading of Wind turbines Credit points 8 CP

  3. Hollings Manufacturing Extension Partnership: A Commercialization Collaborator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perkins, Richard A.

    to process improvements to green manufacturing. MEP also works with partners at the state and federal levelsHollings Manufacturing Extension Partnership: A Commercialization Collaborator MEP · MANUFACTURING to successfully commercialize federal technologies #12;The Manufacturing Extension Partnership

  4. Posted 10/18/11 MANUFACTURING ENGINEER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    manufacturing processes in our Metal Fabrication and Assembly departments. Additional responsibilities includePosted 10/18/11 MANUFACTURING ENGINEER Kenall Manufacturing Gurnee, IL Kenall, a leading manufacturer of advanced lighting solutions for specialized environments, has exceptional opportunities

  5. Seminar Title: Additive Manufacturing Advanced Manufacturing of Polymer and Composite Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    Seminar Title: Additive Manufacturing ­ Advanced Manufacturing of Polymer and Composite Components Functionally Integrated Composite Structures, Augsburg, Germany ME Faculty Candidate Abstract: Additive Manufacturing ­ Advanced Manufacturing of Polymer and Composite Components Additive manufacturing technologies

  6. Wind for Schools (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, M.

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Schools are key to achieving the goal of producing 20% of the nation's electricity demand. Most significantly, schools are training the scientists, technicians, businesspeople, decisionmakers, and teachers of the future. What students learn and believe about wind energy will impact the United States' ability to create markets and policy, develop and improve technology, finance and implement projects, and create change in all of our public and private institutions. In the nearer term, school districts have large facility costs, electrical loads, and utility costs. They are always in search of ways to reduce costs or obtain revenue to improve educational programs. Schools value teaching about the science and technology of renewable energy. They are important opinion leaders, particularly in rural communities. And their financial structures are quite different from other institutions (funding, incentives, restrictions, etc.). Learning objectives: The presentation will use case studies, project experience, and discussion with the audience to convey the current status of wind energy applications and education in U.S. schools and understanding of the elements that create a successful school wind energy project. The presentation will provide attendees with a background in the current level of knowledge and generate discussion on several themes.

  7. Manufacturing Demonstration Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and InterfacesAdministrationManufacturing - GE Appliances, ORNL

  8. ARE660 Wind Generator: Low Wind Speed Technology for Small Turbine Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert W. Preus; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

    2008-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is for the design of a wind turbine that can generate most or all of the net energy required for homes and small businesses in moderately windy areas. The purpose is to expand the current market for residential wind generators by providing cost effective power in a lower wind regime than current technology has made available, as well as reduce noise and improve reliability and safety. Robert W. Preus’ experience designing and/or maintaining residential wind generators of many configurations helped identify the need for an improved experience of safety for the consumer. Current small wind products have unreliable or no method of stopping the wind generator in fault or high wind conditions. Consumers and their neighbors do not want to hear their wind generators. In addition, with current technology, only sites with unusually high wind speeds provide payback times that are acceptable for the on-grid user. Abundant Renewable Energy’s (ARE) basic original concept for the ARE660 was a combination of a stall controlled variable speed small wind generator and automatic fail safe furling for shutdown. The stall control for a small wind generator is not novel, but has not been developed for a variable speed application with a permanent magnet alternator (PMA). The fail safe furling approach for shutdown has not been used to our knowledge.

  9. Industrial Scale Demonstration of Smart Manufacturing Achieving...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Scale Demonstration of Smart Manufacturing Achieving Transformational Energy Productivity Gains Industrial Scale Demonstration of Smart Manufacturing Achieving...

  10. Industrial Scale Demonstration of Smart Manufacturing Achieving...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Scale Demonstration of Smart Manufacturing Achieving Transformational Energy Productivity Gains Development of an Open Architecture, Widely Applicable Smart Manufacturing...

  11. Avian issues in wind development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beyea, J. [National Audubon Society, New York, NY (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a lot of concern among wind supporters, I know, about Audubon`s position on wind power. There is concern that this is the wrong time to be critical, and the wrong time to be putting any doubts in investors` minds, and the wrong time to provide an excuse for utilities to stop buying windpower. The long-term future of biodiversity, including bird diversity, depends on development of renewable energy, and that will mean some wind development in the right places and with the right types of systems. For both the long-time survival of the wind industry and for protection of bird populations, Audubon cannot be quiet on this issue. To avoid mistakes that can kill the industry in the long run, expenditures for wind/avian research have to be increased way beyond their present scope. We are going to need about $5 million dollars per year, if we are to (1) understand the biology and physics of bird-wind plant interactions, (2) if we are to understand relevant bird flightpaths, and (3) if we are to design a strategy to protect bird populations.

  12. 2.854 Manufacturing Systems I (SMA 6304), Fall 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gershwin, Stanley

    As the first in a sequence of four half-term courses, this course will provide the fundamental building blocks for conceptualizing, understanding and optimizing manufacturing systems and supply chains. These building blocks ...

  13. Energy-Saving Opportunities for Manufacturing Enterprises (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet English/Chinese describes the Industrial Technologies Program Save Energy Now model and provides information on tools and resources to help Chinese manufacturing enterprises reduce industrial energy intensity.

  14. Wind Projects Providing Hope for Penn. Workers | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of| Department ofDepartment ofAnnouncementAugust 30,PowerJune 17,Projects

  15. Wind Energy Education and Training Programs (Postcard)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the United States dramatically expands wind energy deployment, the industry is challenged with developing a skilled workforce to support it. The Wind Powering America website features a map of wind energy education and training program locations at community colleges, universities, and other institutions in the United States. The map includes links to contacts and program details. This postcard is a marketing piece that stakeholders can provide to interested parties; it will guide them to this online resource for wind energy education and training programs episodes.

  16. Active Power Control from Wind Power (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ela, E.; Brooks, D.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to keep the electricity grid stable and the lights on, the power system relies on certain responses from its generating fleet. This presentation evaluates the potential for wind turbines and wind power plants to provide these services and assist the grid during critical times.

  17. Wind Resource Assessment in Europe Using Emergy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paudel, Subodh; Santarelli, Massimo; Martin, Viktoria; Lacarriere, Bruno; Le Corre, Olivier

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mance characteristics of wind generator. The wind speed atcharacteristics of the wind generator. When wind speed is

  18. Assessment of Ports for Offshore Wind Development in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elkinton, Chris [DNV GL] [DNV GL; Blatiak, Alicia; Ameen, Hafsa

    2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    As offshore wind energy develops in the United States, port facilities will become strategic hubs in the offshore wind farm supply chain because all plant and transport logistics must transit through these facilities. Therefore, these facilities must provide suitable infrastructure to meet the specific requirements of the offshore wind industry. As a result, it is crucial that federal and state policy-makers and port authorities take effective action to position ports in the offshore wind value chain to take best advantage of their economic potential. The U.S. Department of Energy tasked the independent consultancy GL Garrad Hassan (GL GH) with carrying out a review of the current capability of U.S. ports to support offshore wind project development and an assessment of the challenges and opportunities related to upgrading this capability to support the growth of as many as 54 gigawatts of offshore wind installed in U.S. waters by 2030. The GL GH report and the open-access web-based Ports Assessment Tool resulting from this study will aid decision-makers in making informed decisions regarding the choice of ports for specific offshore projects, and the types of investments that would be required to make individual port facilities suitable to serve offshore wind manufacturing, installation and/or operations. The offshore wind industry in the United States is still in its infancy and this study finds that additional port facilities capable of supporting offshore wind projects are needed to meet the anticipated project build-out by 2030; however, no significant barriers exist to prevent the development of such facilities. Furthermore, significant port capabilities are in place today with purpose-build port infrastructure currently being built. While there are currently no offshore wind farms operating in the United States, much of the infrastructure critical to the success of such projects does exist, albeit in the service of other industries. This conclusion is based on GL GH’s review of U.S. ports infrastructure and its readiness to support the development of proposed offshore wind projects in U.S. waters. Specific examples of facility costs and benefits are provided for five coastal regions (North Atlantic, South Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico, Great Lakes, and Pacific) around the country. GL GH began this study by identifying the logistical requirements of offshore wind ports to service offshore wind. This review was based on lessons learned through industry practice in Northern Europe. A web-based port readiness assessment tool was developed to allow a capability gap analysis to be conducted on existing port facilities based on the identified requirements. Cost models were added to the assessment tool, which allowed GL GH to estimate the total upgrade cost to a port over the period 2014-2030 based on a set of regional project build-out scenarios. Port fee information was gathered from each port allowing an estimate of the potential revenue to the port under this same set of scenarios. The comparison of these revenue and improvement cost figures provides an initial indication of the level of offshore wind port readiness. To facilitate a more in-depth infrastructure analysis, six ports from different geographic regions, with varied levels of interest and preparedness towards offshore wind, were evaluated by modeling a range of installation strategies and port use types to identify gaps in capability and potential opportunities for economic development. Commonalities, trends, and specific examples from these case studies are presented and provide a summary of the current state of offshore wind port readiness in the U.S. and also illustrate the direction some ports have chosen to take to prepare for offshore wind projects. For example, the land area required for wind turbine and foundation manufacturing is substantial, particularly due to the large size of offshore wind components. Also, the necessary bearing capacities of the quayside and storage area are typically greater for offshore wind components than for more conventiona

  19. Main Coast Winds - Final Scientific Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jason Huckaby; Harley Lee

    2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Maine Coast Wind Project was developed to investigate the cost-effectiveness of small, distributed wind systems on coastal sites in Maine. The restructuring of Maine's electric grid to support net metering allowed for the installation of small wind installations across the state (up to 100kW). The study performed adds insight to the difficulties of developing cost-effective distributed systems in coastal environments. The technical hurdles encountered with the chosen wind turbine, combined with the lower than expected wind speeds, did not provide a cost-effective return to make a distributed wind program economically feasible. While the turbine was accepted within the community, the low availability has been a negative.

  20. Howard County- Wind Ordinance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This ordinance sets up provisions for allowing small wind energy systems in various zoning districts.

  1. Hawaii Utility Integration Initiatives to Enable Wind (Wind HUI) Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dora Nakafuji; Lisa Dangelmaier; Chris Reynolds

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To advance the state and nation toward clean energy, Hawaii is pursuing an aggressive Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS), 40% renewable generation and 30% energy efficiency and transportation initiatives by 2030. Additionally, with support from federal, state and industry leadership, the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI) is focused on reducing Hawaii's carbon footprint and global warming impacts. To keep pace with the policy momentum and changing industry technologies, the Hawaiian Electric Companies are proactively pursuing a number of potential system upgrade initiatives to better manage variable resources like wind, solar and demand-side and distributed generation alternatives (i.e. DSM, DG). As variable technologies will continue to play a significant role in powering the future grid, practical strategies for utility integration are needed. Hawaiian utilities are already contending with some of the highest penetrations of renewables in the nation in both large-scale and distributed technologies. With island grids supporting a diverse renewable generation portfolio at penetration levels surpassing 40%, the Hawaiian utilities experiences can offer unique perspective on practical integration strategies. Efforts pursued in this industry and federal collaborative project tackled challenging issues facing the electric power industry around the world. Based on interactions with a number of western utilities and building on decades of national and international renewable integration experiences, three priority initiatives were targeted by Hawaiian utilities to accelerate integration and management of variable renewables for the islands. The three initiatives included: Initiative 1: Enabling reliable, real-time wind forecasting for operations by improving short-term wind forecasting and ramp event modeling capabilities with local site, field monitoring; Initiative 2: Improving operators situational awareness to variable resources via real-time grid condition monitoring using PMU devices and enhanced grid analysis tools; and Initiative 3: Identifying grid automation and smart technology architecture retrofit/improvement opportunities following a systematic review approach, inclusive of increasing renewables and variable distributed generation. Each of the initiative was conducted in partnership with industry technology and equipment providers to facilitate utility deployment experiences inform decision making, assess supporting infrastructure cost considerations, showcase state of the technology, address integration hurdles with viable workarounds. For each initiative, a multi-phased approach was followed that included 1) investigative planning and review of existing state-of-the-art, 2) hands on deployment experiences and 3) process implementation considerations. Each phase of the approach allowed for mid-course corrections, process review and change to any equipment/devices to be used by the utilities. To help the island grids transform legacy infrastructure, the Wind HUI provided more systematic approaches and exposure with vendor/manufacturers, hand-on review and experience with the equipment not only from the initial planning stages but through to deployment and assessment of field performance of some of the new, remote sensing and high-resolution grid monitoring technologies. HELCO became one of the first utilities in the nation to install and operate a high resolution (WindNet) network of remote sensing devices such as radiometers and SODARs to enable a short-term ramp event forecasting capability. This utility-industry and federal government partnership produced new information on wind energy forecasting including new data additions to the NOAA MADIS database; addressed remote sensing technology performance and O&M (operations and maintenance) challenges; assessed legacy equipment compatibility issues and technology solutions; evaluated cyber-security concerns; and engaged in community outreach opportunities that will help guide Hawaii and the nation toward more reliable adoption of clean energy resources. Resu

  2. Evaluating state markets for residential wind systems: Results from an economic and policy analysis tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The market for small wind systems in the United States, often defined as systems less than or equal to 100 kW that produce power on the customer side of the meter, is small but growing steadily. The installed capacity of domestic small wind systems in 2002 was reportedly 15-18 MW, though the market is estimated to be growing by as much as 40 percent annually (AWEA, 2002). This growth is driven in part by recent technology advancements and cost improvements and, perhaps more importantly, by favorable policy incentives targeted at small wind systems that are offered in several states. Currently, over half of all states have incentive policies for which residential small wind installations are eligible. These incentives range from low-interest loan programs and various forms of tax advantages to cash rebates that cover as much as 60 percent of the total system cost for turbines 10 kW or smaller installed in residential applications. Most of these incentives were developed to support a ran ge of emerging renewable technologies (most notably photovoltaic systems), and were therefore not specifically designed with small wind systems in mind. As such, the question remains as to which incentive types provide the greatest benefit to small wind systems, and how states might appropriately set the level and type of incentives in the future. Furthermore, given differences in incentive types and levels across states, as well as variations in retail electricity rates and other relevant factors, it is not immediately obvious which states offer the most promising markets for small wind turbine manufacturers and installers, as well as potential residential system owners. This paper presents results from a Berkeley Lab analysis of the impact of existing and proposed state and federal incentives on the economics of grid-connected, residential small wind systems. Berkeley Lab has designed the Small Wind Analysis Tool (SWAT) to compare system economics under current incentive structures a cross all 50 states. SWAT reports three metrics to characterize residential wind economics in each state and wind resource class: (1) Break-Even Turnkey Cost (BTC): The BTC is defined as the aggregate installed system cost that would balance total customer payments and revenue over the life of the system, allowing the customer to ''break-even'' while earning a specified rate of return on the small wind ''investment.'' (2) Simple Payback (SP): The SP is the number of years it takes a customer to recoup a cash payment for a wind system and all associated costs, assuming zero discount on future revenue and payments (i.e., ignoring the time value of money). (3) Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE): The LCOE is the levelized cost of generating a kWh of electricity over the lifetime of the system, and is calculated assuming a cash purchase for the small wind system and a 5.5 percent real discount rate. This paper presents SWAT results for a 10 kW wind turbine and turbine power production is based on a Bergey Excel system. These results are not directly applicable to turbines with different power curves and rated outputs, especially given the fact that many state incentives are set as a fixed dollar amount, and the dollar per Watt amount will vary based on the total rated turbine capacity.

  3. Estimation of Wind Speed in Connection to a Wind Turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estimation of Wind Speed in Connection to a Wind Turbine X. Ma #3; , N. K. Poulsen #3; , H. Bindner y December 20, 1995 Abstract The wind speed varies over the rotor plane of wind turbine making the wind speed on the rotor plane will be estimated by using a wind turbine as a wind measuring device

  4. Wind energy offers considerable promise; the wind itself is free,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langendoen, Koen

    Wind energy offers considerable promise; the wind itself is free, wind power is clean. One of these sources, wind energy, offers considerable promise; the wind itself is free, wind power is clean, and it is virtually inexhaustible. In recent years, research on wind energy has accelerated

  5. ITP Nanomanufacturing: Nanomanufacturing Portfolio: Manufacturing...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    More Documents & Publications Sustainable Nanomaterials Workshop Advanced Manufacturing Office, U.S. Department of Energy Nanocomposite Materials for Lithium-Ion Batteries...

  6. Manufacturing Spotlight: Boosting American Competitiveness

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Find out how the Energy Department is helping bring new clean energy technologies to the marketplace and make manufacturing processes more energy efficient.

  7. Manufacturing Demonstration Facility Technology Collaborations...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from industry to assess applicability of new technologies that can reduce manufacturing energy intensity or produce new, energy-efficient products. As part of the technology...

  8. Tribal Wind Assessment by the Eastern Shoshone Tribe of the Wind River Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pete, Belvin; Perry, Jeremy W.; Stump, Raphaella Q.

    2009-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tribes, through its consultant and advisor, Distributed Generation Systems (Disgen) -Native American Program and Resources Division, of Lakewood CO, assessed and qualified, from a resource and economic perspective, a wind energy generation facility on tribal lands. The goal of this feasibility project is to provide wind monitoring and to engage in preproject planning activities designed to provide a preliminary evaluation of the technical, economic, social and environmental feasibility of developing a sustainable, integrated wind energy plan for the Eastern Shoshone and the Northern Arapahoe Tribes, who resides on the Wind River Indian Reservation. The specific deliverables of the feasibility study are: 1) Assessments of the wind resources on the Wind River Indian Reservation 2) Assessments of the potential environmental impacts of renewable development 3) Assessments of the transmission capacity and capability of a renewable energy project 4) Established an economic models for tribal considerations 5) Define economic, cultural and societal impacts on the Tribe

  9. Measuring the Isotopic Composition of Solar Wind Noble Gases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    noble gases. #12;Exploring the Solar Wind94 Light solar wind noble gases were directly measured by mass of the light gases are known to vary with energy, so none of these provided solar isotopic and elemental5 Measuring the Isotopic Composition of Solar Wind Noble Gases Alex Meshik, Charles Hohenberg, Olga

  10. Wind Energy Applications of Unified and Dynamic Turbulence Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinz, Stefan

    Wind Energy Applications of Unified and Dynamic Turbulence Models Stefan Heinz and Harish Gopalan applicable as a low cost alternative. 1 Introduction There is a growing interest in using wind energy suggests the possibility of providing 20% of the electricity in the U.S. by wind energy in 2030

  11. Surface wind speed distributions| Implications for climate and wind power.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capps, Scott Blair

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?? Surface constituent and energy fluxes, and wind power depend non-linearly on wind speed and are sensitive to the tails of the wind distribution. Until… (more)

  12. NREL: Wind Research - Boosting Wind Plant Power Output by 4%...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Boosting Wind Plant Power Output by 4%-5% through Coordinated Turbine Controls July 30, 2014 Wind plant underperformance has plagued wind plant developers for years. To address...

  13. Collegiate Wind Competition Engages Tomorrow's Wind Energy Innovators...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Engages Tomorrow's Wind Energy Innovators Collegiate Wind Competition Engages Tomorrow's Wind Energy Innovators January 6, 2014 - 10:00am Addthis 2014 Collegiate Teams Boise State...

  14. Sinomatech Wind Power Blade aka Sinoma Science Technology Wind...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sinomatech Wind Power Blade aka Sinoma Science Technology Wind Turbine Blade Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Sinomatech Wind Power Blade (aka Sinoma Science & Technology...

  15. Method and apparatus for manufacturing gas tags

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, Kenny C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Laug, Matthew T. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For use in the manufacture of gas tags employed in a gas tagging failure detection system for a nuclear reactor, a plurality of commercial feed gases each having a respective noble gas isotopic composition are blended under computer control to provide various tag gas mixtures having selected isotopic ratios which are optimized for specified defined conditions such as cost. Using a new approach employing a discrete variable structure rather than the known continuous-variable optimization problem, the computer controlled gas tag manufacturing process employs an analytical formalism from condensed matter physics known as stochastic relaxation, which is a special case of simulated annealing, for input feed gas selection. For a tag blending process involving M tag isotopes with N distinct feed gas mixtures commercially available from an enriched gas supplier, the manufacturing process calculates the cost difference between multiple combinations and specifies gas mixtures which approach the optimum defined conditions. The manufacturing process is then used to control tag blending apparatus incorporating tag gas canisters connected by stainless-steel tubing with computer controlled valves, with the canisters automatically filled with metered quantities of the required feed gases.

  16. Method and apparatus for manufacturing gas tags

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, K.C.; Laug, M.T.

    1996-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    For use in the manufacture of gas tags employed in a gas tagging failure detection system for a nuclear reactor, a plurality of commercial feed gases each having a respective noble gas isotopic composition are blended under computer control to provide various tag gas mixtures having selected isotopic ratios which are optimized for specified defined conditions such as cost. Using a new approach employing a discrete variable structure rather than the known continuous-variable optimization problem, the computer controlled gas tag manufacturing process employs an analytical formalism from condensed matter physics known as stochastic relaxation, which is a special case of simulated annealing, for input feed gas selection. For a tag blending process involving M tag isotopes with N distinct feed gas mixtures commercially available from an enriched gas supplier, the manufacturing process calculates the cost difference between multiple combinations and specifies gas mixtures which approach the optimum defined conditions. The manufacturing process is then used to control tag blending apparatus incorporating tag gas canisters connected by stainless-steel tubing with computer controlled valves, with the canisters automatically filled with metered quantities of the required feed gases. 4 figs.

  17. Design and Manufacture of Energy Absorbing Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duoss, Eric

    2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Learn about an ordered cellular material that has been designed and manufactured using direct ink writing (DIW), a 3-D printing technology being developed at LLNL. The new material is a patterned cellular material that can absorb mechanical energy-a cushion-while also providing protection against sheering. This material is expected to find utility in application spaces that currently use unordered foams, such as sporting and consumer goods as well as defense and aerospace.

  18. Design and Manufacture of Energy Absorbing Materials

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Duoss, Eric

    2014-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Learn about an ordered cellular material that has been designed and manufactured using direct ink writing (DIW), a 3-D printing technology being developed at LLNL. The new material is a patterned cellular material that can absorb mechanical energy-a cushion-while also providing protection against sheering. This material is expected to find utility in application spaces that currently use unordered foams, such as sporting and consumer goods as well as defense and aerospace.

  19. NREL Innovations Contribute to an Award-Winning Small Wind Turbine (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Skystream 3.7 wind turbine is the result of a decade-long collaboration between the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Southwest Windpower, a commercially successful small wind turbine manufacturer. NREL drew heavily on its research experience to incorporate innovations into the Skystream 3.7, including a unique blade design that makes the wind turbine more efficient and quieter than most.

  20. ASYMMETRIC SOLAR WIND ELECTRON DISTRIBUTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, Peter H.; Kim, Sunjung; Lee, Junggi; Lee, Junhyun; Park, Jongsun; Park, Kyungsun; Seough, Jungjoon [School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin-Si, Gyeonggi-Do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Jinhy [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The present paper provides a possible explanation for the solar wind electron velocity distribution functions possessing asymmetric energetic tails. By numerically solving the electrostatic weak turbulence equations that involve nonlinear interactions among electrons, Langmuir waves, and ion-sound waves, it is shown that different ratios of ion-to-electron temperatures lead to the generation of varying degrees of asymmetric tails. The present finding may be applicable to observations in the solar wind near 1 AU and in other regions of the heliosphere and interplanetary space.

  1. The National Wind Technology Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thresher, R.W.; Hock, S.M. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Loose, R.R.; Cadogon, J.B.

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind energy research began at the Rocky Flats test site in 1976 when Rockwell International subcontracted with the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA). The Rocky Flats Plant was competitively selected from a number of ERDA facilities primarily because it experienced high instantaneous winds and provided a large, clear land area. By 1977, several small wind turbines were in place. During the facility`s peak of operation, in 1979-1980, researchers were testing as many as 23 small wind turbines of various configurations, including commercially available machines and prototype turbines developed under subcontract to Rocky Flats. Facilities also included 8-kW, 40-kW, and 225-kW dynamometers; a variable-speed test bed; a wind/hybrid test facility; a controlled velocity test facility (in Pueblo, Colorado); a modal test facility, and a multimegawatt switchgear facility. The main laboratory building was dedicated in July 1981 and was operated by the Rocky Flats Plant until 1984, when the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) and Rocky Flats wind energy programs were merged and transferred to SERI. SERI and now the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) continued to conduct wind turbine system component tests after 1987, when most program personnel were moved to the Denver WEst Office Park in Golden and site ownership was transferred back to Rocky Flats. The Combined Experiment test bed was installed and began operation in 1988, and the NREL structural test facility began operation in 1990. In 1993, the site`s operation was officially transferred to the DOE Golden Field Office that oversees NREL. This move was in anticipation of NREL`s renovation and reoccupation of the facility in 1994.

  2. Wind Turbine Drivetrain Condition Monitoring - An Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheng, S; Veers, P.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides an overview of wind turbine drivetrain condition monitoring based on presentations from a condition monitoring workshop organized by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in 2009 and on additional references.

  3. Guidance for Local Wind Energy Ordinances

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: The documents described in this summary were designed to provide guidance to local governments that wish to develop their own siting rules for wind turbines. While they were developed under...

  4. Engineering Challenges for Floating Offshore Wind Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butterfield, S.; Musial, W.; Jonkman, J.; Sclavounos, P.

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The major objective of this paper is to survey the technical challenges that must be overcome to develop deepwater offshore wind energy technologies and to provide a framework from which the first-order economics can be assessed.

  5. Distributed Wind Diffusion Model Overview (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preus, R.; Drury, E.; Sigrin, B.; Gleason, M.

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Distributed wind market demand is driven by current and future wind price and performance, along with several non-price market factors like financing terms, retail electricity rates and rate structures, future wind incentives, and others. We developed a new distributed wind technology diffusion model for the contiguous United States that combines hourly wind speed data at 200m resolution with high resolution electricity load data for various consumer segments (e.g., residential, commercial, industrial), electricity rates and rate structures for utility service territories, incentive data, and high resolution tree cover. The model first calculates the economics of distributed wind at high spatial resolution for each market segment, and then uses a Bass diffusion framework to estimate the evolution of market demand over time. The model provides a fundamental new tool for characterizing how distributed wind market potential could be impacted by a range of future conditions, such as electricity price escalations, improvements in wind generator performance and installed cost, and new financing structures. This paper describes model methodology and presents sample results for distributed wind market potential in the contiguous U.S. through 2050.

  6. Next-Generation Wind Technology

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Wind Program works with industry partners to increase the performance and reliability of next-generation wind technologies while lowering the cost of wind energy.

  7. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    natural gas prices), pushed wind energy to the top of (andperformance, and price of wind energy, policy uncertainty –cost, performance, and price of wind energy, some of these

  8. 2012 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Effects of Integrating Wind Power on Transmission Systemat Various Levels of Wind Power Capacity Penetration 201242 6. Wind Power Price

  9. Wind Farms in North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoen, Ben

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    About Large Offshore Wind Power: Underlying Factors. EnergyOpinion on Offshore Wind Power - Interim Report. University2002) Economic Impacts of Wind Power in Kittitas County, Wa.

  10. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island June 1, 2003 ­ August 31, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

  11. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island March 1, 2003 ­ May 31, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  12. WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle June 1, 2005 ­ August 31, 2005 Prepared for United States Department...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  13. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island June 1, 2004 ­ August 31, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

  14. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island December 1, 2003 ­ February 29, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distribution

  15. WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle December 1, 2004 ­ February 28, 2005 Prepared for United States.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  16. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island March 1, 2004 ­ May 31, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

  17. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prepared for the Utility Wind Integration Group. Arlington,Consult. 2010. International Wind Energy Development: WorldUBS Global I/O: Global Wind Sector. UBS Investment Research.

  18. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2008. Washington, DC: American Wind Energy Association.American Wind Energy Association ( AWEA).2009b. AWEA Small Wind Turbine Global Market Study: Year

  19. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island September 1, 2003 ­ November 30, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

  20. WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA June1, 2004 to August 31, 2004. Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 8 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 8 Wind Speed Distributions

  1. WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle March 1, 2005 ­ May 31, 2005 Prepared for United States Department.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  2. WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle December 1, 2004 ­ December 1, 2005 Prepared for United States ......................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  3. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2010. SPP WITF Wind Integration Study. Little Rock,GE Energy. 2011a. Oahu Wind Integration Study Final Report.PacifiCorp. 2010. 2010 Wind Integration Study. Portland,

  4. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wind turbine components (specifically, generators, bladeschangers. ” Wind turbine components such as blades, towers,Canada (8%). Wind turbine component exports (towers, blades,

  5. 2012 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Colorado: Xcel Energy. 2012 Wind Technologies Market ReportOperator. 2012 Wind Technologies Market Report Chadbourne &Power Company. 2012 Wind Technologies Market Report EnerNex

  6. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Market Report vii potential wind energy generation withinthat nearly 8% of potential wind energy generation withinAreas, in GWh (and % of potential wind generation) Electric

  7. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    capacity), with 17% of all potential wind energy generationthat roughly 17% of potential wind energy generation withinexample, roughly 1% of potential wind energy output in 2009

  8. Design for manufacturability Design verification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patel, Chintan

    ITRS Design #12;Design · Design for manufacturability · Design verification #12;Design for Manufacturability · Architecture challenges · Logic and circuit challenges · Layout and physical design challenges · Expected to be the source of multiple DFM challenges · Invest in variability reduction or design

  9. Petrick Technology Trends Of Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;323 Petrick Technology Trends chapter 9 The Future Of Manufacturing Irene Petrick Technology Trends This chapter is a story about the future of manufacturing based on three predictions: · that firms sophisticated modeling and simulation of both new products and production processes; · that additive

  10. Basic Wind Tech Course - Lesson Plans and Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The funds from this project were used to purchase tools and instrumentation to help replicate actual on-the-job wind energy scenarios which provided the students with the practical or applied components of wind energy jobs. This project enhanced the educational experiences provided for the students in terms of engineering and science components of wind energy by using electronics, control systems, and electro-mechanical instrumentation to help students learn standardized wind-specific craftsman skills. In addition the tools and instrumentation helped the students learn the safety necessary to work in the wind industry.

  11. Wind Energy Stakeholder Outreach and Education

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bob Lawrence; Craig Cox; Jodi Hamrick; DOE Contact - Keith Bennett

    2006-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Since August of 2001, Bob Lawrence and Associates, Inc. (BL&A) has applied its outreach and support services to lead a highly effective work effort on behalf of Wind Powering America (WPA). In recent years, the company has generated informative brochures and posters, researched and created case studies, and provided technical support to key wind program managers. BL&A has also analyzed Lamar, Colorado’s 162MW wind project and developed a highly regarded 'wind supply chain' report and outreach presentation. BL&A’s efforts were then replicated to characterize similar supply chain presentations in New Mexico and Illinois. Note that during the period of this contract, the recipient met with members of the DOE Wind Program a number of times to obtain specific guidance on tasks that needed to be pursued on behalf of this grant. Thus, as the project developed over the course of 5 years, the recipient varied the tasks and emphasis on tasks to comply with the on-going and continuously developing requirements of the Wind Powering America Program. This report provides only a brief summary of activities to illustrate the recipient's work for advancing wind energy education and outreach from 2001 through the end of the contract period in 2006. It provides examples of how the recipient and DOE leveraged the available funding to provide educational and outreach work to a wide range of stakeholder communities.

  12. EA-1726: Kahuku Wind Power, LLC Wind Power Generation Facility...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    6: Kahuku Wind Power, LLC Wind Power Generation Facility, O'ahu, HI EA-1726: Kahuku Wind Power, LLC Wind Power Generation Facility, O'ahu, HI May 3, 2010 EA-1726: Final...

  13. Hollings Manufacturing Extension Partnership: A Commercialization Collaborator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of services, from innovation strategies to process improvements to green manufacturing. MEP also worksHollings Manufacturing Extension Partnership: A Commercialization Collaborator MEP · MANUFACTURING Manufacturing Extension Partnership (MEP) works with small and mid-sized U.S. manufacturers to help them create

  14. 2008 Wind Energy Projects, Wind Powering America (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Wind Powering America program produces a poster at the end of every calendar year that depicts new U.S. wind energy projects. The 2008 poster includes the following projects: Stetson Wind Farm in Maine; Dutch Hill Wind Farm in New York; Grand Ridge Wind Energy Center in Illinois; Hooper Bay, Alaska; Forestburg, South Dakota; Elbow Creek Wind Project in Texas; Glacier Wind Farm in Montana; Wray, Colorado; Smoky Hills Wind Farm in Kansas; Forbes Park Wind Project in Massachusetts; Spanish Fork, Utah; Goodland Wind Farm in Indiana; and the Tatanka Wind Energy Project on the border of North Dakota and South Dakota.

  15. Next Generation Power Electronics National Manufacturing Innovation Institute

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Next Generation Power Electronics National Manufacturing Innovation Institute will focus on wide bandgap (WBG) semiconductors - the same materials used in LED light fixtures and many flat screen TVs. The Institute will use $70 million provided by the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Manufacturing Office to support and manage its programs over the next five years. This Institute is one of three new innovation hubs announced by President Obama in his 2013 State of the Union address and part of the National Network for Manufacturing Innovation (NNMI).

  16. September 18, 2012, Webinar: Wind Energy in Urban Environments

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This webinar was held September 18, 2012, and provided information on wind energy installations in Boston Harbor in Hull, Massachusetts, and near downtown Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Download the...

  17. Examining the benefits of renewable energy: wind power.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reker, Benjamin A.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??This report provides a summary of the state of wind energy in the United States, the policy instruments used to encourage renewable energy and the… (more)

  18. Roadmap Prioritizes Barriers to the Deployment of Wind Technology...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently published a Built-Environment Wind Turbine Roadmap that outlines a strategy for providing consumers with safe, reliable...

  19. Wind Farm Monitoring at Lake Benton II Wind Power Project - Equipment Only: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-275

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gevorgian, V.

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Long-term, high-resolution wind turbine and wind power plant output data are important to assess the impact of wind power on grid operations and to derive meaningful statistics for better understanding of the variability nature of wind power. These data are used for many research and analyses activities consistent with the Wind Program mission: Establish a database of long-term wind power similar to other long-term renewable energy resource databases (e.g. solar irradiance and hydrology); produce meaningful statistics about long-term variation of wind power, spatial and temporal diversity of wind power, and the correlation of wind power, other renewable energy resources, and utility load; provide high quality, realistic wind power output data for system operations impact studies and wind plant and forecasting model validation.

  20. Large-Scale Offshore Wind Power in the United States: Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musial, W.; Ram, B.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a summary of a 236-page NREL report that provides a broad understanding of today's offshore wind industry, the offshore wind resource, and the associated technology challenges, economics, permitting procedures, and potential risks and benefits.

  1. Testing Active Power Control from Wind Power at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ela, E.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to keep the electricity grid stable and the lights on, the power system relies on certain responses from its generating fleet. This presentation evaluates the potential for wind turbines and wind power plants to provide these services and assist the grid during critical times.

  2. Wind Energy Workforce Development: A Roadmap to a Sustainable Wind Industry (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, I.; Kelly, M.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the United States moves toward a vision of greatly expanded wind energy use as outlined in the U.S. Department of Energy's 20% Wind Energy by 2030 report, the need for skilled workers at all levels in the industry is repeatedly identified as a critical issue. This presentation is an overview of the educational infrastructure and expected industry needs to support the continued development of a vibrant U.S. wind industry through a discussion of the activities identified that must be put in place to train workers. The paper will also provide a framework to address issues raised from each of the education and industry sectors, identifying a roadmap for developing an educational infrastructure to support wind technology. The presentation will also provide an understanding of the available resources, materials, and programs available across the industry. This presentation provides an overview of the educational infrastructure and expected industry needs to support the continued development of a vibrant U.S. wind industry as part of a collaborative effort to develop a wind workforce roadmap. This presentation will provide 1) A review of needed programs to train workers for the wind industry; 2) An overview of the importance education will play if the nation is to expand wind energy (both in development and deployment terms) and a review of ongoing activities with a focus on federal efforts; 3) A review of the materials and resources available across the industry and a framework to address issues raised from each of the education and industry sectors.

  3. Great Plains Wind Energy Transmission Development Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brad G. Stevens, P.E.; Troy K. Simonsen; Kerryanne M. Leroux

    2012-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In fiscal year 2005, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) received funding from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to undertake a broad array of tasks to either directly or indirectly address the barriers that faced much of the Great Plains states and their efforts to produce and transmit wind energy at the time. This program, entitled Great Plains Wind Energy Transmission Development Project, was focused on the central goal of stimulating wind energy development through expansion of new transmission capacity or development of new wind energy capacity through alternative market development. The original task structure was as follows: Task 1 - Regional Renewable Credit Tracking System (later rescoped to Small Wind Turbine Training Center); Task 2 - Multistate Transmission Collaborative; Task 3 - Wind Energy Forecasting System; and Task 4 - Analysis of the Long-Term Role of Hydrogen in the Region. As carried out, Task 1 involved the creation of the Small Wind Turbine Training Center (SWTTC). The SWTTC, located Grand Forks, North Dakota, consists of a single wind turbine, the Endurance S-250, on a 105-foot tilt-up guyed tower. The S-250 is connected to the electrical grid on the 'load side' of the electric meter, and the power produced by the wind turbine is consumed locally on the property. Establishment of the SWTTC will allow EERC personnel to provide educational opportunities to a wide range of participants, including grade school through college-level students and the general public. In addition, the facility will allow the EERC to provide technical training workshops related to the installation, operation, and maintenance of small wind turbines. In addition, under Task 1, the EERC hosted two small wind turbine workshops on May 18, 2010, and March 8, 2011, at the EERC in Grand Forks, North Dakota. Task 2 involved the EERC cosponsoring and aiding in the planning of three transmission workshops in the midwest and western regions. Under Task 3, the EERC, in collaboration with Meridian Environmental Services, developed and demonstrated the efficacy of a wind energy forecasting system for use in scheduling energy output from wind farms for a regional electrical generation and transmission utility. With the increased interest at the time of project award in the production of hydrogen as a critical future energy source, many viewed hydrogen produced from wind-generated electricity as an attractive option. In addition, many of the hydrogen production-related concepts involve utilization of energy resources without the need for additional electrical transmission. For this reason, under Task 4, the EERC provided a summary of end uses for hydrogen in the region and focused on one end product in particular (fertilizer), including several process options and related economic analyses.

  4. Competitive Wind Grants (Vermont)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Clean Energy Development Fund Board will offer a wind grant program beginning October 1, 2013. The grant program will replace the wind incentives that were originally part of the [http:/...

  5. Residential Wind Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willis, Gary

    2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This research study will explore the use of residential wind power and associated engineering and environmental issues. There is various wind power generating devices available to the consumer. The study will discuss the dependencies of human...

  6. See the Wind

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    See the Wind Grades: 5-8 , 9-12 Topic: Wind Energy Owner: Kidwind Project This educational material is brought to you by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency...

  7. Talbot County- Wind Ordinance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This ordinance amends the Talbot County Code, Chapter 190, Zoning, Subdivision and Land Development, to permit small wind turbine systems with wind turbine towers not to exceed 160 feet in total...

  8. Wind Energy Act (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Maine Wind Energy Act is a summary of legislative findings that indicate the state's strong interest in promoting the development of wind energy and establish the state's desire to ease the...

  9. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AWEA?s Wind Energy Weekly, DOE/EPRI?s Turbine Verification10% Wind Energy Penetration New large-scale 9 wind turbineswind energy continues to decline as a result of lower wind turbine

  10. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AWEA’s Wind Energy Weekly, DOE/EPRI’s Turbine Verification10% Wind Energy Penetration New large-scale 8 wind turbinesTurbine Market Report. Washington, D.C. : American Wind Energy

  11. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prepared for the Utility Wind Integration Group. Arlington,Wind Logics, Inc. 2004. Wind Integration Study—Final Report.EnerNex Corp. 2006. Wind Integration Study for Public

  12. High Energy Studies of Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick Slane

    2008-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The extended nebulae formed as pulsar winds expand into their surroundings provide information about the composition of the winds, the injection history from the host pulsar, and the material into which the nebulae are expanding. Observations from across the electromagnetic spectrum provide constraints on the evolution of the nebulae, the density and composition of the surrounding ejecta, the geometry of the systems, the formation of jets, and the maximum energy of the particles in the nebulae. Here I provide a broad overview of the structure of pulsar wind nebulae, with specific examples that demonstrate our ability to constrain the above parameters. The association of pulsar wind nebulae with extended sources of very high energy gamma-ray emission are investigated, along with constraints on the nature of such high energy emission.

  13. High Energy Studies of Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slane, Patrick

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The extended nebulae formed as pulsar winds expand into their surroundings provide information about the composition of the winds, the injection history from the host pulsar, and the material into which the nebulae are expanding. Observations from across the electromagnetic spectrum provide constraints on the evolution of the nebulae, the density and composition of the surrounding ejecta, the geometry of the systems, the formation of jets, and the maximum energy of the particles in the nebulae. Here I provide a broad overview of the structure of pulsar wind nebulae, with specific examples that demonstrate our ability to constrain the above parameters. The association of pulsar wind nebulae with extended sources of very high energy gamma-ray emission are investigated, along with constraints on the nature of such high energy emission.

  14. Wind Energy Guide for County Commissioners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Costanti, M.

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the key stakeholders associated with economic development are local government officials, who are often required to evaluate and vote on commercial wind energy project permits, as well as to determine and articulate what wind energy benefits accrue to their counties. Often these local officials lack experience with large-scale wind energy and need to make important decisions concerning what may be a complicated and controversial issue. These decisions can be confounded with diverse perspectives from various stakeholders. This project is designed to provide county commissioners, planners, and other local county government officials with a practical overview of information required to successfully implement commercial wind energy projects in their county. The guidebook provides readers with information on the following 13 topics: Brief Wind Energy Overview; Environmental Benefits; Wind Energy Myths and Facts; Economic Development Benefits; Wind Economics; The Development Process; Public Outreach; Siting Issues; Property Tax Incentives; Power System Impacts; Permitting, Zoning, and Siting Processes; Case Studies; and Further Information. For each of the above topics, the guidebook provides an introduction that identifies the topic, why local government should care, a topic snapshot, how the topic will arise, and a list of resources that define and assess the topic.

  15. IEA Wind Task 26: The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy, Work Package 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.; Wiser, R.; Hand, M.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past 30 years, wind power has become a mainstream source of electricity generation around the world. However, the future of wind power will depend a great deal on the ability of the industry to continue to achieve cost of energy reductions. In this summary report, developed as part of the International Energy Agency Wind Implementing Agreement Task 26, titled 'The Cost of Wind Energy,' we provide a review of historical costs, evaluate near-term market trends, review the methods used to estimate long-term cost trajectories, and summarize the range of costs projected for onshore wind energy across an array of forward-looking studies and scenarios. We also highlight the influence of high-level market variables on both past and future wind energy costs.

  16. Kent County- Wind Ordinance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This ordinance establishes provisions and standards for small wind energy systems in various zoning districts in Kent County, Maryland.

  17. Beryllium Manufacturing Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, A

    2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is one of a number of reports that will be combined into a handbook on beryllium. Each report covers a specific topic. To-date, the following reports have been published: (1) Consolidation and Grades of Beryllium; (2) Mechanical Properties of Beryllium and the Factors Affecting these Properties; (3) Corrosion and Corrosion Protection of Beryllium; (4) Joining of Beryllium; (5) Atomic, Crystal, Elastic, Thermal, Nuclear, and other Properties of Beryllium; and (6) Beryllium Coating (Deposition) Processes and the Influence of Processing Parameters on Properties and Microstructure. The conventional method of using ingot-cast material is unsuitable for manufacturing a beryllium product. Beryllium is a highly reactive metal with a high melting point, making it susceptible to react with mold-wall materials forming beryllium compounds (BeO, etc.) that become entrapped in the solidified metal. In addition, the grain size is excessively large, being 50 to 100 {micro}m in diameter, while grain sizes of 15 {micro}m or less are required to meet acceptable strength and ductility requirements. Attempts at refining the as-cast-grain size have been unsuccessful. Because of the large grain size and limited slip systems, the casting will invariably crack during a hot-working step, which is an important step in the microstructural-refining process. The high reactivity of beryllium together with its high viscosity (even with substantial superheat) also makes it an unsuitable candidate for precision casting. In order to overcome these problems, alternative methods have been developed for the manufacturing of beryllium. The vast majority of these methods involve the use of beryllium powders. The powders are consolidated under pressure in vacuum at an elevated temperature to produce vacuum hot-pressed (VHP) blocks and vacuum hot-isostatic-pressed (HIP) forms and billets. The blocks (typically cylindrical), which are produced over a wide range of sizes (up to 183 cm dia. by 61 cm high), may be cut or machined into parts or be thermomechanically processed to develop the desired microstructure, properties, and shapes. Vacuum hot-isostatic pressing and cold-isostatic pressing (CIP) followed by sintering and possibly by a final HIP'ing (CIP/Sinter/HIP) are important in their use for the production of near net-shaped parts. For the same starting powder, a HIP'ed product will have less anisotropy than that obtained for a VHP'ed product. A schematic presentation illustrating the difference between VHP'ing and HIP'ing is shown in Figure I-1. The types of powders and the various beryllium grades produced from the consolidated powders and their ambient-temperature mechanical properties were presented in the consolidation report referred to above. Elevated-temperature properties and the effect of processing variables on mechanical properties are described in the mechanical properties report. Beryllium can also be deposited as coatings as well as freestanding forms. The microstructure, properties, and various methods used that are related to the deposition of beryllium are discussed in the report on beryllium coatings.

  18. Active load control techniques for wind turbines.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Dam, C.P. (University of California, Davis, CA); Berg, Dale E.; Johnson, Scott J. (University of California, Davis, CA)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides an overview on the current state of wind turbine control and introduces a number of active techniques that could be potentially used for control of wind turbine blades. The focus is on research regarding active flow control (AFC) as it applies to wind turbine performance and loads. The techniques and concepts described here are often described as 'smart structures' or 'smart rotor control'. This field is rapidly growing and there are numerous concepts currently being investigated around the world; some concepts already are focused on the wind energy industry and others are intended for use in other fields, but have the potential for wind turbine control. An AFC system can be broken into three categories: controls and sensors, actuators and devices, and the flow phenomena. This report focuses on the research involved with the actuators and devices and the generated flow phenomena caused by each device.

  19. MANUFACTURING ACCELERATING THE INCORPORATION OF MATERIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Joseph W.

    MANUFACTURING ACCELERATING THE INCORPORATION OF MATERIALS ADVANCES INTO MANUFACTURING PROCESSES NATIONAL NEED The proposed topic "Accelerating the Incorporation of Materials Advances into Manufacturing organizations, leading researchers from academic institutions, and others. Materials performance is often

  20. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is located in Europe. In contrast, all wind power projectsin Europe. In 2009, for example, more wind power was

  1. CONGRESSIONAL BRIEFING Offshore Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    CONGRESSIONAL BRIEFING Offshore Wind Lessons Learned from Europe: Reducing Costs and Creating Jobs Thursday, June 12, 2014 Capitol Visitors Center, Room SVC 215 Enough offshore wind capacity to power six the past decade. What has Europe learned that is applicable to a U.S. effort to deploy offshore wind off

  2. Wind farm electrical system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erdman, William L.; Lettenmaier, Terry M.

    2006-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An approach to wind farm design using variable speed wind turbines with low pulse number electrical output. The output of multiple wind turbines are aggregated to create a high pulse number electrical output at a point of common coupling with a utility grid network. Power quality at each individual wind turbine falls short of utility standards, but the aggregated output at the point of common coupling is within acceptable tolerances for utility power quality. The approach for aggregating low pulse number electrical output from multiple wind turbines relies upon a pad mounted transformer at each wind turbine that performs phase multiplication on the output of each wind turbine. Phase multiplication converts a modified square wave from the wind turbine into a 6 pulse output. Phase shifting of the 6 pulse output from each wind turbine allows the aggregated output of multiple wind turbines to be a 24 pulse approximation of a sine wave. Additional filtering and VAR control is embedded within the wind farm to take advantage of the wind farm's electrical impedence characteristics to further enhance power quality at the point of common coupling.

  3. Wind loading on solar concentrators: some general considerations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roschke, E. J.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A survey has been completed to examine the problems and complications arising from wind loading on solar concentrators. Wind loading is site specific and has an important bearing on the design, cost, performance, operation and maintenance, safety, survival, and replacement of solar collecting systems. Emphasis herein is on paraboloidal, two-axis tracking systems. Thermal receiver problems also are discussed. Wind characteristics are discussed from a general point of view; current methods for determining design wind speed are reviewed. Aerodynamic coefficients are defined and illustrative examples are presented. Wind tunnel testing is discussed, and environmental wind tunnels are reviewed; recent results on heliostat arrays are reviewed as well. Aeroelasticity in relation to structural design is discussed briefly. Wind loads, i.e., forces and moments, are proportional to the square of the mean wind velocity. Forces are proportional to the square of concentrator diameter, and moments are proportional to the cube of diameter. Thus, wind loads have an important bearing on size selection from both cost and performance standpoints. It is concluded that sufficient information exists so that reasonably accurate predictions of wind loading are possible for a given paraboloidal concentrator configuration, provided that reliable and relevant wind conditions are specified. Such predictions will be useful to the design engineer and to the systems engineer as well. Information is lacking, however, on wind effects in field arrays of paraboloidal concentrators. Wind tunnel tests have been performed on model heliostat arrays, but there are important aerodynamic differences between heliostats and paraboloidal dishes.

  4. Oscillation Damping: A Comparison of Wind and Photovoltaic Power Plant Capabilities: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, M.; Allen, A.; Muljadi, E.; Gevorgian, V.

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work compares and contrasts strategies for providing oscillation damping services from wind power plants and photovoltaic power plants.

  5. New Wind Energy Resource Potential Estimates for the United States (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, D.; Schwartz, M.; Haymes, S.; Heimiller, D.; Scott, G.; Brower, M.; Hale, E.; Phelps, B.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation provides an overview of the wind energy resource mapping efforts conducted at NREL and by Truepower.

  6. Western Wind and Solar Integration Study: Executive Summary, (WWSIS) May 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Piwko; K. Clark; L. Freeman; G. Jordan; N. Miller

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a summary of background, approach, and findings of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS).

  7. The State of the Art of Generators for Wind Energy Conversion Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    243 1 The State of the Art of Generators for Wind Energy Conversion Systems Y. Amirat, M. E. H. Benbouzid, B. Bensaker, R. Wamkeue and H. Mangel Abstract--Wind Energy Conversion Systems (WECS) have become of the studied generators is provided in Fig. 2. II. WIND ENERGY BACKGROUND A. Wind Power Conversion

  8. Simulation Of Energy Storage In A System With Integrated Wind Yannick Degeilh, Justine Descloux, George Gross

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, George

    Simulation Of Energy Storage In A System With Integrated Wind Resources Yannick Degeilh, Justine is key to providing the means of better harnessing wind energy potential. This paper proposes Wind is a clean and renewable source of energy with zero fuel costs. However, wind generation outputs

  9. Systems Performance Analyses of Alaska Wind-Diesel Projects; St. Paul, Alaska (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, I.

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet summarizes a systems performance analysis of the wind-diesel project in St. Paul, Alaska. Data provided for this project include load data, average wind turbine output, average diesel plant output, dump (controlling) load, average net capacity factor, average net wind penetration, estimated fuel savings, and wind system availability.

  10. How to improve the design of the electrical system in future wind power plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bak, Claus Leth

    . Two of the Ph.D. projects focus specifically to offshore wind farms and full- scale converter wind known to appear in the collection grid of offshore wind farms. The academic and industrial partners Farms will provide in-depth knowledge of all relevant aspects related to harmonics in offshore wind

  11. Structural Composites Industries 4 kilowatt wind system development. Phase I: design and analysis, technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malkine, N.; Bottrell, G.; Weingart, O.

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 4 kW small wind energy conversion system (SWECS) has been designed for residential applications in which relatively low (10 mph) mean annual wind speeds prevail. The objectives were to develop such a machine to produce electrical energy at 6 cents per kWh while operating in parallel with a utility grid or auxiliary generator. The Phase I effort began in November, 1979 and was carried through the Final Design Review in February 1981. During this period extensive trade, optimization and analytical studies were performed in an effort to provide the optimum machine to best meet the objectives. Certain components, systems and manufacturing processes were tested and evaluated and detail design drawings were produced. The resulting design is a 31-foot diameter horizontal axis downwind machine rated 5.7 kW and incorporating the following unique features: Composite Blades; Free-Standing Composite Tower; Torque-Actuated Blade Pitch Control. The design meets or exceeds all contract requirements except that for cost of energy. The target 6 cents per kWh will be achieved in a mean wind speed slightly below 12 mph instead of the specified 10 mph.

  12. Why do meteorologists use wind vanes? Wind vanes are used to determine the direction of the wind. Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Fun Facts Why do meteorologists use wind vanes? Wind vanes are used to determine the direction of the wind. Wind· vanes are also called weather vanes. What do wind vanes look like on a weather station? Wind vanes that are on weather stations look a lot like the one you· made! The biggest differences

  13. Opportunities and Challenges to Sustainable Manufacturing and CMP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dornfeld, David

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Implementing Green Manufacturing,” Trans. North AmericanBoyd, S. , LMAS Green Manufacturing Research Presentation,MANUFACTURING AND GREEN MANUFACTURING Sustainability is

  14. Wind: wind speed and wind power density maps at 10m and 50m above...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    files of wind speed and wind power density at 10 and 50 m heights. Global data of offshore wind resource as generated by NASA's QuikSCAT SeaWinds scatterometer....

  15. Wind: wind speed and wind power density GIS data at 10m and 50m...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    files of wind speed and wind power density at 10 and 50 m heights. Global data of offshore wind resource as generated by NASA's QuikScat SeaWinds scatterometer....

  16. Additive Manufacturing Opportunities for Transportation | ornl...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Additive Manufacturing Opportunities for Transportation Mar 13 2015 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM Lonnie Love, Manufacturing Systems Research Group Transportation Science Seminar Series...

  17. Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative: Increasing American Competitive...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for a Clean Energy Manufacturing Innovation Institute related to composite materials and structures. The Manufacturing Demonstration Facility at Oak Ridge National...

  18. Advanced Manufacturing Initiative Improves Turbine Blade Productivity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Manufacturing Initiative Improves Turbine Blade Productivity Advanced Manufacturing Initiative Improves Turbine Blade Productivity May 20, 2011 - 2:56pm Addthis This is an...

  19. A Management Strategy for Additive Manufacturing:.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zahn, N.Z.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??The thesis is about a Management Strategy for Additive Manufacturing - how engineering change influences the NPD process through the adoption of new manufacturing technology.… (more)

  20. National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) Response...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) Response to Smart Grid RFI National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) Response to Smart Grid RFI The National Electrical...

  1. Additive Manufacturing Cluster Strategy | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Additive Manufacturing Cluster Strategy SHARE Additive Manufacturing Cluster Strategy As the nation's premier research laboratory, ORNL is one of the world's most capable resources...

  2. Welcome and Advanced Manufacturing Partnership (Text Version...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    200 school aged students go into this manufacturing demonstration facility and make 3D printing or other manufacturing parts. Design and make parts for their robots. For their...

  3. Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering Mechatronics Engineering Minor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering Mechatronics Engineering Minor Students pursuing a BSc in mechanical or manufacturing engineering have experience and entrepreneurship. Mechatronics is the synergistic combination of mechanical

  4. Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Incentive Program...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Incentive Program Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Incentive Program This is an interim final rule that establishes the...

  5. Process systems engineering of continuous pharmaceutical manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abel, Matthew J

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Continuous manufacturing offers a number of operational and financial benefits to pharmaceutical companies. This research examines the critical blending step for continuous pharmaceutical manufacturing and the characteristics ...

  6. Understanding Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints, October...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    More Documents & Publications Understanding the 2010 Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints U.S. Manufacturing Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Analysis U.S....

  7. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Maryland Consumer's Guide (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Maryland Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a regional wind resource map and a list of incentives and contacts for more information.

  8. Manufacturing System Design Framework Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaughn, Amanda

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous Lean Aerospace Initiative research in factory operations had indicated that the greatest performance gains are realized when the manufacturing system is designed from the top down and from supplier to the customer. ...

  9. NREL: Wind Research - NREL's WIND Toolkit Provides the Data Needed to

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andData andFleet Test andField Verification ProjectProjects

  10. Wind Program: Wind Vision | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption byAbout PrintableBlenderWhatFellows - PastFarmWindWind PowerWind

  11. Wind tower service lift

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oliphant, David; Quilter, Jared; Andersen, Todd; Conroy, Thomas

    2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus used for maintaining a wind tower structure wherein the wind tower structure may have a plurality of legs and may be configured to support a wind turbine above the ground in a better position to interface with winds. The lift structure may be configured for carrying objects and have a guide system and drive system for mechanically communicating with a primary cable, rail or other first elongate member attached to the wind tower structure. The drive system and guide system may transmit forces that move the lift relative to the cable and thereby relative to the wind tower structure. A control interface may be included for controlling the amount and direction of the power into the guide system and drive system thereby causing the guide system and drive system to move the lift relative to said first elongate member such that said lift moves relative to said wind tower structure.

  12. TX-100 manufacturing final project report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashwill, Thomas D.; Berry, Derek S. (TPI Composites, Inc., Warren, RI)

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details the work completed under the TX-100 blade manufacturing portion of the Carbon-Hybrid Blade Developments: Standard and Twist-Coupled Prototype project. The TX-100 blade is a 9 meter prototype blade designed with bend-twist coupling to augment the mitigation of peak loads during normal turbine operation. This structural coupling was achieved by locating off axis carbon fiber in the outboard portion of the blade skins. The report will present the tooling selection, blade production, blade instrumentation, blade shipping and adapter plate design and fabrication. The baseline blade used for this project was the ERS-100 (Revision D) wind turbine blade. The molds used for the production of the TX-100 were originally built for the production of the CX-100 blade. The same high pressure and low pressure skin molds were used to manufacture the TX-100 skins. In order to compensate for the difference in skin thickness between the CX-100 and the TX-100, however, a new TX-100 shear web plug and mold were required. Both the blade assembly fixture and the root stud insertion fixture used for the CX-100 blades could be utilized for the TX-100 blades. A production run of seven TX-100 prototype blades was undertaken at TPI Composites during the month of October, 2004. Of those seven blades, four were instrumented with strain gauges before final assembly. After production at the TPI Composites facility in Rhode Island, the blades were shipped to various test sites: two blades to the National Wind Technology Center at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Boulder, Colorado, two blades to Sandia National Laboratory in Albuquerque, New Mexico and three blades to the United States Department of Agriculture turbine field test facility in Bushland, Texas. An adapter plate was designed to allow the TX-100 blades to be installed on existing Micon 65/13M turbines at the USDA site. The conclusion of this program is the kick-off of the TX-100 blade testing at the three testing facilities.

  13. Electronically commutated serial-parallel switching for motor windings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, John S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and a circuit for controlling an ac machine comprises controlling a full bridge network of commutation switches which are connected between a multiphase voltage source and the phase windings to switch the phase windings between a parallel connection and a series connection while providing commutation discharge paths for electrical current resulting from inductance in the phase windings. This provides extra torque for starting a vehicle from lower battery current.

  14. Innovative Technologies to Manufacture Hybrid Metal Foam/Composite Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carrino, L.; Durante, M.; Franchitti, S. [DIMP, University of Naples 'Federico II', P.le Tecchio, 80-80125 Naples (Italy); Sorrentino, L.; Tersigni, L. [DII, University of Cassino, Via G. Di Biasio, 43-03043 Cassino (Italy)

    2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this paper is to verify the technological feasibility to realize hybrid metal-foam/composite component and the mechanical performances of the final structure. The hybrid component is composed by a cylindrical core in aluminum foam, the most used between those commercially available, and an outer layer in epoxy/S2-glass, manufactured by filament winding technology.A set of experimental tests have been carried out, to the aim to estimate the improvement of the hybrid component characteristics, compared to the sum of the single components (metal foam cylinder and epoxy/S2-glass tube).

  15. Studying Wind Energy/Bird Interactions: A Guidance Document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, R. [California Energy Commission (US); Morrison, M. [California State Univ., Sacramento, CA (US); Sinclair, K. [Dept. of Energy/National Renewable Energy Lab. (US); Strickland, D. [WEST, Inc. (US)

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This guidance document is a product of the Avian Subcommittee of the National Wind Coordinating Committee (NWCC). The NWCC was formed to better understand and promote responsible, credible, and comparable avian/wind energy interaction studies. Bird mortality is a concern and wind power is a potential clean and green source of electricity, making study of wind energy/bird interactions essential. This document provides an overview for regulators and stakeholders concerned with wind energy/bird interactions, as well as a more technical discussion of the basic concepts and tools for studying such interactions.

  16. Winter Term University of Oldenburg (Core Provider)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habel, Annegret

    Evaluation Modul Winter Term Titel Wind Energy Wind Energy I Wind Tutorial Wind Energy Systems Wind Energy Conversion (Lab) Excursion/Wind/DEWI Modul Winter Term Titel Solar Energy PV Systems I Solar Thermal I Solar Tutorial PV Cell Characteristics (Lab) Solar

  17. the risk issue of wind measurement for wind turbine operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leu, Tzong-Shyng "Jeremy"

    Sciences, National Taiwan University #12;outline · Wind measurement in meteorology and wind farm design-related issues on wind turbine operation 3/31/2011 2 #12;WIND MEASUREMENT IN METEOROLOGY & WIND FARM DESIGN 3.brainybetty.com 11 wind farm at ChangHwa Coastal Industrial Park 70m wind tower 70m 50m 30m 10m #12;1 2 3 4 5 1 (70M

  18. Description of the Columbia Basin Wind Energy Study (CBWES)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, Larry K.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Nelson, Danny A.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Technical Report is to provide background information about the Columbia Basin Wind Energy Study (CBWES). This study, which was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Wind and Water Power Program, was conducted from 16 November 2010 through 21 March 2012 at a field site in northeastern Oregon. The primary goal of the study was to provide profiles of wind speed and wind direction over the depth of the boundary layer in an operating wind farm located in an area of complex terrain. Measurements from propeller and vane anemometers mounted on a 62 m tall tower, Doppler Sodar, and Radar Wind Profiler were combined into a single data product to provide the best estimate of the winds above the site during the first part of CBWES. An additional goal of the study was to provide measurements of Turbulence Kinetic Energy (TKE) near the surface. To address this specific goal, sonic anemometers were mounted at two heights on the 62 m tower on 23 April 2011. Prior to the deployment of the sonic anemometers on the tall tower, a single sonic anemometer was deployed on a short tower 3.1 m tall that was located just to the south of the radar wind profiler. Data from the radar wind profiler, as well as the wind profile data product are available from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) Data Archive (http://www.arm.gov/data/campaigns). Data from the sonic anemometers are available from the authors.

  19. Marketing energy conservation options to Northwest manufactured home buyers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendrickson, P.L.; Mohler, B.L.; Taylor, Z.T.; Lee, A.D.; Onisko, S.A.

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study relies on extensive, existing survey data and new analyses to develop information that would help design a marketing plan to achieve energy conservation in new manufactured homes. Existing surveys present comprehensive information about regional manufactured home occupants and their homes that are relevant to a potential conservation marketing plan. An independent analysis of the cost-effectiveness of various efficiency improvements provides background information for designing a marketing plan. This analysis focuses on the economic impacts of alternative energy conservation options as perceived by the home owner. Identifying impediments to conservation investments is also very important in designing a marketing plan. A recent report suggests that financial constraints and the need for better information and knowledge about conservation pose the major conservation investment barriers. Since loan interest rates for new manufactured homes typically exceed site-built rates by a considerable amount and the buyers tend to have lower incomes, the economics of manufactured home conservation investments are likely to significantly influence their viability. Conservation information and its presentation directly influences the manufactured home buyer's decision. A marketing plan should address these impediments and their implications very clearly. Dealers express a belief that consumer satisfaction is the major advantage to selling energy efficient manufactured homes. This suggests that targeting dealers in a marketing plan and providing them direct information on consumers' indicated attitudes may be important. 74 refs.

  20. NREL: Wind Research - WindPACT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the cost of wind energy Determine probable size ranges of advanced utility-scale turbines over the next decade for U.S. application Evaluate advanced concepts that are...