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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese superoxide dismutase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Cell cycle-regulated manganese superoxide dismutase activity via reversible  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cycle-regulated manganese superoxide dismutase activity via reversible cycle-regulated manganese superoxide dismutase activity via reversible phosphorylation Demet Candas University of California Davis Abstract The constant stress environment that the cells live in required the development of defense systems against free radical and radiation insults. One of the major antioxidant enzymes responsible for detoxifying free radical species is manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD, Sod2), which is specifically localized into the mitochondria of cells. MnSOD catalyzes the conversion of two molecules of superoxide anion into water and hydrogen peroxide, the latter of which is then further oxidized to water. The significance of the role of MnSOD activity was shown by the studies showing that the loss or deficiency of MnSOD sensitize cells to ionizing

2

Metalloantibiotic Mn(II)-bacitracin complex mimicking manganese superoxide dismutase  

SciTech Connect

Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities of various metallobacitracin complexes were evaluated using the riboflavin-methionine-nitro blue tetrazolium assay. The radical scavenging activity of various metallobacitracin complexes was shown to be higher than those of the negative controls, e.g., free transition metal ions and metal-free bacitracin. The SOD activity of the complex was found to be in the order of Mn(II) > Cu(II) > Co(II) > Ni(II). Furthermore, the effect of bacitracin and their complexation to metals on various microorganisms was assessed by antibiotic susceptibility testing. Moreover, molecular modeling and quantum chemical calculation of the metallobacitracin complex was performed to evaluate the correlation of electrostatic charge of transition metal ions on the SOD activity.

Piacham, Theeraphon [Department of Clinical Microbiology, Faculty of Medical Technology, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand); Pure and Applied Biochemistry, Chemical Center, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, 22100 Lund (Sweden); Isarankura-Na-Ayudhya, Chartchalerm [Department of Clinical Microbiology, Faculty of Medical Technology, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand); Nantasenamat, Chanin [Department of Clinical Microbiology, Faculty of Medical Technology, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand); Yainoy, Sakda [Department of Clinical Microbiology, Faculty of Medical Technology, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand); Ye Lei [Pure and Applied Biochemistry, Chemical Center, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, 22100 Lund (Sweden); Buelow, Leif [Pure and Applied Biochemistry, Chemical Center, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, 22100 Lund (Sweden); Prachayasittikul, Virapong [Department of Clinical Microbiology, Faculty of Medical Technology, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand)]. E-mail: mtvpr@mucc.mahidol.ac.th

2006-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

3

Cell cycle-regulated manganese superoxide dismutase activity...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

activity via reversible phosphorylation Demet Candas 1 , Danupon Nantajit 1 , Ming Fan 1 , Jeffrey S. Murley 2 , Gayle Woloschak 3 , David J. Grdina 2 and Jian Jian Li 1 1...

4

Copper and Zinc Metallation Status of Copper Zinc Superoxide Dismutase form Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Transgenic Mice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mutations in the metalloenzyme copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1) cause one form of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and metals are suspected to play a pivotal role in ALS pathology. To learn more about metals in ALS, we determined the metallation states of human wild-type or mutant (G37R, G93A, and H46R/H48Q) SOD1 proteins from SOD1-ALS transgenic mice spinal cords. SOD1 was gently extracted from spinal cord and separated into insoluble (aggregated) and soluble (supernatant) fractions, and then metallation states were determined by HPLC inductively coupled plasma MS. Insoluble SOD1-rich fractions were not enriched in copper and zinc. However, the soluble mutant and WT SOD1s were highly metallated except for the metal-binding-region mutant H46R/H48Q, which did not bind any copper. Due to the stability conferred by high metallation of G37R and G93A, it is unlikely that these soluble SOD1s are prone to aggregation in vivo, supporting the hypothesis that immature nascent SOD1 is the substrate for aggregation. We also investigated the effect of SOD1 overexpression and disease on metal homeostasis in spinal cord cross-sections of SOD1-ALS mice using synchrotron-based x-ray fluorescence microscopy. In each mouse genotype, except for the H46R/H48Q mouse, we found a redistribution of copper between gray and white matters correlated to areas of high SOD1. Interestingly, a disease-specific increase of zinc was observed in the white matter for all mutant SOD1 mice. Together these data provide a picture of copper and zinc in the cell as well as highlight the importance of these metals in understanding SOD1-ALS pathology.

Lelie, H.L.; Miller, L.; Liba, A.; Bourassa, M.W.; Chattopadhyay, M.; Chan, P.K.; Gralla, E.B.; Borchelt, D.R.; et al

2010-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

5

Improving the Performance of Lithium Manganese Phosphate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improving the Performance of Lithium Manganese Phosphate Title Improving the Performance of Lithium Manganese Phosphate Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2009...

6

It's Elemental - The Element Manganese  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chromium Chromium Previous Element (Chromium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Iron) Iron The Element Manganese [Click for Isotope Data] 25 Mn Manganese 54.938045 Atomic Number: 25 Atomic Weight: 54.938045 Melting Point: 1519 K (1246°C or 2275°F) Boiling Point: 2334 K (2061°C or 3742°F) Density: 7.3 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 4 Group Number: 7 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Latin word for magnet, magnes. Say what? Manganese is pronounced as MAN-ge-nees. History and Uses: Proposed to be an element by Carl Wilhelm Scheele in 1774, manganese was discovered by Johan Gottlieb Gahn, a Swedish chemist, by heating the mineral pyrolusite (MnO2) in the presence of charcoal later that year.

7

SEPARATING PROTOACTINIUM WITH MANGANESE DIOXIDE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The preparation of U/sup 235/ and an improved method for isolating Pa/ sup 233/ from foreign products present in neutronirradiated thorium is described. The method comprises forming a solution of neutron-irradiated thorium together with a manganous salt, then adding potassium permanganate to precipitate the manganese as manganese dioxide whereby protoactinium is carried down with the nnanganese dioxide dissolving the precipitate, adding a soluble zirconium salt, and adding phosphate ion to precipitate zirconium phosphate whereby protoactinium is then carried down with the zirconium phosphate to effect a further concentration.

Seaborg, G.T.; Gofman, J.W.; Stoughton, R.W.

1958-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

8

Structural Sequestration of Uranium in Bacteriogenic Manganese...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Highlightsbanner Structural Sequestration of Uranium in Bacteriogenic Manganese Oxides Samuel M. Webb (Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory), Bradley M. Tebo (Oregon Health...

9

New manganese catalyst for light alkane oxidation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Aluminophosphates containing manganese in the structural framework are employed for the oxidation of alkanes, for example the vapor phase oxidation of methane to methanol.

Durante, Vincent A. (West Chester, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA); Walker, Darrell W. (Visalia, CA); Marcus, Bonita K. (Radnor, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Batteries with Orthorhombic Sodium Manganese Oxide Cathodes  

Berkeley National Laboratory researchers have discovered a low-cost, low-toxicity manganese oxide for rechargeable lithium and sodium batteries.

11

Degradation of Manganese Cobalt Spinel SOFC Interconnect ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Degradation of Manganese Cobalt Spinel SOFC Interconnect Coatings. Author(s), Jeffrey W. Fergus, Yingjia Liu, Yu Zhao. On-Site Speaker...

12

Drinking Water Problems: Iron and Manganese  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Iron and manganese can give water an unpleasant taste, odor and color. In this publication you'll learn how to know whether your water contains iron or manganese and how to eliminate these contaminants with various treatment methods such as aeration and chemical oxidation.

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

2004-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

13

Magnesium/manganese dioxide electrochemical cell  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes an improvement in a magnesium/manganese dioxide electrochemical cell that has been stored following partial usage and including an alloy of magnesium as the anode, a moist cathode mix of carbon black, manganese dioxide, magnesium hydroxide, barium chromate and lithium chromate as the cathode, and 3.5 to 4.0 normal magnesium perchlorate as the electrolyte. The improvement involves increasing the moisture content of the cathode mix from 34 to 38 percent at the time of making the cell to reduce the self discharge and increase the operating capacity after the cell has been stored following partial usage.

Jarvis, L.P.; Brundage, M.T.; Atwater, T.B.

1989-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

14

Cation Adsorption on Manganese Dioxide Impregnated Fibers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The complete removal of radioactive cations by standard mixed-bed ion-exchange resins is sometimes not achieved in liquid radwaste systems. This report documents an alternative ion adsorption process for the purification of liquid wastes, specifically, the use of manganese dioxide (MnO2) impregnated fibers to remove selected cations from PWR liquid waste streams.

1993-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

15

Improved magnesium/manganese dioxide electrochemical cell  

SciTech Connect

A magnesium/manganese dioxide electrochemical cell, stored following partial usage, is improved by increasing the cathode moisture content at the time of making the cell to reduce the self-discharge and increase the operating capacity after the cell has been stored following partial usage.

Jarvis, L.P.; Brundage, M.T.; Atwater, T.B.

1988-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

16

Manganese-Based Magnets: Manganese-Based Permanent Magnet with 40 MGOe at 200C  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

REACT Project: PNNL is working to reduce the cost of wind turbines and EVs by developing a manganese-based nano-composite magnet that could serve as an inexpensive alternative to rare-earth-based magnets. The manganese composite, made from low-cost and abundant materials, could exceed the performance of todays most powerful commercial magnets at temperature higher than 200C. Members of PNNLs research team will leverage comprehensive computer high-performance supercomputer modeling and materials testing to meet this objective. Manganese-based magnets could withstand higher temperatures than their rare earth predecessors and potentially reduce the need for any expensive, bulky engine cooling systems for the motor and generator. This would further contribute to cost savings for both EVs and wind turbines.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Calorimetric Investigation of the LithiumManganeseOxygen ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Calorimetric Investigation of the LithiumManganeseOxygen Cathode Material System for Lithium Ion Batteries. Author(s), Damian M. Cupid,...

18

Experimental Cell for Neutron Reflection on Lithium Manganese ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Experimental Cell for Neutron Reflection on Lithium Manganese Oxide to Study the Electrode/Electrolyte Interface. Author(s), Brian Kitchen.

19

A Study of Pelletization of Manganese Ore Fines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... ores, fine manganese fines are characterized by large amount and low price. ... A Study of Coal-Based Direct Reduction of Composite Binder Magnetite...

20

Manganese Cobalt Spinel Oxide Based Coatings for SOFC ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Manganese Cobalt Spinel Oxide Based Coatings for SOFC Interconnects. Author(s), Jeffrey W. Fergus, Yingjia Liu, Yu Zhao. On-Site Speaker...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese superoxide dismutase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

High Temperature Stainless Steel Alloy with Low Cost Manganese  

High Temperature Stainless Steel Alloy with Low Cost Manganese ... Power industry components such as boiler tubing and piping, pressure vessels, chemical

22

Researches on Reduction Roasting of Low-grade Manganese ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, a kind of abundant biomass, pine black charcoal, was firstly used as a substitute for coals to reduce low-grade manganese oxide ores.

23

Manganese Occurrence Near Three Coal Ash Impoundments in Illinois  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes research performed to better understand the cause of elevated manganese concentrations sometimes found in groundwater near coal ash management facilities. Three impoundments in Illinois were selected for detailed field and laboratory studies of conditions conducive to manganese release from coal ash as well as natural soils.

2002-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

24

The Role of Manganese Dioxide (MnO2) Deposition in Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the role of manganese dioxide (MnO2) in microbiologically influenced corrosion.

2004-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

25

Why sequence freshwater manganese depositing β-proteobacterium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

freshwater manganese depositing β-proteobacterium freshwater manganese depositing β-proteobacterium (Siderocapsaceae)? Stream biofilms are key component of stream food webs and contain bacteria that contribute to the carbon and nitrogen cycles. A slow-growing bacterium isolated from a freshwater stream biofilm has potential bioenergy and bioremediation applications. JOSHI_001 is part of a class of bacteria that deposit iron and manganese precipitates externally to the colony early in its life cycle and could be used for fuel cells and to help clean up manganese contaminated water. Members of the Siderocapsaceae family to which JOSHI_001 belongs have been observed in biofilms for the past century, but have never before been isolated and cultivated in a laboratory environment. As a result, researchers have not been able to learn about the

26

The impacts of graphene nanosheets and manganese valency on lithium storage characteristics in graphene/manganese oxide hybrid anode  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Graphene nanosheets (GNS) with attached MnOx nanoparticles are studied in regard to their structure and morphology. The relationship between the lithium storage performances and GNS contents as well as manganese valency was investigated. Experimental ...

S. L. Cheekati; Z. Yao; H. Huang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Xenon in Mercury-Manganese Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Previous studies of elemental abundances in Mercury-Manganese (HgMn) stars have occasionally reported the presence of lines of the ionized rare noble gas Xe II, especially in a few of the hottest stars with Teff ~ 13000--15000 K. A new study of this element has been undertaken using observations from Lick Observatory's Hamilton Echelle Spectrograph. In this work, the spectrum synthesis program UCLSYN has been used to undertake abundance analysis assuming LTE. We find that in the Smith & Dworetsky sample of HgMn stars, Xe is vastly over-abundant in 21 of 22 HgMn stars studied, by factors of 3.1--4.8 dex. There does not appear to be a significant correlation of Xe abundance with Teff. A comparison sample of normal late B stars shows no sign of Xe II lines that could be detected, consistent with the expected weakness of lines at normal abundance. The main reason for the previous lack of widespread detection in HgMn stars is probably due to the strongest lines being at longer wavelengths than the photographic blue. The lines used in this work were 4603.03A, 4844.33A and 5292.22A.

M. M. Dworetsky; J. L. Persaud; K. Patel

2008-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

28

Manganese sulfide formation via concomitant microbial manganese oxide and thiosulfate reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 produced {gamma}-MnS (rambergite) nanoparticles during the concurrent reduction of MnO{sub 2} and thiosulfate coupled to H{sub 2} oxidation. To investigate effect of direct microbial reduction of MnO{sub 2} on MnS formation, two MR-1 mutants defective in outer membrane c-type cytochromes ({Delta}mtrC/{Delta}omcA and {Delta}mtrC/{Delta}omcA/{Delta}mtrF) were also used and it was determined that direct reduction of MnO{sub 2} was dominant relative to chemical reduction by biogenic sulfide generated from thiosulfate reduction. Although bicarbonate was excluded from the medium, incubations of strain MR-1 with lactate as the electron donor produced MnCO{sub 3} (rhodochrosite) as well as MnS in nearly equivalent amounts as estimated by micro X-ray diffraction (micro-XRD) analysis. It was concluded that carbonate released from lactate metabolism promoted MnCO{sub 3} formation and that Mn(II) mineralogy was strongly affected by carbonate ions even in the presence of abundant sulfide and weakly alkaline conditions expected to favor the precipitation of MnS. Formation of MnS, as determined by a combination of micro-XRD, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and selected area electron diffraction analyses was consistent with equilibrium speciation modeling predictions. Biogenic manganese sulfide may be a manganese sink in the Mn biogeochemical cycle in select environments such as deep anoxic marine basins within the Baltic Sea.

Lee, Ji-Hoon; Kennedy, David W.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Moore, Dean A.; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Reed, Samantha B.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

29

Manganese: Recent advances in understanding its transport and neurotoxicity  

SciTech Connect

The present review is based on presentations from the meeting of the Society of Toxicology in San Diego, CA (March 2006). It addresses recent developments in the understanding of the transport of manganese (Mn) into the central nervous system (CNS), as well as brain imaging and neurocognitive studies in non-human primates aimed at improving our understanding of the mechanisms of Mn neurotoxicity. Finally, we discuss potential therapeutic modalities for treating Mn intoxication in humans.

Aschner, Michael [Departments of Pediatrics, Pharmacology, and Kennedy Center for Research on Human Development, B-3307 Medical Center North, Vanderbilt University, School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232-2495 (United States)]. E-mail: Michael.Aschner@vanderbilt.edu; Guilarte, Tomas R. [Neurotoxicology and Molecular Imaging Laboratory, Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States); Schneider, Jay S. [Department of Pathology, Anatomy and Cell Biology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Zheng Wei [School of Health Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States)

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Iron and manganese removal from a groundwater supply  

SciTech Connect

The treatment options and planning techniques used by the town of Castle Rock (Colorado) for a new water treatment facility are described. Castle Rock officials assessed the available treatment options for dissolved iron and manganese removal and selected potassium permanganate as the primary oxidant to be followed by manganese greensand. A backup prechlorination system for oxidation was also installed. In addition, to prevent excess headloss buildup in the manganese greensand filter media, an anthracite carbon cap was used as the top filter medium for precipitate removal. It is recommended that a treatability study be performed to determine individual design criteria to allow for specific site conditions. The town also assessed the capital and operation and maintenance costs for both treatment at individual well fields and a centralized location for treatment of a cluster of well fields. The results indicate that it is more economical to provide centralized water treatment even though there are capital costs associated with piping raw water from the individual well fields to the central facility. 3 refs.

Lorenz, W.; Seifert, K.; Kasch, O.K. (Arber Richard P. Associates, Inc., Denver, CO (USA))

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Reaction of Plutonium(VI) with the Manganese-Substituted Iron Oxide Mineral Goethite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plutonium(VI) Sorption on Manganese-SubstitutedX-ray Beam-Induced Chemistry on Plutonium Sorbed on Variousof Plutonium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .159 v E Anion

Hu, Yung-Jin Hu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

The Use of Manganese Substituted Ferrotitanium Alloys for Energy Storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experimental results are presented on properties of major practical importance in the utilization of manganese-substituted ferrotitanium alloys as hydrogen storage media. Consideration is given to (1) pressure-composition-temperature characteristics, (2) particle attrition properties, (3) effects of long-term cycling on alloy stability, (4) ease of activation and reactivation, and (5) effects of contaminants on alloy activity. The performance of ternary alloys is compared with that of titanium iron as is the development of an optimum ternary alloy for use with a particular peak shaving operation, i.e., the regenerative H2-Cl system.

Johnson, J.R.; Reilly, J.

1977-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

33

The Effect of Manganese Additions on the Reactive Evaporation of Chromium in Ni-Cr Alloys  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chromium is used as an alloy addition in stainless steels and nickel-chromium alloys to form protective chromium oxide scales. Chromium oxide undergoes reactive evaporation in high temperature exposures in the presence of oxygen and/or water vapor. The deposition of gaseous chromium species onto solid oxide fuel cell electrodes can reduce the efficiency of the fuel cell. Manganese additions to the alloy can reduce the activity of chromium in the oxide, either from solid solution replacement of chromium with manganese (at low levels of manganese) or from the formation of manganese-chromium spinels (at high levels of manganese). This reduction in chromium activity leads to a predicted reduction in chromium evaporation by as much as a factor of 35 at 800 C and 55 at 700 C. The results of evaporation loss measurements on nickel-chromium-manganese alloys are compared with the predicted reduction. Quantifying the effects of manganese additions on chromium evaporation should aid alloy development of metallic interconnects and balance-of-plant alloys.

Holcomb, Gordon R.; Alman, David E.

2004-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

34

Proton conduction in electrolyte made of manganese dioxide for hydrogen gas sensor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We propose a network model of oxygen-pairs to store and conduct protons on the surface of manganese dioxide with a weak covalent bond like protons stored in pressured ice. The atomic distances of oxygen-pairs were estimated between 2.57 and 2.60 angstroms in crystal structures of ramsdellite-type and lambda-type manganese dioxides by using protonated samples and inelastic neutron scattering measurements. Good properties for a hydrogen gas sensor using electrolytes made of manganese dioxides that contain such oxygen-pairs were confirmed experimentally.

Koyanaka, Hideki [Kyoto University, Japan; Ueda, Yoshikatsu [Kyoto University, Japan; Takeuchi, K [Tokyo University of Science, Oshamanbe Hokkaido, Japan; Kolesnikov, Alexander I [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Investigation of manganese dioxide as an improved solid desiccant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the preparation of a series of manganese oxides and an analysis of their sorptive, structural, and surface characteristics as low-energetic desiccants for passive dehumidification and active desiccant cooling systems. A cusped Type III isotherm for the adsorption of water is reported for the first time. The data are interpreted as evidence of a first-order phase change from a two-dimensional gas to a liquid film in the first reversibly adsorbed layer. It appears that the water adsorption characteristics of MnO/sub 2/ compared to standard desiccants which exhibit Type II isotherms are due at least in part to differences in the physical topography and electronic properties of the desiccant substrates: MnO/sub 2/ is a p-type semiconductor with essentially-flat, monoenergetic surface structures, while standard desiccants like silica gel are electronic insulators with irregular, heteroenergetic surfaces.

Fraioli, A.V.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

MANGANESE OXIDE AS A NEW CATHODE CATALYST IN MICROBIAL FUEL CELLS (MFCs).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study focused on manganese oxides with a cryptomelane-type octahedral molecular sieve (OMS-2) structure to replace platinum as a cathode catalyst in microbial fuel cells (more)

Li, Xiang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Fabrication and characterization of manganese ferrite nanospheres as a magnetic adsorbent of chromium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Manganese ferrite nanospheres constructed by nanoparticles were synthesized in high yield via a general, one-step, and templatefree solvothermal method. The product was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and ...

Li-Xia Yang, Feng Wang, Yan-Feng Meng, Qing-Hua Tang, Zi-Qi Liu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Influences on the oceanic biogeochemical cycling of the hybrid-type metals, cobalt, iron, and manganese  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Trace metal cycling is one of many processes that influence ocean ecosystem dynamics. Cobalt, iron, and manganese are redox active trace metal micro-nutrients with oceanic distributions that are influenced by both biological ...

Noble, Abigail Emery

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

C:\\Eco-SSLs\\Contaminant Specific Documents\\Manganese\\April 2007...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Toxicity in Field Grown Tea Plants and the Microdistribution of Manganese in the Leaf Tissues as Revealed by Electron Probe X-Ray Micrography. Soil Sci. Plant Nutr. 27(3):...

40

Hot coal gas desulfurization with manganese-based sorbents. Quarterly report, October--December 1993  

SciTech Connect

The focus of work being performed on Hot Coal Gas Desulfurization at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center is primarily in the use of zinc ferrite and zinc titanate sorbents; however, prior studies indicated that an alternate sorbent, manganese dioxide-containing ore in mixture with alumina (75 wt% ore + 25 wt% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) may be a viable alternative to zinc-based sorbents. Manganese, for example, has a lower vapor pressure in the elemental state than zinc hence it is not as likely to undergo depletion from the sorbent surface upon loading and regeneration cycles. Also manganese oxide is less readily reduced to the elemental state than iron hence the range of reduction potentials for oxygen is somewhat greater than for zinc ferrite. In addition, thermodynamic analysis of the manganese-oxygen-sulfur system shows it to be less amenable to sulfation than zinc ferrite. Potential also exists for utilization of manganese at higher temperatures than zinc ferrite or zinc titanate. This Fifth Quarterly Report documents progress in pellet testing via thermogravimetric analysis of pellet formulation FORM4-A of a manganese ore/alumina combination. This formulation, described more fully in the Quarterly Technical Progress Report of October 15, 1993, consists of manganese carbonate combined with alundum. A 2-inch fixed-bed reactor has been fabricated and is now ready for subjecting pellets to cyclic loading and regeneration; however, a minor problem has arisen during the regeneration cycle in that sulfur tends to form and plug the exit tube during the early stage of regeneration. This problem is about to be overcome by increasing the flow rate of air during the regeneration cycle resulting in more oxidizing conditions and hence less tendency for sulfide sulfur (S{sup =}) to oxidize to the intermediate elemental form (S{sup o}) rather than to 4-valent (S{sup +4}).

Hepworth, M.T.; Slimane, R.B.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese superoxide dismutase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Soft x-ray absorption and photoemission spectroscopy study of superoxide KO2 J.-S. Kang,* D. H. Kim, and J. H. Hwang  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soft x-ray absorption and photoemission spectroscopy study of superoxide KO2 J.-S. Kang,* D. H. Kim of superoxide KO2 was investigated by employing soft x-ray absorption spectros- copy XAS and core cooling, O2 - molecular bond axes seem to tilt to have a lower crystal monoclinic symme- try. By lowering

Min, Byung Il

42

Experiments on sorption properties of gamma-manganese dioxide under isothermal conditions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To characterize promising solid desiccant materials for solar desiccant cooling applications, we measured the sorption properties of gamma-manganese dioxide under isothermal conditions using gravimetric methods. Tests were performed at 20/sup 0/C and 40/sup 0/C, a flow rate of about 110 cm/sup 3//min, a pressure of 1 atm, and relative humidities between 3% and 90%. We found the equilibrium water capacity of gamma-manganese dioxide to be much lower than that of silica gel (5% compared with 37% to 40%). The uncertainty in the manganese dioxide capacity calculation is relatively high (+-14%) because of the low sorption capacity of the small sample available (less than 0.3 g). Because of its low adsorption capacity, it cannot be used as a stand-alone desiccant in desiccant dehumidifiers. It may be used in composites with silica gel if its moisture diffusivity is considerably higher than that of silica gel. The moisture diffusivity in manganese dioxide and silica gel/manganese dioxide composites needs to be assessed and compared with that of silica gel for evaluating the composites as advanced desiccants.

Zangrando, F.; Choudhury, K.; Pesaran, A.A.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Nanostructured lithium nickel manganese oxides for lithium-ion batteries.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nanostructured lithium nickel manganese oxides were investigated as advanced positive electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries designated to power plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and all-electric vehicles. The investigation included material characterization and electrochemical testing. In cell tests, the Li{sub 1.375}Ni{sub 0.25}Mn{sub 0.75}O{sub 2.4375} composition achieved high capacity (210 mAh g{sup -1}) at an elevated rate (230 mA g{sup -1}), which makes this material a promising candidate for high energy density Li-ion batteries, as does its being cobalt-free and uncoated. The material has spherical morphology with nanoprimary particles embedded in micrometer-sized secondary particles, possesses a multiphase character (spinel and layered), and exhibits a high packing density (over 2 g cm{sup -3}) that is essential for the design of high energy density positive electrodes. When combined with the Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12} stable anode, the cell showed a capacity of 225 mAh g{sup -1} at the C/3 rate (73 mA g{sup -1}) with no capacity fading for 200 cycles. Other chemical compositions, Li{sub (1+x)}Ni{sub 0.25}Mn{sub 0.75}O{sub (2.25+x/2)} (0.32 {le} x {le} 0.65), were also studied, and the relationships among their structural, morphological, and electrochemical properties are reported.

Deng, H.; Belharouak, I.; Cook, R. E.; Wu, H.; Sun, Y.-K.; Amine, K.; Hanyang Univ.

2010-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

44

Kinetics of Chromium(III) Oxidation by Manganese(IV) Oxides Using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. This represents the first study to determine the chemical kinetics of Cr(III) oxidation on Mn-oxides. The results focusing on the "chemical" kinetics of Cr(III) oxidation on manganese oxides, i.e., the initial rates of Obtaining and Analyzing Kinetic Data. In Rates of Soil Chemical Processes, Sparks, D. L., Suarez, D. L., Eds

Sparks, Donald L.

45

NFkB in the Thiol-Induced Adaptive Response (A)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A) A) David Grdina The University of Chicago Abstract Exposure of cells to low non-lethal doses of ionizing radiation (≤ 10 cGy) or WR1065, the active free thiol form of amifostine, can induce pro-survival pathways that result in protection against the damaging effects of a 2 Gy dose of ionizing radiation. One such signaling pathway involves the activation of NFκB and the subsequent elevation of active manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2). SOD2 is a mitochondrial matrix protein that serves as the primary mitochondrial defense against superoxide formation. Its primary function is to facilitate the dismutation of two molecules of superoxide anion (O2-) produced by normal respiratory processes or following exposure to ionizing radiation into water and hydrogen peroxide. To characterize the role of SOD2 in the radiation- and

46

Arsenic alters monocyte superoxide anion and nitric oxide production in environmentally exposed children  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Arsenic (As) exposure has been associated with alterations in the immune system, studies in experimental models and adults have shown that these effects involve macrophage function; however, limited information is available on what type of effects could be induced in children. The aim of this study was to evaluate effects of As exposure, through the association of inorganic As (iAs) and its metabolites [monomethylated arsenic (MMA) and dimethylated arsenic (DMA)] with basal levels of nitric oxide (NO{sup {center_dot}-}) and superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}-}), in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and monocytes, and NO{sup {center_dot}-} and O{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}-} produced by activated monocytes. Hence, a cross-sectional study was conducted in 87 children (6-10 years old) who had been environmentally exposed to As through drinking water. Levels of urinary As species (iAs, MMA and DMA) were determined by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry, total As (tAs) represents the sum of iAs and its species; tAs urine levels ranged from 12.3 to 1411 {mu}g/g creatinine. Using multiple linear regression models, iAs presented a positive and statistical association with basal NO{sup {center_dot}-} in PBMC ({beta} = 0.0048, p = 0.049) and monocytes ({beta} = 0.0044, p = 0.044), while basal O{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}-} had a significant positive association with DMA ({beta} = 0.0025, p = 0.046). In activated monocytes, O{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}-} showed a statistical and positive association with iAs ({beta} = 0.0108, p = 0.023), MMA ({beta} = 0.0066, p = 0.022), DMA ({beta} = 0.0018, p = 0.015), and tAs ({beta} = 0.0013, p = 0.015). We conclude that As exposure in the studied children was positively associated with basal levels of NO{sup {center_dot}-} and O{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}-} in PBMC and monocytes, suggesting that As induces oxidative stress in circulating blood cells. Additionally, this study showed a positive association of O{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}-} production with iAs and its metabolites in stimulated monocytes, supporting previous data that suggests that these cells, and particularly the O{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}-} activation pathway, are relevant targets for As toxicity.

Luna, Ana L.; Acosta-Saavedra, Leonor C. [Toxicologia, Cinvestav, PO Box: 14-740, Mexico, D.F., 07360 (Mexico); Lopez-Carrillo, Lizbeth [Centro de Investigacion en Salud Poblacional, Instituto Nacional de Salud Publica, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Conde, Patricia; Vera, Eunice; De Vizcaya-Ruiz, Andrea [Toxicologia, Cinvestav, PO Box: 14-740, Mexico, D.F., 07360 (Mexico); Bastida, Mariana [Coordinacion de Investigacion de la Secretaria de Salud del Estado de Hidalgo (Mexico); Cebrian, Mariano E. [Toxicologia, Cinvestav, PO Box: 14-740, Mexico, D.F., 07360 (Mexico); Calderon-Aranda, Emma S., E-mail: scalder@cinvestav.m [Toxicologia, Cinvestav, PO Box: 14-740, Mexico, D.F., 07360 (Mexico)

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Formation of manganese {delta}-doped atomic layer in wurtzite GaN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe the formation of a {delta}-doped manganese layer embedded within c-plane wurtzite gallium nitride using a special molecular beam epitaxy growth process. Manganese is first deposited on the gallium-poor GaN (0001) surface, forming a {radical}(3) Multiplication-Sign {radical}(3)-R30 Degree-Sign reconstructed phase. This well-defined surface reconstruction is then nitrided using plasma nitridation, and gallium nitride is overgrown. The manganese content of the {radical}(3) Multiplication-Sign {radical}(3)-R30 Degree-Sign phase, namely one Mn per each {radical}(3) Multiplication-Sign {radical}(3)-R30 Degree-Sign unit cell, implies that the MnGaN alloy layer has a Mn concentration of up to 33%. The structure and chemical content of the surface are monitored beginning from the initial growth stage up through the overgrowth of 20 additional monolayers (MLs) of GaN. An exponential-like drop-off of the Mn signal with increasing GaN monolayers, as measured by Auger electron spectroscopy, indicates that the highly concentrated Mn layer remains at the {delta}-doped interface. A model of the resultant {delta}-doped structure is formulated based on the experimental data, and implications for possible spintronic applications are discussed.

Shi Meng; Chinchore, Abhijit; Wang Kangkang; Mandru, Andrada-Oana; Liu Yinghao; Smith, Arthur R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nanoscale and Quantum Phenomena Institute, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio 45701 (United States)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Secondary cell with orthorhombic alkali metal/manganese oxide phase active cathode material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An alkali metal manganese oxide secondary cell is disclosed which can provide a high rate of discharge, good cycling capabilities, good stability of the cathode material, high specific energy (energy per unit of weight) and high energy density (energy per unit volume). The active material in the anode is an alkali metal and the active material in the cathode comprises an orthorhombic alkali metal manganese oxide which undergoes intercalation and deintercalation without a change in phase, resulting in a substantially linear change in voltage with change in the state of charge of the cell. The active material in the cathode is an orthorhombic structure having the formula M{sub x}Z{sub y}Mn{sub (1{minus}y)}O{sub 2}, where M is an alkali metal; Z is a metal capable of substituting for manganese in the orthorhombic structure such as iron, cobalt or titanium; x ranges from about 0.2 in the fully charged state to about 0.75 in the fully discharged state, and y ranges from 0 to 60 atomic %. Preferably, the cell is constructed with a solid electrolyte, but a liquid or gelatinous electrolyte may also be used in the cell. 11 figs.

Doeff, M.M.; Peng, M.Y.; Ma, Y.; Visco, S.J.; DeJonghe, L.C.

1996-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

49

Kinetic and morphological development of oxide-sulfide scales on manganese at 1,073 K  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The corrosion behavior of manganese in controlled gas atmospheres of SO{sub 2}-CO{sub 2}-CO-N{sub 2} at 1073 K was studied. Under all conditions, the gas phase was slow to equilibrate, and catalysis of the gas affected the corrosion mechanism and resulting scale morphologies. Product scales invariably became detached from the metal during reaction, but the high manganese vapor pressure meant that no slowing of reaction resulted. Corrosion under conditions where MnS was the equilibrium reaction product led to the formation of a sulfide scale. At low p{sub s{sub 2}} values, this scale grew by reaction with either COS or SO{sub 2} according to parabolic kinetics. Gases with equilibrium compositions calculated to produce MnO, in fact corroded manganese to produce an inner layer of oxide plus sulfide, and an outer layer of MnO. The tendency to form sulfide was more marked at lower SO{sub 2} partial pressure and higher sulfur activities, the latter resulting from gas catalysis. These effects are due to the fact that SO{sub 2} is the principal reactant species.

McAdam, G.; Yound, D.J. (Univ. of New South Wales, Kensington (Australia))

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Morphological development of oxide-sulfide scales on iron and iron-manganese alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pure iron and alloys containing 2, 15, 25, and 50 wt.% manganese have been reacted at 1073 K in controlled gas atmospheres of SO/sub 2/-CO/sub 2/-CO-N/sub 2/. Equilibrium gas compositions were such that (1) FeS was stable but not FeO, or (2) both FeS and FeO were stable, or (3) FeO was stable but not FeS; in all cases, both MnS and MnO were stable. Under all reaction conditions, pure iron corroded to produce both sulfide and oxide. The resultant scale morphologies were consistent with local solid-gas equilibrium for the case in which both oxide and sulfide were stable but in the other cases indicated that equilibrium was not achieved and that direct reaction with SO/sub 2/(g) was responsible for corrosion. Additions of manganese did not greatly alter the scale morphologies. Under reaction conditions that were oxidizing and sulfidizing, very high levels of manganese were required to reduce the corrosion rate. On the other hand, relatively low levels had a beneficial effect both when FeO but not FeS was thermodynamically stable and similarly when FeS but not FeO was stable.

McAdam, G.; Young, D.J.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Relationship between blood manganese and blood pressure in the Korean general population according to KNHANES 2008  

SciTech Connect

Introduction: We present data on the association of manganese (Mn) level with hypertension in a representative sample of the adult Korean population who participated in the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) 2008. Methods: This study was based on the data obtained by KNHANES 2008, which was conducted for three years (2007-2009) using a rolling sampling design involving a complex, stratified, multistage, probability-cluster survey of a representative sample of the noninstitutionalized civilian population of South Korea. Results: Multiple regression analysis after controlling for covariates, including gender, age, regional area, education level, smoking, drinking status, hemoglobin, and serum creatinine, showed that the beta coefficients of log blood Mn were 3.514, 1.878, and 2.517 for diastolic blood pressure, and 3.593, 2.449, and 2.440 for systolic blood pressure in female, male, and all participants, respectively. Multiple regression analysis including three other blood metals, lead, mercury, and cadmium, revealed no significant effects of the three metals on blood pressure and showed no effect on the association between blood Mn and blood pressure. In addition, doubling the blood Mn increased the risk of hypertension 1.828, 1.573, and 1.567 fold in women, men, and all participants, respectively, after adjustment for covariates. The addition of blood lead, mercury, and cadmium as covariates did not affect the association between blood Mn and the prevalence of hypertension. Conclusion: Blood Mn level was associated with an increased risk of hypertension in a representative sample of the Korean adult population. - Highlights: {yields} We showed the association of manganese with hypertension in Korean population. {yields} This study was based on the data obtained by KNHANES 2008. {yields} Blood manganese level was associated with an increased risk of hypertension.

Lee, Byung-Kook [Institute of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, Soonchunhyang University 646 Eupnae-ri, Shinchang-myun, Asan-si, Choongnam 336-745 (Korea, Republic of)] [Institute of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, Soonchunhyang University 646 Eupnae-ri, Shinchang-myun, Asan-si, Choongnam 336-745 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yangho, E-mail: yanghokm@nuri.net [Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 290-3 Cheonha-Dong, Dong-Gu, Ulsan 682-060 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 290-3 Cheonha-Dong, Dong-Gu, Ulsan 682-060 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

52

Thermal treatment for recovery of manganese and zinc from zinc-carbon and alkaline spent batteries  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We separated Zn from Mn in zinc-carbon and alkaline batteries after removal of Hg. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Almost total removal of Hg is achieved at low temperature in air. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nitrogen atmosphere is needed to reduce zinc and to permit its volatilization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A high grade Zn concentrate was obtained with a high recovery at 1000-1200 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The grade of Mn in the residue was enhanced with complete recovery. - Abstract: The aim of this paper is the recovery of manganese and zinc from a mixture of zinc-carbon and alkaline spent batteries, containing 40.9% of Mn and 30.1% of Zn, after preliminary physical treatment followed by removal of mercury. Separation of the metals has been carried out on the basis of their different boiling points, being 357 Degree-Sign C and 906 Degree-Sign C the boiling point of mercury and zinc and 1564 Degree-Sign C the melting point of Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Characterization by chemical analysis, TGA/DTA and X-ray powder diffraction of the mixture has been carried out after comminution sieving and shaking table treatment to remove the anodic collectors and most of chlorides contained in the mixture. The mixture has been roasted at various temperatures and resident times in a flow of air to set the best conditions to remove mercury that were 400 Degree-Sign C and 10 min. After that, the flow of air has been turned into a nitrogen one (inert atmosphere) and the temperatures raised, thus permitting the zinc oxide to be reduced to metallic zinc by the carbon present in the original mixture and recovered after volatilization as a high grade concentrate, while manganese was left in the residue. The recovery and the grade of the two metals, at 1000 Degree-Sign C and 30 min residence time, were 84% and 100% for zinc and 85% and 63% for manganese, respectively. The recovery of zinc increased to 99% with a grade of 97% at 1200 Degree-Sign C and 30 min residence time, while the recovery and grade of manganese were 86% and 87%, respectively, at that temperature. Moreover, the chlorinated compounds that could form by the combustion of the plastics contained in the spent batteries, are destroyed at the temperature required by the process.

Belardi, G. [Institute for Environmental Engineering and Geosciences (CNR) Area della Ricerca CNR, via Salaria km 29,300, Monterotondo, 00016 Rome (Italy); Lavecchia, R.; Medici, F. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Materials and Environment, Sapienza University of Rome, via Eudossiana 84, 00184 Rome (Italy); Piga, L., E-mail: luigi.piga@uniroma1.it [Department of Chemical Engineering, Materials and Environment, Sapienza University of Rome, via Eudossiana 84, 00184 Rome (Italy)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

53

Manganese-Aluminum-Based Magnets: Nanocrystalline t-MnAI Permanent Magnets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

REACT Project: Dartmouth is developing specialized alloys with magnetic properties superior to the rare earths used in todays best magnets. EVs and renewable power generators typically use rare earths to turn the axles in their electric motors due to the magnetic strength of these minerals. However, rare earths are difficult and expensive to refine. Dartmouth will swap rare earths for a manganese-aluminum alloy that could demonstrate better performance and cost significantly less. The ultimate goal of this project is to develop an easily scalable process that enables the widespread use of low-cost and abundant materials for the magnets used in EVs and renewable power generators.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

New Environmentally Friendly Dispersants for High Temperature Invert-Emulsion Drilling Fluids Weighted by Manganese Tetraoxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis provides a detailed evaluation of different environmentally friendly dispersants in invert-emulsion drilling fluids that can be used to drill wells under difficult conditions such as HPHT. The drilling fluid is weighted by manganese tetraoxide (Mn3O4) particles, which have a specific gravity of 4.8 and a mean particle diameter of ca1 micrometers. Manganese tetraoxide has different wetting properties and surface chemistry than other weighting agents. Hence, there is a need to find dispersants for manganese tetraoxide that give reduced sag, reduced rheology, and low fluid-loss at HPHT conditions. This is particularly important for deep wells with narrow operating windows between pore-pressure and fracture pressure gradients. The stricter global environmental regulations mandated the dispersants to be environmentally friendly, e.g. within OCNS group D or E. First, oil compatibility tests and particle settling time experiments were conducted on 31 dispersants. From the experiments, we identified 3 oil-compatible dispersants that gave the longest settling time in base oil and belonged to OCNS group D. We investigated the effectiveness of selected chemicals in dispersing manganese tetraoxide at HPHT conditions. 1.95 and 2.4 S.G. drilling fluid samples were first prepared and tested without any contaminant and then in the presence of rev dust and cement as contaminants. Drilling fluid samples were statically aged at 400 degrees F and 500 psi for 16 hours. Sag and rheological measurements were taken before and after aging to determine the effect of HPHT conditions on fluid properties. Then, HPHT dynamic filtration tests were done at 500 psi differential pressure and 300 degrees F to determine HPHT dynamic fluid-loss. We have found that one of the dispersants (nonionic) gives low rheology and reduced sag before and after static aging. It also gives the lowest fluid-loss of the selected dispersants. For 2.4 S.G. fluid without contaminants, 10-minute gel strength was reduced from 50 to 32 lb/100 ft^2, plastic viscosity from 37 to 25 cp, sag from 0.249 to 0.135 lbm/gal, and fluid-loss was reduced from 44.4 to 39.6 cm^3 with the addition of dispersant. This dispersant prevents agglomeration of particles, thereby reducing fluid rheology, sag, and fluid-loss.

Rehman, Abdul

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Manganese-doped indium oxide and its application in organic light-emitting diodes  

SciTech Connect

Thin films of manganese-doped indium oxide (IMO) deposited by electron beam evaporation have been investigated as anodes in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). The IMO films have a high work function of 5.35 eV, a desirable surface morphology with an average roughness of 1.1 nm, a high average optical transmittance of 87.2% in the visible region, and a maximum optical transmittance of 92% at 460 nm. It is demonstrated that an IMO anode can effectively improve hole injection at the anode/organic interface, resulting in OLEDs with an increased electroluminescent efficiency.

Liao Yaqin [Key Laboratory of Excited State Processes, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130033 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Lu Qipeng; Fan Yi; Liu Xingyuan [Key Laboratory of Excited State Processes, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130033 (China)

2011-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

56

Sorption of Ferric Iron from Siderophore Complexes by Layer Type Manganese  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sorption of Ferric Iron from Siderophore Complexes by Layer Type Sorption of Ferric Iron from Siderophore Complexes by Layer Type Manganese Oxides Owen W. Duckworth (North Carolina State University), John R. Bargar (Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource), and Garrison Sposito (University of California-Berkeley) figure 1 Figure 1. Top: Iron is thought to limit phytoplankton in much of the world's oceans. Bottom: Structure of the iron-siderophore complex ferrioxamine B [Fe(III)HDFOB+]. Image courtesy of Andrzej Jarzecki, Brooklyn College, the City University of New York. Iron is one of several essential nutrients thought to limit phytoplankton growth in large areas of the world's oceans. The growth of marine phytoplankton represents a important linkage in the carbon cycle, accounting for approximately 50% of the total biological uptake of carbon

57

Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy studies of lithium diffusion in doped manganese oxide  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cathode performance is critical to lithium ion rechargeable battery performance; effects of doping lithium manganese oxide cathode materials on cathode performance are being investigated. In this paper, Li diffusion in Al-doped LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} was studied and found to be controlled by the quantity of Al dopant. Electrochemical cycling was conducted at 0.5mA/cm{sub 2}; electrochemical impedance spectra were taken at open circuit potential, with impedance being measured at 65 kHz-0.01 Hz. As the Al dopant level was increased, the Li diffusion rate decreased; this was attributed to the decreased lattice parameter of the doped oxide.

Johnson, B.J.; Doughty, D.H.; Voigt, J.A.; Boyle, T.J.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Nano-sized Lithium Manganese Oxide Dispersed on Carbon Nanotubes for Energy Storage Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nano-sized lithium manganese oxide (LMO) dispersed on carbon nanotubes (CNT) has been synthesized successfully via a microwave-assisted hydrothermal reaction at 200 C for 30 min using MnO{sub 2}-coated CNT and an aqueous LiOH solution. The initial specific capacity is 99.4 mAh/g at a 1.6 C-rate, and is maintained at 99.1 mAh/g even at a 16 C-rate. The initial specific capacity is also maintained up to the 50th cycle to give 97% capacity retention. The LMO/CNT nanocomposite shows excellent power performance and good structural reversibility as an electrode material in energy storage systems, such as lithium-ion batteries and electrochemical capacitors. This synthetic strategy opens a new avenue for the effective and facile synthesis of lithium transition metal oxide/CNT nanocomposite.

Bak, S.B.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Investigation of the release of Si from SiO{sub 2} during the formation of manganese/ruthenium barrier layers  

SciTech Connect

The thermodynamic and structural stability of ruthenium-manganese diffusion barriers on SiO{sub 2} is assessed. A {approx}2 nm film composed of partially oxidized manganese (MnO{sub x} where x < 1) was deposited on a 3 nm thick Ru film and the Mn-MnO{sub x}/Ru/SiO{sub 2} structure was subsequently thermally annealed. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy studies suggest the release and upward diffusion of Si from the dielectric substrate as a result of manganese-silicate formation at the Ru/SiO{sub 2} interface. The migration of Si up through the Ru film results in further manganese-silicate formation upon its interaction with the Mn-MnO{sub x} deposited layer.

McCoy, A. P.; Casey, P.; Bogan, J.; Byrne, C.; Hughes, G. [School of Physical Sciences, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland)] [School of Physical Sciences, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland)

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

60

Design of Peptide-Membrane Interactions to Modulate Single-File Water Transport through Modified Gramicidin Channels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is preformed in the apoprotein, for example, in plastocyanin and superoxide dismutase (Carrico & Deutsch, 1970 Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, and Institut fur Physiologische Chemie, Universitats

de Groot, Bert

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese superoxide dismutase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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61

Copper Deficiency in Blesbok (aliscus pygargus phillipsi) from the Karoo Nature Reserve.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The copper status of blesbok was evaluated by measuring the hepatic and plasma copper concentrations, and erythrocyte superoxide dismutase activity. The copper status of blesbok (more)

Quan, Melvyn

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Manganese Doping of Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles: Tailoring Surface Reactivity for a Regenerable Heavy Metal Sorbent  

SciTech Connect

A method for tuning the analyte affinity of magnetic, inorganic nanostructured sorbents for heavy metal contaminants is described. The manganese-doped iron oxide nanoparticle sorbents have a remarkably high affinity compared to the precursor material. Sorbent affinity can be tuned toward an analyte of interest simply by adjustment of the dopant quantity. The results show that following the Mn doping process there is a large increase in affinity and capacity for heavy metals (i.e., Co, Ni, Zn, As, Ag, Cd, Hg, and Tl). Capacity measurements were carried out for the removal of cadmium from river water and showed significantly higher loading than the relevant commercial sorbents tested for comparison. The reduction in Cd concentration from 100 ppb spiked river water to 1 ppb (less than the EPA drinking water limit of 5 ppb for Cd) was achieved following treatment with the Mn-doped iron oxide nanoparticles. The Mn-doped iron oxide nanoparticles were able to load 1 ppm of Cd followed by complete stripping and recovery of the Cd with a mild acid wash. The Cd loading and stripping is shown to be consistent through multiple cycles with no loss of sorbent performance.

Warner, Cynthia L.; Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Mackie, Katherine E.; Neiner, Doinita; Saraf, Laxmikant; Droubay, Timothy C.; Warner, Marvin G.; Addleman, Raymond S.

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

63

Solar-thermal Water Splitting Using the Sodium Manganese Oxide Process & Preliminary H2A Analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There are three primary reactions in the sodium manganese oxide high temperature water splitting cycle. In the first reaction, Mn2O3 is decomposed to MnO at 1,500°C and 50 psig. This reaction occurs in a high temperature solar reactor and has a heat of reaction of 173,212 J/mol. Hydrogen is produced in the next step of this cycle. This step occurs at 700°C and 1 atm in the presence of sodium hydroxide. Finally, water is added in the hydrolysis step, which removes NaOH and regenerates the original reactant, Mn2O3. The high temperature solar?driven step for decomposing Mn2O3 to MnO can be carried out to high conversion without major complication in an inert environment. The second step to produce H2 in the presence of sodium hydroxide is also straightforward and can be completed. The third step, the low temperature step to recover the sodium hydroxide is the most difficult. The amount of energy required to essentially distill water to recover sodium hydroxide is prohibitive and too costly. Methods must be found for lower cost recovery. This report provides information on the use of ZnO as an additive to improve the recovery of sodium hydroxide.

Todd M. Francis, Paul R. Lichty, Christopher Perkins, Melinda Tucker, Peter B. Kreider, Hans H. Funke, Allan Lewandowski, and Alan W. Weimer

2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

64

Lithium/Manganese Dioxide (Li/MnO(2)) Battery Performance Evaluation: Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In February 1997, under the auspices of the Product Realization Program, an initiative to develop performance models for lithium/manganese dioxide-based batteries began. As a part of this initiative, the performance characteristics of the cells under a variety of conditions were determined, both for model development and for model validation. As a direct result of this work, it became apparent that possible Defense Program (DP) uses for batteries based on this cell chemistry existed. A larger effort aimed at mapping the performance envelope of this chemistry was initiated in order to assess the practicality of this cell chemistry, not only for DP applications, but also for other uses. The work performed included an evaluation of the cell performance as a function of a number of variables, including cell size, manufacturer, current, pulse loads, constant current loads, safety, etc. In addition, the development of new evaluation techniques that would apply to any battery system, such as those related to reliability assessments began. This report describes the results of these evaluations.

Ingersoll, D.; Clark, N.H.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Layered manganese oxide intergrowth electrodes for rechargeable lithium batteries: Part 1-substitution with Co or Ni  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lithium manganese oxides substituted with nickel or cobalt were characterized electrochemically in lithium cell configurations. The compounds studied were either single-phase layered structures with either primarily O2 or O3 stacking arrangements, or O2/O3 intergrowths, prepared from P2, P3 and P2/P3 sodium-containing precursors, respectively. The stacking arrangements are extremely sensitive to the Na/T. M. (T. M. = transition metal) ratios and the level of substitution. Phase diagrams showing the stability regions of the various arrangements for the Na-Ni-Mn-O system are presented. A possible correlation between vacancies and electrochemical performance is suggested. For high levels of substitution with Ni, fewer defects are possible for materials containing more O3 component and higher discharge capacities can be achieved, but spinel conversion upon cycling also occurs more rapidly as the O3 content increases. Intergrowths show intermediate behavior and represent a potential route towards designing stable, high capacity electrodes.

Dolle, Mickael; Patoux, Sebastien; Doeff, Marca M.

2004-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

66

Chemical and structural investigations of the incorporation of metal manganese into ruthenium thin films for use as copper diffusion barrier layers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The incorporation of manganese into a 3 nm ruthenium thin-film is presented as a potential mechanism to improve its performance as a copper diffusion barrier. Manganese ({approx}1 nm) was deposited on an atomic layer deposited Ru film, and the Mn/Ru/SiO{sub 2} structure was subsequently thermally annealed. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies reveal the chemical interaction of Mn with the SiO{sub 2} substrate to form manganese-silicate (MnSiO{sub 3}), implying the migration of the metal through the Ru film. Electron energy loss spectroscopy line profile measurements of the intensity of the Mn signal across the Ru film confirm the presence of Mn at the Ru/SiO{sub 2} interface.

McCoy, A. P.; Casey, P.; Bogan, J.; Hughes, G. [School of Physical Sciences, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Lozano, J. G.; Nellist, P. D. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom)

2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

67

Manganese trends in a sample of thin and thick disk stars. The origin of Mn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CONTEXT: Manganese is an iron-peak element and although the nucleosynthesis path that leads to its formation is fairly well understood, it remains unclear which objects, SN II and/or SN Ia, that contribute the majority of Mn to the interstellar medium. It also remains unclear to which extent the supernovae Mn yields depend on the metallicity of the progenitor star or not. AIMS: By using a well studied and well defined sample of 95 dwarf stars we aim at further constraining the formation site(s) of Mn. METHODS: We derive Mn abundances through spectral synthesis of four Mn I lines at 539.4, 549.2, 601.3, and 601.6 nm. Stellar parameters and data for oxygen are taken from Bensby et al. (2003, 2004, 2005). RESULTS: When comparing our Mn abundances with O abundances for the same stars we find that the abundance trends in the stars with kinematics of the thick disk can be explained by metallicity dependent yields from SN II. We go on and combine our data for dwarf stars in the disks with data for dwarf and giant stars in the metal-poor thick disk and halo from the literature. We find that dwarf and giant stars show the same trends, which indicates that neither non-LTE nor evolutionary effects are a major concern for Mn. Furthermore, the [Mn/O] vs [O/H] trend in the halo is flat. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that the simplest interpretation of our data is that Mn is most likely produced in SN II and that the Mn yields for such SNae must be metallicity dependent. Contribution from SN Ia in the metal-rich thin disk can not, however, be excluded.

S. Feltzing; M. Fohlman; T. Bensby

2007-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

68

Stability Behavior and Thermodynamic States of Iron and Manganese in Sandy Soil Aquifer, Manukan Island, Malaysia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A total of 20 soil samples were collected from 10 boreholes constructed in the low lying area, which included ancillary samples taken from the high elevation area. Redox processes were investigated in the soil as well as groundwater in the shallow groundwater aquifer of Manukan Island, Sabah, Malaysia. Groundwater samples (n = 10) from each boreholes were also collected in the low lying area to understand the concentrations and behaviors of Fe and Mn in the dissolved state. This study strives to obtain a general understanding of the stability behaviors on Fe and Mn at the upper unsaturated and the lower-saturated soil horizons in the low lying area of Manukan Island as these elements usually play a major role in the redox chemistry of the shallow groundwater. Thermodynamic calculations using PHREEQC showed that the groundwater samples in the study area are oversaturated with respect to goethite, hematite, Fe(OH){sub 3} and undersaturated with respect to manganite and pyrochroite. Low concentrations of Fe and Mn in the groundwater might be probably due to the lack of minerals of iron and manganese oxides, which exist in the sandy aquifer. In fact, high organic matters that present in the unsaturated horizon are believed to be responsible for the high Mn content in the soil. It was observed that the soil samples collected from high elevation area (BK) comprises considerable amount of Fe in both unsaturated (6675.87 mg/kg) and saturated horizons (31440.49 mg/kg) compared to the low Fe content in the low lying area. Based on the stability diagram, the groundwater composition lies within the stability field for Mn{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 2+} under suboxic condition and very close to the FeS/Fe{sup 2+} stability boundary. This study also shows that both pH and Eh values comprise a strong negative value thus suggesting that the redox potential is inversely dependent on the changes of pH.

Lin, Chin Yik, E-mail: cy_lin_ars@hotmail.com [Universiti Malaysia Sabah, School of Science and Technology (Malaysia); Abdullah, Mohd. Harun [Universiti Malaysia Sabah, Water Research Unit, School of Science and Technology (Malaysia); Musta, Baba; Praveena, Sarva Mangala [Universiti Malaysia Sabah, School of Science and Technology (Malaysia); Aris, Ahmad Zaharin [Universiti Putra Malaysia, Faculty of Environmental Studies (Malaysia)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

69

Electrodeposited Manganese Oxides on Three-Dimensional Carbon Nanotube Substrate: Supercapacitive Behaviour in Aqueous and Organic Electrolytes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thin amorphous manganese oxide layers with a thickness of 3-5nm are electrodeposited on a carbon nanotube (CNT) film substrate that has a three-dimensional nanoporous structure (denoted asMnO2/CNT electrode). For the purpose of comparison, manganese oxide films are also electrodeposited on a flat Pt-coated Si wafer substrate (denoted as MnO2 film electrode). The pseudocapacitive properties of the MnO2 film and MnO2/CNT electrodes are examined in both aqueous electrolyte (1.0M KCl) and nonaqueousorganic electrolyte (1.0M LiClO4 in propylene carbonate). While both types of electrode showpseudocapacitive behaviour in the aqueous electrolyte, only the MnO2/CNT electrode does so in the organic electrolyte, due to its high oxide/electrolyte interfacial area and improved electron conduction through the CNT substrate. Compared with the MnO2 film electrode, the MnO2/CNT electrode shows a much higher specific capacitance and better high-rate capability, regardless of the electrolyte used.Use of the organic electrolyte results in a ?6 times higher specific energy compared with that obtained with the aqueous electrolyte, while maintaining a similar specific power. The construction of a threedimensional nanoporous network structure consisting of a thin oxide layer on a CNT film substrate at the nm scale and the use of an organic electrolyte are promising approaches to improving the specific energyof supercapacitors.

Nam,K.W.; Yang,X.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Removal of Filter Cake Generated by Manganese Tetraoxide Water-based Drilling Fluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Three effective solutions to dissolve the filter cake created by water-based drilling fluids weighted with Mn3O4 particles were developed. Hydrochloric acid at concentration lower than 5 wt% can dissolve most of Mn3O4-based filter cake. Dissolving the filter cake in two-stage treatment of enzyme and organic acid was effective and eliminated the associated drawbacks of using HCl. Finally, combining low and safe concentration of HCl with an organic acid in one-stage treatment was very effective. Hydrochloric acid (10-wt%) dissolved 78 wt% of Mn3O4-based filter cake at 250F after 28 hours soaking time. However, Chlorine gas was detected during the reaction of 5 to 15-wt% HCl with Mn3O4 particles. At 190F, 1- and 4-wt% HCl dissolved most Mn3O4 particles (up to 70-wt% solubility). Their reactions with Mn3O4 particles followed Eq. 8 at 190F, which further confirmed the absence of chlorine gas production at HCl concentrations lower than 5-wt%. EDTA and DTPA at high pH (12) and acetic, propionic, butyric, and gluconic acids at low pH (3-5) showed very low solubilities of Mn3O4 particles. GLDA, citric, oxalic, and tartaric acids produced large amount of white precipitation upon the reactions with Mn3O4 particles. Similarly, DTPA will produce damaging material if used to dissolve Mn3O4-based filter cake in sandstone formation. At 4-wt% acid concentration, lactic, glycolic, and formic acids dissolved Mn3O4 particles up to 76 wt% solubility at 190F. Malonic acid at lower concentration (2-wt%) dissolved 54 wt% of Mn3O4 particles at 190F. Manganese tetraoxide particles were covered with polymeric material (starch), which significantly reduced the solubility of filter cake in organic acids. Therefore, there was a need to remove Mn3O4-based filter cake in two-stage treatment. Enzyme-A (10-wt%) and Precursor of lactic acid (12.5-wt%) dissolved 84 wt% of the filter cake. An innovative approach led to complete solubility of Mn3O4 particles when low and safe concentration of HCl (1-wt%) combined with 4-wt% lactic acid at 190F. HCl (1-wt%) combined with lactic acid (4-wt%), dissolved 85 wt% of the Mn3O4-based filter cake after 18-22 hours soaking time at 250F in one stage treatment.

Al Mojil, Abdullah Mohammed A.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

By Thomas S. Jones Manganese (Mn) is essential to iron and silicomanganese increased about 7%. consisted of, in tons, natural battery-grade ore,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

about 7%. consisted of, in tons, natural battery-grade ore, steel production by virtue of its sulfur aluminum alloys and is used in oxide form in dry cell batteries. The overall level and nature of manganese consumption in batteries was denoted by the expansion on schedule of domestic capacity for production

Torgersen, Christian

72

Study Shows Roles of Receptor, Thiol on Adaptive Response  

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Study Shows Roles of Receptor, Thiol on Adaptive Response Study Shows Roles of Receptor, Thiol on Adaptive Response Jeffrey Murley Jeffrey Murley, Ph.D. David Grdina, Ph.D. Low Dose program-supported scientists at The University of Chicago have gained more insight into adaptive protective responses indicating the role of oxidative stress, the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the induction of SOD2 (manganese Superoxide Dismutase) activity. These changes are central to the production of adaptive protective responses. Why Study Adaptive Response? Exposing cells to low doses of ionizing radiation has been reported to elevate resistance to genomic damage when the same cells are subsequently exposed to a much higher dose of radiation. This phenomenon, called adaptive response, is characterized by an increase

73

Diane E. Cabelli's List of Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LEAF/Center for LEAF/Center for Radiation Chemistry Research | | Brunschwig | Cabelli | Cook | Creutz | Fujita | Holroyd | Lymar | Miller | Newton | Sutin | Wishart | Diane E. Cabelli List of Publications: 72. Greenleaf, W.B; Stroupe, M.E.; Hearn, A.S.; Cabelli, D.E.; Lepock, J.R.; Tainer, J.A.; Nick H.S.; Silverman, D.N. (submitted) “Role of Hydrogen Bonding in the Active Site of Manganese Superoxide Dismutase” Biochemistry 71. Sharma, V.K.; O’Connor, D.B.; Cabelli, D.E. (submitted) “Oxidation of Thiocyanate by Iron(V) in Alkaline Medium” Inorg. Chim. Acta 70. Hearn, A.S.; Fan, L.; Lepock, J.R.; Luba, J.P.; Greenleaf, W.B.; Cabelli, D.E.; Tainer, J.A.; Nick H.S.; Silverman, D.N. (in press) Catalytic and Structural Effects of Amino Acid Substitution at the Dimeric

74

Flow-Assisted Alkaline Battery: Low-Cost Grid-Scale Electrical Storage using a Flow-Assisted Rechargeable Zinc-Manganese Dioxide Battery  

SciTech Connect

GRIDS Project: Traditional consumer-grade disposable batteries are made of Zinc and Manganese, 2 inexpensive, abundant, and non-toxic metals. But these disposable batteries can only be used once. If they are recharged, the Zinc in the battery develops filaments called dendrites that grow haphazardly and disrupt battery performance, while the Manganese quickly loses its ability to store energy. CUNY Energy Institute is working to tame dendrite formation and to enhance the lifetime of Manganese in order to create a long-lasting, fully rechargeable battery for grid-scale energy storage. CUNY Energy Institute is also working to reduce dendrite formation by pumping fluid through the battery, enabling researchers to fix the dendrites as theyre forming. The team has already tested its Zinc battery through 3,000 recharge cycles (and counting). CUNY Energy Institute aims to demonstrate a better cycle life than lithium-ion batteries, which can be up to 20 times more expensive than Zinc-based batteries.

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

75

X-ray absorption spectroscopy on the calcium cofactor to the manganese cluster in photosynthetic oxygen evolution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Along with Mn, calcium and chloride ions are necessary cofactors for oxygen evolution in Photosystem II (PS II). To further test and verify whether Ca is close to the Mn cluster, the authors substituted strontium for Ca and probed from the Sr point of view for any nearby Mn. The extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) of Sr-reactivated PS II indicates major differences between the intact and NH{sub 2}OH-treated samples. In intact samples, the Fourier transform of the Sr EXAFS shows a Fourier peak that is missing in inactive samples. This peak II is best simulated by two Mn neighbors at a distance of 3.5 Angstrom, confirming the proximity of Ca (Sr) cofactor to the Mn cluster. In addition, polarized Sr EXAFS on oriented Sr-reactivated samples shows this peak II is dichroic: large magnitude at 10 degrees (angle between the PS II membrane normal and the x-ray electric field vector) and small at 80 degrees. Analysis of the dichroism yields the relative angle between the Sr-Mn vector and membrane normal (23 degrees {+-} 4 degrees), and the isotropic coordination number for these layered samples. X-ray absorption spectroscopy has also been employed to assess the degree of similarity between the manganese cluster in PS II and a family of synthetic manganese complexes containing the distorted cubane [Mn{sub 4}O{sub 3}X] core (X = benzoate, acetate, methoxide, hydroxide, azide, fluoride, chloride or bromide). In addition, Mn{sub 4}O{sub 3}Cl complexes containing three or six terminal Cl ligands at three of the Mn were included in this study. The EXAFS method detects the small changes in the core structures as X is varied in this series, and serves to exclude these distorted cubanes of C3v symmetry as a topological model for the Mn catalytic cluster. The sulfur K-edge x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra for the amino acids cysteine, methionine, their corresponding oxidized forms cystine and methionine sulfoxide, and glutathione show distinct differences between the thiol and disulfide forms. Sulfur XANES is also used to detect changes (within 5%) of the thiol-to-disulfide ratio in whole human blood, plasma, and erythrocytes.

Cinco, Roehl M.

1999-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

76

Electrochemical and structural characterization of titanium-substituted manganese oxides based on Na0.44MnO2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of titanium-substituted manganese oxides, Li{sub x}Ti{sub y}Mn{sub 1-y}O{sub 2} (y = 0.11, 0.22, 0.33, 0.44, and 0.55) with the Na{sub 0.44}MnO{sub 2} structure were prepared from Na{sub x}Ti{sub y}Mn{sub 1-y}O{sub 2} (x {approx} 0.44) precursors. The electrochemical characteristics of these compounds, which retain the unique double-tunnel structure during ion exchange, were examined in lithium/polymer electrolyte cells operating at 85 C. All of the substituted cathode materials intercalated lithium reversibly, with Li{sub x}Ti{sub 0.22}Mn{sub 0.78}O{sub 2} exhibiting the highest capacity in polymer cells, about 10-20% greater than that of unsubstituted Li{sub x}MnO{sub 2} made from Na{sub 0.44}MnO{sub 2}. In common with Li{sub x}MnO{sub 2}, the Ti-substituted materials exhibited good capacity retention over one hundred or more cycles, with some compositions exhibiting a fade rate of less than 0.03% per cycle.

Doeff, Marca M.; Richardson, Thomas J.; Hwang, Kwang-Taek

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

X-ray and vibrational spectroscopy of manganese complexes relevant to the oxygen-evolving complex of photosynthesis  

SciTech Connect

Manganese model complexes, relevant to the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) in photosynthesis, were studied with Mn K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES), Mn Kb X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), and vibrational spectroscopy. A more detailed understanding was obtained of the influence of nuclearity, overall structure, oxidation state, and ligand environment of the Mn atoms on the spectra from these methods. This refined understanding is necessary for improving the interpretation of spectra of the OEC. Mn XANES and Kb XES were used to study a di-(mu)-oxo and a mono-(mu)-oxo di-nuclear Mn compound in the (III,III), (III,IV), and (IV,IV) oxidation states. XANES spectra show energy shifts of 0.8 - 2.2 eV for 1-electron oxidation-state changes and 0.4 - 1.8 eV for ligand-environment changes. The shifts observed for Mn XES spectra were approximately 0.21 eV for oxidation state-changes and only approximately 0.04 eV for ligand-environment changes. This indicates that Mn Kb XES i s more sensitive to the oxidation state and less sensitive to the ligand environment of the Mn atoms than XANES. These complimentary methods provide information about the oxidation state and the ligand environment of Mn atoms in model compounds and biological systems. A versatile spectroelectrochemical apparatus was designed to aid the interpretation of IR spectra of Mn compounds in different oxidation states. The design, based on an attenuated total reflection device, permits the study of a wide spectral range: 16,700 (600 nm) - 225

Visser, Hendrik

2001-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

78

Manganese and Ceria Sorbents for High Temperature Sulfur Removal from Biomass-Derived Syngas -- The Impact of Steam on Capacity and Sorption Mode  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Syngas derived from biomass and coal gasification for fuel synthesis or electricity generation contains sulfur species that are detrimental to downstream catalysts or turbine operation. Sulfur removal in high temperature, high steam conditions has been known to be challenging, but experimental reports on methods to tackle the problem are not often reported. We have developed sorbents that can remove hydrogen sulfide from syngas at high temperature (700 C), both in dry and high steam conditions. The syngas composition chosen for our experiments is derived from statistical analysis of the gasification products of wood under a large variety of conditions. The two sorbents, Cu-ceria and manganese-based, were tested in a variety of conditions. In syngas containing steam, the capacity of the sorbents is much lower, and the impact of the sorbent in lowering H{sub 2}S levels is only evident in low space velocities. Spectroscopic characterization and thermodynamic consideration of the experimental results suggest that in syngas containing 45% steam, the removal of H{sub 2}S is primarily via surface chemisorptions. For the Cu-ceria sorbent, analysis of the amount of H{sub 2}S retained by the sorbent in dry syngas suggests both copper and ceria play a role in H{sub 2}S removal. For the manganese-based sorbent, in dry conditions, there is a solid state transformation of the sorbent, primarily into the sulfide form.

Cheah, S.; Parent, Y. O.; Jablonski, W. S.; Vinzant, T.; Olstad, J. L.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Advanced Recombinant Manganese Peroxidase for Biosynthesis of Lignin Bioproducts, Phase I Final Report, STTR Grant #: DE-SC0007503.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The core purpose of this Phase I STTR was to evaluate the feasibility of a new method of producing a recombinant version of manganese peroxidase (MnP) enzyme. MnP is a potentially valuable enzyme for producing high value lignin products and also for industrial de-coloring operations such as biobleaching of pulp and color removal from textile dye effluents. This lignin-modifying enzyme is produced in small amounts by the native host, a white rot fungus. Previous work by Oregon State University developed a secreted recombinant version of the enzyme in the yeast Pichia pastoris. Unfortunately, the expression is barely moderate and the enzyme is heavily glycosylated, which inhibits purification. In this work, the gene for the enzyme is given a tag which targets production of the enzyme to the peroxisome. This is a promising approach since this location is also where heme and hydrogen peroxide are sequestered, which are both necessary cofactors for MnP. More than ten recombinant strains were constructed, verified, and expressed in the Pichia system. Constitutive (GAP) and methanol-induced promoters (AOX) were tried for peroxisomal targeted, cytosolic, and secreted versions of MnP. Only the secreted strains showed activity. The amount of expression was not significantly changed. The degree of glycosylation was lessened using the AOX (methanol) promotoer, but the resulting enzyme was still not able to be purified using immobilized metal affinity chromatography. Additional work beyond the scope of the defined Phase I project was undertaken to construct, verify, and express Pichia strains that mutated the MnP glycosylation sites to inhibit this process. These strains did not show significant activity. The cause is not known, but it is possible that these sites are important to the structure of the enzyme. Also beyond the scope proposed for our Phase I STTR, the team collaborated with AbSci, a startup with a new E. coli based expression system focused on the production of antibodies and enzymes containing disulfide bonds and requiring folding/post-translational modification. With only limited time remaining in the Phase I schedule, a single construct was made to produce MnP with this system. The enzyme was produced in the soluble fraction of the cell lysate, but no activity was measured. MnP from the existing recombinant source was used to act on lignin. The lignin was from a Kraft process and had a molecular weight of about 10,000 Da. Using 1000 Da dialysis membranes and UV-visible spectroscopy, no modification of either lignin was evident in the dialysate or the retentate. Assays using 2,6 dimethoxy phenol (DMP) as a substrate showed consistent activity throughout the project. In summary, these results fell far short of our expectations. A Phase II proposal was not submitted. Possible reasons for the failure of peroxisomal targeting include destruction by native hydrogen peroxide, native proteases, or unforeseen causes. The AbSci system was only lighted tested and further work may yield a strain with active enzyme. The lack of evidence for lignin modification may be due to the techniques employed. NMR or GC-MS studies may reveal evidence of modification.

Beatty, Christopher; Kitner, Joshua; Lajoie, Curtis; McClain, Sean; Potochnik, Steve

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

80

The Journal of Neuroscience, October 1993, 13(10): 4361-4371 Activation of Protein Kinase C by Arachidonic Acid Selectively  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by an inhibitor of pro- tein phosphatase activity or by scavengers of free radicals. Since GAP-43 has been the effects of AA on GAP-43 phosphorylation were altered by the presence of a lipid peroxide scavenger, (+)-a phosphorylation in the presence and absence of a superoxide scavenging system, superoxide dismutase, and catalase

Schaechter, Judith D.

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81

Stability and Rate Capability of Al Substituted Lithium-Rich High-Manganese Content Oxide Materials for Li-Ion Batteries  

SciTech Connect

The structures, electrochemical properties and thermal stability of Al-substituted lithium-excess oxides, Li{sub 1.2}Ni{sub 0.16} Mn{sub 0.56}Co{sub 0.08-y}Al{sub y}O{sub 2} (y = 0, 0.024, 0.048, 0.08), are reported, and compared to the stoichiometric compounds, LiNi{sub z}Mn{sub z}Co{sub 1-2z}O{sub 2}. A solid solution was found up to at least y = 0.06. Aluminum substitution improves the poor thermal stability while preserving the high energy density of lithium-excess oxides. However, these high manganese compositions are inferior to the lithium stoichiometric materials, LiNi{sub z}Mn{sub z}Co{sub 1-2z}O{sub 2} (z = 0.333, 0.4), in terms of both power and thermal stability.

Li, Zheng; Chernova, Natasha A.; Feng, Jijun; Upreti, Shailesh; Omenya, Fredrick; Whittingham, M. Stanley (SUNY-Binghamton)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

82

Advances in Synthesis of Co- and Ter- Polycarbonates and Polyesters from Non-Petroleum Feedstocks and Kinetic Studies of Ligand Substitution from Manganese Half-Sandwich Complexes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation is written in two parts. The first pertains to polycarbonate and polyester synthesis using relatively benign processes. The synthesis of polycarbonates from the coupling of CO2 and epoxides catalyzed by transition metal catalysts has long been studied in the DJD group. The benefits of this process are that it utilizes comparatively benign reagents, can be performed using no extraneous solvent, and is 100% atom efficient. A method potentially useful for achieving more desirable polycarbonate properties is to produce an epoxide A/epoxide B/CO2 terpolymer, thus allowing more fine "tuning" of properties to what one may desire while simultaneously influencing relative epoxide reactivity to potentially increase catalytic turnovers. Specifically, the coupling of propylene oxide and cyclohexene oxide with CO2 to yield a random copolymer with tunable properties has been studied via a Fineman-Ross analysis. Propylene oxide was found to be incorporated into the resultant polymer chain with anywhere from 4-10 times the preference of cylcohexene oxide. Although it has been reported as early as 1969, the copolymerization of epoxides and cyclic anhydrides catalyzed by transition metal complexes to yield polyesters via a chain-growth mechanism has recently gained much attention. This robust method of polyester synthesis can utilize rather inexpensive reagents to synthesize an array of polyester products which have a wide range of Tg values (-30 degrees C ? 90 degreesC), achievable through simple monomer selection. The second part of this dissertation deals with the kinetic study of ligand substitution from manganese carbonyl metal fragments. Some time ago it was postulated that complexes of the (Cp)M(CO)2L variety undergo ligand substitution via a associative mechanism allowed by a haptotropic eta5-eta3 shift in the eta5 ligand. Through kinetic studies and theoretical modeling, an approximate activation energy barrier of ~34 kJ/mol has been calculated for the ring slip of (2,5-dimethylpyrrole)Mn to occur. Additionally, further kinetic studies were performed in which Tp, a ligand electronically similar to Cp, was compared to MnCp complexes.

Poland, Ross Rivers

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Roles of TNFα Signaling and NFκB in Thiol- and Low Dose  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Roles of TNFα Signaling and NFκB in Thiol- and Low Dose Radiation-Induced Roles of TNFα Signaling and NFκB in Thiol- and Low Dose Radiation-Induced Adaptive Responses Jeffrey S. Murley The University of Chicago Abstract To better investigate the roles of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) signaling processes and nuclear transcription factor κB (NFκB) activation on the induction of manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2) mediated adaptive responses, we employed a two by two experimental matrix that includes the use of both wild type C57BL/6 and C57BL/6 tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 and 2 (TNFR1-R2-) knockout mice, and ras/c-myc transfected wild type and TNFR1-R2- knockout mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEF). MEF were immortalized in order to facilitate their use in our mouse models to test the role of normal or TNFR1-R2- stromal cells and tissues on their responses to thiol

84

Molecular cloning and characterization of important stress and redox regulatory genes from Hydra vulgaris  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this research, important stress and redox regulatory genes present in Hydra vulgaris were isolated and characterized to facilitate our understanding of the evolution and mechanisms of stress response. H. vulgaris heat shock protein 70 (HvHSP70), extracellular copper zinc superoxide dismutase (HvECCuZnSOD), manganese superoxide dismutase (HvMnSOD), phospholipid peroxidase glutathione peroxidase (HvPHGPx) and monofunctional catalase (HvCatalase) were cloned and characterized with regard to stress response, phylogeny and molecular structure. The HSP70 gene isolated from H. vulgaris encodes a polypeptide of 650 amino acids (Mw=710,037) and is interrupted by three intron sequences. The 5' non-coding region of the HvHSP70 possessed the canonical heat shock elements. Phylogenetically HvHSP70 formed a distinct lineage. A molecular model generated for the N-terminal fragment of the HvHSP70 displayed the heat shock protein fold and domains of phosphotransferases. The EC-CuZnSOD cDNA isolated from H. vulgaris encodes a protein of 189 amino acids (Mw=20959.73); the first 19 amino acids constitute the presumed signal peptide. Phylogenetically HvEC-CuZnSOD is grouped with ECCuZnSODs from several organisms. A molecular model generated for the HvEC-CuZnSOD displayed the CuZnSOD (beta)-barrel fold. The MnSOD cDNA isolated from H. vulgaris encodes a protein of 219 amino acids (Mw=24348.75); the first 21 amino acids constitute the presumed mitochondria-targeting signal peptide. Phylogenetically HvMnSOD is clustered with mollusk and crustacean MnSODs. A molecular model generated for the HvMnSOD displayed the N-terminal long alpha antiparallel hairpin and the Cterminal mixed alpha/beta fold characteristic of MnSODs. The PHGPx gene isolated from H. vulgaris encodes a polypeptide of 168 amino acids (Mw=18746.51) including a TGA-encoded selenocysteine at residue 44 and lacks any intron. Phylogenetically HvPHGPx is grouped with PHGPxs from several organisms. A molecular model generated for the HvPHGPx displayed the thioredoxin fold. The 3'-end of a cDNA sequence encoding for 168 amino acids of the Cterminal end of a catalase was isolated from H. vulgaris. Phylogenetically HvCatalase is grouped with heme-containing monofunctional catalases. Hydrae exposed to thermal, starvation, oxidative and metal stress responded by regulating respective mRNA transcriptions suggesting that these genes are involved in stress and (anti)oxidative processes and may have potential as molecular biomarkers for assessing aquatic environment quality.

Dash, Bhagirathi

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Pulmonary effects of inhaled diesel exhaust in aged mice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pulmonary morbidity and mortality resulting from exposure to fine particulate matter (PM) increases with age. The present studies analyzed potential mechanisms underlying increased susceptibility of the elderly to PM using diesel exhaust (DE) as a model. Mice (2 m and 18 m) were exposed to DE (0, 300, and 1000 mug/m{sup 3}) for 3 h once (single) or 3 h/day for 3 days (repeated). Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL), serum and lung tissue were collected 0 and 24 h later. Exposure to DE resulted in structural alterations in the lungs of older but not younger mice, including patchy thickening of the alveolar septa and inflammatory cell localization in alveolar spaces. These effects were most pronounced 24 h after a single exposure to the higher dose of DE. Significant increases in BAL nitrogen oxides were also noted in older mice, as well as expression of lipocalin 24p3, an oxidative stress marker in the lung with no effects in younger mice. Following DE inhalation, expression of Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNFalpha) was upregulated in lungs of both younger and older mice; however, this was attenuated in older animals. Whereas exposure to DE resulted in increases in lung Interleukin-6 (IL-6) expression in both older and younger mice, IL-8 increased only in older animals. In younger mice, constitutive expression of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) decreased after DE exposure, while in older mice, constitutive MnSOD was not detectable and DE had no effect on expression of this antioxidant. Taken together, these results suggest that altered generation of inflammatory mediators and MnSOD may contribute to increased susceptibility of older mice to inhaled DE.

Sunil, Vasanthi R., E-mail: sunilvr@eohsi.rutgers.ed [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, 160 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Patel, Kinal J. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, 160 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Mainelis, Gediminas; Turpin, Barbara J. [Department of Environmental Science, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Ridgely, Sherritta [Laboratory Animal Services, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laumbach, Robert J.; Kipen, Howard M. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, UMDNJ, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Nazarenko, Yevgen [Department of Environmental Science, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Veleeparambil, Manoj; Gow, Andrew J. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, 160 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Laskin, Jeffrey D. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, UMDNJ, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Debra L. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, 160 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

86

Pulse radiolysis of the reaction between hydroethidine and superoxide...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sarna, Joan E. Roberts, James F. Wishart and B. Kalyanaraman Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 456, 39-47 (2006). Find paper at Elsevier Science Direct Abstract: Hydroethidine (HE) is...

87

THE ROLES OF SUPEROXIDE DISMUTAGE (SOD) IN LOW DOSE RADIATION...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the detoxifying enzymes may be even more prominent in the case of low-dose, low-LET irradiation, as the majority of genetic damage may be caused by secondary oxidative species. In...

88

Physiological regulation of laccase and manganese ...  

Durmishidze Institute of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, 10 km Agmasheneblis kheivani, 0159 Tbilisi, Georgia article info Article history: Received 16 ...

89

High Manganese Steels - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 20, 2010 ... Mechanical Behavior and Microstructural Evolution of Fe-22Mn-C TWIP/TRIP Steels as a Function of C Content: Eileen Yang1; Hatem Zurob1;...

90

Manganese Oxide Composite Electrodes for Lithium Batteries  

figure according to the manufacturers needs. ... Electric and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, Portable electronic devices, Medical devices, and

91

Nanostructured manganese oxide clusters supported on ...  

2 evolution at nano-structured Mn oxide clusters in mesoporous silica under very mild conditions for the ?rst time. For driving the catalyst with

92

Color stable manganese-doped phosphors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for preparing color stable Mn.sup.+4 doped phosphors includes providing a phosphor of formula I; A.sub.x[MF.sub.y]:Mn.sup.+4 I and contacting the phosphor in particulate form with a saturated solution of a composition of formula II in aqueous hydrofluoric acid; A.sub.x[MF.sub.y]; II wherein A is Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, NR.sub.4 or a combination thereof; M is Si, Ge, Sn, Ti, Zr, Al, Ga, In, Sc, Y, La, Nb, Ta, Bi, Gd, or a combination thereof; R is H, lower alkyl, or a combination thereof; x is the absolute value of the charge of the [MF.sub.y] ion; and y is 5, 6 or 7. In particular embodiments, M is Si, Ge, Sn, Ti, Zr, or a combination thereof. A lighting apparatus capable of emitting white light includes a semiconductor light source; and a phosphor composition radiationally coupled to the light source, and which includes a color stable Mn.sup.+4 doped phosphor.

Lyons, Robert Joseph (Burnt Hills, NY); Setlur, Anant Achyut (Niskayuna, NY); Deshpande, Anirudha Rajendra (Twinsburg, OH); Grigorov, Ljudmil Slavchev (Sofia, BG)

2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

93

Manganese containing layer for magnetic recording media  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides for a magnetic recording media incorporating Mn-containing layers between a substrate and a magnetic layer to provide media having increased coercivity and lower noise. The Mn-containing layer can be incorporated in a rotating, translating or stationary recording media to operate in conjunction with magnetic transducing heads for recording and reading of magnetic data, as well as other applications. The magnetic recording medium of the invention preferably includes a Co or Co alloy film magnetic layer, and Mn-containing layer, preferably comprised of VMn, TiMn, MnZn, CrMnMo, CrMnW, CrMnV, and CrMnTi, and most preferably a CrMn alloy, disposed between the substrate and the magnetic layer to promote an epitaxial crystalline structure in the magnetic layer. The medium can further include seed layers, preferably polycrystalline MgO for longitudinal media, underlayers, and intermediate layers. Underlayers and intermediate layers are comprised of materials having either an A2 structure or a B2-ordered crystalline structure disposed between the seed layer and the magnetic layer. Materials having an A2 structure are preferably Cr or Cr alloys, such as CrV, CrMo, CrW and CrTi. Materials having a B2-ordered structure having a lattice constant that is substantially comparable to that of Cr, such as those preferably selected from the group consisting of NiAl, AILCo, FeAl, FeTi, CoFe, CoTi, CoHf, CoZr, NiTi, CuBe, CuZn, A-LMn, AlRe, AgMg, and Al.sub.2 FeMn.sub.2, and is most preferably FeAl or NiAl.

Lambeth, David N. (Pittsburgh, PA); Lee, Li-Lien (Santa Clara, CA); Laughlin, David E. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Manganese oxide composite electrodes for lithium batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An activated electrode for a non-aqueous electrochemical cell is disclosed with a precursor thereof a lithium metal oxide with the formula xLi.sub.2MnO.sub.3.(1-x)LiMn.sub.2-yM.sub.yO.sub.4 for 0.5

Johnson, Christopher S. (Naperville, IL); Kang, Sun-Ho (Naperville, IL); Thackeray, Michael M. (Naperville, IL)

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

95

Manganese oxide composite electrodes for lithium batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An activated electrode for a non-aqueous electrochemical cell is disclosed with a precursor of a lithium metal oxide with the formula xLi.sub.2MnO.sub.3.(1-x)LiMn.sub.2-yM.sub.yO.sub.4 for 0

Thackeray, Michael M. (Naperville, IL); Johnson, Christopher S. (Naperville, IL); Li, Naichao (Croton on Hudson, NY)

2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

96

Experimental Characterization of Manganese Cobalt Oxide (MCO)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Novel Electrode Material for Symmetrical Solid Oxide Fuel Cells ... High Performance Oxide Protective Coatings for SOFC Components Influence of Pore...

97

Photoassembly of the photosystem II manganese cluster  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Assembly of the photosynthetic water-oxidizing complex (WOC) is believed to involve the sequential oxidation and ligation of individual Mn atoms in a process called photoactivation. The kinetics with which photoactivation occurs has been interpreted to indicate a series mechanism, in which the product of the reaction of Mn{sup 2+} with the first PSII charge separation is unstable until processed by a second PSII charge separation. Because the decay of the unstable intermediate is accelerated in the presence of added reductants of Mn{sup 3+}, it has been hypothesized that the unstable intermediate is Mn{sup 3+} ligated with high affinity and stabilized by ligands supplied by WOC polypeptides. According to this hypothesis, photooxidation of a second Mn{sup 2+} to Mn{sup 3+}, followed by ligation of two more Mn{sup 2+} ions, results in formation of a stable Mn(II)2-Mn(III)2 complex. Several authors have reported a {le}l {mu}M K{sub m} value for a Mn{sup 2+} (or Mn{sup 3+}) binding site in PSII. In most of these determinations, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was present. In another case, the K{sub m} was determined from the inhibition by Mn{sup 2+} of diphenylcarbazide (DPC) photooxidation. On the other hand, the K{sub m} for Mn{sup 2+} oxidation by Y{sub Z+} in the absence of any other additions, is {approximately}10 {mu}M. We have postulated that this 10 {mu}M value is the K{sub m} for Mn{sup 2+} photooxidation by Y{sub Z+} in the second photoact of the photoactivation mechanism, which occurs with low quantum efficiency. According to this view, the Mn{sup {le}}{sup 3+} ligated near Y{sub Z} with high efficiency on the first photoact is responsible for the inhibition of DPC photooxidation in the presence of Mn{sup 2+} and for the low quantum efficiency of steady-state Mn{sup 2+} photooxidation. Here, we provide evidence that this is the case.

Blubaugh, D.J. [Kentucky Univ., Lexington, KY (United States); Cheniae, G.M. [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

98

Diane E. Cabelli  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

E. Cabelli E. Cabelli Picture of Diane E. Cabelli Chemist Redox chemistry of high oxidation state transition-metal complexes, particularly CuIII, MnIII/MnIV; Superoxide chemistry in aqueous solutions: dismutation of superoxide radical; copper-zinc superoxide dismutase and model compounds. Telephone #: (631) 344-4361 cabelli@bnl.gov A.B. Bryn Mawr College, 1973; Ph.D. University of Texas, Austin, 1979 Research Associate, Conservation Center, Institute of Fine Arts, New York University, 3/80-3/81; Research Associate, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 3/81-10/83; Assistant Chemist, BNL, 10/83-12/87; Visiting Scientist, Riso National Laboratory, Denmark, 8/85-7/86; Associate Chemist, BNL, 1/88-9/89; Associate Chemist, continuing, BNL, 10/89-9/95; chemist, continuing, BNL,

99

BNL Photo- and Radiation Chemistry Group Members  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Radiation Chemistry Group and Radiation Chemistry Group Chemistry Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory Staff Diane E. Cabelli Redox chemistry of high oxidation state transition-metal complexes, particularly CuIII, MnIII/MnIV; Superoxide chemistry in aqueous solutions: dismutation of superoxide radical; copper-zinc superoxide dismutase and model compounds. Andrew R. Cook Excited state structure, dynamics and electron transfer reactions of a variety of organic radicals in both low temperature matrices and room temperature solutions using radiation chemistry techniques. Robert A. Crowell Ultrafast reaction phenomena. Etsuko Fujita Photochemistry of transition-metal complexes, small molecule activation by high- and low-oxidation state metal complexes; and biomimetic chemistry of porphyrins and enzymes.

100

Mercury and platinum abundances in mercury-manganese stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report new results for the elemental and isotopic abundances of the normally rare elements mercury and platinum in HgMn stars. Typical overabundances can be 4 dex or more. The isotopic patterns do not follow the fractionation model of White et al (1976).

C. M. Jomaron; M. M. Dworetsky; D. A. Bohlender

1998-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese superoxide dismutase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

ALCHEMI Studies of Cation Site Occupancies in Doped Manganese ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced Heat Resistant Austenitic Stainless Steel and Composite Tube ... Corrosion Fatigue Studies of High Nickel Tubular Samples Containing Molten Salt ... Impact of Heat Transfer Media on Materials for Concentrated Solar Power.

102

High Temperature Properties and Fine Structure of High Manganese ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

concluded to be scarcely effective to the solut$on.hardening, as pointed by Kawabe etc. (9) regardi ng the effect of addition of boron to 18Cr-12Ni-0,2$&I steel.

103

Microstructure and Properties of Low Manganese API X70 Pipeline ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The microstructure of thermomechanically processed X70 pipeline steel primarily consisted of acicular ferrite (AF) together with small fraction of polygonal...

104

Research On Manganese Distribution between Slag and Hot Metal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Forming Austenitic Stainless Steels for Structural Materials of Nuclear Power ... AND RESIDUAL STRESS FIELDS AND CRITICAL AND ALLOWABLE FLAW...

105

Transition Metal Doping of Manganese Cobalt Spinel Oxides for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Nanoparticle Catalysts for Hydrogen Production from Methanol and Methane ... of Long Term Aging on Creep Properties of HP Alloy Hydrogen Reformer Tubes ... of Traditionally Wrought Ni-Based Superalloys for USC Steam Turbines.

106

Biogeochemistry of manganese in ferruginous Lake Matano, Indonesia  

SciTech Connect

This study explores Mn biogeochemistry in a stratified, ferruginous lake, a modern analogue to ferruginous oceans. Intense Mn cycling occurs in the chemocline where Mn is recycled at least 15 times before sedimentation. The product of biologically catalyzed Mn oxidation in Lake Matano is birnessite. Although there is evidence for abiotic Mn reduction with Fe(II), Mn reduction likely occurs through a variety of pathways. The flux of Fe(II) is insufficient to balance the reduction of Mn at 125m depth in the water column, and Mn reduction could be a significant contributor to CH{sub 4} oxidation. By combining results from synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence and X-ray spectroscopy, extractions of sinking particles, and reaction transport modeling, we find the kinetics of Mn reduction in the lake's reducing waters are sufficiently rapid to preclude the deposition of Mn oxides from the water column to the sediments underlying ferruginous water. This has strong implications for the interpretation of the sedimentary Mn record.

Jones, C.; Crowe, S.A.; Sturm, A.; Leslie, K.L.; MacLean, L.C. W.; Katsev, S.; Henny, C.; Fowle, D.A.; Canfield, D.E. (USD-Netherlands); (Kansas); (Saskatchewan); (UMM); (LIPI)

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

107

Reduction and Separation of High Iron Content Manganese Ore and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical Enrichment of Precious Metals in Iron Sulfides Using Microwave Energy Chloridizing ... Co-Gasification Behavior of Metallurgical Coke with High and Low Reactivity .... Thermal Plasma Torches for Metallurgical Applications.

108

Effects of Iron and Manganese Ions on Potentiostatic Current ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Differential Characterization of Ikperejere Iron shale and Iron Sandstone Deposit Direct Precipitation of ... High Temperature Exposure of Oil Well Cements.

109

Compendium and synthesis of bacterial manganese reduction rates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generically as Mox ? Mred we can formulate a rate equation that mimics all three of these features as follows: d½Mred dt ¼ 0 t Mox K1=2þ½Mox t P tlag ( ð1? ½Mox þ ½Mred ¼ ½Mox0 þ ½Mred 0 ¼ ½Mtot ð2? where [Mred] and [Mox] are, respectively, concentrations of the reduced and oxidized metal over

Burgos, William

110

Dopant Segregation and Giant Magnetoresistance in Manganese-doped Germanium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dopant segregation in a Mn{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x} dilute magnetic semiconductor leads to a remarkable self-assembly of Mn-rich nanocolumns, embedded in a fully compensated Ge matrix. Samples grown at 80 C display a giant positive magnetoresistance that correlates directly with the distribution of magnetic impurities. Annealing at 200 C increases Mn substitution in the host matrix above the threshold for the insulator-metal transition, while maintaining the columnar morphology, and results in global ferromagnetism with conventional negative magnetoresistance. The qualitative features of magnetism and transport in this nanophase material are thus extremely sensitive to the precise location and distribution of the magnetic dopants.

Li, An-Ping [ORNL; Zeng, Changgan [ORNL; van Benthem, Klaus [ORNL; Chisholm, Matthew F [ORNL; Shen, Jian [ORNL; Rao, Nageswara [ORNL; Dixit, Suvasis [ORNL; Feldman, Leonard C [ORNL; Petukhov, Andre G [ORNL; Foygel, M. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology; Weitering, Harm H [ORNL; Gunter, Sandra Lynn [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Manganese-stabilized austenitic stainless steels for fusion applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An austenitic stainless steel that is comprised of Fe, Cr, Mn, C but no Ni or Nb and minimum N. To enhance strength and fabricability minor alloying additions of Ti, W, V, B and P are made. The resulting alloy is one that can be used in fusion reactor environments because the half-lives of the elements are sufficiently short to allow for handling and disposal.

Klueh, Ronald L. (Knoxville, TN); Maziasz, Philip J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Arsenite Oxidation by a Poorly Crystalline Manganese-Oxide. 2.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

carried out at the SSRL, a national user facility operated by Stanford University on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. The SSRL Structural Molecular Biology Program

Sparks, Donald L.

113

A ROLE FOR MANGANESE IN OXYGEN EVOLUTION IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The prospects are shrinking rapidly for a future for society based on liquid hydrocarbons as a major source of energy. Among the wide array of alternative sources that are currently undergoing scrutiny, much attention is attracted to the photolysis of water to produce hydrogen and oxygen gases. Water, the starting material, does not suffer from lack of abundance, and there is every likelihood that the environmental consequences of water splitting will be negligible. Solar radiation is the obvious candiate for the ultimate energy source, but of course water cannot be photolyzed directly by the relatively low-energy wave-lengths, greater than 300 nm, that penetrate the earth's atmosphere. Nevertheless, the photolysis of water to produce O{sub 2} and reduced substances, with reduction potentials equivalent to that of H{sub 2}, is accomplished efficiently using sunlight by higher plant photosynthesis. There are even organisms that, under special conditions, will evolve H{sub 2} gas photosynthetically, but not efficiently when coupled with O{sub 2} production. To produce a molecule of O{sub 2} from water requires the removal of four electrons from two H{sub 2}O molecules.

Sauer, Kenneth

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

A ROLE FOR MANGANESE IN OXYGEN EVOLUTION IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

synthesis, Topics jn Photosynthesis, vol. 2, J. Barber,and J. R. Benemann, in Photosynthesis in Relation to ModelProcesses of Photosynthesis, Topics in Photosynthesis, vol.

Sauer, Kenneth

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Effects of Alloy Microstructure and Manganese Cobaltite Coatings ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A21: First-Principles Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Chemical ... A3: Investigation on Co-combustion Kinetics of Anthracite Coal and Biomass Char by ... Lithium Redox Process for Thermochemical Water-Splitting as Energy Conversion.

116

Ionizing irradiation induces apoptotic damage of salivary gland acinar cells via NADPH oxidase 1-dependent superoxide generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have important roles in various physiological processes. Recently, several novel homologues of the phagocytic NADPH oxidase have been discovered and this protein family is now designated as the Nox family. We investigated the involvement of Nox family proteins in ionizing irradiation-induced ROS generation and impairment in immortalized salivary gland acinar cells (NS-SV-AC), which are radiosensitive, and immortalized ductal cells (NS-SV-DC), which are radioresistant. Nox1-mRNA was upregulated by {gamma}-ray irradiation in NS-SV-AC, and the ROS level in NS-SV-AC was increased to approximately threefold of the control level after 10 Gy irradiation. The increase of ROS level in NS-SV-AC was suppressed by Nox1-siRNA-transfection. In parallel with the suppression of ROS generation and Nox1-mRNA expression by Nox1-siRNA, ionizing irradiation-induced apoptosis was strongly decreased in Nox1-siRNA-transfected NS-SV-AC. There were no large differences in total SOD or catalase activities between NS-SV-AC and NS-SV-DC although the post-irradiation ROS level in NS-SV-AC was higher than that in NS-SV-DC. In conclusion, these results indicate that Nox1 plays a crucial role in irradiation-induced ROS generation and ROS-associated impairment of salivary gland cells and that Nox1 gene may be targeted for preservation of the salivary gland function from radiation-induced impairment.

Tateishi, Yoshihisa [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kochi Medical School, Kochi University, Kohasu, Oko-cho, Nankoku-city, Kochi 783-8505 (Japan)], E-mail: tateishi@kochi-u.ac.jp; Sasabe, Eri; Ueta, Eisaku; Yamamoto, Tetsuya [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kochi Medical School, Kochi University, Kohasu, Oko-cho, Nankoku-city, Kochi 783-8505 (Japan)

2008-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

117

Diane Cabelli  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diane Cabelli Diane Cabelli Chemist Chemistry Department Building 555 Brookhaven National Laboratory P.O. Box 5000 Upton, NY 11973-5000 Phone: (631) 344-4361 FAX: (631) 344-5815 e-mail Thermal, Photo- and Radiation-Induced Reactions in Condensed Media Research Interests kinetics and mechanisms of high valent metal complex reactivity in water; oxygen radical reactivity with enzymes/cellular components (superoxide dismutases/reductases) Education A.B, Bryn Mawr College; Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin (1979, w/ Michael Dewar/Alan Cowley) Employment National Museum Act Fellowship, Conservation Center, Institute of Fine Arts, New York University 1980-1981; Research Associate, Brookhaven National Laboratory,1981-1983; Assistant Chemist, Brookhaven National Laboratory,1983-1987; Visiting Scientist, Risoe National Laboratory, Denmark, 1985-1986; Associate Chemist, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 1988-1995; Chemist, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 1995-present.

118

ALS: a disease of motor neurons and their nonneuronal neighbors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a late-onset progressive neurodegenerative disease affecting motor neurons. The etiology of most ALS cases remains unknown, but 2 % of instances are due to mutations in Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1). Since sporadic and familial ALS affects the same neurons with similar pathology, it is hoped that therapies effective in mutant SOD1 models will translate to sporadic ALS. Mutant SOD1 induces non-cell-autonomous motor neuron killing by an unknown gain of toxicity. Selective vulnerability of motor neurons likely arises from a combination of several mechanisms, including protein misfolding, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative damage, defective axonal transport, excitotoxicity, insufficient growth factor signaling, and inflammation. Damage within motor neurons is enhanced by damage incurred by nonneuronal neighboring cells, via an inflammatory response that accelerates disease progression. These findings validate therapeutic approaches aimed at nonneuronal cells.

Sverine Boille; Christine V; E Velde; Don W. Clevel

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Reduction of Agglomerated Manganese Ores In a 150KW pilot scale ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electricity-independent Generation of Si Based on the Use of Rice Husk: A Process Concept Energy consumption of metal electrowinning: an optimization.

120

Synthesis and Characterization of 14-1-11 Ytterbium Manganese Antimonide Derivatives for Thermoelectric Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space

Star, Kurt

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese superoxide dismutase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Synthesis and Characterization of Lithium Manganese Phosphate by a precipitation method  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

LiMnPO4 is synthesized from MnPO4H2O precursor precipitated via a spontaneous reaction. These MnPO4H2O nano-plates react quickly with the lithium source and form a pure phase of LiMnPO4 that has good electrochemical properties. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was used to determine the optimum synthesis temperature. It is found that the crystallization of LiMnPO4 occurs before 438C. After full nucleation at 550C, the samples exhibit a discharge capacity of 115mAh/g (C/20 rate, 2.5-4.4 V) in the first cycle. The Coulombic efficiency is maintained at near 100% after the first few cycles.When the synthesis temperature decreases to 350C, the particle size of the LiMnPO4 is further reduced to 10-50 nm with a reversible capacity of more than 90 mAh/g. For 550C-synthesized LiMnPO4, 73% of the initial capacity is retained at the sixtieth cycle. After high rate (5C) discharge, the reversible capacity of the LiMnPO4 can be recovered to nearly the original value of 110 mAh/g at the C/20 rate. This precipitation method provides a cost effective approach for manufacturing high-performance LiMnPO4 cathode material for Li-ion batteries.

Xiao, Jie; Xu, Wu; Choi, Daiwon; Zhang, Jiguang

2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

122

Molecular Interactions of Plutonium(VI) with Synthetic Manganese-Substituted Goethite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in aqueous solution for Pu(VI) taken from Guillaumont etTable 3. Least-squares fits of Pu L III -edge XANES data toIV) Figure 4. Energy (eV) Pu Solution Speciation pH Figure

Hu, Yung-Jin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Electrocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide by rhenium and manganese polypyridyl catalysts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are on the decline of the peak oil production curve, and thedue to the impending peak in oil production and the threatoil production curves for those countries that have passed peak

Smieja, Jonathan Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Hard and tough electrodeposited aluminum-manganese alloys with tailored nanostructures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tailoring the nanostructure of electrodeposited Al-Mn films to achieve high hardness and toughness is the overarching goal of this thesis. Binary Al-Mn alloys are electrodeposited using a conventional current waveform in ...

Ruan, Shiyun

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Interaction of manganese(II) with the surface of calcite in dilute solutions and seawater  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The interaction of Mn/sup 2 +/ with the surface of calcite in aqueous solutions is complex. In dilute solutions the Mn/sup 2 +/ is rapidly adsorbed, MnCO/sub 3/ nucleates on the calcite surface and then grows by a first order reaction with respect to the initial Mn/sup 2 +/ concentration. At higher ionic strengths, in NaCl solutions, the rate of these processes is slower, but the same general pattern persists. In solutions containing Mg/sup 2 +/, at the concentration of seawater and in seawater, the nucleation phase of the uptake process does not appear to occur. The long term uptake rate of Mn/sup 2 +/ on the surface of calcite in seawater is first order with respect to the disolved Mn/sup 2 +/ concentration. The rate constant is over 3 orders of magnitude smaller than that found in dilute Mg/sup 2 +/-free solutions. A probable explanation for the slower growith rate in seawater is that MnCO/sub 3/ is not nucleated on the calcite surface due to the presence of high Mg/sup 2 +/ concentrations. These, through site competition, prevent enough Mn/sup 2 +/ from being adsorbed to reach a critical concentration for MnCO/sub 3/ nucleation. This behavior is similar to that found for orthophosphate with calcite surfaces in dilute solutions and seawater. Measurements of the solubility of rhodochrosite in seawater gave results from an undersaturation approach to equilibrium in excellent agreement with those found in previous studies in dilute solutions. When equilibrium was approached from supersaturation, approximately 50 times more calcium was precipitated than Mn/sup 2 +/. The measured solubility was over twice that determined from undersaturation. It is possible that a Mn-calcite containing 25 to 30 mole percent MnCO/sub 3/ formed on the rhodochrosite from the supersaturated solutions. Consequently, it is doubtful that rhodochrosite controls the concentration of Mn/sup 2 +/ in calcium carbonate rich marine environments.

Franklin, M. L.; Morse, J. W.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Electrocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide by rhenium and manganese polypyridyl catalysts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for reduction of carbon dioxide. IR-SpectroelectrochemicalElectrocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide mediated by Re(Reduction of Carbon Dioxide to Carbon Monoxide Mediated by (

Smieja, Jonathan Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Quantitative room-temperature mineralization of airborne formaldehyde using manganese oxide catalysts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

extent of mineralization Carbon dioxide levels produced as athe formation of carbon dioxide and water. The concentrationformaldehyde and carbon dioxide concentrations were recorded

Sidheswaran, Meera A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

THE MECHANICAL PROPERTIES AND MICROSTRUCTURAL RELATIONSHIPS IN IRON-MANGANESE-CHROMIUM ALLOYS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

industrial standpoint. Heat treatment scheme B involves an ice-hrine quench 00% salt solution, refrigeration

Thompson, L.D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Carbon spheres-assisted strategy to prepare mesoporous manganese dioxide for supercapacitor applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mesoporous MnO{sub 2} microstructures with large specific surface area have been successfully synthesized by an in-situ redox precipitation method in the presence of colloidal carbon spheres. The samples of them had much higher specific surface area, pore size and pore volume than those obtained via routes without carbon spheres. The morphology, chemical compositions and porous nature of products were fully characterized. Electrochemical measurements showed that these mesoporous MnO{sub 2} could function well when used as positive electrode materials for supercapacitor. Ideal electrochemical capacitive performances and cyclic stability after 2000 galvanostatic charge-discharge cycles could be observed in 1 M neutral Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} aqueous electrolyte with a working voltage of 1.7 V. - Graphical Abstract: Mesoporous MnO{sub 2} microstructures with large S{sub BET} were successfully synthesized by in-situ redox precipitation method in the presence of colloidal carbon spheres. Electrochemical measurements showed that these mesoporous MnO{sub 2} could be well used as electrode materials for supercapacitor. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mesoporous MnO{sub 2} was prepared by in-situ redox method assisted by carbon spheres. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S{sub BET}, pore size and volume were higher than MnO{sub 2} obtained without carbon spheres. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer They could function well when used as electrode materials for supercapacitor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ideal capacitive behaviors and long cycling life showed after 2000 charge-discharge.

Li Siheng [State Key Laboratory of Electroanalytical Chemistry, and Jilin Provincial Key Laboratory of Advanced Low-carbon Chemical Power, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 5625 Renmin St., Changchun 130022 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Qi Li, E-mail: qil@ciac.jl.cn [State Key Laboratory of Electroanalytical Chemistry, and Jilin Provincial Key Laboratory of Advanced Low-carbon Chemical Power, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 5625 Renmin St., Changchun 130022 (China); Lu Lehui; Wang Hongyu [State Key Laboratory of Electroanalytical Chemistry, and Jilin Provincial Key Laboratory of Advanced Low-carbon Chemical Power, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 5625 Renmin St., Changchun 130022 (China)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

130

Luminescence from self-trapped holes in manganese-doped calcium fluoride single crystals  

SciTech Connect

Thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL) and electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements on x-irradiated CaF/sub 2/:Mn (0.1 wt %) single crystals have been conducted in the interval 70 to 300 K. Prominent TSL peaks occur near 150 K (345- and 495-nm emission) and 200 K (predominantly 495-nm emission) with thermal decay of ESR centers at these same temperatures. Taken collectively the data suggest that 150 K TSL emission is due to mobile holes from V/sub K/ centers recombining with both trapped electrons and Mn/sup +/ ions, i.e., V/sub K/ + e/sup -/ ..-->.. 345-nm emission, and V/sub K/ + Mn/sup +/ ..-->.. (Mn/sup 2 +/)* + hv (495-nm emission). Additionally, H centers are formed by transformation of V/sub K/ centers. At 200 K, holes from H centers recombine with Mn/sup +/ to produce excited-state (Mn/sup 2 +/)* which decays by emitting 495-nm radiation.

Jahan, M.S.; Cooke, D.W.; Alexander, C. Jr.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Reaction of Plutonium(VI) with the Manganese-Substituted Iron Oxide Mineral Goethite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

161 E.3 Pu AnionPreparation of Pu(III) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .of Pu(IV) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C.5

Hu, Yung-Jin Hu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Electrocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide by rhenium and manganese polypyridyl catalysts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuels but also shows that total energy usage has increasedfuels, but also shows that total energy usage has increased

Smieja, Jonathan Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Biochemical and biophysical characterization of the manganese transport regulator (MntR) from Bacillus subtilis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a Role for Iron in the Lyme Disease Pathogen. Sciencewas noted by discovery of the Lyme disease pathogen Borrelia

Golynskiy, Misha

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Molecular Interactions of Plutonium(VI) with Synthetic Manganese-Substituted Goethite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E. , Thesis, Reactions of Plutonium(VI) with the Iron Oxideof Uranium, Neptunium, Plutonium, Americium and Technetium;Molecular Interactions of Plutonium(VI) with Synthetic

Hu, Yung-Jin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Complexation and redox interactions between aqueous plutonium and manganese oxide interfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Chemistry of Plutonium (American Nuclear Society,XAS studies with sorbed plutonium on tuff, J. Synch. Rad.state determination of plutonium aquo ions using x-ray

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Novel Process for Utilizing Low-Grade Manganese Oxide Ores by ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, reduction thermodynamic by sulphur of MnO2 was firstly carried out. Then ... Pilot Scale Measurements of NOx Emissions from the Silicon Process.

137

Reaction of Plutonium(VI) with the Manganese-Substituted Iron Oxide Mineral Goethite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

R. , and Sam W. down at SSRL. Your hard work made my exper-been a small part of the SSRL family during my time here.protection group down at SSRL, especially Carol for going

Hu, Yung-Jin Hu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Molecular Interactions of Plutonium(VI) with Synthetic Manganese-Substituted Goethite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

spectra were collected at SSRL on beamline 11-2 using a 30%Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) on beamline 10-2 using a fullyBasic Energy Sciences. The SSRL Structural Molecular Biology

Hu, Yung-Jin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Molecular Interactions of Plutonium(VI) with Synthetic Manganese-Substituted Goethite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lightsource, a national user facility operated by Stanfordnational scientific user facility sponsored by DOE's Office

Hu, Yung-Jin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Structural oxidation state studies of the manganese cluster in the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was performed on Photosystem II (PSII)-enriched membranes prepared from spinach to explore: (1) the correlation between structure and magnetic spin state of the Mn cluster in the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) in the S{sub 2} state; and (2) the oxidation state changes of the Mn cluster in the flash-induced S-states. The structure of the Mn cluster in the S{sub 2} state with the g{approx}4 electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal (S{sub 2}-g4 state) was compared with that in the S{sub 2} state with multiline signal (S{sub 2}-MLS state) and the S{sub 1} state. The S{sub 2}-g4 state has a higher XAS inflection point energy than that of the S{sub 1} state, indicating the oxidation of Mn in the advance from the S{sub 1} to the S{sub 2}-g4 state. Differences in the edge shape and in the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) show that the structure of the Mn cluster in the S{sub 2}-g4 state is different from that in the S{sub 2}-MLS or the S{sub 1} state. In the S{sub 2}-g4 state, the second shell of backscatterers from the Mn absorber contains two Mn-Mn distances of 2.73 {angstrom} and 2.85 {angstrom}. Very little distance disorder exists in the second shell of the S{sub 1} or S{sub 2}-MLS states. The third shell of the S{sub 2}-g4 state at about 3.3 {angstrom} also contains increased heterogeneity relative to that of the S{sub 2}-MLS or the S{sub 1} state. Various S-states were prepared at room-temperature by saturating, single-turnover flashes. The flash-dependent oscillation in the amplitude of the MLS was used to characterize the S-state composition and to construct {open_quotes}pure{close_quotes} S-state Mn K-edge spectra. The edge position shifts to higher energy by 1.8 eV upon the S{sub 1} {yields} S{sub 2} transition.

Liang, W.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese superoxide dismutase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Ionic modeling of lithium manganese spinel materials for use in rechargeable batteries  

SciTech Connect

In order to understand and evaluate materials for use in Li ion rechargeable battery electrodes, we have modeled the crystal structures of various Mn oxide and Li Mn oxide compounds. We have modeled the MnO{sub 2} polymorphs and several spinels with intermediate compositions based on the amount of Li inserted into the tetrahedral site. 3-D representations of the structures provide a basis for identifying site occupancies, coordinations, Mn valence, order-disorder, and potentially new dopants for enhanced cathode behavior. XRD simulations of the crystal structures provide good agreement with observed patterns for synthesized samples. Ionic modeling of these materials consists of an energy minimization approach using Coulombic, repulsive, and van der Waals interactions. Modeling using electronic polarizabilities (shell model) allows a systematic analysis of changes in lattice energy, cell volume, and the relative stability of doped structures using ions such as Al, Ti, Ni, and Co.

Cygan, R.T.; Westrich, H.R.; Doughty, D.H.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

142

Distribution and speciation of trace elements in iron and manganese oxide cave deposits  

SciTech Connect

Fe and Mn oxide minerals control the distribution and speciation of heavy metals and trace elements in soils and aquatic systems through chemical mechanisms involving adsorption, incorporation, and electron transfer. The Pautler Cave System in Southwest Illinois, an analog to other temperate carbonate-hosted karst systems, contains Fe and Mn oxide minerals that form in multiple depositional environments and have high concentrations of associated trace elements. Synchrotron-based micro-scanning X-ray fluorescence ({mu}-SXRF) shows unique spatial distributions of Fe, Mn, and trace elements in mineral samples. Profile maps of Mn oxide cave stream pebble coatings show Fe- and As-rich laminations, indicating dynamic redox conditions in the cave stream. {mu}-SXRF maps demonstrate that Ni, Cu, and Zn correlate primarily with Mn whereas As correlates with both Mn and Fe; As is more enriched in the Fe phase. Zn is concentrated in the periphery of Mn oxide stream pebble coatings, and may be an indication of recent anthropogenic surface activity. X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy measurements reveal that As(V) occurs as surface complexes on Mn and Fe oxides whereas Zn(II) associated with Mn oxides is adsorbed to the basal planes of phyllomanganates in a tetrahedral coordination. Co(III) and Se(IV) are also observed to be associated with Mn oxides. The observation of Fe, Mn, and trace element banding in Mn oxide cave stream pebble coatings suggests that these materials are sensitive to and document aqueous redox conditions, similar to ferromanganese nodules in soils and in marine and freshwater sediments. Furthermore, speciation and distribution measurements indicate that these minerals scavenge trace elements and limit the transport of micronutrients and contaminants in karst aquifer systems while also potentially recording changes in anthropogenic surface activity and land-use.

Frierdich, Andrew J.; Catalano, Jeffrey G. (WU)

2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

143

Phase Composition of the Four-Component Nitrified Steels at Increasing Manganese Concentration  

SciTech Connect

By neutron diffraction the evolution of phase composition of Fe-20Cr-(8 to 24)Mn-0.6N steels was investigated versus the Mn concentration.

Baeva, M. [Institute of Solid State Physics-BAS, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Beskrovnyi, A. I.; Jadrowski, E. L. [Joint Institute of Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

144

Surface chemistry of coated lithium manganese nickel oxide thin film cathodes studied by XPS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of coating high voltage LiMn1.5Ni0.5O4 spinel cathode thin films with three metal oxide thin layers is discussed. The changes in surface chemistry of the electrodes are measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. ZnO is found to decompose during the first charge whereas Al2O3 and ZrO2 are stable for more than 100 cycles. ZrO2, however, importantly limits the available Li storage capacity of the electrochemical reaction due to poorer kinetics. Al2O3 offers the best results in term of capacity retention. Upon cycling, the evidence of a signal at 75.4 eV in the Al2p binding energy spectrum indicates the partial conversion of Al2O3 into Al2O2F2. Moreover, the continuous formation of PEO , esters and LixPOyFz compounds on the surface of the electrodes is found for all coating materials.

Baggetto, Loic [ORNL; Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL; Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Nucleation of the isothermal martensitic transformation in iron-nickel-manganese alloys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By means of quantitative metallography and electrical resistance measurements, the incubation period (time to form a detectable amount of martensite) and the initial nucleation rate have been determined as a function of ...

Pati, Satya Ranjan

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Molecular Interactions of Plutonium(VI) with Synthetic Manganese-Substituted Goethite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Office of Science, Climate and Environmental Sciences Division and the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management

Hu, Yung-Jin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Layered manganese oxide intergrowth electrodes for rechargeable lithium batteries: Part 2. Substitution with Al  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The structural and electrochemical characterization of layered Li{sub x}Al{sub y}Mn{sub 1-y}O{sub 2} compounds prepared from sodium-containing precursors is described. A quaternary phase diagram showing composition ranges for pure P2 and P3 structures and P2/P3 intergrowths obtained in the Na-Al-Mn-O system is presented. Upon ion exchange, these compounds change to O2, O3 or O2/O3 stacking arrangements, respectively. The oxygen array in O3 and spinel structures is similar, and most of the O3 structures convert to spinel rapidly upon electrochemical cycling in lithium cells. This process is delayed somewhat by increased Al substitution, but not completely inhibited. More effective suppression of the phase transformation is observed in O2/O3 intergrowth electrodes. Additionally, the capacity retention upon cycling and the rate behavior of cells containing intergrowth electrodes is superior to those with pure O2 structures.

Patoux, Sebastien; Dolle, Mickael; Doeff, Marca M.

2004-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

148

The Experience and Limitations of using Manganese Alkaline Primary Cells in a large Operational AUV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

shall have sockets and spigots with push-in type integral rubber ring joints. Bends shall be uPVC and all other fittings shall be cast iron, all with similar push-in type joints. Copper pipes Pipes shall measured): 4 203 x 203 x 46Kg/m H-section beams with and including connector plates, etc. m 12 5 M16 x 190

Griffiths, Gwyn

149

Probing The Electrode/Electrolyte Interface in The Lithium Excess Layered Oxide Li1.2Ni0.2Mn0.6O2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A detailed surface investigation of the lithium-excess nickel manganese layered oxide Li1.2Ni0.2Mn0.6O2 structure was carried out using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), total electron yield and transmission x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) during the first two electrochemical cycles. All spectroscopy techniques consistently showed the presence of Mn4+ in the pristine material and a surprising reduction of Mn at the voltage plateau during the first charge. The Mn reduction is accompanied by the oxygen loss revealed by EELS. Upon the first discharge, the Mn at the surface never fully returns back to Mn4+. The electrode/electrolyte interface of this compound consists of the reduced Mn at the crystalline defect-spinel inner layer and an oxidized Mn species simultaneously with the presence of a superoxide species in amorphous outer layer. This proposed model signifies that oxygen vacancy formation and lithium removal result in electrolyte decomposition and superoxide formation, leading to Mn activation/dissolution and surface layer-spinel phase transformation. The results also indicate that the role of oxygen is complex and significant in contributing to the extra capacity of this class of high energy density cathode materials.

Carroll, Kyler J [University of California, San Diego; Qian, Danna [University of California, San Diego; Fell, Chris [University of Florida, Gainesville; Calvin, Scott [Sarah Lawrence College; Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL; Chi, Miaofang [ORNL; Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL; Meng, Ying Shirley [University of California, San Diego

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

KINETICS AND MECHANISMS OF CHROMIUM(III) OXIDATION AND PRECIPITATION ON MANGANESE OXIDES, IN REAL-TIME AND AT THE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Sugar Cube, Please: I Need to Charge My Cellphone Page 1 September 18, 2003 WHAT'S NEXT A Sugar Cube, Please: I Need to Charge My Cellphone By ANNE EISENBERG OTS of people shun sugar these days. It&ex=1064462400&pa12:15:50 PM 9/22/2003 #12;A Sugar Cube, Please: I Need to Charge My Cellphone Page 2

Sparks, Donald L.

151

Adequacy and consistency of animal studies to evaluate the neurotoxicity of chronic low-level manganese exposure in humans.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wood GC, Egyed M. 1994. Risk assessment for the combustionM, Wood GC. 1996. Risk assessment for combustion products of

Gwiazda, Roberto; Lucchini, Roberto; Smith, Donald

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

OPERATION OF A TRITIUM GLOVEBOX CLEAN-UP SYSTEM USING ZIRCONIUM MANGANESE IRON AND ZIRCONIUM TWO IRON METAL GETTERS  

SciTech Connect

A metal hydride-based tritium clean-up system has been successfully operated for more than four years on an 11 m{sup 3} helium/nitrogen glovebox which was used for handling metal tritide powders. The clean-up system consists of two beds: (1) a Zr-Mn-Fe (in a 10% by weight Al binder, SAES ST909) bed operating at 675 C followed by (2) a Zr{sub 2}Fe (SAES ST198) bed operating at 250 C. The Zr-Mn-Fe bed serves to condition the gas stream by cracking hydrogenous impurities (such as H{sub 2}O and hydrocarbons) and absorbing oxygen and carbon. The Zr{sub 2}Fe bed absorbs the hydrogen isotopes from the flowing stream by forming a solid hydride compound. These beds contain 3 kilograms of Zr{sub 2}Fe and have been loaded routinely with 230-250 STP liters of hydrogen isotopes in earlier trials. The Zr-Mn-Fe alloy exhibits an anomaly during activation, namely an exotherm upon initial exposure to nitrogen. The purpose of this work is to better understand this reaction. Nitrogen absorption studies were done in order to quantify the nitrogen taken up by the getter and to characterize the reaction kinetics. In addition, ST909 phases before and after the reaction were studied with x-ray diffraction.

E. LARSON; K. COOK

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Microbial Manganese(II) oxidation : biogeochemistry of a deep-sea hydrothermal plume, enzymatic mechanism, and genomic perspectives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mn(II) oxidation. Near the Mox-1 region there is a predictedCu-binding regions. In the Mox-2 region there is a permeasethat are duplicated in both Mox regions include several

Dick, Gregory J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Real-time x-ray absorption spectroscopy of uranium, iron, and manganese in contaminated sediments during bioreduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS, Brookhaven NationalSynchrotron Light Source (NSLS), Brookhaven Nationalof Georgia). Use of the NSLS was supported by DOE under

Tokunaga, T.K.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Real-time x-ray absorption spectroscopy of uranium, iron, and manganese in contaminated sediments during bioreduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

13ID-C at the Advanced Photon Source (APS, Argonne NationalSector 13), Advanced Photon Source (APS), Argonne National

Tokunaga, T.K.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Electrochemical and structural characterization of titanium-substituted manganese oxides based on Na0.44MnO2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by heating them in a molten salt- mixture of 68-mol% LiNOtakes place during the molten salt exchange. Because the850 C. c) prepared by molten salt exchange of Na x Ti y Mn

Doeff, Marca M.; Richardson, Thomas J.; Hwang, Kwang-Taek

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

X-ray and vibrational spectroscopy of manganese complexes relevant to the oxygen-evolving complex of photosynthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

V. P. ; Nechushtai, R. Photosynthesis Research Ort, D. R. ;F. ; Editors Oxygenic Photosynthesis; The Light Reactions. [Yachandra, V. K. In Photosynthesis: Mechanisms and Effects;

Visser, Hendrik

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Fabrication and characterization of lithium manganese nickel oxide sputtered thin film cathodes for lithium-ion batteries  

SciTech Connect

Li-rich and stoichiometric Li1Mn1.5Ni0.5O4 (LMNO) cathode films have been prepared by magnetron sputtering. Sputtering from a Li stoichiometric target yields Li-rich films composed of spinel, layered and monoclinic phases. Films obtained from a Li deficient target are mostly made of a spinel phase and little layered material. The resulting cathode thin films have good capacity retention and very high rate capability. The reaction mechanism has been investigated by XRD and HRTEM and evidences the reversible formation of a spinel phase, as is also found for the powder samples. The film geometry enables to understand the effect of coatings (ZnO or LiPON). Coating high voltage cathodes reduces the coulombic losses but at the price of rate performance. Nonetheless, these coated sputtered electrode thin films offer a higher rate capability than other LMNO thin films obtained by other physical vapor deposition techniques.

Baggetto, Loic [ORNL; Unocic, Raymond R [ORNL; Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL; Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Molecular dissection of the roles of the SOD genes in mammalian response to low dose irradiation  

SciTech Connect

It has been long recognized that a significant fraction of the radiation-induced genetic damage to cells are caused by secondary oxidative species. Internal cellular defense systems against oxidative stress play significant roles in countering genetic damage induced by ionizing radiation. The role of the detoxifying enzymes may be even more prominent in the case of low-dose, low-LET irradiation, as the majority of genetic damage may be caused by secondary oxidative species. In this study we have attempted to decipher the roles of the superoxide dismutase (SOD) genes, which are responsible for detoxifying the superoxide anions. We used adenovirus vectors to deliver RNA interference (RNAi or siRNA) technology to down-regulate the expression levels of the SOD genes. We have also over-expressed the SOD genes by use of recombinant adenovirus vectors. Cells infected with the vectors were then subjected to low dose ?-irradiation. Total RNA were extracted from the exposed cells and the expression of 9000 genes were profiled by use of cDNA microarrays. The result showed that low dose radiation had clear effects on gene expression in HCT116 cells. Both over-expression and down-regulation of the SOD1 gene can change the expression profiles of sub-groups of genes. Close to 200 of the 9000 genes examined showed over two-fold difference in expression under various conditions. Genes with changed expression pattern belong to many categories that include: early growth response, DNA-repair, ion transport, apoptosis, and cytokine response.

Eric Y. Chuang

2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

160

Multiple sclerosis and interferon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Multiple sclerosis and interferon Multiple sclerosis and interferon Name: iguanajoe Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: I have recently read that interferon is being used as a treatment for multiple sclerosis. Please explain how it affects the nerve tissue and how effective it is. Replies: Interferon is a cell to cell chemical messenger which essentially protects cells from viruses. That is, when a virus infects a cell, it sends out interferon, which is received by neighboring cells. A biochemical reaction then follows which builds the cells resistance viruses, and hopefully, it will be enough to prevent the virus from spreading. If there is work with interferon and MS, perhaps some researchers believe that MS is caused by a viral infection that destroys nervous tissue. r, that viruses cause some genetic mutation which compromises the maintenance of healthy nervous tissue. By the way, the genetic cause for another muscular-nervous disorder, Lou Gherigs Disease or ALS, was recently found to be a hereditary genetic disorder. People susceptible to ALS did not have a gene which codes for a certain superoxide dismutase antioxidant enzyme, necessary to maintain healthy nervous tissue and prevent it from free radical destruction. Maybe the cause of MS is similar.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese superoxide dismutase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Structural and biophysical properties of metal-free pathogenic SOD1 mutants A4V and G93A  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal, progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by the destruction of motor neurons in the spinal cord and brain. A subset of ALS cases are linked to dominant mutations in copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1). The pathogenic SOD1 variants A4V and G93A have been the foci of multiple studies aimed at understanding the molecular basis for SOD1-linked ALS. The A4V variant is responsible for the majority of familial ALS cases in North America, causing rapidly progressing paralysis once symptoms begin and the G93A SOD1 variant is overexpressed in often studied murine models of the disease. Here we report the three-dimensional structures of metal-free A4V and of metal-bound and metal-free G93A SOD1. In the metal-free structures, the metal-binding loop elements are observed to be severely disordered, suggesting that these variants may share mechanisms of aggregation proposed previously for other pathogenic SOD1 proteins.

Galaleldeen, Ahmad; Strange, Richard W.; Whitson, Lisa J.; Antonyuk, Svetlana V.; Narayana, Narendra; Taylor, Alexander B.; Schuermann, Jonathan P.; Holloway, Stephen P.; Hasnain, S.Samar; Hart, P. John; (Texas-HSC); (Liverpool)

2010-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

162

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Title: Scanning tunneling microscope; Semiconductor; Spintronics. Description: [Left] A high resolution STM image of a manganese ...

163

Multivitamin/Multielement Dietary Supplement SRM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... chromium, copper, iodine, iron, magnesium, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, phosphorous, potassium, selenium, silicon, tin, vanadium, and zinc. ...

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

164

NIST Tech Beat - Oct. 12, 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... iron, magnesium, manganese, sodium, potassium, zinc, arsenic cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, lead and ...

165

Theoretical Study of the Reactivity of Mixed Manganese and Silver Oxides on Hydrogen Simulating Tritium for the Limitation of Outgassing from Waste Drums  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental and Organically Bound Tritium / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology (Part 2)

X. Lefebvre; K. Liger; M. Troulay; N. Ghirelli; C. Perrais

166

In situ X-ray absorption fine structure studies of a manganese dioxide electrode in a rechargeable MnO{sub 2}/Zn alkaline battery environment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Electronic and structural aspects of a MnO{sub 2} electrode in a rechargeable MnO{sub 2}/Zn battery environment have been investigated by in situ Mn K-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS). The relative amplitudes of the three major Fourier transform shells of the EXAFS (extended XAFS) function of the rechargeable MnO{sub 2} electrode in the undischarged state were found to be similar to those found for ramsdellite, a MnO{sub 2} polymorph with substantial corner-sharing linkages among the basic MnO{sub 6} octahedral units. The analyses of the background-subtracted pre-edge peaks and absorption edge regions for the nominally 1-e{sup {minus}} discharged electrode were consistent with Mn{sup 3+} as being the predominant constituent species, rather than a mixture of Mn{sup 4+} and Mn{sup 2+} sites. Furthermore, careful inspection of both the XANES (X-ray absorption near edge structure) and EXAFS indicated that the full recharge of MnO, which had been previously discharged either by a 1- or 2-equivalent corner-sharing linkages compared to the original undischarged MnO{sub 2}.

Mo, Y.; Hu, Y.; Bae, I.T.; Miller, B.; Scherson, D.A. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Antonio, M.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemistry Div.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

167

Soil Acidity and Manganese Nutrition of Corn and Soybeans as Affected by Lime and Nitrogen Applications in an Oxisol under a No-Till System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

00.10 m depth and leaf Mn content of corn and soybean. **:p Corn Grain Mn , mg kg -1 Soybean ? = 148.86 m and grain Mn content of corn and soybean. **: p < 0.01.

Caires, Eduardo Fvero; Garbuio, Fernando Jos; Joris, Hlio Antonio Wood; Pereira, Paulo Roberto da Silva Filho

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Understanding the Chemistry of the Actinides in HL Waste Tank Systems: Actinide Speciation in Oxalic Acid Solutions in the Presence of Significant Quantities of Aluminum, Iron, and Manganese  

SciTech Connect

The overall goal of this research plan is to provide a thermodynamic basis for describing actinide speciation over a range of tank-like conditions, including elevated temperature, elevated OH- concentrations, and the presence of various organic ligands. With support from DOE?s EMSP program, we have made significant progress towards measuring thermodynamic parameters for actinide complexation as a function of temperature. We have used the needs of the ESP modelers to guide our work to date, and we have made important progress defining the effect of temperature for actinide complexation by organic, and for hydrolysis of the hexa- and pentvalent oxidation states.

Clark, Sue

2006-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

169

Long-term stability of organic carbon-stimulated chromate reduction in contaminated soils, and its relation to manganese redox status  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Georgia). Use of the NSLS was supported by DOE underNational Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS, Brookhaven NationalSynchrotron Light Source (NSLS), Brookhaven National

Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Wan, Jiamin; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Sutton, Steve R.; Newville, Matthew; Rao, William

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

bis(2-pyridylmethylene)propane-1,3diamine]manganese(II) (1/2/1) In-Chul Hwang a and Kwang Ha b *  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

R factor = 0.045; wR factor = 0.116; data-to-parameter ratio = 16.6. There are three different Mn II complexes in the asymmetric unit of the title compound, [Mn(C15H16N4)(H2O)2]Br2-2{[MnBr(C15H16N4)(H2O)]Br} [MnBr2(C15H16N4)]. In the neutral complex, the Mn 2+ ion is six-coordinated in a distorted octahedral environment by four N atoms of the tetradentate ligand N,N0-bis(2-pyridylmethylene)propane-1,3-diamine (bppd) and two bromide ligands. In the two cationic complexes, the Mn 2+ ions are also six-coordinated in similar environments, but one Mn ion is coordinated by four N atoms of bppd, one Br atom and one O atom of a coordinating water molecule, whereas the other Mn ion is coordinated by four N atoms of bppd and two O atoms of water ligands. The complexes with two coordinated Br atoms or two H2O ligands are disposed about a twofold axis through Mn and C atoms with the special positions ( 1 1 2, y, 0) and (0, y,

Monoclinic C

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Microsoft Word - Mn.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Structural Determination of Marine Bacteriogenic Manganese Oxides John R. Bargar, Samuel M. Webb (Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory), and Bradley M. Tebo (Oregon Health and Science University) Bacterial oxidation of Mn(II) impacts the global geochemical cycling of carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, nutrients, and contaminants in the environment. Manganese is abundant in the biosphere (~10 14 Kg of suspended and dissolved manganese in the oceans) and is second only to iron in relative terrestrial abun- dance of transition metals. Manganese is an important nutrient in the marine water column and is fundamentally required for photosynthesis. The acquisition of manganese by organisms and the biogeochemistry of manganese in the oceans is therefore an

172

Role of MAP kinases in regulating expression of antioxidants and inflammatory mediators in mouse keratinocytes following exposure to the half mustard, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dermal exposure to sulfur mustard causes inflammation and tissue injury. This is associated with changes in expression of antioxidants and eicosanoids which contribute to oxidative stress and toxicity. In the present studies we analyzed mechanisms regulating expression of these mediators using an in vitro skin construct model in which mouse keratinocytes were grown at an air-liquid interface and exposed directly to 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES), a model sulfur mustard vesicant. CEES (100-1000 {mu}M) was found to cause marked increases in keratinocyte protein carbonyls, a marker of oxidative stress. This was correlated with increases in expression of Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase, catalase, thioredoxin reductase and the glutathione S-transferases, GSTA1-2, GSTP1 and mGST2. CEES also upregulated several enzymes important in the synthesis of prostaglandins and leukotrienes including cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-2 (mPGES-2), prostaglandin D synthase (PGDS), 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX), leukotriene A{sub 4} (LTA{sub 4}) hydrolase and leukotriene C{sub 4} (LTC{sub 4}) synthase. CEES readily activated keratinocyte JNK and p38 MAP kinases, signaling pathways which are known to regulate expression of antioxidants, as well as prostaglandin and leukotriene synthases. Inhibition of p38 MAP kinase suppressed CEES-induced expression of GSTA1-2, COX-2, mPGES-2, PGDS, 5-LOX, LTA{sub 4} hydrolase and LTC{sub 4} synthase, while JNK inhibition blocked PGDS and GSTP1. These data indicate that CEES modulates expression of antioxidants and enzymes producing inflammatory mediators by distinct mechanisms. Increases in antioxidants may be an adaptive process to limit tissue damage. Inhibiting the capacity of keratinocytes to generate eicosanoids may be important in limiting inflammation and protecting the skin from vesicant-induced oxidative stress and injury.

Black, Adrienne T.; Joseph, Laurie B. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Casillas, Robert P. [Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, OH (United States); Heck, Diane E. [Environmental Health Sciences, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY (United States); Gerecke, Donald R. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Sinko, Patrick J. [Pharmaceutics, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Debra L. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Jeffrey D., E-mail: jlaskin@eohsi.rutgers.ed [Environmental and Occupational Medicine, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

173

Effects of 4-phenylbutyric acid on the process and development of diabetic nephropathy induced in rats by streptozotocin: Regulation of endoplasmic reticulum stress-oxidative activation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oxidative stress may contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN), although the precise regulatory mechanism is still unclear. Recent reports have shown that chemical molecular chaperone 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA) can suppress oxidative stress by attenuating endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. We therefore hypothesized that 4-PBA could provide renoprotection through the suppression of oxidative stress in DN rats. Male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into three groups: a normal control (NC) group, a streptozotocin (STZ)-induced DN model group, and a DN plus 4-PBA (1 g/kg) treatment group. At the end of 4, 8, and 12 weeks, hydroxyproline content, NADPH oxidase activity and the expression of phosphorylation of inositol-requiring enzyme-1{alpha} (p-IRE1{alpha}), p47phox, nitrotyrosine (NT) and NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) in the kidneys of all rats were determined; malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in serum and urine were also detected; renal nuclear factor {kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) activity in all of the rats was examined at the end of 12 weeks. Compared with the NC group, the DN rats showed a significant increase in hydroxyproline content, NADPH oxidase activity, NF-{kappa}B activity, the expression of p-IRE1{alpha}, p47phox, NT and Nrf2 in renal tissue; markedly, MDA levels were higher and SOD activity was lower in serum and urine of DN rats than in NC rats for the indicated time. These alterations were inhibited by the administration of 4-PBA. These findings first demonstrated that treatment with 4-PBA significantly inhibits the process and development of diabetic nephropathy in rats through the regulation of ER stress-oxidative activation.

Luo Zhifeng [Institute of Nephrology of Chongqing and Department of Nephrology, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400037 (China); Feng Bing, E-mail: fxb12@yahoo.com.c [Institute of Nephrology of Chongqing and Department of Nephrology, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400037 (China); Mu Jiao; Qi Wei; Zeng Wei; Guo Yanhong; Pang Qi; Ye Zilin; Liu Li; Yuan Fahuan [Institute of Nephrology of Chongqing and Department of Nephrology, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400037 (China)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

174

Long-term mequindox treatment induced endocrine and reproductive toxicity via oxidative stress in male Wistar rats  

SciTech Connect

Mequindox (MEQ) is a synthetic antimicrobial chemical of quinoxaline 1, 4-dioxide group. This study was designed to investigate the hypothesis that MEQ exerts testicular toxicity by causing oxidative stress and steroidal gene expression profiles and determine mechanism of MEQ testicular toxicity. In this study, adult male Wistar rats were fed with MEQ for 180 days at five different doses as 0, 25, 55, 110 and 275 mg/kg, respectively. In comparison to control, superoxide dismutase (SOD), reduced glutathione (GSH) and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) levels were elevated at 110 and 275 mg/kg MEQ, whereas the malondialdehyde (MDA) level was slightly increase at only 275 mg/kg. Furthermore, in LC/MS-IT-TOF analysis, one metabolite 2-isoethanol 4-desoxymequindox (M11) was found in the testis. There was significant decrease in body weight, testicular weight and testosterone at 275 mg/kg, serum follicular stimulating hormone (FSH) at 110 and 275 mg/kg, while lutinizing hormone (LH) levels were elevated at 110 mg/kg. Moreover, histopathology of testis exhibited germ cell depletion, contraction of seminiferous tubules and disorganization of the tubular contents of testis. Compared with control, mRNA expression of StAR, P450scc and 17{beta}-HSD in testis was significantly decreased after exposure of 275 mg/kg MEQ while AR and 3{beta}-HSD mRNA expression were significantly elevated at the 110 mg/kg MEQ group. Taken together, our findings provide the first and direct evidence in vivo for the formation of free radicals during the MEQ metabolism through N {yields} O group reduction, which may have implications to understand the possible mechanism of male infertility related to quinoxaline derivatives.

Ihsan, Awais, E-mail: awais.dr@gmail.com [National Reference Laboratory of Veterinary Drug Residues and MOA Key Laboratory of Food Safety Evaluation, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Wang Xu [National Reference Laboratory of Veterinary Drug Residues and MOA Key Laboratory of Food Safety Evaluation, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Liu Zhaoying [National Reference Laboratory of Veterinary Drug Residues and MOA Key Laboratory of Food Safety Evaluation, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); College of Veterinary Medicine, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha, Hunan 410128 (China); Wang Yulian [National Reference Laboratory of Veterinary Drug Residues and MOA Key Laboratory of Food Safety Evaluation, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Huang Xianju [National Reference Laboratory of Veterinary Drug Residues and MOA Key Laboratory of Food Safety Evaluation, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); College of Pharmacy, South-Central University for Nationalities, Wuhan 430074 (China); Liu Yu; Yu Huan; Zhang Hongfei; Li Tingting; Yang Chunhui [National Reference Laboratory of Veterinary Drug Residues and MOA Key Laboratory of Food Safety Evaluation, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Yuan Zonghui, E-mail: yuan5802@mail.hzau.edu.cn [National Reference Laboratory of Veterinary Drug Residues and MOA Key Laboratory of Food Safety Evaluation, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Involvement of DNA polymerase beta in repairing oxidative damages induced by antitumor drug adriamycin  

SciTech Connect

Adriamycin (ADM) is a widely used antineoplastic drug. However, the increasing cellular resistance has become a serious limitation to ADM clinical application. The most important mechanism related to ADM-induced cell death is oxidative DNA damage mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Base excision repair (BER) is a major pathway in the repair of DNA single strand break (SSB) and oxidized base. In this study, we firstly applied the murine embryo fibroblasts wild-type (pol {beta} +/+) and homozygous pol {beta} null cell (pol {beta} -/-) as a model to investigate ADM DNA-damaging effects and the molecular basis underlying these effects. Here, cellular sensitivity to ADM was examined using colorimetric assay and colony forming assay. ADM-induced cellular ROS level and the alteration of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were measured by commercial kits. Further, DNA strand break, chromosomal damage and gene mutation were assessed by comet assay, micronucleus test and hprt gene mutation assay, respectively. The results showed that pol {beta} -/- cells were more sensitive to ADM compared with pol {beta} +/+ cells and more severe SSB and chromosomal damage as well as higher hprt gene mutation frequency were observed in pol {beta} -/- cells. ROS level in pol {beta} -/- cells increased along with decreased activity of SOD. These results demonstrated that pol {beta} deficiency could enable ROS accumulation with SOD activity decrease, further elevate oxidative DNA damage, and subsequently result in SSB, chromosome cleavage as well as gene mutation, which may be partly responsible for the cytotoxicity of ADM and the hypersensitivity of pol {beta} -/- cells to ADM. These findings suggested that pol {beta} is vital for repairing oxidative damage induced by ADM.

Liu Shukun; Wu Mei [Department of Environmental Health, Sichuan University, West China School of Public Health, Chengdu (China); Zhang Zunzhen, E-mail: zhangzunzhen@163.co [Department of Environmental Health, Sichuan University, West China School of Public Health, Chengdu (China)

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Benzene's metabolites alter c-MYB activity via reactive oxygen species in HD3 cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Benzene is a known leukemogen that is metabolized to form reactive intermediates and reactive oxygen species (ROS). The c-Myb oncoprotein is a transcription factor that has a critical role in hematopoiesis. c-Myb transcript and protein have been overexpressed in a number of leukemias and cancers. Given c-Myb's role in hematopoiesis and leukemias, it is hypothesized that benzene interferes with the c-Myb signaling pathway and that this involves ROS. To investigate our hypothesis, we evaluated whether benzene, 1,4-benzoquinone, hydroquinone, phenol, and catechol generated ROS in chicken erythroblast HD3 cells, as measured by 5-(and-6)-chloromethyl-2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFDA) and dihydrorhodamine-123 (DHR-123), and whether the addition of 100 U/ml of the antioxidating enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) could prevent ROS generation. Reduced to oxidized glutathione ratios (GSH:GSSG) were also assessed as well as hydroquinone and benzoquinone's effects on c-Myb protein levels and activation of a transiently transfected reporter construct. Finally we attempted to abrogate benzene metabolite mediated increases in c-Myb activity with the use of SOD. We found that benzoquinone, hydroquinone, and catechol increased DCFDA fluorescence, increased DHR-123 fluorescence, decreased GSH:GSSG ratios, and increased reporter construct expression after 24 h of exposure. SOD was able to prevent DCFDA fluorescence and c-Myb activity caused by benzoquinone and hydroquinone only. These results are consistent with other studies, which suggest metabolite differences in benzene-mediated toxicity. More importantly, this study supports the hypothesis that benzene may mediate its toxicity through ROS-mediated alterations in the c-Myb signaling pathway.

Wan, Joanne [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Winn, Louise M. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada) and School of Environmental Studies, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: winnl@queensu.ca

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

177

Effects of bran from sorghum grains containing different classes and levels of bioactive compounds in colon carcinogenesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to test the dietary effects of bioactive compounds present in whole grains, we decided to observe the effect of varying types of sorghum bran on colon cancer promotion. We used 40 rats consuming diets containing 6% fiber from either cellulose or bran from white (contains phenolic acids), brown (contains tannins), or black (contains anthocyanins) sorghum (n=10). Diets were fed for 10 wk, during which two azoxymethane (AOM) injections (15 mg/kg BW) were administered in wk 3 and 4. We observed that the total number of aberrant crypts (AC) and high multiplicity aberrant crypt foci (HMACF) were lower in rats consuming black (p sorghum diets when compared to the cellulose diet, and that these decreases were an inverse function of diet antioxidant activity (ABTS). These observations led us to evaluate the effect of these diets on endogenous enzymatic activities (superoxide dismutase, SOD; catalase, CAT; and glutathione peroxidase, GPx), redox status as measured by reduced and oxidized glutathione, and cell cycle processes, proliferation and apoptosis, in the rat colon. Total SOD activity was higher (p sorghum when compared to all other diets. A similar, but not significant, trend occurred in mitochondrial SOD. The white sorghum diet had enhanced (p sorghum diets were intermediate. Finally, all sorghum diets suppressed GPx activity relative to cellulose (p sorghum fed rats had a lower proliferative index (p sorghum rats were intermediate. Apoptotic index was highest in brown sorghum rats compared to cellulose (p sorghum diets were intermediate. These data suggest that the suppression of AC and HMACF formation in rats consuming sorghum bran may have resulted through the differential actions of the sorghum brans on endogenous antioxidant enzymes, which may affect colonocyte proliferation and apoptosis.

Lewis, Jayme Beth

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Cadmium induces autophagy through ROS-dependent activation of the LKB1-AMPK signaling in skin epidermal cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cadmium is a toxic heavy metal which is environmentally and occupationally relevant. The mechanisms underlying cadmium-induced autophagy are not yet completely understood. The present study shows that cadmium induces autophagy, as demonstrated by the increase of LC3-II formation and the GFP-LC3 puncta cells. The induction of autophagosomes was directly visualized by electron microscopy in cadmium-exposed skin epidermal cells. Blockage of LKB1 or AMPK by siRNA transfection suppressed cadmium-induced autophagy. Cadmium-induced autophagy was inhibited in dominant-negative AMPK-transfected cells, whereas it was accelerated in cells transfected with the constitutively active form of AMPK. mTOR signaling, a negative regulator of autophagy, was downregulated in cadmium-exposed cells. In addition, cadmium generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) at relatively low levels, and caused poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP) activation and ATP depletion. Inhibition of PARP by pharmacological inhibitors or its siRNA transfection suppressed ATP reduction and autophagy in cadmium-exposed cells. Furthermore, cadmium-induced autophagy signaling was attenuated by either exogenous addition of catalase and superoxide dismutase, or by overexpression of these enzymes. Consequently, these results suggest that cadmium-mediated ROS generation causes PARP activation and energy depletion, and eventually induces autophagy through the activation of LKB1-AMPK signaling and the down-regulation of mTOR in skin epidermal cells. - Highlights: > Cadmium, a toxic heavy metal, induces autophagic cell death through ROS-dependent activation of the LKB1-AMPK signaling. > Cadmium generates intracellular ROS at low levels and this leads to severe DNA damage and PARP activation, resulting in ATP depletion, which are the upstream events of LKB1-AMPK-mediated autophagy. > This novel finding may contribute to further understanding of cadmium-mediated diseases.

Son, Young-Ok; Wang Xin; Hitron, John Andrew [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0305 (United States); Zhang Zhuo [Department of Preventive Medicine and Environmental Health, College of Public Health, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0305 (United States); Cheng Senping; Budhraja, Amit; Ding Songze [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0305 (United States); Lee, Jeong-Chae [Institute of Oral Biosciences and BK21 Program, Research Center of Bioactive Materials, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Shi Xianglin, E-mail: xshi5@email.uky.edu [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0305 (United States)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

179

Reactive oxygen species mediate arsenic induced cell transformation and tumorigenesis through Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway in human colorectal adenocarcinoma DLD1 cells  

SciTech Connect

Long term exposure to arsenic can increase incidence of human cancers, such as skin, lung, and colon rectum. The mechanism of arsenic induced carcinogenesis is still unclear. It is generally believed that reactive oxygen species (ROS) may play an important role in this process. In the present study, we investigate the possible linkage between ROS, {beta}-catenin and arsenic induced transformation and tumorigenesis in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line, DLD1 cells. Our results show that arsenic was able to activate p47{sup phox} and p67{sup phox}, two key proteins for activation of NADPH oxidase. Arsenic was also able to generate ROS in DLD1 cells. Arsenic increased {beta}-catenin expression level and its promoter activity. ROS played a major role in arsenic-induced {beta}-catenin activation. Treatment of DLD1 cells by arsenic enhanced both transformation and tumorigenesis of these cells. The tumor volumes of arsenic treated group were much larger than those without arsenic treatment. Addition of either superoxide dismutase (SOD) or catalase reduced arsenic induced cell transformation and tumor formation. The results indicate that ROS are involved in arsenic induced cell transformation and tumor formation possible through Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line DLD1 cells. - Highlights: > Arsenic activates NADPH oxidase and increases reactive oxygen species generation in DLD1 cells. > Arsenic increases {beta}-catenin expression. > Inhibition of ROS induced by arsenic reduce {beta}-catenin expression. > Arsenic increases cell transformation in DLD1 cells and tumorigenesis in nude mice. > Blockage of ROS decrease cell transformation and tumorigenesis induced by arsenic.

Zhang Zhuo [Department of Preventive Medicine and Environmental Health, University of Kentucky, 121 Washington Avenue, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Wang Xin; Cheng Senping; Sun Lijuan; Son, Young-Ok [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Yao Hua [Department of Stomatology, The First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310003 (China); Li Wenqi [Department of Preventive Medicine and Environmental Health, University of Kentucky, 121 Washington Avenue, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Budhraja, Amit [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Li Li [Department of Family Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Shelton, Brent J.; Tucker, Thomas [Markey Cancer Control Program, University of Kentucky, 2365 Harrodsburg Rd, Lexington, KY 40504 (United States); Arnold, Susanne M. [Markey Cancer Center, University of Kentucky, 800 Rose street, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Shi Xianglin, E-mail: Xianglin.sh@uky.edu [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

180

Diffusion Modeling for Third Generation Advanced High Strength ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and austenite stabilization results from carbon and manganese enrichment. ... Study of Phase Stability and Thermodynamic Properties of Uranium Nitride.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese superoxide dismutase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Available Technologies: Ceramic-Metal Composites for ...  

Renewable Energy; Environmental ... tin, silicon, antimony etc., and ... Batteries with Orthorhombic Sodium Manganese Oxide Cathodes, IB-1009 High Power Performance ...

182

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... known as 'antiferromagnetic coupling,' in which manganese (Mn) atoms in successive magnetic layers spontaneously orient their magnetization in ...

183

Designing Crushing and Grinding Circuits for Improved Energy ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Crushing and grinding, or comminution, circuits are the most ... Materialization of Manganese by Selective Precipitation from Used Battery.

184

Ductile aluminide alloys for high temperature applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Alloys are described which contain nickel, aluminum, boron, iron and in some instances manganese, niobium and titanium.

Liu, Chain T. (Oak Ridge, TN); Koch, Carl C. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Oxide Skin Strength Measurements on Molten Aluminum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, OXIDE SKIN STRENGTH MEASUREMENTS ON MOLTEN ALUMINUM MANGANESE ALLOYS WITH AND WITHOUT SALT ON SURFACE

186

Cast B2-phase iron-aluminum alloys with improved fluidity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Systems and methods are described for iron aluminum alloys. A composition includes iron, aluminum and manganese. A method includes providing an alloy including iron, aluminum and manganese; and processing the alloy. The systems and methods provide advantages because additions of manganese to iron aluminum alloys dramatically increase the fluidity of the alloys prior to solidification during casting.

Maziasz, Philip J. (122 Clark La., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Paris, Alan M. (P.O. Box 64, Tarrs, PA 15688); Vought, Joseph D. (124 Cove Point Rd., Rockwood, TN 37854)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Rac1b and reactive oxygen species mediate MMP-3-induced EMT and genomic instability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. A. et al. Cell transformation by the superoxide-generating oxidase Mox1. Nature 401, 79­-82 (1999

Nelson, Celeste M.

188

FISSION PRODUCT REMOVAL FROM ORGANIC SOLUTIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The decontamination of organic solvents from fission products and in particular the treatment of solvents that were used for the extraction of uranium and/or plutonium from aqueous acid solutions of neutron-irradiated uranium are treated. The process broadly comprises heating manganese carbonate in air to a temperature of between 300 and 500 deg C whereby manganese dioxide is formed; mixing the manganese dioxide with the fission product-containing organic solvent to be treated whereby the fission products are precipitated on the manganese dioxide; and separating the fission product-containing manganese dioxide from the solvent.

Moore, R.H.

1960-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

189

BNL CRCR Principal Investigators  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

dismutase and model compounds. Andrew R. Cook Excited state structure, dynamics and electron transfer reactions of a variety of organic radicals in both low temperature...

190

Analysis of genes regulated by the peroxide response regulator PerR in Borrelia burgdorferi using real-time RT-PCR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, the etiologic agent of Lyme disease, is a spirochetal bacterium that is transmitted to mammals via the bite of an Ixodes tick. The environments that the bacterium is exposed to when it resides in the tick and mammal are quite disparate and include differences in temperature, pH, and oxygen concentration. Although it has been shown that the aforementioned factors alter gene expression, few regulatory proteins have been identified in the B. burgdorferi genome. bb0647 encodes a peroxide response regulator (PerR) which regulates gene expression in response to oxidative stress in other organisms. Several borrelial genes with homology to known oxidative stress genes, and the pathogenesis-associated gene dbpA, contain putative PerR binding domains. To determine if PerR regulates the expression of oxidative stress genes in B. burgdorferi, we inactivated perR from a non-infectious B. burgdorferi strain (designated Lab), creating strain JS167. JS167 is hyper-resistant to reactive oxygen species and has increased superoxide dismutase activity compared to the Lab parental strain. JS167 makes four-fold more DbpA protein than Lab. We analyzed the expression of two oxidative stress genes, napA and sodA, and dbpA using real-time RT-PCR in JS167 and the infectious isolate MSK5 compared to Lab. We found napA and dbpA were induced 1.13-fold and 2.89-fold in JS167 compared to Lab, and sodA was induced 1.78-fold more in Lab than in JS167. The napA and sodA results indicate that the hyper-resistance of JS167 to reactive oxygen species is not due to the up-regulation of these two genes. MSK5 contains all known borrelial plasmids, and we therefore expect that gene expression be more tightly regulated in this strain compared to Lab. dbpA and sodA were expressed 3.48-fold and 1.25-fold more in Lab than in MSK5 and napA was expressed 1.38-fold more in MSK5. The low level of expression of dbpA in MSK5 does not correspond to DbpA protein levels in this isolate. Further studies addressing the effect of different oxygen concentrations and/or the presence of different oxidative stressors are needed to determine how these genes are regulated in response to oxidative stress.

Swingle, Kristen Lynn

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Alloy Modification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...Ilmenite Alumina Silica flour Iron powder Fluorspar Feldspar Manganese dioxide Asbestos (up to 50%) was used as a slag former, but has been phased

192

A Novel Process for Recovering Valuable Materials from Spent ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The positive electrode of the lithium-ion secondary battery is mainly made of lithium oxide as well as cobalt, nickel, manganese, etc. Thus, an effective recycling...

193

Ferrous Alloys: Steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 6, 2013 ... Microstructure and Properties of Low Manganese API X70 Pipeline Steel ... the mean residual relative length change (MRRLC) is 0.1310-5.

194

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

proposes to develop and scaleup high energy density lithium ion batteries using nano silicon-carbon composite anodes and high capacity manganese rich layered-layered...

195

Summary of the Research Progress Meeting April 1, 1948  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

manganese, chromium, and chlorine) were-in all cases exceptactivity was fOUQd in the chlorine fraction; the yield of (

Folden, Margaret Foss

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dioxins and furans, HCl, chlorine gas, Pb, manganese, andas calorific value and chlorine, ash, and trace element (influence setting time Chlorine, sulfur, and alkali, which

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

The Challenge of Allocation in LCA - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One common challenge in LCA stems from allocation of burden when multiple ... Materialization of Manganese by Selective Precipitation from Used Battery.

198

Depth through Breadth: Addressing the Grand Challenges of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Materialization of Manganese by Selective Precipitation from Used Battery Materials ... The Challenge of Allocation in LCA: The Case of Open-Loop Recycling.

199

Lighweight Materials for the Automotive: Environmental Impact ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An extensive life cycle analysis for a reference car design was conducted to study ... Materialization of Manganese by Selective Precipitation from Used Battery.

200

European Recycling Platform Experiences from a New Venture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Materialization of Manganese by Selective Precipitation from Used Battery Materials ... The Challenge of Allocation in LCA: The Case of Open-Loop Recycling.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese superoxide dismutase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Motivating Sustainable Material Use through Industry-Level ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Materialization of Manganese by Selective Precipitation from Used Battery Materials ... The Challenge of Allocation in LCA: The Case of Open-Loop Recycling.

202

'Slag Valorisation', as an Example of High Temperature Industrial ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Materialization of Manganese by Selective Precipitation from Used Battery Materials ... The Challenge of Allocation in LCA: The Case of Open-Loop Recycling.

203

Mechanical and Chemical Development of Alkali Activated Slag ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Materialization of Manganese by Selective Precipitation from Used Battery Materials ... The Challenge of Allocation in LCA: The Case of Open-Loop Recycling.

204

A Collaborative Tool for Waste Management in the Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Materialization of Manganese by Selective Precipitation from Used Battery Materials ... The Challenge of Allocation in LCA: The Case of Open-Loop Recycling.

205

S5, Control of III-V Nanowire Epitaxy by Precursor Chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have also investigated the effects of carbon doping with CBr4 dopant. ... DD7, Manganese-Doping of Group IV Semiconductor Surfaces and...

206

Double perovskite catalysts for oxidative coupling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Alkali metal doped double perovskites containing manganese and at least one of cobalt, iron and nickel are useful in the oxidative coupling of alkane to higher hydrocarbons.

Campbell, K.D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Preparation of Nickel Sulfate from Spent Nickel-Cadmium Batteries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 1, 2000 ... Preparation of Nickel Sulfate from Spent Nickel-Cadmium Batteries ... process could remove other impurities such as zinc and manganese.

208

Characterization of Non-Ferrous Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 1, 2011 ... Grooved cast Pb-Ag anodes are used by some zinc refineries to improve current efficiency. The manganese oxide scale formed on a grooved...

209

EPNews2009Winter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

are arsenic, iron, magnesium, chromium, zinc, boron, barium, selenium, and manganese. Oil shale produced waters are typically derived from retorting, mine drainage, and leachate...

210

Iron-Carbon Nuggets Coalescence: Influence of Slag's ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Researches on Reduction Roasting of Low-grade Manganese Oxide Ores Using Biomass Charcoal as Reductant Simulations for Optimising Plant Flowsheets...

211

Embracing Sustainability in the Materials Engineering Curriculum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

2010 Vittorio de Nora Award Winner: Designing Crushing and Grinding Circuits for ... Materialization of Manganese by Selective Precipitation from Used Battery.

212

Critical and Strategic Failure of Rare Earth Resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

2010 Vittorio de Nora Award Winner: Designing Crushing and Grinding Circuits for ... Materialization of Manganese by Selective Precipitation from Used Battery.

213

Practicing Informed Substitution of Restricted Materials in Electronic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

2010 Vittorio de Nora Award Winner: Designing Crushing and Grinding Circuits for ... Materialization of Manganese by Selective Precipitation from Used Battery.

214

Sustainable Electrolysis for Electrowinning and Electrorefining of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

2010 Vittorio de Nora Award Winner: Designing Crushing and Grinding Circuits for ... Materialization of Manganese by Selective Precipitation from Used Battery.

215

Ceramics for Life in Rural Africa: A TMS Grant Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

2010 Vittorio de Nora Award Winner: Designing Crushing and Grinding Circuits for ... Materialization of Manganese by Selective Precipitation from Used Battery.

216

Assessing Global Metals Flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

2010 Vittorio de Nora Award Winner: Designing Crushing and Grinding Circuits for ... Materialization of Manganese by Selective Precipitation from Used Battery.

217

Toxicity and Resource Depletion Potentials of Light-Emitting Diodes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

2010 Vittorio de Nora Award Winner: Designing Crushing and Grinding Circuits for ... Materialization of Manganese by Selective Precipitation from Used Battery.

218

Lightweight Structural Concrete Incorporating Volcanic Materials for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

2010 Vittorio de Nora Award Winner: Designing Crushing and Grinding Circuits for ... Materialization of Manganese by Selective Precipitation from Used Battery.

219

A Framework and a New Paradigm for Sustainable Materials ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

2010 Vittorio de Nora Award Winner: Designing Crushing and Grinding Circuits for ... Materialization of Manganese by Selective Precipitation from Used Battery.

220

Agent Based Modeling of Large-Scale Socio-Technical Metal ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

2010 Vittorio de Nora Award Winner: Designing Crushing and Grinding Circuits for ... Materialization of Manganese by Selective Precipitation from Used Battery.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese superoxide dismutase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

New Process for Separation and Recovery of Platinum Group Metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

2010 Vittorio de Nora Award Winner: Designing Crushing and Grinding Circuits for ... Materialization of Manganese by Selective Precipitation from Used Battery.

222

Engagement is an Essential Skill in the 21st Century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

2010 Vittorio de Nora Award Winner: Designing Crushing and Grinding Circuits for ... Materialization of Manganese by Selective Precipitation from Used Battery.

223

List of common materials available for ESTAR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 20 Calcium 21 Scandium 22 Titanium 23 Vanadium 24 Chromium 25 Manganese 26 Iron 27 Cobalt 28 Nickel 29 Copper 30 Zinc 31 Gallium 32 ...

224

NIST: Basic Atomic Spectroscopic Data - Atomic Number  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 20 Calcium 21 Scandium 22 Titanium 23 Vanadium 24 Chromium 25 Manganese 26 Iron 27 Cobalt 28 Nickel 29 Copper 30 Zinc 31 Gallium 32 ...

225

Roasting, Reduction and Smelting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 6, 2013 ... Researches on Reduction Roasting of Low-grade Manganese Oxide Ores Using Biomass Charcoal as Reductant: Yuanbo Zhang1; Daoxian...

226

Met and Mat Trans Contents B: February 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Leaching of Marine Manganese Nodules by Acidophilic Bacteria Growing on ... Precipitation of Commercial 3003 Al Alloys Studied by Thermoelectric Power [pp.

227

Simulations for Optimising Plant Flowsheets for Brownfield ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... (breakdowns) shutdowns in the various parts of the plant and supply chain. .... of Low-grade Manganese Oxide Ores Using Biomass Charcoal as Reductant.

228

Novel Magnetic Material Operates under Extreme Stress Conditions...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

oxide insulator composed of nickel, manganese, lanthanum, and oxygen atoms where electron mobility is limited. While most transition-metal monoxides do not possess net...

229

ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL RESEARCH, ANNUAL REPORT 1976-77  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DIVISION ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL RESEARCH ANNUAL REPORTLow-Z Elements in Atmospheric Aerosol Particles by Nuclearof sulfur dioxide by aerosols of manganese sulfate," Ind.

Novakov, T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Bryant C. Nelson  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... to production of AgNP-induced superoxide radical. The presence of persistent oxidative stress will induce a quantifiable change in energy status of ...

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

231

Method for refining contaminated iridium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Contaminated iridium is refined by alloying it with an alloying agent selected from the group consisting of manganese and an alloy of manganese and copper, and then dissolving the alloying agent from the formed alloy to provide a purified iridium powder.

Heshmatpour, Bahman (Waltham, MA); Heestand, Richard L. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Superacid catalysis of light hydrocarbon conversion. Ninth quarterly report, October 1, 1995--December 31, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Transition metal promoters of sulfated zirconia increase its catalytic activity for the conversion of n-butane. The promoter effects vary from one transition metal to another in the family zinc, iron, nickel, cobalt, and manganese. The most active catalyst so far tested is promoted by both iron and manganese. This catalyst is two or more orders of magnitude more active than unpromoted sulfated zirconia. The manganese promoter alone markedly increases the catalytic activity, but the activity declines very rapidly with time on stream in the flow reactor. Under the same experimental conditions, iron has a smaller but longer-lasting effect as a promoter than manganese, and to a first approximation, the iron- and manganese-promoted catalyst shows a behavior that is a superposition of those of the two individual promoters.

Gates, B.C. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

233

Molten salt extraction process for the recovery of valued transition metals from land-based and deep-sea minerals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for extracting transition metals and particularly cobalt and manganese together with iron, copper and nickel from low grade ores (including ocean-floor nodules) by converting the metal oxides or other compositions to chlorides in a molten salt, and subsequently using a combination of selective distillation at temperatures below about 500.degree. C., electrolysis at a voltage not more negative than about -1.5 volt versus Ag/AgCl, and precipitation to separate the desired manganese and cobalt salts from other metals and provide cobalt and manganese in metallic forms or compositions from which these metals may be more easily recovered.

Maroni, Victor A. (Naperville, IL); von Winbush, Samuel (Huntington, NY)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Molten salt extraction process for the recovery of valued transition metals from land-based and deep-sea minerals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for extracting transition metals and particularly cobalt and manganese together with iron, copper and nickel from low grade ores (including ocean-floor nodules) by converting the metal oxides or other compositions to chlorides in a molten salt, and subsequently using a combination of selective distillation at temperatures below about 500/degree/C, electrolysis at a voltage not more negative that about /minus/1.5 volt versus Ag/AgCl, and precipitation to separate the desired manganese and cobalt salts from other metals and provide cobalt and manganese in metallic forms or compositions from which these metals may be more easily recovered.

Maroni, V.A.; von Winbush, S.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Sorbent for use in hot gas desulfurization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multiple metal oxide sorbent supported on a zeolite of substantially silicon oxide is used for the desulfurization of process gas streams, such as from a coal gasifier, at temperatures in the range of about 1200.degree. to about 1600.degree. F. The sorbent is provided by a mixture of copper oxide and manganese oxide and preferably such a mixture with molybdenum oxide. The manganese oxide and the molybdenum are believed to function as promoters for the reaction of hydrogen sulfide with copper oxide. Also, the manganese oxide inhibits the volatilization of the molybdenum oxide at the higher temperatures.

Gasper-Galvin, Lee D. (Washington, PA); Atimtay, Aysel T. (Cankaya, TR)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Hot gas desulfurization sorbent and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multiple metal oxide sorbent supported on a zeolite of substantially silicon oxide is used for the desulfurization of process gas streams, such as from a coal gasifier, at temperatures in the range of about 1200{degrees} to about 1600{degrees}F. The sorbent is provided by a mixture of copper oxide and manganese oxide and preferably such a mixture with molybdenum oxide. The manganese oxide and the molybdenum are believed to function as promoters for the reaction of hydrogen sulfide with copper oxide. Also, the manganese oxide inhibits the volatilization of the molybdenum oxide at the higher temperatures.

Gasper-Galvin, L.D.; Atimtay, A.T.

1991-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

237

Hot gas desulfurization sorbent and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multiple metal oxide sorbent supported on a zeolite of substantially silicon oxide is used for the desulfurization of process gas streams, such as from a coal gasifier, at temperatures in the range of about 1200[degrees] to about 1600[degrees]F. The sorbent is provided by a mixture of copper oxide and manganese oxide and preferably such a mixture with molybdenum oxide. The manganese oxide and the molybdenum are believed to function as promoters for the reaction of hydrogen sulfide with copper oxide. Also, the manganese oxide inhibits the volatilization of the molybdenum oxide at the higher temperatures.

Gasper-Galvin, L.D.; Atimtay, A.T.

1991-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

238

Mitochondrial-Derived Oxidants and Cellular Responses to Low Dose/Low LET Ionizing Radiation  

SciTech Connect

Exposure to ionizing radiation results in the immediate formation of free radicals and other reactive oxygen species (ROS). It has been assumed that the subsequent injury processes leading to genomic instability and carcinogenesis following radiation, derive from the initial oxidative damage caused by these free radicals and ROS. It is now becoming increasingly obvious that metabolic oxidation/reduction (redox) reactions can be altered by irradiation leading to persistent increases in steady-state levels of intracellular free radicals and ROS that contribute to the long term biological effects of radiation exposure by causing chronic oxidative stress. The objective during the last period of support (DE-FG02-05ER64050; 5/15/05-12/31/09) was to determine the involvement of mitochondrial genetic defects in metabolic oxidative stress and the biological effects of low dose/low LET radiation. Aim 1 was to determine if cells with mutations in succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) subunits C and D (SDHC and SDHD in mitochondrial complex II) demonstrated increases in steady-state levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS; O2- and H2O2) as well as demonstrating increased sensitivity to low dose/low LET radiation (10 cGy) in cultured mammalian cells. Aim #2 was to determine if mitochondrially-derived ROS contributed to increased sensitivity to low dose/low LET radiation in mammalian cells containing mutations in SDH subunits. Aim #3 was to determine if a causal relationship existed between increases in mitochondrial ROS production, alterations in electron transport chain proteins, and genomic instability in the progeny of irradiated cells. Evidence gathered in the 2005-2009 period of support demonstrated that mutations in genes coding for mitochondrial electron transport chain proteins (ETC); either Succinate Dehydrogenase (SDH) subunit C (SDHC) or subunit D (SDHD); caused increased ROS production, increased genomic instability, and increased sensitivity to low dose/low LET radiation that could be mitigated by over expression of the H2O2 metabolizing enzyme, catalase, and/or the mitochondrial form of superoxide dismutase (MnSOD). Furthermore, using radiation-induced genomically unstable cells, it was shown that steady-state levels of H2O2 were significantly elevated for many cell generations following exposure, catalase suppressed the radiation-induced mutator phenotype when added long after radiation exposure, unstable clones showed evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction some of which was characterized by improper assembly of SDH subunits (particularly subunit B), and chemical inhibitors of SDH activity could decrease steady-state levels of H2O2 as well as mutation frequency. These results support the hypotheses that 1) SDH mutations could contribute to transformation by inducing genomic instability and a mutator phenotype via increasing steady-state levels of ROS; 2) metabolic sources of O2- and H2O2 play a significant role in low dose radiation induced injury and genomic instability; and 3) increased mutation rates in irradiated mammal cells can be suppressed by scavengers of H2O2 (particularly catalase) long after radiation exposure. Overall the results obtained during this period of support provide clear evidence in support of the hypothesis that abnormal oxidative metabolism in mitochondria that result in increases in steady-sate levels of H2O2 and other ROS are capable of significantly contributing to radiation-induced mutator phenotypes in mammalian cells.

Spitz, Douglas R.

2009-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

239

Li4Ti5O12 as an anode material for Li ion batteries in situ XRD and XPS studies.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This thesis examines parts of the kinetics and performance in Li-battery cells using lithium titanate anodes and lithium manganese oxide cathodes. Lithium titanate (Li4Ti5O12) (more)

Nordh, Tim

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Constraining oceanic dust deposition using surface ocean dissolved Al  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Iron, manganese and lead at Hawaii Ocean Time-series stationof beryllium to the oceans, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. , 114,organic carbon fluxes in the ocean based on the quantitative

Han, Qin; Moore, J. Keith; Zender, Charles; Measures, Chris; Hydes, David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese superoxide dismutase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

A New Copper Smelting Technology Bottom Blown Oxygen ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of Low-grade Manganese Oxide Ores Using Biomass Charcoal as Reductant ... of Carbon-Coated LiNi1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2 Via Microwave-pyrolysis Method.

242

AOCS Official Method Ca 18-79  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis for Chromium, Copper, Iron, Nickel, and Manganese in Triglyceride Oils by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry Using a Graphite Furnace AOCS Official Method Ca 18-79 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods D

243

High Efficiency New Metallurgical Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 12, 2012 ... Investigation of Pyrometallurgical Nickel Pig Iron (NPI) Production Process ... Manganese is mainly consumed by steel and battery industries. ... Hydrothermal Sulfidation of Carbonate-Hosted Zinc-Lead Ore with Elemental...

244

Electrode, Ceramic, Optical, Spintronic, and Coating Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 3, 2011 ... Acidic and alkaline bath were used for the electroless nickel plating. ... materials for rechargeable lithium ion batteries due to their low costs, environmental ... Transparent Conductive Properties of Manganese Zinc Oxide Film...

245

Long-Range Tropospheric Transport of Pollution Aerosols into the Alaskan Arctic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Noncrustal vanadium and manganese are used as chemical tracers for pollution-derived aerosols (collected over a period of four years in the near-surface air at Barrow, Alaska), in order to investigate tropospheric long-range transport of ...

Wolfgang E. Raatz; Glenn E. Shaw

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Process for removing technetium from iron and other metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing technetium from iron and other metals comprises the steps of converting the molten, alloyed technetium to a sulfide dissolved in manganese sulfide, and removing the sulfide from the molten metal as a slag. 4 figs.

Leitnaker, J.M.; Trowbridge, L.D.

1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

247

Process for removing technetium from iron and other metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing technetium from iron and other metals comprises the steps of converting the molten, alloyed technetium to a sulfide dissolved in manganese sulfide, and removing the sulfide from the molten metal as a slag.

Leitnaker, James M. (Kingston, TN); Trowbridge, Lee D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Synthesis, characterization, and microwave-absorbing properties of polypyrrole/MnFe2O4 nanocomposite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conductive polypyrrole (PPy)-manganese ferrite (MnFe2O4) nanocomposites with core-shell structure were synthesized by in situ polymerization in the presence of dodecyl benzene sulfonic acid (DBSA) as the surfactant and dopant and ...

Seyed Hossein Hosseini; Ahmad Asadnia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Environmental Radioactivity in Denmark in 1983  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; FOOD; FOOD CHAINS; GLOBAL FALLOUT; GROUND WATER; LOCAL FALLOUT; MAN; MANGANESE 54; MILK; PLANTS at Ringhals 25 4. FALLOUT NUCLIDES IN THE ABIOTIC ENVIRONMENT 33 4.1. Air 33 4 . 1 . 1 . Strontium-90 33 4 . 1

250

LA-14445-ENV Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.................................................................................................................................5-70 8. White Rock Canyon Springs ................................................................................................................................... 7-6 5. TAL Elements: Follow-up of 2009 Results of Soil Manganese at Two Mile Mesa at TA-6

251

Room 12-065 (Chemistry Lab, Phone : (617) 258-6154) Room 13-5037 (Nanomechanics Lab, Phone : (617) 253-8779)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into a radiation dose reading. Commonly used crystals are calcium fluoride-manganese and lithium fluoride. Sandia Facilities Restoration and Reuse Office. Both EPA Region IV and X have released policy documents on the use

Ortiz, Christine

252

Information Circular INFCIRC/254/Rev.9/Part 1a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into a radiation dose reading. Commonly used crystals are calcium fluoride-manganese and lithium fluoride. Sandia Facilities Restoration and Reuse Office. Both EPA Region IV and X have released policy documents on the use

253

Scalable Routes to Efficient Thermoelectric Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

extinction coefficient of CdTe, CdSe, and CdS nanocrystals,"contraction in free-standing CdSe nanocrystals," Appliedof manganese- doped CdSe nanocrystals," Journal of the

Feser, Joseph Patrick

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

untitled  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

composition of 8020LSM at 0.3M concentration was prepared, with 2-methoxyethanol and acetic acid as solvents, and strontium acetate and manganese acetate as metal organic...

255

Metal phthalocyanine catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

As a new composition of matter, alkali metal or ammonium or tetraalkylammonium diazidoperfluorophthalocyanatoferrate. Other embodiments of the invention comprise compositions wherein the metal of the coordination complex is cobalt, manganese and chromium.

Ellis, Jr., Paul E. (Downingtown, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Metal phthalocyanine catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new composition of matter is described which is an alkali metal or ammonium or tetraalkylammonium diazidoperfluorophthalocyanatoferrate. Other embodiments of the invention comprise compositions wherein the metal of the coordination complex is cobalt, manganese and chromium.

Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Lyons, J.E.

1994-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

257

Copper-base alloy for liquid phase sintering of ferrous powders  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A copper-base alloy composition consisting essentially of 85 - 89% copper, 2 - 4% manganese, and 8 - 11% silicon and use of same in liquid phase sintering of ferrous powders.

Wang, John L. (San Francisco, CA); Pickus, Milton R. (Oakland, CA); Chen, Meng-Hsiu (San Francisco, CA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Effects of Mn Doping on the Dielectric Properties of Nnanostructured ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to further improve the insulation resistance, manganese (Mn) was introduced (0.005 at%-1.0 at%) into the TiO2 system by a powder coating process...

259

Catalytic properties, densification and mechanical properties of nanocrystalline yttria-zirconia-based materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alumina, titania, ceria and manganese oxide were either coated onto or doped in cubic 7 mol% Y203-ZrO2 (7YZ) nanocrystals to form nanocomposites for methane combustion. These novel catalysts were very active and thermally ...

Cui, Jianyi

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

SLIDESHOW: The Energy Department Goes to New York Energy Week...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

that was developed with funding from ARPA-E. At half the weight and five times the life of a lead acid battery, the zinc-manganese dioxide battery is a larger, rechargeable...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese superoxide dismutase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

The Energy Department Goes to New York Energy Week | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

that was developed with funding from ARPA-E. At half the weight and five times the life of a lead acid battery, the zinc-manganese dioxide battery is a larger, rechargeable...

262

Electrochemical in-situ reaction cell for X-ray scattering, diffraction and spectroscopy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An electrochemical in-situ reaction cell for hard X-ray experiments with battery electrodes is described. Applications include the small angle scattering, diffraction, and near-edge spectroscopy of lithium manganese oxide electrodes.

Braun, Artur; Granlund, Eric; Cairns, Elton J.

2003-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

263

K463 -Savernake Refurbishment University of the Witwatersrand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

not been high it has been significant. Future packs are being made using push-in connectors designed the connectors rather thanby hand crimping operations. VII. CONCLUSIONS The use of manganese alkaline batteries

264

DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY EC 1110-2-6066 U.S. Army Corps of Engineers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

not been high it has been significant. Future packs are being made using push-in connectors designed the connectors rather thanby hand crimping operations. VII. CONCLUSIONS The use of manganese alkaline batteries

US Army Corps of Engineers

265

Minerals yearbook: Mineral industries of Africa. Volume 3. 1992 international review  

SciTech Connect

The 53 countries that constituted Africa in 1992 accounted for a significant portion of total world output of a number of mineral commodities. Among the most significant mineral commodities produced in Africa were andalusite, antimony, asbestos, bauxite, chromite, coal, cobalt, copper, diamond, fluorspar, gold, lithium minerals, manganese, phosphate, platinum-group metals, the titanium minerals-ilmenite and rutile, vanadium, vermiculite, uranium, and zircon. Chromite, cobalt, and manganese, were not mined in the Untied States.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Minerals yearbook: Mineral industries of Africa. Volume 3. 1990 international review  

SciTech Connect

The 53 countries that constituted Africa in 1990 accounted for a significant portion of total world output of a number of mineral commodities. Among the most significant to be produced in Africa were andalusite, antimony, asbestos, bauxite, chromite, coal, cobalt, copper, diamond, fluorspar, gold, lithium minerals, manganese, phosphate, platinum-group metals, the titanium minerals--ilmenite and rutile, vanadium, vermiculite, uranium, and zircon. Several of these, chromite, cobalt, diamond, and manganese, were not produced in the United States.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Genomic consequences of DNA oxidation by peroxynitrite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The radicals nitric oxide and superoxide are produced endogenously by activated macrophages and neutrophils and combine in a diffusion-limited reaction to form peroxynitrite, a powerful oxidizing and nitrating agent capable ...

Neeley, William Louis

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Condensed Toxicity Summary for MANGANESE Condensed Toxicity Summary for MANGANESE NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. July 1995 Prepared by A. A. Francis and C. Forsyth, Chemical Hazard Evaluation Group, Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis Section, Health Sciences Research Division, *, Oak Ridge, Tennessee Prepared for OAK RIDGE RESERVATION ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION PROGRAM *Managed by Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC05-84OR21400 Manganese is an essential trace element in humans that can elicit a variety of serious toxic responses upon prolonged exposure to elevated

269

It's Elemental - The Element Iron  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Manganese Manganese Previous Element (Manganese) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Cobalt) Cobalt The Element Iron [Click for Isotope Data] 26 Fe Iron 55.845 Atomic Number: 26 Atomic Weight: 55.845 Melting Point: 1811 K (1538°C or 2800°F) Boiling Point: 3134 K (2861°C or 5182°F) Density: 7.874 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 4 Group Number: 8 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Anglo-Saxon word iron. Iron's chemical symbol comes from the Latin word for iron, ferrum. Say what? Iron is pronounced as EYE-ern. History and Uses: Archaeological evidence suggests that people have been using iron for at least 5000 years. Iron is the cheapest and one of the most abundant of all metals, comprising nearly 5.6% of the earth's crust and nearly all of the

270

Investigation of layered intergrowth Li{sub x}M{sub y}Mn{sub 1-y}O{sub 2+z} (M=Ni,Co,Al) compounds as positive electrodes for Li-ion batteries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Layered substituted lithium manganese oxides suitable for use as lithium ion battery electrodes may be prepared from the corresponding sodium manganese metal oxide compounds by ion-exchange. Stacking arrangements (O2, O3, or O2/O3 intergrowths) in the lithiated materials are dependent upon the Na/transition metal ratio in the sodium-containing precursors, the degree of substitution, and the identity of the substituting metal. O3 layered materials deliver up to 200 mAh/g at moderate current densities in lithium cell configurations, but convert rapidly to spinels upon cell cycling, while O2 compounds are more stable but deliver less capacity. Intergrowths show intermediate behavior, with higher capacities than pure O2 materials and better phase stability than O3 compounds. Some intergrowth structures do not appear to convert to spinel during normal cycling, suggesting it may be possible to tailor high energy density, phase stable layered manganese oxide electrodes for lithium batteries.

Dolle, M.; Hollingsworth, J.; Richardson, T.J.; Doeff, M.M.

2003-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

271

Intramolecular ET in Ru-Modified MnCyt c  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tetraammine(L)ruthenium(III)-Modified Tetraammine(L)ruthenium(III)-Modified Manganocytochromes c Ji Sun and James F. Wishart Inorg. Chem. 37, 1124-1126 (1998) [Find paper at ACS Publications] or use ACS Articles on Request Abstract: Manganese-substituted horse heart cytochrome c was prepared by replacing the iron in the heme group according to established methods. The resulting manganicytochrome c was subsequently modified at histidine-33 with three ruthenium complexes trans-(NH3)4(L)Ru-His33, where L = NH3, pyridine or isonicotinamide. Proof of correct derivatization was obtained by atomic absorption analysis of manganese and ruthenium, differential pulse voltammetry and electrospray mass spectroscopy. Manganese(II)-to-ruthenium(III) intramolecular electron transfer rates were measured as a function of temperature by pulse radiolysis, using oxidation

272

SSRL HEADLINES August 2005  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 August, 2005 2 August, 2005 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - The Mighty Manganese Oxides Secretary of Energy Visits SLAC DOE BES Director of Materials Science Meets with SSRL and GLAM Scientists SSRL's Scientific Advisory Committee and Proposal Review Panel Convenes User Operations Update Update on SSRL Beam Lines and Techniques Nominations for SSRLUOEC and Registration for the Annual SSRL Users' Meeting & Workshops, October 15-19 Students and Teachers Visit SLAC August 10 4th Stanford-Berkeley Summer School for Physical Science Held June 2005 Got News? User Administration Update __________________________________________________________________________ 1. Science Highlight - The Mighty Manganese Oxides

273

Quantitative room-temperature mineralization of airborne formaldehyde using  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quantitative room-temperature mineralization of airborne formaldehyde using Quantitative room-temperature mineralization of airborne formaldehyde using manganese oxide catalysts Title Quantitative room-temperature mineralization of airborne formaldehyde using manganese oxide catalysts Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2011 Authors Sidheswaran, Meera A., Hugo Destaillats, Douglas P. Sullivan, Joern Larsen, and William J. Fisk Journal Applied Catalysis B - Environmental Issue 107 Pagination 34-41 Date Published 2011 Keywords commercial building ventilation & indoor environmental quality group, commercial building ventilation and indoor environmental quality group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, indoor environment department, indoor environment group DOI 10.1016/j.apcatb.2011.06.032 Attachment Size

274

Argonne CNM Highlight: Exploring the limits of antiferromagnetism in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

spin structure of manganese monolayer ; (Top) Schematic of the spin structure of the Mn monolayer on W(110) (6-nm repeat structure). (a) Topography and (b) differential conductance at 40 K. (Inset) High-resolution topographic data taken with a spin-sensitive tip; stripe contrast is related to the degree of antiferromagnetic order. Exploring the limits of antiferromagnetism in nanostructured materials Researchers in the Electronic & Magnetic Materials & Devices Group and at Politecnico di Milano in Italy explored the limits of antiferromagnetism in a nanostructured material for the first time, measuring the temperature required to support antiferromagnetic order in atomic monolayers of manganese on tungsten as the dimensions of the structures are reduced.

275

Autogenous electrolyte, non-pyrolytically produced solid capacitor structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This report discusses the design of a solid electrolytic capacitor having a solid electrolyte comprised of manganese dioxide dispersed in an aromatic polyamide capable of to forming polyimide linkages. This solid electrolyte being disposed between a first electrode made of valve metal covered by an anodic oxide film and a second electrode opposite the first electrode. The electrolyte autogenously produces water, oxygen, and hydroxyl groups which act as healing substances and is not itself produced pyrolytically. Reduction of the manganese dioxide and the water molecules released by formation of imide linkages result in substantially improved self-healing of anodic dielectric layer defects.

Sharp, D.J.; Armstrong, P.S.; Paintz, J.K.G.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Autogenous electrolyte, non-pyrolytically produced solid capacitor structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid electrolytic capacitor having a solid electrolyte comprising manganese dioxide dispersed in an aromatic polyamide capable of further cure to form polyimide linkages, the solid electrolyte being disposed between a first electrode made of valve metal covered by an anodic oxide film and a second electrode opposite the first electrode. The electrolyte autogenously produces water, oxygen, and hydroxyl groups which act as healing substances and is not itself produced pyrolytically. Reduction of the manganese dioxide and the water molecules released by formation of imide linkages result in substantially improved self-healing of anodic dielectric layer defects.

Sharp, Donald J. (Albuquerque, NM); Armstrong, Pamela S. (Abingdon, MD); Panitz, Janda Kirk G. (Edgewood, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Quantification of rapid environmental redox processes with quick-scanning x-ray absorption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

manganese oxide x-ray absorption near-edge structure kinetics In the environment, chemical reactions to determining chemical kinetic rate constants and reaction mechanisms, both of which are required to fully understand environmental chemical processes. Kinetic measurements with traditional techniques, such as batch

Sparks, Donald L.

278

William H. Schlesinger Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, Millbrook, NY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

used in drilling and fracking · Recent increase in permit fee to fund new DEP enforcement · Permit fluids ­ return fluids from fracking ­ mixture of water, sand and chemicals Production fluids ­ fluids, manganese, barium, arsenic, etc.) Surfactants/detergents Total suspended solids Oil/Grease Fracking

279

Absolute measurement of anti. nu. for /sup 252/Cf  

SciTech Connect

Neutron yields were determined by measuring the activities produced in the INEL manganese bath. Of the three fission methods used, the neutron-fission coincidence method was found to be the most consistent and reliable. The value of /sup 252/Cf anti ..nu.. obtained by these measurements was 3.764. (RWR)

Smith, J.R.; Reeder, S.D.; Gehrke, R.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Laboratory Measurements of Particle Capture by Evaporating Cloud Drops  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The capture efficiencies of evaporating cloud drops (5693 ?m radius) for particles of manganese hypophosphite (0.583.2 ?m radius) were obtained experimentally. In each experimental run, a large number of widely spaced uniform size drops fell ...

K. H. Leong; K. V. Beard; Harry T. Ochs III

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese superoxide dismutase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Nanowire properties DOI: 10.1002/smll.200500311  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and nanorods, as well as nanowires made of silicon carbide,[10] gold,[3] silver,[11] and manganese oxide,[12] a specimens and microscale fibers of diameter >5 mm. However, recent indirect mechanical characteriza- tion, material fibers or wires of nanometer-scale diameter exhibit much higher strength than the corresponding

Van Vliet, Krystyn J.

282

Battery-Driven System Design: A New Frontier in Low Power Design? yKanishka Lahiri zAnand Raghunathan ySujit Dey yDebashis Panigrahi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

" (carbon nanotubes, electrodes of lithium ion battery, intermetallic alloys) and "soft" (gaseous clusters of lithium ion battery Electronic structure of hydrogen in perovskite oxide Nagoya University, Nagoya, Japan Research associate (1997 ­ 2000) Lithium manganese/cobalt oxides as cathode materials of lithium ion

California at San Diego, University of

283

Synthesis and Characterization of MnO2-Based Mixed Oxides as Supercapacitors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Synthesis and Characterization of MnO2-Based Mixed Oxides as Supercapacitors Hansung Kim. Available electronically January 28, 2003. The development of a high-power-density supercapacitor made to develop supercapacitors based on non-noble oxides.13 Hydrous manganese oxide (a-MnO2 · nH2O

Popov, Branko N.

284

This is an author-deposited version published in: http://oatao.univ-toulouse.fr/ Eprints ID: 8673  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-capacitive supercapacitor. (2010) Electrochimica Acta, vol. 55 (n° 25). pp. 7454- 7459. ISSN 0013-4686 Open Archive Toulouse nanorods: Enhanced high rate behavior in pseudo-capacitive supercapacitor Y. Leia , B. Daffosb , P Paul Sabatier Toulouse 3, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 4, France Keywords: Supercapacitor Manganese dioxide

285

Nitrated metalloporphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Compositions of matter comprising nitro-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has nitro groups attached thereto in meso and/or [beta]-pyrrolic positions.

Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Lyons, J.E.

1994-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

286

Aluminum battery alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Aluminum alloys suitable for use as anode structures in electrochemical cells are disclosed. These alloys include iron levels higher than previously felt possible, due to the presence of controlled amounts of manganese, with possible additions of magnesium and controlled amounts of gallium.

Thompson, D.S.; Scott, D.H.

1984-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

287

Process for producing dimethyl ether form synthesis gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This invention pertains to a Fischer Tropsch process for converting synthesis gas to an oxygenated hydrocarbon with particular emphasis on dimethyl ether. Synthesis gas comprising carbon monoxide and hydrogen are converted to dimethyl ether by carrying out the reaction in the presence of an alkali metal-manganese-iron carbonyl cluster incorporated onto a zirconia-alumina support.

Pierantozzi, Ronald (Macungie, PA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Process for producing dimethyl ether from synthesis gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention pertains to a Fischer Tropsch process for converting synthesis gas to an oxygenated hydrocarbon with particular emphasis on dimethyl ether. Synthesis gas comprising carbon monoxide and hydrogen are converted to dimethyl ether by carrying out the reaction in the presence of an alkali metal-manganese-iron carbonyl cluster incorporated onto a zirconia-alumina support.

Pierantozzi, R.

1985-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

289

Start | View At a Glance | Author Index 219-5 Coupled Biotic and Abiotic Arsenite Oxidation Kinetics with Heterotrophic Soil Bacteria and a Poorly Crystalline  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kinetics with Heterotrophic Soil Bacteria and a Poorly Crystalline Manganese Oxide. See more from this Division: S02 Soil Chemistry See more from this Session: Chemistry of Metal(loids) and Trace Elements in Soils Tuesday, November 2, 2010: 9:15 AM Long Beach Convention Center, Room 202B, Second Floor L

Sparks, Donald L.

290

Cathode for the electrolytic production of hydrogen  

SciTech Connect

The invention relates to a cathode for the electrolytic production of hydrogen. The cathode comprises an active surface consisting of a metal oxide obtained by the thermal decomposition of a thermally decomposable compound of a metal chosen from amongst cobalt, iron, manganese or nickel. The cathode is particularly suitable for the electrolysis of aqueous sodium chloride solutions in cells with a permeable diaphragm.

Nicolas, E.

1983-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

291

dining news menu highlight  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in fat. It is also rich in B vitamins, iron, phosphorous, and manganese. As such, it complements, less fat, and more than twice the fiber than the same amount of rice! did you know? · YD's Guest Chef will include Southern Fried Chicken; Four Cheese Calzones; Cashew Chili; Blackened Catfish Fil- let; Southern

292

Thermal Characteristic Analysis of Power Lithium-ion Battery System for Electric Vehicle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the electric vehicles used lithium manganese lithium-ion power battery (LiMn2O4 power battery) as the research object, the paper researched on the parameter identification of battery cell, has built the finite element model of single cell and completed ... Keywords: Lithium-ion battery, Thermal characteristic analysis, Electric Vehicle

Wang Wenwei; Lin Cheng; Tang Peng; Zhou Chengjun

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

-DK;^5c>ook>o Environmental Radioactivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; DRINKING WATER; ENVIRONMENT; FALL- OUT DEPOSITS; FISHES; FOOD; FOOD CHAINS; GLOBAL FALLOUT; GROUND WATER; LOCAL FALLOUT; MAN; MANGANESE 54; MILK; PLANTS; PLUTONIUM ISOTOPES; RADIOACTIVITY; RINGHALS-1 REACTOR-emitting radionuclides in sea sediments 26 4. FALLOUT NUCLIDES IN THE ABIOTIC ENVIRONMENT 31 4.1. Air 31 4.1.1. Strontium

294

Radionuclide trap  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The deposition of radionuclides manganese-54, cobalt-58 and cobalt-60 from liquid sodium coolant is controlled by providing surfaces of nickel or high nickel alloys to extract the radionuclides from the liquid sodium, and by providing surfaces of tungsten, molybdenum or tantalum to prevent or retard radionuclide deposition.

McGuire, Joseph C. (Richland, WA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Aluminum battery alloys  

SciTech Connect

Aluminum alloys suitable for use as anode structures in electrochemical cs are disclosed. These alloys include iron levels higher than previously felt possible, due to the presence of controlled amounts of manganese, with possible additions of magnesium and controlled amounts of gallium.

Thompson, David S. (Richmond, VA); Scott, Darwin H. (Mechanicsville, VA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Production of Boron Containing Iron-Based Alloys by Metallothermic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... studies were simulated by using FactSage 6.2 Thermochemical software in order to ... Co-Gasification Behavior of Metallurgical Coke with High and Low Reactivity ... Deformation Simulation of Copper Plates of Slab Continuous Casting Mold ... of Low-grade Manganese Oxide Ores Using Biomass Charcoal as Reductant.

297

~T)^TT(Td/nS Riso-R-582 Physics Department  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with Heat Produced by Sending Alternating Current through the Glass. Knud Brodersen and Ib Larsen. 1967. 47. Manganese Activated Lithium Borate as a Thermoluminescent Dosimetry Material. P. Christensen. 1967. 29 p. 19 p. 175. On the viscosity and heat conductivity of a collisionless plasma in a magnetic field. V

298

Cyano- and polycyanometallo-porphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

New compositions of matter comprising cyano-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has cyano groups attached thereto in meso and/or .beta.-pyrrolic positions.

Ellis, Jr., Paul E. (Downingtown, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Nitrated metalloporphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Compositions of matter comprising nitro-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has nitro groups attached thereto in meso and/or .beta.-pyrrolic positions.

Ellis, Jr., Paul E. (Downingtown, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Ferritic Fe-Mn alloy for cryogenic applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A ferritic, nickel-free alloy steel composition, suitable for cryogenic applications, which consists essentially of about 10-13% manganese, 0.002-0.01% boron, 0.1-0.5% titanium, 0-0.05% aluminum, and the remainder iron and incidental impurities normally associated therewith.

Hwang, Sun-Keun (Rockypoint, NY); Morris, Jr., John W. (Berkeley, CA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese superoxide dismutase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Cyano- and polycyanometallo-porphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

New compositions of matter comprising cyano-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has cyano groups attached thereto in meso and/or [beta]-pyrrolic positions.

Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Lyons, J.E.

1995-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

302

Cyano- and polycyanometallo-porphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

New compositions of matter comprising cyano-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has cyano groups attached thereto in meso and/or .beta.-pyrrolic positions.

Ellis, Jr., Paul E. (Downingtown, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Cyano- and polycyanometallo-porphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

New compositions of matter comprising cyano-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has cyano groups attached thereto in meso- and/or [beta]-pyrrolic positions.

Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Lyons, J.E.

1993-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

304

Met and Mat Trans Contents B: April 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Communication: Role of Ore/Carbon Contact and Direct Reduction in the Reduction of ... in Liquid Iron-Carbon-Silicon Manganese-Sulfur Alloys by Carbon Dioxide in Nitrogen [pp. ... Effect of Factors on the Extraction of Boron from Slags [pp.

305

Coherent spin control by electrical manipulation of the magnetic anisotropy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-spin paramagnetic manganese defects in polar piezoelectric zinc oxide exhibit a simple almost axial anisotropy and phase coherence times of the order of a millisecond at low temperatures. The anisotropy energy is tunable using an externally applied electric field. This can be used to control electrically the phase of spin superpositions and to drive spin transitions with resonant microwave electric fields.

Richard E George; James P Edwards; Arzhang Ardavan

2012-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

306

Radionuclide deposition control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The deposition of radionuclides manganese-54, cobalt-58 and cobalt-60 from liquid sodium coolant is controlled by providing surfaces of nickel or high nickel alloys to extract the radionuclides from the liquid sodium, and by providing surfaces of tungsten, molybdenum or tantalum to prevent or retard radionuclide deposition.

Brehm, William F. (Richland, WA); McGuire, Joseph C. (Richland, WA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Sulfur oxide adsorbents and emissions control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High capacity sulfur oxide absorbents utilizing manganese-based octahedral molecular sieve (Mn--OMS) materials are disclosed. An emissions reduction system for a combustion exhaust includes a scrubber 24 containing these high capacity sulfur oxide absorbents located upstream from a NOX filter 26 or particulate trap.

Li, Liyu (Richland, WA); King, David L. (Richland, WA)

2006-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

308

Ductile Binder Phase For Use With Almgb14 And Other Hard Ceramic Materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a ductile binder phase for use with AlMgB14 and other hard materials. The ductile binder phase, a cobalt-manganese alloy, is used in appropriate quantities to tailor good hardness and reasonable fracture toughness for hard materials so they can be used suitably in industrial machining and grinding applications.

Cook, Bruce A. (Ankeny, IA); Russell, Alan (Ames, IA); Harringa, Joel (Ames, IA)

2005-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

309

FY 2012 Annual Progress Report for Energy Storage R&D  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FY 2012 Annual Progress Report ix Energy Storage R&D FY 2012 Annual Progress Report ix Energy Storage R&D $1.5 Billion for Advanced Battery Manufacturing for Electric Drive Vehicles "Commercial Ready Technologies" Material Supply Cell Components Cell Fabrication Pack Assembly Recycling Lithium Supply Cathode Prod. Iron Phosphate Iron Phosphate Lithium Ion 1 award 3 awards 1 award 1 award 1 award Anode Prod. Nickel Cobalt Metal Nickel Cobalt Metal 2 awards 3 awards 3 awards Electrolyte Prod. Manganese Spinel Manganese Spinel 2 awards 2 awards 2 awards Advanced Lead Separator Prod. Acid Batteries 2 awards 2 awards Other Component 1 award $28.43 M $259 M $735 M $462 M $9.55 M II. American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009

310

Building a Better Battery | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A New Method for Measuring X-ray Optics Aberrations A New Method for Measuring X-ray Optics Aberrations New Clues for Asthma Treatment Extending Resonant Diffraction to Very High Energies for Structural Studies of Complex Materials Tuning the Collective Properties of Artificial Nanoparticle Supercrystals The Workings of a Key Staph Enzyme and How to Block It Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Building a Better Battery APRIL 23, 2011 Bookmark and Share (Top panel) Schematic arrangement of lithium (yellow), cobalt (blue), and manganese (magenta) atoms in the transition metal plane of the layered Li1.2Co0.4Mn0.4O2 structure. Well connected areas with LiCoO2, where only cobalt is present, and Li2MnO3, where manganese atoms surround lithium

311

Microsoft PowerPoint - Bender - 11th Annual SECA Conference  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Functional Interconnect Functional Interconnect System for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Program #DE-FC26-05NT42513 Matthew Bender July 28, 2010 2 © ATI 2010. All Rights Reserved. Presentation Overview * Overview of ATI and ATI Allegheny Ludlum * Alloy Design - Third-Generation Alloy Development - ASR Testing - Oxidation Testing * Post-Processing Surface Modification - Sample Preparation - ASR Testing * Additional SECA Activities - Processing of Material for Low-Chromium Alloy Research 3 © ATI 2010. All Rights Reserved. Conclusions 1 * A cerium-modified manganese cobaltite spinel coating continues to be effective in reducing the rate of ASR increase for nearly all of the potential interconnect alloys tested * The rate of increase in ASR of ATI 441HP(tm) alloy coated with PNNL's cerium-modified manganese cobaltite spinel

312

It's Elemental - The Element Chromium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vanadium Vanadium Previous Element (Vanadium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Manganese) Manganese The Element Chromium [Click for Isotope Data] 24 Cr Chromium 51.9961 Atomic Number: 24 Atomic Weight: 51.9961 Melting Point: 2180 K (1907°C or 3465°F) Boiling Point: 2944 K (2671°C or 4840°F) Density: 7.15 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 4 Group Number: 6 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Greek word for color, chroma. Say what? Chromium is pronounced as KROH-mee-em. History and Uses: Chromium was discovered by Louis-Nicholas Vauquelin while experimenting with a material known as Siberian red lead, also known as the mineral crocoite (PbCrO4), in 1797. He produced chromium oxide (CrO3) by mixing

313

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using X-rays to Find an Evolutionary Step in the Origin of Oxygenic Using X-rays to Find an Evolutionary Step in the Origin of Oxygenic Photosynthesis July 2013 SSRL Science Summary by Manuel Gnida, SLAC Office of Communications Figure The evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis approximately 2.3 to 2.4 billion years ago revolutionized life on Earth. For most modern-day terrestrial life, oxygen has become indispensable. At the heart of oxygenic photosynthesis is the production of oxygen from water - a process mediated by the water-splitting manganese cluster of Photosystem II. Little is known about how oxygenic photosynthesis originally evolved, although some have hypothesized a manganese-oxidizing photosystem as a precursor step. Researchers from the California Institute of Technology, SSRL, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have now found geological

314

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Formal Toxicity Summary for MANGANESE Formal Toxicity Summary for MANGANESE NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. INTRODUCTION 2. METABOLISM AND DISTRIBUTION 2.1 ABSORPTION 2.2 DISTRIBUTION 2.3 METABOLISM 2.4 EXCRETION 3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 3.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 3.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 3.4 TARGET ORGANS/CRITICAL EFFECTS 4. CARCINOGENICITY 4.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 4.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 4.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 4.4 EPA WEIGHT-OF-EVIDENCE 4.5 CARCINOGENICITY SLOPE FACTORS 5. REFERENCES July 1995 Prepared by A. A. Francis and C. Forsyth, Chemical Hazard Evaluation Group,

315

Improving the performance of soft carbon for lithium-ion batteries.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A novel technique for designing a robust solid electrolyte interface (SEI) on the negative electrodes of lithium-ion batteries has been developed using a silane coating. Two silane compounds, 3,3,3-trifluoropropyltrimethoxysilane (TFPTMS) and dimethoxybis(2-(2-(2-mothoxyethoxy)ethoxy)ethoxy)silane (1ND3(MeO)), have been investigated with respect to improving the capacity retention of lithium manganese oxide spinel/soft carbon cells. The impact of the silane coating on the soft carbon electrode will be attributed to (1) changes in surface functional groups, (2) compositional change of the SEI, and (3) changes in the kinetics of manganese deposition. The impact of the upper cutoff voltage on the capacity retention of the cell was also discussed.

Chen, Z.; Wang, Q.; Amine, K.; Chemical Engineering

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Rare-Earth-Free Nanostructure Magnets: Rare-Earth-Free Permanent Magnets for Electric Vehicle Motors and Wind Turbine Generators: Hexagonal Symmetry Based Materials Systems Mn-Bi and M-type Hexaferrite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

REACT Project: The University of Alabama is developing new iron- and manganese-based composite materials for use in the electric motors of EVs and renewable power generators that will demonstrate magnetic properties superior to todays best rare-earth-based magnets. Rare earths are difficult and expensive to refine. EVs and renewable power generators typically use rare earths to make their electric motors smaller and more powerful. The University of Alabama has the potential to improve upon the performance of current state-of-the-art rare-earth-based magnets using low-cost and more abundant materials such as manganese and iron. The ultimate goal of this project is to demonstrate improved performance in a full-size prototype magnet at reduced cost.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Photo-induced electron transfer method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The efficiency of photo-induced electron transfer reactions is increased and the back transfer of electrons in such reactions is greatly reduced when a photo-sensitizer zinc porphyrin-surfactant and an electron donor manganese porphyrin-surfactant are admixed into phospho-lipid membranes. The phospholipids comprising said membranes are selected from phospholipids whose head portions are negatively charged. Said membranes are contacted with an aqueous medium in which an essentially neutral viologen electron acceptor is admixed. Catalysts capable of transfering electrons from reduced viologen electron acceptor to hydrogen to produce elemental hydrogen are also included in the aqueous medium. An oxidizable olefin is also admixed in the phospholipid for the purpose of combining with oxygen that coordinates with oxidized electron donor manganese porphyrin-surfactant.

Wohlgemuth, Roland (2823 Hillegass Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705); Calvin, Melvin (2683 Buena Vista Way, Berkeley, CA 94708)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Soil chemical properties of the residuum of Callaway County, Missouri  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil samples of Callaway County, Missouri, were analyzed for soil pH, clay mineralogy, free iron and manganese oxides, total organic carbon content (TOC), and cation exchange capacity (CEC). The soil samples represent Ordovician, Devonian, Mississippian and Pennsylvanian residuum. In addition, alluvium, loess, colluvium and glacial till samples were analyzed. The clay minerals consist of kaolinite, illite, smectite and illite-smectite mixed layers, iron and manganese oxide content ranges from 0.137 to 2.87% and 0.003 to 0.082% respectively, while TOC values range from 0.03 to 3.00%. The CEC values show a wide range from 5 to 89 milliequivalent/100 grams. The influence of the different soil constituents on the adsorption capacity of the soils is evaluated.

Biggs, T.C. (REACT Environmental Engineers, St. Louis, MO (United States)); Bolter, E. (Univ. of Missouri, Rolla, MO (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Electrode Manufacture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Functions of common core ingredients in FCAW electrodes...control Arc stabilizer Alloy Rutile (TiO 2 ) X X Fluorspar (CaF 2 ) X X Lime (CaCO 3 ) X X X Feldspar X X Synthetic frits X X X Manganese X X Silicon X X Titanium X X Aluminum X X Chromium, nickel, molybdenum X...

320

Mining in Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Survey report:Recently developed oil wealth and currently expanding mineral development operations are changing the economic status of Mexico. Mineral exploration, production, and refining activities are reviewed/ reserves and resources of copper, silver, fluorspar, coal, iron, zinc, lead, manganese, and sulfur are included. Data reporting mineral beneficiation plant capacity and location are tabulated. (15 diagrams, 2 drawings, 7 maps, 46 photos, 18 references, 12 tables)

White, L.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese superoxide dismutase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Effects of CO{sub 2} and nitrogen fertilization on growth and nutrient content of juvenile ponderosa pine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This data set presents measured values of plant diameter and height, biomass of plant components, and nutrient (carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, sulfur, potassium, calcium, magnesium, boron, copper, iron, manganese, and zinc) concentrations from a study of the effects of carbon dioxide and nitrogen fertilization on ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws.) conducted in open-top chambers in Placerville, California, from 1991 through 1996. This data set contains values from 1991 through 1993.

Johnson, D.W. [Desert Research Inst., Reno, NV (United States). Biological Sciences Center]|[Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States). Coll. of Agriculture; Ball, J.T. [Desert Research Inst., Reno, NV (United States). Biological Sciences Center; Walker, R.F. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States). Coll. of Agriculture; Cushman, R.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Solid state electrochemical current source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cathode and a solid state electrochemical cell comprising said cathode, a solid anode and solid fluoride ion conducting electrolyte. The cathode comprises a metal oxide and a compound fluoride containing at least two metals with different valences. Representative compound fluorides include solid solutions of bismuth fluoride and potassium fluoride; and lead fluoride and potassium fluoride. Representative metal oxides include copper oxide, lead oxide, manganese oxide, vanadium oxide and silver oxide.

Potanin, Alexander Arkadyevich (Sarov, RU); Vedeneev, Nikolai Ivanovich (Sarov, RU)

2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

323

Process for diffusing metallic coatings into ceramics to improve their voltage withstanding capabilities  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure relates to a method for diffusing a coating of manganese powder and titanium powder into a ceramic to improve its voltage hold off withstanding capability. The powder coated ceramic is fired for from about 30 to about 90 minutes within about one atmosphere of wet hydrogen at a temperature within the range of from about 1450.degree. to about 1520.degree. C to cause the mixture to penetrate into the ceramic to a depth on the order of a millimeter.

Miller, H. Craig (Clearwater, FL); Zuhr, Herbert F. (St. Petersburg, FL)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

AN L-89/7 Site Surveillance and Maintenance Program for Palos...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0.01 Chloride 7 9 21 250 Chromium < 0.02 < 0.02 < 0.02 0.05 Copper < 0.1 < 0.1 < 0.1 Fluoride 0.26 - Iron 11.4 3.2 0.8 Lead 0.09 0.02 0.01 0.05 Manganese 0.062 0.026 < 0.01...

325

Assessment of arsenic mobility in the soils of some golf courses in South Florida  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High concentrations of arsenic have been detected in soils and underlying groundwater of some South Florida golf courses, indicating the possible impact of the application of arsenic-containing herbicides.The mobility of arsenic in the soils from selected golf courses was studied using a simple two-step sequential extraction procedure.Sodium nitrate (0.1 M), potassium dihydrogen phosphate (0.1 M) and concentrated nitric acid were used to obtain mobile, mobilizable, and pseudo total arsenic fractions.Soils were separated into fine (-0.25 mm) and large (0.250.75 2 mm) particle size fractions.Arsenic contents were correlated with the distribution of iron (R s0.4827), manganese 2 2 (R s0.7674) and aluminum (R s5459) in the particle size fractions, while such correlation was not observed for soil organic matter, indicating that the oxidesyhydroxides of iron, manganese and aluminum control the distribution of arsenic in these soils.Sodium nitrate and potassium dihydrogen phosphate extractants used in this study extracted large portions of arsenic from most soil samples studied.This is especially true for the fine fraction where the extractable arsenic ranged from 9.2 to 51.3 % with an average of 28.7"13.3%, whereas in the large fraction, arsenic ranged from 7.2 to 24.7 % with an average of 15.4"6.4%. These extractants, however, release only small amounts of iron, manganese, and aluminum.It seems likely that arsenic can be released by sodium nitrate and potassium dihydrogen phosphate without significant dissolution of the oxidesyhydroxides of iron, manganese, and aluminum in

Yong Cai; Julio C. Cabrera; Myron Georgiadis; Krish Jayach

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

X-Ray Absorption Characterization of Diesel Exhaust Particulates  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have characterized particulates from a 1993 11.1 Detroit Diesel Series 60 engine with electronic unit injectors operated using fuels with and without methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl (MMT) and overbased calcium sulfonate added. X-ray photoabsorption (XAS) spectroscopy was used to characterize the diesel particulates. Results reveal a mixture of primarily Mn-phosphate with some Mn-oxide, and Ca-sulfate on the surface of the filtered particulates from the diesel engine.

Nelson, A J; Ferreira, J L; Reynolds, J G; Roos, J W

1999-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

327

Long-Term Performance of a Passive Wastewater Treatment System: The Albright Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Albright passive wastewater treatment system, which receives alkaline leachate from a closed coal combustion by-product landfill, has operated continuously for 19 years. It has undergone two major upgrades to incorporate new passive technologies. Monitoring parameters have included pH, alkalinity, acidity, aluminum, iron, manganese, nickel, zinc, total dissolved solids, and total suspended solids, along with several other trace metals present at very low concentrations. This report summarizes the his...

2007-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

328

CATALYTIC CONVERSION OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS USING PENETRATING RADIATION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of hydrogenating an olefinic hydrocarbon by irradiating a substrate catalyst and increasing its catalytic activity is described. Ferric oxide with about 0.005% by weight of at least one oxide of a metal selected from the group consisting of aluminum, magnesium, nickel, zirconium, and manganese incorporated therein is irradiated. Then an alkane is placed upon the surface of the catalyst and irradiated in an atmosphere of hydrogen. Any olefin produced from this radiolysis becomes hydrogenated. (AEC)

Caffrey, J.M. Jr.

1961-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Stabilization of solar films against hi temperature deactivation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multi-layer solar energy collector of improved stability comprising: (1) a solar absorptive film consisting essentially of copper oxide, cobalt oxide and manganese oxide; (2) a substrate of quartz, silicate glass or a stainless steel; and (3) an interlayer of platinum, plus a method for preparing a thermally stable multi-layered solar collector, in which the absorptive layer is undercoated with a thin film of platinum to obtain a stable conductor-dielectric tandem.

Jefferson, Clinton F. (Millburn, NJ)

1984-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

330

Superacid catalysis of light hydrocarbon conversion. Final report, August 26, 1993--August 26, 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Motivated by the goal of finding improved catalysts for low- temperature conversion of light alkanes into fuel components or precursors of fuel components, the researchers have investigated sulfated zirconia and promoted sulfated zirconia for conversion of butane, propane, and ethane. Catalyst performance data for sulfated zirconia promoted with iron and manganese show that it is the most active noncorrosive, nonhalide catalyst known for n-butane isomerization, and it is an excellent candidate catalyst for new low- temperature n-butane isomerization processes to make isobutane, which can be converted by established technology into methyl t-butyl ether (MTBE). Various transition metals have been found to work as promoters of sulfated zirconia for n-butane isomerization. The combination of iron and manganese is the best known combination of promoters yet discovered. The iron- and manganese-promoted sulfated zirconia is also a catalyst for conversion of propane and of ethane. Ethane is converted into ethylene and butanes in the presence of the iron- and manganese-promoted sulfated zirconia; propane is also converted into butane, among other products. However, the activities of the catalyst for these reactions are orders of magnitude less than the activity for n-butane conversion, and there is no evidence that the catalyst would be of practical value for conversion of alkanes lighter than butane. The product distribution data for ethane and propane conversion provide new insights into the nature of the catalyst and its acidity. These data suggest the involvement of Olah superacid chemistry, whereby the catalyst protonates the alkane itself, giving carbonium ions (as transition states). The mechanism of protonation of the alkane may also pertain to the conversion of butane, but there is good evidence that the butane conversion also proceeds via alkene intermediates by conventional mechanisms of carbenium ion formation and rearrangement.

Gates, B.C.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

331

REMOVAL OF FISSION PRODUCTS FROM WATER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is given for precipitating fission products from a body of water having a pH of above 6.5. Calcium permanganate and ferrous sulfate are added in a molar ratio of l: 3, whereby a mixed precipitate of manganese dioxide, ferric hydroxide and calcium sulfate is formed; the precipitate carries the fisston products and settles to the bottom of the body of water. (AEC)

Rosinski, J.

1961-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

332

Duct and cladding alloy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An austenitic alloy having good thermal stability and resistance to sodium corrosion at 700.degree. C. consists essentially of 35-45% nickel 7.5-14% chromium 0.8-3.2% molybdenum 0.3-1.0% silicon 0.2-1.0% manganese 0-0.1% zirconium 2.0-3.5% titanium 1.0-2.0% aluminum 0.02-0.1% carbon 0-0.01% boron and the balance iron.

Korenko, Michael K. (Rockville, MD)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Reducing acid leaching of manganiferous ore: Effect of the iron removal operation on solid waste disposal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The process of reducing acid leaching of manganiferous ore is aimed at the extraction of manganese from low grade manganese ores. This work is focused on the iron removal operation. The following items have been considered in order to investigate the effect of the main operating conditions on solid waste disposal and on the process costs: (i) type and quantity of the base agent used for iron precipitation, (ii) effective need of leaching waste separation prior to the iron removal operation, (iii) presence of a second leaching stage with the roasted ore, which might also act as a preliminary iron removal step, and (iv) effect of tailings washing on the solid waste classification. Different base compounds have been tested, including CaO, CaCO{sub 3}, NaOH, and Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. The latter gave the best results concerning both the precipitation process kinetics and the reagent consumption. The filtration of the liquor leach prior to iron removal was not necessary, implying significant savings in capital costs. A reduction of chemical consumption and an increase of manganese concentration in the solution were obtained by introducing secondary leaching tests with the previously roasted ore; this additional step was introduced without a significant decrease of global manganese extraction yield. Finally, toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) tests carried out on the leaching solid waste showed: (i) a reduction of arsenic mobility in the presence of iron precipitates, and (ii) the need for a washing step in order to produce a waste that is classifiable as not dangerous, taking into consideration the existing Environmental National Laws.

De Michelis, Ida; Ferella, Francesco [University of L'Aquila, Department of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials, Monteluco di Roio, 67040 L'Aquila (Italy); Beolchini, Francesca [Polytechnic University of Marche, Department of Marine Sciences, Via Brecce Bianche, 60131 Ancona (Italy)], E-mail: f.beolchini@univpm.it; Veglio, Francesco [University of L'Aquila, Department of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials, Monteluco di Roio, 67040 L'Aquila (Italy)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

334

Heat and corrosion resistant cast CN-12 type stainless steel with improved high temperature strength and ductility  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cast stainless steel alloy and articles formed therefrom containing about 0.5 wt. % to about 10 wt. % manganese, 0.02 wt. % to 0.50 wt. % N, and less than 0.15 wt. % sulfur provides high temperature strength both in the matrix and at the grain boundaries without reducing ductility due to cracking along boundaries with continuous or nearly-continuous carbides. Alloys of the present invention also have increased nitrogen solubility thereby enhancing strength at all temperatures because nitride precipitates or nitrogen porosity during casting are not observed. The solubility of nitrogen is dramatically enhanced by the presence of manganese, which also retains or improves the solubility of carbon thereby providing additional solid solution strengthening due to the presence of manganese and nitrogen, and combined carbon. Such solution strengthening enhances the high temperature precipitation-strengthening benefits of fine dispersions of NbC. Such solid solution effects also enhance the stability of the austenite matrix from resistance to excess sigma phase or chrome carbide formation at higher service temperatures. The presence of sulfides is substantially eliminated.

Mazias, Philip J. (Oak Ridge, TN); McGreevy, Tim (Morton, IL); Pollard,Michael James (East Peoria, IL); Siebenaler, Chad W. (Peoria, IL); Swindeman, Robert W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2007-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

335

Conducting Polymer-Inorganic\tNanoparticle (CPIN) Nanoarrays for Battery Applications - Final Technical Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Our objective was to develop new, self-assembling conducting polymer-inorganic nanoparticle nanoarrays (CPIN nanoarrays) comprised of nanoparticles of inorganic Li+ insertion compounds that are wired together with oligomeric chains of derivatives of polythiophene. Using these nanoarrays, we developed an understanding of the relationship between structure and electrochemical function for nanostructured materials. Such nanoarrays are expected to have extremely high specific energy and specific power for battery applications due to the unique structural characteristics that derive from the nanoarray. Under this award we developed several synthetic approaches to producing manganese dioxide nanoparticles (NPs). We also developed a layer-by-layer approach for immobilizing these NPs so they could be examined electrochemically. We also developed new synthetic procedures for encapsulating manganese dioxide nanoparticles within spheres of polyethylenedioxythiophene (PEDOT), a conducting polymer with excellent charge-discharge stability. These have a unique manganese dioxide core-PEDOT shell structure. We examined the structures of these systems using transmission electron microscopy, various scanning probe microscopies, and electrochemical measurements. Various technical reports have been submitted that describe the work, including conference presentations, publications and patent applications. These reports are available through http://www.osti.gov, the DOE Energy Link System.

Buttry, Daniel A.

2006-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

336

Process for strontium-82 separation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A process for selective separation of strontium-82 and strontium-85 from proton irradiated molybdenum targets comprises dissolving the molybdenum target in a hydrogen peroxide solution to form a first solution containing ions selected from a group consisting of molybdenum, niobium, technetium, selenium, vanadium, arsenic, germanium, zirconium, rubidium, zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium, strontium, and yttrium; passing the solution through a first cationic resin whereby ions selected from a group consisting of zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium, strontium, yttrium a portion of zirconium and a portion of rubidium are selectively absorbed by the first resin; contacting the first resin with an acid solution to strip and remove the absorbed ions from the first cationic exchange resin to form a second solution; evaporating the second solution for a time sufficient to remove substantially all of the acid and water from the solution whereby a residue remains; dissolving the residue in a dilute acid to form a third solution; passing the third solution through a second cationic resin whereby the ions are absorbed by the second resin; contacting the second resin with a dilute sulfuric acid solution whereby the absorbed ions selected from the group consisting of rubidium, zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium and zirconium are selectively removed from the second resin; and contacting the second resin with a dilute acid solution whereby the absorbed strontium ions are selectively removed.

Heaton, Richard C. (Los Alamos, NM); Jamriska, Sr., David J. (Los Alamos, NM); Taylor, Wayne A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Process for strontium-82 separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for selective separation of strontium-82 and strontium-85 from proton irradiated molybdenum targets comprises dissolving the molybdenum target in a hydrogen peroxide solution to form a first solution containing ions selected from a group consisting of molybdenum, niobium, technetium, selenium, vanadium, arsenic, germanium, zirconium, rubidium, zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium, strontium, and yttrium; passing the solution through a first cationic resin whereby ions selected from a group consisting of zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium, strontium, yttrium a portion of zirconium and a portion of rubidium are selectively absorbed by the first resin; contacting the first resin with an acid solution to strip and remove the absorbed ions from the first cationic exchange resin to form a second solution; evaporating the second solution for a time sufficient to remove substantially all of the acid and water from the solution whereby a residue remains; dissolving the residue in a dilute acid to form a third solution; passing the third solution through a second cationic resin whereby the ions are absorbed by the second resin; contacting the second resin with a dilute sulfuric acid solution whereby the absorbed ions selected from the group consisting of rubidium, zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium and zirconium are selectively removed from the second resin; and contacting the second resin with a dilute acid solution whereby the absorbed strontium ions are selectively removed. 1 fig.

Heaton, R.C.; Jamriska, D.J. Sr.; Taylor, W.A.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Superacid catalysis of light hydrocarbon conversion. Tenth quarterly report, January 1, 1996--March 31, 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Transition metal promoters markedly increase the activity of sulfated zirconia for isomerization of butane. Data presented here demonstrate the effects of the promoters zinc, iron, and manganese; none of these is as effective as the iron/manganese combination. The effects of feed impurities (olefins and/or isobutane in n-butane) are consistent with those described in the preceding quarterly report: they lead to an improvement in catalytic activity. These observations are inferred to be of practical importance; they indicate the benefit of the impurities in increasing butane conversion. The product distribution data show that reactions accompanying isomerization and disproportionation are more important with some promoters (e.g., iron) than others (e.g., zinc). The data demonstrate that the iron- and manganese-promoted catalyst can be regenerated at least sever times with negligible loss of activity (within the experimental error). To apply this catalyst or a related catalyst industrially, it seems very likely to be necessary to reduce the rate of deactivation substantially and/or to regenerate the catalyst through many cycles.

Gates, B.C. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Effect Of Solid Phase Organic Substrate Characteristics On Sulfate Reducer Activity And Metal Removal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. This paper is a progress report on studies whose objectives are to determine methods of analysis that will rate metal sorption and sulfate reduction activity of organic materials for use in passive treatment systems (PTS). Substrates tested include agricultural residues (alfalfa pellets, sugar beat pulp pellets, brewery waste, corncobs, and walnut hulls), inoculums (dairy manure and wetland inoculum), and a variety woods (maple, oak, pine, poplar, and walnut). Characteristics targeted include moisture, organic and nutrient content; water, ethanol and acid soluble and insoluble fractions and metal sorption capacity. The short-term and long-term effects of organic substrate characteristics on metal removal and sulfate reduction rate are being evaluated in batch and column experiments receiving mine water. These data are not presented in this paper but will be included in the oral presentation. Measured values of moisture and organic content ranged from 5.5 to 65 % and 7.4 to 95 % relative to raw sample weights, respectively. The water-soluble fractions and protein content ranged from 0 to 32 % and 2 to 23 % relative to dried samples, respectively. Low concentration zinc sorption studies were described well by Freundlich isotherms. Using a wider range of concentrations, manganese sorption to substrates was more closely modeled by Langmuir isotherms. The highest manganese sorption was observed for manure, corncobs, walnut hulls and wetland inoculum (8-13 mg Mn / gram substrate at an equilibrium concentration (Ce) = 50 mg/L Mn). Corncobs and walnut hulls can be included in substrate specifications to target manganese removal. Moisture and organic content are important parameters in the specification of organic substrates as a significant portion of the raw organic substrate weight can be inorganic. A high soluble fraction should correlate with a rapid startup of SRB activity and thus is an important element in substrate specification. All substrates have some capacity for metal sorption and their quantification is essential for use in PTS.

J. Seyler; L. Figueroa; D. Ahmann; T. R. Wildeman; M. Robustelli

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

SSRL HEADLINES Oct 2006  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 October, 2006 4 October, 2006 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - Uranium-Hungry Bacteria Lead to Safer Water Supply Science Highlight - Uranium Trapped in Bacteriogenic Manganese Oxide Tunnels Roger Kornberg Wins the 2006 Chemistry Nobel Prize Another Successful Users' Meeting SSRL Awards Honor Mike Soltis and Bill Schlotter SSRL Users' Organization Executive Committee Update Ground Breaking New Science NIH-NCRR Officials Visit SSRL SESAME to Open: Particle Accelerator Spurs Middle East Science Partnership Beam Time Requests for X-ray/VUV Beam Lines and Macromolecular Crystallography Proposals Due December 1 Photon Science Job Opportunities __________________________________________________________________________

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese superoxide dismutase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Theses | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Theses Theses 2013 Elizabeth L. Baxter, "Uncovering Allostery in a Uniquely Folded Metalloprotein", University of California San Diego, 2013; Advisor: P. A. Jennings Martja A. Beckwith, "X-ray Absorption and Emission Spectroscopy of Manganese Complexes Relevant to Photosystem II", Cornell University, 2013; Advisor: S. DeBeer Beate Fulda, "Changes in Copper and Cadmium Solubility and Speciation Induced by Soil Redox Dynamics - Competitive Metal Sulfide Formation and Interactions with Natural Organic Matter", ETH Zurich, 2013; Advisor: R. Kretzschmar Thomas D. Grant, "Understanding the Structure of Eukaryotic Glutaminyl-TRNA Synthetase: Combining X-ray Crystallography with Statistical Evaluations of Small Angle Scattering Data", State University of New York Buffalo, 2013;

342

High strength alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tubular that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

Maziasz, Phillip James [Oak Ridge, TN; Shingledecker, John Paul [Knoxville, TN; Santella, Michael Leonard [Knoxville, TN; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo [Knoxville, TN; Sikka, Vinod Kumar [Oak Ridge, TN; Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX; John, Randy Carl [Houston, TX; Kim, Dong Sub [Sugar Land, TX

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

343

Coating Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 14 Compositions of unmelted frit batches for high-temperature service silicate-based coatings...Sodium nitrate 5.0 4.0 4.4 . . . 3.8 . . . . . . Fluorspar 4.5 3.2 2.8 . . . 3.0 . . . . . . Tricobalt tetroxide 0.6 . . . 0.4 . . . 0.5 . . . . . . Nickel oxide 0.6 . . . 0.4 . . . 0.6 . . . . . . Manganese dioxide 1.8 . . . 1.1 . . . 1.1 . . . . . . Barium carbonate . . . . . . . . . 26.3 . . . 56.6 56.6...

344

Fusion welding process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the fusion welding of nickel alloy steel members wherein a ferrite containing pellet is inserted into a cavity in one member and melted by a welding torch. The resulting weld nugget, a fusion of the nickel containing alloy from the members to be welded and the pellet, has a composition which is sufficiently low in nickel content such that ferrite phases occur within the weld nugget, resulting in improved weld properties. The steel alloys encompassed also include alloys containing carbon and manganese, considered nickel equivalents.

Thomas, Kenneth C. (Export, PA); Jones, Eric D. (Salem, PA); McBride, Marvin A. (Hempfield Township, Westmoreland County, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

SSRL HEADLINES - December 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 - December 2011 6 - December 2011 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: From the Director - Outreach and Support Efforts Science Highlight - Manganese-II Oxidation: A Biotic and Abiotic Process Science Highlight - Characterization of Iron Diazene Complexes in Two Oxidation States Biological SAXS Symposium - A Tribute to Dr. Hiro Tsuruta Awards - Prof. Harold Hwang Named American Physical Society Fellow Announcements - Shipping, Lightsources.org Survey, SSRL at the Exploratorium, NUFO Profile - Postdoc Eric Verploegen Energized by Experiences, Mentoring In the News - Metallurgy, Earth's Core, Nitrogenase __________________________________________________________________________ 1. From the Director: Outreach and Support Efforts

346

List of Reproductive Toxins and Highly Acute Toxic Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reproductive Toxins and Highly Acute Toxic Materials Reproductive Toxins and Highly Acute Toxic Materials Reproductive Toxins Acrylonitr ile Aniline Arsenic and its compounds Benzene Benzo(a)pyrene Beryllium Boric acid (Boron) Cadmium and its compounds Carbon monoxide Chlordecone (Kepone) Chloroform Chloroprene Dibromochloropropane (DBCP) Dichlorobenzene 1,1-Dichloroethane Dichloromethane Dioxane Epichlorohydrin Ethylene Dibromide Ethylene Dichloride Ethylene Oxide Fluorocarbons Formaldehyde Formamides Lead (Organic) Manganese and its compounds Mercury and its compounds (Inorganic) Methyl n-butyl ketone Methyl chloroform Methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) Nitrogen Dioxide Ozone Platinum and its compounds Polybrominated biphenyls (PBB) Polychlorinated bipenyls (PCB) Selenium and its compounds Styrene Tellurium and its compounds Tetr achloroethylene

347

Zinc phosphate conversion coatings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Zinc phosphate conversion coatings for producing metals which exhibit enhanced corrosion prevention characteristics are prepared by the addition of a transition-metal-compound promoter comprising a manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, or copper compound and an electrolyte such as polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, polyitaconic acid and poly-L-glutamic acid to a phosphating solution. These coatings are further improved by the incorporation of Fe ions. Thermal treatment of zinc phosphate coatings to generate .alpha.-phase anhydrous zinc phosphate improves the corrosion prevention qualities of the resulting coated metal.

Sugama, Toshifumi (Wading River, NY)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Melt Treatments for Group I to III Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 8   Pouring temperatures of copper alloys...1230??1260 2250??2300 1205??1230 2200??2250 Yellow brass C85200 1095??1150 2000??2100 1010??1095 1850??2000 C85400 1065??1150 1950??2100 1010??1065 1850??1950 C85800 1150??1175 1950??2150 1010??1095 1850??2000 C87900 1150??1175 1950??2150 1010??1095 1850??2000 Manganese bronze C86200 1150??1175 1950??2150 980??1065...

349

Oxidation resistant alloys, method for producing oxidation resistant alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for producing oxidation-resistant austenitic alloys for use at temperatures below 800 C. comprising of: providing an alloy comprising, by weight %: 14-18% chromium, 15-18% nickel, 1-3% manganese, 1-2% molybdenum, 2-4% silicon, 0% aluminum and the balance being iron; heating the alloy to 800 C. for between 175-250 hours prior to use in order to form a continuous silicon oxide film and another oxide film. The method provides a means of producing stainless steels with superior oxidation resistance at temperatures above 700 C. at a low cost

Dunning, John S.; Alman, David E.

2002-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

350

Hydrogen Production Using Hydrogenase-Containing Oxygenic Photosynthetic Organisms  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reversible physiological process provides for the temporal separation of oxygen evolution and hydrogen production in a microorganism, which includes the steps of growing a culture of the microorganism in medium under illuminated conditions to accumulate an endogenous substrate, depleting from the medium a nutrient selected from the group consisting of sulfur, iron, and/or manganese, sealing the culture from atmospheric oxygen, incubating the culture in light whereby a rate of light-induced oxygen production is equal to or less than a rate of respiration, and collecting an evolved gas. The process is particularly useful to accomplish a sustained photobiological hydrogen gas production in cultures of microorganisms, such as Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

Melis, A.; Zhang, L.; Benemann, J. R.; Forestier, M.; Ghirardi, M.; Seibert, M.

2006-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

351

Purification of silicon by the silicon fluoride transport process. Thermochemical study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A computer-assisted thermochemical equilibrium analysis was conducted for the silicon transport reaction: Si(s) + SiF/sub 4/(g) = (intermediates) = Si(s) + SiF/sub 4/(g). The calculations indicated that a substantial transport rate should be possible at temperatures of 1700/sup 0/K and one atmosphere pressure. Computations were made to determine whether the elemental impurities present in metallurgical-grade silicon would transfer in this process. It was concluded that aluminum, chromium, copper, iron, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, vanadium, and zirconium would not transfer, but that boron, magnesium, phosphorus, and titanium would transfer.

Rhein, R.A.

1979-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

352

Compositions of corrosion-resistant Fe-based amorphous metals suitable for producing thermal spray coatings  

SciTech Connect

A method of coating a surface comprising providing a source of amorphous metal that contains manganese (1 to 3 atomic %), yttrium (0.1 to 10 atomic %), and silicon (0.3 to 3.1 atomic %) in the range of composition given in parentheses; and that contains the following elements in the specified range of composition given in parentheses: chromium (15 to 20 atomic %), molybdenum (2 to 15 atomic %), tungsten (1 to 3 atomic %), boron (5 to 16 atomic %), carbon (3 to 16 atomic %), and the balance iron; and applying said amorphous metal to the surface by a spray.

Farmer, Joseph C; Wong, Frank M.G.; Haslam, Jeffery J; Ji, Xiaoyan; Day, Sumner D; Blue, Craig A; Rivard, John D.K.; Aprigliano, Louis F; Kohler, Leslie K; Bayles, Robert; Lemieux, Edward J; Yang, Nancy; Perepezko, John H; Kaufman, Larry; Heuer, Arthur; Lavernia, Enrique J

2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

353

Compositions of corrosion-resistant Fe-based amorphous metals suitable for producing thermal spray coatings  

SciTech Connect

A method of coating a surface comprising providing a source of amorphous metal that contains manganese (1 to 3 atomic %), yttrium (0.1 to 10 atomic %), and silicon (0.3 to 3.1 atomic %) in the range of composition given in parentheses; and that contains the following elements in the specified range of composition given in parentheses: chromium (15 to 20 atomic %), molybdenum (2 to 15 atomic %), tungsten (1 to 3 atomic %), boron (5 to 16 atomic %), carbon (3 to 16 atomic %), and the balance iron; and applying said amorphous metal to the surface by a spray.

Farmer, Joseph C.; Wong, Frank M. G.; Haslam, Jeffery J.; Ji, Xiaoyan (Jane); Day, Sumner D.; Blue, Craig A.; Rivard, John D. K.; Aprigliano, Louis F.; Kohler, Leslie K.; Bayles, Robert; Lemieux, Edward J.; Yang, Nancy; Perepezko, John H.; Kaufman, Larry; Heuer, Arthur; Lavernia, Enrique J.

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

354

Design and synthesis of mixed oxides nanoparticles for biofuel applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The work in this dissertation presents the synthesis of two mixed metal oxides for biofuel applications and NMR characterization of silica materials. In the chapter 2, high catalytic efficiency of calcium silicate is synthesized for transesterfication of soybean oil to biodisels. Chapter 3 describes the synthesis of a new Rh based catalyst on mesoporous manganese oxides. The new catalyst is found to have higher activity and selectivity towards ethanol. Chapter 4 demonstrates the applications of solid-state Si NMR in the silica materials.

Chen, Senniang

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

355

Use of inorganic ion exchangers in the neutron activation determination of arsenic in coal ash  

SciTech Connect

Irradiated coal ssh samples were fused with NaOH, dissolved, and acidified so that the resulting solution was 7M in HNO/sub 3/. From this medium, carrier-free amounts of arsentc were retained on colunms of acid aluminum oxide or hydrated manganese dioxide. The latter is preferred because;t hss a greater load;ng capacity. Low-temperature sshes of six lllinois coals hsve been analyzed with both exchangers. Results compare well with those obtained by an acid dissolution-distillation separation method. (auth)

Santoliquido, P.M.

1973-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

356

Rechargeable Zn-MnO sub 2 alkaline batteries  

SciTech Connect

In this paper progress in the development of rechargeable alkaline zinc-manganese dioxide cells is described. The advantages and limitations of the system are evaluated. Laboratory tests run on commercial primary alkaline cells as well as model simulations of a bipolar MnO{sub 2} electrode show that the rechargeable alkaline battery may be able to compete with lead-acid, nickel-cadmium, and secondary lithium cells for low- to moderate-rate applications. However, because of this poor performance at high rates and low temperatures, the alkaline MnO{sub 2} battery is not suitable for present automotive starting applications.

Wruck, W.J.; Reichman, B.; Bullock, K.R.; Kao, W.H. (Corporate Applied Research, Johnson Controls, Inc., Milwaukee, WI (US))

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

The changing battery industry  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an economic and technological assessment of the electrical battery industry, highlighting major trends. Among those systems considered are lithium-based, sodium-sulfur nickel-zinc, nickel-iron, nickel-hydrogen, zinc-chloride, conductive polymer, and redox cells. Lead-acid, nickel-cadmium, and manganese dioxide-based batteries and direct solar power and fuel cells are discussed in relation to these new techniques. New applications, including electric vehicles, solar power storage, utility load leveling, portable appliances, computer power and memory backup, and medical implants are discussed. Predictions and development scenarios for the next twenty years are provided for the U.S. market.

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Ultrafiltration treatment for liquid laundry wastes from nuclear power stations  

SciTech Connect

The authors conduct a comprehensive analysis of the waste constituents--radioactive and organic--of the laundry water resulting from the on-site laundering and decontamination of clothing worn in nuclear power plants. The primary isotope contaminants consist of niobium and zirconium 95, manganese 54, cobalt 60, iron 59, and cesium 134 and 137. A variety of filter and adsorbent materials used in an ultrafiltration process are comparatively tested for their effectiveness in removing not only these isotopes but also the organic contaminants in the process of recycling the water. Those materials consist of copper hexacyanoferrate, polyacrylophosphonic acid, and several metal-polymer complexes.

Kichik, V.A.; Maslova, M.N.; Svittsov, A.A.; Kuleshov, N.F.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Method and system for ethanol production  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A transition metal carbonyl and a tertiary amine are employed as a homogeneous catalytic system in methanol or a less volatile solvent to react methanol with carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas producing ethanol and carbon dioxide. The gas contains a high carbon monoxide to hydrogen ratio as is present in a typical gasifier product. The reaction has potential for anhydrous ethanol production as carbon dioxide rather than water is produced. The only other significant by product is methane. Selected transition metal carbonyls include those of iron, ruthenium and possibly manganese and osmium. Selected amines include trimethylamine, N-Methylpyrrolidine, 24-diazabicyclooctane, dimethyneopentylamine and 2-pryidinol.

Feder, Harold M. (Darien, IL); Chen, Michael J. (Darien, IL)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Method and system for ethanol production  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A transition metal carbonyl and a tertiary amine are employed as a homogeneous catalytic system in methanol or a less volatile solvent to react methanol with carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas producing ethanol and carbon dioxide. The gas contains a high carbon monoxide to hydrogen ratio as is present in a typical gasifier product. The reaction has potential for anhydrous ethanol production as carbon dioxide rather than water is produced. Selected transition metal carbonyls include those of iron, rhodium ruthenium, manganese in combination with iron and possibly osmium. Selected amines include trimethylamine, N-Methylpyrrolidine, 2,4-diazabicyclooctane, dimethylneopentylamine, N-methylpiperidine and derivatives of N-methylpiperidine.

Feder, Harold M. (Darien, IL); Chen, Michael J. (Darien, IL)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese superoxide dismutase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Method and system for ethanol production  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A transition metal carbonyl and a tertiary amine are employed as a homogeneous catalytic system in methanol or a less volatile solvent to react methanol with carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas producing ethanol and carbon dioxide. The gas contains a high carbon monoxide to hydrogen ratio as is present in a typical gasifier product. The reaction has potential for anhydrous ethanol production as carbon dioxide rather than water is produced. Selected transition metal carbonyls include those of iron, rhodium, ruthenium, manganese in combination with iron and possibly osmium. Selected amines include trimethylamine, N-Methylpyrrolidine, 2,4-diazabicyclooctane, dimethylneopentylamine, N-methylpiperidine and derivatives of N-methylpiperidine.

Feder, H.M.; Chen, M.J.

1981-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

362

Method and system for ethanol production  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A transition metal carbonyl and a tertiary amine are employed as a homogeneous catalytic system in methanol or a less volatile solvent to react methanol with carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas producing ethanol and carbon dioxide. The gas contains a high carbon monoxide to hydrogen ratio as is present in a typical gasifier product. The reaction has potential for anhydrous ethanol production as carbon dioxide rather than water is produced. The only other significant by-product is methane. Selected transition metal carbonyls include those of iron, ruthenium and possibly manganese and osmium. Selected amines include trimethylamine, N-Methylpyrrolidine, 24-diazabicyclooctane, dimethyneopentylamine and 2-pryidinol.

Feder, H.M.; Chen, M.J.

1980-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

363

Long life lithium batteries with stabilized electrodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to non-aqueous electrolytes having electrode stabilizing additives, stabilized electrodes, and electrochemical devices containing the same. Thus the present invention provides electrolytes containing an alkali metal salt, a polar aprotic solvent, and an electrode stabilizing additive. In some embodiments the additives include a substituted or unsubstituted cyclic or spirocyclic hydrocarbon containing at least one oxygen atom and at least one alkenyl or alkynyl group. When used in electrochemical devices with, e.g., lithium manganese oxide spinel electrodes or olivine or carbon-coated olivine electrodes, the new electrolytes provide batteries with improved calendar and cycle life.

Amine, Khalil (Downers Grove, IL); Liu, Jun (Naperville, IL); Vissers, Donald R. (Naperville, IL); Lu, Wenquan (Darien, IL)

2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

364

DEVELOPMENT OF IMPROVED CATALYSTS FOR THE SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF NITROGEN OXIDES WITH HYDROCARBONS  

SciTech Connect

Significant work has been done by the investigators on the cerium oxide-copper oxide based sorbent/catalysts for the combined removal of sulfur and nitrogen oxides from the flue gases of stationary sources. Evaluation of these sorbents as catalysts for the selective reduction of NO{sub x} gave promising results with methane. Since the replacement of ammonia by methane is commercially very attractive, in this project, the effect of promoters on the activity and selectivity of copper oxide/cerium oxide-based catalysts and the reaction mechanism for the SCR with methane was investigated. Unpromoted and promoted catalysts were investigated for their SCR activity with methane in a microreactor setup and also, by the temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) technique. The results from the SCR experiments indicated that manganese is a more effective promoter than the other metals (Rh, Li, K, Na, Zn, and Sn) for the supported copper oxide-ceria catalysts under study. The effectiveness of the promoter increased with the increase in Ce/Cu ratio. Among the catalysts tested, the Cu1Ce3 catalyst promoted with 1 weight % Mn was found to be the best catalyst for the SCR of NO with methane. This catalyst was subjected to long-term testing at the facilities of our industrial partner TDA Research. TDA report indicated that the performance of this catalyst did not deteriorate during 100 hours of operation and the activity and selectivity of the catalyst was not affected by the presence of SO{sub 2}. The conversions obtained by TDA were significantly lower than those obtained at Hampton University due to the transport limitations on the reaction rate in the TDA reactor, in which 1/8th inch pellets were used while the Hampton University reactor contained 250-425-{micro}m catalyst particles. The selected catalyst was also tested at the TDA facilities with high-sulfur heavy oil as the reducing agent. Depending on the heavy oil flow rate, up to 100% NO conversions were obtained. The temperature programmed desorption studies a strong interaction between manganese and cerium. Presence of manganese not only enhanced the reduction rate of NO by methane, but also significantly improved the N{sub 2} selectivity. To increase the activity of the Mn-promoted catalyst, the manganese content of the catalyst need to be optimized and different methods of catalyst preparation and different reactor types need to be investigated to lower the transport limitations in the reactor.

Ates Akyurtlu; Jale F. Akyurtlu

2003-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

365

Joint Egypt/United States report on Egypt/United States cooperative energy assessment. Volume 2 of 5 Vols. Annex 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Detailed summaries are presented of Egypt's indigenous energy resources from the U.S. Geological Survey assessments; preliminary information collected early in 1977 from files, reports, and publications existing in the U.S.; and data gathered during one-month assessment program in March--April 1978. Detailed reports are given on oil and gas, coal and oil shale, uranium and thorium, geothermal energy, water resources, and energy-related minerals/commodities. An assessment of cement-making materials, iron ore, manganese, aluminium, barite, bentonite, copper, chromium, nickel, titanium, and miscellaneous metals used in steel making is presented.

Not Available

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

SEPARATION OF URANYL NITRATE BY EXTRACTION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is presented for obtaining U/sup 233/ from solutions containing Pa/sup 233/. A carrier precipitate, such as MnO/sub 2/, is formed in such solutions and carries with it the Pa/sup 233/ present. This precipitate is then dissolved in nitric acid and the solution is aged to allow decay of the Pa/ sup 233/ into U/sup 233/. After a sufficient length of time the U/sup 233/ bearing solution is made 2.5 to 4.5 Molar in manganese nitrate by addition thereof, and the solution is then treated with ether to obtain uranyl nitrate by solvent extraction techniques.

Stoughton, R.W.; Steahly, F.L.

1958-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

367

Primary explosives  

SciTech Connect

The present invention provides a compound of the formula (Cat).sup.+.sub.z[M.sup.++(5-nitro-1H-tetrazolato-N2).sup.-.sub.x(H.sub.2- O).sub.y] where x is 3 or 4, y is 2 or 3, x+y is 6, z is 1 or 2, and M.sup.++ is selected from the group consisting of iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, zinc, chromium, and manganese, and (Cat).sup.+ is selected from the group consisting of ammonium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and cesium. A method of preparing the compound of that formula is also disclosed.

Hiskey, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM); Huynh, My Hang V. (Los Alamos, NM)

2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

368

Primary explosives  

SciTech Connect

The present invention provides a compound of the formula (Cat).sup.+.sub.z[M.sup.++(5-nitro-1H-tetrazolato-N2).sup.-.sub.x(H.sub.2- O).sub.y] where x is 3 or 4, y is 2 or 3, x+y is 6, z is 1 or 2, and M.sup.++ is selected from the group consisting of iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, zinc, chromium, and manganese, and (Cat).sup.+ is selected from the group consisting of ammonium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and cesium. A method of preparing the compound of that formula is also disclosed.

Hiskey, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM); Huynh, My Hang V. (Los Alamos, NM)

2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

369

P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. First quarter 1994  

SciTech Connect

During first quarter 1994, samples from the six PAC monitoring wells at the P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for indicator parameters, groundwater quality parameters, parameters characterizing suitability as a drinking water supply, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standard during the quarter are discussed in this report. During first quarter 1994, no constituents exceeded the final PDWS. Aluminum exceeded its SRS Flag 2 criterion in all six PAC wells. Iron exceeded its Flag 2 criterion in four wells, while manganese exceeded its Flag 2 criterion in three wells.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Porphyrins and their synthesis from dipyrromethanes and aldehydes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention comprises new compositions of matter, which are iron, manganese, cobalt or ruthenium complexes of porphyrins having hydrogen, haloalkyl or haloaryl groups in meso positions, two of the opposed meso atoms or groups being hydrogen or haloaryl, and two of the opposed meso atoms or groups being hydrogen or haloalkyl, but not all four of the meso atoms or groups being hydrogen. The invention also comprises new compositions of matter in which all four of the meso positions are substituted with haloalkyl groups and the beta positions are substituted with halogen atoms. A new method of synthesizing porphyrinogens is also provided.

Wijesekera, Tilak (Glen Mills, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA); Ellis, Jr., Paul E. (Downingtown, PA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Porphyrins and their synthesis from dipyrromethanes and aldehydes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention comprises new compositions of matter, which are iron, manganese, cobalt or ruthenium complexes of porphyrins having hydrogen, haloalkyl or haloaryl groups in meso positions, two of the opposed meso atoms or groups being hydrogen or haloaryl, and two of the opposed meso atoms or groups being hydrogen or haloalkyl, but not all four of the meso atoms or groups being hydrogen. The invention also comprises new compositions of matter in which all four of the meso positions are substituted with haloalkyl groups and the beta positions are substituted with halogen atoms. A new method of synthesizing porphyrinogens is also provided.

Wijesekera, T.; Lyons, J.E.; Ellis, P.E. Jr.

1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

372

IMPROVEMENT OF CdMnTe DETECTOR PERFORMANCE BY MnTe PURIFICATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Residual impurities in manganese (Mn) are a big obstacle to obtaining high-performance CdMnTe (CMT) X-ray and gamma-ray detectors. Generally, the zone-refining method is an effective way to improve the material's purity. In this work, we purified the MnTe compounds combining the zone-refining method with molten Te, which has a very high solubility for most impurities. We confirmed the improved purity of the material by glow-discharge mass spectrometry (GDMS). We also found that CMT crystals from a multiply-refined MnTe source, grown by the vertical Bridgman method, yielded better performing detectors.

Kim, K.H.; Bolotnikov, A.E.; Camarda, G.S.; Tappero, R.; Hossain, A.; Cui, Y.; Yang, G.; Gul, R.; and James, R.B.

2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

373

CX-005775: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Categorical Exclusion Determination 5: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005775: Categorical Exclusion Determination Synthesis of Inorganic Materials Using Microwave Reactor CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04/07/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office A microwave accelerated reaction system (MARS) will be used to synthesize various metal oxides and oxyhydroxides from the corresponding metal nitrates (Aluminiun, Iron, Manganese, Nickel) and sodium hydroxide. In addition, sodium titanate materials will be synthesized from titanium isopropoxide and titanium dioxide. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-005775.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-002987: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004813: Categorical Exclusion Determination

374

Tubulin and microtubule associated proteins  

SciTech Connect

Active oxygen species including superoxide radicals, hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals are continuously being produced during respiration in cells, as well as during ionizing radiation or metabolism of various chemicals. Since these species are unstable and highly reactive, they are assumed to affect various biological phenomena such as mutation, cancer and aging. This book reviews the protection mechanisms that respiring organisms have evolved against these active oxygen species and the associated new genes mvrA and mvrB. This book presents a discussion of tubulin and microtubule associated proteins.

Foster, K.E. (Univ. of Kent (GB))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

High efficiency cadmium and zinc telluride-based thin film solar cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Polycrystalline Cd{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te and Cd{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}Te films with a band gap of 1.7 eV were successfully grown on glass/SnO{sub 2}/CdS substrates by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), respectively. Polycrystalline Cd{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te films grown by MBE resulted in uniform composition and sharp interfaces. However, polycrystalline Cd{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}Te films grown by MOCVD showed nonuniform compositions and evidence of manganese accumulation at the Cd{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}Te/CdS interface. We found that manganese interdiffuses and replaces cadmium in the CdS film. By improving the CdTe/CdS interface and, thus, reducing the collection function effects, the efficiency of the MOCVD CdTe cell can be improved to about 13.5%. MBE-grown CdTe cells also produced 8%--9% efficiencies. The standard CdTe process was not optimum for ternary films and resulted in a decrease in the band gap. Recent results indicate that CdCl{sub 2} + ZnCl{sub 2} chemical treatment may prevent the band-gap reduction, and that chromate etch (rather than bromine etch) may provide the solution to contact resistance in the ternary cells.

Rohatgi, A.; Summers, C.J.; Erbil, A.; Sudharsanan, R.; Ringel, S. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (USA). School of Electrical Engineering)

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

 

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Manganese (Mn) Manganese (Mn) Quantity Value Units Value Units Atomic number 25 Atomic mass 54.938045(5) g mole-1 Density 7.44 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 272.0 eV Minimum ionization 1.428 MeV g-1cm2 10.62 MeV cm-1 Nuclear collision length 81.4 g cm-2 10.94 cm Nuclear interaction length 131.4 g cm-2 17.67 cm Pion collision length 106.7 g cm-2 14.34 cm Pion interaction length 160.2 g cm-2 21.54 cm Radiation length 14.64 g cm-2 1.968 cm Critical energy 22.59 MeV (for e-) 21.89 MeV (for e+) Molière radius 13.74 g cm-2 1.847 cm Plasma energy 53.02 eV Muon critical energy 358. GeV For muons, dE/dx = a(E) + b(E) E. Tables of b(E): PS PDF TEXT Table of muon dE/dx and Range: PS PDF TEXT Explanation of some entries

377

Long-Term Testing of Rhodium-Based Catalysts for Mixed Alcohol Synthesis 2013 Progress Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energys Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been conducting research since 2005 to develop a catalyst for the conversion of synthesis gas (carbon monoxide and hydrogen) into mixed alcohols for use in liquid transportation fuels. Initially, research involved screening possible catalysts based on a review of the literature, because at that time, there were no commercial catalysts available. The screening effort resulted in a decision to focus on catalysts containing rhodium and manganese. Subsequent research identified iridium as a key promoter for this catalyst system. Since then, research has continued to improve rhodium/manganese/iridium-based catalysts, optimizing the relative and total concentrations of the three metals, examining baseline catalysts on alternative supports, and examining effects of additional promoters. Testing was continued in FY 2013 to evaluate the performance and long-term stability of the best catalysts tested to date. Three tests were conducted. A long-term test of over 2300 hr duration at a single set of operating conditions was conducted with the best carbon-supported catalyst. A second test of about 650 hr duration at a single set of operating conditions was performed for comparison using the same catalyst formulation on an alternative carbon support. A third test of about 680 hr duration at a single set of operating conditions was performed using the best silica-supported catalyst tested to date.

Gerber, Mark A.; Gray, Michel J.; Thompson, Becky L.

2013-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

378

Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) Groundwater Monitoring Report: Fourth quarter 1991 and 1991 summary  

SciTech Connect

During fourth quarter 1991, tritium, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, chloroethene (vinyl chloride), total radium, mercury, and lead exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency primary drinking water standards (PDWS) in groundwater samples from monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) and adjacent facilities. Tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread contaminants; 55 (49%) wells exhibited elevated tritium activities, and 24 (21%) wells exhibited elevated trichloroethylene concentrations. Tritium and trichloroethylene levels exceeding the PDWS also occurred in several wells in Aquifer Unit IIA (Congaree). Levels of manganese, total organic halogens, nickel, iron, 1,1-dichloroethane, aluminum, nonvolatile beta, and trichlorofluoromethane that exceeded Flag 2 criteria were found in one or more wells beneath the MWMF. Downgradient wells in the three hydrostratigraphic units at the MWMF contained elevated levels of tritium, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, total radium, chloroethene (vinyl chloride), lead, mercury, manganese, total organic halogens, nickel, iron, 1,1-dichloroethane, aluminum, nonvolatile beta, or trichlorofluoromethane. Groundwater samples from 81 (72%) of the monitoring wells at the MWMF and adjacent facilities contained elevated levels of several contaminants.

Thompson, C.Y.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Individual Reactions of Permanganate and Various Reductants - Student Report to the DOE ERULF Program for Work Conducted May to July 2000  

SciTech Connect

Tank waste on the Hanford Site contains radioactive elements that need to be removed from solution prior to disposal. One effective way to do this is to precipitate the radioactive elements with manganese solids, produced by permanganate oxidation. When added to tank waste, the permanganate reacts quickly producing manganese (IV) dioxide precipitate. Because of the speed of the reaction it is difficult to tell what exactly is happening. Individual reactions using non-radioactive reductants found in the tanks were done to determine reaction kinetics, what permanganate was reduced to, and what oxidation products were formed. In this project sodium formate, sodium nitrite, glycolic acid, glycine, and sodium oxalate were studied using various concentrations of reductant in alkaline sodium hydroxide solutions. It was determined that formate reacted the quickest, followed by glycine and glycolic acid. Oxalate and nitrite did not appear to react with the permanganate solutions. The products of the oxidation reaction were examined. Formate was oxidized to carbonate and water. Glycolic acid was oxidized slower producing oxalate and water. Glycine reactions formed some ammonia in solution, oxalate, and water. The research reported by Amber Gauger in this report was part of a DOE ERULF student intern program at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory under the direction of Richard Hallen in the summer of 2000.

Gauger, Amber M.; Hallen, Richard T.

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

380

Synthesis, characterization and electrochemmistry of lithium battery electrodes : xLi{sub 2}MnO{sub 3}{center_dot}(1-x)LiMn{sub 0.333}Ni{sub 0.333}Co{sub 0.333}O{sub2} (0{le}x{le}0.7).  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lithium- and manganese-rich layered electrode materials, represented by the general formula xLi{sub 2}MnO{sub 3} {center_dot} (1-x)LiMO{sub 2} in which M is Mn, Ni, and Co, are of interest for both high-power and high-capacity lithium ion cells. In this paper, the synthesis, structural and electrochemical characterization of xLi{sub 2}MnO{sub 3} {center_dot} (1-x)LiMn{sub 0.333}Ni{sub 0.333}Co{sub 0.333}O{sub 2} electrodes over a wide compositional range (0 {le} x {le} 0.7) is explored. Changes that occur to the compositional, structural, and electrochemical properties of the electrodes as a function of x and the importance of using a relatively high manganese content and a high charging potential (>4.4 V) to generate high capacity (>200 mAh/g) electrodes are highlighted. Particular attention is given to the electrode composition 0.3Li{sub 2}MnO{sub 3} {center_dot} 0.7LiMn{sub 0.333}Ni{sub 0.333}Co{sub 0.333}O{sub 2} (x = 0.3) which, if completely delithiated during charge, yields Mn{sub 0.533}Ni{sub 0.233}Co{sub 0.233}O{sub 2}, in which the manganese ions are tetravalent and, when fully discharged, LiMn{sub 0.533}Ni{sub 0.233}Co{sub 0.233}O{sub 2}, in which the average manganese oxidation state (3.44) is marginally below that expected for a potentially damaging Jahn-Teller distortion (3.5). Acid treatment of 0.3Li{sub 2}MnO{sub 3} {center_dot} 0.7LiMn{sub 0.333}Ni{sub 0.333}Co{sub 0.333}O{sub 2} composite electrode structures with 0.1 M HNO{sub 3} chemically activates the Li{sub 2}MnO{sub 3} component and essentially eliminates the first cycle capacity loss but damages electrochemical behavior, consistent with earlier reports for Li{sub 2}MnO{sub 3}-stabilized electrodes. Differences between electrochemical and chemical activation of the Li{sub 2}MnO{sub 3} component are discussed. Electrochemical charge/discharge profiles and cyclic voltammogram data suggest that small spinel-like regions, generated in cycled manganese-rich electrodes, serve to stabilize the electrodes, particularly at low lithium loadings (high potentials). The study emphasizes that, for high values of x, a relatively small LiMO{sub 2} concentration stabilizes a layered Li{sub 2}MnO{sub 3} electrode to reversible lithium insertion and extraction when charged to a high potential.

Johnson, C. S.; Li, N.; Lefief, C.; Vaughey, J. T.; Thackeray, M. M.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese superoxide dismutase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Magnetism in LithiumOxygen Discharge Product  

SciTech Connect

Nonaqueous lithiumoxygen batteries have a much superior theoretical gravimetric energy density compared to conventional lithium-ion batteries, and thus could render long-range electric vehicles a reality. A molecular-level understanding of the reversible formation of lithium peroxide in these batteries, the properties of major/minor discharge products, and the stability of the nonaqueous electrolytes is required to achieve successful lithiumoxygen batteries. We demonstrate that the major discharge product formed in the lithiumoxygen cell, lithium peroxide, exhibits a magnetic moment. These results are based on dc-magnetization measurements and a lithium oxygen cell containing an ether-based electrolyte. The results are unexpected because bulk lithium peroxide has a significant band gap. Density functional calculations predict that superoxide- type surface oxygen groups with unpaired electrons exist on stoichiometric lithium peroxide crystalline surfaces and on nanoparticle surfaces; these computational results are consistent with the magnetic measurement of the discharged lithium peroxide product as well as EPR measurements on commercial lithium peroxide. The presence of superoxide-type surface oxygen groups with spin can play a role in the reversible formation and decomposition of lithium peroxide as well as the reversible formation and decomposition of electrolyte molecules.

Lu, Jun; Jung, Hun-Ji; Lau, Kah Chun; Zhang, Zhengcheng; Schlueter, John A.; Du, Peng; Assary, Rajeev S.; Greeley, Jeffrey P.; Ferguson, Glen A.; Wang, Hsien-Hau; Hassoun, Jusef; Iddir, Hakim; Zhou, Jigang; Zuin, Lucia; Hu, Yongfeng; Sun, Yang-Kook; Scrosati, Bruno; Curtiss, Larry A.; Amine, Khalil

2013-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

382

Enzymantic Conversion of Coal to Liquid Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The work in this project focused on the conversion of bituminous coal to liquid hydrocarbons. The major steps in this process include mechanical pretreatment, chemical pretreatment, and finally solubilization and conversion of coal to liquid hydrocarbons. Two different types of mechanical pretreatment were considered for the process: hammer mill grinding and jet mill grinding. After research and experimentation, it was decided to use jet mill grinding, which allows for coal to be ground down to particle sizes of 5 {mu}m or less. A Fluid Energy Model 0101 JET-O-MIZER-630 size reduction mill was purchased for this purpose. This machine was completed and final testing was performed on the machine at the Fluid Energy facilities in Telford, PA. The test results from the machine show that it can indeed perform to the required specifications and is able to grind coal down to a mean particle size that is ideal for experimentation. Solubilization and conversion experiments were performed on various pretreated coal samples using 3 different approaches: (1) enzymatic - using extracellular Laccase and Manganese Peroxidase (MnP), (2) chemical - using Ammonium Tartrate and Manganese Peroxidase, and (3) enzymatic - using the live organisms Phanerochaete chrysosporium. Spectral analysis was used to determine how effective each of these methods were in decomposing bituminous coal. After analysis of the results and other considerations, such as cost and environmental impacts, it was determined that the enzymatic approaches, as opposed to the chemical approaches using chelators, were more effective in decomposing coal. The results from the laccase/MnP experiments and Phanerochaete chrysosporium experiments are presented and compared in this final report. Spectra from both enzymatic methods show absorption peaks in the 240nm to 300nm region. These peaks correspond to aromatic intermediates formed when breaking down the coal structure. The peaks then decrease in absorbance over time, corresponding to the consumption of aromatic intermediates as they undergo ring cleavage. The results show that this process happens within 1 hour when using extracellular enzymes, but takes several days when using live organisms. In addition, live organisms require specific culture conditions, control of contaminants and fungicides in order to effectively produce extracellular enzymes that degrade coal. Therefore, when comparing the two enzymatic methods, results show that the process of using extracellular lignin degrading enzymes, such as laccase and manganese peroxidase, appears to be a more efficient method of decomposing bituminous coal.

Richard Troiano

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

383

CX-001384: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: Categorical Exclusion Determination 4: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001384: Categorical Exclusion Determination Enhanced Energy Storage Facilities to Support Expanding Department of Energy Program CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04/05/2010 Location(s): Illinois Office(s): Science, Argonne Site Office Two laboratory facilities are to be operated under this effort in Building #205 of the Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division (CSE), a laboratory-scale battery cell fabrication facility and a battery cell post test analysis facility. The focus of both facilities will be advanced lithium-ion battery technologies. These technologies typically contain positive electrodes coated on aluminum foil comprised of a lithiated transition metal (for example nickel, manganese, or cobalt) oxide active

384

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-13-053 Woods Hole EC B3-16.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 SECTION A. Project Title: Advances in the Recovery of Uranium from Seawater: Studies under Real Ocean Conditions - Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution SECTION B. Project Description Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution proposes to study the effectiveness of uranium adsorbents using different field testing designs. Objectives include: 1) To test the extraction efficiency of the uranium adsorbents under changing environmental conditions in a controlled laboratory setting and then in the field. 2) To collect and measure radium extracted onto manganese oxide coated fibers to quantify the volume of water passing through the uranium adsorbents. 3) To determine by field-tests the most efficient methods for collecting and the best platform to expose, in high current regimes,

385

 

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Envia Systems, in partnership with Argonne National Laboratory, proposes to develop and scaleup high energy density lithium ion batteries using Envia Systems, in partnership with Argonne National Laboratory, proposes to develop and scaleup high energy density lithium ion batteries using nano silicon-carbon composite anodes and high capacity manganese rich layered-layered composite cathodes. Silicon coated carbon nanotubes and fibers and silicon and porous silicon-carbon composite anodes will be developed. The novel anode composites will have a high specific capacity (>1000mAh/g), low irreversible capacity loss (<200mAh/g) and improved cycle life. Envia will also develop cathodes with high specific capacity (>250mAh/g) and an irreversible capacity loss that is tailored to match the irreversible capacity loss of the anodes. Integration of both novel anode and cathodes electrodes will take place in the form of ~40Ah capacity commercial format pouch cells. Energy density of

386

Pseudogaps, Polarons, and the Mystery of High-Tc Superconductivity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pseudogaps, Polarons, and the Pseudogaps, Polarons, and the Mystery of High-Tc Superconductivity Pseudogaps, Polarons, and the Mystery of High-Tc Superconductivity Print Wednesday, 26 April 2006 00:00 Working at the ALS, a multi-institutional collaboration led by researchers at ALS and Stanford University has identified a pseudogap phase with a nodal-antinodal dichotomy in ferromagnetic manganese oxide materials (manganites). Even though ferromagnetism and superconductivity do not exist together, the pseudogap state found in these manganites is remarkably similar to that found in high-temperature superconducting copper oxide materials (cuprates). This discovery casts new doubts on any direct link between the pseudogap phase and high-temperature superconductivity and adds fire to the debate over one of the great scientific mysteries of our time: What causes high-temperature superconductivity?

387

 

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sludge simulant is needed for rotary microfliter (RMF) testing. The PEP sludge simulant is a blend of the following five major components: Fe-rich Sludge simulant is needed for rotary microfliter (RMF) testing. The PEP sludge simulant is a blend of the following five major components: Fe-rich sludge simulant, specific supernate simulant, aluminum hydroxide solids, aluminum oxyhydroxide solids, and sodium oxalate solids. The specific supernate simulant has the following components: Sodium oxalate, aluminum nitrate, sodium phosphate, sodium sulfate, sodium nitrate, sodium hydroxide, sodium nitrite, and sodium carbonate. The Fe-rich sludge simulant has the following components: Solid hydroxides of iron, calcium, cerium, lanthanum, neodymium, nickel, strontium, and zirconium; and manganese dioxide solids in a supernate matrix comprising sodium oxalate, sodium phosphate, sodium nitrate, sodium hydroxide, and sodium carbonate. The objective of this work is to prepare approximately 8.5 liters PEP sludge

388

CX-004134: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: Categorical Exclusion Determination 4: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004134: Categorical Exclusion Determination Electrodeposited Manganese-Cobalt Alloy Coating for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Interconnects CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.1 Date: 09/17/2010 Location(s): Clayton, Ohio Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Commercialization of solid oxide fuel cells requires low-cost components, materials and manufacturing processes. Specifically, the interconnect material and coating used in solid oxide fuel cells represent 45% of the total material cost for the typical stack; therefore, it is desirable that new manufacturing technologies be developed that effectively increase system durability while decreasing production costs. Faraday Technology, Inc., proposes to continue the optimization and tuning of the

389

Polaron Coherence Condensation in Layered Colossal Resistive Manganites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Polaron Coherence Condensation in Layered Colossal Resistive Manganites Print Polaron Coherence Condensation in Layered Colossal Resistive Manganites Print Novel quantum phenomena, such as high-temperature superconductivity (HTSC) and colossal magnetoresistance (CMR), arise in certain materials where the interactions between electrons are very strong, but the mechanism driving their appearance remains a major puzzle. Now, angle-resolved photoemission findings from an international team led by researchers from Stanford University and the ALS provide the first direct spectroscopic evidence that the transition from insulator to metal in CMR manganese oxides (manganites) results from coherent "polaron condensation." The new findings also suggest that coherence-driven transitions are a generic controlling factor for novel quantum phenomena in doped transition-metal oxides.

390

Hawaii Geothermal Project annotated bibliography: Biological resources of the geothermal subzones, the transmission corridors and the Puna District, Island of Hawaii  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Task 1 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project Interagency Agreement between the Fish and Wildlife Service and the Department of Energy-Oak Ridge National Laboratory (DOE) includes an annotated bibliography of published and unpublished documents that cover biological issues related to the lowland rain forest in Puna, adjacent areas, transmission corridors, and in the proposed Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP). The 51 documents reviewed in this report cover the main body of biological information for these projects. The full table of contents and bibliography for each document is included along with two copies (as requested in the Interagency Agreement) of the biological sections of each document. The documents are reviewed in five main categories: (1) geothermal subzones (29 documents); (2) transmission cable routes (8 documents); (3) commercial satellite launching facility (Spaceport; 1 document); (4) manganese nodule processing facility (2 documents); (5) water resource development (1 document); and (6) ecosystem stability and introduced species (11 documents).

Miller, S.E.; Burgett, J.M. [Fish and Wildlife Service, Honolulu, HI (United States). Pacific Islands Office

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Optimization of Rhodium-Based Catalysts for Mixed Alcohol Synthesis -- 2011 Progress Report  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been conducting research to investigate the feasibility of producing mixed alcohols from biomass-derived synthesis gas (syngas). In recent years, this research has primarily involved the further development of catalysts containing rhodium and manganese based on the results of earlier catalyst screening tests. Research during FY 2011 continued to examine the performance of RhMn catalysts on alternative supports including selected zeolite, silica, and carbon supports. Catalyst optimization continued using both the Davisil 645 and Merck Grade 7734 silica supports. Research also was initiated in FY 2011, using the both Davisil 645 silica and Hyperion CS-02C-063 carbon supports, to evaluate the potential for further improving catalyst performance, through the addition of one or two additional metals as promoters to the catalysts containing Rh, Mn, and Ir.

Gerber, Mark A.; Gray, Michel J.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Rummel, Becky L.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Optimization of Rhodium-Based Catalysts for Mixed Alcohol Synthesis -- 2010 Progress Report  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been conducting research for the U.S. Department of Energy, Energy Efficiency Renewable Energy, Biomass Program to investigate the feasibility of producing mixed alcohols from biomass-derived synthesis gas. In recent years this research has primarily involved the further development of a silica-supported catalyst containing rhodium and manganese that was selected from earlier catalyst screening tests. A major effort during 2010 was to examine alternative catalyst supports to determine whether other supports, besides the Davisil 645 silica, would improve performance. Optimization of the Davisil 645 silica-supported catalyst also was continued with respect to candidate promoters iridium, platinum, and gallium, and examination of selected catalyst preparation and activation alternatives for the baseline RhMn/SiO2 catalyst.

Gerber, Mark A.; Gray, Michel J.; Albrecht, Karl O.; White, J. F.; Rummel, Becky L.; Stevens, Don J.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Minerals yearbook: The mineral industry of Mexico. 1988 international review  

SciTech Connect

Mexico is one of the major mineral-producing countries in the world, continuing in 1988 a role that the nation had assumed since the first European settlement of the Western Hemisphere. With respect to nonfuel minerals, Mexico was the world's leading producer of bismuth and silver; was among the top 5 producers of barite, fluorspar, graphite, molybdenum, and strontium; and was among the top 10 producers of antimony, white arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, manganese, mercury, salt, selenium, sulfur, and zinc. In the mineral fuels sector, Mexico was the sixth largest producer of crude oil and ranked eighth in terms of proven oil reserves. In addition, Mexico was the largest foreign supplier of crude oil and cement to the United States. Topics discussed in the report include: Government policies and programs; Production; Trade; Commodity review--Metals, Industrial minerals, and Mineral fuels.

Machamer, J.F.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Electrode Manufacture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Functions of common core ingredients in flux cored arc welding electrodes...stabilizer Alloy Rutile (TiO 2 ) ? ? ? X X ? ? Fluorspar (CaF 2 ) ? ? ? X X ? ? Lime (CaCO 3 ) X ? ? X ? X ? Feldspar ? ? ? X ? X ? Synthetic frits ? ? ? X X X ? Manganese ? X ? ? ? ? X Silicon ? X ? ? ? ? X Titanium ? X X ? ? ? ? Aluminum ? X X ? ? ? ? Chromium, nickel, molybdenum ? ? ? ? ? ? X...

395

F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin Groundwater Monitoring Report. Fourth quarterly report and summary 1993  

SciTech Connect

During fourth quarter 1993, samples from the six FAC monitoring wells at the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for indicator parameters, groundwater quality parameters, parameters indicating suitability as drinking water, and other constituents. One of the FAC piezometers was scheduled for these analyses but was dry. Analytical results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standard during the quarter are the focus of this report. Gross alpha exceeded the final PDWS in two wells. Aluminum exceeded its Flag 2 criterion in five wells. Iron exceeded standards in four wells, manganese exceeded standards in two wells, and total organic halogens exceeded standards in one well. Turbidity exceeded the SRS standard in well FAC 3.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Proposed Action Title: (0472-1545) Dartmouth College -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

45) Dartmouth College - 45) Dartmouth College - Nanocrystalline T-MnAI Permanent Magnets Program or Field Office: Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy LocationCs) CCity/County/State): Hanover, NH Proposed Action Description: Funding will support the development of manganese-aluminum (T-MnAI) bulk powder capable of replacing rare earth elements in permanent magnets that are used in wind turbine generators and electric vehicle motors. Dartmouth College's application was selected for an initial 18- month period (Phase 1) of funding. The ARPA-E Program Director may decide to negotiate and fund project activities for an additional H3-month period (Phase II) after evaluating the work performed in Phase I. ARPA-E has not obligated funds or negotiated a scope of work for Phase II at

397

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Phase III Xlerator Program: Electro-deposited Phase III Xlerator Program: Electro-deposited Mn-Co Alloy Coating for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Interconnects-Faraday Technology Background Based on preliminary cost analysis estimates, Faraday Technology has shown that its FARADAYIC TM electrodeposition process for coating interconnects is cost competitive. Funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) under the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase III Xlerator Program will be directed toward developing, optimizing, and validating the FARADAYIC process as an effective and economical manufacturing method for coating interconnect materials with a manganese-cobalt (Mn-Co) alloy for use in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks. This project is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy

398

Guoying Chen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guoying Chen Guoying Chen Guoying Chen Electrochemical Technologies Group Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road MS 62-0203 Berkeley CA 94720 Office Location: 62-0327 (510) 486-5843 GChen@lbl.gov My research focuses on improving the energy density, cycle life, and safety of lithium-ion batteries. One of my group's specialties is performing advanced diagnostics on electrode materials like olivine-type phosphates, high-capacity "layered-layered" lithium nickel-manganese-cobalt oxides, and high-voltage Ni/Mn spinels. The crystal structures, compositions, microstructures, and surface characteristics of these materials separately and interdependently affect performance and stability. Empirically optimizing these parameters is, therefore, expensive and impractically

399

Polaron Coherence Condensation in Layered Colossal Resistive Manganites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Polaron Coherence Condensation Polaron Coherence Condensation in Layered Colossal Resistive Manganites Polaron Coherence Condensation in Layered Colossal Resistive Manganites Print Wednesday, 30 July 2008 00:00 Novel quantum phenomena, such as high-temperature superconductivity (HTSC) and colossal magnetoresistance (CMR), arise in certain materials where the interactions between electrons are very strong, but the mechanism driving their appearance remains a major puzzle. Now, angle-resolved photoemission findings from an international team led by researchers from Stanford University and the ALS provide the first direct spectroscopic evidence that the transition from insulator to metal in CMR manganese oxides (manganites) results from coherent "polaron condensation." The new findings also suggest that coherence-driven transitions are a generic controlling factor for novel quantum phenomena in doped transition-metal oxides.

400

Polaron Coherence Condensation in Layered Colossal Resistive Manganites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Polaron Coherence Condensation in Layered Colossal Resistive Manganites Print Polaron Coherence Condensation in Layered Colossal Resistive Manganites Print Novel quantum phenomena, such as high-temperature superconductivity (HTSC) and colossal magnetoresistance (CMR), arise in certain materials where the interactions between electrons are very strong, but the mechanism driving their appearance remains a major puzzle. Now, angle-resolved photoemission findings from an international team led by researchers from Stanford University and the ALS provide the first direct spectroscopic evidence that the transition from insulator to metal in CMR manganese oxides (manganites) results from coherent "polaron condensation." The new findings also suggest that coherence-driven transitions are a generic controlling factor for novel quantum phenomena in doped transition-metal oxides.

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401

Pseudogaps, Polarons, and the Mystery of High-Tc Superconductivity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pseudogaps, Polarons, and the Mystery of High-Tc Superconductivity Print Pseudogaps, Polarons, and the Mystery of High-Tc Superconductivity Print Working at the ALS, a multi-institutional collaboration led by researchers at ALS and Stanford University has identified a pseudogap phase with a nodal-antinodal dichotomy in ferromagnetic manganese oxide materials (manganites). Even though ferromagnetism and superconductivity do not exist together, the pseudogap state found in these manganites is remarkably similar to that found in high-temperature superconducting copper oxide materials (cuprates). This discovery casts new doubts on any direct link between the pseudogap phase and high-temperature superconductivity and adds fire to the debate over one of the great scientific mysteries of our time: What causes high-temperature superconductivity?

402

NIDC: Online Catalog of Isotope Products | Product Search  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Product Search Product Search Step 1 - Enter your search criteria below. Element Name Actinium Aluminum Americium Antimony Argon Arsenic Astatine Barium Berkelium Beryllium Bismuth Bohrium Boron Bromine Cadmium Caesium Calcium Californium Carbon Cerium Chlorine Chromium Cobalt Copernicium Copper Curium Darmstadtium Dubnium Dysprosium Einsteinium Erbium Europium Fermium Fluorine Francium Gadolinium Gallium Germanium Gold Hafnium Hassium Helium Holmium Hydrogen Indium Iodine Iridium Iron Krypton Lanthanum Lawrencium Lead Lithium Lutetium Magnesium Manganese Meitnerium Mendelevium Mercury Molybdenum Neodymium Neon Neptunium Nickel Niobium Nitrogen Nobelium Osmium Oxygen Palladium Phosphorus Platinum Plutonium Polonium Potassium Praseodymium Promethium Protactinium Radium Radon Rhenium Rhodium Roentgenium Rubidium Ruthenium Rutherfordium Samarium Scandium Seaborgium Selenium Silicon Silver Sodium Strontium Sulfur Tantalum Technetium Tellurium Terbium Thallium Thorium Thulium Tin Titanium Tungsten Ununhexium Ununoctium Ununpentium Ununquadium Ununseptium Ununtrium Uranium Vanadium Xenon Ytterbium Yttrium Zinc Zirconium

403

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

71 - 5280 of 26,777 results. 71 - 5280 of 26,777 results. Download CX-004134: Categorical Exclusion Determination Electrodeposited Manganese-Cobalt Alloy Coating for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Interconnects CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.1 Date: 09/17/2010 Location(s): Clayton, Ohio Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-004134-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-004017: Categorical Exclusion Determination High-Temperature Wire Insulations for Downhole Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) Equipment CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.1 Date: 09/16/2010 Location(s): Lafayette, Colorado Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-004017-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-007164: Categorical Exclusion Determination

404

One Giant Leap for Radiation Biology? | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What's in the Cage Matters in Iron Antimonide Thermoelectric Materials What's in the Cage Matters in Iron Antimonide Thermoelectric Materials Novel Experiments on Cement Yield Concrete Results Watching a Glycine Riboswitch "Switch" Polyamorphism in a Metallic Glass Under Pressure, Vanadium Won't Turn Down the Volume Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed One Giant Leap for Radiation Biology? MAY 2, 2007 Bookmark and Share Image overlay of transmission electron microscopy, light microscopy, and x-ray fluorescence microprobe analyses of D. radiodurans. Average abundance of manganese (blue, green, and pink) and iron (red) are shown within a single D. radiodurans diplococcus. The field of radiobiology is built upon the premise that radiation is

405

NIDC: Online Catalog of Isotope Products | Request a New Product  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Request a New Product Request a New Product Step 1 - Enter the new product's criteria below. Element Name Actinium Aluminum Americium Antimony Argon Arsenic Astatine Barium Berkelium Beryllium Bismuth Bohrium Boron Bromine Cadmium Caesium Calcium Californium Carbon Cerium Chlorine Chromium Cobalt Copernicium Copper Curium Darmstadtium Dubnium Dysprosium Einsteinium Erbium Europium Fermium Fluorine Francium Gadolinium Gallium Germanium Gold Hafnium Hassium Helium Holmium Hydrogen Indium Iodine Iridium Iron Krypton Lanthanum Lawrencium Lead Lithium Lutetium Magnesium Manganese Meitnerium Mendelevium Mercury Molybdenum Neodymium Neon Neptunium Nickel Niobium Nitrogen Nobelium Osmium Oxygen Palladium Phosphorus Platinum Plutonium Polonium Potassium Praseodymium Promethium Protactinium Radium Radon Rhenium Rhodium Roentgenium Rubidium Ruthenium Rutherfordium Samarium Scandium Seaborgium Selenium Silicon Silver Sodium Strontium Sulfur Tantalum Technetium Tellurium Terbium Thallium Thorium Thulium Tin Titanium Tungsten Ununhexium Ununoctium Ununpentium Ununquadium Ununseptium Ununtrium Uranium Vanadium Xenon Ytterbium Yttrium Zinc Zirconium

406

Pseudogaps, Polarons, and the Mystery of High-Tc Superconductivity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pseudogaps, Polarons, and the Mystery of High-Tc Superconductivity Print Pseudogaps, Polarons, and the Mystery of High-Tc Superconductivity Print Working at the ALS, a multi-institutional collaboration led by researchers at ALS and Stanford University has identified a pseudogap phase with a nodal-antinodal dichotomy in ferromagnetic manganese oxide materials (manganites). Even though ferromagnetism and superconductivity do not exist together, the pseudogap state found in these manganites is remarkably similar to that found in high-temperature superconducting copper oxide materials (cuprates). This discovery casts new doubts on any direct link between the pseudogap phase and high-temperature superconductivity and adds fire to the debate over one of the great scientific mysteries of our time: What causes high-temperature superconductivity?

407

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

71 - 28180 of 28,904 results. 71 - 28180 of 28,904 results. Download CX-004132: Categorical Exclusion Determination Low Cost Carbon Fiber Composites for Lightweight Vehicle Parts CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.1 Date: 09/17/2010 Location(s): Fletcher, North Carolina Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-004132-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-004134: Categorical Exclusion Determination Electrodeposited Manganese-Cobalt Alloy Coating for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Interconnects CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.1 Date: 09/17/2010 Location(s): Clayton, Ohio Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-004134-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-004147: Categorical Exclusion Determination In-Containment Application of Wireless Technology for Online Conditioning

408

Field Projects: Durango, Colorado | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Long-Term Surveillance - Operations and Maintenance Long-Term Surveillance - Operations and Maintenance » Permeable Reactive Barriers » Field Projects: Durango, Colorado Field Projects: Durango, Colorado Personnel from Sandia National Laboratories in New Mexico installed four permeable reactive barriers PRBs at the Durango, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title I site in October 1995. These PRBs are managed by LM. Foamed zero-valent (ZVI) iron bricks produced by Cercona of America, steel wool, and granular iron have been used as reactive media to remove ammonium, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, manganese, molybdenum, nitrate, radium-226, selenium, uranium, vanadium, and zinc contamination from leachate exiting the uranium mill tailings disposal cell. After passing through the ZVI, the leachate contaminant levels meet the

409

U  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

proud to announce that Christopher Johnson has been awarded an R&D 100 Award for a novel manganese-cobalt coating process used in solid oxide fuel cells from R&D Magazine. R&D Magazine held its 49 th annual R&D 100 Awards Banquet, where the awards were presented, on Thursday, October 13, 2011 in Orlando, Fla. Several of NETL's employees took home an award. The annual event, known as the "Oscars of Innovation," recognizes the 100 most technologically significant products to enter the marketplace in the past year. Johnson is a Physical Scientist/Project Manager at NETL and works in the Project Management Center managing battery projects. He grew up in Minnesota and earned a bachelor's degree in chemistry from Augsburg College in Minneapolis, and a PhD in inorganic chemistry from the University of Oregon. He

410

Microsoft Word - Appendix J-LCRS-Train 3 Treament Contingency Plan1.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

LCRS/Train 3 Treatment Contingency Plan U.S. Department of Energy Weldon Spring Site LTS&M Plan July 2005 Doc. No. S0079000 Page J-3 J1.0 Contingency Plan Overview J1.1 Background The disposal cell at the Weldon Spring Site currently (August 2004) generates approximately 200 gallons of leachate per day, and manganese concentrations in the leachate exceeds the permitted effluent limit. The LCRS sump capacity is approximately 11,000 gallons, or 45 days of storage at the current flow rate. The uranium activity is below the discharge goal stated in the NPDES permit. This leachate is currently being hauled to the Metropolitan Sewer District (MSD) via commercial hauler for disposal and treatment under an approval granted to DOE on December 21, 2001, by the MSD. DOE had originally expected to treat the leachate on-site and

411

Radiation effects on MOS devices: dosimetry, annealing, irradiation sequence and sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on some investigations of dosimetry, annealing, irradiation sequences, and radioactive sources, involved in the determination of radiation effects on MOS devices. Results show that agreement in the experimental and theoretical surface to average doses support the use of thermo-luminescent dosimeters (manganese activated calcium fluoride) in specifying the surface dose delivered to thin gate insulators of MOS devices. Annealing measurements indicate the existence of at least two energy levels, or activation energies, for recovery of soft oxide MOS devices after irradiation by electrons, protons, and gammas. Damage sensitivities of MOS devices were found to be independent of combinations and sequences of radiation type or energies. Comparison of various gamma sources indicated a small dependence of damage sensitivity on the Cobalt facility, but a more significant dependence in the case of the Cesium source. These results were attributed to differences in the spectral content of the several sources.

Stassinopoulos, E.; Brucker, G.; Gunten, O.; Jordan, T.; Knudson, A.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Porous desulfurization sorbent pellets containing a reactive metal oxide and an inert zirconium compound  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Sorbent pellets for removing hydrogen sulfide from coal gas are prepared by combining a reactive oxide, in particular zinc oxide, with a zirconium compound such as an oxide, silicate, or aluminate of zirconium, and an inorganic binder and pelletizing and calcining the mixture. Alternately, the zinc oxide may be replaced by copper oxide or a combination of copper, molybdenum, and manganese oxides. The pellet components may be mixed in dry form, moistened to produce a paste, and converted to pellets by forming an aqueous slurry of the components and spray drying the slurry, or the reactive oxide may be formed on existing zirconium-containing catalyst-carrier pellets by infusing a solution of a salt of the active metal onto the existing pellets and firing at a high temperature to produce the oxide. Pellets made according to this invention show a high reactivity with hydrogen sulfide and durability such as to be useful over repeated cycles of sorption and regeneration.

Gardner, Todd H.; Gasper-Galvin, Lee D.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

PROCESSES OF RECLAIMING URANIUM FROM SOLUTIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for reclaiming residual enriched uranium from calutron wash solutions containing Fe, Cr, Cu, Ni, and Mn as impurities. The solution is adjusted to a pH of between 2 and 4 and is contacted with a metallic reducing agent, such as iron or zinc, in order to reduce the copper to metal and thereby remove it from the solution. At the same time the uranium present is reduced to the uranous state The solution is then contacted with a precipitate of zinc hydroxide or barium carbonate in order to precipitate and carry uranium, iron, and chromium away from the nickel and manganese ions in the solution. The uranium is then recovered fronm this precipitate.

Zumwalt, L.R.

1959-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

414

Prevention of trace and major element leaching from coal combustion products by hydrothermally-treated coal ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The most important structural components of coal ash obtained by coal combustion in 'Nikola Tesla A' power plant located near Belgrade (Serbia) are amorphous alumosilicate, alpha-quartz, and mullite. The phase composition of coal ash can be altered to obtain zeolite type NaA that crystallizes in a narrow crystallization field (SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}; Na{sub 2}O/SiO{sub 2}; H{sub 2}O/Na{sub 2}O ratios). Basic properties (crystallization degree, chemical composition, the energy of activation) of obtained zeolites were established. Coal ash extracts treated with obtained ion-exchange material showed that zeolites obtained from coal ash were able to reduce the amounts of iron, chromium, nickel, zinc, copper, lead, and manganese in ash extracts, thus proving its potential in preventing pollution from dump effluent waters.

Adnadjevic, B.; Popovic, A.; Mikasinovic, B. [University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia). Dept. of Chemistry

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Magnetism, chemical spots, and stratification in the HgMn star phi Phoenicis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mercury-manganese (HgMn) stars have been considered as non-magnetic and non-variable chemically peculiar (CP) stars for a long time. However, recent discoveries of the variability in spectral line profiles suggested an inhomogeneous surface distribution of chemical elements in some HgMn stars. From the studies of other CP stars it is known that magnetic field plays a key role in the formation of surface spots. All attempts to find magnetic fields in HgMn stars yielded negative results. In this study, we investigate a possible presence of the magnetic field in phi Phe (HD 11753) and reconstruct surface distribution of chemical elements that show variability in spectral lines. We also test a hypothesis that magnetic field is concentrated in chemical spots and look into the possibility that some chemical elements are stratified with depth in the stellar atmosphere.

Makaganiuk, V; Piskunov, N; Jeffers, S V; Johns-Krull, C M; Keller, C U; Rodenhuis, M; Snik, F; Stempels, H C; Valenti, J A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Steel bonded dense silicon nitride compositions and method for their fabrication  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A two-stage bonding technique for bonding high density silicon nitride and other ceramic materials to stainless steel and other hard metals, and multilayered ceramic-metal composites prepared by the technique are disclosed. The technique involves initially slurry coating a surface of the ceramic material at about 1500/sup 0/C in a vacuum with a refractory material and the stainless steel is then pressure bonded to the metallic coated surface by brazing it with nickel-copper-silver or nickel-copper-manganese alloys at a temperature in the range of about 850/sup 0/ to 950/sup 0/C in a vacuum. The two-stage bonding technique minimizes the temperature-expansion mismatch between the dissimilar materials.

Landingham, R.L.; Shell, T.E.

1985-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

417

In-situ spectro-microscopy on organic films: Mn-Phthalocyanine on Ag(100)  

SciTech Connect

Metal phthalocyanines are attracting significant attention, owing to their potential for applications in chemical sensors, solar cells and organic magnets. As the electronic properties of molecular films are determined by their crystallinity and molecular packing, the optimization of film quality is important for improving the performance of organic devices. Here, we present the results of in situ low-energy electron microscopy / photoemission electron microscopy (LEEM/PEEM) studies of incorporation-limited growth [1] of manganese-phthalocyanine (MnPc) on Ag(100) surfaces. MnPc thin films were grown on both, bulk Ag(100) surface and thin Ag(100)/Fe(100) films, where substrate spin-polarized electronic states can be modified through tuning the thickness of the Ag film [2]. We also discuss the electronic structure and magnetic ordering in MnPc thin films, investigated by angle- and spin-resolved photoemission spectroscopy.

Al-Mahboob A.; Vescovo, E.; Sadowski, J.T.

2013-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

418

Stability of Jahn-Teller distortion in LaMnO{sub 3} under pressure: An x-ray absorption study  

SciTech Connect

The local environment of manganese atoms in LaMnO{sub 3} under pressure up to 15.3 GPa has been studied by x-ray absorption spectroscopy. For pressures below 8 GPa, no change is detected within the MnO{sub 6} octahedra. Above this pressure a continuous reduction of the long Mn-O distance takes place, however, the octahedral distortion persists over the whole pressure range. At 15.3 GPa the average Jahn-Teller splitting of the distances is reduced by about one-third, indicating that a total removal of the local Jahn-Teller distortion would occur only for pressures around 30 GPa, where metallization is reported to take place. A hysteresis in the long distance reduction is observed down to ambient pressure, suggesting the coexistence of MnO{sub 6} distorted and undistorted units.

Ramos, Aline Y.; Tolentino, Helio C. N.; Souza-Neto, Narcizo M.; Itie, Jean-Paul; Morales, Liliana; Caneiro, Alberto [Institut Neel, UPR 2940-CNRS, 25 av. des Martyrs, Boite Postale 166, 38042 Grenoble, France and Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron-LNLS, P.O. Box 6192, 13084-971, Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron-LNLS, P.O. Box 6192, 13084-971, Campinas, Sao Paulo, Brazil and Departamento de Fisica dos Materiais e Mecanica, DFMT-IF-USP, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Synchrotron SOLEIL, L'Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, Boite Postale 48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Centro Atomico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica and Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, 8400 S.C. de Bariloche (Argentina)

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Optimization of Rhodium-Based Catalysts for Mixed Alcohol Synthesis -- 2009 Progress Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been conducting research for the United States Department of Energy, Energy Efficiency Renewable Energy, Biomass Program to investigate the feasibility of producing mixed alcohols from biomass-derived synthesis gas (syngas). This research has involved the screening of potential catalysts, and optimization of the more promising ones, using laboratory scale reactors. During 2009, the main goal of the testing program focused on optimizing selected supported catalysts containing rhodium (Rh) and manganese (Mn). Optimization involved examining different total concentrations and atomic ratios of Rh and Mn as well as that of the more promising promoters (Ir and Li) identified in the earlier screening studies. Evaluation of catalyst performance focused on attaining improvements with respect to the space-time-yield and converted carbon selectivity to C2+ oxygenates, with additional consideration given to the fraction of the oxygenates that were C2+ alcohols.

Gerber, Mark A.; Gray, Michel J.; Stevens, Don J.; White, J. F.; Rummel, Becky L.

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

420

Austenitic alloy and reactor components made thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An austenitic stainless steel alloy is disclosed, having excellent fast neutron irradiation swelling resistance and good post irradiation ductility, making it especially useful for liquid metal fast breeder reactor applications. The alloy contains: about 0.04 to 0.09 wt. % carbon; about 1.5 to 2.5 wt. % manganese; about 0.5 to 1.6 wt. % silicon; about 0.030 to 0.08 wt. % phosphorus; about 13.3 to 16.5 wt. % chromium; about 13.7 to 16.0 wt. % nickel; about 1.0 to 3.0 wt. % molybdenum; and about 0.10 to 0.35 wt. % titanium.

Bates, John F. (Ogden, UT); Brager, Howard R. (Richland, WA); Korenko, Michael K. (Wexford, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese superoxide dismutase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report  

SciTech Connect

During second quarter 1992, the four wells at the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (FSS wells) and the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) of Savannah River Plant were sampled and analyzed for constituents required quarterly by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 12,076. None of these analytes exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria at either sewage sludge site. The F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site wells also were analyzed for a number of other constituents not required by the permit. Of these constituents, tritium exceeded the PDWS in wells FSS 2D and 3D. Lead exceeded the PDWS in well FSS 3D. Iron exceeded the Flag 2 criterion in well FSS 4D, and manganese exceeded the SRS Flag 2 criterion in wells FSS 2D and 3D.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites Groundwater Monitoring Report: Third quarter 1993  

SciTech Connect

Samples from the four wells at the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (FSS wells) and the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents as required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 12,076 and, as requested, for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals, also are required by the permit. Currently, iron, lead, and manganese are the only permit-required analytes that exceed standards at the F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites. Tritium and aluminum are the nonpermit constituents exceeding standards. Other constituents have exceeded standards at this site previously, but only sporadically.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report. Fourth quarter 1993 and 1993 summary  

SciTech Connect

Samples from the four wells at the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (FSS wells) and the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents as required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 12,076 and, as requested, for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals, also are required by the permit. No constituent exceeded either the final Primary Drinking Water Standards or the SRS Flag 2 criteria during fourth quarter 1993. Iron, lead, and manganese were the only permit- required analytes that exceeded standards at the F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites in 1993. Tritium, aluminum, and other constituents not included in the permit have exceeded standards at this site previously, but only sporadically. These constituents were not analyzed fourth quarter 1993.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report  

SciTech Connect

Samples from the four wells at the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (FSS wells) and the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents as required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 12,076 and, as requested, for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals, also are required by the permit. Historically and currently, no permit-required analytes exceed standards at the F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites except iron, lead, and manganese, which occur in elevated concentrations frequently in FSS wells and occasionally in HSS wells. Tritium and aluminum are the primary nonpermit constituents that exceed standards at the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site. Other constituents also exceed standards at this site but only sporadically.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1992  

SciTech Connect

During second quarter 1992, the four wells at the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (FSS wells) and the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) of Savannah River Plant were sampled and analyzed for constituents required quarterly by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 12,076. None of these analytes exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria at either sewage sludge site. The F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site wells also were analyzed for a number of other constituents not required by the permit. Of these constituents, tritium exceeded the PDWS in wells FSS 2D and 3D. Lead exceeded the PDWS in well FSS 3D. Iron exceeded the Flag 2 criterion in well FSS 4D, and manganese exceeded the SRS Flag 2 criterion in wells FSS 2D and 3D.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Determination of selected elements in SRM 1548a typical diet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Neutron activation analysis (NAA), including instrumental NAA (INAA) and radiochemical NAA, is one of the primary analytical techniques used for the certification of elemental content in biological standard reference materials (SRMs) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). SRM 1548a, which is a freeze-dried mixture of typical diet composite based on foods consumed in the United States was analyzed for aluminum, calcium, chlorine, potassium, manganese, and sodium by INAA. This analysis is a part of an ongoing effort to improve the quality of the SRMs by understanding and minimizing all known sources of errors or interferences in NAA. To perform highly accurate INAA, the system was calibrated using multiple primary standards. Homogeneity was also measured for these six elements in 12 samples of SRM 1548a in 250-mg sample sizes. The control samples were used to internally evaluate and cross-check the NAA method.

Tandon, L. [North American Scientific, North Hollywood, CA (United States); Garrity, K.M.; Becker, D.A. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

427

Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 5   Results for chromium, nickel, and manganese for Example 1...V Sample NBS SRM-442 52 Cr 0.237 0.228 0.241 0.230 0.230 0.222 0.238 0.221 0.245 0.232 Avg 0.238 ± 0.006 0.226 ± 0.005 55 Mn 0.241 0.147 0.236 0.142 0.238 0.142 0.240 0.150 0.245 0.145 Avg 0.240 ± 0.003 0.145 ± 0.003 60 Ni 0.047 0.182 0.049 0.183 0.050 0.187 0.045 0.175 0.047 0.182 Avg 0.048...

428

Mesoporous Silica-Supported Metal Oxide-Promoted Rh Nanocatalyst for Selective Production of Ethanol from Syngas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective is to develop a process that will convert synthesis gas from coal into ethanol and then transform the ethanol into hydrogen. Principal investigators from Iowa State University include Dr. George Kraus, Dr. Victor Lin, Marek Pruski, and Dr. Robert Brown. Task 1 involves catalyst development and catalyst scale up. Mesoporous manganese silicate mixed oxide materials will be synthesized, characterized and evaluated. The first-and secondgeneration catalysts have been prepared and scaled up for use in Task 2. The construction of a high-pressure reactor system for producing synthetic liquid fuel from simulated synthesis gas stream has been completed as the first step in Task 2. Using the first- and second generation catalysts, the reactor has demonstrated the production of synthetic liquid fuel from a simulated synthesis gas stream.

George Kraus

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

429

Focussing the view on Nature's water-splitting catalyst  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

About 3 billion years ago Nature invented a catalyst that splits water with highefficiency into molecular oxygen and hydrogen equivalents (protons and electrons). This reaction is energetically driven by sun light and the active centre contains relatively cheap and abundant metals: manganese and calcium. This biological system therefore forms the paradigm for all man made attempts for direct solar fuel production and several studies are underway to determine the electronic and geometric structures of this catalyst. In this report we briefly summarize the problems and the current status of these efforts, and propose a DFT-based strategy for obtaining a reliable high resolution structure of this unique catalyst that includes both the inorganic core and the first ligand sphere.

Messinger, Johannes; Yano, Junko

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Radiation resistant austenitic stainless steel alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An austenitic stainless steel alloy, with improved resistance to radiation-induced swelling and helium embrittlement, and improved resistance to thermal creep at high temperatures, consisting essentially of, by weight percent: from 16 to 18% nickel; from 13 to 17% chromium; from 2 to 3% molybdenum; from 1.5 to 2.5% manganese; from 0.01 to 0.5% silicon; from 0.2 to 0.4% titanium; from 0.1 to 0.2% niobium; from 0.1 to 0.6% vanadium; from 0.06 to 0.12% carbon; from 0.01 to 0.03% nitrogen; from 0.03 to 0.08% phosphorus; from 0.005 to 0.01% boron; and the balance iron, and wherein the alloy may be thermomechanically treated to enhance physical and mechanical properties. 4 figs.

Maziasz, P.J.; Braski, D.N.; Rowcliffe, A.F.

1987-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

431

Observation of Orbital Ordering and Jahn-Teller Distortions Supporting the Wigner-crystal Model in Highly Dopes Bi{1-x}Ca{x}MnO{3}  

SciTech Connect

We report on the experimental characterization of orbital ordering and the associated lattice distortions in highly doped Bi{sub 1-x}Ca{sub x}MnO{sub 3}. Resonant x-ray diffraction was used at the Mn L-edge for the direct observation of the ordered localized states, and at the Mn K-edge for the sensitivity to the distortions of the manganese-oxygen octahedra. The orbital ordering on Mn atoms was directly observed at x=0.69; the analysis and the numerical simulations of the K-edge spectra allow us to characterize the pattern of the distorted octahedra at x = 4/5. These observations support the Wigner-crystal-type model at both dopings; the bi-stripe model is ruled out at x = 0.69.

Grenier,S.; Kiryukhin, V.; Cheong, S.; Kim, B.; Hill, J.; Thomas, K.; Tonnerre, J.; Joly, Y.; Staub, U.; Scagnoli, V.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Activation of methane by transition metal-substituted aluminophosphate molecular sieves  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Aluminophosphate molecular sieves substituted with cobalt, manganese or iron and having the AlPO.sub.4 -34 or AlPO.sub.4 -5, or related AlPO.sub.4 structure activate methane starting at approximately 350.degree. C. Between 400.degree. and 500.degree. C. and at methane pressures .ltoreq.1 atmosphere the rate of methane conversion increases steadily with typical conversion efficiencies at 500.degree. C. approaching 50% and selectivity to the production of C.sub.2+ hydrocarbons approaching 100%. The activation mechanism is based on reduction of the transition metal(III) form of the molecular sieve to the transition metal(II) form with accompanying oxidative dehydrogenation of the methane. Reoxidation of the - transition metal(II) form to the transition metal(III) form can be done either chemically (e.g., using O.sub.2) or electrochemically.

Iton, Lennox E. (Downers Grove, IL); Maroni, Victor A. (Naperville, IL)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Electric cell with a non-aqueous electrolyte  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An electric cell with a non-aqueous electrolyte. The cell includes a positive electrode whose active material is suitable for inserting the negative active material dynamically, a negative electrode whose active material includes at least one alkali metal, and an electrolyte, wherein said positive electrode includes at least one compound whose general formula is mx4rntp, where M represents an element chosen from among silicon, germanium, tin and lead, X represents sulphur, selenium or tellurium, R and T represent an element chosen from among copper, silver, manganese, iron, cobalt and nickel, N being greater than or equal to 0 and less than or equal to 4, P being greater than or equal to 0 and less than or equal to 2. The invention is used in connection with button type electric cells.

Le Blanc-Soreau, A.; Le Mehaute, A.; Rouxel, J.

1982-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

434

Recovery of niobium from irradiated targets  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for selective separation of niobium from proton irradiated molybdenum targets is provided and includes dissolving the molybdenum target in a hydrogen peroxide solution to form a first ion-containing solution, contacting the first ion-containing solution with a cationic resin whereby ions selected form the group consisting of molybdenum, biobium, technetium, selenium, vanadium, arsenic, germanium, zirconium and rubidium remain in a second ion-containing solution while ions selected from the group consisting of rubidium, zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium, strontium, yttrium and zirconium are selectively adsorbed by the cationic resin; adjusting the pH of the second ion-containing solution to within a range of from about 5.0 to about 6.0; contacting the pH adjusting second ion-containing solution with a dextran-based material for a time to selectively separate niobium from the solution and recovering the niobium from the dextran-based material.

Phillips, Dennis R. (Los Alamos, NM); Jamriska, Sr., David J. (Los Alamos, NM); Hamilton, Virginia T. (Los Alamos, NM)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

In Situ Formation Of Reactive Barriers For Pollution Control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of treating soil contamination by forming one or more zones of oxidized material in the path of percolating groundwater is disclosed. The zone or barrier region is formed by delivering an oxidizing agent into the ground for reaction with an existing soil component. The oxidizing agent modifies the existing soil component creating the oxidized zone. Subsequently when soil contaminates migrate into the zone, the oxidized material is available to react with the contaminates and degrade them into benign products. The existing soil component can be an oxidizable mineral such as manganese, and the oxidizing agent can be ozone gas or hydrogen peroxide. Soil contaminates can be volatile organic compounds. Oxidized barriers can be used single or in combination with other barriers.

Gilmore, Tyler J. (Pasco, WA); Riley, Robert G. (West Richland, WA)

2004-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

436

In-Situ Studies of Intercritically Austempered Ductile Iron Using Neutron Diffraction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intercritically austempered ductile irons hold promise for applications requiring fatigue durability, excellent castability, low production energy requirements, reduced greenhouse gas emissions and excellent machinability. In the present study, four different ductile iron alloys, containing manganese and nickel as the primary austenite-stabilizing elements, were heat treated to obtain different quantities of austenite in the final microstructure. This paper reports the microstructures and phases present in these alloys. Further, lattice strains and diffraction elastic constants in various crystallographic directions and the transformation characteristics of the austenite as a function of applied stress were determined using in-situ loading with neutron diffraction at the second generation Neutron Residual Stress Facility (NRSF2) at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).

Druschitz, Alan [University of Alabama, Birmingham; Aristizabal, Ricardo [University of Alabama, Birmingham; Druschitz, Edward [University of Alabama, Birmingham; Hubbard, Camden R [ORNL; Watkins, Thomas R [ORNL; Walker, Larry R [ORNL; Ostrander, M [Rex Heat Treat, Anniston, AL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

SEPARATION OF URANIUM FROM THORIUM AND PROTACTINIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to the separation of uranium from thorium and protactinium; such mixtures of elements usually being obtained by neutron irradiation of thorium. The method of separating the constituents has been first to dissolve the mixture of elements in concertrated nitric acid and then to remove the protactinium by absorption on manganese dioxide and the uranium by solvent extraction with ether. Prior to now, comparatively large amounts of thorium were extracted with the uranium. According to the invention this is completely prevented by adding sodium diethyldithiocarbamate to the mixture of soluble nitrate salts. The organic salt has the effect of reacting only with the uranyl nitrate to form the corresponding uranyl salt which can then be selectively extracted from the mixture with amyl acetate.

Musgrave, W.K.R.

1959-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

438

Experiments on sorption characteristics of solid desiccant materials for solar desiccant cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A test facility for measuring the sorption properties of candidate solid desiccant materials under dynamic conditions as well as equilibrium conditions, those experienced during desiccant dehumidifier operation, was constructed and tested. The theory of perturbation chromatography was initially used to measure the equilibrium properties of a desiccant/water-vapor system for the first time. Silica gel, molecular sieve, and gamma-manganese dioxide were tested. The equilibrium capacity estimated by the perturbation chromatography was lower than those available in literature, which suggests that perturbation chromatography may not be applicable to desiccant/water-vapor systems. The perturbation chromatography was replaced with a gravimetric technique, and satisfactory results were obtained for a water-vapor/molecular-sieve system.

Pesaran, A.A.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Superconducting composite with multilayer patterns and multiple buffer layers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An article of manufacture is described including a substrate, a patterned interlayer of a material selected from the group consisting of magnesium oxide, barium-titanium oxide or barium-zirconium oxide, the patterned interlayer material overcoated with a secondary interlayer material of yttria-stabilized zirconia or magnesium-aluminum oxide, upon the surface of the substrate whereby an intermediate article with an exposed surface of both the overcoated patterned interlayer and the substrate is formed, a coating of a buffer layer selected from the group consisting of cerium oxide, yttrium oxide, curium oxide, dysprosium oxide, erbium oxide, europium oxide, iron oxide, gadolinium oxide, holmium oxide, indium oxide, lanthanum oxide, manganese oxide, lutetium oxide, neodymium oxide, praseodymium oxide, plutonium oxide, samarium oxide, terbium oxide, thallium oxide, thulium oxide, yttrium oxide and ytterbium oxide over the entire exposed surface of the intermediate article, and, a ceramic superconductor. 5 figures.

Wu, X.D.; Muenchausen, R.E.

1993-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

440

Nanoscale fabrication and modification of selected battery materials  

SciTech Connect

Carbon is an integral part of many battery electrodes. We explored the use of semiconductor-processing techniques that involve photolithography to pattern photoresists and subsequent pyrolysis to form carbon microstructures that function as microelectrodes. In this study, we describe the status of the fabrication of carbon microelectrodes obtained by pyrolysis of photoresist. Electrochemical nanometer-scale patterning of the surface of a conducting lithium manganese oxide (LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}) by scanning probe microscopy (SPM) was studied. We show that a localized surface chemical change can be confined to a depth which depends on the oxide-tip voltage difference and ambient humidity The ability to produce nanometer-size patterns of chemically modified oxide or nanometer-sized alterations of the oxide morphology is demonstrated and discussed with reference to possible mechanisms.

Kostecki, Robert; Song, Xiang Yun; Kinoshita, Kim; McLarnon, Frank

2001-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese superoxide dismutase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Structural phase transition and electrode characteristics of LiMn{sub 2{minus}x}Mg{sub x}O{sub 4} positive electrode material for the lithium secondary battery  

SciTech Connect

With in mind improving the cycle performance of 4V class lithium manganese oxide positive electrode material for the lithium secondary battery, the authors have been investigating the effects of partial substitution of Mn by another metal. The crystal phase transition in the quaternary spinel LiMn{sub 2{minus}x}Mg{sub x}O{sub 4} was studied by neutron powder diffraction at 200K and DSC measurements at low temperatures. They find that substituting Mn by Mg resulted in a more stable crystal structure with the Jahn-Teller transition suppressed down to low temperature. The charge-discharge characteristics of these positive electrode active materials were investigated at 4V range. Although the discharge capacity decreased with increasing Mg content, the cycle performance was improved with increasing Mg content.

Idemoto, Y.; Udagawa, K.; Koura, N.; Richardson, J. W., Jr.; Takeuchi, K.; Loong, C.-K.

1999-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

442

Process for light-driven hydrocarbon oxidation at ambient temperatures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photochemical reaction for the oxidation of hydrocarbons uses molecular oxygen as the oxidant. A reductive photoredox cycle that uses a tin(IV)- or antimony(V)-porphyrin photosensitizer generates the reducing equivalents required to activate oxygen. This artificial photosynthesis system drives a catalytic cycle, which mimics the cytochrome P{sub 450} reaction, to oxidize hydrocarbons. An iron(III)- or manganese(III)-porphyrin is used as the hydrocarbon-oxidation catalyst. Methylviologen can be used as a redox relay molecule to provide for electron-transfer from the reduced photosensitizer to the Fe or Mn porphyrin. The system is long-lived and may be used in photo-initiated spectroscopic studies of the reaction to determine reaction rates and intermediates. 1 fig. 2 tab.

Shelnutt, J.A.

1989-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

443

Development of MnCoO Coating with New Aluminizing Process for Planar SOFC Stacks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Low-cost, chromia-forming steels find widespread use in SOFCs at operating temperatures below 800C, because of their low thermal expansion mismatch and low cost. However, volatile Cr-containing species originating from this scale poison the cathode material in the cells and subsequently cause power degradation in the devices. To prevent this, a conductive manganese cobaltite coating has been developed. However, this coating is not compatible with forming hermetic seals between the interconnect or window frame component and ceramic cell. This coating reacts with sealing materials. Thus, a new aluminizing process has been developed for the sealing regions in these parts, as well as for other metallic stack and balance-of-plant components. From this development, the sealing performance and SOFC stack performance became very stable.

Choi, Jung-Pyung; Weil, K. Scott; Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Yang, Zhenguo

2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

444

Microwave-assisted fast vapor-phase transport synthesis of MnAPO-5 molecular sieves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

MnAPO-5 was prepared by a microwave-assisted vapor-phase transport method at 180 deg. C in short times. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectra, UV-vis spectroscopic measurement, NH{sub 3}-temperature-programmed desorption and esterification reaction. It was found that dry gels prepared with aluminum isopropoxide, phosphoric acid and manganese acetate could be transferred to MnAPO-5 in the vapors of triethylamine and water by the microwave-assisted vapor-phase transport method at 180 deg. C for less than 30 min. The crystallization time was greatly reduced by the microwave heating compared with the conventional heating. The resulting MnAPO-5 exhibited much smaller particle sizes, higher surface areas and slightly higher catalytic activity in the esterification of acetic acid and butyl alcohol than those prepared by the conventional vapor-phase transport method and hydrothermal synthesis.

Shao Hui [State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing 210009 (China); Department of Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu Polytechnic University, Changzhou 213016 (China); Yao Jianfeng; Ke Xuebin [State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing 210009 (China); Zhang Lixiong [State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing 210009 (China)], E-mail: lixiongzhang@yahoo.com; Xu Nanping [State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing 210009 (China)

2009-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

445

F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1994  

SciTech Connect

During second quarter 1994, samples from the FAC monitoring wells at the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclide indicators, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Piezometer FAC 5P and monitoring well FAC 6 were dry and could not be sampled. Analytical results that exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS), other Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria, or the SRS turbidity standard of 50 NTU during the quarter were as follows: gross alpha exceeded the final PDWS and aluminum, iron, manganese, and total organic halogens exceeded the SRS Flag 2 criteria in one or more of the FAC wells. Turbidity exceeded the SRS standard in well FAC 3. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water table beneath the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were similar to past quarters.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

H-area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. First quarter 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During first quarter 1994, samples collected from the four HAC monitoring wells at the H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin received comprehensive analyses (exclusive of boron and lithium) and turbidity measurements. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standard during the quarter are the focus of this report. Tritium exceeded the final PDWS in all four HAC wells during first quarter 1994. Carbon tetrachloride and heptachlor epoxide exceeded the final PDWS in well HAC 4. Aluminum exceeded its Flag 2 criterion in wells HAC 2, 3, and 4. Iron was elevated in wells HAC 1 and 2. Manganese exceeded its Flag 2 criterion in well HAC 3. Total organic halogens was elevated in wells HAC 2 and 3. No well samples exceeded the SRS turbidity standard.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report, second quarter 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During second quarter 1994, groundwater from the six PAC monitoring wells at the P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin was analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, radium-226, radium-228, turbidity, and comprehensive constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standard during the quarter are discussed in this report. During second quarter 1994, no constituents exceeded the final PDWS. Aluminum exceeded its SRS Flag 2 criterion in five PAC wells. Iron and manganese exceeded Flag 2 criteria in three wells, while specific conductance was elevated in one well. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water table beneath the P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were similar to past quarters.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin Groundwater Monitoring Report. Fourth quarter 1992 and 1992 summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During fourth quarter 1992, samples from the four HAC monitoring wells at the H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin received comprehensive analyses. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standard during the quarter are the focus of this report. Tritium exceeded the final PDWS in wells HAC 1, 2, 3, and 4 during fourth quarter 1992. Tritium activities in upgradient well HAC 4 were similar to tritium levels in wells HAC 1, 2, and 3. Iron was elevated in well HAC 1, 2, and 3. Specific conductance and manganese were elevated in one downgradient well each. No well samples exceeded the SRS turbidity standard. During 1992, tritium was the only constituent that exceeded the final PDWS. It did so consistently in all four wells during all four quarters, with little variability in activity.

Thompson, C.Y.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Method of making high strength, tough alloy steel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high strength, tough alloy steel, particularly suitable for the mining industry, is formed by heating the steel to a temperature in the austenite range (1000.degree.-1100.degree. C.) to form a homogeneous austenite phase and then cooling the steel to form a microstructure of uniformly dispersed dislocated martensite separated by continuous thin boundary films of stabilized retained austenite. The steel includes 0.2-0.35 weight % carbon, at least 1% and preferably 3-4.5% chromium, and at least one other subsitutional alloying element, preferably manganese or nickel. The austenite film is stable to subsequent heat treatment as by tempering (below 300.degree. C.) and reforms to a stable film after austenite grain refinement.

Thomas, Gareth (Berkeley, CA); Rao, Bangaru V. N. (Albany, CA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Process for recovering evolved hydrogen enriched with at least one heavy hydrogen isotope  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a separation means and method for enriching a hydrogen atmosphere with at least one heavy hydrogen isotope by using a solid titaniun alloy hydride. To this end, the titanium alloy hydride containing at least one metal selected from the group consisting of vanadium, chromium, manganese, molybdenum, iron, cobalt and nickel is contacted with a circulating gaseous flow of hydrogen containing at least one heavy hydrogen isotope at a temperature in the range of -20.degree. to +40.degree. C and at a pressure above the dissociation pressure of the hydrided alloy selectively to concentrate at least one of the isotopes of hydrogen in the hydrided metal alloy. The contacting is continued until equilibrium is reached, and then the gaseous flow is isolated while the temperature and pressure of the enriched hydride remain undisturbed selectively to isolate the hydride. Thereafter, the enriched hydrogen is selectively recovered in accordance with the separation factor (S.F.) of the alloy hydride employed.

Tanaka, John (Storrs, CT); Reilly, Jr., James J. (Bellport, NY)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Porphyrins  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention comprises new compositions of matter, which are iron, manganese, cobalt or ruthenium complexes of porphyrins having hydrogen, haloalkyl or haloaryl groups in meso positions, two of the opposed meso atoms or groups being hydrogen or haloaryl, and two of the opposed meso atoms or groups being hydrogen or haloalkyl, but not all four of the meso atoms or groups being hydrogen. The invention also comprises new compositions of matter in which all four of the meso positions are substituted with haloalkyl groups and the beta positions are substituted with halogen atoms. A new method of synthesizing porphyrinogens is also provided. The novel compositions and others made according to the process of the invention are useful as hydrocarbon conversion catalysts; for example, for the oxidation of alkanes and the decomposition of hydroperoxides.

Wijesekera, Tilak (Glen Mills, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA); Ellis, Jr., Paul E. (Downingtown, PA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Porphyrins  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention comprises new compositions of matter, which are iron, manganese, cobalt or ruthenium complexes of porphyrins having hydrogen, haloalkyl or haloaryl groups in meso positions, two of the opposed meso atoms or groups being hydrogen or haloaryl, and two of the opposed meso atoms or groups being hydrogen or haloalkyl, but not all four of the meso atoms or groups being hydrogen. The invention also comprises new compositions of matter in which all four of the meso positions are substituted with haloalkyl groups and the beta positions are substituted with halogen atoms. A new method of synthesizing porphyrinogens is also provided. The novel compositions and others made according to the process of the invention are useful as hydrocarbon conversion catalysts; for example, for the oxidation of alkanes and the decomposition of hydroperoxides.

Wijesekera, T.; Lyons, J.E.; Ellis, P.E. Jr.

1996-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

453

Process for light-driven hydrocarbon oxidation at ambient temperatures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photochemical reaction for the oxidation of hydrocarbons uses molecular oxygen as the oxidant. A reductive photoredox cycle that uses a tin(IV)- or antimony(V)-porphyrin photosensitizer generates the reducing equivalents required to activate oxygen. This artificial photosynthesis system drives a catalytic cycle, which mimics the cytochrome P.sub.450 reaction, to oxidize hydrocarbons. An iron(III)- or manganese(III)-porphyrin is used as the hydrocarbon-oxidation catalyst. Methylviologen can be used as a redox relay molecule to provide for electron-transfer from the reduced photosensitizer to the Fe or Mn porphyrin. The system is long-lived and may be used in photo-initiated spectroscopic studies of the reaction to determine reaction rates and intermediates.

Shelnutt, John A. (Tijeras, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Solid solution strengthened duct and cladding alloy D9-B1  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A modified AISI type 316 stainless steel is described for use in an atmosphere where the alloy will be subject to neutron irradiation. The alloy is characterized by its phase stability in both the annealed as well as cold work condition and above all by its superior resistance to radiation induced swelling. Graphical data is included to demonstrate the superior swelling resistance of the alloy which contains from about 0.5% to 2.2% manganese, from about 0.7% to about 1.1% silicon, from about 12.5% to 14% chromium, from about 14.5% to about 16.5% nickel, from about 1.2% to about 1.6% molybdenum, from 0.15% to 0.30% titanium, from 0.02% to 0.08% zirconium, and the balance iron with incidental impurities.

Korenko, Michael K. (Rockville, MD)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Charge transport properties of CdMnTe radiation detectors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Growth, fabrication and characterization of indium-doped cadmium manganese telluride (CdMnTe)radiation detectors have been described. Alpha-particle spectroscopy measurements and time resolved current transient measurements have yielded an average charge collection efficiency approaching 100 %. Spatially resolved charge collection efficiency maps have been produced for a range of detector bias voltages. Inhomogeneities in the charge transport of the CdMnTe crystals have been associated with chains of tellurium inclusions within the detector bulk. Further, it has been shown that the role of tellurium inclusions in degrading chargecollection is reduced with increasing values of bias voltage. The electron transit time was determined from time of flight measurements. From the dependence of drift velocity on applied electric field the electron mobility was found to be n = (718 55) cm2/Vs at room temperature.

Kim K.; Rafiel, R.; Boardman, M.; Reinhard, I.; Sarbutt, A.; Watt, G.; Watt, C.; Uxa, S.; Prokopovich, D.A.; Belas, E.; Bolotnikov, A.E.; James, R.B.

2012-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

456

Catalyzed Water Oxidation by Solar Irradiation of Band-Gap-Narrowed Semiconductors (Part 2. Overview).  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this report are: (1) Investigate the catalysis of water oxidation by cobalt and manganese hydrous oxides immobilized on titania or silica nanoparticles, and dinuclear metal complexes with quinonoid ligands in order to develop a better understanding of the critical water oxidation chemistry, and rationally search for improved catalysts. (2) Optimize the light-harvesting and charge-separation abilities of stable semiconductors including both a focused effort to improve the best existing materials by investigating their structural and electronic properties using a full suite of characterization tools, and a parallel effort to discover and characterize new materials. (3) Combine these elements to examine the function of oxidation catalysts on Band-Gap-Narrowed Semiconductor (BGNSC) surfaces and elucidate the core scientific challenges to the efficient coupling of the materials functions.

Fujita,E.; Khalifah, P.; Lymar, S.; Muckerman, J.T.; Rodriguez, J.

2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

457

Catalyzed Water Oxidation by Solar Irradiation of Band-Gap-Narrowed Semiconductors (Part 1. Overview).  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this report are: (1) Investigate the catalysis of water oxidation by cobalt and manganese hydrous oxides immobilized on titania or silica nanoparticles, and dinuclear metal complexes with quinonoid ligands in order to develop a better understanding of the critical water oxidation chemistry, and rationally search for improved catalysts. (2) Optimize the light-harvesting and charge-separation abilities of stable semiconductors including both a focused effort to improve the best existing materials by investigating their structural and electronic properties using a full suite of characterization tools, and a parallel effort to discover and characterize new materials. (3) Combine these elements to examine the function of oxidation catalysts on Band-Gap-Narrowed Semiconductor (BGNSC) surfaces and elucidate the core scientific challenges to the efficient coupling of the materials functions.

Fujita,E.; Khalifah, P.; Lymar, S.; Muckerman, J.T.; Rodgriguez, J.

2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

458

Optimization of Rhodium-Based Catalysts for Mixed Alcohol Synthesis 2012 Progress Report  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been conducting research to investigate the feasibility of producing mixed alcohols from biomass-derived synthesis gas (syngas). In recent years, this research has primarily involved the further development of catalysts containing rhodium and manganese based on the results of earlier catalyst screening tests. Testing continued in FY 2012 to further improve the Ir-promoted RhMn catalysts on both silica and carbon supports for producing mixed oxygenates from synthesis gas. This testing re-examined selected alternative silica and carbon supports to follow up on some uncertainties in the results with previous test results. Additional tests were conducted to further optimize the total and relative concentrations of Rh, Mn, and Ir, and to examine selected promoters and promoter combinations based on earlier results. To establish optimum operating conditions, the effects of the process pressure and the feed gas composition also were evaluated.

Gerber, Mark A.; Gray, Michel J.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Thompson, Becky L.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

CX-006635: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

635: Categorical Exclusion Determination 635: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006635: Categorical Exclusion Determination Testing of Hydrogen Storage Materials CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08/03/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Savannah River Operations Office Hydrogen Technology Research Lab 134 is a laboratory used by the Hydrogen Technology Section for hydrogen related research and development activities. The primary function will be the development of materials, equipment, and processes focused on conventional metal hydrides which include palladium, titanium, chromium, lanthanum, nickel, aluminum, iron, zirconium, lithium, magnesium, manganese, rhenium, ruthenium, tungsten, and zinc as well as various alloys of these materials. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-006635.pdf

460

Why sequence radiation-resistant bacterium Deinococcus grandis?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

radiation-resistant radiation-resistant bacterium Deinococcus grandis? A fifth of the United States' electricity is generated from nuclear power, which can also be used for medical procedures and other applications. The radioactive waste generated by nuclear reactors, hospitals and universities need to be disposed of in specially selected sites. Deinococcus bacteria have the capacity to add electrons to a variety of metals, including uranium, chromium, mercury, technetium, iron and manganese. Due to this unique characteristic, this group of extremely radiation-resistant bacteria has been considered as a prospective candidate to help clean up radioactive waste sites. However, many Deinococcus bacteria require oxygen, which is a problem considering most waste environments are anaerobic.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese superoxide dismutase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Polaron Coherence Condensation in Layered Colossal Resistive Manganites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Polaron Coherence Condensation in Layered Colossal Resistive Manganites Print Polaron Coherence Condensation in Layered Colossal Resistive Manganites Print Novel quantum phenomena, such as high-temperature superconductivity (HTSC) and colossal magnetoresistance (CMR), arise in certain materials where the interactions between electrons are very strong, but the mechanism driving their appearance remains a major puzzle. Now, angle-resolved photoemission findings from an international team led by researchers from Stanford University and the ALS provide the first direct spectroscopic evidence that the transition from insulator to metal in CMR manganese oxides (manganites) results from coherent "polaron condensation." The new findings also suggest that coherence-driven transitions are a generic controlling factor for novel quantum phenomena in doped transition-metal oxides.

462

Slide 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

R R IDS F low-A s s is ted R ec hargeable Zn-MnO 2 B attery / C UNY E nergy Ins titute Grid-scale battery from extremely low cost materials The CUNY Energy Institute proposes to develop a novel flow- assisted rechargeable zinc-manganese dioxide (Zn-MnO 2 ) battery. Due to low cost basis materials, this battery has the potential to revolutionize the renewable energy industry, offering grid-scale energy storage for < $100 / kWh. * CUNY's innovation of flow-assist Zn electrodes * RBC's innovation of Bi-doped MnO 2 materials These overcome long-standing cycleability challenges: Zn dendrite formation and MnO 2 irreversibility. Cost targets, cycle life, and power needs are met with these materials when operating at low depth of discharge (DOD), appropriate for stationary grid-scale applications.

463

Cementation process for minerals recovery from Salton Sea geothermal brines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential for minerals recovery from a 1000-MWe combined geothermal power and minerals recovery plant in the Salton Sea is examined. While the possible value of minerals recovered would substantially exceed the revenue from power production, information is insufficient to carry out a detailed economic analysis. The recovery of precious metals - silver, gold, and platinum - is the most important factor in determining the economics of a minerals recovery plant; however, the precious metals content of the brines is not certain. Such a power plant could recover 14 to 31% of the US demand for manganese and substantial amounts of zinc and lead. Previous work on minerals extraction from Salton Sea brines is also reviewed and a new process, based on a fluidized-bed cementation reaction with metallic iron, is proposed. This process would recover the precious metals, lead, and tin present in the brines.

Maimoni, A.

1982-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

464

Mixed metal films with switchable optical properties  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thin, Pd-capped metallic films containing magnesium and first row transition metals (Mn, Fe, Co) switch reversibly from their initial reflecting state to visually transparent states when exposed to gaseous hydrogen or following cathodic polarization in an alkaline electrolyte. Reversion to the reflecting state is achieved by exposure to air or by anodic polarization. The films were prepared by co-sputtering from one magnesium target and one manganese, iron, or cobalt target. Both the dynamic optical switching range and the speed of the transition depend on the magnesium-transition metal ratio. Infrared spectra of films in the transparent, hydrided (deuterided) states support the presence of the intermetallic hydride phases Mg3MnH7, Mg2FeH6, and Mg2CoH5.

Richardson, Thomas J.; Slack, Jonathan L.; Farangis, Baker; Rubin, Michael D.

2001-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

465

Phosphate-stabilized Lithium intercalation compounds  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Four manganese and iron phosphates with alluaudite or fillowite structures have been prepared by solid state reactions: Na2FeMn2(PO4)3, LiNaFeMn2(PO4)3, NaFe3(PO4)3, and Na2Mn3(PO4)3. LixNa2-xFeMn2(PO4)3 with x close to 2 was prepared from Na2FeMn2(PO4)3 by molten salt ion exchange. These materials are similar in stoichiometry to the phospho-olivines LiFe(Mn)PO4, but have a more complex structure that can accommodate mixed transition metal oxidation states. They are of interest as candidates for lithium battery cathodes because of their somewhat higher electronic conductivity, high intercalant ion mobility, and ease of preparation. Their performance as intercalation electrodes in non-aqueous lithium cells was, however, poor.

Richardson, Thomas J.

2002-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

466

Non-stoichiometric AB5 alloys for metal hydride electrodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a non-stoichiometric alloy comprising a composition having the formula AB.sub.5+X an atomic ratio wherein A is selected from the group consisting of the rare earth metals, yttrium, mischmetal, or a combination thereof; B is nickel and tin, or nickel and tin and at least a third element selected from the group consisting of the elements in group IVA of the periodic table, aluminum, manganese, iron, cobalt, copper, antimony or a combination thereof; X is greater than 0 and less than or equal to about 2.0; and wherein at least one substituted A site is occupied by at least one of the B elements. An electrode incorporating said alloy and an electrochemical cell incorporating said electrode are also described.

Reilly, James J. (Bellport, NY); Adzic, Gordana D. (Setauket, NY); Johnson, John R. (Calverton, NY); Vogt, Thomas (Cold Spring Harbor, NY); McBreen, James (Bellport, NY)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Heavy metals in bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) tadpoles: Effects of depuration before analysis  

SciTech Connect

Although tadpoles may well be excellent organisms to use as bioindicators of heavy metal contamination, the relationship of deposition in the body compared to the tail, and the effect of sediments or other debris in the digestive tract on heavy metal concentrations is unknown. The authors examined the effect of experimental depuration of bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) tadpoles on heavy metal and selenium concentrations in intact tadpoles, as well as their bodies and tails. They defined depuration in this experiment as allowing defecation as an elimination process for intestinal contents. The authors maintained wild-caught tadpoles in clean water for 0, 24, 48, and 72 h to determine the effects of clearing on heavy metal concentrations. They also examined the concentrations of heavy metals in the whole body and digestive tract separately. The authors test the null hypotheses that no differences occur in metals as a function of time in uncontaminated water, and that no differences occur in metal concentrations in the body compared to the tail and to the digestive tract. They rejected these hypotheses based on regression models. Variance in concentrations of chromium (77%) and lead (70%) were explained by part and clearing time; for manganese (80%), mercury (64%), selenium (28%), and cadmium (25%) the variation was explained only by body part; for arsenic (53%), the variation was explained by part, clearing time, and weight of the various parts. For those metals in which clearing time explained part of the variation, metal concentrations in both the body and tail decreased after 24 and 48 h, but increased slightly thereafter. Clearing, however, did not greatly decrease metal concentrations in either the body or tail. These data suggest that for some metals (mercury, manganese, cadmium, selenium), clearing has no effect, and for others the effect is slight. For fresh tadpoles, however, the digestive tract contained significantly higher concentrations of all metals than either the body or head, probably reflecting metals absorbed to sediment particles in the gut.

Burger, J. [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States); Snodgrass, J. [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States)]|[Savannah River Ecology Lab., Aiken, SC (United States)

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Heavy metals in commercial fish in New Jersey  

SciTech Connect

Levels of contaminants in fish are of particular interest because of the potential risk to humans who consume them. While attention has focused on self-caught fish, most of the fish eaten by the American public comes from commercial sources. We sampled 11 types of fish and shellfish obtained from supermarkets and specialty fish markets in New Jersey and analyzed them for arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, manganese, mercury, and selenium. We test the null hypothesis that metal levels do not vary among fish types, and we consider whether the levels of any metals could harm the fish themselves or their predators or pose a health risk for human consumers. There were significant interspecific differences for all metals, and no fish types had the highest levels of more than two metals. There were few significant correlations (Kendall tau) among metals for the three most numerous fish (yellowfin tuna, bluefish, and flounder), the correlations were generally low (below 0.40), and many correlations were negative. Only manganese and lead positively were correlated for tuna, bluefish, and flounder. The levels of most metals were below those known to cause adverse effects in the fish themselves. However, the levels of arsenic, lead, mercury, and selenium in some fish were in the range known to cause some sublethal effects in sensitive predatory birds and mammals and in some fish exceeded health-based standards. The greatest risk from different metals resided in different fish; the species of fish with the highest levels of a given metal sometimes exceeded the human health guidance or standards for that metal. Thus, the risk information given to the public (mainly about mercury) does not present a complete picture. The potential of harm from other metals suggests that people not only should eat smaller quantities of fish known to accumulate mercury but also should eat a diversity of fish to avoid consuming unhealthy quantities of other heavy metals. However, consumers should bear in mind that standards have a margin of safety.

Burger, Joanna [Division of Life Sciences, 604 Allison Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8082 (United States) and Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute and Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)]. E-mail: burger@biology.rutgers.edu; Gochfeld, Michael [Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute and Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Environmental and Occupational Medicine, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)

2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

469

The role of calcium in the oxygen evolving center of photosystem II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The photosynthetic oxygen evolving complex (OEC) contains a cluster of four manganese atoms and requires both Ca and Cl for activity. Ca can be replaced by Sr with retention of activity. The role of Ca in the OEC has been investigated by performing Mn X-ray absorption experiments on Ca-depleted samples of photosystem II (PS II) and on PS II samples depleted of Ca and reconstituted by either Ca or Sr. Mn X-ray K-edge spectra exhibit no significant differences in oxidation state or symmetry between Ca- and Sr-reactivated preparations, but differences are observed in the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). The amplitude of a Fourier transform peak arising from scatterers at distances greater than 3 A is larger for samples reactivated with strontium relative to calcium. Curve-fitting analyses of the EXAFS data using FEFF 5-calculated parameters favor a model where both manganese and calcium (or strontium) scatterers contribute to the {approximately}3 {Angstrom} Fourier peak (Mn-Mn at 3.3{Angstrom} and Mn-Ca(Sr) at 3.4--3.5 {Angstrom}). Possible structural arrangements for a calcium binding site are discussed. Analysis of Mn K-edge spectra from Ca-depleted samples in the S{sub 1}, S{sub 2}, and S{sub 3} states shows an edge shift on the S{sub 1}-S{sub 2} transition, but no edge shift on the S{sub 2}-S{sub 3} transition, supporting a model where the oxidizing equivalent from the S{sub 2} to S{sub 3} transition is stored on a ligand or nearby protein residue rather than on the Mn cluster. Parallels between Ca-depleted and native samples are discussed.

Latimer, M.J.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Investigation of the relationship between particulate-bound mercury and properties of fly ash in a full-scale 100 MWe pulverized coal combustion boiler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The properties of fly ash in coal-fired boilers influence the emission of mercury from power plants into the environment. In this study, seven different bituminous coals were burned in a full-scale 100 MWe pulverized coal combustion boiler and the derived fly ash samples were collected from a mechanical hopper (MH) and an electrostatic precipitator hopper (ESP). The mercury content, specific surface area (SSA), unburned carbon, and elemental composition of the fly ash samples were analyzed to evaluate the correlation between the concentration of particulate-bound mercury and the properties of coal and fly ash. For a given coal, it was found that the mercury content in the fly ash collected from the ESP was greater than in the fly ash samples collected from the MHP. This phenomenon may be due to a lower temperature of flue gas at the ESP (about 135{sup o}C) compared to the temperature at the air preheater (about 350{sup o}C). Also, a significantly lower SSA observed in MH ash might also contribute to the observation. A comparison of the fly ash samples generated from seven different coals using statistical methods indicates that the mercury adsorbed on ESP fly ashes has a highly positive correlation with the unburned carbon content, manganese content, and SSA of the fly ash. Sulfur content in coal showed a significant negative correlation with the Hg adsorption. Manganese in fly ash is believed to participate in oxidizing volatile elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) to ionic mercury (Hg{sup 2+}). The oxidized mercury in flue gas can form a complex with the fly ash and then get removed before the flue gas leaves the stack of the boiler.

Sen Li; Chin-Min Cheng; Bobby Chen; Yan Cao; Jacob Vervynckt; Amanda Adebambo; Wei-Ping Pan [Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY (United States). Institute for Combustion Science and Environmental Technology

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

471

Process for separation of zirconium-88, rubidium-83 and yttrium-88  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for selective separation of strontium-82 and strontium-85 from proton irradiated molybdenum targets is provided and includes dissolving the molybdenum target in a hydrogen peroxide solution to form a first ion-containing solution, passing the first ion-containing solution through a first cationic resin whereby ions selected from the group consisting of molybdenum, niobium, technetium, selenium, vanadium, arsenic, germanium, zirconium and rubidium remain in the first ion-containing solution while ions selected from the group consisting of rubidium, zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium, strontium, yttrium and zirconium are selectively adsorbed by the first resin, contacting the first resin with an acid solution capable of stripping adsorbed ions from the first cationic exchange resin whereby the adsorbed ions are removed from the first resin to form a second ion-containing solution, evaporating the second ion-containing solution for time sufficient to remove substantially all of the acid and water from the second ion-containing solution whereby a residue remains, dissolving the residue from the evaporated second-ion containing solution in a dilute acid to form a third ion-containing solution, said third ion-containing solution having an acid molarity adapted to permit said ions to be adsorbed by a cationic exchange resin, passing the third ion-containing solution through a second cationic resin whereby the ions are adsorbed by the second resin, contacting the second resin with a dilute sulfuric acid solution whereby the adsorbed ions selected from the group consisting of rubidium, zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium, and zirconium are selectively removed from the second resin, and contacting the second resin with a dilute acid solution whereby the adsorbed strontium ions are selectively removed. Zirconium, rubidium, and yttrium radioisotopes can also be recovered with additional steps.

Heaton, Richard C. (Los Alamos, NM); Jamriska, Sr., David J. (Los Alamos, NM); Taylor, Wayne A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

RADIOISOTOPE AND RADIATION APPLICATIONS. Quarterly Progress Report  

SciTech Connect

An evaluation was given of the possible hazards to consumers from radioisotope residues in consumer products. A laboratory demonstration was given of the use of Mn/sup 54/ to facilitate removal of manganese from process feed water. lt was found in the hazards evaluation that the "worst case" of radiation exposure from residual radioisotopes in steel gives a radiation exposure somewhat less than the maximum allowable dose levels for occupational exposure. Initial study indicates that for actual cases, the radiation exposures to be expected from radioisotope residues in steel products would ordinarily be small compared to natural background. An exception to this generalization might be found when a longer lived isotope like Mn/sup 54/ was present. Preliminary results of the laboratory demonstnation of using Mn/sup 54/ to monitor the removal of manganese from feed water indicated that the method may allow a considerable improvement in accuracy of process control. The study of the mechanism of formation of free radicals in polymeric materials was continued. Emphasis was placed on examination of the effect of structural factors on the efficiency of free-radical site formation in acrylate polymers. The investigation was extended to include an examination of the effect on free-radical formation of the constituents on the carbon atom located alpha to the ester group. Polymethylacrylate, polymethylmethacrylate, and polymethyl- alpha -chloroacrylate were used in this study. Measurement of the volatile products from the irradiation of the polymethyl- alpha -chloroacrylate was completed. The data substantiated earlier findings which indicated that the point of attack in free-radical formation occurs on the ester side chain. (auth)

Sunderman, D.N., ed.

1961-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

473

Slag remelt purification of irradiated vanadium alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes theoretical and scoping experimental efforts to investigate the decontamination potential of a slag remelting process for decontaminating irradiated vanadium alloys. Theoretical calculations, using a commercial thermochemical computer code HSC Chemistry, determined the potential slag compositions and slag-vanadium alloy ratios. The experiment determined the removal characteristics of four surrogate transmutation isotopes (Ca, Y - to simulate Sc, Mn, and Ar) from a V-5Ti-5Cr alloy with calcium fluoride slag. An electroslag remelt furnace was used in the experiment to melt and react the constituents. The process achieved about a 90 percent removal of calcium and over 99 percent removal of yttrium. Analyses indicate that about 40 percent of the manganese may have been removed. Argon analyses indicates that 99.3% of the argon was released from the vanadium alloy in the first melt increasing to 99.7% during the second melt. Powder metallurgy techniques were used to incorporate surrogate transmutation products in the vanadium. A powder mixture was prepared with the following composition: 90 wt % vanadium, 4.7 wt % titanium, 4.7 wt % chromium, 0.35 wt % manganese, 0.35 wt % CaO, and 0.35 wt % Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}. This mixture was packed into 2.54 cm diameter stainless steel tubes. Argon was introduced into the powder mixture by evacuating and backfilling the stainless steel containers to a pressure of 20 kPa (0.2 atm). The tubes were hot isostatically pressed at 207 MPa (2000 atm) and 1473 K to consolidate the metal. An electroslag remelt furnace (crucible dimensions: 5.1 cm diameter by 15.2 cm length) was used to process the vanadium electrodes. Chemical analyses were performed on samples extracted from the slags and ingots. Ingot analyses results are shown below. Values are shown in percent removal of the four targeted elements of the initial compositions.

Carmack, W.J.; Smolik, G.R.; McCarthy, K.A.; Gorman, P.K.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Material and energy flows in the materials production, assembly, and end-of-life stages of the automotive lithium-ion battery life cycle  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document contains material and energy flows for lithium-ion batteries with an active cathode material of lithium manganese oxide (LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}). These data are incorporated into Argonne National Laboratory's Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model, replacing previous data for lithium-ion batteries that are based on a nickel/cobalt/manganese (Ni/Co/Mn) cathode chemistry. To identify and determine the mass of lithium-ion battery components, we modeled batteries with LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} as the cathode material using Argonne's Battery Performance and Cost (BatPaC) model for hybrid electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, and electric vehicles. As input for GREET, we developed new or updated data for the cathode material and the following materials that are included in its supply chain: soda ash, lime, petroleum-derived ethanol, lithium brine, and lithium carbonate. Also as input to GREET, we calculated new emission factors for equipment (kilns, dryers, and calciners) that were not previously included in the model and developed new material and energy flows for the battery electrolyte, binder, and binder solvent. Finally, we revised the data included in GREET for graphite (the anode active material), battery electronics, and battery assembly. For the first time, we incorporated energy and material flows for battery recycling into GREET, considering four battery recycling processes: pyrometallurgical, hydrometallurgical, intermediate physical, and direct physical. Opportunities for future research include considering alternative battery chemistries and battery packaging. As battery assembly and recycling technologies develop, staying up to date with them will be critical to understanding the energy, materials, and emissions burdens associated with batteries.

Dunn, J.B.; Gaines, L.; Barnes, M.; Wang, M.; Sullivan, J. (Energy Systems)

2012-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

475

Superacid catalysis of light hydrocarbon conversion. Sixth quarterly report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Iron- and Manganese-promoted sulfated zirconia is a catalyst for the conversion of propane, but the rate of conversion of propane is much less than the rate of conversion of butane. Whereas this catalyst appears to be a good candidate for practical, industrial conversion of butane, it appears to lack sufficient activity for practical conversion of propane. Perhaps more active catalysts will be useful for propane conversion. The propane conversion data reported here provide excellent insights into the chemistry of the catalytic conversions; they are consistent with the inference that the catalyst is a superacid and that the chemistry is analogous to. that determined in superacid solutions by G.A. Olah, who was awarded the most recent Nobel Prize in chemistry for his work. The catalyst was tested for conversion of propane at 1 bar, 200--300{degrees}C and propane partial pressures in the range of 0.01--0.05 bar. At 250{degrees}C, catalysis was demonstrated, as the number of propane molecules converted was at least 1 per sulfate group after 16 days of operation in a continues flow reactor. Propane was converted in high yield to butanes, but the conversions were low, for example being only a fraction of a percent at a space velocity of 9.1 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} mol(g of catalysis {center_dot} s) and 250{degrees}C. Coke formation was rapid. The observation of butanes, pentanes, and methane as products is consistent with Olah superacid chemistry, whereby propane is first protonated by a very strong acid to form a carbonium ion. The carbonium ion then decomposes into methane and an ethyl cation which undergoes oligocondensation reactions with propane to form higher molecular weight alkanes. The results are consistent with the identification of iron- and manganese-promoted sulfated zirconia as a superacid.

Gates, B.C. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Chaun-Yuan Li  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chaun-Yuan Li Chaun-Yuan Li Radiation Biology Research, Duke University Medical Center Funded Projects Molecular Characterization of the Role of SOD Genes in Mammalian Cellular Response to Low Dose Ionizing, abstract, description. Technical Abstracts 2006 Workshop: The Roles of Superoxide Dismutage (SOD) in Low Dose Radiation Induced Adaptive Response Yang, Z., Chuang, E., Batinic-Haberle, I., and Li, C.-Y. 2005 Workshop: Molecular Characterization of the Roles of SOD Genes in Mammalian Cellular Response to Low Dose Radiation Li, C.-Y., Guo, Z., Yang, Z., and Chuang, E. 2003 Workshop: Molecular Characterization of the Roles of SOD Genes in Mammalian Cellular Response to Low Dose Radiation Li, C.-Y. and Chuang, E. Publications Li, F., Sonveaux, P., Rabbani, Z.N., Liu, S., Yan, B., Huang, Q.,

477

LET and gender are critical factors in accelerating development of lymphoma  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and gender are critical factors in accelerating development of lymphoma and gender are critical factors in accelerating development of lymphoma in irradiated Bax transgenic C57Bl/6 mice James A. Jacobus The University of Iowa Abstract Humans are exposed to sparsely ionizing (low LET) radiation from environmental sources and radiotherapy as well as densely ionizing (high LET) radiation during radiotherapy and from cosmic radiations, particularly during space travel. To test the hypothesis that defects in mitochondrial metabolism leading to increased ROS levels could alter responses to radiation, lymphoma-prone C57Bl/6 mice over expressing the mitochondrial-acting Bax protein in thymocytes (which demonstrate increased steady-state levels of superoxide; FRBM 44: 1677-1686, 2008) were irradiated with both low and high LET radiations and the onset of tumor

478

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rechargeable Li- Rechargeable Li- air battery - overcoming the major obstacles Dong Zheng, Qiang Wang, Deyang Qu University of Massachusetts Boston Xiao-Qing Yang Brookhaven National Laboratory Dilemma of Li air cell M.S. Whittingham, The Holy Grail of Batteries - Lithium air: Reality vs Hype, 219 ECS, 2011 Montreal, Canada G. Girishkumar etc. J Phy. Chem. Lett. 2010, 1, 2193 The obstacles need to be overcome ▸ Rechargeable metallic Li anode ▸ Rechargeable Gas-Diffusion-Electrode ▸ Formation of superoxide ion during the reduction of oxygen - chemical reaction with electrolyte, e.g. PC ▸ Oxygen solubility of diffusion rate - discharge rate. ▸ Solid products from the reduction of Oxygen - Capacity. Catalytic Disproportionation of O 2 - is much faster then its reaction with PC

479

Free radicals induced in aqueous solution by non-contact atmospheric-pressure cold plasma  

SciTech Connect

To understand plasma-induced chemical processing in liquids, we investigated the formation of free radicals in aqueous solution exposed to different types of non-contact atmospheric-pressure helium plasma using the spin-trapping technique. Both hydroxyl radical (OH{center_dot}) and superoxide anion radical (O{sub 2}{sup -}{center_dot}) adducts were observed when neutral oxygen gas was additionally supplied to the plasma. In particular, O{sub 2}{sup -}{center_dot} can be dominantly induced in the solution via oxygen flow into the afterglow gas of helium plasma. This type of plasma treatment can potentially be used in medical applications to control infectious diseases, because the O{sub 2}{sup -}{center_dot} is crucial for sterilization of liquids via atmospheric-pressure plasma.

Tani, Atsushi; Fukui, Satoshi [Department of Earth and Space Science, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Ono, Yusuke; Kitano, Katsuhisa [Center for Atomic and Molecular Technologies, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ikawa, Satoshi [Technology Research Institute of Osaka Prefecture, Izumi, Osaka 594-1157 (Japan)

2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

480

INITIAL CHARACTERIZATIONS AND SRAT SIMULATIONS OF FOUR SLUDGE MATRIX STUDY SIMULANTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) initiated a sludge matrix study to evaluate the impact of changing insoluble solid composition on the processing characteristics of slurries in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Three compositional ranges were developed for three groups of elements in the waste. The first was high iron/low aluminum versus low iron/high aluminum. The second was high calcium-manganese/low nickel, chromium, and magnesium versus low calcium-manganese/high nickel, chromium, and magnesium. The third was high noble metals (Ag, Pd, Rh, Ru) versus low noble metals. These three options can be combined to form eight distinct sludge compositions. The sludge matrix study called for testing each of these eight simulants near the minimum acid required for nitrite destruction and at a second acid level that produced significant hydrogen by noble metal catalyzed decomposition of formic acid. Four simulants were prepared based on the four possible combinations of the Al/Fe and Mn-Ca/Mg-Ni-Cr options. Preliminary simulant preparation work has already been documented. The four simulants can be used for both high and low noble metal concentration testing and high and low acid testing. This report summarizes preliminary testing of each of the four simulants at low noble metals and low acid stoichiometry. The remaining matrix study tests are on hold. Chemically processed simulant was needed for U. S. Department of Energy-Office of Environmental Management and DWPF funded melt rate studies. Therefore, a preliminary assessment of the processing characteristics of the four sludge matrix simulants was completed using the low noble metal concentration option to meet this need. Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) testing was at low total acid stoichiometry (near the minimum acid end of the stoichiometric acid window). Composition and physical property measurements were made on the SRAT products. Updated values for formate loss and nitrite-to-nitrate conversion were found that can be used in the acid calculations for future sludge matrix process simulations. A reasonable determination of the minimum acid requirement for nitrite destruction was found to be slightly less than 105% of the Koopman minimum stoichiometric acid equation prediction for all four simulants at the low noble metal concentrations. The Koopman minimum stoichiometric acid equation is based on supernate carbonate, plus total Mg and Ca, in addition to the usual DWPF inputs such as base equivalents and Mn. This group of four tests extends the range of bulk insoluble solids concentrations over which the new Koopman minimum stoichiometric acid equation has been validated. The low iron-low manganese case appeared to have somewhat more excess acid than the other three combinations. Preliminary results of the initial testing indicate: (1) Hydrogen generation rate was not an issue in these tests. (2) Mercury stripping was less efficient than expected at about 1000 g steam/g mercury stripped. Only about 25% of the initial concentration of 1.5 wt% Hg in the total solids was removed in 13-14 hours of boiling, when 70% needed to be removed to meet the DWPF SRAT product specification of 0.45 wt% in the total solids. (3) Foaminess was not an issue using the nominal antifoam addition strategy in these tests. (4) Ammonia generation was not an issue based on off-gas condensate analyses. (5) One of the SRAT products (an HM-type simulant) was much more viscous than the other three SRAT products even though it had the lowest wt% insoluble solids. More comprehensive results concerning the impact of insoluble solids composition on processing, melt rate, etc. must await completion of the full sludge matrix study experimental scope.

Koopman,D.; Lambert, D.

2009-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

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481

REMOVING SLUDGE HEELS FROM SAVANNAH RIVER SITE WASTE TANKS BY OXALIC ACID DISSOLUTION  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) will remove sludge as part of waste tank closure operations. Typically the bulk sludge is removed by mixing it with supernate to produce a slurry, and transporting the slurry to a downstream tank for processing. Experience shows that a residual heel may remain in the tank that cannot be removed by this conventional technique. In the past, SRS used oxalic acid solutions to disperse or dissolve the sludge heel to complete the waste removal. To better understand the actual conditions of oxalic acid cleaning of waste from carbon steel tanks, the authors developed and conducted an experimental program to determine its effectiveness in dissolving sludge, the hydrogen generation rate, the generation rate of other gases, the carbon steel corrosion rate, the impact of mixing on chemical cleaning, the impact of temperature, and the types of precipitates formed during the neutralization process. The test samples included actual SRS sludge and simulated SRS sludge. The authors performed the simulated waste tests at 25, 50, and 75 C by adding 8 wt % oxalic acid to the sludge over seven days. They conducted the actual waste tests at 50 and 75 C by adding 8 wt % oxalic acid to the sludge as a single batch. Following the testing, SRS conducted chemical cleaning with oxalic acid in two waste tanks. In Tank 5F, the oxalic acid (8 wt %) addition occurred over seven days, followed by inhibited water to ensure the tank contained enough liquid to operate the mixer pumps. The tank temperature during oxalic acid addition and dissolution was approximately 45 C. The authors analyzed samples from the chemical cleaning process and compared it with test data. The conclusions from the work are: (1) Oxalic acid addition proved effective in dissolving sludge heels in the simulant demonstration, the actual waste demonstration, and in SRS Tank 5F. (2) The oxalic acid dissolved {approx} 100% of the uranium, {approx} 100% of the iron, and {approx} 40% of the manganese during a single contact in the simulant demonstration. (The iron dissolution may be high due to corrosion of carbon steel coupons.) (3) The oxalic acid dissolved {approx} 80% of the uranium, {approx} 70% of the iron, {approx} 50% of the manganese, and {approx} 90% of the aluminum in the actual waste demonstration for a single contact. (4) The oxalic acid dissolved {approx} 100% of the uranium, {approx} 15% of the iron, {approx} 40% of the manganese, and {approx} 80% of the aluminum in Tank 5F during the first contact cycle. Except for the iron, these results agree well with the demonstrations. The data suggest that a much larger fraction of the iron in the sludge dissolved, but it re-precipitated with the oxalate added to Tank 5F. (5) The demonstrations produced large volumes (i.e., 2-14 gallons of gas/gallon of oxalic acid) of gas (primarily carbon dioxide) by the reaction of oxalic acid with sludge and carbon steel. (6) The reaction of oxalic acid with carbon steel produced hydrogen in the simulant and actual waste demonstrations. The volume produced varied from 0.00002-0.00100 ft{sup 3} hydrogen/ft{sup 2} carbon steel. The hydrogen production proved higher in unmixed tanks than in mixed tanks.

Poirier, M; David Herman, D; Fernando Fondeur, F; John Pareizs, J; Michael Hay, M; Bruce Wiersma, B; Kim Crapse, K; Thomas Peters, T; Samuel Fink, S; Donald Thaxton, D

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

IMPACT OF NOBLE METALS AND MERCURY ON HYDROGEN GENERATION DURING HIGH LEVEL WASTE PRETREATMENT AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site vitrifies radioactive High Level Waste (HLW) for repository internment. The process consists of three major steps: waste pretreatment, vitrification, and canister decontamination/sealing. HLW consists of insoluble metal hydroxides (primarily iron, aluminum, calcium, magnesium, manganese, and uranium) and soluble sodium salts (carbonate, hydroxide, nitrite, nitrate, and sulfate). The pretreatment process in the Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) consists of two process tanks, the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) as well as a melter feed tank. During SRAT processing, nitric and formic acids are added to the sludge to lower pH, destroy nitrite and carbonate ions, and reduce mercury and manganese. During the SME cycle, glass formers are added, and the batch is concentrated to the final solids target prior to vitrification. During these processes, hydrogen can be produced by catalytic decomposition of excess formic acid. The waste contains silver, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, and mercury, but silver and palladium have been shown to be insignificant factors in catalytic hydrogen generation during the DWPF process. A full factorial experimental design was developed to ensure that the existence of statistically significant two-way interactions could be determined without confounding of the main effects with the two-way interaction effects. Rh ranged from 0.0026-0.013% and Ru ranged from 0.010-0.050% in the dried sludge solids, while initial Hg ranged from 0.5-2.5 wt%, as shown in Table 1. The nominal matrix design consisted of twelve SRAT cycles. Testing included: a three factor (Rh, Ru, and Hg) study at two levels per factor (eight runs), three duplicate midpoint runs, and one additional replicate run to assess reproducibility away from the midpoint. M