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1

Viscosity of Liquid Sodium and Potassium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

2 November 1936 research-article Viscosity of Liquid Sodium and Potassium Y. S. Chiong The Royal Society is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve, and extend...

1936-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Neutron Activation Analysis of Manganese and Sodium in Bacterial Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Metabolism and Products Neutron Activation Analysis of Manganese and Sodium...Columbus, Ohio 43210. The application of neutron activation analysis for mineral determinations...two elements. The results indicate that neutron activation analysis is readily applicable...

Woodrow B. Krueger; Walter E. Carey; Bruno J. Kolodzeij

1970-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Alternatives for sodium-potassium alloy treatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sodium-potassium alloy (NaK) is currently treated at the Y-12 Plant by open burning. Due to uncertainties with future permits for this process alternative treatment methods were investigated, revealing that two treatment processes are feasible. One process reacts the NaK with water in a highly concentrated molten caustic solution (sodium and potassium hydroxide). The final waste is a caustic that may be used elsewhere in the plant. This process has two safety concerns: Hot corrosive materials used throughout the process present handling difficulties and the process must be carefully controlled (temperature and water content) to avoid explosive NaK reactions. To avoid these problems a second process was developed that dissolves NaK in a mixture of propylene glycol and water at room temperature. While this process is safer, it generates more waste than the caustic process. The waste may possibly be used as a carbon food source in biological waste treatment operations at the Y-12 Plant. Experiments were conducted to demonstrate both processes, and they showed that both processes are feasible alternatives for NaK treatment. Process flow sheets with mass balances were generated for both processes and compared. While the caustic process generates less waste, the propylene glycol process is safer in several ways (temperature, material handling, and reaction control). The authors recommend that the propylene glycol alternative be pursued further as an alternative for NaK treatment. To optimize this process for a larger scale several experiments should be conducted. The amount of NaK dissolved in propylene glycol and subsequent waste generated should be optimized. The offgas processes should be optimized. The viability of using this waste as a carbon food source at one of the Y-12 Plant treatment facilities should be investigated. If the state accepts this process as an alternative, design and construction of a pilot-scale treatment system should begin.

Takacs, T.J.; Johnson, M.E.

1993-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

4

Sodium and potassium levels in the serum of acutely irradiated and non-irradiated rats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SODIUM AND POTASSIUM LEVELS IN THE SERUM OF ACUTELY IRRADIATED AND NON-IRRADIATED RATS A Thesis By DAVID PRESTON SHEPHERD Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1967 Major Subject: Zoology SODIUM AND POTASSIUM LEVELS IN THE SERUM OF ACUTELY IRRADIATED AND NON-IRRADIATED RATS A Thesis By DAVID PRESTON SHEPHERD Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head...

Shepherd, David Preston

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

5

Diffusion of sodium, potassium, calcium, manganese, and radon in tuff and clinoptilolite under leaching  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear physics methods are used to determine the diffusion coefficients of Na, Ca, Mn, K, and 222Rn in clinoptilolite (Sokirnitsa occurrence, Ukraine) and in natural tuff (Yucca Mountain, Nevada, United States) ...

N. P. Dikii; A. N. Dovbnya; Yu. V. Lyashko; D. V. Medvedev…

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Roderick MacKinnon and Ion Channels - Potassium Channels and Sodium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Roderick MacKinnon and Ion Channels Roderick MacKinnon and Ion Channels Resources with Additional Information · Patents Roderick MacKinnon Courtesy of The Rockefeller University Roderick MacKinnon, M.D., a visiting researcher at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory, is a recipient of the 2003 Nobel Prize in Chemistry 'for structural and mechanistic studies of ion channels.' His research explains "how a class of proteins helps to generate nerve impulses - the electrical activity that underlies all movement, sensation, and perhaps even thought. The work leading to the prize was done primarily at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source [CHESS] and the National Synchrotron Light Source [NSLS] at Brookhaven. The proteins, called ion channels, are tiny pores that stud the surface of all of our cells. These channels allow the passage of potassium, calcium, sodium, and chloride molecules called ions. Rapid-fire opening and closing of these channels releases ions, moving electrical impulses from the brain in a wave to their destination in the body."1

7

Bench-scale screening tests for a boiling sodium-potassium alloy solar receiver  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bench-scale tests were carried out in support of the design of a second-generation 75-kW{sub t} reflux pool-boiler solar receiver. The receiver will be made from Haynes Alloy 230 and will contain the sodium-potassium alloy NaK-78. The bench-scale tests used quartz-lamp-heated boilers to screen candidate boiling-stabilization materials and methods at temperatures up to 750{degree}C. Candidates that provided stable boiling were tested for hot-restart behavior. Poor stability was obtained with single 1/4-inch diameter patches of powdered metal hot-press-sintered onto the wetted side of the heat-input area. Laser-drilled and electric-discharge-machined cavities in the heated surface also performed poorly. Small additions of xenon, and heated-surface tilt out of the vertical dramatically improved poor boiling stability; additions of helium or oxygen did not. The most stable boiling was obtained when the entire heat-input area was covered by a powdered-metal coating. The effect of heated-area size was assessed for one coating: at low incident fluxes, when even this coating performed poorly, increasing the heated-area size markedly improved boiling stability. Good hot-restart behavior was not observed with any candidate, although results were significantly better with added xenon in a boiler shortened from 3 to 2 feet. In addition to the screening tests, flash-radiography imaging of metal-vapor bubbles during boiling was attempted. Contrary to the Cole-Rohsenow correlation, these bubble-size estimates did not vary with pressure; instead they were constant, consistent with the only other alkali metal measurements, but about 1/2 their size.

Moreno, J.B.; Moss, T.A.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Discovery of Sodium and Potassium Vapor in the Atmosphere of the Moon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...lunar atmosphere: Solar-wind implantation and subsequent release of sodium, solar wind-driven sputtering of sodium...internal release. Solar-wind implantation can only supply...near the south pole at large local solar zenith angles suggests...

A. E. Potter; T. H. Morgan

1988-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

9

A High Temperature (400 to 650oC) Secondary Storage Battery Based on Liquid Sodium and Potassium Anodes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This STTR Phase I research program was on the development of high temperature (400 to 650 C), secondary batteries with roundtrip efficiency > 90% for integration with a 3 to 10 kW solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system. In fulfillment of this objective, advanced planar high temperature rechargeable batteries, comprised of an alkali metal ion conducting, highly refractory, beta'' alumina solid electrolyte (BASE) sandwiched between liquid sodium (or potassium) anode and liquid metal salt cathode, were developed at MSRI. The batteries have been successfully demonstrated at a working temperature as high as 600 C. To our knowledge, so far no work has been reported in the literature on planar rechargeable batteries based on BASE, and results obtained in Phase I for the very first time demonstrated the viability of planar batteries, though relatively low temperature tubular-based sodium-sulfur batteries and ZEBRA batteries have been actively developed by very limited non U.S. companies. The results of this Phase I work have fulfilled all the goals and stated objectives, and the achievements showed much promise for further, substantial improvements in battery design and performance. The important results of Phase I are briefly described in what follows: (1) Both Na-BASE and K-BASE discs and tubes have been successfully fabricated using MSRI's patented vapor phase process. Ionic conductivity measurements showed that Na-BASE had higher ionic conductivity than K-BASE, consistence with the literature. At 500 C, Na-BASE conductivity is 0.36 S/cm, which is more than 20 times higher than 8YSZ electrolyte used for SOFC at 800 C. The activation energy is 22.58 kJ/mol. (2) CuCl{sub 2}, FeCl{sub 2}, ZnCl{sub 2}, and AgCl were identified as suitable salts for Na/metal salt or K/metal salt electrochemical couples based on thermochemical data. Further open circuit voltage measurements matched those deduced from the thermochemical data. (3) Tubular cells with CuCl{sub 2} as the cathode and Na as the anode were constructed. However, it was discovered that CuCl{sub 2} was somewhat corrosive and dissolved iron, an element of the cathode compartment. Since protective coating technology was beyond this Phase I work scope, no further work on the CuCl{sub 2} cathode was pursued in Phase I. Notwithstanding, due to its very high OCV and high specific energy, CuCl{sub 2} cathode is a very attractive possibility for a battery capable of delivering higher specific energy with higher voltage. Further investigation of the Na-CuCl{sub 2} battery can be done by using suitable metal coating technologies developed at MSRI for high temperature applications. (4) In Phase I, FeCl{sub 2} and ZnCl{sub 2} were finalized as the potential cathodes for Na-metal salt batteries for delivering high specific energies. Planar Na-FeCl{sub 2} and Na-ZnCl{sub 2} cells were designed, constructed, and tested between 350 and 600 C. Investigation of charge/discharge characteristics showed they were the most promising batteries. Charge/discharge cycles were performed as many as 27 times, and charge/discharge current was as high as 500 mA. No failure was detected after 50 hours testing. (5) Three-cell planar stacks were designed, constructed, and evaluated. Preliminary tests showed further investigation was needed for optimization. (6) Freeze-thaw survival was remarkably good for planar BASE discs fabricated by MSRI's patented vapor phase process.

Tao, Greg; Weber, Neill

2007-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

10

Investigation of different manganese ores as oxygen carriers in chemical-looping combustion (CLC) for solid fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The chemical-looping combustion (CLC) process is a novel solution for efficient combustion with direct capture of carbon dioxide. The process uses a metal oxide as an oxygen carrier to transfer oxygen from an air to a fuel reactor, where the fuel reacts with the solid oxygen carrier. In this work, six different manganese ores are investigated as oxygen carriers for CLC application. The chemical-looping characteristics of the oxygen carriers were evaluated in a laboratory-scale fluidized-bed reactor in the temperature range of 900–970 °C during alternating reducing and oxidizing conditions. Three of the manganese ores showed a small oxygen release in inert environment between 850 and 950 °C. During reactivity tests, the gas yield with methane increased with the temperature and complete conversion of 50% CO in H2 was obtained for all of the ores. The rates of char gasification of two fuels, namely Mexican petroleum coke and Swedish wood char, were compared for the different manganese ores at 970 °C and with 50% H2O in N2 as fluidizing gas. Ilmenite and a manufactured Mn-oxide oxygen carrier consisting of Mn3O4 and MgO-stabilized ZrO2 as support were also included for comparison. The char gasification rate and the gas conversion were higher with the manganese ores and the Mn-oxide oxygen carrier compared to ilmenite. However, the higher reactivity of the manganese ores with H2 and the ensuing decrease in H2 inhibition for manganese ores is not sufficient to explain their higher rate of char gasification. Surface analysis of partially gasified petcoke particles in the presence of manganese ores showed formation of cavities and channels as well as a uniform distribution of potassium and sodium elements. The rate of char gasification also increased with the concentration of potassium and sodium impurities in the manganese ores. Thus the results suggest that the increased rate of char conversion for manganese ores is due to alkali-catalyzed steam gasification. The increase in rate of char gasification, in combination with potentially low costs of these materials suggests that manganese ores could be interesting materials for CLC with solid fuels.

Mehdi Arjmand; Henrik Leion; Tobias Mattisson; Anders Lyngfelt

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Vapour pressures, densities, and viscosities of the (water + lithium bromide + potassium acetate) system and (water + lithium bromide + sodium lactate) system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Measurements of thermophysical properties (vapour pressure, density, and viscosity) of the (water + lithium bromide + potassium acetate) system LiBr:CH3COOK = 2:1 by mass ratio and the (water + lithium bromide + sodium lactate) system LiBr:CH3CH(OH)COONa = 2:1 by mass ratio were measured. The system, a possible new working fluid for absorption heat pump, consists of absorbent (LiBr + CH3COOK) or (LiBr + CH3CH(OH)COONa) and refrigerant H2O. The vapour pressures were measured in the ranges of temperature and absorbent concentration from T = (293.15 to 333.15) K and from mass fraction 0.20 to 0.50, densities and viscosities were measured from T = (293.15 to 323.15) K and from mass fraction 0.20 to 0.40. The experimental data were correlated with an Antoine-type equation. Densities and viscosities were measured in the same range of temperature and absorbent concentration as that of the vapour pressure. Regression equations for densities and viscosities were obtained with a minimum mean square error criterion.

Antonio de Lucas; Marina Donate; Juan F. Rodríguez

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Microstructural characteristics of chemically processed manganese oxide nanofibers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nanostructured fibrous manganese oxide cryptomelane-type hollandite powders were prepared via a chemical route. Powders were obtained by the chemical reaction of the aqueous solutions of potassium permanganate and manganese sulfate in the presence of a strong acid, followed by crystalline growth at elevated temperatures. These powders were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Rietveld refinement, analytical scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) combined with micro-micro diffraction ({mu}{mu}d), and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The crystalline structure, morphology, crystallite size, fiber growth direction, and structural defects are discussed.

Xiao, T.D. [CIMAV, Chihuahua (Mexico). Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados] [CIMAV, Chihuahua (Mexico). Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados; [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States). Connecticut Advanced Technology Center for Precision Manufacturing; Bokhimi; Benaissa, M.; Perez, R.; Yacaman, M.J. [Univ. Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City (Mexico). Inst. de Fisica] [Univ. Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City (Mexico). Inst. de Fisica; Strutt, P.R. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States). Connecticut Advanced Technology Center for Precision Manufacturing] [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States). Connecticut Advanced Technology Center for Precision Manufacturing

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Manganese carbonate additive for manganese dioxide-containing nonaqueous cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A nonaqueous cell employing a manganese dioxide-containing solid cathode having a minor amount of manganese carbonate to improve the pulse voltage capability of the cell at low temperatures such as -10/sup 0/ C.

Langan, R.A.

1984-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

14

It's Elemental - The Element Manganese  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chromium Chromium Previous Element (Chromium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Iron) Iron The Element Manganese [Click for Isotope Data] 25 Mn Manganese 54.938045 Atomic Number: 25 Atomic Weight: 54.938045 Melting Point: 1519 K (1246°C or 2275°F) Boiling Point: 2334 K (2061°C or 3742°F) Density: 7.3 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 4 Group Number: 7 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Latin word for magnet, magnes. Say what? Manganese is pronounced as MAN-ge-nees. History and Uses: Proposed to be an element by Carl Wilhelm Scheele in 1774, manganese was discovered by Johan Gottlieb Gahn, a Swedish chemist, by heating the mineral pyrolusite (MnO2) in the presence of charcoal later that year.

15

Scattering lengths for collisions between sodium and potassium atoms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Venturi,V. Jamieson,M.J. Cote,R. Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics, Vol. 34 pp 4339-4347

Venturi, V.

16

Treating electrolytic manganese residue with alkaline additives for stabilizing manganese and removing ammonia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electrolytic manganese residue (EMR) from the electrolytic manganese industry is a solid waste containing mainly calcium sulfate dihydrate and quartzite. It is impossible to directly use the EMR as a building mat...

Changbo Zhou; Jiwei Wang; Nanfang Wang

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

New manganese catalyst for light alkane oxidation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Aluminophosphates containing manganese in the structural framework are employed for the oxidation of alkanes, for example the vapor phase oxidation of methane to methanol.

Durante, Vincent A. (West Chester, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA); Walker, Darrell W. (Visalia, CA); Marcus, Bonita K. (Radnor, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Addressing the Voltage Fade Issue with Lithium-Manganese-Rich...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Addressing the Voltage Fade Issue with Lithium-Manganese-Rich Oxide Cathode Materials Addressing the Voltage Fade Issue with Lithium-Manganese-Rich Oxide Cathode Materials 2013 DOE...

19

Molecular Interactions of Plutonium(VI) with SyntheticManganese...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Plutonium(VI) with Synthetic Manganese-Substituted Goethite. Abstract: Plutonium(VI) sorption on the surface of well-characterized synthetic manganese-substituted goethite...

20

Effects of dietary potassium and sodium on magnesium and potassium balance in lambs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

allow a more adequate evaluation of the K status of an animal. Magnesium (Mg) absorption is depressed when animals are fed high levels of K (Greene, 1983a, b, c; Field and Suttle, 1979; MacGregor and Armstrong, 1979; Thomas and Potter, 1976; Suttle... reserves of K in contrast to the bone reserves of Ca, Mg, Na or P. The normal kidney functions to remove excess K from the plasma and even under dangerously low body K concentrations, renal excretion of X continues. Cowan and Phillips (1973) observed a...

Poe, Julie Hamilton

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

It's Elemental - The Element Potassium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Argon Argon Previous Element (Argon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Calcium) Calcium The Element Potassium [Click for Isotope Data] 19 K Potassium 39.0983 Atomic Number: 19 Atomic Weight: 39.0983 Melting Point: 336.53 K (63.38°C or 146.08°F) Boiling Point: 1032 K (759°C or 1398°F) Density: 0.89 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 4 Group Number: 1 Group Name: Alkali Metal What's in a name? From the English word potash. Potassium's chemical symbol comes from the Latin word for alkali, kalium. Say what? Potassium is pronounced as poh-TASS-ee-em. History and Uses: Although potassium is the eighth most abundant element on earth and comprises about 2.1% of the earth's crust, it is a very reactive element

22

Drinking Water Problems: Iron and Manganese  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Iron and manganese can give water an unpleasant taste, odor and color. In this publication you'll learn how to know whether your water contains iron or manganese and how to eliminate these contaminants with various treatment methods such as aeration...

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

2004-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

23

Original article Intestinal transfer of manganese  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Original article Intestinal transfer of manganese: resemblance to and competition with calcium Y of calcium, phosphate and the sugars lactose and sorbitol on the intestinal absorption of manganese were retention of 54Mn, while phosphate decreased it. In situ ileal loop studies indicated that Mn absorption

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

24

Genetic Analysis of Salt Tolerance in Arabidopsis: Evidence for a Critical Role of Potassium Nutrition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...certain threshold levels in the presence of excess external Na+ is critical for plant growth...7447-40-7 Potassium Chloride 7447-41-8 Lithium Chloride 7647-14-5 Sodium Chloride...Methanesulfonate Fast Neutrons Genes, Plant Lithium Chloride pharmacology Mutagenesis Osmolar...

Jian-Kang Zhu; Jiping Liu; Liming Xiong

25

potassium | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate Project No.: FC26-02NT41440 Pilot Plant at the University of Texas Pilot Plant at the University of Texas The...

26

The Transference Numbers of Potassium Bromide in Aqueous Solution at 25°C  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The transference numbers for aqueous solutions of potassium bromide at 25°C have been determined by the moving boundary method. Cells with cadmium bromide and lithium bromide as cation indicators and with potassium iodate as anion indicator were employed. The measurements are more difficult than with potassium and sodium chlorides; with sheared junctions a thorough investigation of the effect of indicator concentration is necessary for each solution studied and the same is true with both sheared and autogenic boundaries of the effect of current density. The results differ slightly from those previously reported by Longsworth but are consistent with the known value of t + 0. Potassium bromide also differs from the alkali chlorides and acetates in that the Longsworth function t + 0? is not linear in the concentration thus precluding an independent extrapolation of the transference data.

A. G. Keenan; A. R. Gordon

1943-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Recycling of sodium waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recycling of sodium waste ... Methods for handling and recycling a dangerous and costly chemical. ...

Bettina Hubler-Blank; Michael Witt; Herbert W. Roesky

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Structural Determination of Marine Bacteriogenic Manganese Oxides  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

fig 2 Figure 2. (A) X-ray diffraction intensity data for bacteriogenic manganese oxides produced in sea water. The bottom pattern is for clean cells. (B) X-ray diffraction...

29

Stark broadening of potassium lines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recently published Stark broadening data of potassium ns-4p and nd-4p lines have been reexamined. Newly derived data are compared with theoretical results obtained from a simple approximative formula. The experiment agrees with theoretical results, in average, within ±20%.

N. Konjevi?

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Promises and Challenges of Lithium- and Manganese-Rich Transition...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Promises and Challenges of Lithium- and Manganese-Rich Transition-Metal Layered-Oxide Cathodes Promises and Challenges of Lithium- and Manganese-Rich Transition-Metal Layered-Oxide...

31

Multivalent Manganese Hydrazide Gels for Kubas-Type Hydrogen Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Manganese(II) hydrazide gels designed for Kubas-type hydrogen storage were synthesized from the reaction between bis(trimethylsilylmethyl) manganese and anhydrous hydrazine. The synthetic materials were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, nitrogen ...

Tuan K. A. Hoang; Leah Morris; Jeremy M. Rawson; Michel L. Trudeau; David M. Antonelli

2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

32

THE STATE OF MANGANESE IN THE PHOTOSYNTHETIC APPARATUS. II. X-RAY ABSORPTION EDGE STUDIES ON MANGANESE IN PHOTOSYNTHETIC MEMBRANES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

oxygen evolving capabilities ed X) These preparations are reported to have 4-6 manganese atoms per photochemical reaction center(

Kirby, J.A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

First-principles characterization of potassium intercalation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

intercalation in the hexagonal 2H-MoS2. Abstract: Periodic density functional theory calculations were performed to study the structural and electronic properties of potassium...

34

Structural Evaluation and Solution Integrity of Alkali Metal Salt Complexes of the Manganese 12-Metallacrown-4 (12-MC-4) Structural Type  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of crystalline salts (LiCl2)[12-MCMn(III)N(shi)-4]- ([(LiCl2),1]-), (Li(trifluoro- acetate))[12-MCMn(III)N(shi)-4:1 metal:metallacrown adducts with lithium and 2:1 metal:metallacrown complexes with sodium and potassium

Gibney, Brian R.

35

Sensory and physical characteristics of reduced sodium, chunked and formed hams from hot-processed, electrically stimulated pork carcasses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

treatment, were subdivided into two equal groups, deboned and injected with brine containing sodium nitrite (0. 1X), dextrose (1. 25X), sodium erythorbate (0. 42K), sodium phosphate (0. 5X), and chloride salt (15. 0X) consisting of either sodium chloride... (NaC1) or equivalent amounts of NaC1 and potassium chloride (KC1). Within each salt treatment, hams were tumbled for 1, 2 or 3 hr and vacuum stuffed into pre-stuck fibrous casings. All hams were cooked to an internal temperature of 65 C, chilled...

Bohac, Joseph John

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

36

Manganese-Based Magnets: Manganese-Based Permanent Magnet with 40 MGOe at 200°C  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

REACT Project: PNNL is working to reduce the cost of wind turbines and EVs by developing a manganese-based nano-composite magnet that could serve as an inexpensive alternative to rare-earth-based magnets. The manganese composite, made from low-cost and abundant materials, could exceed the performance of today’s most powerful commercial magnets at temperature higher than 200°C. Members of PNNL’s research team will leverage comprehensive computer high-performance supercomputer modeling and materials testing to meet this objective. Manganese-based magnets could withstand higher temperatures than their rare earth predecessors and potentially reduce the need for any expensive, bulky engine cooling systems for the motor and generator. This would further contribute to cost savings for both EVs and wind turbines.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Submersible sodium pump  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electromagnetic submerged pump has an outer cylindrical stator with an inner cylindrical conductive core for the submerged pumping of sodium in the cylindrical interstitial volume defined between the stator and core. The cylindrical interstitial volume is typically vertically oriented, and defines an inlet at the bottom and an outlet at the top. The outer stator generates upwardly conveyed toroidal magnetic fields, which fields convey preferably from the bottom of the pump to the top of the pump liquid sodium in the cold leg of a sodium cooled nuclear reactor. The outer cylindrical stator has a vertically disposed duct surrounded by alternately stacked layers of coil units and laminates. 14 figs.

Brynsvold, G.V.; Lopez, J.T.; Olich, E.E.; West, C.W.

1989-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

38

Differential effects of sodium on hydrogen- and glucose-dependent growth of the acetogenic bacterium Acetogenium kivui.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...0.012i FIG. 3. Effects of sodium, lithium, and potassium on the H2d dependent growth...represent the amount of biomass formed in excess of the inoculum. d Growth after a 3-day...represent the amount of biomass formed in excess of the inoculum. c Acetate (millimolar...

H C Yang; H L Drake

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Why sequence freshwater manganese depositing β-proteobacterium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

freshwater manganese depositing β-proteobacterium freshwater manganese depositing β-proteobacterium (Siderocapsaceae)? Stream biofilms are key component of stream food webs and contain bacteria that contribute to the carbon and nitrogen cycles. A slow-growing bacterium isolated from a freshwater stream biofilm has potential bioenergy and bioremediation applications. JOSHI_001 is part of a class of bacteria that deposit iron and manganese precipitates externally to the colony early in its life cycle and could be used for fuel cells and to help clean up manganese contaminated water. Members of the Siderocapsaceae family to which JOSHI_001 belongs have been observed in biofilms for the past century, but have never before been isolated and cultivated in a laboratory environment. As a result, researchers have not been able to learn about the

40

Studies of potassium-promoted nickel catalysts for methane steam reforming: Effect of surface potassium location  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The effect of potassium addition to the Ni/Al2O3 steam reforming catalyst has been investigated on several model systems, including K/Al2O3 with various amounts of alkali promoters (1–4 wt% of K2O), a model catalyst 90%NiO-10%Al2O3 promoted with potassium and a commercial catalyst. The potassium surface state and stability were investigated by means of the Species Resolved Thermal Alkali Desorption method (SR-TAD). The activity of the catalysts in the steam reforming of methane and their coking-resistance were also evaluated. The results reveal that the beneficial effect of potassium addition is strongly related to its location in the catalysts. The catalyst surface should be promoted with potassium in order to obtain high coking-resistant catalysts. Moreover, the catalyst preparation procedure should ensure a direct interaction of potassium with the Al2O3 support surface. Due to the low stability of potassium on ?-Al2O3 this phase is undesirable during the preparation of a stable steam reforming catalyst.

Tadeusz Borowiecki; Andrzej Denis; Micha? Rawski; Andrzej Go??biowski; Kazimierz Sto?ecki; Jaromir Dmytrzyk; Andrzej Kotarba

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Proton conductivity of potassium doped barium zirconates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Potassium doped barium zirconates have been synthesized by solid state reactions. It was found that the solubility limit of potassium on A-sites is between 5% and 10%. Introducing extra potassium leads to the formation of second phase or YSZ impurities. The water uptake of barium zirconates was increased even with 5% doping of potassium at the A-site. The sintering conditions and conductivity can be improved significantly by adding 1 wt% ZnO during material synthesis. The maximum solubility for yttrium at B-sites is around 15 at% after introducing 1 wt% zinc. The conductivity of Ba{sub 0.95}K{sub 0.05}Zr{sub 0.85}Y{sub 0.11}Zn{sub 0.04}O{sub 3-{delta}} at 600 deg. C is 2.2x10{sup -3} S/cm in wet 5% H{sub 2}. The activation energies for bulk and grain boundary are 0.29(2), 0.79(2) eV in wet 5% H{sub 2} and 0.31(1), 0.74(3) eV in dry 5% H{sub 2}. A power density of 7.7 mW/cm{sup 2} at 718 deg. C was observed when a 1 mm thick Ba{sub 0.95}K{sub 0.05}Zr{sub 0.85}Y{sub 0.11}Zn{sub 0.04}O{sub 3-{delta}} pellet was used as electrolyte and platinum electrodes. - Graphical abstract: Potassium doped barium zirconates have been synthesized by solid state reactions. It was found that the solubility limit of potassium on A-sites is between 5% and 10 %. The sintering conditions and conductivity can be improved significantly by adding 1 wt% ZnO during material synthesis. Five percent doping of potassium at A-site can double the total conductivity.

Xu Xiaoxiang [School of Chemistry, University of St. Andrews, Fife KY16 9ST (United Kingdom); Tao Shanwen, E-mail: s.tao@hw.ac.u [School of Chemistry, University of St. Andrews, Fife KY16 9ST (United Kingdom); Department of Chemistry, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Irvine, John T.S. [School of Chemistry, University of St. Andrews, Fife KY16 9ST (United Kingdom)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

42

It's Elemental - The Element Sodium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Neon Neon Previous Element (Neon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Magnesium) Magnesium The Element Sodium [Click for Isotope Data] 11 Na Sodium 22.98976928 Atomic Number: 11 Atomic Weight: 22.98976928 Melting Point: 370.95 K (97.80°C or 208.04°F) Boiling Point: 1156 K (883°C or 1621°F) Density: 0.97 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 3 Group Number: 1 Group Name: Alkali Metal What's in a name? From the English word soda and from the Medieval Latin word sodanum, which means "headache remedy." Sodium's chemical symbol comes from the Latin word for sodium carbonate, natrium. Say what? Sodium is pronounced as SO-dee-em. History and Uses: Although sodium is the sixth most abundant element on earth and comprises

43

Xenon in Mercury-Manganese Stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Previous studies of elemental abundances in Mercury-Manganese (HgMn) stars have occasionally reported the presence of lines of the ionized rare noble gas Xe II, especially in a few of the hottest stars with Teff ~ 13000--15000 K. A new study of this element has been undertaken using observations from Lick Observatory's Hamilton Echelle Spectrograph. In this work, the spectrum synthesis program UCLSYN has been used to undertake abundance analysis assuming LTE. We find that in the Smith & Dworetsky sample of HgMn stars, Xe is vastly over-abundant in 21 of 22 HgMn stars studied, by factors of 3.1--4.8 dex. There does not appear to be a significant correlation of Xe abundance with Teff. A comparison sample of normal late B stars shows no sign of Xe II lines that could be detected, consistent with the expected weakness of lines at normal abundance. The main reason for the previous lack of widespread detection in HgMn stars is probably due to the strongest lines being at longer wavelengths than the photographic blue. The lines used in this work were 4603.03A, 4844.33A and 5292.22A.

M. M. Dworetsky; J. L. Persaud; K. Patel

2008-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

44

Mechanical Properties of Sodium and Potassium Activated Metakaolin-Based Geopolymers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geopolymers (GPs) are a new class of inorganic polymers that have been considered as good candidate materials for many applications, including fire resistant and refractory panels, adhesives, and coatings, waste encapsulation material, etc. The aim...

Kim, Hyunsoo

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

45

Luminescence and Electrical Properties of CdS Films Doped with Potassium and Sodium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CdS films, both pure and doped with the alkali metals Na and K, ... -power UV radiation have been obtained. The doping of samples results in a tenfold increase ... nm) as compared to pure samples of CdS. Upon irr...

V. G. Klyuev; T. L. Maiorova; A. V. Naumov…

46

Inhibition of the Sodium/Potassium ATPase Impairs N-Glycan Expression and Function  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Drosophila N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I produce defects in locomotion and a reduced life span. J Biol Chem 2006;281:12776-85. 15 Liu W, Wei W, Winer D, et al. CEACAM1 impedes thyroid cancer growth but promotes invasiveness: a putative mechanism...

Reza Beheshti Zavareh; Ken S. Lau; Rose Hurren; Alessandro Datti; David J. Ashline; Marcela Gronda; Pam Cheung; Craig D. Simpson; Wei Liu; Amanda R. Wasylishen; Paul C. Boutros; Hui Shi; Amudha Vengopal; Igor Jurisica; Linda Z. Penn; Vern N. Reinhold; Shereen Ezzat; Jeff Wrana; David R. Rose; Harry Schachter; James W. Dennis; Aaron D. Schimmer

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

47

Failure to find Increased Sodium, Potassium-ATPase in Red Cell Ghosts of Schizophrenics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... , and Glynn, I. M., J. Physiol., 156, 274 (1961).Tosteson, D. C., and Hoffman, J. F., J. Gen. Physiol., ...

JOHN C. PARKER; JOSEPH F. HOFFMAN

1964-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

48

An electron spin resonance investigation of irradiated potassium chloride crystals doped with sodium nitroprusside  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's, attention was turned. to a large extent to the topic of organic n-radicals. Electron spin resonance was first observed in free rad1cals in 1907 by Kozyrev and. Salikhov ) in the case of pentaphenyclopentadienyl. In solid penta... radical possesses mainly spin magnetism in accordance with measurements of its static magnetic susceptibility. In l949 a systematic study of electron spin resonance spectra in free radicals was initiated, i. e. molecules in which at least one electron...

Mayers, Richard Ralph

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

49

Substantiation of proposals on standardization of the manganese content in water supplied for electrodyalysis treatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The results of systematic investigations of the electrodialysis process of manganese-containing solutions and the impact of manganese compounds on electrochemical characteristics of ion-exchange membranes have...

L. A. Mel’nik

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

SOFC Ohmic Resistance Reduction by HCl-Induced Removal of Manganese...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SOFC Ohmic Resistance Reduction by HCl-Induced Removal of Manganese at the AnodeElectrolyte Interface. SOFC Ohmic Resistance Reduction by HCl-Induced Removal of Manganese at the...

51

Metals in the sporulation phosphorelay: manganese binding by the response regulator Spo0F  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reports the crystal structure of the response regulator Spo0F in complex with manganese and explores the differing possibilities for the involvement of manganese and magnesium in the phosphoryl transfer.

Mukhopadhyay, D.

2004-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

52

AN X-RAY ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY STUDY OF MANGANESE CONTAINING COMPOUNDS AND PHOTOSYNTHETIC SPINACH CHLOROPLASTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

oxygen evolving capabilities. These preparations are reported to have 4-6 manganese atoms per photochemical reaction center(

Kirby, Jon Allan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Thermophysical Properties of Sodium Nitrate and Sodium Chloride  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Thermophysical Properties of Sodium Nitrate and Sodium Chloride Thermophysical Properties of Sodium Nitrate and Sodium Chloride Solutions and Their Effects on Fluid Flow in Unsaturated Media Tianfu Xu and Karsten Pruess Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 ABSTRACT. Understanding movement of saline sodium nitrate (NaNO 3 ) waste solutions is important for assessing the contaminant migration near leaking waste storage tanks in the unsaturated zone at the Hanford site (Washington, USA). The purpose of this study is to contribute a basic understanding of effects of the thermophysical behavior of NaNO 3 solutions on fluid flow in unsaturated media. We first present mathematical expressions for the dependence of density, viscosity, solubility and vapor pressure of

54

Joining of highly aluminum-doped lanthanum strontium manganese oxide with tetragonal zirconia by plastic deformation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Joining of highly aluminum-doped lanthanum strontium manganese oxide with tetragonal zirconia February 2008; accepted 24 March 2008 Abstract Aluminum-doped lanthanum strontium manganese oxide, La0.77Sr at the interface. © 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Lanthanum strontium aluminum manganese oxide

Dutta, Prabir K.

55

Manganese-Containing Cathode-Active Materials for Lithium-Ion Batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Manganese, which has a Clarke number of 0.06%,1...is the tenth-most abundant element in the earth’s crust, and has been utilized as a cathode-active material for manganese, alkaline-manganese, and lithium ... , f...

Koichi Numata

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Nano-sized manganese oxides as biomimetic catalysts for water oxidation in artificial photosynthesis: a review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...review-article Review articles 1004 30 36 15 Nano-sized manganese oxides as biomimetic...of about approximately 0.5 nm. Thus, nano-sized manganese compounds might be good...particles. In this paper, we focus on nano-sized manganese oxides as functional...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Sodium loop framework structural analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides the structural analysis of the Sodium Loop framework in a drop condition. The drop is similar to the US Department of Transportation non-bulk, performance-oriented packaging (Packaging Group I) drop test. The drop height evaluated for the Sodium Loop framework is 5.9 ft.

Nguyen, P.M.

1995-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

58

Cell cycle-regulated manganese superoxide dismutase activity via reversible  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cycle-regulated manganese superoxide dismutase activity via reversible cycle-regulated manganese superoxide dismutase activity via reversible phosphorylation Demet Candas University of California Davis Abstract The constant stress environment that the cells live in required the development of defense systems against free radical and radiation insults. One of the major antioxidant enzymes responsible for detoxifying free radical species is manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD, Sod2), which is specifically localized into the mitochondria of cells. MnSOD catalyzes the conversion of two molecules of superoxide anion into water and hydrogen peroxide, the latter of which is then further oxidized to water. The significance of the role of MnSOD activity was shown by the studies showing that the loss or deficiency of MnSOD sensitize cells to ionizing

59

Transuranic interfacial reaction studies on manganese oxidemineral surfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several DOE sites have been contaminated by transuranicradionuclide (TRU) discharges including neptunium and plutonium. Theirinteraction with the surrounding geological media can affect thetransport and remediation of these radionuclides in the environment.Manganese based minerals, present as minor phases in the vadose zone, canpreferentially sequester TRU over other minerals present in largerquantities. The objective of this project is to understand theinteractions between plutonium and neptunium and manganese oxyhydroxideminerals to predict potential hazards they represent to the environment,as well as to provide important scientific information for the design ofeffective remediation strategies for contaminated DOE sites.

Shaughnessy, Dawn A.; Nitsche, Heino; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Shuh,David K.; Waychunas, Glenn A.; Booth, Corwin H.; Cantrell, Kirk J.

2002-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

60

Tables of thermodynamic properties of sodium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermodynamic properties of saturated sodium, superheated sodium, and subcooled sodium are tabulated as a function of temperature. The temperature ranges are 380 to 2508 K for saturated sodium, 500 to 2500 K for subcooled sodium, and 400 to 1600 K for superheated sodium. Tabulated thermodynamic properties are enthalpy, heat capacity, pressure, entropy, density, instantaneous thermal expansion coefficient, compressibility, and thermal pressure coefficient. Tables are given in SI units and cgs units.

Fink, J.K.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Federal - June 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Federal - June 2012 June 2012 Review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project -...

62

Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Contractor - June 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Contractor - June 2012 June 2012 Review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project...

63

Simulation of sodium boiling experiments with THERMIT sodium version  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Natural and forced convection experiments(SBTF and French) are simulated with the sodium version of the thermal-hydraulic computer code THERMIT. Simulation is done for the test secti- -on with the pressure-velocity boundary ...

Huh, Kang Yul

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

THE STATE OF MANGANESE IN THE PHOTOSYNTHETIC APPARATUS. I. EXAFS STUDIES ON CHLOROPLASTS AND di-u-oxo BRIDGED di-MANGANESE MODEL COMPOUNDS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) studies on the manganese contained in spinach chloroplasts and on certain di-u-oxo bridged manganese dimers of the form (X{sub 2}Mn)O{sub 2}(MnX{sub 2} (X=2,2'-bypyridine and 1,10-phenanthroline) are reported. From these studies, the manganese associated with photosynthetic oxygen evolution is suggested to occur as a bridged transition metal dimer with most likely another manganese. Extensive details on the analysis are included.

Kirby, J.A.; Robertson, A.S.; Smith, J.P.; Thompson, A.C.; Thompson, A.C.; Klein, M.P.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation and Recycle of Sodium Hydroxide and Sodium Nitrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Disposal of high-level nuclear waste is horrendously expensive, in large part because the actual radioactive matter in the tanks has been diluted over 1000-fold by ordinary inorganic chemicals. Treatment processes themselves can exacerbate the problem by adding further volume to the waste. Waste retrieval and sludge washing, for example, will require copious amounts of sodium hydroxide. If the needed sodium hydroxide could be separated from the waste and recycled, however, the addition of fresh sodium hydroxide could be avoided, ultimately reducing the final waste volume and associated disposal costs. The major objective of this research is to explore new liquid-liquid extraction approaches to the selective separation of sodium hydroxide from alkaline high-level wastes stored in underground tanks at the Hanford and Savannah River sites. Consideration is also given to separating potassium and abundant anions, including nitrate, nitrite, aluminate, and carbonate. Salts of these ions represent possible additional value for recycle, alternative disposal, or even use as commodity chemicals. A comprehensive approach toward understanding the extractive chemistry of these salts is envisioned, involving systems of varying complexity, from use of simple solvents to new bifunctional host molecules for ion-pair recognition. These extractants will ideally require no adjustment of the waste composition and will release the extracted salt into water, thereby consuming no additional chemicals and producing no additional waste volume. The overall goal of this research is to provide a scientific foundation upon which the feasibility of new liquid-liquid extraction chemistry applicable to the bulk reduction of the volume of tank waste can be evaluated.

Moyer, Bruce A.; Marchand, Alan P.

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation and Recycle of Sodium Hydroxide and Sodium Nitrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Disposal of high- level waste is horrendously expensive, in large part because the actual radioactive matter in the tanks has been diluted over 1000-fold by ordinary inorganic chemicals. Treatment processes themselves can exacerbate the problem by adding further volume to the waste. Waste retrieval and sludge washing, for example, will require copious amounts of sodium hydroxide. If the needed sodium hydroxide could be separated from the waste and recycled, however, the addition of fresh sodium hydroxide could be avoided, ultimately reducing the final waste volume and associated disposal costs. The major objective of this research is to explore new liquid- liquid extraction approaches to the selective separation of sodium hydroxide from alkaline high-level wastes stored in underground tanks at the Hanford and Savannah River sites. Consideration is also given to separating potassium and abundant anions, including nitrate, nitrite, aluminate, and carbonate. Salts of these ions represent possible additional value for recycle, alternative disposal, or even use as commodity chemicals. A comprehensive approach toward understanding the extractive chemistry of these salts is envisioned, involving systems of varying complexity, from use of simple solvents to new bifunctional host molecules for ion-pair recognition. These extractants will ideally require no adjustment of the waste composition and will release the extracted salt into water, thereby consuming no additional chemicals and producing no additional waste volume. The overall goal of this research is to provide a scientific foundation upon which the feasibility of new liquid-liquid extraction chemistry applicable to the bulk reduction of the volume of tank waste can be evaluated.

Moyer, Bruce A.; Marchand, Alan P.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Manganese Based Oxidative Technologies For Water/Wastewater Treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NaNO3. The vessel was then spiked with manganese oxide to achieve a specified oxide concentration. The reactor solution was stirred using a Teflon coated magnetic stirrer for an hour before the reaction’s initiation. This process ensured...

Desai, Ishan

2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

68

Manganese-oxidizing photosynthesis before the rise of cyanobacteria  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Manganese-oxidizing photosynthesis before the rise of cyanobacteria Jena E. Johnsona,1 , Samuel M) The emergence of oxygen-producing (oxygenic) photosynthesis fundamentally transformed our planet; however biological innovation-- the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis (3, 4). Several bio- chemical attributes

Fischer, Woodward

69

Potassium emission absorption system. Topical report 12  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Potassium Emission Absorption System is one of the advanced optical diagnostics developed at Mississippi State University to provide support for the demonstration of prototype-scale coal-fired combustion magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) electrical power generation. Intended for application in the upstream of an MHD flow, the system directly measures gas temperature and neutral potassium atom number density through spectroscopic emission absorption techniques. From these measurements the electron density can be inferred from a statistical equilibrium calculation and the electron conductivity in the MHD channel found by use of an electron mobility model. The instrument has been utilized for field test measurements on MHD facilities for almost a decade and has been proven to provide useful measurements as designed for MHD nozzle, channel, and diffuser test sections. The theory of the measurements, a system description, its capabilities, and field test measurement results are reported here. During the development and application of the instrument several technical issues arose which when addressed advanced the state of the art in emission absorption measurement. Studies of these issues are also reported here and include: two-wavelength measurements for particle-laden flows, potassium D-line far wing absorption coefficient, bias in emission absorption measurements arising from dirty windows and misalignments, non-coincident multiwavelength emission absorption sampling errors, and lineshape fitting for boundary layer flow profile information. Although developed for NLHD application, the instrument could be applied to any high temperature flow with a resonance line in the 300 to 800 nm range, for instance other types of flames, rocket plumes or low temperature plasmas.

Bauman, L.E.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Ground beef shelf life assessment as influenced by sodium lactate, sodium propionate, sodium diacetate, and soy protein concentrate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In phase I all-beef and soy-added ground beef patties containing sodium lactate, sodium propionate, and sodium diacetate at various levels and combinations were stored for nine months at -10°C. Upon cooking, the addition of sodium lactate increased...

Grones, Kelly Leann

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

71

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminum potassium sulfate Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Kelvin KOH potassium hydroxide KOtBu potassium-tert-butoxide KPA potassium... Light Emitting Diode LiAlH4 lithium aluminum hydride LiF lithium ... Source: Groningen,...

72

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid potassium glycyrrhetinate Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

provides some chemicals which are incompatible with other compounds. Summary: Potassium carbon tetrachloride, carbon dioxide, water Potassium chlorate sulfuric and other acids...

73

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Potassium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Argon Argon Previous Element (Argon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Calcium) Calcium Isotopes of the Element Potassium [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 39 93.2581% STABLE 40 0.0117% 1.248×10+9 years 41 6.7302% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 32 No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 33 < 25 nanoseconds Proton Emission No Data Available 34 < 25 nanoseconds Proton Emission No Data Available 35 178 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission 0.37% 36 342 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00%

74

The relationship of nutritional manganese to the development of postmenopausal osteopenia in rats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

intake, and other studies have not demonstrated a long-term effect of calcium supplementation. Minerals other than calcium are essential to the integrity of bone tissue. Among these are phosphorus, copper, fluorine, zinc and manganese. Manganese... and Lowther 1976). Original investigations of bone mineralization, density, strength, and ash content have been noted to be lower in manganese deficiency, with calcium and phosphorus remaining unchanged (Asling and Hurley 1963). Bone density and breaking...

Miyasato, Jan Leiko

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

75

The Sodium-Restricted Diet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The value of salt has long been known. Feuds and wars were waged for the possession of salt during man's early development. The common expressions "salt of the earth" and "worth his weight in salt" all show the high value placed on salt. Taxes were... collected for possession of salt. Even the word "salary" is connected with salt. Salt remains valuable to us as a source of sodium, an essential nutrient needed by our body to function properly. The body needs sodium to form tissue - to aid a child...

Anonymous,

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Thermal expansion of manganese dioxide using high-temperature in situ X-ray diffraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The thermal expansion behaviour of manganese dioxide, an important battery material, is reported using high-temperature in situ X-ray diffraction between 298 and 673 K.

Dose, W.M.

2013-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

77

Surface-Driven Sodium Ion Energy Storage in Nanocellular Carbon...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Surface-Driven Sodium Ion Energy Storage in Nanocellular Carbon Foams. Surface-Driven Sodium Ion Energy Storage in Nanocellular Carbon Foams. Abstract: Sodium ion (Na+) batteries...

78

Sodium Zirconium Cyclosilicate in Hyperkalemia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...were performed for the two study phases. For tests of the primary efficacy end point during the two phases, the study had a power of 90% with a two-tailed type I error rate of 0.05. We used a predefined closed testing procedure, in which we first tested the highest dose in the initial phase, then the... Hyperkalemia (serum potassium level, >5.0 mmol per liter) is a common electrolyte disorder that is associated with serious cardiac dysrhythmias and increased mortality.1–3 Patients with renal dysfunction and those with diabetes are at increased risk for ...

2014-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

79

Pilot plant for CO2 capture with aqueous piperazine/potassium carbonate , Gary T. Rochelle1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GHGT-8 1 Pilot plant for CO2 capture with aqueous piperazine/potassium carbonate Eric Chen1 , Gary pilot for CO2 capture was successfully operated using potassium carbonate promoted with piperazine, potassium carbonate, piperazine Introduction Several amine-promoted potassium carbonate solvents have been

Rochelle, Gary T.

80

Periadolescent oral manganese exposure affects conditioned place preference by cocaine and conditioned place aversion by lithium chloride in rats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Manganese neurotoxicity compromises basal ganglia functions that could affect the limbic system and drug sensitivity. Male rats were orally exposed to manganese chloride (0, 100, 200 mg/kg/day Mn) for 15 days starting at postnatal day (PND) 28...

Lee, Samuel Ming Hin

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate Fourth Quarterly Report 2005 Quarterly Progress. #12;3 Abstract The objective of this work is to improve the process for CO2 capture by alkanolamine

Rochelle, Gary T.

82

CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate Third Quarterly Report 2005 Quarterly Progress. #12;3 Abstract The objective of this work is to improve the process for CO2 capture by alkanolamine

Rochelle, Gary T.

83

CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate First Quarterly Report 2006 Quarterly Progress the process for CO2 capture by alkanolamine absorption/stripping by developing an alternative solvent, aqueous

Rochelle, Gary T.

84

Nature of Bridging Bonds in Lithium and Potassium Acetate Dimers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The structures of lithium and potassium acetates were studied by the RHF/6-31G*...3COOLi)2 and (CH3COOK)2 are electrostatic in nature. The bridging lithium bond is intermediate between hydrogen and ionic, ... of ...

I. A. Panteleev; S. G. Semenov; D. N. Glebovskii

85

Pyroprocessing of oxidized sodium-bonded fast reactor fuel - An experimental study of treatment options for degraded EBR-II fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental study was conducted to assess pyrochemical treatment options for degraded EBR-II fuel. As oxidized material, the degraded fuel would need to be converted back to metal to enable electrorefining within an existing electro-metallurgical treatment process. A lithium-based electrolytic reduction process was studied to assess the efficacy of converting oxide materials to metal with a particular focus on the impact of zirconium oxide and sodium oxide on this process. Bench-scale electrolytic reduction experiments were performed in LiCl-Li{sub 2}O at 650 C. degrees with combinations of manganese oxide (used as a surrogate for uranium oxide), zirconium oxide, and sodium oxide. In the absence of zirconium or sodium oxide, the electrolytic reduction of MnO showed nearly complete conversion to metal. The electrolytic reduction of a blend of MnO-ZrO{sub 2} in LiCl - 1 wt% Li{sub 2}O showed substantial reduction of manganese, but only 8.5% of the zirconium was found in the metal phase. The electrolytic reduction of the same blend of MnO-ZrO{sub 2} in LiCl - 1 wt% Li{sub 2}O - 6.2 wt% Na{sub 2}O showed substantial reduction of manganese, but zirconium reduction was even less at 2.4%. This study concluded that ZrO{sub 2} cannot be substantially reduced to metal in an electrolytic reduction system with LiCl - 1 wt% Li{sub 2}O at 650 C. degrees due to the perceived preferential formation of lithium zirconate. This study also identified a possible interference that sodium oxide may have on the same system by introducing a parasitic and cyclic reaction of dissolved sodium metal between oxidation at the anode and reduction at the cathode. When applied to oxidized sodium-bonded EBR-II fuel (e.g., U-10Zr), the prescribed electrolytic reduction system would not be expected to substantially reduce zirconium oxide, and the accumulation of sodium in the electrolyte could interfere with the reduction of uranium oxide, or at least render it less efficient.

Hermann, S.D.; Gese, N.J. [Separations Department, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Wurth, L.A. [Zinc Air Inc., 5314-A US Hwy 2 West, Columbia Falls, MT 59912 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Carbon Dioxide Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Capture by Absorption Carbon Dioxide Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate Background Although alkanolamine solvents, such as monoethanolamine (MEA), and solvent blends have been developed as commercially-viable options for the absorption of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from waste gases, natural gas, and hydrogen streams, further process improvements are required to cost-effectively capture CO 2 from power plant flue gas. The promotion of potassium carbonate (K

87

Performance of MHD insulating materials in a potassium environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this study are to evaluate the compatibility of the MHD insulating materials boron nitride and silicon nitride in a potassium environment at temperatures of 1000 and 1400{degrees}F (538 and 760{degrees}C, respectively) and to measure the electrical conductivities of the specimens before and after exposure to potassium. Based on the test results, an assessment is to be made of the suitability of these materials for application as insulator materials in an MHD channel.

Natesan, K.; Park, J.H.; Rink, D.L. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Thomas, C.A. (USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States))

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Where plants make oxygen: a structural model for the photosynthetic oxygen-evolving manganese cluster  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...MANGANESE O2-EVOLVING COMPLEX AND THE IRON QUINONE ACCEPTOR COMPLEX IN PHOTOSYSTEM-II...MANGANESE(III) - ANALOGS OF THE DI-IRON(III) CENTER IN HEMERYTHRIN, JOURNAL...Mn(IV)(sal)2(bipy) (acac, acetylacetonate; bipy, R:Mn(II) bipyridine; and...

VK Yachandra; VJ DeRose; MJ Latimer; I Mukerji; K Sauer; MP Klein

1993-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

89

Coupled anoxic nitrification/manganese reduction in marine sediments STEFAN HULTH,1,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coupled anoxic nitrification/manganese reduction in marine sediments STEFAN HULTH,1, * ROBERT C distributions of oxygen, manganese, and nitrogen from hemipelagic and shelf sediments sometimes indicate a close by biological reworking of Mn-oxide-rich surface sediments into underlying anoxic zones. Surface sediment from

Boyer, Edmond

90

Engineering and characterization of human manganese superoxide dismutase mutants with high activity and low  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering and characterization of human manganese superoxide dismutase mutants with high activity2 and Huimin Zhao1 1 Departments of Chemical Engineering and Biomolecular Engineering, and Chemistry. Each monomer has at its center a manganese (II) / (III) ion, which is surrounded in a trigonal

Zhao, Huimin

91

Growth of manganese filled carbon nanofibers in the vapor phase  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report the vapor phase growth of partially filled graphitic fibers, 20-30 nm in diameter and up to a micron in length, during a manganese catalyzed carbon electric arc discharge. The fiber morphology resembles that of catalytic chemical vapor deposited carbon filaments but the inside hollow contains intermittent precipitates and continuous filling of Mn that at times occupy >50% of fiber lengths. Transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss line spectra show that the fillings form as solid cores and may correspond to pure metal.

P. M. Ajayan; C. Colliex; J. M. Lambert; P. Bernier; L. Barbedette; M. Tence; O. Stephan

1994-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

92

Paramagnetic Relaxation in Dilute Potassium Ferricyanide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Paramagnetic relaxation times have been measured for the ground-state doublet of iron present as a dilute substitutional impurity in potassium cobalt cyanide. Measurements were carried out over the temperature range 1.25 to 4.5°K and over a range of Fe/Co concentrations 0.24 to 3.5 at.%. Two frequencies were used, 1.8 and 8.5 Gc/sec, to provide a direct test of the frequency variation of the relaxation time. The "fast-passage-recovery" technique was employed, and a description of the apparatus is included. At 0.24% the 1.8-Gc/sec times are found to be well fitted by a Raman rate 1T1=4.3×10-3 T9 sec-1 over the entire temperature range and over five decades of time. At 8.5 Gc/sec this rate is augmented by a direct rate 1T1=3.1 T. At 0.5% the X-band direct rate is the same, but the Raman rate appears slightly higher; and the L-band rates are substantially faster. All relaxation rates increase with further increases in concentration, but the effect is stronger at 1.8 Gc/sec, so that the rates at both frequencies become equal at 1.7%. Still higher concentrations give rise to behavior not describable by a simple relaxation rate.For low concentration, the theoretical fourth-power frequency dependence of the direct relaxation process is not verified directly because the low frequency rates are always dominated by the Raman process; however, the frequency dependence must be as at least the third power to be consistent with the data. Some attempts are made to interpret the concentration dependence in terms of cross relaxation between single ions and coupled pairs.

Andreas Rannestad and Peter E. Wagner

1963-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation and Recycle of Sodium Hydroxide and Sodium Nitrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to explore new liquid-liquid extraction approaches to the selective separation of major sodium salts from alkaline high-level wastes stored in underground tanks at Hanford, Savannah River, and Oak Ridge sites. Disposal of high level waste is horrendously expensive, in large part because the actual radioactive matter in the tanks has been diluted over 1000-fold by ordinary inorganic chemicals. Since the residual bulk chemicals must still undergo expensive treatment and disposal after most of the hazardous radionuclides have been removed, large cost savings will result from processes that reduce the overall waste volume. It is proposed that major cost savings can be expected if sodium hydroxide needed for sludge washing can be obtained from the waste itself, thus avoiding the addition of yet another bulk chemical to the waste and still further increase of the waste volume and disposal cost. Secondary priority is given to separating potassium an d abundant anions, including nitrate, nitrite, aluminate, and carbonate. Salts of these ions represent possible additional value for recycle, alternative disposal, or even use as commodity chemicals. A comprehensive approach toward understanding the extractive chemistry of these salts is envisioned, involving systems of varying complexity, from use of simple solvents to new bifunctional host molecules for ion-pair recognition. These extractants will ideally require no adjustment of the waste composition and will release the extracted salt into water, thereby consuming no additional chemicals and producing no additional waste volume. The overall goal of this research is to provide a scientific foundation upon which the feasibility of new liquid-liquid extraction chemistry applicable to the bulk reduction of the volume of tank waste can be evaluated.

Moyer, Bruce A.; Marchand, Alan P.; Bryan, Jeffrey C.; Bonnesen, Peter V.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Potassium, Uranium, Thorium Radiogenic Heat Contribution To Heat Flow In  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Potassium, Uranium, Thorium Radiogenic Heat Contribution To Heat Flow In Potassium, Uranium, Thorium Radiogenic Heat Contribution To Heat Flow In The Precambrian And Younger Silicic Rocks Of The Zuni And Florida Mountains, New Mexico (Usa) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Potassium, Uranium, Thorium Radiogenic Heat Contribution To Heat Flow In The Precambrian And Younger Silicic Rocks Of The Zuni And Florida Mountains, New Mexico (Usa) Details Activities (4) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: High heat flow in the Zuni Mountains, New Mexico, U.S.A., has been explained by the possible presence of a buried felsic pluton. Alternately, high K, U, Th abundances have been proposed to account for part of the high heat flow. The mean radiogenic heat contribution for 60 samples of Precambrian core rocks is 7.23 μcal/gm-yr, which is slightly

95

Independent Oversight Assessment, Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Bearing Waste Treatment Project - November 2012 November 2012 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project This...

96

Sodium sulfide leaching of low-grade jamesonite concentrate in production of sodium pyroantimoniate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sodium sulfide leaching of a low-grade jamesonite concentrate in the production of sodium pyroantimoniate through the air oxidation process and the influencing factors on the leaching rate of antimony were...

Tian-zu Yang PhD; Ming-xi Jiang…

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Asymmetric deposition of manganese oxide in single walled carbon nanotube films as electrodes for flexible high frequency response electrochemical capacitors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Manganese oxide (MnO2) is a promising pseudocapacitive electrode material because of its high capacitance, abundant resource, low-cost, and environmental friendliness. However, its poor electrical and ionic conductivities and low stability hinder applications. Forming MnO2 nanocomposites with high surface area porous metal, carbon materials, or conducting polymers is a possible solution. In this work, we have developed a facile and scalable asymmetric in situ deposition method to incorporate MnO2 nanoparticles in conductive single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films. The high porosity of vacuum filtrated SWCNT films accommodates pseudocapacitive MnO2 nanoparticles without sacrificing the mechanical flexibility and electrochemical stability of SWCNT films. We exposed one side of SWCNT films to acidic potassium permanganate (KMnO4) solution. The infiltrated \\{KMnO4\\} solution partially etches \\{SWCNTs\\} to create abundant mesopores, which ensure electrolyte ions efficiently access deposited MnO2. Meanwhile, the remaining SWCNT network serves as excellent current collectors. The electrochemical performance of the SWCNT–MnO2 composite electrodes depends on the porosity of SWCNT films, pH, and concentration of \\{KMnO4\\} solution, deposition temperature and time. Our optimized two-electrode electrochemical capacitor, with 1 M Na2SO4 in water as electrolyte, showed a superior performance with specific capacitance of 529.8 F g?1, energy density of 73.6 Wh kg?1, power density of 14.6 kW kg?1, excellent capacitance retention (99.9%) after 2000 charge and discharge cycles, and one of the highest reported frequency responses (knee frequency at 1318 Hz). The high performance flexible electrochemical capacitors have broad applications in portable electronics and electrical vehicles, especially when high frequency response is desired.

Jianmin Shen; Andong Liu; Yu Tu; Hong Wang; Rongrong Jiang; Jie Ouyang; Yuan Chen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Recovery of acids and sodium hydroxide from solutions of sodium sulfate and sodium chloride with the use of bipolar membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors examined the kinetic laws governing the electrodialysis recovery of hydrochloric acid and sulfuric acid, as well as sodium hydroxide, from 1M sodium chloride and 0.5 M sodium sulfate solutions and from a mixture of these salts with the use of the MB-1, MB-2, and MB-3 bipolar membranes. Kinetic plots of the current density and the concentration of the acid and the base in the chambers next to the bipolar membranes during the electrodialysis treatment of 1M sodium chloride, 0.5 M sodium sulfate, and solutions are presented. It was established that it is better to use the MB-3 membrane for the electrodialysis conversion of sodium chloride and sodium sulfate into acids and sodium hydroxide owing to the high rate and current efficiency and low expenditure of electrical energy and degree of contamination of the products obtained by the salts. It was also established that the resistance of the MB-1 and MB-2 bipolar membranes is almost an order of magnitude higher than that of the MB-3 membrane.

Bobrinskaya, G.A.; Pavlova, T.V.; Shatalov, A.Ya.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

E-Print Network 3.0 - activates atp-sensitive potassium Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

atp-sensitive potassium Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: activates atp-sensitive potassium Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 ATP-sensitive...

100

Direct production of light olefins from syngas over potassium modified Fe–Mn catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A series of potassium promoted Fe–Mn catalysts for light olefin synthesis from CO hydrogenation were prepared by the co-precipitation-calcination-impregnation method. The impact of potassium promoter on the te...

Jiang-Bing Li; Hong-Fang Ma; Hai-Tao Zhang…

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Magnon damping by magnon-phonon coupling in manganese perovskites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inelastic neutron scattering was used to systematically investigate the spin-wave excitations (magnons) in ferromagnetic manganese perovskites. In spite of the large differences in the Curie temperatures (T{sub C}'s) of different manganites, their low-temperature spin waves have very similar dispersions with the zone-boundary magnon softening and broadening that cannot be explained by the canonical double exchange mechanism. From the wave-vector dependence of the magnon lifetime effects and its correlation with the dispersions of the optical-phonon modes, we argue that a strong magnetoelastic (magnon-phonon) coupling is responsible for the observed low-temperature anomalous spin dynamical behavior of the manganites. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

Dai, Pengcheng [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6393 (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6393 (United States); Hwang, H. Y. [Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974 (United States)] [Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974 (United States); Zhang, Jiandi [Department of Physics, Florida International University, University Park, Miami, Florida 33199 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Florida International University, University Park, Miami, Florida 33199 (United States); Fernandez-Baca, J. A. [Oak Ridge Natinal Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6393 (United States)] [Oak Ridge Natinal Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6393 (United States); Cheong, S.-W. [Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974 (United States) [Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08855 (United States); Kloc, C. [Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974 (United States)] [Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974 (United States); Tomioka, Y. [Joint Research Center for Atom Technology (JRCAT), Tsukuba 305 8562, (Japan)] [Joint Research Center for Atom Technology (JRCAT), Tsukuba 305 8562, (Japan); Tokura, Y. [Joint Research Center for Atom Technology (JRCAT), Tsukuba 305 8562, (Japan) [Joint Research Center for Atom Technology (JRCAT), Tsukuba 305 8562, (Japan); Department of Applied Physics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113 8656, (Japan)

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Hydrothermal manganese plumes in the Mid-Atlantic Ridge rift valley  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Fracture Zone at 1G? in August 1984. Manganese was measured on board ship by flameless atomic absorption after preconcentration with oxine9 to give a detection limit of 0.05 nmol ...

G. Klinkhammer; P. Rona; M. Greaves; H. Elderfield

1985-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

103

Structural Basis for the Metal-Selective Activation of the Manganese Transport Regulator of Bacillus subtilis,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-containing cofactor is at the heart of the oxygen-evolving complex (2), and in mammals, a manganese, UniVersity of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Unit 1000, Houston, Texas 77030 ReceiVed NoVember 27

Lycan, Deborah E.

104

Influences on the oceanic biogeochemical cycling of the hybrid-type metals, cobalt, iron, and manganese  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Trace metal cycling is one of many processes that influence ocean ecosystem dynamics. Cobalt, iron, and manganese are redox active trace metal micro-nutrients with oceanic distributions that are influenced by both biological ...

Noble, Abigail Emery

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Effect of manganese addition on hydrogen storage performance of vanadium-based BCC hydrogen storage alloys  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of manganese addition on hydrogen storage performance of vanadium-based BCC alloys was ... plateau pressure and a reverse effect on maximum hydrogen storage capacity. However, an effective hydrogen storage

Chan-Yeol Seo; Zhao-Liang Zhang; Jin-Ho Kim…

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

On the Martensitic Transformation in f.c.c. Manganese Alloys. I. Measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...c. Manganese Alloys. I. Measurements R. D. Lowde R. T. Harley...cube axis directions. Phonon energy measurements, made to an accuracy of about...tenth of a reciprocal lattice unit of the origin. The anomalous...

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Spin-dependent electron transport in zinc- and manganese-doped adenine molecules  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The spin-dependent electron transport properties of zinc- and manganese-doped adenine molecules connected to zigzag graphene leads are studied in the zero bias regime using the non-equilibrium Green's function method. The conductance of the adenine molecule increased and became spin-dependent when a zinc or manganese atom was doped into the molecules. The effects of a transverse electric field on the spin-polarization of the transmitted electrons were investigated and the spin-polarization was controlled by changing the transverse electric field. Under the presence of a transverse electric field, both the zinc- and manganese-doped adenine molecules acted as spin-filters. The maximum spin-polarization of the manganese-doped adenine molecule was greater than the molecule doped with zinc.

Simchi, Hamidreza, E-mail: simchi@iust.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, Tehran 16844 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Semiconductor Technology Center, Tehran 16844 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Esmaeilzadeh, Mahdi, E-mail: mahdi@iust.ac.ir; Mazidabadi, Hossein [Department of Physics, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, Tehran 16844 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

108

Commercialization of cryptomelane-type manganese oxide (OMS-2) nanowire paper oil sorbent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cryptomelane-type Manganese oxide (OMS-2, a group of Octahedral Molecular Sieves) nanowire paper exhibits interesting properties: reversible wettability, oleophilic while being hydrophobic, and high thermal stability. These ...

Soo, Haw Yun

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

E-Print Network 3.0 - atp-sensitive potassium channels Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

channels Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: atp-sensitive potassium channels...

110

E-Print Network 3.0 - atp-sensitive potassium channel Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

channel Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: atp-sensitive potassium channel...

111

Atlas Sodium Automated Batch Synthesis System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atlas Sodium Automated Batch Synthesis System (Syrris) June 2013 #12;Introduction to the system · The Atlas Sodium system consists of an Atlas base equipped with a 400ºC hotplate, a stacking dry bath systemL) for automated addition and/or removal of solution. · The system is computer controlled by the Atlas software

Subramanian, Venkat

112

CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate Fourth Quarterly Report 2006 Quarterly Progress of this work is to improve the process for CO2 capture by alkanolamine absorption/stripping by developing% in the order: thiosulfatecarbonate is ineffective in the absence of oxygen

Rochelle, Gary T.

113

CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate Second Quarterly Report 2006 Quarterly Progress of this work is to improve the process for CO2 capture by alkanolamine absorption/stripping by developing for simultaneous removal of CO2 and SO2. Corrosion of carbon steel in uninhibited MEA solution is increased

Rochelle, Gary T.

114

CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate First Quarterly Report 2007 Quarterly Progress of this work is to improve the process for CO2 capture by alkanolamine absorption/stripping by developing% to 160% in the order: thiosulfatecarbonate is ineffective

Rochelle, Gary T.

115

CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate Third Quarterly Report 2006 Quarterly Progress of this work is to improve the process for CO2 capture by alkanolamine absorption/stripping by developing by Jou and Mather. Corrosion of carbon steel without inhibitors increases from 19 to 181 mpy in lean

Rochelle, Gary T.

116

Short Communication Catalytic coal gasification: use of calcium versus potassium*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Short Communication Catalytic coal gasification: use of calcium versus potassium* Ljubisa R on the gasification in air and 3.1 kPa steam of North Dakota lignitic chars prepared under slow and rapid pyrolysis of calcium is related to its sintering via crystallite growth. (Keywords: coal; gasification; catalysis

117

Mitochondrial potassium transport: the K+ Keith D. Garlid*, Petr Paucek  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; Ion channel gating; Membrane transport; Volume regulation 1. Introduction The inner membrane. This means that ion traffic across the inner membrane will be very high. Moreover, the gradients driving saltReview Mitochondrial potassium transport: the K+ cycle Keith D. Garlid*, Petr Paucek Department

Garlid, Keith

118

Sodium Heat Engine Development Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Sodium Heat Engine (SHE) is an efficient thermoelectric conversion device which directly generates electricity from a thermally regenerative electrochemical cell that relies on the unique conduction properties of {beta}{double prime}-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE). Laboratory models of a variety of SHE devices have demonstrated the feasibility and efficiency of the system, engineering development of large prototype devices has been slowed by a series of materials and fabrication problems. Failure of the electrolyte tubes has been a recurring problem and a number of possible causes have been postulated. To address these issues, a two-phase engineering development program was undertaken. This report summarizes the final results of the first phase of the program, which included extensive materials characterization activities, a study of applicable nondestructive evaluation methods, an investigation of possible stress states that would contribute to fracture, and certain operational issues associated with the electromagnetic pumps used in the SHE prototype. Mechanical and microstructural evaluation of commercially obtained BASE tubes revealed that they should be adequate for SHE applications and that sodium exposure produced no appreciable deleterious strength effects. Processing activities to produce a more uniform and smaller grain size for the BASE tubes were completed using isostatic pressing, extrusion, and slip casting. Green tubes were sintered by conventional and microwave plasma methods. Of particular interest is the residual stress state in the BASE tubes, and both analysis and nondestructive evaluation methods were employed to evaluate these stresses. X-ray and neutron diffraction experiments were performed to determine the bulk residual stresses in commercially fabricated BASE tubes; however, tube-to-tube variations and variations among the various methods employed did not allow formulation of a definitive definition of the as-fabricated stress state.

Singh, J.P.; Kupperman, D.S.; Majumdar, S.; Dorris, S.; Gopalsami, N.; Dieckman, S.L.; Jaross, R.A.; Johnson, D.L.; Gregar, J.S.; Poeppel, R.B.; Raptis, A.C.; Valentin, R.A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Evaluation of frankfurters formulated with potassium lactate and sodium diacetate and innocualted with Listeria monocytogenes before and after irradiation treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

°C. Incorporation of lactate/diacetate into frankfurter formulations with or without irradiation had a strong listeriostatic effect throughout 4 wk of aerobic storage. Total microbial counts for frankfurters formulated with lactate/diacetate remained constant...

Knight, Timothy David

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

120

In-Situ Method for Treating Residual Sodium  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A unique process for deactivating residual sodium in Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) systems which uses humidified (but not saturated) carbon dioxide at ambient temperature and pressure to convert residual sodium into solid sodium bicarbonate.

Sherman, Steven R.; Henslee, S. Paul

2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

In-situ method for treating residual sodium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A unique process for deactivating residual sodium in Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) systems which uses humidified (but not saturated) carbon dioxide at ambient temperature and pressure to convert residual sodium into solid sodium bicarbonate.

Sherman, Steven R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Henslee, S. Paul (Idaho Falls, ID)

2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

122

Hydrogen embrittlement of type 410 stainless steel in sodium chloride, sodium sulfate, and sodium hydroxide environments at 90 C  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Susceptibility of martensitic type 410 (UNS S41000) stainless steel (SS) to environmental cracking was evaluated at 90 C in concentrated sodium chloride, sodium sulfate and sodium hydroxide solutions, all of which are environments related to steam turbine conditions, using the slow strain rate testing (SSRT) technique. In NaCl, the effects of solution pH, concentration, and anodic and cathodic polarization were investigated. Tests were supplemented by detailed electron fractography and hydrogen permeation measurements. A clear correlation was found between the degree of embrittlement and the amount of hydrogen permeating the steel, suggesting a hydrogen-induced cracking mechanism.

Gonzalez-Rodriguez, J.G.; Salinas-Bravo, V.M. [Inst. de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico). Dept. Fisico Quimica Aplicada; Martinez-Villafane, A. [Centro de Investigaciones en Materiales Avanzados Leon Tolstoi, Chihuahua (Mexico)

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

SciTech Connect: Thermodynamic and transport properties of sodium...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

on thermophysical properties of sodium have been included in this critical assessment. Thermodynamic properties of sodium liquid and vapor that have been assessed...

124

High-capacity hydrogen storage in lithium and sodium amidoboranes...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

capacity hydrogen storage in lithium and sodium amidoboranes. High-capacity hydrogen storage in lithium and sodium amidoboranes. Abstract: A substantial effort worldwide has been...

125

Adsorption and decomposition of triclosan by activated carbons, manganese oxides, and their composite materials from aqueous solution.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This research investigates the use of activated carbon (AC) and manganese oxides as adsorbents and oxidizing agents to adsorb and oxidize triclosan, a compound which… (more)

Fang, Sheng

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Production and field performance of transgenic alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) expressing alpha-amylase and manganese-dependent lignin peroxidase  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Transgenic alfalfa plants expressing Bacillus licheniformis alpha-amylase and manganese-dependent lignin peroxidase (Mn-P...Phanerochaete chrysosporium were produced using the Agrobacterium tumefaciens...transfor...

S. Austin; E. T. Bingham; D. E. Mathews…

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Comparative effects of sodium channel blockers in short term rat whole embryo culture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was undertaken to examine the effect on the rat embryonic heart of two experimental drugs (AZA and AZB) which are known to block the sodium channel Nav1.5, the hERG potassium channel and the L-type calcium channel. The sodium channel blockers bupivacaine, lidocaine, and the L-type calcium channel blocker nifedipine were used as reference substances. The experimental model was the gestational day (GD) 13 rat embryo cultured in vitro. In this model the embryonic heart activity can be directly observed, recorded and analyzed using computer assisted image analysis as it responds to the addition of test drugs. The effect on the heart was studied for a range of concentrations and for a duration up to 3 h. The results showed that AZA and AZB caused a concentration-dependent bradycardia of the embryonic heart and at high concentrations heart block. These effects were reversible on washout. In terms of potency to cause bradycardia the compounds were ranked AZB > bupivacaine > AZA > lidocaine > nifedipine. Comparison with results from previous studies with more specific ion channel blockers suggests that the primary effect of AZA and AZB was sodium channel blockage. The study shows that the short-term rat whole embryo culture (WEC) is a suitable system to detect substances hazardous to the embryonic heart. - Highlights: • Study of the effect of sodium channel blocking drugs on embryonic heart function • We used a modified method rat whole embryo culture with image analysis. • The drugs tested caused a concentration dependent bradycardia and heart block. • The effect of drugs acting on multiple ion channels is difficult to predict. • This method may be used to detect cardiotoxicity in prenatal development.

Nilsson, Mats F, E-mail: Mats.Nilsson@farmbio.uu.se [Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences, Uppsala University (Sweden); Sköld, Anna-Carin; Ericson, Ann-Christin; Annas, Anita; Villar, Rodrigo Palma [AstraZeneca R and D Södertälje (Sweden); Cebers, Gvido [AstraZeneca R and D, iMed, 141 Portland Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Hellmold, Heike; Gustafson, Anne-Lee [AstraZeneca R and D Södertälje (Sweden); Webster, William S [Department of Anatomy and Histology, University of Sydney (Australia)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

128

IAEA sodium void reactivity benchmark calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, the IAEA-1 992 ``Benchmark Calculation of Sodium Void Reactivity Effect in Fast Reactor Core`` problem is evaluated. The proposed design is a large axially heterogeneous oxide-fueled fast reactor as described in Section 2; the core utilizes a sodium plenum above the core to enhance leakage effects. The calculation methods used in this benchmark evaluation are described in Section 3. In Section 4, the calculated core performance results for the benchmark reactor model are presented; and in Section 5, the influence of steel and interstitial sodium heterogeneity effects is estimated.

Hill, R.N.; Finck, P.J.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

IAEA sodium void reactivity benchmark calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, the IAEA-1 992 Benchmark Calculation of Sodium Void Reactivity Effect in Fast Reactor Core'' problem is evaluated. The proposed design is a large axially heterogeneous oxide-fueled fast reactor as described in Section 2; the core utilizes a sodium plenum above the core to enhance leakage effects. The calculation methods used in this benchmark evaluation are described in Section 3. In Section 4, the calculated core performance results for the benchmark reactor model are presented; and in Section 5, the influence of steel and interstitial sodium heterogeneity effects is estimated.

Hill, R.N.; Finck, P.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Muon Spin Relaxation Study of Spinel Lithium Manganese Oxides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Muons can be implanted into any material, and the direction of the muon spin at the instant of decay (?+ ? e+ + ?e + ???, lifetime = 2.179 ?s) provides information on the dynamics of the muon during its lifetime and on the static and fluctuating magnetic fields from neighboring nuclear and atomic moments. ... On the other hand, the shape of the H+-MnO2 spectrum at 100 K shows two Gaussian components, which indicates the existence of at least two different depolarization rates that can be due to muons at two different muon sites. ... Therefore, these results indicate that the temperature for onset of Li+ ion diffusion decreases with an increase in the amount of lithium in the spinel manganese oxide, which is not incompatible with a higher Li+ diffusion coefficient on LiMn2O4 than on Li1.33Mn1.67O4 found from NMR experiments,21 since NMR data will average over all Li nuclei whereas muons only interact with those Li nearest to the muon. ...

María J. Ariza; Deborah J. Jones; Jacques Rozière; James S. Lord; Didier Ravot

2003-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

131

Sodium Alanate Nanoparticles for Hydrogen Storage.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Preparation and characterization of sodium alanate (NaAlH4) based hydrogen storage materials are described in this book. The effect of the NaAlH4 particle size, particularly in… (more)

Baldé, C.P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Kinetics of wet sodium vapor complex plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we have investigated the kinetics of wet (partially condensed) Sodium vapor, which comprises of electrons, ions, neutral atoms, and Sodium droplets (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated by light. The formulation includes the balance of charge over the droplets, number balance of the plasma constituents, and energy balance of the electrons. In order to evaluate the droplet charge, a phenomenon for de-charging of the droplets, viz., evaporation of positive Sodium ions from the surface has been considered in addition to electron emission and electron/ion accretion. The analysis has been utilized to evaluate the steady state parameters of such complex plasmas (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated; the results have been graphically illustrated. As a significant outcome irradiated, Sodium droplets are seen to acquire large positive potential, with consequent enhancement in the electron density.

Mishra, S. K., E-mail: nishfeb@rediffmail.com [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Sodha, M. S. [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)] [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

133

The Sodium Process Facility at Argonne National Laboratory-West  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) has approximately 680,000 liters of raw sodium stored in facilities on site. As mandated by the State of Idaho and the US Department of Energy (DOE), this sodium must be transformed into a stable condition for land disposal. To comply with this mandate, ANL-W designed and built the Sodium Process Facility (SPF) for the processing of this sodium into a dry, sodium carbonate powder. The major portion of the sodium stored at ANL-W is radioactively contaminated. The sodium will be processed in three separate and distinct campaigns: the 290,000 liters of Fermi-1 primary sodium, the 50,000 liters of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) secondary sodium, and the 330,000 liters of the EBR-II primary sodium. The Fermi-1 and the EBR-II secondary sodium contain only low-level of radiation, while the EBR-II primary sodium has radiation levels up to 0.5 mSv (50 mrem) per hour at 1 meter. The EBR-II primary sodium will be processed last, allowing the operating experience to be gained with the less radioactive sodium prior to reacting the most radioactive sodium. The sodium carbonate will be disposed of in 270 liter barrels, four to a pallet. These barrels are square in cross-section, allowing for maximum utilization of the space on a pallet, minimizing the required landfill space required for disposal.

Michelbacher, J.A.; Henslee, S.P. McDermott, M.D.; Price, J.R.; Rosenberg, K.E.; Wells, P.B.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Hydrothermal Synthesis of Pure r-Phase Manganese(II) Sulfide without the Use of Organic Reagents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Articles Hydrothermal Synthesis of Pure r-Phase Manganese(II) Sulfide without the Use of Organic for finding carbon-free synthesis methods for metal sulfides. The decomposition of organosulfur, such as manganese sulfide (MnS). Here we report a hydrothermal synthesis method for the formation of MnS in which

135

ENVR Dionysios Dionysiou Wednesday, August 22, 2012 261 -Arsenic mobilization in the critical zone: Oxidation by manganese oxide minerals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716, United States, (2) Engineer Research & Development Center, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Vicksburg, MS 39180, United States Manganese(IV) oxides are one of the main redox catalysts in the subsurface environment. Their highly reactive surfaces allow manganese (Mn

Sparks, Donald L.

136

The connection between the damping capacity and the crystal structure of some copper-manganese alloys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE CONNECTION BETHEEN THE DANPIING CAPACIITY AND THE CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF SOME COPPER-MANGANESE ALLOYS A Thesis By Leon Eldon McCrary Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanlcai College of Texas ln partial fulfil... lment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIIENCE August 'l960 Major Sub)ect: Physics THE CONNECTION BETWEEN THE DAMPING CAPACITY AND THE CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF SOME COPPER-MANGANESE ALLOYS A Thesis By Leon E I don McC ra ry Approved...

McCrary, Leon Eldon

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Manganese oxide helices, rings, strands, and films, and methods for their preparation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods for the preparation of mixed-valence manganese oxide compositions with quaternary ammonium ions are described. The compositions self-assemble into helices, rings, and strands without any imposed concentration gradient. These helices, rings, and strands, as well as films having the same composition, undergo rapid ion exchange to replace the quaternary ammonium ions with various metal ions. And the metal-ion-containing manganese oxide compositions so formed can be heat treated to form semi-conducting materials with high surface areas.

Suib, Steven L. (Storrs, CT); Giraldo, Oscar (Storrs, CT); Marquez, Manuel (Wheeling, IL); Brock, Stephanie (Detroit, MI)

2003-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

138

E-Print Network 3.0 - atp-dependent potassium channels Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

andrecovery. Recently, ATP-dependent potassium channels havebeen identified by direct patch... and Partial Purification of the Glibenclamide-sensitive, ATP-dependent K' Channel...

139

Potassium Fixation and Supply by Soils with Mixed Clay Minerals.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

supplied onl!. Studies were made on three agriculturally important me/me of exchangeable K. The capacity of all a soils of South Texas and Northern Mexico to determine soils to fix K increased with increasing remo\\dl i their potassium (K)-supplying power...- T east and Southeast United States has been investigated. Little work has been done, however, on soils of the Southwest. Soils of the West and Southwest are generally quite high in K, and responses are not usually obtained from the addition of K...

Hipp, Billy W.

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

High Pressure X-ray Diffraction Study of Potassium Azide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Crystal structure and compressibility of potassium azide was investigated by in-situ synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction in a diamond anvil cell at room temperature up to 37.7 GPa. In the body-centered tetragonal (bct) phase, an anisotropic compressibility was observed with greater compressibility in the direction perpendicular to the plane containing N{sub 3}{sup -} ions than directions within that plane. The bulk modulus of the bct phase was determined to be 18.6(7) GPa. A pressure-induced phase transition may occur at 15.5 GPa.

C Ji; F Zhang; D Hong; H Zhu; J Wu; M Chyu; V Levitas; Y Ma

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Potassium sources and availability in three East Texas soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coefficient of determination values for selected parameters of Troup versus exchangeable po tas slum 63 16 Fstimated amount of mica potassium in s5um materials to a depth of 235cm 65 LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page Distribution of percent K 0 in Troup... with depth 34 Comparison of Na S 0 treated and untreated Troup 20-5um mater aI from 205-235cm depth 38 Distribution of Gapon selectivity coefficients in Troup with depth Distribution of Gapon selectivity coefficients in Boswell with depth 46 X...

Hons, F. M

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

142

Determination of Sodium Fluoroacetate (Compound 1080) in Biological Tissues  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......potassium carbonate, as the base with varying success (20-23). However, derivatization of fluoroacetic acid was found to pro- ceed best when anhydrous potassium carbonate and acetone were used, a finding comparable to that of Okuno and Meeker (15). Chromatographic......

William J. Allender

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

The effect of paramagnetic manganese cations on 1 H MR spectroscopy of the brain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effect of paramagnetic manganese cations on 1 H MR spectroscopy of the brain K. S. Madsen1 has investigated the effect of Mn on 1 H MR spectroscopy using an in vivo Mn-enhanced optic tract into a stereotactic device. Images and 1 H MR spectra were acquired using a Varian 4.7T animal scanner together

144

Reverse Transcription-PCR Analysis of the Regulation of the Manganese Peroxidase Gene Family  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...also contain putative heat shock elements...of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-contaminated soil with...Alic M. Gold M. H. Heat shock induction of manganese...Farrell R. L. Enzymatic combustion: the microbial degradation...enzyme, as well as by heat shock and other factors...

Jessica M. Gettemy; Biao Ma; Margaret Alic; Michael H. Gold

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Carbon Nanotube/Manganese Oxide Ultrathin Film Electrodes for Electrochemical Capacitors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Multiwall carbon nanotube (MWNT)/manganese oxide (MnO2) nanocomposite ultrathin film electrodes have been created via redox deposition of MnO2 on layer-by-layer (LbL)-assembled MWNT films. We demonstrate that these LbL-assembled MWNT (LbL-MWNT)/MnO2 thin ...

Seung Woo Lee; Junhyung Kim; Shuo Chen; Paula T. Hammond; Yang Shao-Horn

2010-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

146

Parallel Polarization EPR Characterization of the Mn(III) Center of Oxidized Manganese Superoxide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Parallel Polarization EPR Characterization of the Mn(III) Center of Oxidized Manganese Superoxide polarization CW-EPR to investigate the paramagnetic Mn3+ ion of the MnSOD enzyme from Escherichia coli with a positive axial zero-field splitting value, D, are arranged as shown in Figure 1. An EPR signal from the Mn

Miller, Anne-Frances

147

Rare earth element sorption onto hydrous manganese oxide A modeling study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

element sorption onto hydrous manganese oxide A modeling study Olivier Pourret1* and Mélanie Davranche2 1 models due to the lack of a comprehensive set of sorption reactions consistent with a given surface complexation model (SCM), as well as discrepancies between published sorption data and predictions using

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

148

X-ray Fluorescence Measurements of Manganese in Petroglyphs and Graffiti in the Bluff, Utah Area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray Fluorescence Measurements of Manganese in Petroglyphs and Graffiti in the Bluff, Utah Area the age of rock art using Mn levels, Lytle (2008). In this work we use x-ray fluorescence (XRF) to measure of methods including atomic mass spectroscopy (AMS) measurements of 14 C, Particle-induced X-ray Excitation

149

Amperometric Biosensors Based on Carbon Paste Electrodes Modified with Nanostructured Mixed-valence Manganese Oxides and Glucose Oxidase  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nanostructured multivalent manganese oxides octahedral molecular sieve (OMS), including cryptomelane-type manganese oxides and todorokite-type manganese oxides, were synthesized and evaluated for chemical sensing and biosensing at low operating potential. Both cryptomelane-type manganese oxides and todorokite-type manganese oxides are nanofibrous crystals with sub-nanometer open tunnels that provide a unique property for sensing applications. The electrochemical and electrocatalytic performance of OMS for the oxidation of H2O2 have been compared. Both cryptomelane-type manganese oxides and todorokite-type manganese oxides can be used to fabricate sensitive H2O2 sensors. Amperometric glucose biosensors are constructed by bulk modification of carbon paste electrodes (CPEs) with glucose oxidase as a biocomponent and nanostructured OMS as a mediator. A Nafion thin film was applied as an immobilization/encapsulation and protective layer. The biosensors were evaluated as an amperometric glucose detector at phosphate buffer solution with a pH 7.4 at an operating potential of 0.3 V (vs. Ag/AgCl). The biosensor is characterized by a well-reproducible amperometric response, linear signal-to-glucose concentration range up to 3.5 mM and 1.75 mM, and detection limits (S/N = 3) of 0.1 mM and 0.05 mM for todorokite-type manganese oxide and cryptomelane-type manganese oxide modified electrodes, respectively. The biosensors based on OMS exhibit considerable good reproducibility and stability, and the construction and renewal are simple and inexpensive.

Cui, Xiaoli; Liu, Guodong; Lin, Yuehe

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Reaction of Sodium Borohydride with Wool  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... It has recently been found that sodium borohydride in alkaline solution rapidly dissolves wool under conditions of temperature and pH milder than many in current use. The reaction ... in current use. The reaction has been studied as follows: 1 gm. of solvent-scoured Merino ...

J. M. GILLESPIE

1959-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

151

In sodium tests of ultrasonic transducers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ultrasonic techniques are seen as suitable candidates for the in-service inspection and for the continuous surveillance of sodium cooled reactors (SFR). These techniques need the development and the qualification of immersed ultrasonic transducers, and materials. This paper presents some developments performed by CEA (DTN and LIST) and AREVA (NDE Solutions), and some results. (authors)

Lhuillier, C.; Descombin, O.; Baque, F. [CEA, DTN, 13108 Saint Paul lez Durance Cedex (France); Marchand, B. [CEA, LIST, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Saillant, J. F. [AREVA/NDE Solutions, 4 rue Thomas Dumorey, 71109 Chalon sur Saone Cedex (France); Augem, J. M. [EDF, 12-14 avenue Dutrievoz, 69628 Villeurbanne (France)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Inhibition Of Washed Sludge With Sodium Nitrite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the results of electrochemical tests used to determine the relationship between the concentration of the aggressive anions in washed sludge and the minimum effective inhibitor concentration. Sodium nitrate was added as the inhibitor because of its compatibility with the DWPF process. A minimum of 0.05M nitrite is required to inhibit the washed sludge simulant solution used in this study. When the worst case compositions and safety margins are considered, it is expected that a minimum operating limit of nearly 0.1M nitrite will be specified. The validity of this limit is dependent on the accuracy of the concentrations and solubility splits previously reported. Sodium nitrite additions to obtain 0.1M nitrite concentrations in washed sludge will necessitate the additional washing of washed precipitate in order to decrease its sodium nitrite inhibitor requirements sufficiently to remain below the sodium limits in the feed to the DWPF. Nitrite will be the controlling anion in "fresh" washed sludge unless the soluble chloride concentration is about ten times higher than predicted by the solubility splits. Inhibition of "aged" washed sludge will not be a problem unless significant chloride dissolution occurs during storage. It will be very important tomonitor the composition of washed sludge during processing and storage.

Congdon, J. W.; Lozier, J. S.

2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

153

Vasopressin, ATP and Catecholamines Differentially Control Potassium Secretion in Inner Ear Cell line  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Vasopressin, ATP and Catecholamines Differentially Control Potassium Secretion in Inner Ear Cell and catecholamines stimulate while ATP inhibits apical potassium secretion by EC5v cells. These results open new OF ABBREVIATIONS ,-Me-ATP: ,-methylene-ATP ,-Me-ATP: ,-methylene ATP InsPs: total inositol phosphates Asn1 , Val5

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

154

High-pressure alloying of potassium and iron: Radioactivity in the Earth's core?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/U (potassium/uranium) ratios of $1 Ã? 104 on Earth are distinct from the 8 Ã? 104 ratio found in chondrites argued that because potassium is a moderately volatile element, it is depleted due to the high for the depletion of K in the terrestrial planets, as a mass-dependent depletion of the isotopes would

Lee, Kanani K. M.

155

Gypsum and Polyacrylamide Soil Amendments Used With High Sodium Wastewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using wastewater for irrigation of crops represents an attractive alternative to disposal. Typically, municipal wastewaters are high in sodium, and the resulting high sodium absorption ratio (SAR) alters the soil structure making it more impermeable...

Gardiner, Duane

156

Types of red cell potassium in seven Spanish native breeds Paquita GONZALEZ Maria Jess TUON M. VALLEJO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Note Types of red cell potassium in seven Spanish native breeds of cattle Paquita GONZALEZ Maria Madrid, Spain Summary The distribution of red-cell potassium was studied in seven Spanish native breeds-equiv/1. For HK animals the means ranged from 50.8 to 66.1 m-equiv/1. Key word : red cell potassium

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

157

Cast Stone Formulation At Higher Sodium Concentrations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A low temperature waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide supplemental Low Activity Waste (LAW) immobilization capacity for the Hanford site. Formulation of Cast Stone at high sodium concentrations is of interest since a significant reduction in the necessary volume of Cast Stone and subsequent disposal costs could be achieved if an acceptable waste form can be produced with a high sodium molarity salt solution combined with a high water to premix (or dry blend) ratio. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the factors involved with increasing the sodium concentration in Cast Stone, including production and performance properties and the retention and release of specific components of interest. Three factors were identified for the experimental matrix: the concentration of sodium in the simulated salt solution, the water to premix ratio, and the blast furnace slag portion of the premix. The salt solution simulants used in this study were formulated to represent the overall average waste composition. The cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash were sourced from a supplier in the Hanford area in order to be representative. The test mixes were prepared in the laboratory and fresh properties were measured. Fresh density increased with increasing sodium molarity and with decreasing water to premix ratio, as expected given the individual densities of these components. Rheology measurements showed that all of the test mixes produced very fluid slurries. The fresh density and rheology data are of potential value in designing a future Cast Stone production facility. Standing water and density gradient testing showed that settling is not of particular concern for the high sodium compositions studied. Heat of hydration measurements may provide some insight into the reactions that occur within the test mixes, which may in turn be related to the properties and performance of the waste form. These measurements showed that increased sodium concentration in the salt solution reduced the time to peak heat flow, and reducing the amount of slag in the premix increased the time to peak heat flow. These observations may help to describe some of the cured properties of the samples, in particular the differences in compressive strength observed after 28 and 90 days of curing. Samples were cured for at least 28 days at ambient temperature in the laboratory prior to cured properties analyses. The low activity waste form for disposal at the Hanford Site is required to have a compressive strength of at least 500 psi. After 28 days of curing, several of the test mixes had mean compressive strengths that were below the 500 psi requirement. Higher sodium concentrations and higher water to premix ratios led to reduced compressive strength. Higher fly ash concentrations decreased the compressive strength after 28 days of curing. This may be explained in that the cementitious phases matured more quickly in the mixes with higher concentrations of slag, as evidenced by the data for the time to peak heat generation. All of the test mixes exhibited higher mean compressive strengths after 90 days of curing, with only one composition having a mean compressive strength of less than 500 psi. Leachability indices were determined for the test mixes for contaminants of interest. The leaching performance of the mixes evaluated in this study was not particularly sensitive to the factors used in the experimental design. This may be beneficial in demonstrating that the performance of the waste form is robust with respect to changes in the mix composition. The results of this study demonstrate the potential to achieve significantly higher waste loadings in Cast Stone and other low temperature, cementitious waste forms. Additional work is needed to elucidate the hydration mechanisms occurring in Cast Stone formulated with highly concentrated salt solutions since these reactions are responsible for determining the performance of the cured waste form. The thermal analyses completed in this study provide some preliminary insight, although the l

Fox, K. M.; Roberts, K. A.; Edwards, T. B.

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

158

Chemical modification of surfaces: the effect of potassium on the chemisorption of molecules on transition metal crystal surfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The physical and chemical properties of pure potassium monolayers and its effect on the adsorption of oxygen, carbon monoxide and benzene on the (111) faces of platinum and rhodium single crystals are described. Potassium adsorption on both surfaces is quite similar. Potassium forms hexagonally close packed structures that are incommensurate with the substrate. The heat of desorption of potassium on these surfaces decreases with increasing potassium coverage. The surface free electron density increases and the work function decreases substantially wtih alkali adsorption, indicating charge transfer occurs from potassium to the substrate. Oxygen adsorption increases the potassium binding energy, and forms a surface complex at high potassium coverages. Oxygen adsorption is dissociative on both clean and potassium dosed Rh(111). The metal-oxygen stretching vibration increases in the presence of potassium, indicating stronger adsorption. Carbon monoxide adsorption on both metal surfaces is strongly affected. With increasing potassium coverage, the heat of desorption increases while the C-O stretching frequencies decrease. Also, substantial population shifts from the atop to the bridged site occur. Dissociation of CO is induced on Rh(111) by the presence of potassium. Benzene is found to be ..pi.. bonded oriented with the ring plane parallel to the surface with C/sub 3v/(sigma/sub d/) symmetry on both the clean and potassium dosed Rh(111) surfaces. Potassium reduces the heat of desorption of molecular benzene and induces a lower temperature pathway to decomposition. The major influence of potassium is to increase the surface electron density, which, for molecular adsorbates with low lying vacant orbitals of the correct symmetry, can lead to substantial changes in their bonding with the surface.

Crowell, J.E.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Filtration of Sludge and Sodium Nonatitanate Solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proposed facility designs for the ion exchange and solvent extraction flowsheets under development to treat high level waste at the Savannah River Site use crossflow filtration to remove entrained sludge and monosodium titanate (MST). Bench-scale and pilot-scale testing performed with simulated feed streams showed much lower filtration rates than desired for the process. This report documents an investigation of the impact on filtration of using Honeywell sodium nonatitanate (ST), rather than MST, for strontium and actinide removal.

Poirier, M.R.

2000-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

160

Sodium Plugging Test Loop - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sodium Plugging Test Loop Sodium Plugging Test Loop Sodium Plugging Test Loop Overview Other Facilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Sodium Plugging Test Loop This experimental setup is part of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) Advanced Fuel Cycle R&D work carried out at Argonne on advanced sodium component technology. Bookmark and Share For long range sodium technology research and development, employing supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle power conversion technology as an advanced balance of plant technology is being considered. The component that provides the interface between the sodium and supercritical CO2 is a compact heat exchanger known as a printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE). This heat exchanger has very small coolant flow passages that may foul or

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Idaho Site Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup Treatment |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup Treatment Idaho Site Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup Treatment March 28, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis CWI engineers Jeff Jones, David Tolman, right, and Kirk Dooley (seated) developed a treatment to safely dissolve a bicarbonate crust and treat and remove the sodium in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II at the Idaho site. CWI engineers Jeff Jones, David Tolman, right, and Kirk Dooley (seated) developed a treatment to safely dissolve a bicarbonate crust and treat and remove the sodium in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II at the Idaho site. Piping in the east boiler basement of the sodium processing building was color coded for easy identification. Orange indicates sodium and green identifies cooling water.

162

Low-Pressure Sodium Lighting Basics | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Low-Pressure Sodium Lighting Basics Low-Pressure Sodium Lighting Basics Low-Pressure Sodium Lighting Basics August 16, 2013 - 10:17am Addthis Low-pressure sodium lighting provides more energy-efficient outdoor lighting than high-intensity discharge lighting, but it has very poor color rendition. Typical applications include highway and security lighting, where color is not important. Low-pressure sodium lamps work somewhat like fluorescent lamps. Like high-intensity discharge lighting, low-pressure sodium lamps require up to 10 minutes to start and have to cool before they can restart. Therefore, they are most suitable for applications in which they stay on for hours at a time. They are not suitable for use with motion detectors. The chart below compares low-pressure sodium lamps and high-intensity

163

Idaho Site Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup Treatment |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Idaho Site Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup Idaho Site Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup Treatment Idaho Site Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup Treatment March 28, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis CWI engineers Jeff Jones, David Tolman, right, and Kirk Dooley (seated) developed a treatment to safely dissolve a bicarbonate crust and treat and remove the sodium in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II at the Idaho site. CWI engineers Jeff Jones, David Tolman, right, and Kirk Dooley (seated) developed a treatment to safely dissolve a bicarbonate crust and treat and remove the sodium in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II at the Idaho site. Piping in the east boiler basement of the sodium processing building was color coded for easy identification. Orange indicates sodium and green identifies cooling water.

164

A Parkinsonian Syndrome in Methcathinone Users and the Role of Manganese  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...antibodies, CD4 lymphocyte counts, and liver function. In addition, serum ceruloplasmin and copper levels were measured. MRI was performed with a General Electric 1.0T Signa Horizon LX high-speed system with head coil and a standardized magnetic resonance examination protocol; sagittal, axial, and coronal T1... In this case series of 23 adults in Latvia who were injection users of methcathinone (a drug manufactured by users from readily available pharmaceutical agents such as pseudoephedrine), patients had an extrapyramidal syndrome, elevated serum manganese levels, and MRI abnormalities in the basal ganglia. These findings suggest that methcathinone use can result in neurologic toxic effects from manganese contained in the methcathinone solution.

Stepens A.; Logina I.; Liguts V.

2008-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

165

Study by IR-spectroscopy and adsorption of platinum-alumina catalysts modified by manganese  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Additions of Re are widely employed for modifying platinum-alumina catalysts (PAC). The effect of Mn on the catalysis of and the physicochemical properties of PAC has been less studied. It is only known that adding <0.2 wt. % Mn has no effect on the dispersity of the Pt crystallites. In this work the authors have studied the state of Pt in unmodified PAC by IR spectroscopy of adsorbed CO and by the adsorption of H/sub 2/ at elevated temperatures. The state of the metallic platinum in platinum-alumina catalysts modified by Mn is more heterogeneous than in the unmodified sample. When manganese is added, platinum crystallites with stronger electron-donor properties form on the surface of the catalyst. In platinum-alumina catalysts modified by manganese, there is an increase in the number of sites for the high-temperature dissociative adsorption of hydrogen located on the surface of the Mn-modified carrier.

Zaitsev, A.V.; Barkova, A.P.; Borovkov, B.Yu.; Sterligov, O.D.; Isagulyants, G.V.; Kazanskii, V.B.

1987-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

166

Effect of potassium permanganate as an oxidizing agent in the production of lignite-based fertilizers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this work was to observe the effect of potassium permanganate oxidation of lignites from Elbistan for end use as fertilizers, after being ammoniated. The experiments at each stage were designed by a 1/2 x full factorial design. The oxidation was carried out by three different methods. In the first two methods potassium permanganate in neutral or basic medium was used. In the other method two stages of oxidation were used: nitric acid followed by potassium permanganate in acidic medium. The latter proved to be more successful.

Baris, S.; Dincer, S.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Recent Sodium Technology Development for the Decommissioning of the Rapsodie and Superphenix Reactors and the Management of Sodium Wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) has recently developed and/or conducted experiments on several processes in support of the decommissioning of two French liquid-metal fast reactors (LMFRs), Rapsodie and Superphenix, as well as on the treatment of CEA sodium wastes. CEA has demonstrated that it is possible to define appropriate and efficient processes to meet the different situations encountered in decommissioning LMFRs. Mechanical techniques derived from standard technologies have been successfully applied to fast reactor decommissioning to complete primary vessel draining from sodium. In addition, specific chemical processes have been developed to deal safely with metallic sodium reactivity. Sodium-contaminated equipment has been successfully cleaned by reacting sodium with water mist in an atmosphere with carbon dioxide to form inert sodium carbonate. Bulk sodium has been successfully converted into aqueous caustic soda by injection of liquid-metallic sodium into sodium hydroxide solution. Several processes were also defined to deal with specific sodium wastes. In all cases the principle is based on a sodium/water chemical reaction where the released hydrogen and heat are controlled. With the development of a wide variety of processes, all steps in the decommissioning of LMFRs are assumed to be now properly mastered.

Rodriguez, G.; Gastaldi, O.; Baque, F. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique Cadarache (France)

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

168

ENERGY LEVELS AND SPECTRAL LINES OF SINGLY IONIZED MANGANESE (Mn II)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This compilation revises the previously recommended list of energy levels of singly ionized manganese (Mn II) and provides a comprehensive list of observed spectral lines and transition probabilities in this spectrum. The new level optimization takes into account critically assessed uncertainties of measured wavelengths and includes about a hundred high-precision wavelengths determined by laser spectroscopy and Fourier transform techniques. Uncertainties of 63% of energy levels and 74% of Ritz wavelengths are reduced by a factor of three on average.

Kramida, Alexander; Sansonetti, Jean E. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States)] [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States)

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Hot coal gas desulfurization with manganese-based sorbents. Final report, September 1992--December 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The focus of much current work being performed by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) of the Department of Energy on hot coal-derived fuel gas desulfurization is in the use of zinc-based sorbents. METC has shown interest in formulating and testing manganese-based pellets as alternative effective sulfur sorbents in the 700 to 1200{degree}C temperature range. To substantiate the potential superiority of Mn-based pellets, a systematic approach toward the evaluation of the desulfurizing power of single-metal sorbents is developed based on thermodynamic considerations. This novel procedure considered several metal-based sorbents and singled out manganese oxide as a prime candidate sorbent capable of being utilized under a wide temperature range, irrespective of the reducing power (determined by CO{sub 2}/CO ratio) of the fuel gas. Then, the thermodynamic feasibility of using Mn-based pellets for the removal of H{sub 2}S from hot-coal derived fuel gases, and the subsequent oxidative regeneration of loaded (sulfided) pellets was established. It was concluded that MnO is the stable form of manganese for virtually all commercially available coal-derived fuel gases. In addition, the objective of reducing the H{sub 2}S concentration below 150 ppMv to satisfy the integrated gasification combined cycle system requirement was shown to be thermodynamically feasible. A novel process is developed for the manufacture of Mn-based spherical pellets which have the desired physical and chemical characteristics required.

Hepworth, M.T.; Slimane, R.B.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Demonstration of the 101st harmonic generated from a laser-produced manganese plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate the generation of the 101st harmonic (wavelength {lambda}=7.9 nm) from manganese plasma, which is generated using the plasma high-order harmonic technique. We also investigate the variation of the high-order harmonic distribution from the manganese plasma plume as a function of the prepulse and main pulse intensities. The harmonic cutoff was at the 31st order, for pump intensities below the barrier suppression intensity for singly charged Mn ions. However, by using higher prepulse and main pulse intensities, the harmonic cutoff was extended to the 101st order, with an appearance of second plateau for harmonics higher than the 31st order. In this case, the low-order harmonics decreased in intensity, or completely disappeared, and the spectrum for wavelengths longer than 27.6 nm was dominated by plasma line emission. The origin of the harmonics appearing at this short wavelength plateau is attributed to the interaction of the intense main pump laser field with doubly charged manganese ions.

Ganeev, R. A. [Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, Centre Energie, Materiaux et Telecommunications, 1650 Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Quebec, J3X 1S2 (Canada); Scientific Association Akadempribor, Academy of Sciences of Uzbekistan, Akademgorodok, Tashkent 100125 (Uzbekistan); Bom, L. B. Elouga; Kieffer, J.-C.; Ozaki, T. [Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, Centre Energie, Materiaux et Telecommunications, 1650 Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Quebec, J3X 1S2 (Canada); Suzuki, M.; Kuroda, H. [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan)

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

171

Secondary cell with orthorhombic alkali metal/manganese oxide phase active cathode material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An alkali metal manganese oxide secondary cell is disclosed which can provide a high rate of discharge, good cycling capabilities, good stability of the cathode material, high specific energy (energy per unit of weight) and high energy density (energy per unit volume). The active material in the anode is an alkali metal and the active material in the cathode comprises an orthorhombic alkali metal manganese oxide which undergoes intercalation and deintercalation without a change in phase, resulting in a substantially linear change in voltage with change in the state of charge of the cell. The active material in the cathode is an orthorhombic structure having the formula M.sub.x Z.sub.y Mn.sub.(1-y) O.sub.2, where M is an alkali metal; Z is a metal capable of substituting for manganese in the orthorhombic structure such as iron, cobalt or titanium; x ranges from about 0.2 in the fully charged state to about 0.75 in the fully discharged state, and y ranges from 0 to 60 atomic %. Preferably, the cell is constructed with a solid electrolyte, but a liquid or gelatinous electrolyte may also be used in the cell.

Doeff, Marca M. (Hayward, CA); Peng, Marcus Y. (Cupertino, CA); Ma, Yanping (Albany, CA); Visco, Steven J. (Berkeley, CA); DeJonghe, Lutgard C. (Lafayette, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Use of manganese ore in chemical-looping combustion (CLC)—Effect on steam gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The chemical-looping combustion (CLC) process is a novel solution for efficient combustion with direct separation of carbon dioxide. The process uses a metal oxide as an oxygen carrier to transfer oxygen from an air to a fuel reactor, where the fuel reacts with the solid oxygen carrier. When solid fuel is used in CLC, the char needs to be gasified by e.g. steam to form H2 and CO that can be subsequently oxidized to H2O and CO2 by the oxygen carrier. In this work, the influence of the oxygen carrier on the rate of steam gasification is studied, by comparing the conversion of petcoke in the presence of manganese ore to that of ilmenite. The experiments were carried out in a fluidized-bed reactor at 970 °C using a fluidization gas of 50% steam in nitrogen. The manganese ore shows an increase by a factor five in the rate of steam gasification of char as compared to ilmenite. The dramatic increase in rate of steam gasification, in combination with potentially low costs of this material suggests that manganese ore could be an interesting material for CLC with solid fuels.

Mehdi Arjmand; Henrik Leion; Anders Lyngfelt; Tobias Mattisson

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Secondary cell with orthorhombic alkali metal/manganese oxide phase active cathode material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An alkali metal manganese oxide secondary cell is disclosed which can provide a high rate of discharge, good cycling capabilities, good stability of the cathode material, high specific energy (energy per unit of weight) and high energy density (energy per unit volume). The active material in the anode is an alkali metal and the active material in the cathode comprises an orthorhombic alkali metal manganese oxide which undergoes intercalation and deintercalation without a change in phase, resulting in a substantially linear change in voltage with change in the state of charge of the cell. The active material in the cathode is an orthorhombic structure having the formula M{sub x}Z{sub y}Mn{sub (1{minus}y)}O{sub 2}, where M is an alkali metal; Z is a metal capable of substituting for manganese in the orthorhombic structure such as iron, cobalt or titanium; x ranges from about 0.2 in the fully charged state to about 0.75 in the fully discharged state, and y ranges from 0 to 60 atomic %. Preferably, the cell is constructed with a solid electrolyte, but a liquid or gelatinous electrolyte may also be used in the cell. 11 figs.

Doeff, M.M.; Peng, M.Y.; Ma, Y.; Visco, S.J.; DeJonghe, L.C.

1996-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

174

Relationships between chemical forms of soil iron and manganese and their absorption by rice from 34 flooded Gulf Coast soils of Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GULF COAST SOILS OF TEXAS A Thesis by DOUGLAS P. PHILLIPS Approved as to style and content by: airman of Comnittee ea of Department em er ember Mem er Mem er Mem er December 1971 ABSTRACT Relationships Between Chemical Forms of Soil Iron... of iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn) in 34 Gulf Coast rice soils at 48 days from submergence . . . 44 6 Content of active iron and manganese, exchangeable iron and manganese (48 days from submergence), and water soluble iron and manganese (48 days from...

Phillips, Douglas Patton

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to improve the process for CO{sub 2} capture by alkanolamine absorption/stripping by developing an alternative solvent, aqueous K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} promoted by piperazine. The best K{sup +}/PZ solvent, 4.5 m K{sup +}/4.5 m PZ, requires equivalent work of 31.8 kJ/mole CO{sub 2} when used with a double matrix stripper and an intercooled absorber. The oxidative degradation of piperazine or organic acids is reduced significantly by inhibitor A, but the production of ethylenediamine is unaffected. The oxidative degradation of piperazine in 7 m MEA/2 m PZ is catalyzed by Cu{sup ++}. The thermal degradation of MEA becomes significant at 120 C. The solubility of potassium sulfate in MEA/PZ solvents is increased at greater CO{sub 2} loading. The best solvent and process configuration, matrix with MDEA/PZ, offers 22% and 15% energy savings over the baseline and improved baseline, respectively, with stripping and compression to 10 MPa. The energy requirement for stripping and compression to 10 MPa is about 20% of the power output from a 500 MW power plant with 90% CO{sub 2} removal. The stripper rate model shows that a ''short and fat'' stripper requires 7 to 15% less equivalent work than a ''tall and skinny'' one. The stripper model was validated with data obtained from pilot plant experiments at the University of Texas with 5m K{sup +}/2.5m PZ and 6.4m K{sup +}/1.6m PZ under normal pressure and vacuum conditions using Flexipac AQ Style 20 structured packing. Experiments with oxidative degradation at low gas rates confirm the effects of Cu{sup +2} catalysis; in MEA/PZ solutions more formate and acetate is produced in the presence of Cu{sup +2}. At 150 C, the half life of 30% MEA with 0.4 moles CO{sub 2}/mole amine is about 2 weeks. At 100 C, less than 3% degradation occurred in two weeks. The solubility of potassium sulfate in MEA solution increases significantly with CO{sub 2} loading and decreases with MEA concentration. The base case corrosion rate in 5 M MEA/1.2M PZ is 22 mpy. With 1 wt% heat stable salt, the corrosion rate increases by 50% to 160% in the order: thiosulfate< oxalate

Gary T. Rochelle; Andrew Sexton; Jason Davis; Marcus Hilliard; Qing Xu; David Van Wagener; Jorge M. Plaza

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

176

Factors contributing to the breakdown of sodium beta-alumina  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Clarification of the breakdown process occurring during charge transfer in sodium beta alumina solid electrolytes was derived from: (1) studying the effects of molten sodium contact at 350/sup 0/C on single crystal sodium beta alumina and polycrystalline sodium beta alumina; (2) determination of critical current density by monitoring acoustic emissions accompanying crack growth in sodium/sodium beta alumina/sodium cells subjected to linear current ramping at 1 mA cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/; (3) failure analysis conducted on cycled electrolytes, some from commercial sodium/sulfur cells, which had been subjected to up to 703 Ahr cm/sup -2/ of charge transfer. Gray coloration developing in beta aluminas in contact with molten sodium was found to be a consequence of formation, through reduction by sodium, of oxygen vacancies charge compensated by electrons. Electronic conductivity of the electrolyte increases as a result. No second phase formation was detected. Colored electrolytes from sodium/sulfur cells show evidence of a newly recognized degradation mechanism in which fracture occurs when sodium is reduced and deposited internally under pressure as metal in regions where an electronic conductivity gradient exists. Heating colored beta aluminas in air produces reoxidation and bleaching. Kinetics and other properties of the coloration and bleaching processes were determined. Critical current density was found to bear an inverse relation to average electrolyte grain size. Evidence was found in the cycled electrolytes for a slow crack growth mechanism and a progressive mode of degradation advancing from the sulfur electrode interface. Implications of the findings for the construction and operation of sodium/sulfur battery systems are discussed.

Buechele, A.C.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

E-Print Network 3.0 - adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

<< < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Neuron, Vol. 38, 417432, May 8, 2003, Copyright 2003 by Cell Press ATP-Sensitive Potassium Channel Traffic Regulation Summary: Neuron, Vol. 38, 417-432, May...

178

E-Print Network 3.0 - atp sensitive potassium Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: atp sensitive potassium Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Na'-K+-ATPase activity in medullary...

179

Building an apparatus for ultracold lithium-potassium Fermi-Fermi mixtures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, I designed and built laser systems to cool, trap and image lithium-6 and potassium-40 atoms. I also constructed the vacuum system for the experiment and experimentally tested a new method to coat the chamber ...

Campbell, Sara L., S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Potassium geopolymer foams made with silica fume pore forming agent for thermal insulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Porous potassium based geopolymers with a mutli-scale porosity were synthesized. Silica fume is introduced as an additive to the geopolymer formulation. The free silicon contained inside this silica fume is ox...

Joseph Henon; Arnaud Alzina; Joseph Absi…

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

E-Print Network 3.0 - aqueous potassium acetate Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Heat at 70 C for 30'. 8. Add 100ml 5M potassium acetate, vortex 30". 9. Allow... to tube. 13. Invert to mix and ... Source: Singer, Mitchell - Section of Microbiology,...

182

Nested potassium hydroxide etching and protective coatings for silicon-based microreactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have developed a multilayer, multichannel silicon-based microreactor that uses elemental fluorine as a reagent and generates hydrogen fluoride as a byproduct. Nested potassium hydroxide etching (using silicon nitride ...

de Mas, Nuria

183

Effect of potassium carbonate on char gasification by carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A differential packed-bed reactor has been employed to study the gasification of 7.5 wt% K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-catalyzed Saran char in carbon dioxide/carbon monoxide mixtures at a total pressure near 1 atm (101.3 kPa) and temperatures between 922 and 1046 K. The rate data were tested with a model which involves two-site adsorption and subsequent dissociation of CO/sub 2/ on the char surface. The results indicate that this model adequately explains the catalyzed gasification data. Moreover, the activation energy for desorption of carbon-oxygen complex is lower for the catalyzed case than for the uncatalyzed case. Adsorption of CO and CO/sub 2/ on both catalyzed and uncatalyzed chars was also followed with a volumetric adsorption apparatus at pressures between 1 and 100 kPa and temperatures from 273 to 725 K. The catalyzed char adsorbed an order of magnitude more CO/sub 2/ at 560 K than the uncatalyzed char. Subsequent dissociation of CO/sub 2/ on the carbon surface does not appear to be catalyzed by potassium. Thus, the catalyst's role is to enhance CO/sub 2/ adsorption, thereby creating more oxygen on the surface, and lowering the activation energy for desorption of the resultant carbon-oxygen species.

Koenig, P.C.; Squires, R.G.; Laurendeau, N.M.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

The Nuclear Spin and Magnetic Moment of Potassium (41)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The spin of the K41 nucleus and the h.f.s. separation of the S122 normal state have been measured by the method of zero moments. The high resolution necessary to separate the two isotopes was obtained by passing a beam of neutral potassium atoms through a weak inhomogeneous magnetic field 153 cm long. The total beam length was 201 cm. A new method of analysis of the zero moment peak of K41 in relation to that of K39 was used in the determination of the spin. The spin was found to be 3/2 and the h.f.s. separation to be 0.554±0.2 percent of that of K39. The same ratio applies to the magnetic moments, hence this ratio and the values for K39 given by Fox and Rabi yield {??(K41),=0.00853±0.0001 cm-1}{?(K41),=0.22 nuclear Bohr magneton .} From the peak intensities it is possible to give the abundance ratio K39/K41 as 13.4±0.5.

J. H. Manley

1936-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

185

Fact Sheet: Sodium-Beta Batteries (October 2012)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sodium-Beta Batteries Sodium-Beta Batteries Improving the performance and reducing the cost of sodium-beta batteries for large-scale energy storage Sodium-beta batteries (Na-beta batteries or NBBs) use a solid beta-alumina (ß˝-Al 2 O 3 ) electrolyte membrane that selectively allows sodium ion transport between a positive electrode (e.g., a metal halide) and a negative sodium electrode. NBBs typically operate at temperatures near 350˚C. They are increasingly used in renewable storage and utility applications due to their high round-trip efficiency, high energy densities, and energy storage capacities ranging from a few kilowatt-hours to multiple megawatt-hours. In fact, U.S. utilities

186

Sodium/Phosphorus-Sulfur Cells II. Phase Equilibria  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

II. Phase Equilibria II. Phase Equilibria Title Sodium/Phosphorus-Sulfur Cells II. Phase Equilibria Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 1996 Authors Ridgway, Paul L., Frank R. McLarnon, and John S. Newman Journal Journal of the Electrochemistry Society Volume 143 Issue 2 Pagination 412-417 Keywords 25 ENERGY STORAGE, 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE, ALUMINIUM OXIDES, equilibrium, performance, PHASE DIAGRAMS, PHOSPHIDES, PHOSPHORUS ADDITIONS, SODIUM COMPOUNDS, SODIUM SULFIDES, SODIUM-SULFUR BATTERIES Abstract Equilibrium open-circuit cell voltage data from a sodium/{beta}{double_prime}-alumina/phosphorus-sulfur cell utilizing P/S ratios of 0, 0.143, and 0.332 and a sodium atom fraction ranging from 0 to 0.4 were interpreted to construct ternary phase diagrams of the Na-P-S ternary system at 350 and 400 C.

187

Review of Chemical Processes for the Synthesis of Sodium Borohydride  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Review of Chemical Processes for the Synthesis of Sodium Borohydride Review of Chemical Processes for the Synthesis of Sodium Borohydride Millennium Cell Inc. Prepared by Ying Wu Michael T. Kelly Jeffrey V. Ortega Under DOE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC36-04GO14008 August 2004 Table of Contents Introduction..................................................................................................................................... 1 Section 1: Commercially Practiced Sodium Borohydride Synthesis Process ............................... 2 The Brown-Schlesinger Process ................................................................................................. 2 The Bayer Process.......................................................................................................................

188

Sodium cobalt bronze batteries and a method for making same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A solid state secondary battery utilizing a low cost, environmentally sound, sodium cobalt bronze electrode. A method is provided for producing same.

Doeff, Marca M. (Hayward, CA); Ma, Yanping (Berkeley, CA); Visco, Steven J. (Berkeley, CA); DeJonghe, Lutgard (Lafayette, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Internal temperatures of neutral sodium clusters: a “PIE-thermometer”  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Distinct temperature effects could be observed in the threshold regions of photoionisation efficiency (PIE) measurements of sodium clusters. Simulations of the PIE thresholds at various temperatures were carried ...

U. Röthlisberger; M. Schär; E. Schumacher

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Function and Regulation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ENA Sodium ATPase System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...sodium when sodium is present in excess in the external medium relies...of sensitivity to sodium and lithium cations (31, 36, 70, 77...confer distinct sodium and lithium tolerances, with the former...The accumulation of sodium or lithium cations in calcineurin-deficient...

Amparo Ruiz; Joaquín Ariño

2007-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

191

DAFS study of site-specific local structure of Mn in manganese ferrite films.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Manganese ferrite (MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) is a well-known magnetic material widely used in electronics for many years. It is well established that its magnetic behavior is strongly influenced by local structural properties of Mn ions, which are distributed between crystallographically inequivalent tetrahedral and octahedral sites in the unit cell. In order to understand and be able to tune properties of these structures, it is necessary to have detailed site-specific structural information on the system. Here we report on the application of diffraction-anomalous fine structure (DAFS) spectroscopy to resolve site-specific Mn local structures in manganese ferrite films. The DAFS measurements were done at undulator beamline 4-ID-D of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. The DAFS spectra (Fig. 1) were measured at several Bragg reflections in the vicinity of the Mn absorption K-edge, having probed separately contributions from tetrahedrally and octahedrally coordinated Mn sites. The DAFS data analysis done with an iterative Kramers-Kroenig algorithm made it possible to solve separately the local structure around different inequivalent Mn sites in the unit cell. The reliability of the data treatment was checked carefully, and it was showed that the site-specific structural parameters obtained with DAFS allow us to describe fluorescence EXAFS spectrum measured independently. Fig. 2 shows individual site contributions to the imaginary part of the resonant scattering amplitude obtained from the treatment of the data of Fig. 1. The analysis of the refined site-specific absorption spectra was done using EXAFS methods based on theoretical standards. We provided direct evidence for the tetrahedral Mn-O bond distance being increased relative to the corresponding Fe-O distance in bulk manganese ferrites. The first coordination shell number was found to be reduced significantly for Mn atoms at these sites. This finding is consistent with the well-known tendency of Mn to be tetrahedrally coordinated in these compounds.

Kravtsov, E.; Haskel, D.; Cady, A.; Yang, A.; Vittoria, C.; Zuo, X.; Harris, V. G.; X-Ray Science Division; Inst. of Metal Physics; Northeastern Univ.; Nankai Univ.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Sodium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Neon Neon Previous Element (Neon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Magnesium) Magnesium Isotopes of the Element Sodium [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 23 100% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 18 1.3×10-21 seconds Proton Emission 100.00% 19 < 40 nanoseconds Proton Emission No Data Available 20 447.9 milliseconds Electron Capture with delayed Alpha Decay 20.05% Electron Capture 100.00% 21 22.49 seconds Electron Capture 100.00% 22 2.6027 years Electron Capture 100.00% 23 STABLE - - 24 14.997 hours Beta-minus Decay 100.00%

193

Mercury exosphere I. Global circulation model of its sodium component  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mercury exosphere I. Global circulation model of its sodium component Francois Leblanc a,*, R 2010 Accepted 27 April 2010 Available online 5 May 2010 Keywords: Mercury, Atmosphere Aeronomy a b s t r a c t Our understanding of Mercury's sodium exosphere has improved considerably in the last 5

Johnson, Robert E.

194

RESEARCH Open Access Half-molar sodium lactate infusion improves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESEARCH Open Access Half-molar sodium lactate infusion improves cardiac performance in acute heart for the myocardium at rest and during stress. We tested the effects of half-molar sodium lactate infusion on cardiac by 1 ml/kg/h continuous infusion for 24 hours. The control group received only a 3 ml/kg bolus

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

195

Sol–gel synthesis of sodium and lithium based materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sodium and lithium cobaltates are important materials for thermoelectric and ... the sol–gel synthesis of sodium- and lithium-based materials by using acetate precursors. The produced Na2/3CoO2, Li(Ni1/3Mn1/3Co1/...

Sandra Hildebrandt; Andreas Eva…

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Manganese-Aluminum-Based Magnets: Nanocrystalline t-MnAI Permanent Magnets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

REACT Project: Dartmouth is developing specialized alloys with magnetic properties superior to the rare earths used in today’s best magnets. EVs and renewable power generators typically use rare earths to turn the axles in their electric motors due to the magnetic strength of these minerals. However, rare earths are difficult and expensive to refine. Dartmouth will swap rare earths for a manganese-aluminum alloy that could demonstrate better performance and cost significantly less. The ultimate goal of this project is to develop an easily scalable process that enables the widespread use of low-cost and abundant materials for the magnets used in EVs and renewable power generators.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Reactivity of biogenic manganese oxide for metal sequestration and photochemistry: Computational solid state physics study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many microbes, including both bacteria and fungi, produce manganese (Mn) oxides by oxidizing soluble Mn(II) to form insoluble Mn(IV) oxide minerals, a kinetically much faster process than abiotic oxidation. These biogenic Mn oxides drive the Mn cycle, coupling it with diverse biogeochemical cycles and determining the bioavailability of environmental contaminants, mainly through strong adsorption and redox reactions. This mini review introduces recent findings based on quantum mechanical density functional theory that reveal the detailed mechanisms of toxic metal adsorption at Mn oxide surfaces and the remarkable role of Mn vacancies in the photochemistry of these minerals.

Kwon, K.D.; Sposito, G.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopic study of the interaction of potassium with carbon monoxide and benzene on the Pt(111) surface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The interaction of potassium with carbon monoxide and benezene has been studied on the Pt(111) crystal surface by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). The adsorptive changes reported in previous studies for carbon monoxide and benzene when potassium is coadsorbed are correlated with the UPS results presented here and are explained with the aid of a molecular orbital analysis. The authors find that the valence molecular orbitals increase their binding energy slightly when the potassium is coadsorbed, implying a model in which the adsorbates sense the potassium-induced changes in dipole field at the surface. 36 references, 11 figures.

Kudo, M.; Garfunkel, E.L.; Somorjai, G.A.

1985-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

199

Effect of Manganese Concentration in the Cd1-xMnxTe/CdTe Tandem Structure on Photovoltaic Energy Conversion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The photovoltaic electricity is obtained by direct conversion of sunlight into electricity by solar cells. The objective of this work is the study and simulation of a Tandem photovoltaic structure based on Cd1-xMnxTe as top material cell. This paper describes the optimization of energy efficiency for Cd1-xMnxTe thin films deposited by epitaxy on CdTe substrat. We present the impact of the manganese concentration in Cd1-xMnxTe thin films on solar cells performances. Our study includes simulation results to show the conversion efficiency and main performances factors as function of the manganese concentration.

A. Aissat; M. El Bey; M. Fathi; J.P. Vilcot

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project -  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Contractor - June 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Contractor - June 2012 June 2012 Review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Integrated Waste Treatment Unit Contractor Operational Readiness Review This report documents the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), independent review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project-Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (SBWTP-IWTU) contractor Operational Readiness Review (C-ORR). The review was conducted at the Idaho Site from February 27 to March 6, 2012. This report discusses the background, scope, results, and conclusions of the review, as well as

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Independent Oversight Assessment, Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - November 2012 Independent Oversight Assessment, Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - November 2012 November 2012 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an independent assessment of nuclear safety culture at the DOE Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project (SBWTP). The primary objective of the evaluation was to provide information regarding the status of the safety culture at SBWTP. The data collection phase of the assessment occurred in April and May 2012. SBWTP is one of DOE's largest nuclear

202

Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project -  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Federal - June 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Federal - June 2012 June 2012 Review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Integrated Waste Treatment Unit Federal Operational Readiness Review This report documents the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), independent review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project-Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (SBWTP-IWTU) DOE (Federal) Operational Readiness Review (D-ORR). The review was performed by the HSS Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations and was intended to assess the effectiveness of the CORR process as implemented for

203

EIS-0287: Notice of Preferred Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Technology |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Preferred Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Preferred Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Technology EIS-0287: Notice of Preferred Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Technology Idaho High-Level Waste (HLW) and Facilities Disposition In October 2002, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE or the Department) issued the Final Idaho High-Level Waste (HLW) and Facilities Disposition Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0287 (Final EIS)). The Final EIS contains an evaluation of reasonable alternatives for the management of mixed transuranic waste/sodium bearing waste (SBW),1 mixed HLW calcine, and associated low-level waste (LLW), as well as disposition alternatives for HLW facilities when their missions are completed. DOE/EIS-0287, Notice of Preferred Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Technology, Office of Environmental Management, Idaho, 70 FR 44598 (August

204

Production of sodium-22 from proton irradiated aluminum  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for selective separation of sodium-22 from a proton irradiated minum target including dissolving a proton irradiated aluminum target in hydrochloric acid to form a first solution including aluminum ions and sodium ions, separating a portion of the aluminum ions from the first solution by crystallization of an aluminum salt, contacting the remaining first solution with an anion exchange resin whereby ions selected from the group consisting of iron and copper are selectively absorbed by the anion exchange resin while aluminum ions and sodium ions remain in solution, contacting the solution with an cation exchange resin whereby aluminum ions and sodium ions are adsorbed by the cation exchange resin, and, contacting the cation exchange resin with an acid solution capable of selectively separating the adsorbed sodium ions from the cation exchange resin while aluminum ions remain adsorbed on the cation exchange resin is disclosed.

Taylor, Wayne A. (Los Alamos, NM); Heaton, Richard C. (Los Alamos, NM); Jamriska, David J. (Los Alamos, NM)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Theoretical Adiabatic Temperature and Chemical Composition of Sodium Combustion Flame  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sodium fire safety analysis requires fundamental combustion properties, e.g., heat of combustion, flame temperature, and composition. We developed the GENESYS code for a theoretical investigation of sodium combustion flame.Our principle conclusions on sodium combustion under atmospheric air conditions are (a) the maximum theoretical flame temperature is 1950 K, and it is not affected by the presence of moisture; the uppermost limiting factor is the chemical instability of the condensed sodium-oxide products under high temperature; (b) the main combustion product is liquid Na{sub 2}O in dry air condition and liquid Na{sub 2}O with gaseous NaOH in moist air; and (c) the chemical equilibrium prediction of the residual gaseous reactants in the flame is indispensable for sodium combustion modeling.

Okano, Yasushi; Yamaguchi, Akira [O-arai Engineering Center (Japan)

2003-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

206

MAGNESIUM MONO POTASSIUM PHOSPHATE GROUT FOR P-REACTOR VESSEL IN-SITU DECOMISSIONING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to document laboratory testing of magnesium mono potassium phosphate grouts for P-Reactor vessel in-situ decommissioning. Magnesium mono potassium phosphate cement-based grout was identified as candidate material for filling (physically stabilizing) the 105-P Reactor vessel (RV) because it is less alkaline than portland cement-based grout (pH of about 12.4). A less alkaline material ({<=} 10.5) was desired to address a potential materials compatibility issue caused by corrosion of aluminum metal in highly alkaline environments such as that encountered in portland cement grouts. Information concerning access points into the P-Reactor vessel and amount of aluminum metal in the vessel is provided elsewhere. Fresh and cured properties were measured for: (1) commercially blended magnesium mono potassium phosphate packaged grouts, (2) commercially available binders blended with inert fillers at SRNL, (3) grouts prepared from technical grade MgO and KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} and inert fillers (quartz sands, Class F fly ash), and (4) Ceramicrete{reg_sign} magnesium mono potassium phosphate-based grouts prepared at Argonne National Laboratory. Boric acid was evaluated as a set retarder in the magnesium mono potassium phosphate mixes.

Langton, C.; Stefanko, D.

2011-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

207

E-Print Network 3.0 - acetate sodium lactate Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

sodium-high lactate infusion'. Of course, it is easy to demonstrate that high lactate infusion... . Also, sodium-lactate infusion in humans ... Source: Ecole Polytechnique, Centre...

208

High-resolution lidar observations of mesospheric sodium and implications for adaptive optics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Observations of sodium density variability in the upper mesosphere/lower thermosphere, obtained using a high-resolution lidar system, show rapid fluctuations in the sodium centroid...

Pfrommer, Thomas; Hickson, Paul

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Packaging and deployment of a 5. 5 MWe potassium---Rankine nuclear electric propulsion spacecraft  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A design study was performed to investigate packaging and deployment options for the potassium---Rankine, nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) spacecraft described by Rovang (1992). The subject spacecraft is the cargo portion of a split-sprint (cargo/piloted) Mars mission, carrying 144 mt of cargo. Two parallel SP-100 type reactors, potassium---Rankine power conversion assemblies, and argon ion thrusters are utilized in the selected architecture. A spacecraft design and deployment approach which uses two heavy lift launch vehicles (HLLV) to insert the entire spacecraft into low Earth orbit is presented.

Rovang, R.D.; Marko, M. (Rockwell International, Rocketdyne Division, 6633 Canoga Avenue, P.O. Box 7922, Canoga Park, California 91309-7922 (United States))

1993-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

210

Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Stopped-Flow Kinetic Study of Manganese(II) Sorption--Desorption on Birnessite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Stopped-Flow Kinetic Study of Manganese(II) Sorption- nique is demonstrated by investigating the sorption of Mn2+ on S- MnOj. The sorption reaction+ was observed. Measurement of the initial reaction rate al- lowed the forward (sorption) rate constant

Sparks, Donald L.

211

Thermodynamics of Potassium Exchange in Soil Using a Kinetics Approach1 D. L. SPARKS AND P. M. JARDINEZ  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermodynamics of Potassium Exchange in Soil Using a Kinetics Approach1 D. L. SPARKS AND P. M. JARDINEZ ABSTRACT Thermodynamics of potassium (K) exchange using a kinetics ap- proach was investigated that more energy was needed to desorb K than to adsorb K. Thermodynamic and pseudother- modynamic parameters

Sparks, Donald L.

212

Risk Management for Sodium Fast Reactors.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accident management is an important component to maintaining risk at acceptable levels for all complex systems, such as nuclear power plants. With the introduction of self - correcting, or inherently safe, reactor designs the focus has shifted from management by operators to allowing the syste m's design to manage the accident. While inherently and passively safe designs are laudable, extreme boundary conditions can interfere with the design attributes which facilitate inherent safety , thus resulting in unanticipated and undesirable end states. This report examines an inherently safe and small sodium fast reactor experiencing a beyond design basis seismic event with the intend of exploring two issues : (1) can human intervention either improve or worsen the potential end states and (2) can a Bayes ian Network be constructed to infer the state of the reactor to inform (1). ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The author s would like to acknowledge the U.S. Department of E nergy's Office of Nuclear Energy for funding this research through Work Package SR - 14SN100303 under the Advanced Reactor Concepts program. The authors also acknowledge the PRA teams at A rgonne N ational L aborator y , O ak R idge N ational L aborator y , and I daho N ational L aborator y for their continue d contributions to the advanced reactor PRA mission area.

Denman, Matthew R; Groth, Katrina; Cardoni, Jeffrey N; Wheeler, Timothy A.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Pulse radiolysis of solutions of sodium tetraphenylborate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pulse radiolysis of solutions of sodium tetraphenylborate (NaBPh/sub 4/) indicates that the absorption observed in organic amides with lambda/sub max/ in the range 650-724 nm is not due to Na/sup -/, an electron adduct to BPh/sub 4//sup -/, a triplet excited state, or a proton-donating solvent cation. Experiments in aqueous solution are described in which the reactions of selected radicals with NaBPh/sub 4/ are studied. One-electron oxidation of NaBPh/sub 4/ by N/sub 3//sup .-/ radicals yields a species, assumed to be NaBPh/sub 4//sup ./, with absorption maxima at 335 and 800 nm. A similar spectrum is observed on pulse radiolysis of solutions of NaBPh/sub 4/ in tetramethylurea (TMU), but the long-wavelength absorption is shifted to 725 nm. The formation of an oxidizing radical in irradiated TMU was confirmed by the observation of I/sub 2//sup .-/ on pulse radiolysis of solutions of KI in this solvent. Pulse radiolysis of solution of NaBPh/sub 4/ and KI in TMU demonstrated that these solutes compete for the oxidizing intermediate.

Liu, K.J.; Langan, J.R.; Salmon, G.A.; Holton, D.M.; Edwards, P.P.

1988-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

214

Recovery of manganese oxides from spent alkaline and zinc–carbon batteries. An application as catalysts for VOCs elimination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: • Manganese oxides were synthesized using spent batteries as raw materials. • Spent alkaline and zinc–carbon size AA batteries were used. • A biohydrometallurgical process was employed to bio-lixiviate batteries. • Manganese oxides were active in the oxidation of VOCs (ethanol and heptane). - Abstract: Manganese, in the form of oxide, was recovered from spent alkaline and zinc–carbon batteries employing a biohydrometallurgy process, using a pilot plant consisting in: an air-lift bioreactor (containing an acid-reducing medium produced by an Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans bacteria immobilized on elemental sulfur); a leaching reactor (were battery powder is mixed with the acid-reducing medium) and a recovery reactor. Two different manganese oxides were recovered from the leachate liquor: one of them by electrolysis (EMO) and the other by a chemical precipitation with KMnO{sub 4} solution (CMO). The non-leached solid residue was also studied (RMO). The solids were compared with a MnO{sub x} synthesized in our laboratory. The characterization by XRD, FTIR and XPS reveal the presence of Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the EMO and the CMO samples, together with some Mn{sup 4+} cations. In the solid not extracted by acidic leaching (RMO) the main phase detected was Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}. The catalytic performance of the oxides was studied in the complete oxidation of ethanol and heptane. Complete conversion of ethanol occurs at 200 °C, while heptane requires more than 400 °C. The CMO has the highest oxide selectivity to CO{sub 2}. The results show that manganese oxides obtained using spent alkaline and zinc–carbon batteries as raw materials, have an interesting performance as catalysts for elimination of VOCs.

Gallegos, María V., E-mail: plapimu@yahoo.com.ar [Pla.Pi.Mu-Planta Piloto Multipropósito, (CICPBA-UNLP) Cno. Centenario y 505, M.B. Gonnet, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Falco, Lorena R., E-mail: mlfalco@quimica.unlp.edu.ar [Pla.Pi.Mu-Planta Piloto Multipropósito, (CICPBA-UNLP) Cno. Centenario y 505, M.B. Gonnet, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Peluso, Miguel A., E-mail: apelu@quimica.unlp.edu.ar [Centro de Investigación y Desarrollo en Ciencias Aplicadas, “Dr. J. Ronco” CINDECA (CONICET CCT La Plata), 47 N°257, La Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Sambeth, Jorge E., E-mail: sambeth@quimica.unlp.edu.ar [Centro de Investigación y Desarrollo en Ciencias Aplicadas, “Dr. J. Ronco” CINDECA (CONICET CCT La Plata), 47 N°257, La Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Thomas, Horacio J. [Pla.Pi.Mu-Planta Piloto Multipropósito, (CICPBA-UNLP) Cno. Centenario y 505, M.B. Gonnet, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

215

Internal structure, hygroscopic and reactive properties of mixed sodium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Internal structure, hygroscopic and Internal structure, hygroscopic and reactive properties of mixed sodium methanesulfonate-sodium chloride particles Internal structure, hygroscopic and reactive properties of mixed sodium methanesulfonate-sodium chloride particles Print Friday, 13 May 2011 00:00 Scientists recently combined experimental approaches and molecular dynamics modeling to gain new insights into the internal structure of sea salt particles and relate it to their fundamental chemical reactivity in the atmosphere. This research shows that surface enhancement or depletion of chemical components in marine particles can occur because of the difference in the chemical nature of the species. Because the atmospheric chemistry of the salt particles takes place at the gas-particle interface, understanding their complex surfaces provides new insights about their effect on the environment and climate change. Article Link.

216

Loop simulation capability for sodium-cooled systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A one-dimensional loop simulation capability has been implemented in the thermal-hydraulic analysis code, THERMIT-4E. This code had been used to simulate and investigate flow in test sections of experimental sodium loops ...

Adekugbe, Oluwole A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

The Salt or Sodium Chloride Content of Feeds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 EXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS W. B. BIZZELL, Preeident BULLETIN NO. 271 OCTOBER, 1920 DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY THE SALT OR SODIUM CHLORIDE CONTENT OF FEEDS B. YOUNGBLOOD, DIRECTOK COLLEGE.... ............... Salt content of feecls.. ......... Salt content of mixed feeds.. ................... Summary ancl conclusions. Page. l1 [Blank Page in Original Bulletin] BULLETIN XO. 271. OCTOBE- '"On THE SALT OR SODIUM CHLORIDE CONTENT OF FEI The Texas feed...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach); Lomanitz, S. (Sebastian)

1920-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Genetic diversity in chlorella viruses flanking kcv, a gene that encodes a potassium ion channel protein  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Genetic diversity in chlorella viruses flanking kcv, a gene that encodes a potassium ion channel Received 23 March 2004; accepted 27 May 2004 Abstract The chlorella virus PBCV-1 encodes a 94-amino acid additional chlorella viruses and transcription in two of these viruses, as well as the effect of the three

Graves, Michael V.

219

Biogenic Potassium Salt Particles as Seeds for Secondary Organic Aerosol in the Amazon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...potassium and sulfur has been attributed to local biogenic sources (24–26), which is...A description of the advanced research WRF version 3” [National Center for Atmospheric...the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model simulations. We gratefully acknowledge...

Christopher Pöhlker; Kenia T. Wiedemann; Bärbel Sinha; Manabu Shiraiwa; Sachin S. Gunthe; Mackenzie Smith; Hang Su; Paulo Artaxo; Qi Chen; Yafang Cheng; Wolfgang Elbert; Mary K. Gilles; Arthur L. D. Kilcoyne; Ryan C. Moffet; Markus Weigand; Scot T. Martin; Ulrich Pöschl; Meinrat O. Andreae

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

220

Sorption of Ferric Iron from Siderophore Complexes by Layer Type Manganese  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sorption of Ferric Iron from Siderophore Complexes by Layer Type Sorption of Ferric Iron from Siderophore Complexes by Layer Type Manganese Oxides Owen W. Duckworth (North Carolina State University), John R. Bargar (Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource), and Garrison Sposito (University of California-Berkeley) figure 1 Figure 1. Top: Iron is thought to limit phytoplankton in much of the world's oceans. Bottom: Structure of the iron-siderophore complex ferrioxamine B [Fe(III)HDFOB+]. Image courtesy of Andrzej Jarzecki, Brooklyn College, the City University of New York. Iron is one of several essential nutrients thought to limit phytoplankton growth in large areas of the world's oceans. The growth of marine phytoplankton represents a important linkage in the carbon cycle, accounting for approximately 50% of the total biological uptake of carbon

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

3-D Atomic-Scale Mapping of Manganese Dopants in Lead Sulfide Nanowires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dopants in nanowires, whether intentional or unintentional, can ultimately control the material's properties and therefore need to be understood on the atomic scale. We study vapor-liquid-solid grown manganese-doped lead sulfide nanowires by atom-probe tomography for the first time for lead salt materials. The three-dimensional chemical concentration maps at the atomic scale demonstrate a radial distribution profile of Mn ions, with a concentration of only 0.18 at.% and 0.01 at.% for MnCl2 and Mn-acetate precursors, respectively. The ability to characterize these small concentrations of dopant atoms in Pb1-xMnxS nanowires (x = 0.0036 and 0.0002), important for spintronic and thermoelectric devices, sets a platform for similar analyses for all nanostructures. First-principles calculations confirm that Mn atoms substitute for Pb in the PbS structure.

Isheim, Dieter; Kaszpurenko, Jason; Yu, Dong; Mao, Zugang; Seidman, David N.; Arslan, Ilke

2012-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

222

Hole dispersions in the G- and C-type orbital ordering backgrounds: Doped manganese oxides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the framework of the linear spin-wave theory and orbital-charge separation, we calculate quasiparticle (QP) dispersions for two different antiferromagnetic orbital structures in the fully saturated spin phase of manganese oxides. Although with the same orbital wave excitations, the QP bands of C- and G-type orbital structures exhibit completely different shapes. The pseudogap observed in the density of states and spectral functions around ?=0 is related with the large antiferromagnetic orbital fluctuation. The minimal band energy for G-type is lower than that for C-type orbital order, while these band curves almost coincide in some momentum points. Larger energy splitting occurs between the two branches of kz=0 and kz=? when increasing the superexchange coupling J, suggesting that the orbital scattering plays an essential role in the QP dispersions.

Xiao-Juan Fan; Shun-Qing Shen; Z. D. Wang; X.-G. Li; Qiang-Hua Wang

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Electronic structure and magnetic properties of the perovskite cerium manganese oxide from ab initio calculations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We have performed first-principle calculations of the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of cerium manganese oxide (CeMnO)3, using full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave (FP-LAPW) scheme within GGA and GGA+U approaches. Features such as the lattice constant, bulk modulus and its pressure derivative are reported. Also, we have presented our results of the band structure and the density of states. The results show a half-metallic ferromagnetic ground state for CeMnO3 in GGA+U treatment, whereas semi-metallic ferromagnetic character is observed in GGA. The results obtained, make the cubic CeMnO3 a candidate material for future spintronic application.

Saadi Berri; Djamel Maouche; Miloud Ibrir; Badis Bakri

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

The Absorption Spectrum of Manganese Vapor in the Visible and Ultraviolet  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With an absorbing column of the vapor about 3 cm long heated to temperatures between 1200°C and 1600°C, absorption was observed at 31 lines. Grotrian had previously reported absorption at 6 of these lines. All of the absorptions are from manganese atoms in the normal state (1s6 term) and occur in groups of 1, 2 and 3 lines. Five absorption lines represent 1s6-d?6 combinations for which the rule of inner quantum numbers is obeyed but the azimuthal quantum number changes by 2. Four lines are 1s6-p8 combinations and twelve are 1s6-p6 combinations. Some of the remainder are perhaps 1s6-p4 and 1s6-p2 combinations.

R. V. Zumstein

1925-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Method of and apparatus for removing silicon from a high temperature sodium coolant  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of and system for removing silicon from a high temperature liquid sodium coolant system for a nuclear reactor. The sodium is cooled to a temperature below the silicon saturation temperature and retained at such reduced temperature while inducing high turbulence into the sodium flow for promoting precipitation of silicon compounds and ultimate separation of silicon compound particles from the liquid sodium.

Yunker, Wayne H. (Richland, WA); Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Elevated manganese and cognitive performance in school-aged children and their mothers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Background: Growing evidence suggests that excess manganese (Mn) in children is associated with neurobehavioral impairments. In Brazil, elevated hair Mn concentrations were reported in children living near a ferro-manganese alloy plant. Objectives: We investigated these children's and caregivers' cognitive function in relation to bioindicators of Mn exposure. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, the WISC-III was administered to 83 children aged between 6 and 12 years; the Raven Progressive Matrix was administered to the primary caregivers (94% mothers), who likewise responded to a questionnaire on socio demographics and birth history. Mn in hair (MnH) and blood (MnB) and blood lead (PbB) were measured by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). Results: Children's mean MnB and MnH were 8.2 {mu}g/L (2.7-23.4) and 5.83 {mu}g/g (0.1-86.68), respectively. Mean maternal MnH was 3.50 {mu}g/g (0.10-77.45) and correlated to children's MnH (rho=0.294, p=0.010). Children's MnH was negatively related to Full-Scale Intelligence Quotient (IQ) and Verbal IQ; {beta} coefficients for MnH were -5.78 (95% CI -10.71 to -0.21) and -6.72 (-11.81 to -0.63), adjusted for maternal education and nutritional status. Maternal MnH was negatively associated with performance on the Raven's ({beta}=-2.69, 95% CI -5.43 to 0.05), adjusted for education years, family income and age. Conclusions: These findings confirm that high MnH in children is associated with poorer cognitive performance, especially in the verbal domain. Primary caregiver's IQ is likewise associated to Mn exposure, suggesting that, in this situation, children's cognition may be affected directly and indirectly by Mn exposure.

Menezes-Filho, Jose A., E-mail: antomen@ufba.br [College of Pharmacy, Federal University of Bahia (Brazil); Public and Environmental Health Program, National School of Public Health, Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (Brazil); Novaes, Cristiane de O.; Moreira, Josino C.; Sarcinelli, Paula N. [Public and Environmental Health Program, National School of Public Health, Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (Brazil)] [Public and Environmental Health Program, National School of Public Health, Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (Brazil); Mergler, Donna [Centre de Recherche Interdisciplinaire sur la Biologie, la Sante, la Societe et l'Environnement (CINBIOSE), Universite du Quebec a Montreal (Canada)] [Centre de Recherche Interdisciplinaire sur la Biologie, la Sante, la Societe et l'Environnement (CINBIOSE), Universite du Quebec a Montreal (Canada)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

227

Low Frequency-SAFT Inspection Methodology for Coarse-Grained Steel Rail Components (Manganese Steel Frogs)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the rail industry, sections of high strength Manganese steel are employed at critical locations in railroad networks. Ultrasonic inspections of Manganese steel microstructures are difficult to inspect with conventional means, as the propagation medium is highly attenuative, coarse-grained, anisotropic and nonhomogeneous in nature. Current in-service inspection methods are ineffective while pre-service X-ray methods (used for full-volumetric examinations of components prior to shipment) are time-consuming, costly, require special facilities and highly trained personnel for safe operations, and preclude manufacturers from inspecting statistically meaningful numbers of frogs for effective quality assurance. In-service examinations consist of visual inspections only and by the time a defect or flaw is visually detected, the structural integrity of the component may already be compromised, and immediate repair or replacement is required. A novel ultrasonic inspection technique utilizing low frequency ultrasound (100 to 500 kHz) combined with a synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) for effective reduction of signal clutter and noise, and extraction of important features in the data, has proven to be effective for these coarse grained steel components. Results from proof-of-principal tests in the laboratory demonstrate an effective means to detect and localize reflectors introduced as a function of size and depth from the top of the frog rail. Using non-optimal, commercially available transducers coupled with the low-frequency/SAFT approach, preliminary evaluations were conducted to study the effects of the material microstructure on ultrasonic propagation, sensitivity and resolution in thick section frog components with machined side-drilled holes. Results from this study will be presented and discussed.

Diaz, Aaron A.; Andersen, Eric S.; Samuel, Todd J.

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Suppression of manganese-dependent production of nitric oxide in astrocytes: implications for therapeutic modulation of glial-derived inflammatory mediators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Primary cultured astrocytes were treated with Mn in the absence and presence of proinflammatory cytokines to determine their effect upon stimulation of nitric oxide (NO) production. Treatments of manganese and cytokines raised NO production...

Wright, Tyler T.

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

229

Pillared smectite modified with carbon and manganese as catalyst for SCR of NOx with NH3. Part I. General characterization and catalyst screening  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon- and manganese-modified zirconia-pillared smectites were prepared, characterized (XRD, BET and pore analysis, XPS) and tested in selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3. Both untreated and acidic pre...

Lucjan Chmielarz; Roman Dziembaj; Teresa Grzybek; Jerzy Klinik…

230

The distribution of copper, manganese, zinc, and iron in antarctic waters and the relation of the concentrations of these metals to biological primary productivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE DISTRIBUTION OF COPPER, MANGANESE, ZINC, AND IRON IN ANTARCTIC WATERS AND THE RELATION OF THE CONCENTRATIONS OF THESE METALS TO BIOLOGICAL PRIMARY PRODUCTIVITY A Thesis By MARTIN EDWARD ARHELGER Submitted to the Graduate College... of the Texas A& 1 University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August I967 Major Subj ect: CHEMICAL OCEANOGRAPHY THE DISTRIBUTION OF COPPER, MANGANESE, ZINC, AND IRON IN ANTARCTIC WATERS AND THE RELATION...

Arhelger, Martin Edward

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Sodium removal process development for LMFBR fuel subassemblies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two 37-pin scale models of Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant fuel subassemblies were designed, fabricated and used at Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division in the development and proof-testing of a rapid water-based sodium removal process for the ORNL Hot Experimental Facility, Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Fuel Reprocessing Cycle. Through a series of development tests on one of the models, including five (5) sodium wettings and three (3) high temperature sodium removal operations, optimum process parameters for a rapid water vapor-argon-water rinse process were identified and successfully proof-tested on a second model containing argon-pressurized, sodium-corroded model fuel pins simulating the gas plenum and cladding conditions expected for spent fuel pins in full scale subassemblies. Based on extrapolations of model proof test data, preliminary process parameters for a water vapor-nitrogen-water rinse process were calculated and recommended for use in processing full scale fuel subassemblies in the Sodium Removal Facility of the Fuel Receiving Cell, ORNL HEF.

Simmons, C.R.; Taylor, G.R.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Development of under sodium inspection techniques for FBR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reactor vessel of a fast breeder reactor (FBR) is filled with opaque liquid sodium and ultrasonic inspection techniques are effective and useful for observing the in-vessel structures under sodium. Firstly, in the development of the under sodium visual inspection technique, the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) and cross-correlation processing have been applied to realize ultrasonic 3-dimensional cross-correlation image processing with high resolution. Cross-correlation processing improves the S/N ratio of the ultrasonic echoes which are deteriorated by sodium wetting, and realizes high-density integration of the matrix arrayed transducer. Matrix arrayed transducer, in which 100 piezoelectric elements are arranged as a 10 x 10 matrix array, has been manufactured for the in-water visualizing test. Secondly, in the development of the under sodium volumetric inspection technique, a prototype electric scanning UT sensor has been developed for the volumetric test of the core support structures in the reactor vessel. The UT sensor consists of 60 arrayed piezoelectric elements, non-organic materials such as ceramic backing. Ultrasonic echoes transmitted from the elements is scanned electronically and real-time B-scope images of the structures can be realized. A prototype UT sensor has been tested to evaluate the acoustic characteristics in water and confirm the heat-proof performance under high temperature silicon oil. The performance of the UT sensor satisfied the requirements.

Karasawa, H.; Suzuki, T.; Nagai, S.; Izumi, M.; Kobayashi, T. [Toshiba Corp., Yokohama (Japan); Sasaki, S.; Ota, S.; Kai, M. [Japan Atomic Power Co., Tokyo (Japan)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Biochemical aspects of vitamin E deficiency in fowl  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.57 Vitamins^ 1.02 Supplied the following per kilogram of diet: calcium carbonate, 16.03 gm.5 dicalcium phosphate, 60.10 gm.; sodium chloride, 5.0 gin.; manganese sulfate, 1 .1*+ gm.5 ferric citrate, 1.6 gm.5 cupric sulfate, 20.0 mg.; zinc chloride, m.O mg....; potassium iodide, l+O.O mg.; cobalt chloride, 0.5 mg.; potassium chloride, 6.0 gm.; magnesium sulfate, 5.76 gm. 2 Supplied the following per kilogram of diet: riboflavin, 8.0 mg.; calcium pantothenate, 16.0 mg.; pyridoxine, 8.0 mg.; niacin, 120 mg...

Creech, Billy Gene

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

234

Inverse association of intellectual function with very low blood lead but not with manganese exposure in Italian adolescents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Background: Pediatric lead (Pb) exposure impacts cognitive function and behavior and co-exposure to manganese (Mn) may enhance neurotoxicity. Objectives: To assess cognitive and behavioral function in adolescents with environmental exposure to Pb and Mn. Methods: In this cross sectional study, cognitive function and behavior were examined in healthy adolescents with environmental exposure to metals. The Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC) and the Conners-Wells' Adolescent Self-Report Scale Long Form (CASS:L) were used to assess cognitive and behavioral function, respectively. ALAD polymorphisms rs1800435 and rs1139488 were measured as potential modifiers. Results: We examined 299 adolescents (49.2% females) aged 11-14 years. Blood lead (BPb) averaged 1.71 {mu}g/dL (median 1.5, range 0.44-10.2), mean Blood Manganese (BMn) was 11.1 {mu}g/dL (median 10.9, range 4.00-24.1). Average total IQ was 106.3 (verbal IQ=102, performance IQ=109.3). According to a multiple regression model considering the effect of other covariates, a reduction of about 2.4 IQ points resulted from a two-fold increase of BPb. The Benchmark Level of BPb associated with a loss of 1 IQ-point (BML01) was 0.19 {mu}g/dL, with a lower 95% confidence limit (BMLL01) of 0.11 {mu}g/dL. A very weak correlation resulted between BPb and the ADHD-like behavior (Kendall's tau rank correlation=0.074, p=0.07). No influence of ALAD genotype was observed on any outcome. Manganese was not associated with cognitive and behavioral outcomes, nor was there any interaction with lead. Conclusions: These findings demonstrate that very low level of lead exposure has a significant negative impact on cognitive function in adolescent children. Being an essential micro-nutrient, manganese may not cause cognitive effects at these low exposure levels.

Lucchini, Roberto G., E-mail: lucchini@med.unibs.it [Department of Preventive Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, NY (United States); Section of Occupational Medicine, University of Brescia, P.le Spedali Civili 1, 25123 Brescia (Italy); Zoni, Silvia [Section of Occupational Medicine, University of Brescia, P.le Spedali Civili 1, 25123 Brescia (Italy)] [Section of Occupational Medicine, University of Brescia, P.le Spedali Civili 1, 25123 Brescia (Italy); Guazzetti, Stefano [Public Health Service, Reggio Emilia (Italy)] [Public Health Service, Reggio Emilia (Italy); Bontempi, Elza [INSTM and Chemistry for Technologies Laboratory, University of Brescia (Italy)] [INSTM and Chemistry for Technologies Laboratory, University of Brescia (Italy); Micheletti, Serena [Cognition Psychology Neuroscience lab., University of Pavia and Unit of Child Neurology and Psychiatry, Civil Hospital of Brescia (Italy)] [Cognition Psychology Neuroscience lab., University of Pavia and Unit of Child Neurology and Psychiatry, Civil Hospital of Brescia (Italy); Broberg, Karin [Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University (Sweden)] [Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University (Sweden); Parrinello, Giovanni [Statistics and Biometry, University of Brescia (Italy)] [Statistics and Biometry, University of Brescia (Italy); Smith, Donald R. [Microbiology and Environmental Toxicology, University of California at Santa Cruz (United States)] [Microbiology and Environmental Toxicology, University of California at Santa Cruz (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

235

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Sodium-based Battery Development - Dave Ingersoll, SNL  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sodium-based Battery Development Sodium-based Battery Development A Family of Batteries for Large Scale Energy Storage D. Ingersoll, C. Apblett, E. Spoerke, K. Zavadil, R. Cygan, J. Ihlefeld, F. Delnick, & T. Anderson Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM Prof. E. Wachsman University of Maryland, College Park, MD Profs. R. Kee & J. Porter, Dr. H. Zhu Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO S. Bhavaraju & M. Robins Ceramatec, Inc, Salt Lake City, UT D. Beeaff CoorsTek, Inc, Golden, CO J. Martin Boulder Ionics, Golden CO US DOE Energy Storage Systems Research Program Peer Review, Washington, DC, Sept. 26-28, 2012 Sodium-based batteries  Purpose  Demonstrate a family of sodium-based battery chemistries  sodium-iodine, sodium-bromine, sodium-air, sodium insertion, sodium-metal, etc

236

Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project -  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Contractor - June 2012 Contractor - June 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Contractor - June 2012 June 2012 Review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Integrated Waste Treatment Unit Contractor Operational Readiness Review This report documents the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), independent review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project-Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (SBWTP-IWTU) contractor Operational Readiness Review (C-ORR). The review was conducted at the Idaho Site from February 27 to March 6, 2012. This report discusses the background, scope, results, and conclusions of the review, as well as opportunities for improvement (OFIs) and items identified for further

237

Generation IV International Forum Signs Agreement to Collaborate on Sodium  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Forum Signs Agreement to Collaborate on Forum Signs Agreement to Collaborate on Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors Generation IV International Forum Signs Agreement to Collaborate on Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors February 17, 2006 - 11:58am Addthis FUKUI , JAPAN - The Department of Energy today announced that the United States signed a sodium-cooled fast reactor systems arrangement with France and Japan, providing the framework for collaboration among these countries on the research and development of these advanced nuclear reactors. The signing of the agreement took place on February 16, 2006. This arrangement will support the development of technologies associated with the U.S.-led Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP), announced earlier this month by Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman. GNEP is a

238

Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project -  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Federal - June 2012 Federal - June 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Federal - June 2012 June 2012 Review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Integrated Waste Treatment Unit Federal Operational Readiness Review This report documents the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), independent review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project-Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (SBWTP-IWTU) DOE (Federal) Operational Readiness Review (D-ORR). The review was performed by the HSS Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations and was intended to assess the effectiveness of the CORR process as implemented for the SBWTP-IWTU. This review also provides additional data regarding

239

Potassium-Rankine power conversion subsystem modeling for nuclear electric propulsion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A potassium-Rankine power conversion system model was developed under Contract No. NAS3-25808 for the NASA-LeRC. This model predicts potassium-Rankine performance for turbine inlet temperatures (TIT) from 1200 - 1600 K, TIT to condenser temperature ratios from 1.25-1.6, power levels from 100 to 10,000 kWe, and lifetimes from 2-10 years. The model is for a Rankine cycle with reheat for turbine stage moisture control. The model assumes heat is supplied from a lithium heat transport loop. The model does not include a heat source or a condenser/heat rejection system model. These must be supplied by the user.

Johnson, G.A.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Contribution of potassium channels to myogenic response in skeletal muscle arterioles: effects of age and fiber type  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In isolated skeletal muscle arterioles, increasing transmural pressure causes an increase in constriction. This active myogenic response varies with age and fiber type. Increased transmural pressure activates both Ca2+-activated (KCa) potassium...

Kim, Se Jeong

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Potassium Rankine cycle nuclear power systems for spacecraft and lunar-mass surface power  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potassium Rankine cycle has high potential for application to nuclear power systems for spacecraft and surface power on the moon and Mars. A substantial effort on the development of Rankine cycle space power systems was carried out in the 1960`s. That effort is summarized and the status of the technology today is presented. Space power systems coupling Rankine cycle power conversion to both the SP-100 reactor and thermionic reactors as a combined power cycle are described in the paper.

Holcomb, R.S.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

New P2 Compound with Brucite-Like Layers: Potassium Lithiostannate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

New P2 Compound with Brucite-Like Layers: Potassium Lithiostannate ... A new compound with brucite-like layers (K0.72Li0.24Sn0.76O2) ... A new compound with brucite-like layers, K0.72Li0.24Sn0.76O2, has been obtained two ways, via solid-state reactions: with a big excess of KOH and in a controllable atmosphere without water and carbon dioxide. ...

Igor L. Shukaev; Vera V. Butova

2012-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

243

The effect of sulfur, magnesium, and various rates of potassium on forage production in some sandy soils of East Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EFFECT OF SULFUR, MAGNESIUM, AND VARIOUS RATES OF POTASSIUM ON FORAGE PRODUCTION IN SOME SANDy SOILS OF EAST TEXAS A Thesis by DENNIS PAUL LANDUA Submitted to the Graduate Collccje of Texas AFM Unive, sity in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Ma 1969 Major Subject Soil Chemistr THE EFFECT OF SULFUR, MAGNESIUM, AND VARIOUS RATES OF POTASSIUM ON FORAGE PRODUCTION IN SOME SANDY SOILS OF EAST TEXAS A Thesis by DENNIS PAUL LANDUA Approved...

Landua, Dennis Paul

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

244

Salt index of potassium phosphate fertilizers and its relation to germination and early plant growth of field crops  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SALT INDEX OF POTASSIUM PHOSPHATE FERTILIZERS AND ITS RELATION TO GERMINATION AND EARLY PLANT GROWTH OF FIELD CROPS A Thesis by JERRY ALLEN FREEOUF Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1975 Major Subject: Soil Chemistry SALT 1NDEX OF POTASSIUM PHOSPHATE FERTILIZERS AND ITS RELATION TO GERMINATION AND EARLY PLANT GROWTH OF FIELD CROPS A Thesis by JERRY ALLEN FREEOUF Approved...

Freeouf, Jerry Allen

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

245

Numerical Methodology to Evaluate Fast Reactor Sodium Combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the present study, a numerical methodology for sodium combustion has been developed for the safety evaluation of a liquid-metal-cooled fast reactor. The methodology includes a fast-running zone model computer program for safety evaluation, a field model program for multidimensional thermal hydraulics, and a chemical reaction analysis program based on chemical equilibrium theory. Two recently performed experiments have been analyzed using the computer programs, and the numerical results are in good agreement with the experiments. Although sodium combustion is a complex phenomenon, use of these computer programs gives better understanding of the coupled thermal hydraulics and chemical reaction.

Yamaguchi, Akira; Takata, Takashi; Okano, Yasushi [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (Japan)

2001-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

246

The magnesium nutrition of cotton as influenced by sodium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1964 Major Subject. Plant Physic logy THE MAGNESIUM NUTRITION OF COTTON AS INFLUENCED BY SODIUM A Thesis By MERVYN M. THENABADU Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of Commi. e Nun Head of Department Member Mem, er Member Member... REVIEW OF LITERATURE (a) Sodium as a plant nutrient (b) I'he role of magnesium in plant nutrition MATERIALS AND METHODS RESUL:S DISCUSSION 13 21 24 (a) The effect of treatments on grcwth and reproduction (b) The effect of treatments on the ccr...

Thenabadu, Mervyn Wellesly

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

247

Aluminum Zintl anion moieties within sodium aluminum clusters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Through a synergetic combination of anion photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory based calculations, we have established that aluminum moieties within selected sodium-aluminum clusters are Zintl anions. Sodium–aluminum cluster anions, Na{sub m}Al{sub n}{sup ?}, were generated in a pulsed arc discharge source. After mass selection, their photoelectron spectra were measured by a magnetic bottle, electron energy analyzer. Calculations on a select sub-set of stoichiometries provided geometric structures and full charge analyses for both cluster anions and their neutral cluster counterparts, as well as photodetachment transition energies (stick spectra), and fragment molecular orbital based correlation diagrams.

Wang, Haopeng; Zhang, Xinxing; Ko, Yeon Jae; Grubisic, Andrej; Li, Xiang; Ganteför, Gerd; Bowen, Kit H., E-mail: AKandalam@wcupa.edu, E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu, E-mail: kbowen@jhu.edu [Department of Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Schnöckel, Hansgeorg [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany)] [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Eichhorn, Bryan W. [Department of Chemistry, University of Maryland at College Park, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, University of Maryland at College Park, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Lee, Mal-Soon; Jena, P. [Department of Physics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23284 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23284 (United States); Kandalam, Anil K., E-mail: AKandalam@wcupa.edu, E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu, E-mail: kbowen@jhu.edu [Department of Physics, West Chester University of Pennsylvania, West Chester, Pennsylvania 19383 (United States); Kiran, Boggavarapu, E-mail: AKandalam@wcupa.edu, E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu, E-mail: kbowen@jhu.edu [Department of Chemistry, McNeese State University, Lake Charles, Louisiana 70609 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, McNeese State University, Lake Charles, Louisiana 70609 (United States)

2014-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

248

Synthesis, structures and properties of a series of manganese coordination complexes constructed from dicarboxylic fluorene derivatives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Assembly reactions of 9,9-diethylfluorene-2,7-dicarboxylic acid (H{sub 2}DFDC) and Mn(CH{sub 3}COO){sub 2}{center_dot}4H{sub 2}O or MnCl{sub 2}{center_dot}4H{sub 2}O by tuning of various secondary ligands such as 2,2 Prime -bipyridine (2,2 Prime -bpy), 4,4 Prime -bipyridine (4,4 Prime -bpy) or 1,3-bis(4-pyridyl)propane) (bpp), gave rise to four complexes {l_brace} [Mn{sub 2}(DFDC){sub 2}(DMF){sub 2}]{center_dot}H{sub 2}O{r_brace} {sub n} (1), [Mn(DFDC)(2,2 Prime -bpy)]{sub n} (2), {l_brace} [Mn{sub 2}(DFDC){sub 2}(4,4 Prime -bpy){sub 2}]{center_dot}2CH{sub 3}OH{r_brace} {sub n} (3), and {l_brace} [Mn{sub 4}(DFDC){sub 4}(bpp){sub 2}(CH{sub 3}OH){sub 3} (H{sub 2}O){sub 3}]{center_dot}3(CH{sub 3}OH){center_dot}3(H{sub 2}O){r_brace} {sub n} (4). Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis reveal that complex 1 is three dimensional structure with rhombic channels filled by guest water molecules; 2 presents a close-packed structure with high thermal stability; 3 exhibits a three dimensional framework with micro-porous channels filled by guest methanol molecules and 4 is a two-dimensional structure. The photoluminescent properties of 1-4 have been studied, respectively, showing that the Mn(II) ions, accessorial organic ligands or crystal structures exert important influences on the photoluminescence emissions of H{sub 2}DFDC ligands. Thermogravimetric analysis show that the complexes have remarkably high thermal stability. Magnetic susceptibility measurements have been finished and discussed for the complexes. - Graphical abstract: Assembly of 9,9-diethylfluorene-2,7-dicarboxylic acid and Mn(II) salts by tuning of various accessorial ligands resulted in four manganese complexes with different topological frameworks. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Four manganese complexes based on 9,9-diethylfluorene-2,7-dicarboxylic acid were obtained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The complexes were structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The complexes 1-4 display different topological structures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermogravimetric analysis show the complexes have remarkably high thermal stability.

Li Xing, E-mail: lixing@nbu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory Base of Novel Functional Materials and Preparation Science, Faculty of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Ningbo University, Ningbo, Zhejiang, 315211 (China); Zhao Xiuhua; Bing Yue; Zha Meiqin; Xie Hongzhen; Guo Zhiyong [State Key Laboratory Base of Novel Functional Materials and Preparation Science, Faculty of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Ningbo University, Ningbo, Zhejiang, 315211 (China)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

249

A green synthesis of a layered titanate, potassium lithium titanate; lower temperature solid-state reaction and improved materials performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A layered titanate, potassium lithium titanate, with the size range from 0.1 to 30 µm was prepared to show the effects of the particle size on the materials performance. The potassium lithium titanate was prepared by solid-state reaction as reported previously, where the reaction temperature was varied. The reported temperature for the titanate preparation was higher than 800 °C, though 600 °C is good enough to obtain single-phase potassium lithium titanate. The lower temperature synthesis is cost effective and the product exhibit better performance as photocatalysts due to surface reactivity. - Graphical abstract: Finite particle of a layered titanate, potassium lithium titanate, was prepared by solid-state reaction at lower temperature to show modified materials performance. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Potassium lithium titanate was prepared by solid-state reaction. • Lower temperature reaction resulted in smaller sized particles of titanate. • 600 °C was good enough to obtain single phased potassium lithium titanate. • The product exhibited better performance as photocatalyst.

Ogawa, Makoto, E-mail: waseda.ogawa@gmail.com [Graduate School of Creative Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 1-6-1 Nishiwaseda, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8050 (Japan); Department of Earth Sciences, Waseda University, 1-6-1 Nishiwaseda, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8050 (Japan); Morita, Masashi, E-mail: m-masashi@y.akane.waseda.jp [Graduate School of Creative Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 1-6-1 Nishiwaseda, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8050 (Japan); Igarashi, Shota, E-mail: uxei_yoshi_yoshi@yahoo.co.jp [Graduate School of Creative Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 1-6-1 Nishiwaseda, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8050 (Japan); Sato, Soh, E-mail: rookie_so_sleepy@yahoo.co.jp [Graduate School of Creative Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 1-6-1 Nishiwaseda, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8050 (Japan)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

250

Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation and Recycle of Sodium Hydroxide and Sodium Nitrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research has focused on new liquid-liquid extraction chemistry applicable to separation of major sodium salts from alkaline tank waste. It was the overall goal to provide the scientific foundation upon which the feasibility of liquid-liquid extraction chemistry for bulk reduction of the volume of tank waste can be evaluated. Sodium hydroxide represented the initial test case and primary focus. It is a primary component of the waste1 and has the most value for recycle. A full explanation of the relevance of this research to USDOE Environmental Management needs will be given in the Relevance, Impact, and Technology Transfer section below. It should be noted that this effort was predicated on the need for sodium removal primarily from low-activity waste, whereas evolving needs have shifted attention to volume reduction of the high-activity waste. The results of the research to date apply to both applications, though treatment of high-activity wastes raises new questions that will be addressed in the renewal period. Toward understanding the extractive chemistry of sodium hydroxide and other sodium salts, it was the intent to identify candidate extractants and determine their applicable basic properties regarding selectivity, efficiency, speciation, and structure. A hierarchical strategy was to be employed in which the type of liquid-liquid-extraction system varied in sophistication from simple, single-component solvents to solvents containing designer host molecules. As an aid in directing this investigation toward addressing the fundamental questions having the most value, a conceptualization of an ideal process was advanced. Accordingly, achieving adequate selectivity for sodium hydroxide represented a primary goal, but this result is worthwhile for waste applications only if certain conditions are met.

Moyer, Bruce A.; Marchand, Alan P.; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Bryan, Jeffrey C.; Haverlock, Tamara J.

2002-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

251

Manganese valence and coordination structure in Mn,Mg-codoped {gamma}-AlON green phosphor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The valence and coordination structure of manganese in a Mn,Mg-codoped {gamma}-AlON spinel-type oxynitride green phosphor were studied by synchrotron X-ray diffraction and absorption fine structure measurements. The absorption edge position of the XANES revealed the bivalency of Mn. Two cation sites are available in the spinel structure for cation doping: a tetrahedral site and an octahedral site. The pre-edge of the XANES and the distance to the nearest neighbor atoms obtained from the EXAFS measurement showed that Mn was situated at the tetrahedral site. Rietveld analysis showed that the vacancy occupied the octahedral site. The preferential occupation of the tetrahedral site by Mn and the roles of N and Mg are discussed in relation to the spinel crystal structure. - Graphical Abstract: Fourier transform of EXAFS of Mn K-edge for Mn,Mg-codoped green phosphor and Mn coordination structure. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mn, Mg-codoped {gamma}-AlON green phosphor for white LED. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The valence of Mn is divalent. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mn occupies the tetrahedral site in the spinel structure.

Takeda, Takashi, E-mail: TAKEDA.Takashi@nims.go.jp [National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)] [National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Xie, Rong-Jun; Hirosaki, Naoto [National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)] [National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Matsushita, Yoshitaka [National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), NIMS-SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)] [National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), NIMS-SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Honma, Tetuso [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI), 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)] [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI), 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

252

Atmospheric chemistry of methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl: Photolysis, reaction with hydroxyl radicals and ozone  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The atmospheric fate of MMT has been studied using laboratory smog chamber systems. MMT absorbs strongly in the UV-visible region from 210 to 400 nm with {sigma} (333 nm) = (1.9 {+-} 0.2) x 10{sup {minus}18} cm{sub 2} molecule{sup {minus}1} and undergoes photolysis at a rate estimated to be (1.3 {+-} 0.1) x 10{sup {minus}2} x{sup {minus}1} for a typical summer day at a latitude of 40{degree}N. Photolysis gives CO in a molar yield that is indistinguishable from 100% and an unidentified species believed to be methylcyclopentadienyl manganese dicarbonyl (MMD), which also undergoes rapid photolysis liberating additional CO. Reaction of MMT with OH and O{sub 3} proceeds rapidly with rate constants of k{sub OH} = (1.1 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup {minus}10} and k{sub 0{sub 3}} = (7.7 {+-} 1.9) x 10{sup {minus}18} cm{sub 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}. During the day, the atmospheric loss of MMT proceeds essentially entirely via photolysis. At night reaction with O{sub 3} can be significant.

Wallington, T.J.; Sokolov, O.; Hurley, M.D.; Tyndall, G.S.; Orlando, J.J.; Barnes, I.; Becker, K.H.; Vogt, R.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Lithium/Manganese Dioxide (Li/MnO(2)) Battery Performance Evaluation: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In February 1997, under the auspices of the Product Realization Program, an initiative to develop performance models for lithium/manganese dioxide-based batteries began. As a part of this initiative, the performance characteristics of the cells under a variety of conditions were determined, both for model development and for model validation. As a direct result of this work, it became apparent that possible Defense Program (DP) uses for batteries based on this cell chemistry existed. A larger effort aimed at mapping the performance envelope of this chemistry was initiated in order to assess the practicality of this cell chemistry, not only for DP applications, but also for other uses. The work performed included an evaluation of the cell performance as a function of a number of variables, including cell size, manufacturer, current, pulse loads, constant current loads, safety, etc. In addition, the development of new evaluation techniques that would apply to any battery system, such as those related to reliability assessments began. This report describes the results of these evaluations.

Ingersoll, D.; Clark, N.H.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Water balance analysis and wastewater recycling investigation in electrolytic manganese industry of China — A case study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A water balance investigation was performed for a representative electrolytic manganese metal (EMM) enterprise to study the details of water consumption and generation in the production process. A new integrated wastewater treatment approach was put forward to recover useful chemicals from the process wastewater, which contained high concentrations of Mn2 +, Cr(VI), Cr3 +, and NH4+. Cr(VI) was recovered from the wastewater by ion exchange techniques and reused as EMM passivant. The remaining wastewater containing Mn2 + and NH4+ was returned to the leaching section before the impurity removal procedure to prepare electrolytes. Complete wastewater recycling was achieved after water balance regulation and optimization. Final demonstration line results proved that the proposed process is feasible and exhibits significant advantages of better treatment effects, lower costs and lower environmental impact compared to the traditional reduction–neutralization–sedimentation treatment method. With the adoption of the proposed approach, solid waste disposal cost and the required area for the landfill yard were decreased by 80%. Operating costs for wastewater treatment were lowered by 85%. Around 4.8 kg/t EMM of Mn2 +, 5.2 kg/t EMM of NH4+ and 0.24 kg/t EMM of Cr(VI) were recovered. The recycled wastewater proportion was increased from 6.2% to 100.0%. 1.168 m3/t EMM of fresh water was saved and the equivalent amount of discharging wastewater was reduced to the environment.

Fuyuan Xu; Linhua Jiang; Zhigang Dan; Xiaojuan Gao; Ning Duan; Guimei Han; Hong Zhu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Oxidation state of manganese in zinc pyrophosphate: Probed by luminescence and EPR studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Zn{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7}: Mn was synthesized by wet chemical route and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), photoluminescence (PL) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques. Photoluminescence spectrum shows two bands, one at 500 nm (green emission), which is attributed to the {sup 4}T{sub 1}({sup 4}G)-{sup 6}A{sub 1}({sup 6}S) transition of Mn{sup 2+} and other centered at 686 nm (red emission) is attributed to the electronic transition between {sup 2}E and {sup 4}A{sub 2} of Mn{sup 4+} accompanied with vibronic transitions. EPR spectroscopic studies also confirmed the presence of both Mn2+ and Mn4+ ions in zinc pyrophosphate with difference in the number of fine transitions and g values (Mn{sub 4+}, S=3/2, three fine transitions and g < 2.00; Mn{sup 2+} S=5/2, five fine transitions and g=2.00).Mn{sup 2+} is attributed to presence of Mn at 6-ccordinated Zn{sup 2+} site whereas Mn{sup 4+} is due to presence substitution of Mn{sup 4+} at Zn{sup 2+} site thereby invoking charge compensation by presence of interstitial oxygen ions around Mn{sup 4+} ion or due to substitution of manganese at distorted 5-coordinated zinc site.

Gupta, Santosh K., E-mail: santoshg@barc.gov.in; Kadam, R. M., E-mail: santoshg@barc.gov.in; Natarajan, V., E-mail: santoshg@barc.gov.in; Godbole, S. V., E-mail: santoshg@barc.gov.in [Radiochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

256

Unsteady aspects of sodium–water–air reaction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

One important issue for the Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) concept is the reactivity of metallic sodium and its exothermal reaction with water. In particular during equipments washing operations, sodium needs to be firstly converted (‘destroyed’) into non reactive species via a chemical reaction with water. Today, such operations are performed in tanks that confine the system and mitigate the consequences of any possible abnormal condition. Some data were obtained from experiments run by the French Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA) and were used as a basis for modelling. Among the principal phenomena identified so far are rapid water vaporization, hydrogen emission and explosion in air. High explosive-like pressure waves are generated from which sodium fragmentation and dispersion in water may ensue increasing the overall reactivity. It is extremely important to clarify the phenomenology to allow realistic extrapolation to full scale plants. A state of the art is proposed in this paper, starting from available experimental data and present perception of the physics. A comparison with present modelling strategy is also performed, underlining the necessity to improve a different and more physical approach aimed to well represent dynamic aspects of reaction.

Sofia Carnevali; Christophe Proust; Michel Soucille

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Multiple reheat helium Brayton cycles for sodium fast reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sodium fast reactors (SFR) traditionally adopt the steam Rankine cycle for power conversion. The resulting potential for water-sodium reaction remains a continuing concern which at least partly delays the SFR technology commercialization and is a contributor to higher capital cost. Supercritical CO2 provides an alternative, but is also capable of sustaining energetic chemical reactions with sodium. Recent development on advanced inert-gas Brayton cycles could potentially solve this compatibility issue, increase thermal efficiency, and bring down the capital cost close to light water reactors. In this paper, helium Brayton cycles with multiple reheat and intercooling states are presented for SFRs with reactor outlet temperatures in the range of 510°C to 650°C. The resulting thermal efficiencies range from 39% and 47%, which is comparable with supercritical recompression CO2 cycles (SCO2 cycle). A systematic comparison between multiple reheat helium Brayton cycle and the SCO2 cycle is given, considering compatibility issues, plant site cooling temperature effect on plant efficiency, full plant cost optimization, and other important factors. The study indicates that the multiple reheat helium cycle is the preferred choice over SCO2 cycle for sodium fast reactors.

Haihua Zhao; Per F. Peterson

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

FATE OF INGESTED SODIUM BICARBONATE IN THE FOWL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 100 calcium while rations 3 and4contained 3.85 p. 100 calcium. Sodium bicarbonate was added at a level. The duodenum was entered at the top of the loop and the electrode tip immersed its full length down the posterior side of the loop. The #12;mid-intestinal reading was taken with the incision at approximately

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

259

Process for making boron nitride using sodium cyanide and boron  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This a very simple process for making boron nitride by mixing sodium cyanide and boron phosphate and heating the mixture in an inert atmosphere until a reaction takes place. The product is a white powder of boron nitride that can be used in applications that require compounds that are stable at high temperatures and that exhibit high electrical resistance.

Bamberger, Carlos E. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Method of Manufacturing Micro-Disperse Particles of Sodium Borohydride  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compact solid source of hydrogen gas, where the gas is generated by contacting water with micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in the presence of a catalyst, such as cobalt or ruthenium. The micro-disperse particles can have a substantially uniform diameter of 1-10 microns, and preferably about 3-5 microns. Ruthenium or cobalt catalytic nanoparticles can be incorporated in the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride, which allows a rapid and complete reaction to occur without the problems associated with caking and scaling of the surface by the reactant product sodium metaborate. A closed loop water management system can be used to recycle wastewater from a PEM fuel cell to supply water for reacting with the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in a compact hydrogen gas generator. Capillary forces can wick water from a water reservoir into a packed bed of micro-disperse fuel particles, eliminating the need for using an active pump.

Kravitz, Stanley H. (Placitas, NM); Hecht, Andrew M. (Sandia Park, NM); Sylwester. Alan P. (Albuquerque, NM); Bell, Nelson S. (Albuquerque, NM)

2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Method of generating hydrogen gas from sodium borohydride  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compact solid source of hydrogen gas, where the gas is generated by contacting water with micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in the presence of a catalyst, such as cobalt or ruthenium. The micro-disperse particles can have a substantially uniform diameter of 1-10 microns, and preferably about 3-5 microns. Ruthenium or cobalt catalytic nanoparticles can be incorporated in the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride, which allows a rapid and complete reaction to occur without the problems associated with caking and scaling of the surface by the reactant product sodium metaborate. A closed loop water management system can be used to recycle wastewater from a PEM fuel cell to supply water for reacting with the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in a compact hydrogen gas generator. Capillary forces can wick water from a water reservoir into a packed bed of micro-disperse fuel particles, eliminating the need for using an active pump.

Kravitz, Stanley H. (Placitas, NM); Hecht, Andrew M. (Sandia Park, NM); Sylwester, Alan P. (Albuquerque, NM); Bell, Nelson S. (Albuquerque, NM)

2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

262

Chemistry of Petroleum Crude Oil Deposits: Sodium Naphthenates 2009 NHMFL Science Highlight for NSF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry of Petroleum Crude Oil Deposits: Sodium Naphthenates 2009 NHMFL Science Highlight for NSF-355. Chemistry of Petroleum Crude Oil Deposits: Sodium Naphthenates 2009 NHMFL Science Highlight for NSF DMR

Weston, Ken

263

Structural basis for the transformation pathways of the sodium naproxen anhydrate-hydrate system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Relationships between the crystal structures of two polymorphs of sodium naproxen dihydrate and its monohydrate and anhydrate phases provide a basis to rationalize the observed transformation pathways in the sodium (S)-naproxen anhydrate-hydrate system.

Bond, A.D.

2014-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

264

SnSb@carbon nanocable anchored on graphene sheets for sodium ion batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The development of materials with unique nanostructures is an effective strategy for the improvement of sodium storage in sodium ion batteries to achieve stable cycling performance and good ... , SnSbcore/carbon-...

Li Li; Kuok Hau Seng; Dan Li; Yongyao Xia; Hua Kun Liu; Zaiping Guo

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Chemical Hygiene and Safety Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lithium citrate . 919164 medroxyprogesterone acetate acetate, furfural Sulfides Sulfuric acid Acids Potassium chlorate, potassium perchlorate, potassium permanganate (similar compounds of light metals, such as sodium, lithium)

Ricks Editor, R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Hyperoxaluria after modern bariatric surgery: case series and literature review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnesium Oxalate pH Phosphorous Potassium Sodium Sulfateuric acid, creatinine, phosphorous, sodium, potassium, andCreatinine Magnesium Oxalate Phosphorous Table 3 Mean 24-h

Whitson, Jared M.; Stackhouse, G. Bennett; Stoller, Marshall L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Go No-Go Recommendation for Sodium Borohydride for On-Board Vehicular Hydrogen Storage  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

Independent review panel recommendation for go/no go decision on use of hydrolysis of sodium borohydride for hydrogen storage.

268

Effect of sodium montmorillonite nanoclay on the water absorbency and cationic dye removal of carrageenan-based nanocomposite superabsorbents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nanocomposite superabsorbents were synthesized by simultaneously solution copolymerization of acrylamide (AAm) and sodium acrylate (Na-AA) in the presence of carrageenan biopolymer and sodium montmorillonite (Na-...

Gholam Reza Mahdavinia; Bakhshali Massoumi; Karim Jalili…

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Evaluation of iron- and manganese-based mono- and mixed-metallic oxygen carriers for chemical looping combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is an emerging technology for clean combustion of fossil fuels with inherent CO2 capture. In the present work, we investigate the use of iron and manganese based mixed oxides (MnxFe1?x–CeO2) supported on CeO2 as oxygen carriers in CLC. The low cost and low toxicity of iron and manganese make them interesting candidates for CLC, but both mono-metallic carriers suffer from issues of low reactivity, and manganese is additionally prone to form undesired spinel structures with typical oxide supports. Mono- and bimetallic oxygen carriers were synthesized across the entire spectrum of compositions from pure Mn to pure Fe (with x = 0, 0.1, 0.33, 0.5, 0.8, 0.9, 1), characterized, and tested in thermogravimetric and fixed-bed reactor studies using H2 and CH4 as fuels. We find that the use of ceria as support results in stable operation for all compositions of the metal phase, including pure Mn. Bimetallic carriers with high Fe content, which contain a FeMnO3 phase, exhibit an unusual, reversible de-alloying/re-alloying behavior during cyclic redox operation, which precludes any synergistic effects between the two metals and results in slowed reduction kinetics. However, Mn-rich carriers show a pronounced increase in carrier reactivity and selectivity for total oxidation of methane due to the addition of small amounts of Fe, indicating the promise of appropriately designed FeMn carriers as low-cost, environmentally benign oxygen carrier materials for chemical looping combustion.

Saurabh Bhavsar; Brian Tackett; Götz Veser

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Spatially resolved characterization of biogenic manganese oxideproduction within a bacterial biofilm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pseudomonas putida strain MnB1, a biofilm forming bacteria, was used as a model for the study of bacterial Mn oxidation in freshwater and soil environments. The oxidation of Mn{sub (aq)}{sup +2} by P. putida was characterized by spatially and temporally resolving the oxidation state of Mn in the presence of a bacterial biofilm using scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) combined with near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy at the Mn-L{sub 2,3} absorption edges. Subsamples were collected from growth flasks containing 0.1 mM and 1 mM total Mn at 16, 24, 36 and 48 hours after inoculation. Immediately after collection, the unprocessed hydrated subsamples were imaged at 40 nm resolution. Manganese NEXAFS spectra were extracted from x-ray energy sequences of STXM images (stacks) and fit with linear combinations of well characterized reference spectra to obtain quantitative relative abundances of Mn(II), Mn(III) and Mn(IV). Careful consideration was given to uncertainty in the normalization of the reference spectra, choice of reference compounds, and chemical changes due to radiation damage. The STXM results confirm that Mn{sub (aq)}{sup +2} was removed from solution by P. putida and was concentrated as Mn(III) and Mn(IV) immediately adjacent to the bacterial cells. The Mn precipitates were completely enveloped by bacterial biofilm material. The distribution of Mn oxidation states was spatially heterogeneous within and between the clusters of bacterial cells. Scanning transmission x-ray microscopy is a promising tool to advance the study of hydrated interfaces between minerals and bacteria, particularly in cases where the structure of bacterial biofilms needs to be maintained.

Toner, Brandy; Fakra, Sirine; Villalobos, Mario; Warwick, Tony; Sposito, Garrison

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Manganese-loaded lipid-micellar theranostics for simultaneous drug and gene delivery to lungs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Gadolinium (Gd) contrast agents are predominantly used for T1 MR imaging. However, the high toxicity of Gd3 + and potential side effects including nephrogenic systemic fibrosis have led to the search for alternative T1 contrast agents. Since manganese (Mn) has paramagnetic properties with five unpaired electrons that permit high spin number, long electronic relaxation times, and labile water exchange, we evaluated Mn as a T1 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent for lung imaging. Here we report on the design and synthesis of multifunctional lipid-micellar nanoparticles (LMNs) containing Mn oxide (M-LMNs) for MRI that can also be used for DNA and drug delivery. Oleic acid-coated MnO nanoparticles were encapsulated in micelles composed of polyethylene glycol (PEG-2000), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), DC-cholesterol, and dioleoyl-phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE). The particles are taken up in vitro by human embryonic kidney (HEK293), Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC1), and A549 cells and are devoid of cytotoxicity. When administered to mice intranasally, they preferentially accumulate in the lungs. In vitro phantom and ex vivo lung MRI results confirmed that M-LMNs are able to enhance T1 MRI contrast. M-LMNs loaded with plasmid DNA and/or doxorubicin are efficiently taken up by HEK293 cells in vitro and by target cells in vivo. Taken together, these results demonstrate that M-LMNs are capable of simultaneously providing MRI contrast and DNA and/or drug delivery to target cells in the lung and therefore may prove useful as a lung theranostic, especially for lung cancers.

M. Howell; J. Mallela; C. Wang; S. Ravi; S. Dixit; U. Garapati; S. Mohapatra

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Microsoft Word - EC Sodium coolant removal.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 1 SECTION A. Project Title: MFC - EBR-II Sodium Removal/RCRA Closure Activities SECTION B . Project Description The proposed action will remove the sodium from the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR)-II piping system and tanks to achieve clean-closure for eventual decommissioning, deactivation and demolition (DD&D). The clean-closure will be completed in compliance with the EBR-II Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (HWMA/RCRA) Storage and Treatment Permit PER-120, which includes the closure plan. EBR-II is located at the Materials and Fuels Complex at the Idaho National Laboratory. The EBR-II DD&D actions will be addressed under the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation, and Liability Act, specifically, the Engineering Evaluation/Cost

273

Effects of iron and manganese in culture solution on their concentrations in roots and shoots of rice plants (Oryza sativa L.) grown under anaerobic conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(~Or za sativa L. ) GROWN UNDER ANAEROBIC CONDITIONS A Thesis by RICHARD E. BACHA Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of Committee Head of Department 0 ember em er December 1976 g+g TO, I ABSTRACT Effects of Iron and Manganese... EFFECTS OF IRON AND MANGANESE IN CULTURE SOLUTION ON THEIR CONCENTRATIONS IN ROOTS AND SHOOTS OF RICE PLANTS (~Or za sativa L. ) GROWN UNDER ANAEROBIC CONDITIONS A Thesis by RICHARD E. BACHA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM Un...

Bacha, Richard E

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment, Applied Technology Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho mandates treatment of sodium-bearing waste at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center within the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. One of the requirements of the Settlement Agreement is to complete treatment of sodium-bearing waste by December 31, 2012. Applied technology activities are required to provide the data necessary to complete conceptual design of four identified alternative processes and to select the preferred alternative. To provide a technically defensible path forward for the selection of a treatment process and for the collection of needed data, an applied technology plan is required. This document presents that plan, identifying key elements of the decision process and the steps necessary to obtain the required data in support of both the decision and the conceptual design. The Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment Applied Technology Plan has been prepared to provide a description/roadmap of the treatment alternative selection process. The plan details the results of risk analyzes and the resulting prioritized uncertainties. It presents a high-level flow diagram governing the technology decision process, as well as detailed roadmaps for each technology. The roadmaps describe the technical steps necessary in obtaining data to quantify and reduce the technical uncertainties associated with each alternative treatment process. This plan also describes the final products that will be delivered to the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office in support of the office's selection of the final treatment technology.

Lance Lauerhass; Vince C. Maio; S. Kenneth Merrill; Arlin L. Olson; Keith J. Perry

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Sodium boiling dryout correlation for LMFBR fuel assemblies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under certain postulated accident conditions for a Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR), such as the failure of the shutdown heat removal system (SHRS), sodium boiling and clad dryout might occur in the fuel assemblies. It is important to predict the time from boiling inception to dryout, since sustained clad dryout will result in core damage. In this paper a dryout correlation is presented. This correlation is based on 21 boiling tests which resulted in dryout from the THORS BUNDLE 6A, a 19-pin full-length simulated LMFBR fuel assembly and from the THORS Bundle 9, a 61-pin full-length simulated LMFBR fuel assembly. All these tests were performed as follows: for each specified bundle power, an initial steady-state high sodium flow was established, for which sodium boiling did not occur in the bundle. The temperature at the outlet of the test section was approx. 700/sup 0/C. Then, using a programmable pump control system, the flow was reduced to a low value and boiling occurred.

Carbajo, J.J.; Rose, S.D.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

EIS-0306: Treatment and Management of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear Fuel |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

306: Treatment and Management of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear 306: Treatment and Management of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear Fuel EIS-0306: Treatment and Management of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear Fuel Summary This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of the proposed electrometallurgical treatment of DOE-owned sodium bonded spent nuclear fuel in the Fuel Conditioning Facility at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W). Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. Documents Available for Download September 19, 2000 EIS-0306: Record of Decision Treatment and Management of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear Fuel July 1, 2000 EIS-0306: Final Environmental Impact Statement Treatment and Management of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear Fuel July 1, 1999 EIS-0306: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Treatment of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear Fuel

277

Manganese reduction/oxidation reaction on graphene composites as a reversible process for storing enormous energy at a fast rate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oxygen reduction/evolution reaction (ORR/OER) is a basic process for fuel cells or metal air batteries. However, ORR/OER generally requires noble metal catalysts and suffers from low solubility (10-3 molar per liter) of O2, low kinetics rate (10-6 cm2/s) and low reversibility. We report a manganese reduction/oxidation reaction (MRR/MOR) on graphene/MnO2 composites, delivering a high capacity (4200 mAh/g), fast kinetics (0.0024 cm2/s, three orders higher than ORR/OER), high solubility (three orders than O2), and high reversibility (100%). We further use MRR/MOR to invent a rechargeable manganese ion battery (MIB), which delivers an energy density of 1200 Wh/Kg (several times of lithium ion battery), a fast charge ability (3 minutes), and a long cycle life (10,000 cycles). MRR/MOR renders a new class of energy conversion or storage systems with a very high energy density enabling electric vehicles run much more miles at one charge.

Chen, Yanyi; Shi, Shan; Li, Jia; Kang, Feiyu; Wei, Chunguang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Microstructural characterization of high-manganese austenitic steels with different stacking fault energies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microstructures of tensile-deformed high-manganese austenitic steels exhibiting twinning-induced plasticity were analyzed by electron backscatter diffraction pattern observation and X-ray diffraction measurement to examine the influence of differences in their stacking fault energies on twinning activity during deformation. The steel specimen with the low stacking fault energy of 15 mJ/m{sup 2} had a microstructure with a high population of mechanical twins than the steel specimen with the high stacking fault energy (25 mJ/m{sup 2}). The <111> and <100> fibers developed along the tensile axis, and mechanical twinning occurred preferentially in the <111> fiber. The Schmid factors for slip and twinning deformations can explain the origin of higher twinning activity in the <111> fiber. However, the high stacking fault energy suppresses the twinning activity even in the <111> fiber. A line profile analysis based on the X-ray diffraction data revealed the relationship between the characteristics of the deformed microstructures and the stacking fault energies of the steel specimens. Although the variation in dislocation density with the tensile deformation is not affected by the stacking fault energies, the effect of the stacking fault energies on the crystallite size refinement becomes significant with a decrease in the stacking fault energies. Moreover, the stacking fault probability, which was estimated from a peak-shift analysis of the 111 and 200 diffractions, was high for the specimen with low stacking fault energy. Regardless of the difference in the stacking fault energies of the steel specimens, the refined crystallite size has a certain correlation with the stacking fault probability, indicating that whether the deformation-induced crystallite-size refinement occurs depends directly on the stacking fault probability rather than on the stacking fault energies in the present steel specimens. - Highlights: {yields} We studied effects of stacking fault energies on deformed microstructures of steels. {yields} Correlations between texture and occurrence of mechanical twinning are discussed. {yields} Evolutions of dislocations and crystallite are analyzed by line profile analysis.

Sato, Shigeo, E-mail: s.sato@imr.tohoku.ac.jp [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Kwon, Eui-Pyo [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Imafuku, Muneyuki [Faculty of Engineering, Tokyo City University, Tokyo 158-8557 (Japan); Wagatsuma, Kazuaki [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Suzuki, Shigeru [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

279

ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels are found in pancreatic _cells, heart, smooth and skeletal muscle and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels are found in pancreatic â_cells, heart, smooth and skeletal al. 1997). Kir6.2 serves as an ATP-sensitive pore while SUR is a regulatory subunit that modulates the channel gating properties, enhances the apparent ATP sensitivity and acts as the target for sulphonylurea

Tucker, Stephen J.

280

ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels are found in pancreatic _cells, cardiac, smooth and skeletal muscles, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels are found in pancreatic â_cells, cardiac, smooth ATP and ADP bind to cause channel inhibition. SUR is a regulatory subunit that modulates the channel gating properties, enhances the apparent ATP sensitivity and acts as the target for sulphonylurea drugs

Tucker, Stephen J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Mercury Emissions Control in Coal Combustion Systems Using Potassium Iodide: Bench-Scale and Pilot-Scale Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

power plant exhaust gases using conventional air pollution control devices (APCDs) is significantly Act list of sources of hazardous air pollutants. Both the reversal and the CAMR were vacated by the UMercury Emissions Control in Coal Combustion Systems Using Potassium Iodide: Bench-Scale and Pilot

Li, Ying

282

Dynamic stability experiments in sodium-heated steam generators. [LMFBR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seventy-two dynamic stability tests were performed in the sodium-heated boiling-water test facility at Argonne National Laboratory. A full-scale LMFBR steam generator tube was employed as the test section operating over the water parameter ranges of 6.9 to 15.9 MPa pressure and 170 to 800 kg/m/sup 2/.s mass flux. The stability thresholds from the test compared well to the predictions of a modified version of a correlation equation recently published by other investigators. Typical experimental data and the modified correlation equation are presented.

France, D.M.; Roy, R.; Carlson, R.D.; Chiang, T.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Effects of the mycotoxin penicillic acid on electrogenic sodium transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Maximal 1nh1- bition of sodium transport (89. 7%) by PA was achieved after 40 minutes reaction time. The addition of d1thiothreitol to the test med1a prevented short-c1rc1ut current inhibition 1ndicating that the mode of PA action on sod1um flux may..., and 45 minutes . 47 15 C-PA binding to 1ntact toad urigry bladder with and without addit1on of DTT to the C-PA before bladder app1 i cati on. . . 48 Relationship of radiotoxin binding to intact bladder with respect to inhibition of the sod1um pump...

Wilczynski, Teresa Anne

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

284

The determination of exchangeable potassium in the canine with the aid of whole body counting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The a~changeable potassium measured at 0. 65-0. 85 hours post-injection was 37. 51+ 3. 85 mEq/kg. It is therefore possible to make the measurement soon after injection and note whether there is a possible electrolyte imbalance, but it is recommended... of the lesser beta energies in its decay as compared to the decay of K (Jo69). (2. 4h ' 4RK IS (&) d)~ 1. 44 L2$ o I 19 O. OS% 4. 4 %144 0. 14% 4. / I ?it 10% P. 0 ? L22LO. SSD5 0 - LST (Myw) 42% ?to 4+ 4R aoCa N (12. 41)t B 2, n. -1. 141 atomtc...

Followill, David

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

285

United States, France and Japan Increase Cooperation on Sodium-Cooled Fast  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

United States, France and Japan Increase Cooperation on United States, France and Japan Increase Cooperation on Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor Prototypes United States, France and Japan Increase Cooperation on Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor Prototypes February 1, 2008 - 11:13am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S Department of Energy (DOE), the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) and Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) today expanded cooperation to coordinate Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor Prototype development through a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) signed by DOE Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy Dennis R. Spurgeon, CEA Chairman Alain Bugat and JAEA President Toshio Okazaki. The MOU establishes a collaborative framework with the ultimate goal of deploying sodium-cooled fast reactor prototypes. A sodium-cooled fast reactor uses liquid sodium

286

E-Print Network 3.0 - aqueous sodium chloride Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cholate... by the addition of sodium chloride or ammonium sulfate salt and then resuspension of the SWNTs... peroxidase (HRP) on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) using...

287

E-Print Network 3.0 - aqueous sodium sulfate Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: by the addition of sodium chloride or ammonium sulfate salt and then resuspension of the SWNTs... peroxidase (HRP) on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) using...

288

LOW FLAMMABILITY FOAM-LIKE MATERIALS BASED ON EPOXY, TANNIC ACID, SODIUM MONTMORILLONITE CLAY.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Aerogels based on sodium montmorillonite clay, epoxy polymer, and tannic acid as a flame retardant additive were fabricated through a simple environmentally-friendly freeze drying process… (more)

Lang, Xiaolong

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

ELECTROCHEMICAL RESEARCH IN CHEMICAL HYDROGEN STORAGE MATERIALS: SODIUM BOROHYDRIDE AND ORGANOTIN HYDRIDES.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Chemical storage of hydrogen involves release of hydrogen in a controlled manner from materials in which the hydrogen is covalently bound. Sodium borohydride and aminoborane… (more)

McLafferty, Jason

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Low Temperature Sodium-Sulfur Grid Storage and EV Battery - Energy...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and a conductive polymer, while the solid electrolyte - based on cross-linked polyethylene oxide - forms a stable but ion-conducting barrier separating the liquid sodium...

291

A study of phase transitions in sodium stearate by means of nuclear magnetic resonance.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The mesomorphic phase transitions of sodium stearate occurring between 23°C. and 200°C. were investigated by means of the nuclear magnetic resonance of the hydrogen nuclei… (more)

Grant, Rowland Frederick

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Coherent population trapping on the sodium D1 line in high magnetic fields  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We consider the coherent-population-trapping (CPT) phenomenon in a sodium atomic vapor. The experiment leading to the first observation of CPT is revisited with an improved...

Höller, R; Renzoni, F; Windholz, L; Xu, J H

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

E-Print Network 3.0 - affecting sodium hypochlorite Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Workshop Summary: equipment, vehicles Sodium hypochlorite (bleach) 200-500 ppm Nets, boots, clothing. Surfaces must be clean... hypochlorite solution.Note: Bleach is 5.25%...

294

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline sodium borohydride Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aardahl, PNNL) The most critical hurdle for the use of sodium ... Source: DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure...

295

E-Print Network 3.0 - aged sodium borophosphate Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

is a pool-type, sodium- cooled fast reactor that uses a large core of depleted uranium and a "sparkplug Source: Los Alamos National Laboratory, Theoretical Division,...

296

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminum sodium chloride Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

agents Water Acetyl chloride, alkaline and alkaline... hypochlorite, all oxidizing agents Carbon tetrachloride Sodium ... Source: Hall, Sharon J. - School of Life Sciences, Arizona...

297

TRUEX partitioning studies applied to ICPP sodium-bearing waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP), located in southeast Idaho at the USDOE Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, formerly reprocessed highly enriched spent nuclear fuel to recover fissionable uranium. The HLW raffinates from the combined PUREX/REDOX type uranium recovery process were converted to solid oxides (calcine) in a high temperature fluidized bed. Liquid effluents from the calcination process were combined with liquid sodium bearing waste (SBW) generated primarily in conjunction with decontamination activities. Due to the high sodium content in the SBW, this secondary waste stream is not directly amenable to solidification via calcination. Currently, approximately 1.5 millon gallons of liquid SBW are stored at the ICPP in large tanks. Several treatment options for the SBW are currently being considered, including the TRansUranic EXtraction (TRUEX) process developed by Horwitz and co-workers at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), in preparation for the final disposition of SBW. Herein described are experimental results of radionuclide tracer studies with simulated SBW using the TRUEX process solvent.

Herbst, R.S.; Brewer, K.N.; Law, J.D.; Tranter, T.J.; Todd, T.A.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Preliminary engineering design of sodium-cooled CANDLE core  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The CANDLE burning process is characterized by the autonomous shifting of burning region with constant reactivity and constant spacial power distribution. Evaluations of such critical burning process by using widely used neutron diffusion and burning codes under some realistic engineering constraints are valuable to confirm the technical feasibility of the CANDLE concept and to put the idea into concrete core design. In the first part of this paper it is discussed that whether the sustainable and stable CANDLE burning process can be reproduced even by using conventional core analysis tools such as SLAROM and CITATION-FBR. As a result it is certainly possible to demonstrate it if the proper core configuration and initial fuel composition required as CANDLE core are applied to the analysis. In the latter part an example of a concrete image of sodium cooled metal fuel 2000MWt rating CANDLE core has been presented by assuming an emerging inevitable technology of recladding. The core satisfies engineering design criteria including cladding temperature pressure drop linear heat rate and cumulative damage fraction (CDF) of cladding fast neutron fluence and sodium void reactivity which are defined in the Japanese FBR design project. It can be concluded that it is feasible to design CADLE core by using conventional codes while satisfying some realistic engineering design constraints assuming that recladding at certain time interval is technically feasible.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Solar abundance of manganese: a case for the existence of near Chandrasekhar-mass Type Ia supernova progenitors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Context: Manganese is predominantly synthesised in Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) explosions. Owing to the entropy dependence of the Mn yield in explosive thermonuclear burning, SNe Ia involving near Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarfs (WDs) are predicted to produce Mn to Fe ratios significantly exceeding those of SN Ia explosions involving sub-Chandrasekhar mass primary WDs. Of all current supernova explosion models, only SN Ia models involving near-Chandrasekhar mass WDs produce [Mn/Fe] > 0.0. Aims: Using the specific yields for competing SN Ia scenarios, we aim to constrain the relative fractions of exploding near-Chandrasekhar mass to sub-Chandrasekhar mass primary WDs in the Galaxy. Methods: We extract the Mn yields from three-dimensional thermonuclear supernova simulations referring to different initial setups and progenitor channels. We then compute the chemical evolution of Mn in the Solar neighborhood, assuming SNe Ia are made up of different relative fractions of the considered explosion models. Results: We ...

Seitenzahl, Ivo R; Roepke, Friedrich K; Ruiter, Ashley J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Graphite coated with manganese oxide/multiwall carbon nanotubes composites as anodes in marine benthic microbial fuel cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Improving anode performance is of great significance to scale up benthic microbial fuel cells (BMFCs) for its marine application to drive oceanography instruments. In this study, manganese oxide (MnO2)/multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) composites are prepared to be as novel anodes in the \\{BMFCs\\} via a direct redox reaction between permanganate ions (MnO4?) and MWCNTs. The results indicate that the MnO2/MWCNTs anode has a better wettability, greater kinetic activity and higher power density than that of the plain graphite (PG) anode. It is noted that the MnO2 (50% weight percent)/MWCNTs anode shows the highest electrochemical performance among them and will be a promising material for improving bioelectricity production of the BMFCs. Finally, a synergistic mechanism of electron transfer shuttle of Mn ions and their redox reactions in the interface between modified anode and bacteria biofilm are proposed to explain its excellent electrochemical performance.

Yubin Fu; Jian Yu; Yelong Zhang; Yao Meng

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Remedial Action Certification Docket - Sodium Reactor Experiment (SRE)  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

c~-?i-- c~-?i-- I ,3-l Remedial Action Certification Docket - Sodium Reactor Experiment (SRE) .Complex and the Hot Cave Facility (Bldg. 003), Santa Susana ,Fie!d Laboratory, Chatsworth, California ..:'..~::Yerlette Gatl in, MA-232 I am attaching for entry into the Public Document Room, one copy of the N -23 subject documentat ion. These documents are the backup data for the certification that the facilfties are radiologically acceptable for b- unrestricted use as noted in the certification statement published in the &aney Federal Register. Inasmuch as the certification for unrestricted use is 9/2(/85 being published in the Federal Register, it is prudent that the attached documentation also be available to the public. These documents should be retained In accordance with DOE Order 1324.2--disposal schedule 25.

302

Feasibility Study for Vitrification of Sodium-Bearing Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Treatment of sodium-bearing waste (SBW) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) within the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory is mandated under a Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. One of the requirements of the Settlement Agreement is the complete calcination (i.e., treatment) of all SBW by December 31, 2012. One of the proposed options for treatment of SBW is vitrification. This study will examine the viability of SBW vitrification. This study describes the process and facilities to treat the SBW, from beginning waste input from INTEC Tank Farm to the final waste forms. Schedules and cost estimates for construction and operation of a Vitrification Facility are included. The study includes a facility layout with drawings, process description and flow diagrams, and preliminary equipment requirements and layouts.

J. J. Quigley; B. D. Raivo; S. O. Bates; S. M. Berry; D. N. Nishioka; P. J. Bunnell

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment Alternatives Implementation Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to discuss issues related to the implementation of each of the five down-selected INEEL/INTEC radioactive liquid waste (sodium-bearing waste - SBW) treatment alternatives and summarize information in three main areas of concern: process/technical, environmental permitting, and schedule. Major implementation options for each treatment alternative are also identified and briefly discussed. This report may touch upon, but purposely does not address in detail, issues that are programmatic in nature. Examples of these include how the SBW will be classified with respect to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA), status of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) permits and waste storage availability, available funding for implementation, stakeholder issues, and State of Idaho Settlement Agreement milestones. It is assumed in this report that the SBW would be classified as a transuranic (TRU) waste suitable for disposal at WIPP, located in New Mexico, after appropriate treatment to meet transportation requirements and waste acceptance criteria (WAC).

Charles M. Barnes; James B. Bosley; Clifford W. Olsen

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Hybrid sodium heat pipe receivers for dish/Stirling systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design of a hybrid solar/gas heat pipe receiver for the SBP 9 kW dish/Stirling system using a United Stirling AB V160 Stirling engine and the results of on-sun testing in alternative and parallel mode will be reported. The receiver is designed to transfer a thermal power of 35 kW. The heat pipe operates at around 800 C, working fluid is sodium. Operational options are solar-only, gas augmented and gas-only mode. Also the design of a second generation hybrid heat pipe receiver currently developed under a EU-funded project, based on the experience gained with the first hybrid receiver, will be reported. This receiver is designed for the improved SPB/L. and C.-10 kW dish/Stirling system with the reworked SOLO V161 Stirling engine.

Laing, D.; Reusch, M. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Stuttgart (Germany). Inst. fuer Technische Thermodynamik

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

305

Screening Evaluation of Sodium Nonatitanate for Strontium and Actinide Removal from Alkaline Salt Solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes results from screening tests evaluating strontium and actinide removal characteristics of a sodium titanate material developed by Clearfield and coworkers at Texas A and M University and offered commercially by Honeywell. Sodium nonatitanate may exhibit improved actinide removal kinetics and filtration characteristics compared to MST and thus merit testing.

Hobbs, D.T.

2001-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

306

Adsorption of Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate on Functionalized Graphene Measured by Conductometric Titration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

applications, including graphene-metal oxide nano- composites for Li-ion battery electrodes,4,5 grapheneAdsorption of Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate on Functionalized Graphene Measured by Conductometric States ABSTRACT: We report on the adsorption of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) onto functionalized graphene

Aksay, Ilhan A.

307

Small-angle neutron scattering analysis of Mn–C clusters in high-manganese 18Mn–0.6C steel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Nanometer-scale particles (Mn–C clusters) were analyzed quantitatively using small-angle neutron scattering in 18Mn–0.6C (wt.%) austenite high-manganese steel. The size, number, and volume fraction of the particles were determined as a function of strain (0, 5, 15, 30, 45, 50%) at different temperatures (25 and 100 °C). The diameter of the cluster ranges from 2 to 14 nm in the matrix. The total volume fraction of the cluster significantly increases from 2.7 × 10? 6 to 8.7 × 10? 6 as the strain increases. Such clustering phenomenon is correlated to the serration behavior under loading in high-manganese steels.

Mihyun Kang; Eunjoo Shin; Wanchuck Woo; Young-Kook Lee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Impact of mineralogy on potassium dynamics and retention behavior in Bangladesh soils used in rice cropping systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

amounts of K were present in all fractions of silts and clays. Potassium concentration was greatest in the coarse clay fraction. High HNO 3 - extractable K suggested that much of the K in soils was from mica interlayers. Acidic soils contained less K... in all fractions than the less weathered, calcareous soils. The clay fractions exhibited mostly mica, vermiculite, smectite and kaolinite. The cation exchange capacity (CEC) of reduced soils was less under oxidized condition, due to collapse...

Biswas, Sumitra Bose

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

309

Desiccation resistance and root growth rate of St. Augustinegrass (Stenotaphrum secundatum (Walt.) Kuntze 'Floratam') as influenced by potassium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The influence of potassium on the mean visual turfgrass quality rating of previously stressed and watered St. Augustinegrass turfs during the 12 day period of recovery from water stress. 58 12. The influence of previous water regime treat- ment on the root.... . . . . . . . . 100 22 The influence of previous water regime of the visual turfgrass quality ratings of St. Augustinegrass maintained in the greenhouse 104 23. The influence of previous water stress on the clipping dry weights obtained from St. Augustinegrass...

DiPaola, J. M

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

310

Removal of mercury from solids using the potassium iodide/iodine leaching process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Potassium iodide (KI) and iodine (I{sub 2}) leaching solutions have been evaluated for use in a process for removing mercury from contaminated mixed waste solids. Most of the experimental work was completed using surrogate waste. During the last quarter of fiscal year 1995, this process was evaluated using an actual mixed waste (storm sewer sediment from the Oak Ridge Y-12 Site). The mercury content of the storm sewer sediment was measured and determined to be approximately 35,000 mg/kg. A solution consisting of 0.2 M I{sub 2} and 0.4 M KI proved to be the most effective leachant used in the experiments when applied for 2 to 4 h at ambient temperature. Over 98% of the mercury was removed from the storm sewer sediment using this solution. Iodine recovery and recycle of the leaching agent were also accomplished successfully. Mathematical model was used to predict the amount of secondary waste in the process. Both surrogate waste and actual waste were used to study the fate of radionuclides (uranium) in the leaching process.

Klasson, K.T.; Koran, L.J. Jr.; Gates, D.D.; Cameron, P.A.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Surface Structure of Lithium Doped Potassium Tantalate (KLT) using Helium Atom Scattering.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The structures of the (001) surface of potassium tantalate doped with nominally 2, 4 and 7% lithium have been investigated using high resolution helium atom scattering. The surfaces were prepared by cleaving single crystal samples in situ under UHV conditions. Diraction measurements in the region around the He specular re ection angle soon after cleaving yielded specular peaks initially with broad shoulders. However, over a period of about an hour, the widths of these specular peaks decreased markedly as the shoulders diminished into the background. Drift spectra measurements of the stabilized surfaces revealed that the step heights separating surface terraces were predominantly multiples of the cubic unit cell dimension, about 4A, rather than multiples of a half unit cell, 2A, expected from the cleaving of these crystals. Together these results suggest that after cleaving these surfaces are rapidly modied by migration of ions to the surface from the near-surface. Further, half-order diraction peaks were observed in the <100> azimuth a short time after cleaving samples at room temperature, indicating that domains with (21) structure had formed.

Fatema, Rifat [Florida State University; Van Winkle, David [Florida State University; Skofronick, J. G. [Florida State University; Sanfron, Sanford a [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida State University; Flaherty, F. A. [Valdosta State University, Valdosta, GA; Boatner, Lynn A [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Regeneration of FGD waste liquors: Production of ammonium and potassium sulfate mixed fertilizer. Quarterly technical report, July 1993--September 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Regeneration of the Fe{sup II}-EDTA scrubbing liquors for simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} in flue gas involves removing the nitrogen-sulfur (N-S) compounds accumulated in the liquor. In this paper, the authors investigated a simple regeneration process which selectively precipitates the N-S compounds as potassium salts and then hydrolyzes them to yield ammonium/potassium sulfate as a marketable byproduct. They believe this is the first report on precipitation and hydrolysis characteristics of the N-S compounds in actual waste scrubbing liquor. Precipitation of the N-S compounds was achieved by adding K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} to the scrubbing liquor. Effects of the amount of added K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} on the amount of removed N-S compounds, precipitated crystals, and the potassium left over in the scrubbing liquor were studied. Hydrolysis of the precipitated N-S compounds to ammonium sulfate was performed in a sulfuric acid environment. Effects of acidity, concentration of N-S compounds, and temperature on the hydrolysis are discussed. Analysis of the observed hydrolysis pattern showed that the reaction proceeded following first order kinetics in terms of N-S compound concentration.

Randolph, A.D.; Kwon, T.M.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Mitochondrial localization of fission yeast manganese superoxide dismutase is required for its lysine acetylation and for cellular stress resistance and respiratory growth  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research highlights: {yields} Fission yeast manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) is acetylated. {yields} The mitochondrial targeting sequence (MTS) is required for the acetylation of MnSOD. {yields} The MTS is not crucial for MnSOD activity, but is important for respiratory growth. {yields} Posttranslational regulation of MnSOD differs between budding and fission yeast. -- Abstract: Manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) is localized in the mitochondria and is important for oxidative stress resistance. Although transcriptional regulation of MnSOD has been relatively well studied, much less is known about the protein's posttranslational regulation. In budding yeast, MnSOD is activated after mitochondrial import by manganese ion incorporation. Here we characterize posttranslational modification of MnSOD in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Fission yeast MnSOD is acetylated at the 25th lysine residue. This acetylation was diminished by deletion of N-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequence, suggesting that MnSOD is acetylated after import into mitochondria. Mitochondrial localization of MnSOD is not essential for the enzyme activity, but is crucial for oxidative stress resistance and growth under respiratory conditions of fission yeast. These results suggest that, unlike the situation in budding yeast, S. pombe MnSOD is already active even before mitochondrial localization; nonetheless, mitochondrial localization is critical to allow the cell to cope with reactive oxygen species generated inside or outside of mitochondria.

Takahashi, Hidekazu, E-mail: hidetakahashi@riken.jp [Chemical Genetics Laboratory/Chemical Genomics Research Group, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)] [Chemical Genetics Laboratory/Chemical Genomics Research Group, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Suzuki, Takehiro [Biomolecular Characterization Team, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan) [Biomolecular Characterization Team, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); CREST Research Project, Japan Science and Technology Corporation, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Shirai, Atsuko; Matsuyama, Akihisa [Chemical Genetics Laboratory/Chemical Genomics Research Group, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)] [Chemical Genetics Laboratory/Chemical Genomics Research Group, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Dohmae, Naoshi [Biomolecular Characterization Team, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan) [Biomolecular Characterization Team, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); CREST Research Project, Japan Science and Technology Corporation, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Yoshida, Minoru, E-mail: yoshidam@riken.jp [Chemical Genetics Laboratory/Chemical Genomics Research Group, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan) [Chemical Genetics Laboratory/Chemical Genomics Research Group, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); CREST Research Project, Japan Science and Technology Corporation, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan)

2011-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

314

Mercury's sodium exosphere: Magnetospheric ion recycling Service d'Aeronomie du CNRS/IPSL, Verrie`res-Le-Buisson, France  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mercury's sodium exosphere: Magnetospheric ion recycling F. Leblanc Service d'Ae´ronomie du CNRS December 2003. [1] A three-dimensional Monte Carlo model of Mercury's neutral sodium exosphere was used in the surface concentration of sodium along Mercury's motion around the Sun [Leblanc and Johnson, 2003]. Four

Johnson, Robert E.

315

Analysis and methodology for measuring oxygen concentration in liquid sodium with a plugging meter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oxygen concentration in liquid sodium is a critical measurement in assessing the potential for corrosion damage in sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFRs). There has been little recent work on sodium reactors and oxygen detection. Thus, the technical expertise dealing with oxygen measurements within sodium is no longer readily available in the U.S. Two methods of oxygen detection that have been investigated are the plugging meter and the galvanic cell. One of the overall goals of the Univ. of Wisconsin's sodium research program is to develop an affordable, reliable galvanic cell oxygen sensor. Accordingly, attention must first be dedicated to a well-known standard known as a plugging meter. Therefore, a sodium loop has been constructed on campus in effort to develop the plugging meter technique and gain experience working with liquid metal. The loop contains both a galvanic cell test section and a plugging meter test section. Consistent plugging results have been achieved below 20 [wppm], and a detailed process for achieving effective plugging has been developed. This paper will focus both on an accurate methodology to obtain oxygen concentrations from a plugging meter, and on how to easily control the oxygen concentration of sodium in a test loop. Details of the design, materials, manufacturing, and operation will be presented. Data interpretation will also be discussed, since a modern discussion of plugging data interpretation does not currently exist. (authors)

Nollet, B. K.; Hvasta, M.; Anderson, M. [Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Engineering Dr., Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

The activated state of a sodium channel voltage sensor in a membrane environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...suggests a displacement of ?4 elementary charges per subunit across...voltage sensor reveals a focused electric field . Nature 427 ( 6974...CA Horn R ( 2005 ) Focused electric field across the voltage sensor of potassium...protease activity for protamine resistance of Escherichia coli . Arch...

Sudha Chakrapani; Pornthep Sompornpisut; Pathumwadee Intharathep; Benoît Roux; Eduardo Perozo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Fiber optic sensors for monitoring sodium circuits and power grid cables  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At Kalpakkam, India, a programme on development of Raman Distributed Temperature sensor (RDTS) for Fast Breeder Reactors (FBR) application is undertaken. Leak detection in sodium circuits of FBR is critical for the safety and performance of the reactors. It is demonstrated that RDTS can be usefully employed in monitoring sodium circuits and in tracking the percolating sodium in case of any leak. Aluminum Conductor Steel Reinforced (ACSR) cable is commonly used as overhead power transmission cable in power grid. A second application demonstrates the suitability of using RDTS to monitor this transmission cable for any defect. (authors)

Kasinathan, M.; Sosamma, S.; Pandian, C.; Vijayakumar, V.; Chandramouli, S.; Nashine, B. K.; Rao, C. B.; Murali, N.; Rajan, K. K.; Jayakumar, T. [IGCAR, Kalpakkam (India)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Sodium-bearing Waste Treatment Technology Evaluation Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sodium-bearing waste (SBW) disposition is one of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Idaho Operation Office’s (NE-ID) and State of Idaho’s top priorities at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL has been working over the past several years to identify a treatment technology that meets NE-ID and regulatory treatment requirements, including consideration of stakeholder input. Many studies, including the High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), have resulted in the identification of five treatment alternatives that form a short list of perhaps the most appropriate technologies for the DOE to select from. The alternatives are (a) calcination with maximum achievable control technology (MACT) upgrade, (b) steam reforming, (c) cesium ion exchange (CsIX) with immobilization, (d) direct evaporation, and (e) vitrification. Each alternative has undergone some degree of applied technical development and preliminary process design over the past four years. This report presents a summary of the applied technology and process design activities performed through February 2004. The SBW issue and the five alternatives are described in Sections 2 and 3, respectively. Details of preliminary process design activities for three of the alternatives (steam reforming, CsIX, and direct evaporation) are presented in three appendices. A recent feasibility study provides the details for calcination. There have been no recent activities performed with regard to vitrification; that section summarizes and references previous work.

Charles M. Barnes; Arlin L. Olson; Dean D. Taylor

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

EXAFS studies of sodium silicate glasses containing dissolved actinides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sodium silicate glasses containing dissolved Th, U, Np, and Pu have been studied using the EXAFS technique. Th/sup 4 +/, U/sup 4 +/, Np/sup 4 +/, and Pu/sup 4 +/ ions in the silicate glasses are 8-fold coordinated to oxygen neighbors. The higher valent U/sup 6 +/ and Np/sup 5 +/ ions have complex local symmetries. The U/sup 6 +/ ions appear in a uranyl configuration with 2 oxygen atoms at 1.85A and 4 at 2.25A from the U ion. The Np/sup 5 +/ local symmetry is more complex and difficult to determine uniquely. The U/sup 6 +/ glasses show substantial clustering of the uranium atoms. A structural model, with nearly planar uranyl sheets sandwiched between alkali and silica layers, is used to explain the U/sup 6 +/ EXAFS data. This model allows us to understand why U/sup 6 +/ ions are much more soluble in the glasses than the actinide 4/sup +/ ions. 4 references, 2 figures.

Knapp, G.S.; Veal, B.W.; Paulikas, A.P.; Mitchell, A.W.; Lam, D.J.; Klippert, T.E.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Tolerance Test of Eisenia Fetida for Sodium Chloride  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Saltwater spills that make soil excessively saline often occur at petroleum exploration and production (E&P) sites and are ecologically damaging. Brine scars appear when produced water from an E&P site is spilled onto surrounding soil, causing loss of vegetation and subsequent soil erosion. Revegetating lands damaged by brine water can be difficult. The research reported here considers earthworms as a bioremedial treatment for increasing the salt mobility in this soil and encouraging plant growth and a healthy balance of soil nutrients. To determine the practical application of earthworms to remediate brine-contaminated soil, a 17-d test was conducted to establish salt tolerance levels for the common compost earthworm (Eisenia fetida) and relate those levels to soil salinity at brine-spill sites. Soil samples were amended with sodium chloride in concentrations ranging from 1 to 15 g/kg, which represent contamination levels at some spill sites. The survival rate of the earthworms was near 90% in all tested concentrations. Also, reproduction was noted in a number of the lower-concentration test replicates but absent above the 3-g/kg concentrations. Information gathered in this investigation can be used as reference in further studies of the tolerance of earthworms to salty soils, as results suggest that E. fetida is a good candidate to enhance remediation at brine-damaged sites.

Kerr, M.; Stewart, A.J.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Development of high performance sodium/metal chloride cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sodium/metal chloride (MCl{sub 2}) cells and batteries are being studied at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for stationary energy storage and transportation applications. The work is being directed toward (1) development of thin, high-capacity density electrodes and inexpensive {beta}{double prime}-alumina-glass composite electrolyte materials to replace {beta}{double prime}-alumina and (2) the development of models to project MCl{sub 2} system performances. In our NiCl{sub 2} electrode work, the effects of charge/discharge rates, temperature, electrode porosity, and sulfur content on electrode performance were determined using annular electrodes fabricated in the uncharged state. Of all electrode design parameters mentioned, electrode porosity, sulfur content, and charge rates have the greatest effect on utilization and on the area-specific impedance. The {beta}{double prime}-alumina-glass composite electrolyte work has led to the development of a highly conductive (3.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}2}S/cm at 250{degree}C) composite material. Preliminary modeling studies indicate that the performance of the MCl{sub 2} electrodes can be fitted by a mathematic model very successfully and that cell electrolyte configurations of either multiple tubes joined at a header or compartmented flat structures of either {beta}{double prime}-alumina or of the composite material would result in high-performance batteries with power-to-energy ratios of about 5. 15 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

Vissers, D.R.; Bloom, I.D.; Hash, M.C.; Redey, L.; Hammer, C.L.; Dees, D.W.; Nelson, P.A.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Structure of rhenium-containing sodium borosilicate glass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of sodium borosilicate glasses were synthesized with increasing fractions of KReO4 or Re2O7, to 10000 ppm (1 mass%) target Re in glass, to assess the effects of large concentrations of rhenium on glass structure and to estimate the solubility of technetium, a radioactive component in typical low active waste nuclear waste glasses. Magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy were performed to characterize the glasses as a function of Re source additions. In general, silicon was found coordinated in a mixture of Q2 and Q3 structural units, while Al was 4-coordinated and B was largely 3-coordinate and partially 4-coordinated. The rhenium source did not appear to have significant effects on the glass structure. Thus, at the up to the concentrations that remain in dissolved in glass, ~3000 ppm Re by mass maximum. , the Re appeared to be neither a glass-former nor a strong glass modifier., Rhenium likely exists in isolated ReO4- anions in the interstices of the glass network, as evidenced by the polarized Raman spectrum of the Re glass in the absence of sulfate. Analogous to SO42-¬ in similar glasses, ReO4- is likely a network modifier and forms alkali salt phases on the surface and in the bulk glass above solubility.

Goel, Ashutosh; McCloy, John S.; Windisch, Charles F.; Riley, Brian J.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Ferreira, Jose M.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Kinetic models for uncatalyzed and potassium-catalyzed gasification of char by carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A differential packed-bed reactor has been employed to study the gasification of uncatalyzed and 7.5 wt% K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-catalyzed Saran char in carbon dioxide/carbon monoxide mixtures at a total pressure near 1 atm (101.3 kPa). The gasification temperature was varied between 1131 and 1229 K for the uncatalyzed case, and between 922 and 1046 K for the catalyzed case. Gasification rate data were tested with a model which involves two-site adsorption and subsequent dissociation of CO/sub 2/ on the char surface. The results indicate that this model adequately explains both the uncatalyzed and catalyzed gasification data. However, higher concentrations of carbon-oxygen complex, (C(O)), exist on the surface during catalyzed gasification. The increase in (C(O)) weakens carbon-carbon bonds and thus lowers the activation energy for desorption of the C(O) complex. Adsorption of CO and CO/sub 2/ on both catalyzed and uncatalyzed chars was also followed with a volumetric adsorption apparatus at pressures between 1 and 100 kPa and temperatures from 273 to 725 K. The catalyzed char adsorbed an order of magnitude more CO/sub 2/ at 559 K than the uncatalyzed char. Subsequent dissociation of CO/sub 2/ on the carbon surface does not appear to be catalyzed by potassium. Thus, the catalysts' role is to augment the efficiency and/or number of sites for CO/sub 2/ adsorption, thereby creating more oxygen on the surface. The higher rate during catalyzed gasification can be attributed to a combination of increased (C(O)) and a smaller activation energy for desorption of C(O).

Koenig, P.C.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Identification of quaternary ammonium compounds as potent inhibitors of hERG potassium channels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) channel, a member of a family of voltage-gated potassium (K{sup +}) channels, plays a critical role in the repolarization of the cardiac action potential. The reduction of hERG channel activity as a result of adverse drug effects or genetic mutations may cause QT interval prolongation and potentially leads to acquired long QT syndrome. Thus, screening for hERG channel activity is important in drug development. Cardiotoxicity associated with the inhibition of hERG channels by environmental chemicals is also a public health concern. To assess the inhibitory effects of environmental chemicals on hERG channel function, we screened the National Toxicology Program (NTP) collection of 1408 compounds by measuring thallium influx into cells through hERG channels. Seventeen compounds with hERG channel inhibition were identified with IC{sub 50} potencies ranging from 0.26 to 22 {mu}M. Twelve of these compounds were confirmed as hERG channel blockers in an automated whole cell patch clamp experiment. In addition, we investigated the structure-activity relationship of seven compounds belonging to the quaternary ammonium compound (QAC) series on hERG channel inhibition. Among four active QAC compounds, tetra-n-octylammonium bromide was the most potent with an IC{sub 50} value of 260 nM in the thallium influx assay and 80 nM in the patch clamp assay. The potency of this class of hERG channel inhibitors appears to depend on the number and length of their aliphatic side-chains surrounding the charged nitrogen. Profiling environmental compound libraries for hERG channel inhibition provides information useful in prioritizing these compounds for cardiotoxicity assessment in vivo.

Xia Menghang, E-mail: mxia@mail.nih.gov [NIH Chemical Genomics Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Shahane, Sampada A.; Huang, Ruili; Titus, Steven A. [NIH Chemical Genomics Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Shum, Enoch; Zhao Yong [Cerep, Inc., Redmond, WA (United States); Southall, Noel; Zheng, Wei [NIH Chemical Genomics Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Witt, Kristine L.; Tice, Raymond R. [National Toxicology Program, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Austin, Christopher P. [NIH Chemical Genomics Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Small-angle neutron scattering study of poly(methyl methacrylate-block-sodium acrylate-block-methyl methacrylate) and poly(sodium acrylate-block-methyl methacrylate-block-sodium acrylate) triblock copolymers in aqueous solutions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

?Small-angle neutron scattering experiments were made on poly(methyl methacrylate-block-sodium acrylate-block-methyl methacrylate) [p(MMA-b-NaA-b-MMA)] and p(NaA-b-MMA-b...-NaA) solutions by varying the compositi...

Szabolcs Vass; Kristina Haimer; Gerhard Meier…

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Process Flow Chart for Immobilizing of Radioactive High Concentration Sodium Hydroxide Product from the Sodium Processing Facility at the BN-350 Nuclear power plant in Aktau, Kazakhstan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the results of a joint research investigations carried out by the group of Kazakhstan, British and American specialists in development of a new material for immobilization of radioactive 35% sodium hydroxide solutions from the sodium coolant processing facility of the BN-350 nuclear power plant. The resulting solid matrix product, termed geo-cement stone, is capable of isolating long lived radionuclides from the environment. The physico-mechanical properties of geo-cement stone have been investigated and the flow chart for its production verified in a full scale experiments. (author)

Burkitbayev, M.; Omarova, K.; Tolebayev, T. [Ai-Farabi Kazakh National University, Chemical Faculty, Republic of Kazakhstan (Kazakhstan); Galkin, A. [KATEP Ltd., Republic of Kazakhstan (Kazakhstan); Bachilova, N. [NIISTROMPROEKT Ltd., Republic of Kazakhstan (Kazakhstan); Blynskiy, A. [Nuclear Technology Safety Centre, Republic of Kazakhstan (Kazakhstan); Maev, V. [MAEK-Kazatomprom Ltd., Republic of Kazakhstan (Kazakhstan); Wells, D. [NUKEM Limited- a member of the Freyssinet Group, Winfrith Technology Centre, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom); Herrick, A. [NUKEM Limited- a member of the Freyssinet Group, Caithness (United Kingdom); Michelbacher, J. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Intrasphere and extrasphere effects of the influence of ammine complexes of transition metals on their catalytic activity in reactions of oxidation of manganese sulfate to the dioxide by atmospheric oxygen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Manganese(II) sulfate is a waste product from the large-tonnage redox process for production of anthraquinone from aniline. Recovery of the original manganese dioxide and removal of manganese(II) sulfate from the wastewaters are economically and ecologically necessary. Liquid-phase low-temperature conversion of manganese(II) sulfate by the action of atmospheric oxygen blown through an aqueous solution of the salt containing ammine complexes of transition metals was studied earlier. It was shown that it does not depend only on intrasphere cations or extrasphere anions; it may be influenced by the effects of their interactions. The purpose of the present work was to study this influence in a complete factorial experiment of the CFE-3T type. It was found that homogeneous catalysis of oxidation of manganese(II) sulfate by atmospheric oxygen in presence of transition-metal ammines is determined to a considerable extent by the effects of pair interactions between complex-forming cations and extrasphere anions.

Eremeev, A.P.; Veselovskii, P.F.

1986-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

328

Sodium/Phosphorus-Sulfur Cells I. Cell Performance Paul L. Ridgway,  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sodium/Phosphorus-Sulfur Cells Sodium/Phosphorus-Sulfur Cells I. Cell Performance Paul L. Ridgway, Frank R. McLarnon, and Elton J. Cairns* Energy and Environment Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA ABSTRACT Sodium/°-alumina/phosphorus-sulfur cells utilizing P/S ratios of 0, 0.143, 0.332, and 1.17 at temperatures from 350 to 500°C were studied by measurement of the equilibrium cell voltages at open circuit, and the steady-state cell voltages at current densities up to 70 mA/cm2. States of charge, represented by sodium atom fraction in the P-S electrode, ranged from 0 to 0.4. Open-circuit voltages up to 2.65 V were measured. Theoretical specific energies up to 825 Wh/kg were cal-

329

Thermal-hydraulic analysis of innovative fuel configurations for the sodium fast reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The sodium fast reactor (SFR) is currently being reconsidered as an instrument for actinide management throughout the world, thanks in part to international programs such as the Generation-IV and especially the Global ...

Memmott, Matthew J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

The role of sodium bicarbonate in the nucleation of noctilucent clouds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the sublimation of H2O to bulk ice. A 1-dimensional model of sodium chemistry was then employed to show and particles; cloud physics and chemistry; middle atmosphere ± composition and chemistry) Introduction

Boyer, Edmond

331

SYNTHESIS OF HYDROCARBON STANDARDS Tetrahydrofuran (THF) was distilled from sodium/benzophenone under argon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SYNTHESIS OF HYDROCARBON STANDARDS Tetrahydrofuran (THF) was distilled from sodium Synthesis (Pelham, NH, USA). Other phosphonium salts were synthesized as follows. A solution, USA). Synthesis of Straight-chain Z-alkenes. Aldehydes needed for Wittig reactions that were

Hanks, Lawrence M.

332

Materials issues in high temperature ultrasonic transducers for under-sodium viewing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquid sodium is used as the coolant in some fast spectrum nuclear reactors. This material is optically opaque. To facilitate operations and maintenance activities, an ultrasonic under-sodium viewing system has been developed. In the USA, the technology was successfully demonstrated in the 1970s and, over the intervening 30+ years, the capability was lost. This paper reports materials challenges encountered in developing both single-element and linear phased-array 2-MHz transducers that must operate at temperatures up to 260 deg. C. The critical issues are fundamentally material selection: the ability of a transducer to be immersed into liquid sodium and function at 260 deg. C, to achieve wetting and transmission of ultrasound into the sodium, and to be able to be removed and re-used.

Bond, L. J.; Griffin, J. W.; Posakony, G. J.; Harris, R. V.; Baldwin, D. L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)

2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

333

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced fast sodium Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in HaleBopp M. E. Brown and A. H. Bouchez Summary: Sodium Velocities and Sources in Hale-Bopp M. E. Brown and A. H. Bouchez Division of Geological... resolved high-resolution...

334

Population strategies to decrease sodium intake : a global cost-effectiveness analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Excessive sodium consumption is both prevalent and very costly in many countries around the world. Recent research has found that more than 90% of the world's adult population live in countries with mean intakes exceeding ...

Webb, Michael William, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Development of a model to predict flow oscillations in low-flow sodium boiling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An experimental and analytical program has been carried out in order to better understand the cause and effect of flow oscillations in boiling sodium systems. These oscillations have been noted in previous experiments with ...

Levin, Alan Edward

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Comparison of Nanocomposites Prepared from Sodium, Zinc, and Lithium Ionomers of Ethylene/Methacrylic Acid Copolymers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Morphology and mechanical properties of nanocomposites prepared by melt mixing a montmorillonite-based organoclay with lithium, sodium, and zinc ionomers of poly(ethylene-co-methacrylic acid) are presented here. The effect of the type of neutralizing ...

Rhutesh K. Shah; D. R. Paul

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

337

Development of an improved sodium exposure test cell experiment for characterization of AMTEC electrode performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An investigation into sources of inconsistencies in sodium exposure test cell (SETC) measurements, used to characterize AMTEC electrode performance, was conducted. Development of modifications to the SETC setup and operation was also accomplished...

Fiebig, Bradley Nelson

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

338

Development of Novel Nanomaterials for Lithium-Air and Sodium-Air Batteries.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Lithium-air and sodium-air batteries are promising energy storage systems for future smart grids and electric vehicles due to their extremely high theoretical energy densities. However,… (more)

Li, Yongliang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Narrowband sodium lidar for the measurements of mesopause region temperature and wind  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report here a narrowband high-spectral resolution sodium temperature/wind lidar recently developed at the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) in Hefei, China...

Li, Tao; Fang, Xin; Liu, Wei; Gu, Sheng-Yang; Dou, Xiankang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Brain Tolerance in Dogs to Boron Neutron Capture Therapy with Borocaptate Sodium (BSH) or Boronophenylalanine (BPA)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Research programs investigating the potential use of BNCT for brain tumors have been initiated in Europe and in the U.S. using epithermal neutron beams and either borocaptate sodium (BSH) or boronophenylalanine (

R. Huiskamp; P. R. Gavin; J. A. Coderre; K. H. I. Philipp…

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

The Safe Use of Sodium Hydride on Scale: The Process Development of a Chloropyrimidine Displacement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Safe Use of Sodium Hydride on Scale: The Process Development of a Chloropyrimidine Displacement ... Global Pharmaceutical Commercialization, Merck Manufacturing Division, Rahway, New Jersey, 07065 ... This article is part of the Safety of Chemical Processes 11 special issue. ...

Jamie M. McCabe Dunn; Alicia Duran-Capece; Brendan Meehan; James Ulis; Tetsuo Iwama; Guy Gloor; George Wong; Evan Bekos

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

342

COST-EFFECTIVENESS OF INTRAVENOUS NICARDIPINE VERSUS SODIUM NITROPRUSSIDE FOR POSTOPERATIVE HYPERTENSION AFTER CARDIAC SURGERY.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Postoperative hypertension after cardiac surgery is common and associated with substantial morbidity. Both sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and nicardipine (NIC) are effective in its management. SNP is inexpensive, but associated ...

Barnes, Brian Joseph

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

343

Sodium-Copper Exchange on Wyoming Montmorillonite in Chloride, Perchlorate, Nitrate, and Sulfate Solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sodium-Copper Exchange on Wyoming Montmorillonite in Chloride, Perchlorate, Nitrate, and Sulfate. The copper exchange capacity (CuEC) and Na-Cu exchange reactions on Wyoming montmo- rillonite were studied

Sparks, Donald L.

344

Pilot scale gasification of spent cooking liquor from sodium sulfite based delignification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes a pilot scale high pressure entrained flow gasification experiment with spent cooking liquor from a sodium sulfite based delignification process in the DP-1 black liquor gasifier in Piteå, Sweden. Approximately 92 tons of sulfite ...

Erik Furusjö; Ragnar Stare; Ingvar Landälv; Patrik Löwnertz

2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

345

Evaporation of water from sodium chloride solutions under controlled climatic conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EVAPORATION OF WATER FROM SODIUM CELORIDE SOLUTIONS UNDER CONTROLLED CLIMATIC CONDITIONS A Thesis by Jaroy Moore Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE January 1967 Haj or Subject: Soil Physics EVAPORATION OF WATER FROM SODIUM CHLORIDE SOLUTIONS UNDER CONTROLLED CLIMATIC CONDITIONS A Thesis by Jaroy Moore Approved as to style and content by: (Ch+jman of Committee) (Member) (, j. (Head...

Moore, Jaroy

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

346

Transport parameter determination and modeling of sodium and strontium plumes at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. , 1974] . . 7. Generalized plume with centerline 8. Strontium-90 distribution, 1970 [after Robertson et aL, 1974]. . . . 20 . 22 9. The sodium plume transverse dispersivity-Rnite source size in y iteration diagram. 10. The calculat. ed sodium plume.... There is flow there which picks up the contaminant ions dispersing them through the complex network of fractures and interconnected pore space of the saturated porous medium, the aquifer. Being able to model this spread of contaminant in the subsurface...

Londergan, John Thomas

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

347

Evolution of Sodium Technology R and D Actions Supporting French Liquid-Metal Fast Breeder Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the evolution of sodium technology research and development in parallel to sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor (FBR) developments in France and provides information concerning operating plants and existing projects. This paper also discusses how supporting research has adapted to the decline in FBR activities since the decommissioning of Superphenix, while capitalizing on knowledge acquired over more than four decades to be passed down to future generations.

Rodriguez, G.; Baque, F.; Astegiano, J.C. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, Cadarache (France)

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

348

Characterization of the liquid sodium spray generated by a pipework hole  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to its advantageous thermodynamic characteristics at high temperature (550 deg. C), liquid sodium is the main candidate to be the cooling fluid for Generation TV nuclear reactors SFR (Sodium-cooled Fast Reactors). Now, sodium reacts very violently, both with the water and the oxygen of the air. Only few data were known about the liquid sodium behaviour when spread in the environment through micro defects. These are often present in a cooling circuit in welded or sealed joints and more rarely in the pipes. Micro defects, on the other hand, can be also generated in a cooling circuit because of the vibrations always present in a circuit into which a fluid runs. A new set-up, named LISOF, was built for testing high temperature liquid sodium when passing through micro defects and generating sprays or jets. Sprays and jets were generated by means of nozzles embedding sub milli-metric holes the diameter of which was: 0.2 mm, 0.4 mm, 0.5 mm. Tests were performed by pressurizing liquid sodium (550 deg. C) at: 3, 6 and 9 barg. Normal and high speed cinematography were used for the direct observation of the liquid sodium sprays while Phase Doppler Interferometry was used for the measurement of the droplets characteristics and velocity. Tests concerning the behaviour of the high temperature liquid sodium firing in air or in contact with the cement cover applied to a scaled down core catcher simulacrum were also performed. The paper presents the built set-up and the collected results. (authors)

Torsello, G.; Parozzi, F.; Nericcio, L. [RSE - Nuclear and Industrial Plant Safety Team, Power Generation System Dept., via Rubattino 54, 20134 Milano (Italy); Araneo, L.; Cozzi, F. [Politecnico di Milano, Energy Dept., via Lambruschini 4, 20156 Milano (Italy); Carcassi, M.; Mattei, N. [Universita di Pisa-Facolta d'Ingegneria DIMNP-Mechanical, Nuclear and Production Dep., Largo L. Lazzarino 2, 56126 Pisa (Italy)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Proper use of sodium bisulfite with minimal salt penetration during brine immersion freezing of shrimp  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROPER USE OF SODIUM BISULFITE WITH MINIMAL SALT PENETRATION DURING BRINE IMMERSION FREEZING OF SHRIMP A Thesis by SUZANNE RENE BROUSSARD Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the reguirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE MAY 1988 OC o Z m Z IJ III s Z Major Subject: Food Science and Technology PROPER USE OF SODIUM BISULFITE WITH MINIMAL SALT PENETRATION DURING BRINE IMMERSION FREEZING OF SHRIMP A Thesis by SUZANNE RENE...

Broussard, Suzanne Rene

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

350

The electrochemical analysis of sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate in solutions containing oilfield impurities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE ELECTROCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF SODIUM DODECYLBENZENESULFONATE IN SOLUTIONS CONTAINING OILFIELD IMPURITIES A Thesis by MICHAEL CARL BECKER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1979 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering THE ELECTROCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF SODIUM DODECYLBENZENESULFONATE IN SOLUTIONS CONTAINING OILFIELD IMPURITIES A Thesis by MICHAEL CARL BECKER Approved as to style...

Becker, Michael Carl

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

351

Growth and bone development in weanling quarter horses fed diets supplemented with sodium zeolite-A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GROWTH AND BONE DEVELOPMENT IN WEANLING QUARTER HORSES FED DIETS SUPPLEMENTED WITH SODIUM ZEOLITE-A A Thesis by KIMBERLY SUZANNE FREY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... in Weanling Quarter Horses Fed Diets Supplemented with Sodium Zeolite-A. (December 1991) Kimberly Suzanne Frey, B. S. , Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Gary D. Potter Sixty Quarter Horse weanlings were used in a study to determine...

Frey, Kimberly Suzanne

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

352

A Novel Low-Cost Sodium-Zinc Chloride Battery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The sodium-metal halide (ZEBRA) battery has been considered as one of the most attractive energy storage systems for stationary and transportation applications. Even though Na-NiCl2 battery has been widely investigated, there is still a need to develop a more economical system to make this technology more attractive for commercialization. In the present work, a novel low-cost Na-ZnCl2 battery with a thin planar ??-Al2O3 solid electrolyte (BASE) was proposed, and its electrochemical reactions and battery performance were investigated. Compared to the Na-NiCl2 chemistry, the ZnCl2-based chemistry was more complicated, in which multiple electrochemical reactions including liquid-phase formation occurred at temperatures above 253°C. During the first stage of charge, NaCl reacted with Zn to form Na in the anode and Na2ZnCl4 in the cathode. Once all the residual NaCl was consumed, further charging led to the formation of a NaCl-ZnCl2 liquid phase. At the end of charge, the liquid phase reacted with Zn to produce solid ZnCl2. To identify the effects of liquid-phase formation on electrochemical performance, button cells were assembled and tested at 280°C and 240°C. At 280°C where the liquid phase formed during cycling, cells revealed quite stable cyclability. On the other hand, more rapid increase in polarization was observed at 240°C where only solid-state electrochemical reactions occurred. SEM analysis indicated that the stable performance at 280°C was due to the suppressed growth of Zn and NaCl particles, which were generated from the liquid phase during discharge of each cycle.

Lu, Xiaochuan; Li, Guosheng; Kim, Jin Yong; Lemmon, John P.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Yang, Zhenguo

2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

353

Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this research involving collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is to explore new approaches to the separation of sodium hydroxide, sodium nitrate, and other sodium salts from high-level alkaline tank waste. The principal potential benefit is a major reduction in disposed waste volume, obviating the building of expensive new waste tanks and reducing the costs of vitrification. Principles of ion recognition are being researched toward discovery of liquid-liquid extraction systems that selectively separate sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrate from other waste components. The successful concept of pseudo hydroxide extraction using fluorinated alcohols and phenols is being developed at ORNL and PNNL toward a greater understanding of the controlling equilibria, role of solvation, and of synergistic effects involving crown ethers. Synthesis efforts are being directed toward enhanced sodium binding by crown ethers, both neutral and proton-ionizable. Studies with real tank waste at PNNL will provide feedback toward solvent compositions that have promising properties.

Moyer, Bruce A.; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Custelcean, Radu; Delmau, Laetitia H.; Engle, Nancy L.; Kang, Hyun-Ah; Keever, Tamara J.; Marchand, Alan P.; Gadthula, Srinivas; Gore, Vinayak K.; Huang, Zilin; Sivappa, Rasapalli; Tirunahari, Pavan K.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Lumetta, Gregg J.

2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

354

An evaluation of neutralization for processing sodium-bearing liquid waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses an alternative concept for potentially managing the sodium-bearing liquid waste generated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant from the current method of calcining a blend of sodium waste and high-level liquid waste. The concept is based on removing the radioactive components from sodium-bearing waste by neutralization and grouting the resulting low-level waste for on-site near-surface disposal. Solidifying the sodium waste as a remote-handled transuranic waste is not considered to be practical because of excessive costs and inability to dispose of the waste in a timely fashion. Although neutralization can remove most radioactive components to provide feed for a solidified low-level waste, and can reduce liquid inventories four to nine years more rapidly than the current practice of blending sodium-bearing liquid waste with first-cycle raffinite, the alternative will require major new facilities and will generate large volumes of low-level waste. Additional facility and operating costs are estimated to be at least $500 million above the current practice of blending and calcining. On-site, low-level waste disposal may be technically difficult and conflict which national and state policies. Therefore, it is recommended that the current practice of calcining a blend of sodium-bearing liquid waste and high-level liquid waste be continued to minimize overall cost and process complexities. 17 refs., 4 figs., 16 tabs.

Chipman, N.A.; Engelgau, G.O.; Berreth, J.R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

The development of potassium tantalate niobate thin films for satellite-based pyroelectric detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Potassium tantalate niobate (KTN) pyroelectric detectors are expected to provide detectivities, of 3.7 x 10{sup 11} cmHz {sup {1/2}}W{sup {minus}1} for satellite-based infrared detection at 90 K. The background limited detectivity for a room-temperature thermal detector is 1.8 x 10{sup 10} cmHz{sup {1/2}}W{sup {minus}1}. KTN is a unique ferroelectric for this application because of the ability to tailor the temperature of its pyroelectric response by adjusting its ratio of tantalum to niobium. The ability to fabricate high quality KTN thin films on Si-based substrates is crucial to the development of KTN pyroelectric detectors. Si{sub x}N{sub y} membranes created on the Si substrate will provide the weak thermal link necessary to reach background limited detectivities. The device dimensions obtainable by thin film processing are expected to increase the ferroelectric response by 20 times over bulk fabricated KTN detectors. In addition, microfabrication techniques allow for easier array development. This is the first reported attempt at growth of KTN films on Si-based substrates. Pure phase perovskite films were grown by pulsed laser deposition on SrRuO{sub 3}/Pt/Ti/Si{sub x}N{sub y}/Si and SrRuO{sub 3}/Si{sub x}N{sub y}/Si structures; room temperature dielectric permittivities for the KTN films were 290 and 2.5, respectively. The dielectric permittivity for bulk grown, single crystal KTN is {approximately}380. In addition to depressed dielectric permittivities, no ferroelectric hysteresis was found between 80 and 300 K for either structure. RBS, AES, TEM and multi-frequency dielectric measurements were used to investigate the origin of this apparent lack of ferroelectricity. Other issues addressed by this dissertation include: the role of oxygen and target density during pulsed laser deposition of KTN thin films; the use of YBCO, LSC and Pt as direct contact bottom electrodes to the KTN films, and the adhesion of the bottom electrode layers to Si{sub x}N{sub y}/Si.

Cherry, H.B.B. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Sustained Recycle in Light Water and Sodium-Cooled Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From a physics standpoint, it is feasible to sustain recycle of used fuel in either thermal or fast reactors. This paper examines multi-recycle potential performance by considering three recycling approaches and calculating several fuel cycle parameters, including heat, gamma, and neutron emission of fresh fuel; radiotoxicity of waste; and uranium utilization. The first recycle approach is homogeneous mixed oxide (MOX) fuel assemblies in a light water reactor (LWR). The transuranic portion of the MOX was varied among Pu, NpPu, NpPuAm, or all-TRU. (All-TRU means all isotopes through Cf-252.) The Pu case was allowed to go to 10% Pu in fresh fuel, but when the minor actinides were included, the transuranic enrichment was kept below 8% to satisfy the expected void reactivity constraint. The uranium portion of the MOX was enriched uranium. That enrichment was increased (to as much as 6.5%) to keep the fuel critical for a typical LWR irradiation. The second approach uses heterogeneous inert matrix fuel (IMF) assemblies in an LWR - a mix of IMF and traditional UOX pins. The uranium-free IMF fuel pins were Pu, NpPu, NpPuAm, or all-TRU. The UOX pins were limited to 4.95% U-235 enrichment. The number of IMF pins was set so that the amount of TRU in discharged fuel from recycle N (from both IMF and UOX pins) was made into the new IMF pins for recycle N+1. Up to 60 of the 264 pins in a fuel assembly were IMF. The assembly-average TRU content was 1-6%. The third approach uses fast reactor oxide fuel in a sodium-cooled fast reactor with transuranic conversion ratio of 0.50 and 1.00. The transuranic conversion ratio is the production of transuranics divided by destruction of transuranics. The FR at CR=0.50 is similar to the CR for the MOX case. The fast reactor cases had a transuranic content of 33-38%, higher than IMF or MOX.

Steven J. Piet; Samuel E. Bays; Michael A. Pope; Gilles J. Youinou

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Preparation of polyaniline/sodium alanate hybrid using a spray-drying process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nowadays, hydrogen is highly interesting as an energy source, in particular in the automotive field. In fact, hydrogen is attractive as a fuel because it prevents air pollution and greenhouse emissions. One of the main problems with the utilization of hydrogen as a fuel is its on-board storage. The purpouse of this work was to develop a new hybrid material consisting of a polyaniline matrix with sodium alanate (NaAlH{sub 4}) using a spray-drying process. The polyaniline used for this experiment was synthesized by following a well-established method for the synthesis of the emeraldine base form of polyaniline using dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid as dopant. Micro particles of polyaniline/sodium alanate hybrids with 30 and 50 wt% of sodium alanate were prepared by using a spray-drying technique. Dilute solutions of polyaniline/sodium alanate were first prepared, 10g of the solid materials were mixed with 350 ml of toluene under stirring at room temperature for 24h and the solutions were dried using spray-dryer (Büchi, Switzerland) with 115°C of an inlet temperature. The hybrids were analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry, FT-IR and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The addition of sodium alanate decreased the glass transition temperature of the hybrids when compared to neat polyaniline. FT-IR spectrum analysis was performed to identify the bonding environment of the synthesized material and was observed that simply physically mixture occurred between polyaniline and sodium alanate. The SEM images of the hybrids showed the formation of microspheres with sodium alanate dispersed in the polymer matrix.

Moreira, B. R., E-mail: bru-rms@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: fabiopassador@gmail.com, E-mail: pessan@ufscar.br; Passador, F. R., E-mail: bru-rms@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: fabiopassador@gmail.com, E-mail: pessan@ufscar.br; Pessan, L. A., E-mail: bru-rms@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: fabiopassador@gmail.com, E-mail: pessan@ufscar.br [Dep. de Engenharia de Materiais, Federal University of São Carlos (Brazil)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

358

Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this project, now completing its third year of its second renewal period, a collaborative project involving Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and the University of North Texas has been addressing outstanding questions regarding the separation of the bulk sodium constituents of alkaline tank waste. The principal potential benefit of this research is a major reduction in the volume of radioactive tank waste, obviating the building of expensive new tanks and reducing the costs of vitrification. As a general approach, principles of ion recognition are being explored toward discovery and basic understanding of liquid-liquid extraction systems that selectively separate sodium hydroxide and sodium salts from waste-like matrices. Questions being addressed pertain to applicable extraction equilibria and how extraction properties relate to extractant structure. Progress has included the elucidation of the promising concept of pseudo hydroxide extraction (PHE), demonstration of crown-ether synergized PHE, demonstration of combined sodium hydroxide/sodium nitrate separation, and synthesis of novel ditopic receptors for ditopic PHE. In future efforts (pending renewal), a thermochemical study of PHE relating extractant acidity to extraction strength is proposed, and this study will be extended to systems containing crown ethers, including proton-ionizable ones. A series of crown ethers will be synthesized for this purpose and to investigate the extraction of bulk sodium salts (e.g., nitrate, nitrite, and sulfate), possibly in combination with sodium hydroxide. Simple proof-of-principle tests with real tank waste at PNNL will provide feedback toward solvent designs that have desirable properties. In view of the upcoming milestone of completion of the second renewal period, this report will, in addition to providing a summary of the past year's progress, summarize all of the work completed since the start of this project.

Moyer, Bruce A.; Marchand, Alan P.; Lumetta, Gregg J.

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

359

Synthesis and single crystal structure refinement of the one-layer hydrate of sodium brittle mica  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A sodium brittle mica with the ideal composition [Na{sub 4}]{sup inter}[Mg{sub 6}]{sup oct}[Si{sub 4}Al{sub 4}]{sup tet}O{sub 20}F{sub 4} was synthesized via melt synthesis in a gas tight crucible. This mica is unusual inasmuch as the known mica structure holds only room for two interlayer cations per unit cell and inasmuch as it readily hydrates despite the high layer charge while ordinary micas and brittle micas are non-swelling. The crystal structure of one-layer hydrate sodium brittle mica was determined and refined from single crystal X-ray data. Interlayer cations reside at the center of the distorted hexagonal cavities and are coordinated by the three inner basal oxygen atoms. The coordination of the interlayer cation is completed by three interlayer water molecules residing at the center of the interlayer region. The relative position of adjacent 2:1-layers thus is fixed by these octahedrally coordinated interlayer cations. Pseudo-symmetry leads to extensive twinning. In total five twin operations generate the same environment for the interlayer species and are energetically degenerate. - Graphical abstract: The sodium brittle mica has been successfully synthesized by melt synthesis and the crystal structure of the one-layer hydrate of sodium brittle mica was determined from single crystal X-ray diffraction data. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Melt synthesis yielded coarse grained sodium brittle mica which showed little disorder. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sodium brittle mica hydrated completely to the state of one-layer hydrate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structure of one-layer hydrate of sodium brittle mica could therefore be determined and refined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Arrangement of upper and lower tetrahedral sheet encompassing interlayer cation were clarified.

Kalo, Hussein; Milius, Wolfgang [Lehrstuhl fuer Anorganische Chemie I, University of Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth (Germany)] [Lehrstuhl fuer Anorganische Chemie I, University of Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Braeu, Michael [BASF Construction Chemicals GmbH, 83308 Trostberg (Germany)] [BASF Construction Chemicals GmbH, 83308 Trostberg (Germany); Breu, Josef, E-mail: Josef.Breu@uni-bayreuth.de [Lehrstuhl fuer Anorganische Chemie I, University of Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth (Germany)] [Lehrstuhl fuer Anorganische Chemie I, University of Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth (Germany)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

360

Water sorption behaviour of highly swelling (carboxy methylcellulose-g-polyacrylamide) hydrogels and release of potassium nitrate as agrochemical  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Novel types of highly swelling hydrogels have been prepared by grafting crosslinked polyacrylamide chains onto carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) via a free radical polymerization method. The hydrogels were characterized by IR spectral analysis and by evaluating various network parameters such as average molecular weight between crosslinks (Mc), crosslink density (q) and the number of elastically effective chains (Vc). The hydrogels showed enormous swelling in aqueous medium and displayed swelling characteristics which were highly dependent on the chemical composition of the hydrogel and pH and ionic strength of the medium in which the hydrogel was immersed. The kinetics of water uptake and the water transport mechanism were studied as a function of the composition of the hydrogel and the pH of the medium. The hydrogels were also loaded with potassium nitrate as a model agrochemical and their potential for controlled release of potassium nitrate was judged by measuring conductivity. Various kinetic parameters such as the diffusion coefficient and swelling exponents were also calculated.

A.K Bajpai; Anjali Giri

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Long-Term Reduction in 137Cs Concentration in Food Crops on Coral Atolls Resulting from Potassium Treatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bikini Island was contaminated March 1, 1954 by the Bravo detonation (U.S nuclear test series, Castle) at Bikini Atoll. About 90% of the estimated dose from nuclear fallout to potential island residents is from cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) transferred from soil to plants that are consumed by residents. Thus, radioecology research efforts have been focused on removing {sup 137}Cs from soil and/or reducing its uptake into vegetation. Most effective was addition of potassium (K) to soil that reduces {sup 137}Cs concentration in fruits to 3-5% of pretreatment concentrations. Initial observations indicated this low concentration continued for some time after K was last applied. Long-term studies were designed to evaluate this persistence in more detail because it is very important to provide assurance to returning populations that {sup 137}Cs concentrations in food (and, therefore, radiation dose) will remain low for extended periods, even if K is not applied annually or biennially. Potassium applied at 300, 660, 1260, and 2070 kg ha{sup -1} lead to a {sup 137}Cs concentration in drinking coconut meat that is 34, 22, 10, and about 4% of original concentration, respectively. Concentration of {sup 137}Cs remains low 8 to 10 y after K is last applied. An explanation for this unexpected result is discussed.

Robison, W L; Stone, E L; Hamilton, T F; Conrado, C L

2004-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

362

Long-Term Reduction in 137Cs Concentration in Food Crops on Coral Atolls Resulting from Potassium Treatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bikini Island was contaminated March 1, 1954 by the Bravo detonation (U.S nuclear test series, Castle) at Bikini Atoll. About 90% of the estimated dose from nuclear fallout to potential island residents is from cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) transferred from soil to plants that are consumed by residents. Thus, radioecology research efforts have been focused on removing {sup 137}Cs from soil and/or reducing its uptake into vegetation. Most effective was addition of potassium (K) to soil that reduces {sup 137}Cs concentration in fruits to 3-5% of pretreatment concentrations. Initial observations indicated this low concentration continued for some time after K was last applied. Long-term studies were designed to evaluate this persistence in more detail because it is very important to provide assurance to returning populations that {sup 137}Cs concentrations in food (and, therefore, radiation dose) will remain low for extended periods, even if K is not applied annually or biennially. Potassium applied at 300, 660, 1260, and 1970 kg ha{sup -1} lead to a {sup 137}Cs concentration in drinking coconut meat that is 34, 22, 10, and about 4 % of original concentration, respectively. Concentration of {sup 137}Cs remains low 8 to 10 y after K is last applied. An explanation for this unexpected result is discussed.

Robison, W; Stone, E; Hamilton, T; Conrado, C

2005-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

363

SNAKE Sodium S-CO2 Interactions Experiment - Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SNAKE Sodium S-CO2 Interactions Experiment SNAKE Sodium S-CO2 Interactions Experiment Capabilities Engineering Experimentation Reactor Safety Testing and Analysis Overview Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments MAX NSTF SNAKE Aerosol Experiments System Components Laser Applications Robots Applications Other Facilities Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr SNAKE Sodium S-CO2 Interactions Experiment 1 2 The supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO2) Brayton cycle, coupled with a Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR), has been identified as a new and innovative energy conversion technology that could contribute to improving the economics of advanced nuclear energy. For these reactors, a new generation of compact, highly-efficient heat exchangers (HXs) will be employed that show great promise in improving the safety and cost of SFRs; however, small HX leaks could still occur. SNAKE is designed to study S-CO2 leakage into sodium.

364

Nanocomposite hydrogel from grafting of acrylamide onto HPMC using sodium montmorillonite nanoclay and removal of crystal violet dye  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogel nanocomposites were synthesized from grafting of acrylamide onto hydroxypropyl methylcellulose using methylenebisacrylamide crosslinker and sodium montmorillonite (Na-MMt) nanoclay. The effect of nanoclay

Gholam Reza Mahdavinia; Javad Hasanpour; Zeinab Rahmani; Shiva Karami…

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Combined Utilization of Cation Exchanger and Neutral Receptor to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report, novel approaches to the selective liquid-liquid extraction separation of sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrate from high-level alkaline tank waste will be discussed. Sodium hydroxide can be successfully separated from alkaline tank-waste supernatants by weakly acidic lipophilic hydroxy compounds via a cation-exchange mechanism referred to as pseudo hydroxide extraction. In a multi-cycle process, as sodium hydroxide in the aqueous phase becomes depleted, it is helpful to have a neutral sodium receptor in the extraction system to exploit the high nitrate concentration in the waste solution to promote sodium removal by an ion-pair extraction process. Simultaneous utilization of an ionizable organic hydroxy compound and a neutral extractant (crown ether) in an organic phase results in the synergistic enhancement of ion exchange and improved separation selectivity due to the receptor's strong and selective sodium binding. Moreover, combination of the hydroxy compound and the crown ether provides for mutually increased solubility, even in a non-polar organic solvent. Accordingly, application of Isopar{reg_sign} L, a kerosene-like alkane solvent, becomes feasible. This investigation involves examination of such dual-mechanism extraction phases for sodium extraction from simulated and actual salt cake waste solutions. Sodium salts can be regenerated upon the contact of the loaded extraction phases with water. Finally, conditions of potential extraction/strip cycling will be discussed.

Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Moyer, Bruce A.

2004-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

366

Manganese and Ceria Sorbents for High Temperature Sulfur Removal from Biomass-Derived Syngas -- The Impact of Steam on Capacity and Sorption Mode  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Syngas derived from biomass and coal gasification for fuel synthesis or electricity generation contains sulfur species that are detrimental to downstream catalysts or turbine operation. Sulfur removal in high temperature, high steam conditions has been known to be challenging, but experimental reports on methods to tackle the problem are not often reported. We have developed sorbents that can remove hydrogen sulfide from syngas at high temperature (700 C), both in dry and high steam conditions. The syngas composition chosen for our experiments is derived from statistical analysis of the gasification products of wood under a large variety of conditions. The two sorbents, Cu-ceria and manganese-based, were tested in a variety of conditions. In syngas containing steam, the capacity of the sorbents is much lower, and the impact of the sorbent in lowering H{sub 2}S levels is only evident in low space velocities. Spectroscopic characterization and thermodynamic consideration of the experimental results suggest that in syngas containing 45% steam, the removal of H{sub 2}S is primarily via surface chemisorptions. For the Cu-ceria sorbent, analysis of the amount of H{sub 2}S retained by the sorbent in dry syngas suggests both copper and ceria play a role in H{sub 2}S removal. For the manganese-based sorbent, in dry conditions, there is a solid state transformation of the sorbent, primarily into the sulfide form.

Cheah, S.; Parent, Y. O.; Jablonski, W. S.; Vinzant, T.; Olstad, J. L.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

A New Partially Deprotonated Mixed-Valence Manganese(II,III) Hydroxide–Arsenate with Electronic Conductivity: Magnetic Properties of High- and Room-Temperature Sarkinite  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A relevant feature of this new material is that it is actually the first member of the adamite-type family with mixed-valence manganese(II,III) and electronic conductivity. ... In particular, langbeinite-type compounds, such as NaTi2(PO4)3,(1) are used as superionic conductors,(2) iron hydroxylphosphate minerals like barbosalite Fe3(PO4)2(OH)2,(3) and rockbridgeite Fe5(PO4)3(OH)5,(4) as efficient catalysts to produce methyl methacrylate, a very important intermediate in a large number of chemical processes,(5) or triplite(6) or adamite,(6) primary manganese–iron phosphates and arsenates, M2(F/OH)(XO4) (M = Fe and Mn; X = P and As), and as precursors of electrode material like LiFe(OH)PO4(7) and LiFe(OH)AsO4(8) or LiMnPO4(9) for rechargeable Li-ion batteries. ... The complex structural chemistry of the adamite-type [M2(F/OH)(XO4)] (where M = Zn, Mg, Co, Mn, Cu, etc.; X = P and As) family,(10-19) with a wide variety of polymorphs,(20, 21) shows a large diversity of structural phases built up on |MO6| octahedra, |MO5| trigonal bipyramids linked to one another by |OH| ligands, and |XO4| [X = P and As] tetrahedra. ...

Imanol de Pedro; Jose M. Rojo; Jordi Rius; Oriol Vallcorba; Idoia Ruiz de Larramendi; Jesús Rodríguez Fernández; Luis Lezama; Teofilo Rojo

2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

368

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Sodium Intercalation Battery for Stationary Storage - David Ofer, Tiax  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sodium Intercalation Battery for Sodium Intercalation Battery for Stationary Storage Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) Peer Review and Update Meeting 2012 David Ofer Ofer.david@tiaxllc.com Washington DC, September 27, 2012 Sodium Intercalation Battery for Stationary Storage Background and Purpose 2 Large-scale stationary energy storage for integration with renewables and for off-peak energy capture is a new application requiring new rechargeable batteries. * New combination of requirements - Long cycle life under deep cycling use profile - High cycling efficiency - Moderate rate capability - Very low cost - No requirement for particularly high specific energy or energy density * TIAX is developing a novel Na-ion battery - Leverages teachings of Li-ion technology - Targets novel low-cost chemistry and cell design

369

Cost Transfers at the Department's Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Facility Construction Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits and Inspections Audit Report Cost Transfers at the Department's Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Facility Construction Project OAS-M-13-03 August 2013 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 August 8, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SENIOR ADVISOR FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT FROM: Rickey R. Hass Deputy Inspector General for Audits and Inspections Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Cost Transfers at the Department's Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Facility Construction Project" BACKGROUND In 2005, the Department of Energy (Department) awarded the Idaho Cleanup Project contract to CH2M ♦ WG Idaho, LLC (CWI) to remediate the Idaho National Laboratory. The Sodium

370

Fact Sheet: Sodium-Beta Batteries (October 2012) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Beta Batteries (October 2012) Beta Batteries (October 2012) Fact Sheet: Sodium-Beta Batteries (October 2012) DOE's Energy Storage Program is funding research to further develop a novel planar design for sodium-beta batteries (Na-beta batteries or NBBs) that will improve energy and power densities and simplify manufacturing. This project will demonstrate a planar prototype that operates at <300 degrees Celsius and will scale up the storage capacity to 5 kW, improving on the performance levels being pursued in related battery research projects. Fact Sheet: Sodium-Beta Batteries (October 2012) More Documents & Publications Energy Storage Systems 2012 Peer Review Presentations - Poster Session 1 (Day 1): ARPA-E Projects Energy Storage Systems 2012 Peer Review and Update Meeting Advanced Materials and Devices for Stationary Electrical Energy Storage

371

Two-dimensional computational modeling of sodium boiling in simulated LMFBR fuel-pin bundles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extensive sodium boiling tests have been carried out in two simulated LMFBR fuel pin bundles in the Thermal-Hydraulic Out-of-Reactor Safety (THORS) Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Experimental results from a 19-pin bundle (THORS Bundle 6A) have been previously reported, and experimental results from a 61-pin bundle (THORS Bundle 9) will be reported soon. The results discussed here are from the 19-pin bundle. Preliminary analysis has shown that the computational methods used and conclusions reached are equally valid for the 61-pin bundle, as well as the 19-pin in-reactor Sodium Loop Safety Facility (SLSF) W-1 experiment. The main result of THORS sodium boiling experimentation is that boiling behavior is determined by two-dimensional effects, i.e., the rates of mass, momentum and energy transfer in the direction perpendicular to the axes of the fuel pins.

Dearing, J.F.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Development and application of modeling tools for sodium fast reactor inspection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To support the development of in-service inspection methods for the Advanced Sodium Test Reactor for Industrial Demonstration (ASTRID) project led by the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), several tools that allow situations specific to Sodium cooled Fast Reactors (SFR) to be modeled have been implemented in the CIVA software and exploited. This paper details specific applications and results obtained. For instance, a new specular reflection model allows the calculation of complex echoes from scattering structures inside the reactor vessel. EMAT transducer simulation models have been implemented to develop new transducers for sodium visualization and imaging. Guided wave analysis tools have been developed to permit defect detection in the vessel shell. Application examples and comparisons with experimental data are presented.

Le Bourdais, Florian; Marchand, Benoît; Baronian, Vahan [CEA LIST, Centre de Saclay F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

373

Design and development of a high-temperature sodium compatibility testing facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of advanced alloys within sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFRs) has been identified as a means of increasing plant efficiency and reducing construction costs. In particular, alloys such as NF-616, NF-709 and HT-UPS are promising because they exhibit greater strength than traditional structural materials such as 316-SS. However, almost nothing is known about the sodium compatibility of these new alloys. Therefore, research taking place at the Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison is focused on studying the effects of sodium corrosion on these materials under prototypic SFR operating conditions (600 [ deg. C], V Na=10 [m/s], C 0{approx} 1 [wppm]). This paper focuses on the design and construction of the testing facility with an emphasis on moving magnet pumps (MMPs). Corrosion data from a preliminary 500 [hr] natural convection test will also be presented. (authors)

Hvasta, M. G.; Nolet, B. K.; Anderson, M. H. [Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Engineering Dr., Madison - ERB 841, WI 53705 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Sodium sulfate–diatomite composite materials for high temperature thermal energy storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This work explores the use of sodium sulfate and diatomite to formulate composite materials for high temperature thermal energy storage applications. Sodium sulfate in the composite functions as a phase change material (PCM) and diatomite as a structural skeleton for shape stabilization. It is found that sodium sulfate and diatomite have an excellent chemical compatibility with the PCM melting temperature at around 880 °C. It is shown that the composite containing 45% diatomite gives an optimal formulation in terms of energy density, salt leakage and mechanical strength. The results also suggest that the composite with the optimal formulation has an application window of 890–980 °C. Failures occur to the composite materials at temperatures above 1000 °C.

Yue Qin; Guanghui Leng; Xiang Yu; Hui Cao; Geng Qiao; Yunfeng Dai; Yelong Zhang; Yulong Ding

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Surface-Driven Sodium Ion Energy Storage in Nanocellular Carbon Foams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sodium ion (Na+) batteries have attracted increased attention for energy storage due to the natural abundance of sodium, but their development is hindered by the poor intercalation property of Na+ in electrodes. This paper reports a detailed study of high capacity, high rate sodium ion energy storage in high-surface-area nanocellular carbon foams (NCCF). The energy storage mechanism is surface-driven reactions between Na+ and oxygen-containing functional groups on the surface of NCCF. The surface reaction, rather than a Na+ bulk intercalation reaction, leads to high rate performance and cycling stability due to the enhanced reaction kinetics and the absence of electrode structure change. The NCCF makes more surface area and surface functional groups available for the Na+ reaction. It delivers 152 mAh/g capacity at the rate of 0.1 A/g and a capacity retention of 90% for over 1600 cycles.

Shao, Yuyan; Xiao, Jie; Wang, Wei; Engelhard, Mark H.; Chen, Xilin; Nie, Zimin; Gu, Meng; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Exarhos, Gregory J.; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

376

Method of making a current collector for a sodium/sulfur battery  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This specification is directed to a method of making a current collector for a sodium/sulfur battery. The current collector so-made is electronically conductive and resistant to corrosive attack by sulfur/polysulfide melts. The method includes the step of forming the current collector for the sodium/sulfur battery from a composite material formed of aluminum filled with electronically conductive fibers selected from the group of fibers consisting essentially of graphite fibers having a diameter up to 10 microns and silicon carbide fibers having a diameter in a range of 500--1,000 angstroms. 2 figs.

Tischer, R.P.; Winterbottom, W.L.; Wroblowa, H.S.

1987-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

377

Characterization of Sodium Emulsion Soaps Formed from Production Fluids of Kutei Basin, Indonesia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Kutei Basin soap emulsions are resolved by heating and treatment with relatively high dosages of acid demulsifiers. ... Two main types of soaps can form in production fluids:1 calcium naphthenate scales, which can manifest as in situ sticky or hardened deposits, and sodium emulsion soaps, which can create severe oil dehydration problems and lead to excessive slop oil/sludge volumes at crude-oil terminals. ... Similar sodium carboxylate soaps are also common to other basins around Borneo (e.g., Sarawak, Brunei, and Sabah)2 and in other parts of southeast Asia (e.g., the South China Sea, Malaysia, offshore Vietnam, Bohai Bay in China, and elsewhere in Indonesia). ...

Darrell L. Gallup; Joseph A. Curiale; P. Colin Smith

2007-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

378

Effects of potassium and calcination pretreatment on the adsorption and chemical/physical properties of Fe/SiO/sub 2/  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies of the effects of potassium on CO, CO/sub 2/, and hydrogen adsorptions on iron indicate that potassium promotion increases heats of adsorption of CO and H/sub 2/, enhances the rate of CO dissociation, increases CO saturation coverage, and decreases the CO sticking coefficient. The purpose of this work was to investigate the effects of potassium promoter and calcination of the stoichiometries and kinetics of CO, CO/sub 2/, and H/sub 2/ adsorptions on Fe/SiO/sub 2/ and to relate these effects to changes in the physical and chemical properties of the catalyst. The results reveal important differences in behavior for CO and H/sub 2/ adsorptions on precalcined Fe/SiO/sub 2/ and Fe/K/SiO/sub 2/ compared to the adsorptions on single crystal or polycrystalline iron, which may relate to changes in the surface and bulk properties of iron such as potassium coverage and extent of reduction. 33 references.

Rankin, J.L.; Bartholomew, C.H.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Intrinsically disordered C-terminal segments of voltage-activated potassium channels: a possible fishing rod-like mechanism for channel binding to scaffold proteins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Membrane-embedded voltage-activated potassium channels (Kv) bind intracellular scaffold proteins, such as the Post Synaptic Density 95 (PSD-95) protein, using a conserved PDZ-binding motif located at the channels' C-terminal tip. This interaction underlies ...

Elhanan Magidovich; Sarel J. Fleishman; Ofer Yifrach

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

(K4Li4)Al8Ge8O32·8H2O: an Li+-exchanged potassium aluminogermanate with the zeolite gismondine (GIS) topology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The title microporous material, (K,Li)-(Al,Ge)-GIS, namely lithium potassium dialuminium digermanium octaoxide dihydrate, is the result of a 50% Li+ exchange into the K-(Al,Ge)-GIS structure. A structural change occurs due to disordering of K+ ions with Li+ ions along [001] and ordering of water molecules along [101].

Celestian, A.J.

2003-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Simplified modeling of liquid sodium medium with temperature and velocity gradient using real thermal-hydraulic data. Application to ultrasonic thermometry in sodium fast reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the framework of the French R and D program for the Generation IV reactors and specifically for the sodium cooled fast reactors (SFR), studies are carried out on innovative instrumentation methods in order to improve safety and to simplify the monitoring of fundamental physical parameters during reactor operation. The aim of the present work is to develop an acoustic thermometry method to follow up the sodium temperature at the outlet of subassemblies. The medium is a turbulent flow of liquid sodium at 550 Degree-Sign C with temperature inhomogeneities. To understand the effect of disturbance created by this medium, numerical simulations are proposed. A ray tracing code has been developed with Matlab Copyright-Sign in order to predict acoustic paths in this medium. This complex medium is accurately described by thermal-hydraulic data which are issued from a simulation of a real experiment in Japan. The analysis of these results allows understanding the effects of medium inhomogeneities on the further thermometric acoustic measurement.

Massacret, N.; Jeannot, J. P. [DEN/DTN/STPA/LIET, CEA Cadarache, Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Moysan, J.; Ploix, M. A.; Corneloup, G. [Aix-Marseille Univ, LMA UPR 7051 CNRS, site LCND, 13625 Aix-en-Provence (France)

2013-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

382

Journal of the Geological Society, London, Vol. 168, 2011, pp. 805815. doi: 10.1144/0016-76492010-132. Hydrothermal origin of elevated iron, manganese and redox-sensitive trace  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.1144/0016-76492010-132. 805 Hydrothermal origin of elevated iron, manganese and redox-sensitive trace elements in the c. 635 Ma Doushantuo cap carbonate JING HUANG1,2 , XUELEI CHU1,2 *, GANQING JIANG3 , LIANJUN FENG1 & HUAJIN, including REE, concentrations of the Doushantuo cap carbonate (c. 635 Ma) in South China show enrichment

Jiang, Ganqing

383

Experimental study of the optical properties of atomic potassium in high-temperature carbon dioxide and nitrogen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper studies the absorption coefficient of atomic potassium in high-temperature carbon dioxide in the wavelength range 0.63-1.2 ..mu.. at temperatures of 2400-2600 degrees K and pressures of 0.8-1.6 MPa. Measurements were also made of the temperature and pressure of the investigated gas mixture and the density of the integral radiation flows. The calculations showed that behind a reflected shock wave in CO/sub 2/ the products of decomposition of particles of KNO/sub 3/ attain equilibrium with the gas after about 150 ..mu.. at Vs - 1.5 km/sec and after about 80 usec at Vs = 3.5 km/sec.

Zubareva, N.V.; Eigenson, E.B.; Kon'kov, A.A.; Krymov, G.A.; Shikov, V.K.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Continuous-wave sodium D2 resonance radiation generated in single-pass sum-frequency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-frequency generation. The demonstrated conversion efficiency is 3.2% W-1 cm-1 . This compact solid-state light source applications involving the high- resolution sodium spectrum, including laser remote sensing, biology, communications, display technology [1], and Bose­Einstein condensation [2]. A narrow- band solid-state source

385

indirect study, coal was oxidatively de-graded with sodium dichromate and the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cleaning Technology (Noyes Data Corporation, Park Ridge, N.J., 1981). 10. Z. Hussain, E. Umbach, D. Aindirect study, coal was oxidatively de- graded with sodium dichromate and the esterified products- vestigators concluded (17, p. 380) that "thiophene derivatives must be indige- nous to coal." The direct XANES

Howat, Ian M.

386

Synthesis of highly ordered mesoporous silica materials using sodium silicate and amphiphilic block copolymers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Synthesis of highly ordered mesoporous silica materials using sodium silicate and amphiphilic block. Pinnavaia and coworkers6 have reported the synthesis of MSU-X mesoporous materials with several non- ionic and cowork- ers7 have reported the synthesis of SBA mesoporous silica materials, which have well

Kim, Ji Man

387

Pressure-Induced Structural Transformations of the Zintl Phase Sodium Silicide Ral Quesada Cabreraa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and reduction of Na+ to metallic sodium. We have combined our experimental studies with DFT calculations and germanides belong to the family of Zintl phases, in which polyanionic species, formed of the tetrelide atoms counterbalance the electropositive metal cations [1-3]. These compounds are interesting because the Si and Ge

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

388

Molecular Dynamic Simulation of Sodium in 7-Pin LMFBR Bundle Under Hypothetical Accident Conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the frame of safety analysis of liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs) under hypothetical Unprotected Loss of Flow (ULOF) conditions two-phase flow of sodium is simulated in a 7-pin bundle, with hexagonal lattice. Molecular dynamics, with the application of the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method, and a macroscopic model describing rewetting sequences due to the flow of a sodium liquid film along the pin surfaces, are applied to simulate the coolant in the bundle. The pin surfaces and the inner surface of the hexagonal canning are treated in the Monte Carlo simulation as diffusively reflecting surfaces. Collisions of sodium molecules are computed with the 'hard-sphere' model. With respect to previous work the following improvements of the computational code were made: i) The full bundle is simulated, thus allowing for asymmetries, like a skewed power distribution, to be accounted for; ii) A pin model calculates detailed temperature distributions in the pins, so that temperature boundary conditions are computed and not imposed; iii) Post processing visualisation of computed results was developed. An out of pile sodium boiling experiment run at the Nuclear Research Center of Karlsruhe, Germany, is simulated and conclusions are drawn about the applicability of the methodology in computer codes dedicated to breeder reactors safety analysis. (authors)

Bottoni, Maurizio [University of Ferrara, Physics Department, Via Paradiso 12, I-44100 Ferrara (Italy); Bottoni, Claudio; Scanu, John [University of Pisa, Lungarno Pacinotti, 43 - 56126 Pisa (Italy)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

NACOM code for analysis of postulated sodium spray fires in LMFBRs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An analysis of potential sodium spills and fires in liquid metal fast breeder reactors has been made to assess the maximum equipment cell loading conditions. A computer code called NACOM (sodium combustion) has been developed at Brookhaven National Laobratory (BNL) to analyze sodium spray fires. This report contains a detailed description of physical models used in this code as well as programming aspects. The single droplet combustion model and the model describing the droplets' motion are verified. Comparisons between NACOM predictions and SPRAY-3A predictions of the Atomics International (AI) LTV Jet Tests are made. Good agreement is found between the NACOM predictions and the experimental data. NACOM predictions of the pressure rise are more accurate than SPRAY-3A predictions for most of the cases studied. The code has been verified for oxygen concentrations ranging from 0 to 21%. NACOM utilizes more realistic single droplet and spray combustion models than SPRAY-3A. Moreover, NACOM does not utilize adjustable parameters for the burning rate equations, contrary to the approach taken with SPRAY-3A. Thus, the NACOM code is a more reliable code for use in the analysis of large-scale sodium spray fires in LMFBR containment cells. 24 refs., 32 figs.

Tsai, S.S.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

A simple Markov model of sodium channels with a dynamic threshold  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Characteristics of action potential generation are important to understanding brain functioning and, thus, must be understood and modeled. It is still an open question what model can describe concurrently the phenomena of sharp spike shape, the spike ... Keywords: Conductance-based neurons, Divisive effect, Dynamic patch-clamp, Sodium channels, Spike shape, Spike threshold

A. V. Chizhov; E. Yu. Smirnova; K. Kh. Kim; A. V. Zaitsev

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Deficiencies of sodium and iodine in grazing sheep in northern China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deficiencies of sodium and iodine in grazing sheep in northern China DG Masters JR Lindsay SX Yu DX of Traditional Veterinary Medicine, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Science, Xiaoxihu, Lanzhou, Gansu, China An examination of the mineral status of grazing sheep at 3 sites in northern China has provided evidence

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

392

Bonding in Sodium Chloride Nanotubes: A New Analysis via Madelung Constants and Cohesive Energies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Bonding in Sodium Chloride Nanotubes: A New Analysis via Madelung Constants and Cohesive Energies is introduced which employs a linear relationship between nanotube cohesive energies determined via Density between ionic and cohesive bonding energies indicate that, as the nanotubes become longer, ionic bonding

Hanusa, Christopher

393

Sodium-Silicate Route to Submicrometer Hybrid PEG@Silica Particles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sodium-Silicate Route to Submicrometer Hybrid PEG@Silica Particles ... Supported by the Nano Functional Materials (NFM) MAGNET Program of the Israel Ministry of Trade and Industry, by the Infrastructure (Tashtiot) Program of the Israel Ministry of Science, and by the European Functionalized Advanced Materials and Engineering Hybrids and Ceramic (FAME) Network of Excellence (NOE). ...

Hila Elimelech; David Avnir

2008-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

394

Advanced Materials for Sodium-Beta Alumina Batteries: Status, Challenges and Perspectives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The increasing penetration of renewable energy and the trend toward clean, efficient transportation have spurred growing interests in sodium-beta alumina batteries that store electrical energy via sodium ion transport across a ?"-Al2O3 solid electrolyte at elevated temperatures (typically 300~350°C). Currently, the negative electrode or anode is metallic sodium in molten state during battery operation; the positive electrode or cathode can be molten sulfur (Na-S battery) or solid transition metal halides plus a liquid phase secondary electrolyte (e.g., ZEBRA battery). Since the groundbreaking works in the sodium-beta alumina batteries a few decades ago, encouraging progress has been achieved in improving battery performance, along with cost reduction. However there remain issues that hinder broad applications and market penetration of the technologies. To better the Na-beta alumina technologies require further advancement in materials along with component and system design and engineering. This paper offers a comprehensive review on materials of electrodes and electrolytes for the Na-beta alumina batteries and discusses the challenges ahead for further technology improvement.

Lu, Xiaochuan; Xia, Guanguang; Lemmon, John P.; Yang, Zhenguo

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Effects of Sodium Chloride Particles, Ozone, UV, and Relative Humidity on Atmospheric Corrosion of Silver  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects of Sodium Chloride Particles, Ozone, UV, and Relative Humidity on Atmospheric Corrosion The corrosion of Ag contaminated with NaCl particles in gaseous environments containing humidity and ozone analyzed using a coulometric reduction technique. The atmospheric corrosion of Ag was greatly accelerated

396

Original article Increased late sodium current in myocytes from a canine heart failure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Original article Increased late sodium current in myocytes from a canine heart failure model and from failing human heart Carmen R. Valdivia, William W. Chu, Jielin Pu 1 , Jason D. Foell, Robert A December 2004 Abstract Electrophysiological remodeling of ion channels in heart failure causes action

Kamp, Tim

397

Room-temperature stationary sodium-ion batteries for large-scale electric energy storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy and utility applications, such as pump hydro, compressed air, y-wheel and electrochemicalRoom-temperature stationary sodium-ion batteries for large-scale electric energy storage Huilin Pan attention particularly in large- scale electric energy storage applications for renewable energy and smart

Wang, Wei Hua

398

Evaluation of a sodium/Hastelloy-X heat pipe for wing leading edge cooling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers assembly of a sodium heat pipe, testing to verify performance during start-up and under steady-state conditions with stagnation point heat loads to about 80 W/cm{sup 2}, performance analysis and evaluation. Evaluation of this leading edge cooling concept is offered and recommendations for further research discussed.

Merrigan, M.A.; Sena, J.T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Glass, D.E. [Analytical Services and Materials, Hampton, VA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

399

Physical and functional links between anion exchanger-1 and sodium pump  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pressure cooker containing 0.1 M sodium citrate buffer, pH 6.0 for 2 min. Following blocking with 10% FBS in PBST-1 (Blocking buffer), primary antibodies at 1:50 dilution in blocking buffer were applied and sections incubated at 4(C overnight. Fluorochrome...

Su, Ya; Al-Lamki, Rafia S.; Blake-Palmer, Katherine G.; Best, Alison; Golder, Zoe J.; Zhou, Aiwu; Karet Frankl, Fiona E.

2014-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

400

Ion Exchangers NHX1 and NHX2 Mediate Active Potassium Uptake into Vacuoles to Regulate Cell Turgor and Stomatal Function in Arabidopsis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...driving K+ accumulation ratios in excess of 106-fold (Maathuis and Sanders...examined in seedlings after sodium, lithium, and sorbitol treatments that were...of stomatal aperture, preventing excess transpirational vapor loss, relies...

Verónica Barragán; Eduardo O. Leidi; Zaida Andrés; Lourdes Rubio; Anna De Luca; José A. Fernández; Beatriz Cubero; José M. Pardo

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Advanced Recombinant Manganese Peroxidase for Biosynthesis of Lignin Bioproducts, Phase I Final Report, STTR Grant #: DE-SC0007503.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The core purpose of this Phase I STTR was to evaluate the feasibility of a new method of producing a recombinant version of manganese peroxidase (MnP) enzyme. MnP is a potentially valuable enzyme for producing high value lignin products and also for industrial de-coloring operations such as biobleaching of pulp and color removal from textile dye effluents. This lignin-modifying enzyme is produced in small amounts by the native host, a white rot fungus. Previous work by Oregon State University developed a secreted recombinant version of the enzyme in the yeast Pichia pastoris. Unfortunately, the expression is barely moderate and the enzyme is heavily glycosylated, which inhibits purification. In this work, the gene for the enzyme is given a tag which targets production of the enzyme to the peroxisome. This is a promising approach since this location is also where heme and hydrogen peroxide are sequestered, which are both necessary cofactors for MnP. More than ten recombinant strains were constructed, verified, and expressed in the Pichia system. Constitutive (GAP) and methanol-induced promoters (AOX) were tried for peroxisomal targeted, cytosolic, and secreted versions of MnP. Only the secreted strains showed activity. The amount of expression was not significantly changed. The degree of glycosylation was lessened using the AOX (methanol) promotoer, but the resulting enzyme was still not able to be purified using immobilized metal affinity chromatography. Additional work beyond the scope of the defined Phase I project was undertaken to construct, verify, and express Pichia strains that mutated the MnP glycosylation sites to inhibit this process. These strains did not show significant activity. The cause is not known, but it is possible that these sites are important to the structure of the enzyme. Also beyond the scope proposed for our Phase I STTR, the team collaborated with AbSci, a startup with a new E. coli based expression system focused on the production of antibodies and enzymes containing disulfide bonds and requiring folding/post-translational modification. With only limited time remaining in the Phase I schedule, a single construct was made to produce MnP with this system. The enzyme was produced in the soluble fraction of the cell lysate, but no activity was measured. MnP from the existing recombinant source was used to act on lignin. The lignin was from a Kraft process and had a molecular weight of about 10,000 Da. Using 1000 Da dialysis membranes and UV-visible spectroscopy, no modification of either lignin was evident in the dialysate or the retentate. Assays using 2,6 dimethoxy phenol (DMP) as a substrate showed consistent activity throughout the project. In summary, these results fell far short of our expectations. A Phase II proposal was not submitted. Possible reasons for the failure of peroxisomal targeting include destruction by native hydrogen peroxide, native proteases, or unforeseen causes. The AbSci system was only lighted tested and further work may yield a strain with active enzyme. The lack of evidence for lignin modification may be due to the techniques employed. NMR or GC-MS studies may reveal evidence of modification.

Beatty, Christopher; Kitner, Joshua; Lajoie, Curtis; McClain, Sean; Potochnik, Steve

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

402

DRIFT study of manganese/titania-based catalysts for low-temperature selective catalytic reduction of NO with NH{sub 3}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Manganese oxides and iron-manganese oxides supported on TiO{sub 2} were prepared by the sol-gel method and used for low-temperature selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO with NH{sub 3}. Based on the previous study, Mn(0.4)/TiO{sub 2} and Fe(0.1)-Mn(0.4)/TiO{sub 2} were then selected to carry out the in situ diffuse reflectance infrared transform spectroscopy (DRIFT) investigation for revealing the reaction mechanism. The DRIFT spectroscopy for the adsorption of NH{sub 3} indicated the presence of coordinated NH{sub 3} and NH{sub 4}{sup +} on both of the two catalysts. When NO was introduced, the coordinated NH{sub 3} on the catalyst surface was consumed rapidly, indicating these species could react with NO effectively. When NH{sub 3} was introduced into the sample preadsorbed with NO + O{sub 2}, SCR reaction would not proceed on Mn(0.4)/TiO{sub 2}. However, for Fe(0.1)-Mn(0.4)/TiO{sub 2} the bands due to coordinated NH{sub 3} on Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} were formed. Simultaneously, the bidentate nitrates were transformed to monodentate nitrates and NH{sub 4}{sup +} was detected. NO{sub 2} from the oxidation of NO on catalyst could react with NH{sub 4}{sup +} leading to the reduction of NO. Therefore, it was suggested that the SCR reaction on Fe(0.1)-Mn(0.4)/TiO{sub 2} could also take place in a different way from the reactions on Mn(0.4)/TiO{sub 2} proposed by other researchers. Furthermore, the SCR reaction steps for these two kinds of catalysts were proposed. 29 refs., 9 figs.

Zhongbiao Wu; Boqiong Jiang; Yue Liu; Haiqiang Wang; Ruiben Jin [Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China). Dept. of Environmental Engineering

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

403

Liquid-Metal Electrode to Enable Ultra-Low Temperature Sodium-Beta Alumina Batteries for Renewable Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metal electrodes have a high capacity for energy storage but have found limited applications in batteries because of dendrite formation and other problems. In this paper, we report a new alloying strategy that can significantly reduce the melting temperature and improve wetting with the electrolyte to allow the use of liquid metal as anode in sodium-beta alumina batteries (NBBs) at much lower temperatures (e.g., 95 to 175°C). Commercial NBBs such as sodium-sulfur (Na-S) battery and sodium-metal halide (ZEBRA) batteries typically operate at relatively high temperatures (e.g., 300-350°C) due to poor wettability of sodium on the surface of ?"-Al2O3. Our combined experimental and computational studies suggest that Na-Cs alloy can replace pure sodium as the anode material, which provides a significant improvement in wettability, particularly at lower temperatures (i.e., <200°C). Single cells with the Na-Cs alloy anode exhibit excellent cycling life over those with pure sodium anode at 175 and 150°C. The cells can even operate at 95°C, which is below the melting temperature of pure sodium. These results demonstrate that NBB can be operated at ultra lower temperatures with successfully solving the wetting issue. This work also suggests a new strategy to use liquid metal as the electrode materials for advanced batteries that can avoid the intrinsic safety issues associated with dendrite formation on the anode.

Lu, Xiaochuan; Li, Guosheng; Kim, Jin Yong; Mei, Donghai; Lemmon, John P.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Liu, Jun

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Potassium-Modified Iron Ore as Oxygen Carrier for Coal Chemical Looping Combustion: Continuous Test in 1 kW Reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(20) Briefly, it consists of a fast fluidized bed as an air reactor, a cyclone, a spout-fluid bed as a fuel reactor, and an external loop-seal. ... Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research (2013), 52 (28), 9573-9585 CODEN: IECRED; ISSN:0888-5885. ... Gu, H.; Shen, L.; Xiao, J.; Zhang, S.; Song, T.; Chen, D.Iron ore as oxygen carrier improved with potassium for chemical looping combustion of anthracite coal Combust. ...

Haiming Gu; Laihong Shen; Zhaoping Zhong; Xin Niu; Huijun Ge; Yufei Zhou; Shen Xiao

2014-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

405

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Advanced Sodium Battery - Joonho Koh, Materials & Systems Research  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sodium Battery Sodium Battery Joonho Koh (jkoh@msrihome.com), Greg Tao (gtao@msrihome.com), Neill Weber, and Anil V. Virkar Materials & Systems Research, Inc., 5395 W 700 S, Salt Lake City, UT 84104 Company Introduction History  Founded in 1990 by Dr. Dinesh K. Shetty and Dr. Anil V. Virkar  Currently 11 employees including 5 PhDs  10,000 ft² research facility in Salt Lake City, Utah MSRI's Experience of Na Batteries Status of the Na Batteries Overall Project Description Goal Develop advanced Na battery technology for enhanced safety, reduced fabrication cost, and high-power performance Approach  Innovative cell design using stronger structural materials  Reduction of the fabrication cost using a simple and reliable processing technique

406

Fact Sheet: Sodium-Ion Batteries for Grid-Level Applications (October 2012)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Aquion Energy, Inc. Aquion Energy, Inc. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) Sodium-Ion Batteries for Grid-Level Applications Demonstrating low-cost, grid-scale, ambient temperature sodium-ion batteries In June 2012, Aquion Energy, Inc. completed the testing and demonstration requirements for the U.S. Department of Energy's program with its low-cost, grid-scale, ambient temperature Aqueous Hybrid Ion (AHI) energy storage device. During the three-year project, Aquion manufactured hundreds of batteries and assemble them into high-voltage, grid-scale systems. This project helped them move their aqueous electrochemical energy storage device from bench-scale testing to pilot-scale manufacturing. The testing successfully demonstrated a grid-connected, high voltage (>1,000 V), 13.5 kWh system with a 4-hour discharge.

407

Two-dimensional modeling of sodium boiling in a simulated LMFBR loss-of-flow test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Loss-of-flow (LOF) accidents are of major importance in LMFBR safety. Tests have been performed to simulate the simultaneous failure of all primary pumps and reactor shutdown systems in a 37-pin electrically heated test bundle installed in the KNS sodium boiling loop at the Institute of Reactor Development, Karlsruhe. The tests simulated LOF conditions of the German prototype LMFBR, the SNR 300. The main objectives of these tests were to characterize the transient boiling development to cladding dryout and to provide data for validation of sodium boiling codes. One particular LOF test, designated L22, at full power was selected as a benchmark exercise for comparison of several codes at the Eleventh Meeting of the Liquid Metal Boiling Working Group (LMBWG) held in Grenoble, France, in October 1984. In this paper, the results of the calculations performed at ORNL with the two-dimensional (2-D) boiling code THORAX are presented.

Rose, S.D.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Chapter 3 - Potential of Sodium-Sulfur Battery Energy Storage to Enable Further Integration of Wind  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Wind generation is the leading alternative for environmentally responsible power generation and for energy independence in the future. However, wind power output cannot be controlled same as conventional generation, and wind is not necessarily available to serve peak load. In this chapter, the use of a Sodium Sulfur battery directly coupled with a wind farm to provide generation shifting for serving peak demand and for limiting the wind farm power output ramp-rate is discussed. Results from field operation of a 1 MW, 7.2 \\{MWh\\} Sodium Sulfur battery coupled with an 11.55 MW wind farm were provided to validate the battery’s ability to successfully carry out both the tasks. It is shown that the two tasks could be combined to achieve maximum benefit. Value addition from shifting wind generation to on-peak is calculated and the optimal ratio storage to wind ratio is discussed.

Saurabh Tewari

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Calcitriol inhibits Ether-a go-go potassium channel expression and cell proliferation in human breast cancer cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Antiproliferative actions of calcitriol have been shown to occur in many cell types; however, little is known regarding the molecular basis of this process in breast carcinoma. Ether-a-go-go (Eag1) potassium channels promote oncogenesis and are implicated in breast cancer cell proliferation. Since calcitriol displays antineoplastic effects while Eag1 promotes tumorigenesis, and both factors antagonically regulate cell cycle progression, we investigated a possible regulatory effect of calcitriol upon Eag1 as a mean to uncover new molecular events involved in the antiproliferative activity of this hormone in human breast tumor-derived cells. RT real-time PCR and immunocytochemistry showed that calcitriol suppressed Eag1 expression by a vitamin D receptor (VDR)-dependent mechanism. This effect was accompanied by inhibition of cell proliferation, which was potentiated by astemizole, a nonspecific Eag1 inhibitor. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot demonstrated that Eag1 and VDR abundance was higher in invasive-ductal carcinoma than in fibroadenoma, and immunoreactivity of both proteins was located in ductal epithelial cells. Our results provide evidence of a novel mechanism involved in the antiproliferative effects of calcitriol and highlight VDR as a cancer therapeutic target for breast cancer treatment and prevention.

Garcia-Becerra, Rocio [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)] [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Diaz, Lorenza, E-mail: lorenzadiaz@gmail.com [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)] [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Camacho, Javier [Department of Pharmacology, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional 2508, San Pedro Zacatenco 07360, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)] [Department of Pharmacology, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional 2508, San Pedro Zacatenco 07360, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Barrera, David; Ordaz-Rosado, David; Morales, Angelica [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)] [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Ortiz, Cindy Sharon [Department of Pathology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)] [Department of Pathology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Avila, Euclides [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)] [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Bargallo, Enrique [Department of Breast Tumors, Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, Av. San Fernando No. 22, Tlalpan 14080, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)] [Department of Breast Tumors, Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, Av. San Fernando No. 22, Tlalpan 14080, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Arrecillas, Myrna [Department of Pathology, Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, Av. San Fernando No. 22, Tlalpan 14080, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)] [Department of Pathology, Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, Av. San Fernando No. 22, Tlalpan 14080, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Halhali, Ali; Larrea, Fernando [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)] [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Technology Development Program for an Advanced Potassium Rankine Power Conversion System Compatible with Several Space Reactor Designs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the work performed during the first phase of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), National Research Announcement (NRA) Technology Development Program for an Advanced Potassium Rankine Power Conversion System Compatible with Several Space Reactor Designs. The document includes an optimization of both 100-kW{sub e} and 250-kW{sub e} (at the propulsion unit) Rankine cycle power conversion systems. In order to perform the mass optimization of these systems, several parametric evaluations of different design options were investigated. These options included feed and reheat, vapor superheat levels entering the turbine, three different material types, and multiple heat rejection system designs. The overall masses of these Nb-1%Zr systems are approximately 3100 kg and 6300 kg for the 100- kW{sub e} and 250-kW{sub e} systems, respectively, each with two totally redundant power conversion units, including the mass of the single reactor and shield. Initial conceptual designs for each of the components were developed in order to estimate component masses. In addition, an overall system concept was presented that was designed to fit within the launch envelope of a heavy lift vehicle. A technology development plan is presented in the report that describes the major efforts that are required to reach a technology readiness level of 6. A 10-year development plan was proposed.

Yoder, G.L.

2005-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

411

The fate of chlorine, sulfur, and potassium during co-combustion of bark, sludge, and solid recovered fuel in an industrial scale BFB boiler  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of fuel composition on the fate of chlorine, sulfur, and potassium was investigated during an extensive measurement campaign in a 107 \\{MWth\\} bubbling fluidized bed (BFB) combustor. Bark, sludge, and solid recovered fuel (SRF) were co-combusted in different proportions during the campaign. The elemental composition of the fuel and outgoing ashes was determined, supplemented with gas composition measurements, to obtain the distribution of chlorine, sulfur, and potassium. Additionally, chemical fractionation was carried out for the pure fuels to study the leachability of the ash-forming elements. When firing bark and bark +sludge, potassium, sulfur, and chlorine ended up mainly in the fly ash stream. When SRF was a part of the fuel mixture a considerable amount of SO2 was measured in the second pass. Most of the chlorine entering with the fuel was found as gaseous \\{HCl\\} in the second pass, which indicates that sulfation reactions took place in the furnace. Most of the \\{HCl\\} and a part of the SO2 were captured in the baghouse filter ash and the emissions of these gases were low. This work showed the positive effects of co-firing challenging fuels.

Emil Vainio; Patrik Yrjas; Maria Zevenhoven; Anders Brink; Tor Laurén; Mikko Hupa; Tuula Kajolinna; Hannu Vesala

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

?-Conotoxin KIIIA Derivatives with Divergent Affinities versus Efficacies in Blocking Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Because of their facile chemical synthesis, KIIIA analogues that had as a core structure the disulfide-depleted KIIIA[C1A,C2U,C9A,C15U] (where U is selenocysteine) or ddKIIIA were used. ... Abbreviations: dap, diaminoproprionate; ddKIIIA, disulfide-depleted ?-conotoxin KIIIA, i.e., KIIIA[C1A,C2U,C9A,C5U], where U is selenocysteine; ddKIIIA[K7X], ddKIIIA with residue X in position 7; ddKIIIA·NaV, binary complex of ddKIIIA and NaV; ddKIIIA[K7X]·NaV, binary complex of ddKIIIA[K7X] and NaV; ddKIIIA[K7X]·TTX·NaV, ternary complex of ddKIIIA[K7X], TTX, and NaV; GIIIA, ?-conotoxin GIIIA; INa, sodium current; KIIIA, ?-conotoxin KIIIA; KIIIA[K7A], ?-conotoxin KIIIA[K7A]; NaV, ?-subunit of the voltage-gated sodium channel; rINa, residual sodium current; TTX, tetrodotoxin; TTX·NaV, binary complex of TTX and NaV; VGSC, voltage-gated sodium channel. ... The long moniker of ddKIIIA[K7X] is KIIIA[C1A,C2U,K7X,C9A,C15U], where residue X at position 7 was either Ala, Asp, Gly, Leu, Lys (i.e., ddKIIIA), Phe, Ser, Thr, Val, or diaminoproprionate (dap). ...

Min-Min Zhang; Tiffany S. Han; Baldomero M. Olivera; Grzegorz Bulaj; Doju Yoshikami

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

413

The tolerance of two varieties of cotton to relatively high levels of sodium and magnesium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of MASTER OP SCIENCE August 1969 Major Subject Plant ~ph ~siolo THE TOLERANCE OF TvJO VARIETIES OF COTTON TO RELATIVELY HIGH LEVELS OF SODIUN AND NAGNESIUN A Thesis by Nanhar C. Parekh Approved as to style and content by: (Head of Department...) (Nember) (Nemb ) August 1969 ABSTRACT The Tolerance of Two Varieties of Cotton to Relatively High Levels of Sodium and Magnesium. (August 1969) Masher C. Parekh, B. S. , Gujarat University, Directed by: Dr. H. E. Joham An experiment was conducted...

Parekh, Manhar C

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

414

The influence of dikegulac sodium on growth of Syngonium podophyllum 'White Butterfly'  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

facing producers of Syngonium podophy11um 'White Butterfly' along with the characteristics and potential of dikegulac sodium (Atrimmec, Maag Agrochemicals Inc. , Vera Beach, Fl) allowed for consideration of the following research objectives: 1... III DIKEGULAC CONCENTRATION, APPLICATION FREQUENCY AND MANUAL PINCHING STUDY ON TISSUE CULTURE PRODUCED LINERS Introduction Dikegulac (Atrimmec, Maag Agrochemicals Inc. , Vera Beach, Fl. ) is a carbohydrate derivative with plant growth regulative...

Womack, William Michael

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

415

Phase 2 THOR Steam Reforming Tests for Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

About one million gallons of acidic, hazardous, and radioactive sodium-bearing waste is stored in stainless steel tanks at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), which is a major operating facility of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Steam reforming is a candidate technology being investigated for converting the waste into a road ready waste form that can be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico for interment. A steam reforming technology patented by Studsvik, Inc., and licensed to THOR Treatment Technologies has been tested in two phases using a Department of Energy-owned fluidized bed test system located at the Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) Science and Technology Applications Research Center located in Idaho Falls, Idaho. The Phase 1 tests were reported earlier in 2003. The Phase 2 tests are reported here. For Phase 2, the process feed rate, stoichiometry, and chemistry were varied to identify and demonstrate process operation and product characteristics under different operating conditions. Two test series were performed. During the first series, the process chemistry was designed to produce a sodium carbonate product. The second series was designed to produce a more leach-resistant, mineralized sodium aluminosilicate product. The tests also demonstrated the performance of a MACT-compliant off-gas system.

Nicholas R. Soelberg

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Development of models for the two-dimensional, two-fluid code for sodium boiling NATOF-2D  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Several features were incorporated into NATOF-2D, a twodimensional, two fluid code developed at M.I.T. for the purpose of analysis of sodium boiling transients under LMFBR conditions. They include improved interfacial mass, ...

Zielinski, R. G.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Modelling of thermo-mechanical and irradiation behavior of metallic and oxide fuels for sodium fast reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A robust and reliable code to model the irradiation behavior of metal and oxide fuels in sodium cooled fast reactors is developed. Modeling capability was enhanced by adopting a non-empirical mechanistic approach to the ...

Karahan, Aydin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

A four-equation two-phase flow model for sodium boiling simulation of LMFBR fuel assemblies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A three-dimensional numerical model for the simulation of sodium boiling transients has been developed. The model uses mixture mass and energy equations, while employing a separate momentum equation for each phase. Thermal ...

Schor, Andrei L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Ruthenium(VI) catalyzed oxidation of sodium salts of lactic, tartaric and glycolic acid by alkaline hexacyanoferrate(III)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The kinetics of ruthenium(VI) catalyzed oxidation of sodium salts of lactic, tartaric and glycolic acid by hexacyanoferrate(III) in aqueous alkaline medium have been studied at constant ionic strength. The rea...

P. Kumar; K. C. Gupta; K. Vehari

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Mechanical relaxation behavior of polyurethanes reinforced with the in situ-generated sodium silica-polyphosphate nanophase  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Further exploration of hybrid organic/inorganic composites (polyurethane based with inorganic material sodium silica polyphosphate) properties with mechanical relaxometer gives ability to analyze microstructure of such materials in terms of chain reptation tubes filler's fractal aggregates and stress amplification.

V. O. Dupanov; S. M. Ponomarenko

2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Integrated fuel performance and thermal-hydraulic sub-channel models for analysis of sodium fast reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sodium Fast Reactors (SFR) show promise as an effective way to produce clean safe nuclear power while properly managing the fuel cycle. Accurate computer modeling is an important step in the design and eventual licensing ...

Fricano, Joseph William

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Technical Information on the Carbonation of the EBR-II Reactor, Summary Report Part 2: Application to EBR-II Primary Sodium System and Related Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Residual sodium is defined as sodium metal that remains behind in pipes, vessels, and tanks after the bulk sodium metal has been melted and drained from such components. The residual sodium has the same chemical properties as bulk sodium, and differs from bulk sodium only in the thickness of the sodium deposit. Typically, sodium is considered residual when the thickness of the deposit is less than 5-6 cm. This residual sodium must be removed or deactivated when a pipe, vessel, system, or entire reactor is permanently taken out of service, in order to make the component or system safer and/or to comply with decontamination and decomissioning regulations. As an alternative to the established residual sodium deactivation techniques (steam-and-nitrogen, wet vapor nitrogen, etc.), a technique involving the use of moisture and carbon dioxide has been developed. With this technique, sodium metal is converted into sodium bicarbonate by reacting it with humid carbon dioxide. Hydrogen is emitted as a by-product. This technique was first developed in the laboratory by exposing sodium samples to humidifed carbon dioxide under controlled conditions, and then demonstrated on a larger scale by treating residual sodium within the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) secondary cooling system, followed by the primary cooling system, respectively. The EBR-II facility is located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in southeastern Idaho, USA. This report is Part 2 of a two-part report. This second report provides a supplement to the first report and describes the application of the humdidified carbon dioxide technique ("carbonation") to the EBR-II primary tank, primary cover gas systems, and the intermediate heat exchanger. Future treatment plans are also provided.

Steven R. Sherman; Collin J. Knight

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project, November 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Idaho Cleanup Project Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project May 2011 November 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Independent Oversight Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction........................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Scope and Methodology ....................................................................................................................... 2

424

Development of Surface Complexation Models of Cr(VI) Adsorption on Soils, Sediments and Model Mixtures of Kaolinite, Montmorillonite, ?-Alumina, Hydrous Manganese and Ferric Oxides and Goethite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hexavalent chromium is a highly toxic contaminant that has been introduced into aquifers and shallow sediments and soils via many anthropogenic activities. Hexavalent chromium contamination is a problem or potential problem in the shallow subsurface at several DOE sites, including Hanford, Idaho National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Oak Ridge Reservation (DOE, 2008). To accurately quantify the fate and transport of hexavalent chromium at DOE and other contaminated sites, robust geochemical models, capable of correctly predicting changes in chromium chemical form resulting from chemical reactions occurring in subsurface environments are needed. One important chemical reaction that may greatly impact the bioavailability and mobility of hexavalent chromium in the subsurface is chemical binding to the surfaces of particulates, termed adsorption or surface complexation. Quantitative thermodynamic surface complexation models have been derived that can correctly calculate hexavalent chromium adsorption on well-characterized materials over ranges in subsurface conditions, such pH and salinity. However, models have not yet been developed for hexavalent chromium adsorption on many important constituents of natural soils and sediments, such as clay minerals. Furthermore, most of the existing thermodynamic models have been developed for relatively simple, single solid systems and have rarely been tested for the complex mixtures of solids present in real sediments and soils. In this study, the adsorption of hexavalent chromium was measured as a function of pH (3-10), salinity (0.001 to 0.1 M NaNO3), and partial pressure of carbon dioxide(0-5%) on a suite of naturally-occurring solids including goethite (FeOOH), hydrous manganese oxide (MnOOH), hydrous ferric oxide (Fe(OH)3), ?-alumina (Al2O3), kaolinite (Al2Si2O5(OH)4), and montmorillonite (Na3(Al, Mg)2Si4O10(OH)2?nH2O). The results show that all of these materials can bind substantial quantities of hexavalent chromium, especially at low pH. Unexpectedly, experiments with the clay minerals kaolinite and montmorillonite suggest that hexavalent chromium may interact with these solids over much longer periods of time than expected. Furthermore, hexavalent chromium may irreversibly bind to these solids, perhaps because of oxidation-reduction reactions occurring on the surfaces of the clay minerals. More work should be done to investigate and quantify these chemical reactions. Experiments conducted with mixtures of goethite, hydrous manganese oxide, hydrous ferric oxide, ?-alumina, montmorillonite and kaolinite demonstrate that it is possible to correctly predict hexavalent chromium binding in the presence of multiple minerals using thermodynamic models derived for the simpler systems. Further, these models suggest that of the six solid considered in this study, goethite is typically the solid to which most of the hexavalent chromium will bind. Experiments completed with organic-rich and organic-poor natural sediments demonstrate that in organic-rich substrates, organic matter is likely to control uptake of the hexavalent chromium. The models derived and tested in this study for hexavalent chromium binding to ?-alumina, hydrous manganese oxide, goethite, hydrous ferric oxide and clay minerals can be used to better predict changes in hexavalent chromium bioavailability and mobility in contaminated sediments and soils.

Koretsky, Carla [Western Michigan University] [Western Michigan University

2013-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

425

Thermochemical cyclic system for decomposing H/sub 2/O and/or CO/sub 2/ by means of cerium-titanium-sodium-oxygen compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermochemical closed cyclic process for the decomposition of water and/or carbon dioxide to hydrogen and/or carbon monoxide begins with the reaction of ceric oxide (CeO/sub 2/), titanium dioxide (TiO/sub 2/) and sodium titanate (Na/sub 2/TiO/sub 3/) to form sodium cerous titanate (NaCeTi/sub 2/O/sub 6/) and oxygen. Sodium cerous titanate (NaCeTi/sub 2/O/sub 6/) reacted with sodium carbonate (Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/) in the presence of steam, produces hydrogen. The same reaction, in the absence of steam, produces carbon monoxide. The products, ceric oxide and sodium titanate, obtained in either case, are treated with carbon dioxide and water to produce ceric oxide, titanium dioxide, sodium titanate, and sodium bicarbonate. After dissolving sodium bicarbonate from the mixture in water, the remaining insoluble compounds are used as starting materials for a subsequent cycle. The sodium bicarbonate can be converted to sodium carbonate by heating and returned to the cycle.

Bamberger, C.E.

1980-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

426

Thermochemical cyclic system for decomposing H.sub.2 O and/or CO.sub.2 by means of cerium-titanium-sodium-oxygen compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A thermochemical closed cyclic process for the decomposition of water and/or carbon dioxide to hydrogen and/or carbon monoxide begins with the reaction of ceric oxide (CeO.sub.2), titanium dioxide (TiO.sub.2) and sodium titanate (Na.sub.2 TiO.sub.3) to form sodium cerous titanate (NaCeTi.sub.2 O.sub.6) and oxygen. Sodium cerous titanate (NaCeTi.sub.2 O.sub.6) reacted with sodium carbonate (Na.sub.2 CO.sub.3) in the presence of steam, produces hydrogen. The same reaction, in the absence of steam, produces carbon monoxide. The products, ceric oxide and sodium titanate, obtained in either case, are treated with carbon dioxide and water to produce ceric oxide, titanium dioxide, sodium titanate, and sodium bicarbonate. After dissolving sodium bicarbonate from the mixture in water, the remaining insoluble compounds are used as starting materials for a subsequent cycle. The sodium bicarbonate can be converted to sodium carbonate by heating and returned to the cycle.

Bamberger, Carlos E. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Structural And Physical Characterization of Tetranuclear [Mn**II(3)Mn**IV] And [Mn**II(2)Mn**III(2)] Valence-Isomer Manganese Complexes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two tetranuclear Mn complexes with an average Mn oxidation state of +2.5 have been prepared. These valence isomers have been characterized by a combination of X-ray crystallography, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and magnetic susceptibility. The Mn{sup II}{sub 3}Mn{sup IV} tetramer has the Mn ions arranged in a distorted tetrahedron, with an S = 6 ground spin state, dominated by ferromagnetic exchange among the manganese ions. The Mn{sup II}{sub 2}Mn{sup III}{sub 2} tetramer also has a distorted tetrahedral arrangement of Mn ions but shows magnetic behavior, suggesting that it is a single-molecule magnet. The X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra for the two complexes are similar, suggesting that, while Mn XANES has sufficient sensitivity to distinguish between trinuclear valence isomers (Alexiou et al. Inorg. Chem. 2003, 42, 2185), similar distinctions are difficult for tetranuclear complexes such as that found in the photosynthetic oxygen-evolving complex.

Zaleski, C.M.; Weng, T.-C.; Dendrinou-Samara, C.; Alexiou, M.; Kanakaraki, P.; Hsieh, W.-Y.; Kampf, J.; Penner-Hahn, J.E.; Pecoraro, V.L.; Kessissoglou, D.P.

2009-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

428

Stability and Rate Capability of Al Substituted Lithium-Rich High-Manganese Content Oxide Materials for Li-Ion Batteries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The structures, electrochemical properties and thermal stability of Al-substituted lithium-excess oxides, Li{sub 1.2}Ni{sub 0.16} Mn{sub 0.56}Co{sub 0.08-y}Al{sub y}O{sub 2} (y = 0, 0.024, 0.048, 0.08), are reported, and compared to the stoichiometric compounds, LiNi{sub z}Mn{sub z}Co{sub 1-2z}O{sub 2}. A solid solution was found up to at least y = 0.06. Aluminum substitution improves the poor thermal stability while preserving the high energy density of lithium-excess oxides. However, these high manganese compositions are inferior to the lithium stoichiometric materials, LiNi{sub z}Mn{sub z}Co{sub 1-2z}O{sub 2} (z = 0.333, 0.4), in terms of both power and thermal stability.

Li, Zheng; Chernova, Natasha A.; Feng, Jijun; Upreti, Shailesh; Omenya, Fredrick; Whittingham, M. Stanley (SUNY-Binghamton)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

429

Evaluation of lithium as a toxicant and the modifying effect of sodium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Routine compliance tests conducted for a groundwater treatment facility at the Y-12 Plant on the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), TN, showed that the effluent was acutely toxic to Ceriodaphnia dubia and fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) larvae. An evaluation of suspected contaminants revealed that increased toxicity coincided with increased concentrations of lithium. Lithium is a light, strong metal that is used in DOE operations, including fusion weapons and fission reactors. Little has been published about lithium toxicity. Toxicity tests were conducted with fathead minnows and C. dubia using lithium chloride and lithium tetraborate. Dilute mineral water (DMW) or the receiving stream water (East Fork Poplar Creek) was used as the dilution water in the toxicity evaluation. A concentration of 1 mg Li/L in DMW reduced the survival of both test species; 0.5 mg Li/L in DMW reduced C. dubia reproduction and minnow growth. Sodium appears to influence the toxicity of Li; the metal was six times more toxic in the low-sodium DMW than in stream water containing 30 mg Na/L. Tests with LiCl in combination with NaCl and NA{sub 2}SO{sub 4} demonstrated that the presence of sodium reduced the toxicity of Li to C. dubia. In laboratory tests with a snail (Elimia clavaeformis) common on the ORR, the feeding rate declined in 0.15 mg Li/L. Because Li has also been demonstrated to be toxic to several plant species, tests with LiCi were also conducted using buttercrunch lettuce (Lactuca saliva). The EC{sub 50} for seed growth after 8 d incubation was 37.5 mg Li/L. These findings are significant because of widespread industrial use and potential accumulation of Li in soils.

Kszos, L.A.; Stewart, A.J.; O`Reilly, S.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

430

Tracers for monitoring the activity of sodium/glucose cotransporters in health and disease  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Radiolabeled tracers for sodium/glucose cotransporters (SGLTs), their synthesis, and their use are provided. The tracers are methyl or ethyl pyranosides having an equatorial hydroxyl group at carbon-2 and a C 1 preferred conformation, radiolabeled with .sup.18F, .sup.123I, or .sup.124I, or free hexoses radiolabeled with .sup.18F, .sup.123I, or .sup.124. Also provided are in vivo and in vitro techniques for using these and other tracers as analytical and diagnostic tools to study glucose transport, in health and disease, and to evaluate therapeutic interventions.

Wright, Ernest M; Barrio, Jorge R; Hirayama, Bruce A; Kepe, Vladimir

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

431

Sodium-sulfur battery development. Phase VB final report, October 1, 1981--February 28, 1985  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the technical progress made under Contract No. DE-AM04-79CH10012 between the U.S. Department of Energy, Ford Aerospace & Communications Corporations and Ford Motor Company, for the period 1 October 1981 through 28 February 1985, which is designated as Phase VB of the Sodium-Sulfur Battery Development Program. During this period, Ford Aerospace held prime technical responsibility and Ford Motor Company carried out supporting research. Ceramatec, Inc., was a major subcontractor to Ford Aerospace for electrolyte development and production.

NONE

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Measurement of Conduction-Electron-Spin Relaxation in Sodium, 14-20 K  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Conduction-electron-spin relaxation in sodium has been measured in the liquid-hydrogen-temperature range 14-20 K. We believe we have successfully separated the contributions to the measured relaxation rate from the impurity, surface, and electron-phonon (intrinsic) mechanisms by working with samples of controlled geometry at low rf frequency (10 MHz). The temperature dependence of the intrinsic relaxation time agrees reasonably well with the Debye-model calculations of Yafet. In our samples the probability of relaxation per surface collision for an electron spin is on the order of 10-3.

S. -K. Wang and R. T. Schumacher

1973-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

SWAAM-LT: The long-term, sodium/water reaction analysis method computer code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SWAAM-LT Code, developed for analysis of long-term effects of sodium/water reactions, is discussed. The theoretical formulation of the code is described, including the introduction of system matrices for ease of computer programming as a general system code. Also, some typical results of the code predictions for available large scale tests are presented. Test data for the steam generator design with the cover-gas feature and without the cover-gas feature are available and analyzed. The capabilities and limitations of the code are then discussed in light of the comparison between the code prediction and the test data.

Shin, Y.W.; Chung, H.H.; Wiedermann, A.H. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Tanabe, H. [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Structure of Dense Sodium Di-2-Ethylsulfosuccinate/D2O/Decane Microemulsions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Small-angle neutron scattering is used to investigate the structure of single-phase AOT (sodium di-2-ethylsulfosuccinate)/D2O/decane microemulsions containing equal volumes of water and oil and a variable concentration of surfactant. Each scattered-neutron spectrum exhibits a pronounced interaction peak. As the volume fraction of AOT is increased from 0.18 to 0.42, the peak position shifts to larger values of Q, and the peak height diminishes. The spectra are consistent with an ordered droplet phase, as opposed to a bicontinuous structure.

Michael Kotlarchyk; Sow-Hsin Chen; John S. Huang; Mahn Won Kim

1984-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

435

Galvanic corrosion of structural aluminum coupled with mild steel in a dilute sodium dichromate electrolyte  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or the requirement for' the deqr, e of MASTER OF SCIl-NCI= Jaruary IgiO Major Sub ect: Civii I. ngineering GALVANIC CORROSION GF STRUCTURAI. ALUMINUM COUPLED WITH MILD STI:EL IN A DILUTE SODIUii DICIIROMA1'E ELECTROLTTE A Thesis ROBERT FRANKLIN FORD, JR.... Approved as to style and content by: + ~J Co-Chairman of Commii:t C Co-Chair n of Committe~e Member+ I Head of D=p rtm t) Januar; IDIO ABSTRACT Calvanic Corrosion of Structural Aluminum Coup'led with Mild Steel in a Dilute Sodium Dichromate...

Ford, Robert Franklin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

436

Under-Sodium Viewing: A Review of Ultrasonic Imaging Technology for Liquid Metal Fast Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This current report is a summary of information obtained in the "Information Capture" task of the U.S. DOE-funded "Under Sodium Viewing (USV) Project." The goal of the multi-year USV project is to design, build, and demonstrate a state-of-the-art prototype ultrasonic viewing system tailored for periodic reactor core in-service monitoring and maintenance inspections. The study seeks to optimize system parameters, improve performance, and re-establish this key technology area which will be required to support any new U.S. liquid-metal cooled fast reactors.

Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Peters, Timothy J.; Posakony, Gerald J.; Chien, Hual-Te; Bond, Leonard J.; Denslow, Kayte M.; Sheen, Shuh-Haw; Raptis, Paul

2009-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

437

Thermal analysis for fuel handling system for sodium cooled reactor considering minor actinide-bearing metal fuel.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) is one of the components of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) used to close the fuel cycle. ABR is a sodium-cooled fast reactor that is used to consume transuranic elements resulting from the reprocessing of light water reactor spent nuclear fuel. ABR-1000 [1000 MW(thermal)] is a fast reactor concept created at Argonne National Laboratory to be used as a reference concept for various future trade-offs. ABR-1000 meets the GNEP goals although it uses what is considered base sodium fast reactor technology for its systems and components. One of the considerations of any fast reactor plant concept is the ability to perform fuel-handling operations with new and spent fast reactor fuel. The transmutation fuel proposed as the ABR fuel has a very little experience base, and thus, this paper investigates a fuel-handling concept and potential issues of handling fast reactor fuel containing minor actinides. In this study, two thermal analyses supporting a conceptual design study on the ABR-1000 fuel-handling system were carried out. One analysis investigated passive dry spent fuel storage, and the other analysis investigated a fresh fuel shipping cask. Passive dry storage can be made suitable for the ABR-1000 spent fuel storage with sodium-bonded metal fuel. The thermal analysis shows that spent fast reactor fuel with a decay heat of 2 kW or less can be stored passively in a helium atmosphere. The 2-kW value seems to be a reasonable and practical level, and a combination of reasonably-sized in-sodium storage followed by passive dry storage could be a candidate for spent fuel storage for the next-generation sodium-cooled reactor with sodium-bonded metal fuel. Requirements for the shipping casks for minor actinide-bearing fuel with a high decay heat level are also discussed in this paper. The shipping cask for fresh sodium-cooled-reactor fuel should be a dry type to reduce the reaction between residual moisture on fresh fuel and the sodium coolant. The cladding temperature requirement is maintained below the creep temperature limit to avoid any damage before core installation. The thermal analysis shows that a helium gas-filled cask can accommodate ABR-1000 fresh minor actinide-bearing fuel with 700-W decay heat. The above analysis results revealed the overall requirement for minor actinide-bearing metal fuel handling. The information is thought to be helpful in the design of the ABR-1000 and future sodium-cooled-reactor fuel-handling system.

Chikazawa, Y.; Grandy, C.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Enhancement of the inherent self-protection of the fast sodium reactor cores with oxide fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the development and research into the generation IV fast sodium reactors, great attention is paid to the enhancement of the core inherent self-protection characteristics. One of the problems dealt here is connected with the reduction of the reactivity margin so that the control rods running should not result in the core overheating and melting. In this paper we consider the possibilities of improving the core of BN-1200 with oxide fuel by a known method of introducing an axial fertile layer into the core. But unlike earlier studies this paper looks at the possibility of using such a layer not only for improving breeding, but also for reducing sodium void reactivity effect (SVRE). This proposed improvement of the BN-1200 core does not solve the problem of strong interference in control and protection system (CPS) rods of BN-1200, but they reduce significantly the reactivity margin for burn-up compensation. This helps compensate all the reactivity balances in the improved core configurations without violating constraints on SVRE value.

Eliseev, V.A.; Malisheva, I.V.; Matveev, V.I.; Egorov, A.V.; Maslov, P.A. [SSC RF - IPPE, Obninsk, Kaluga region (Russian Federation)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Further Investigations of the Effect of Replacing Lithium by Sodium on Lithium Silicate Scintillating Glass Efficiency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ce3+ doped lithium (6Li) silicate glasses are thermal neutron detectors. Prior work showed that when sodium (Na) is substituted for Li the scintillation efficiency, under beta particle stimulation, increased and then decreased as the sodium (Na) content was increased [1]. When all the 6Li was replaced by Na no scintillation was observed. Raman spectra, acquired using a visible excitation source provided no evidence of anomalous behavior. SEM microscopy did show some phase separation, but there was no obvious correlation with the scintillation efficiency. We have reexamined these glass samples using deep UV Raman excitation which reduces fluorescence interference. The newly acquired spectra show evidence of phase separation in the glasses. Specifically we see a peak at 800 cm-1 Raman shift which can be assigned to a vitreous silica moiety that results from phase separation. There is a strong correlation between this peak's area, the scintillation efficiency, and the Na content. The observed trend suggests that phase separation enhances scintillation and addition of Na reduces the amount of phase separation. We also see evidence of at least two defect structures that can be tentatively assigned to a three-membered ring structure and an oxygen vacancy. The latter is fairly strongly correlated with enhanced scintillation efficiency.

Bliss, Mary; Aker, Pamela M.; Windisch, Charles F.

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

440

Neutronic Assessment of Transmutation Target Compositions in Heterogeneous Sodium Fast Reactor Geometries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The sodium fast reactor is under consideration for consuming the transuranic waste in the spent nuclear fuel generated by light water reactors. This work is concerned with specialized target assemblies for an oxide-fueled sodium fast reactor that are designed exclusively for burning the americium and higher mass actinide component of light water reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The associated gamma and neutron radioactivity, as well as thermal heat, associated with decay of these actinides may significantly complicate fuel handling and fabrication of recycled fast reactor fuel. The objective of using targets is to isolate in a smaller number of assemblies these concentrations of higher actinides, thus reducing the volume of fuel having more rigorous handling requirements or a more complicated fabrication process. This is in contrast to homogeneous recycle where all recycled actinides are distributed among all fuel assemblies. Several heterogeneous core geometries were evaluated to determine the fewest target assemblies required to burn these actinides without violating a set of established fuel performance criteria. The DIF3D/REBUS code from Argonne National Laboratory was used to perform the core physics and accompanying fuel cycle calculations in support of this work. Using the REBUS code, each core design was evaluated at the equilibrium cycle condition.

Samuel E. Bays; Rodolfo M. Ferrer; Michael A. Pope; Benoit Forget; Mehdi Asgari

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Pressure-induced structural transformations of the Zintl phase sodium silicide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The high-pressure behaviour of NaSi has been studied using Raman spectroscopy and angle-dispersive synchrotron X-ray diffraction to observe the onset of structural phase transformations and potential oligomerisation into anionic Si nanoclusters with extended dimensionality. Our studies reveal a first structural transformation occurring at 8-10 GPa, followed by irreversible amorphisation above 15 GPa, suggesting the formation of Si-Si bonds with oxidation of the Si{sup -} species and reduction of Na{sup +} to metallic sodium. We have combined our experimental studies with DFT calculations to assist in the analysis of the structural behaviour of NaSi at high pressure. - Abstract: The high-pressure behaviour of NaSi has been studied using Raman spectroscopy and angle-dispersive synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Our studies reveal a first structural transformation occurring at 8-10 GPa, followed by irreversible amorphisation, suggesting the formation of Si-Si bonds with oxidation of the Si{sup -} species and reduction of Na{sup +} to metallic sodium. We have combined our experimental studies with DFT calculations to assist in the analysis of the structural behaviour of NaSi at high pressure. Display Omitted

Cabrera, Raul Quesada; Salamat, Ashkan; Barkalov, Oleg I. [Department of Chemistry and Materials Chemistry Centre, Christopher Ingold Laboratories, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom); Leynaud, Olivier [Department of Crystallography, Birkbeck College, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HX (United Kingdom); Hutchins, Peter; Daisenberger, Dominik [Department of Chemistry and Materials Chemistry Centre, Christopher Ingold Laboratories, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom); Machon, Denis [Universite de Lyon, F-69000, France-Univ. Lyon 1, Laboratoire PMCN, CNRS, UMR 5586, F-69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Sella, Andrea; Lewis, Dewi W. [Department of Chemistry and Materials Chemistry Centre, Christopher Ingold Laboratories, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom); McMillan, Paul F., E-mail: p.f.mcmillan@ucl.ac.u [Department of Chemistry and Materials Chemistry Centre, Christopher Ingold Laboratories, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

442

Calcium-Mediated Regulation of Proton-Coupled Sodium Transport - Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The long-term goal of our experiments was to understand mechanisms that regulate energy coupling by ion currents in plants. Activities of living organisms require chemical, mechanical, osmotic or electrical work, the energy for which is supplied by metabolism. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) has long been recognized as the universal energy currency, with metabolism supporting the synthesis of ATP and the hydrolysis of ATP being used for the subsequent work. However, ATP is not the only energy currency in living organisms. A second and very different energy currency links metabolism to work by the movement of ions passing from one side of a membrane to the other. These ion currents play a major role in energy capture and they support a range of physiological processes from the active transport of nutrients to the spatial control of growth and development. In Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis), the activity of a plasma membrane Na+/H+ exchanger, SALT OVERLY SENSITIVE1 (SOS1), is essential for regulation of sodium ion homeostasis during plant growth in saline conditions. Mutations in SOS1 result in severely reduced seedling growth in the presence of salt compared to the growth of wild type. SOS1 is a secondary active transporter coupling movement of sodium ions out of the cell using energy stored in the transplasma membrane proton gradient, thereby preventing the build-up of toxic levels of sodium in the cytosol. SOS1 is regulated by complexes containing the SOS2 and CALCINEURIN B-LIKE10 (CBL10) or SOS3 proteins. CBL10 and SOS3 (also identified as CBL4) encode EF-hand calcium sensors that interact physically with and activate SOS2, a serine/threonine protein kinase. The CBL10/SOS2 or SOS3/SOS2 complexes then activate SOS1 Na+/H+ exchange activity. We completed our studies to understand how SOS1 activity is regulated. Specifically, we asked: (1) how does CBL10 regulate SOS1 activity? (2) What role do two putative CBL10-interacting proteins play in SOS1 regulation? (3) Are there differences in the regulation and/or activity of SOS1 in plants differing in their adaptation to salinity?

Schumaker, Karen S [Professor] [Professor

2013-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

443

Go/No-Go Recommendation for Sodium Borohydride for On-Board Vehicular Hydrogen Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MP-150-42220 MP-150-42220 U. S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Program Go/No-Go Recommendation for Sodium Borohydride for On-Board Vehicular Hydrogen Storage National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a U. S. Department of Energy Laboratory operated by Midwest Research Institute and Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-98-GO10337 I I n n d d e e p p e e n n d d e e n n t t R R e e v v i i e e w w November 2007 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or

444

Sodium Loop Safety Facility W-2 experiment fuel pin rupture detection system. [LMFBR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the Sodium Loop Safety Facility (SLSF) W-2 experiment is to characterize the combined effects of a preconditioned full-length fuel column and slow transient overpower (TOP) conditions on breeder reactor (BR) fuel pin cladding failures. The W-2 experiment will meet this objective by providing data in two technological areas: (1) time and location of cladding failure, and (2) early post-failure test fuel behavior. The test involves a seven pin, prototypic full-length fast test reactor (FTR) fuel pin bundle which will be subjected to a simulated unprotected 5 cents/s reactivity transient overpower event. The outer six pins will provide the necessary prototypic thermal-hydraulic environment for the center pin.

Hoffman, M.A.; Kirchner, T.L.; Meyers, S.C.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

W-1 Sodium Loop Safety Facility experiment centerline fuel thermocouple performance. [LMFBR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The W-1 Sodium Loop Safety Facility (SLSF) experiment is the fifth in a series of experiments sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the National Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) Safety Assurance Program. The experiments are being conducted under the direction of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL). The irradiation phase of the W-1 SLSF experiment was conducted between May 27 and July 20, 1979, and terminated with incipient fuel pin cladding failure during the final boiling transient. Experimental hardware and facility performed as designed, allowing completion of all planned tests and test objectives. This paper focuses on high temperature in-fuel thermocouples and discusses their development, fabrication, and performance in the W-1 experiment.

Meyers, S.C.; Henderson, J.M.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Preparation and humidity controlling behaviors of sepiolite/polyacrylic acid (sodium) composite  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sepiolite/polyacrylic acid (sodium) nanocomposite was synthesized using inverse suspension polymerization method under different sepiolite content, dispersant content and neutralization degree with orthogonal experiments. The surface morphology and structure of sepiolite/polyacrylic acid composite were observed and analyzed, and the humidity controlling properties of composites were determined by absorption and desorption testing. The results showed that sepiolite/polyacrylic acid composite was in a fine particle with rough surface. During the polymerization process, acrylic acid monomer was grafted with hydroxyl on the surface of sepiolite and then intercalated successfully into the tetrahedral silica layers of sepiolite. With the increasing of sepiolite content, dispersant conten, neutralization degree and the humidity controlling behaviors of composite rose initially and then dropped down. The impact of three factors on the humidity controlling behavior of composites increased by the order of sepiolite content, dispersant content and neutralization degree. The optimum preparation parameters are sepiolite content of 4%, dispersant content of 15% and neutralization degree of 90%.

Jihui Wang; Shuping Ren; Mengjie Guo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Two-dimensional modeling of sodium boiling transients in simulated LMFBR fuel bundles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A two-dimensional code for analysis of sodium boiling in LMFBR fuel assemblies has been developed at ORNL. This code, THORAX, has been used to analyze tests in 19- and 61-pin electrically-heated, simulated LMFBR fuel assemblies in the THORS facility. THORAX has simulated well the transient growth of the two-dimensional boiling region and the resulting static flow instability leading to dryout. Extrapolation of results to a full size fuel pin bundle shows that two-dimensional effects are reduced but still significant. The code will be extended to include a loop model in support of forthcoming tests in the THORS-SHRS Assembly 1 loop, which will include two parallel 19-pin simulated driver bundles.

Rose, S.D.; Dearing, J.F; Carbajo, J.J.; Levin, A.E.; Montgomery, B.H.; Wantland, J.L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

RELY: A reliability modeling system for analysis of sodium-sulfur battery configurations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of the Office of Energy Storage and Distribution of the US Department of Energy (DOE), Pacific Northwest Laboratory has produced a microcomputer-based software package, called RELY, to assess the impact of sodium-sulfur cell reliability on constant current discharge battery performance. The Fortran-based software operates on IBM microcomputers and IBM-compatibles that have a minimum of 512K of internal memory. The software package has three models that provide the following: (1) a description of the failure distribution parameters used to model cell failure, (2) a Monte Carlo simulation of battery life, and (3) a detailed discharge model for a user-specified battery discharge cycle. 6 refs., 31 figs., 4 tabs.

Hostick, C.J.; Huber, H.D.; Doggett, W.H.; Dirks, J.A.; Dovey, J.F.; Grinde, R.B.; Littlefield, J.S.; Cuta, F.M.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Sodium pumps adapt spike bursting to stimulus Sara Arganda1,2,4, Raul Guantes1,3,4 & Gonzalo G de Polavieja1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sodium pumps adapt spike bursting to stimulus statistics Sara Arganda1,2,4, Rau´l Guantes1,3,4 & Gonzalo G de Polavieja1,2 Pump activity is a homeostatic mechanism that maintains ionic gradients. Here we examined whether the slow reduction in excitability induced by sodium-pump activity that has been seen

Guantes, Raúl

450

Computer Simulation of Diffusion of Pb-Bi Eutectic in Liquid Sodium by Molecular Dynamics Method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lead-bismuth eutectic is a potential candidate for coolant of secondary loops of sodium-cooled fast breeder reactors (FBR). The studies on the diffusion of liquid Pb-Bi in liquid Na are carried out corresponding to the case that liquid Pb-Bi leaks to liquid Na by accident. As the diffusion processes are the results of atomic motions, molecular dynamics method has been used to study the diffusion process. The self-diffusion coefficients of pure liquid Pb and Na, and liquid Pb-Bi are calculated and compared with ones by the empirical equations. The discrepancy between them could be eliminated by changing the densities of the liquids. The diffusion of lead-bismuth in sodium is simulated based on the changed densities under which the self-diffusion coefficients of individual liquid metals are close to those by the empirical equations. The simulation results show that the diffusion process of liquid Pb-Bi in liquid Na is a heat releasing process and the density of ternary liquid Na-Pb-Bi is higher than the average value of the densities of liquid Na and liquid Pb-Bi. It is also found that the diffusion coefficients of liquid Pb-Bi in liquid Na are much higher than their self-diffusion coefficients, indicating that liquid Pb-Bi are easy and quickly to diffuse in liquid Na. However, the diffusion coefficient of liquid Na is decreased due to the existence of liquid Pb-Bi, implying that liquid Na-Pb-Bi have a higher viscosity than that of pure liquid Na. (authors)

Yingxia Qi; Minoru Takahashi [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Sodium reflux pool-boiler solar receiver on-sun test results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The efficient operation of a Stirling engine requires the application of a high heat flux to the relatively small area occupied by the heater head tubes. Previous attempts to couple solar energy to Stirling engines generally involved directly illuminating the heater head tubes with concentrated sunlight. In this study, operation of a 75-kW{sub t} sodium reflux pool-boiler solar receiver has been demonstrated and its performance characterized on Sandia's nominal 75-kW{sub t} parabolic-dish concentrator, using a cold-water gas-gap calorimeter to simulate Stirling engine operation. The pool boiler (and more generally liquid-metal reflux receivers) supplies heat to the engine in the form of latent heat released from condensation of the metal vapor on the heater head tubes. The advantages of the pool boiler include uniform tube temperature, leading to longer life and higher temperature available to the engine, and decoupling of the design of the solar absorber from the engine heater head. The two-phase system allows high input thermal flux, reducing the receiver size and losses, therefore improving system efficiency. The receiver thermal efficiency was about 90% when operated at full power and 800{degree}C. Stable sodium boiling was promoted by the addition of 35 equally spaced artificial cavities in the wetted absorber surface. High incipient boiling superheats following cloud transients were suppressed passively by the addition of small amounts of xenon gas to the receiver volume. Stable boiling without excessive incipient boiling superheats was observed under all operating conditions. The receiver developed a leak during performance evaluation, terminating the testing after accumulating about 50 hours on sun. The receiver design is reported here along with test results including transient operations, steady-state performance evaluation, operation at various temperatures, infrared thermography, x-ray studies of the boiling behavior, and a postmortem analysis.

Andraka, C E; Moreno, J B; Diver, R B; Moss, T A [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Crystallization of Sodium Phosphate Dodecahydrate and Re-Crystallization to Natrophosphate in Simulated Hanford Nuclear Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nuclear waste at the Hanford site near Richland, WA, has large concentrations of phosphate in the form of the phosphate ion, sodium phosphate dodecahydrate (Na3PO4.12H2O.(1/4)NaOH) and natrophosphate (Na7F(PO4)3.19H2O). Sodium phosphate dodecahydrate can form a gel and natrophosphate can crystallize large particles, complicating the processing of slurries of both salts. The gel is regarded as more problematic, so natrophosphate has historically been crystallized to prevent phosphate gelling. This study determined that natrophosphate crystals can grow to large size in short time periods (a few weeks), time periods relevant to short process shutdowns. Solutions of NaOH and NaAl(OH)4 were blended at different ratios with stock solutions containing NaOH, NaF, and Na3PO4 at 50 °C. The mixtures were allowed to cool to 22 °C, and the crystal growth was monitored by Polarized Light Microscopy (PLM) for 17 days. Four of the six blends investigated gelled rapidly due to Na3PO4.12H2O.(1/4)NaOH precipitation. The gel slowly dissipated over time as the solids recrystallized into natrophosphate. In one case, the natrophosphate reached sizes of greater than 1000 microns in diameter in just 4 days. This rapid gelling and crystallization kinetics is important to engineers trying to manage nuclear wastes high in phosphates. Hanford tank farm engineers are developing sampling plans to support temperature and process control strategies for preventing the formation of solid phosphates. They are also developing methods of suspending large natrophosphate crystals.

Reynolds, J. G.

2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

453

A High Temperature Electrochemical Energy Storage System Based on Sodium Beta-Alumina Solid Electrolyte (Base)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work done during the period September 1, 2005 and March 31, 2008. Work was conducted in the following areas: (1) Fabrication of sodium beta{double_prime} alumina solid electrolyte (BASE) using a vapor phase process. (2) Mechanistic studies on the conversion of {alpha}-alumina + zirconia into beta{double_prime}-alumina + zirconia by the vapor phase process. (3) Characterization of BASE by X-ray diffraction, SEM, and conductivity measurements. (4) Design, construction and electrochemical testing of a symmetric cell containing BASE as the electrolyte and NaCl + ZnCl{sub 2} as the electrodes. (5) Design, construction, and electrochemical evaluation of Na/BASE/ZnCl{sub 2} electrochemical cells. (6) Stability studies in ZnCl{sub 2}, SnCl{sub 2}, and SnI{sub 4} (7) Design, assembly and testing of planar stacks. (8) Investigation of the effect of porous surface layers on BASE on cell resistance. The conventional process for the fabrication of sodium ion conducting beta{double_prime}-alumina involves calcination of {alpha}-alumina + Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} + LiNO{sub 3} at 1250 C, followed by sintering powder compacts in sealed containers (platinum or MgO) at {approx}1600 C. The novel vapor phase process involves first sintering a mixture of {alpha}-alumina + yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) into a dense ceramic followed by exposure to soda vapor at {approx}1450 C to convert {alpha}-alumina into beta{double_prime}-alumina. The vapor phase process leads to a high strength BASE, which is also resistant to moisture attack, unlike BASE made by the conventional process. The PI is the lead inventor of the process. Discs and tubes of BASE were fabricated in the present work. In the conventional process, sintering of BASE is accomplished by a transient liquid phase mechanism wherein the liquid phase contains NaAlO{sub 2}. Some NaAlO{sub 2} continues to remain at grain boundaries; and is the root cause of its water sensitivity. In the vapor phase process, NaAlO{sub 2} is never formed. Conversion occurs by a coupled transport of Na{sup +} through BASE formed and of O{sup 2-} through YSZ to the reaction front. Transport to the reaction front is described in terms of a chemical diffusion coefficient of Na{sub 2}O. The conversion kinetics as a function of microstructure is under investigation. The mechanism of conversion is described in this report. A number of discs and tubes of BASE have been fabricated by the vapor phase process. The material was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), before and after conversion. Conductivity (which is almost exclusively due to sodium ion transport at the temperatures of interest) was measured. Conductivity was measured using sodium-sodium tests as well as by impedance spectroscopy. Various types of both planar and tubular electrochemical cells were assembled and tested. In some cases the objective was to determine if there was any interaction between the salt and BASE. The interaction of interest was mainly ion exchange (possible replacement of sodium ion by the salt cation). It was noted that Zn{sup 2+} did not replace Na+ over the conditions of interest. For this reason much of the work was conducted with ZnCl{sub 2} as the cathode salt. In the case of Sn-based, Sn{sup 2+} did ion exchange, but Sn{sup 4+} did not. This suggests that Sn{sup 4+} salts are viable candidates. These results and implications are discussed in the report. Cells made with Na as the anode and ZnCl{sub 2} as the cathode were successfully charged/discharged numerous times. The key advantages of the batteries under investigation here over the Na-S batteries are: (1) Steel wool can be used in the cathode compartment unlike Na-S batteries which require expensive graphite. (2) Planar cells can be constructed in addition to tubular, allowing for greater design flexibility and integration with other devices such as planar SOFC. (3) Comparable or higher open circuit voltage (OCV) than the Na-S battery. (4) Wider operating temperature range and higher temper

Anil Virkar

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

454

Mercury Lamps Recycling Fluorescent light-tubes, compact fluorescent bulbs, mercury and sodium vapor lamps, ultraviolet and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mercury Lamps Recycling Fluorescent light-tubes, compact fluorescent bulbs, mercury and sodium vapor lamps, ultraviolet and HID (high-intensity discharge) lamps and all other mercury containing labeled for shipment to a recycling plant for mercury, glass and aluminum recovery. The beneficial re

Baker, Chris I.

455

F POWER MEASUREMENT FOR GENERATION IV SODIUM FAST R. COULON, S. NORMAND, M. MICHEL, L. BARBOT, T. DOMENECH,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.F-84500 Bollène, France. ABSTRACT The Phénix nuclear power plant has been a French Sodium Fast Reactor. Drift between the measured ex-core neutron flux and the instant released thermal power (fission rate the research of power tagging agents. Then, simulation study has been done to evaluate measurability using high

Boyer, Edmond

456

Tetrodotoxin binding sites in human heart and human brain sodium channels. Final report, 28 June 1991-27 June 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tetrodotoxin (TTX) and saxitoxin (STX) are potent and lethal threats to exposed soldiers. The development of an antidote or site-specific antibodies for low affinity TTX/STX cardiac sodium channels and high affinity TTX/STX brain and peripheral nerve sodium channels requires a data base not only of the primary structure of the toxin receptor site(s) but also insight into the secondary structures of these site(s). Five goals or tasks were attempted and the first three were completed. Full-length human cardiac and brain sodium channel cDNAs have been cloned and expressed as functional proteins in Xenopus oocytes. Silent restriction sites have been introduced around the pore or P-region of the Na+ channel repeats. Site-directed mutagenesis has identified critical residues in the pore from the primary structure involved in sensitivity to TTX and STX and other pore properties. Chemical modification of cysteine mutants of these initial residues by methanethiosulfonate compounds produces an expanded data base of the secondary structure of the toxins` receptors. Specific peptides which mimic these receptors will be made to compete with the natural receptor for the toxins. We have successfully cloned the cDNAs for both human heart and brain sodium channels and expressed functional proteins. The initial chemical modification data suggests file receptor sites for TTX/STX are not interchangeable and are not the same site.

Brown, A.M.; Hartmann, H.A.

1994-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

457

Aluminium alloy based hydrogen storage tank operated with sodium aluminium hexahydride Na3AlH6  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Here we present the development of an aluminium alloy based hydrogen storage tank, charged with Ti-doped sodium aluminium hexahydride Na3AlH6. This hydride has a theoretical hydrogen storage capacity of 3 mass-% and can be operated at lower pressure compared to sodium alanate NaAlH4. The tank was made of aluminium alloy EN AW 6082 T6. The heat transfer was realised through an oil flow in a bayonet heat exchanger, manufactured by extrusion moulding from aluminium alloy EN AW 6060 T6. Na3AlH6 is prepared from 4 mol-% TiCl3 doped sodium aluminium tetrahydride NaAlH4 by addition of two moles of sodium hydride NaH in ball milling process. The hydrogen storage tank was filled with 213 g of doped Na3AlH6 in dehydrogenated state. Maximum of 3.6 g (1.7 mass-% of the hydride mass) of hydrogen was released from the hydride at approximately 450 K and the same hydrogen mass was consumed at 2.5 MPa hydrogenation pressure. 45 cycle tests (rehydrogenation and dehydrogenation) were carried out without any failure of the tank or its components. Operation of the tank under real conditions indicated the possibility for applications with stationary HT-PEM fuel cell systems.

R. Urbanczyk; K. Peinecke; M. Felderhoff; K. Hauschild; W. Kersten; S. Peil; D. Bathen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Small angle neutron scattering study of deuterated sodium dodecylsulfate micellization in dilute poly((2edimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Small angle neutron scattering study of deuterated sodium dodecylsulfate micellization in dilute 2010 Keywords: Poly((2edimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) Micelle Small angle neutron scattering a b angle neutron scattering. We found three transitions of the poly ((2edimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate

Kofinas, Peter

459

Sodium-dependent transport of neutral amino acids by whole cells and membrane vesicles of Streptococcus bovis, a ruminal bacterium.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...diluted into either lithium or choline chloride...was inhibited by an excess of threonine, but...diluted into either lithium or choline chloride...was inhibited by an excess of threonine, but...choline chloride, lithium chloride, or sodium...presence of a 70-fold excess of nonlabeled L-threonine...

J B Russell; H J Strobel; A J Driessen; W N Konings

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Second harmonic signal detection on Poly[µ2-L-alanine-µ3-nitrato-sodium (I)] crystals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Crystals of poly (L-alanine sodium nitrate) have been grown by the slow evaporation at room temperature method. Crystal sizes of 500mm and 10 mm were obtained. UV-vis spectrum shows a wide transparent window where lake of absorption around the 532 nm. ... Keywords: L- alanine, NLO, SHG, alanine, semiorganic

E. Gallegos-Loya; E. Alvarez Ramos; E. Regalado; A. Duarte-Moller

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Physiological responses to training and racing in two year-old Quarter Horses fed Sodium Zeolite A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Table 82A Page Packed cell volume ('/0) at recovery 10 minutes in two- year-old Quarter Horses fed varying amounts of Sodium Zeolite A Table 83A. Packed cell volume (/o) at recovery 20 minutes in two- year-old Quarter Horses fed varying amounts...

Reynolds, Judith Amy Lundgren

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

462

Partial Pressure of Saturated Sodium Nitrite Vapor over the System NaNO2-NaNO3  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The partial pressure of sodium nitrite was measured in the system NaNO2-NaNO3...at temperatures of 798, 823, and 848 K and the logarithm of the NaNO2 pressure was obtained as a function of inverse temperature. Th...

V. I. Glazov; G. P. Dukhanin; M. Kh. Dkhaibe…

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

High-Pressure Synthesis and Structure Determination of K6(SeO4)(SeO5), The First Potassium Orthoselenate(VI)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors report on the first synthesis of a potassium orthoselenate(VI), K{sub 6}(SeO{sub 4})(SeO{sub 5}), and the structure determination from synchrotron powder diffraction data. The title compound crystallizes in the tetragonal space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 with a = 8.1259(1) {angstrom}, c = 17.4953(2) {angstrom}, V = 1155.21(2) {angstrom}{sup 3}, and Z = 4. Selenium displays two different complex anions, tetrahedral SeO{sub 4}{sup 2-} and trigonal-bipyramidal SeO{sub 5}{sup 4-}. When the formula is reduced to A{sub 3}B, the spatial arrangement of the constituting building units can be derived from the Li{sub 3}Bi type of structure.

Orosel,D.; Dinnebeier, R.; Jansen, M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Effect of co-doped SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles on photoluminescence of cu-doped potassium lithium borate glass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SnO{sub 2} co-doped lithium potassium borate glasses doped with 0.05, 0.10, 0.25 and 0.50 mol% of Cu were synthesized by the melt quenching technique. The SnO{sub 2} co-dope was added to the compounds in the amounts of 0.05, 0.10, and 0.20 mol%. The photoluminescent spectrum for different concentrations of copper was studied. It was observed that the intensity of blue emission (450, 490 nm) varies with concentration mol%. In addition, with different concentration of SnO{sub 2} to 0.10 mol% Cu, the influence of the luminescence has been observed to enhance intensity and shifted to blue and red (490, 535 nm) emissions.

Namma, Haydar Aboud; Wagiran, H.; Hussin, R.; Ariwahjoedi, B. [Department of Physics, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Skudai 81310, Malaysia and Baghdad College of Economic Sciences University (Iraq); Fundamental and Applied Sciences Department, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, 31750 Tronoh (Malaysia)

2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

465

NIDC: Online Catalog of Isotope Products | Product Search  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Product Search Product Search Step 1 - Enter your search criteria below. Element Name Actinium Aluminum Americium Antimony Argon Arsenic Astatine Barium Berkelium Beryllium Bismuth Bohrium Boron Bromine Cadmium Caesium Calcium Californium Carbon Cerium Chlorine Chromium Cobalt Copernicium Copper Curium Darmstadtium Dubnium Dysprosium Einsteinium Erbium Europium Fermium Fluorine Francium Gadolinium Gallium Germanium Gold Hafnium Hassium Helium Holmium Hydrogen Indium Iodine Iridium Iron Krypton Lanthanum Lawrencium Lead Lithium Lutetium Magnesium Manganese Meitnerium Mendelevium Mercury Molybdenum Neodymium Neon Neptunium Nickel Niobium Nitrogen Nobelium Osmium Oxygen Palladium Phosphorus Platinum Plutonium Polonium Potassium Praseodymium Promethium Protactinium Radium Radon Rhenium Rhodium Roentgenium Rubidium Ruthenium Rutherfordium Samarium Scandium Seaborgium Selenium Silicon Silver Sodium Strontium Sulfur Tantalum Technetium Tellurium Terbium Thallium Thorium Thulium Tin Titanium Tungsten Ununhexium Ununoctium Ununpentium Ununquadium Ununseptium Ununtrium Uranium Vanadium Xenon Ytterbium Yttrium Zinc Zirconium

466

NIDC: Online Catalog of Isotope Products | Request a New Product  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Request a New Product Request a New Product Step 1 - Enter the new product's criteria below. Element Name Actinium Aluminum Americium Antimony Argon Arsenic Astatine Barium Berkelium Beryllium Bismuth Bohrium Boron Bromine Cadmium Caesium Calcium Californium Carbon Cerium Chlorine Chromium Cobalt Copernicium Copper Curium Darmstadtium Dubnium Dysprosium Einsteinium Erbium Europium Fermium Fluorine Francium Gadolinium Gallium Germanium Gold Hafnium Hassium Helium Holmium Hydrogen Indium Iodine Iridium Iron Krypton Lanthanum Lawrencium Lead Lithium Lutetium Magnesium Manganese Meitnerium Mendelevium Mercury Molybdenum Neodymium Neon Neptunium Nickel Niobium Nitrogen Nobelium Osmium Oxygen Palladium Phosphorus Platinum Plutonium Polonium Potassium Praseodymium Promethium Protactinium Radium Radon Rhenium Rhodium Roentgenium Rubidium Ruthenium Rutherfordium Samarium Scandium Seaborgium Selenium Silicon Silver Sodium Strontium Sulfur Tantalum Technetium Tellurium Terbium Thallium Thorium Thulium Tin Titanium Tungsten Ununhexium Ununoctium Ununpentium Ununquadium Ununseptium Ununtrium Uranium Vanadium Xenon Ytterbium Yttrium Zinc Zirconium

467

Sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate-assisted synthesis through a hydrothermal reaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphical abstract: Reaction of a SeCl{sub 4} aqueous solution with a NiCl{sub 2}·6H{sub 2}O aqueous solution in presence of sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS) as capping agent and hydrazine (N{sub 2}H{sub 4}·H{sub 2}O) as reductant, produces nanosized nickel selenide through a hydrothermal method. The effect of temperature, reaction time and amounts of reductant on the morphology, particle sizes of NiSe nanostructures has been investigated. Highlights: ? NiSe nanostructures were synthesized by hydrothermal method. ? A novel Se source was used to synthesize NiSe. ? SDBS as capping agent plays a crucial role on the morphology of products. ? A mixture of Ni{sub 3}Se{sub 2} and NiSe was prepared in the presence of 2 ml hydrazine. ? A pure phase of NiSe was prepared in the presence of 4 or 6 ml hydrazine. -- Abstract: The effects of the anionic surfactant on the morphology, size and crystallization of NiSe precipitated from NiCl{sub 2}·6H{sub 2}O and SeCl{sub 4} in presence of hydrazine (N{sub 2}H{sub 4}·H{sub 2}O) as reductant were investigated. The products have been successfully synthesized in presence of sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS) as surfactant via an improved hydrothermal route. A variety of synthesis parameters, such as reaction time and temperature, capping agent and amount of reducing agent have a significant effect on the particle size, phase purity and morphology of the obtained products. The sample size became bigger with decreasing reaction temperature and increasing reaction time. In the presence of 2 ml hydrazine, the samples were found to be the mixture of Ni{sub 3}Se{sub 2} and NiSe. With increasing the reaction time and amount of hydrazine a pure phase of hexagonal NiSe was obtained. X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images indicate phase, particle size and morphology of the products. Chemical composition and purity of the products were characterized by X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Photoluminescence (PL) was used to study the optical properties of NiSe samples.

Sobhani, Azam [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Kashan, Kashan, P.O. Box 87317–51167, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Kashan, Kashan, P.O. Box 87317–51167, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salavati-Niasari, Masoud, E-mail: salavati@kashanu.ac.ir [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Kashan, Kashan, P.O. Box 87317–51167, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of) [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Kashan, Kashan, P.O. Box 87317–51167, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute of Nano Science and Nano Technology, University of Kashan, Kashan, P.O. Box 87317–51167, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

468

Phase 2 TWR Steam Reforming Test for Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

About one million gallons of acidic, hazardous, and radioactive sodium-bearing waste (SBW) is stored in stainless steel tanks a the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), which is a major operating facility of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Steam reforming is a candidate technology being investigated for converting the SBW into a road ready waste form that can be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico for interment. Fluidized bed steam reforming technology, licensed to ThermoChem Waste Remediation, LLC (TWR) by Manufacturing Technology Conversion International, was tested in two phases using an INEEL (Department of Energy) fluidized bed test system located at the Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) Science and Technology Applications Research Center in Idaho Falls, Idaho. The Phase 1 tests were reported earlier. The Phase 2 tests are reported here. For Phase 2, the process feed rate, reductant stoichiometry, and process temperature were varied to identify and demonstrate how the process might be optimized to improve operation and product characteristics. The first week of testing was devoted primarily to process chemistry and the second week was devoted more toward bed stability and particle size control.

Nicholas R. Soelberg; Doug Marshall; Dean Taylor; Steven Bates

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Status of advanced fuel candidates for Sodium Fast Reactor within the Generation IV International Forum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main challenge for fuels for future Sodium Fast Reactor systems is the development and qualification of a nuclear fuel sub-assembly which meets the Generation IV International Forum goals. The Advanced Fuel project investigates high burn-up minor actinide bearing fuels as well as claddings and wrappers to withstand high neutron doses and temperatures. The R&D outcome of national and collaborative programs has been collected and shared between the AF project members in order to review the capability of sub-assembly material and fuel candidates, to identify the issues and select the viable options. Based on historical experience and knowledge, both oxide and metal fuels emerge as primary options to meet the performance and the reliability goals of Generation IV SFR systems. There is a significant positive experience on carbide fuels but major issues remain to be overcome: strong in-pile swelling, atmosphere required for fabrication as well as Pu and Am losses. The irradiation performance database for nitride fuels is limited with longer term R&D activities still required. The promising core material candidates are Ferritic/Martensitic (F/M) and Oxide Dispersed Strengthened (ODS) steels.

F. Delage; J. Carmack; C. B. Lee; T. Mizuno; M. Pelletier; J. Somers

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

On the Criticality Safety of Transuranic Sodium Fast Reactor Fuel Transport Casks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work addresses the neutronic performance and criticality safety issues of transport casks for fuel pertaining to low conversion ratio sodium cooled fast reactors, conventionally known as Advanced Burner Reactors. The criticality of a one, three, seven and 19-assembly cask capacity is presented. Both dry “helium” and flooded “water” filled casks are considered. No credit for fuel burnup or fission products was assumed. As many as possible of the conservatisms used in licensing light water reactor universal transport casks were incorporated into this SFR cask criticality design and analysis. It was found that at 7-assemblies or more, adding moderator to the SFR cask increases criticality margin. Also, removal of MAs from the fuel increases criticality margin of dry casks and takes a slight amount of margin away for wet casks. Assuming credit for borated fuel tube liners, this design analysis suggests that as many as 19 assemblies can be loaded in a cask if limited purely by criticality safety. If no credit for boron is assumed, the cask could possibly hold seven assemblies if low conversion ratio fast reactor grade fuel and not breeder reactor grade fuel is assumed. The analysis showed that there is a need for new cask designs for fast reactors spent fuel transportation. There is a potential of modifying existing transportation cask design as the starting point for fast reactor spent fuel transportation.

Samuel Bays; Ayodeji Alajo

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

The case for endurance testing of sodium-heated steam generators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is generally believed that a nuclear power comeback before the end of the century will be through the vehicle of the light water reactor (LWR). The newer designs, with their important technical and economic advances, should attract wide interest and result in commercial success for the manufacturers and their utility customers. To develop the liquid-metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR), approximately $30 billion has been spent worldwide, a third of which has been spent in the US. As a result of this considerable investment, most of the technical obstacles to deployment of the LMFBR have been removed with a few exceptions, one of which is the long-term performance of sodium-heated steam generators. Of the difficulties that have beset the current vintage of nuclear power plants, the performance of steam generators in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) was the most egregious. There was very little development testing and no model testing of PWR steam generators. Development occurred in the plants themselves resulting in many outages and more than $5 billion in lost revenue and replacement power costs. As a result, the electric utility industry is certain to exercise caution regarding acquisition of the LMFBR and will demand strong objective evidence of steam generator reliability. Only long-term endurance testing of prototypic models under prototypic conditions will satisfy this demand.

Onesto, A.T.; Zweig, H.R.; Gibbs, D.C. (Energy Technology Engineering Center, Canoga Park, CA (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Sodium bromide electron-extraction layers for polymer bulk-heterojunction solar cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inexpensive and non-toxic sodium bromide (NaBr) was introduced into polymer solar cells (PSCs) as the cathode buffer layer (CBL) and the electron extraction characteristics of the NaBr CBL were investigated in detail. The PSCs based on NaBr CBL with different thicknesses (i.e., 0?nm, 0.5?nm, 1?nm, and 1.5?nm) were prepared and studied. The optimal thickness of NaBr was 1?nm according to the photovoltaic data of PSCs. The open-circuit voltage (V{sub oc}), short-circuit current density (J{sub sc}), fill factor (FF), and power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the PSC with 1?nm NaBr were evaluated to be 0.58?V, 7.36?mA/cm{sup 2}, 0.63, and 2.70%, respectively, which were comparable to those of the reference device with the commonly used LiF. The optimized photovoltaic performance of PSC with 1?nm NaBr was ascribed to the improved electron transport and extraction capability of 1?nm NaBr in PSCs. In addition, the NaBr CBL could prevent the diffusion of oxygen and water vapor into the active layer and prolong the lifetime of the devices to some extent. Therefore, NaBr layer could be considered as a promising non-toxic CBL for PSCs in future.

Gao, Zhi; Qu, Bo, E-mail: bqu@pku.edu.cn; Xiao, Lixin; Chen, Zhijian [State Key Laboratory for Artificial Microstructures and Mesoscopic Physics, Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China) [State Key Laboratory for Artificial Microstructures and Mesoscopic Physics, Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); New Display Device and System Integration Collaborative Innovation Center of the West Coast of the Taiwan Strait, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Zhang, Lipei [State Key Laboratory for Artificial Microstructures and Mesoscopic Physics, Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [State Key Laboratory for Artificial Microstructures and Mesoscopic Physics, Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Gong, Qihuang [State Key Laboratory for Artificial Microstructures and Mesoscopic Physics, Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China) [State Key Laboratory for Artificial Microstructures and Mesoscopic Physics, Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing 100871 (China)

2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

473

Experimental Investigation on Density Wave Instability of Sodium Boiling Two-Phase Flow in an Annulus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experiments of density wave instability in a liquid sodium boiling two-phase flow experiments in an annulus were carried out in the following parameters range: heat flux from 80 kW/m{sup 2} to 976 kW/m{sup 2}, inlet subcooling from 25.6 deg. C to 226.8 deg. C, mass flow rate from 7.92 kg/h to 68.9 kg/h, system pressure from 2600 Pa to 0.12 Mpa. Not only the mechanism of the instability, critical conditions and oscillation period, but also the effects of pressure, mass flow rate and inlet subcooling on the density wave instability were explored experimentally and theoretically. From the experimental data, it was found that the lower the inlet temperature was, the higher the system pressure and the mass flow rate that could result in a more stable boiling two-phase flow were. A correlation for the density wave instability was obtained on from the dimensional analysis for the conservation equations of mass, momentum and energy. (authors)

Suizheng Qiu; Dounan Jia [Xi'an Jiaotong University, No.28, Xianning West Road, Xi'an, Shaanxi, 710049 (China); Minoru Takahashi [Tokyo Institute of Technology, O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152 (Japan)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Steam Reforming Application for Treatment of DOE Sodium Bearing Tank Wastes at INL for ICP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The patented THOR® steam reforming waste treatment technology has been selected as the technology of choice for treatment of Sodium Bearing Waste (SBW) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for the Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP). SBW is an acidic tank waste at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at INL. It consists primarily of waste from decontamination activities and laboratory wastes. SBW contains high concentrations of nitric acid, alkali and aluminum nitrates, with minor amounts of many inorganic compounds including radionuclides, mainly cesium and strontium. The THOR® steam reforming process will convert the SBW tank waste feed into a dry, solid, granular product. The THOR® technology was selected to treat SBW, in part, because it can provide flexible disposal options to accommodate the final disposition path selected for SBW. THOR® can produce a final end-product that will meet anticipated requirements for disposal as Remote-Handled TRU (RH-TRU) waste; and, with modifications, THOR® can also produce a final endproduct that could be qualified for disposal as High Level Waste (HLW). SBW treatment will be take place within the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU), a new facility that will be located at the INTEC. This paper provides an overview of the THOR® process chemistry and process equipment being designed for the IWTU.

J. Bradley Mason; Kevin Ryan; Scott Roesener; Michael Cowen; Duane Schmoker; Pat Bacala; Bill Landman

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Membrane formation by preferential solvation of ions in mixture of water, 3-methylpyridine, and sodium tetraphenylborate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The structure and dynamics of a ternary system composed of deuterium oxide (D{sub 2}O), 3-methylpyridine (3MP), and sodium tetraphenylborate (NaBPh{sub 4}) are investigated by means of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and neutron spin echo (NSE) techniques. In the SANS experiments, a structural phase transition is confirmed between a disordered-phase and an ordered-lamellar-phase upon variation of the composition and/or temperature of the mixture. The characteristic lengths of the structures is on the sub-micrometer scale. A dispersion relation of the structure is measured through NSE experiments, which shows that the relaxation rate follows a cubic relation with momentum transfer. This implies that the dynamics of the system are determined predominantly by membrane fluctuations. The present results indicate that 3MP-rich domains are microscopically separated from bulk water in the presence of NaBPh{sub 4}, and that the layers behave as membranes. These results are interpreted that preferential solvation of salt in each solvent induces a microphase separation between the solvents, and the periodic structure of 3MP-rich domains is stabilized by the long-range electrostatic interaction arising from Na{sup +} ions in D{sub 2}O-rich domains.

Sadakane, Koichiro, E-mail: sadakane@fc.ritsumei.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Ritsumeikan University, Noji-Higashi 1-1-1, Kusatsu 525-8577 (Japan)] [Department of Physics, Ritsumeikan University, Noji-Higashi 1-1-1, Kusatsu 525-8577 (Japan); Nagao, Michihiro [NIST Center for Neutron Research, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-6102 (United States) [NIST Center for Neutron Research, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-6102 (United States); Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47408-1398 (United States); Endo, Hitoshi; Seto, Hideki [KENS and CMRC, Institute of Materials Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan)] [KENS and CMRC, Institute of Materials Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan)

2013-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

476

Removal of ash from Indian Assam coking coal using sodium hydroxide and acid solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mineral matter (ash) removal from Assam coking coal by leaching with different concentrations of sodium hydroxide and acid (HCl, H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, HNO{sub 3}, and HF) solutions has been investigated at a temperature of 75 C. The parameters tested were concentration of NaOH, type of acid, concentration of acids, and number of acid leaching steps. Total ash removed increased with increase of NaOH and acid concentrations up to the range studied. For the same experimental conditions, treatment of caustic leached coal in HCl acid resulted in better demineralization than in H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} or HNO{sub 3} acid. In the NaOH-HNO{sub 3} leaching method, a higher concentration (>20%) of HNO{sub 3} acid had an adverse effect on the de-ashing of coal. The NaOH-HF leaching process has been found to be the most effective method of coal de-ashing. The two acid treatment steps (HCl-H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/HCl-HNO{sub 3}) after caustic leaching are the next most effective methods of coal de-ashing. The removal of mineral matter (including S) from coal is expected to decrease the graphite reactivity and thus the atmospheric pollution (due to the generation of smaller quantities of CO and SO{sub 2} gases).

Kumar, M.; Shankar, R.H.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

The corrosion behavior of molybdenum and Hastelloy B in sulfur and sodium polysulfides at 623 K  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental study was completed to determine the corrosion behavior of molybdenum and Hastelloy B, a nickel-based alloy with high molybdenum content, in sulfur and sodium polysulfides (Na/sub 2/S/sub 3/,Na/sub 2/S/sub 4/, Na/sub 2/S/sub 5/) at 623 K. In sulfur, molybdenum corrodes very slowly, with a parabolic rate constant of 3.6 x 10/sup -9/ cm s/sup -1/2/. Hastelloy B shows no measurable corrosion after 100h of exposure to sulfur. The corrosion reaction of molybdenum in Na/sub 2/S/sub 3/ is characterized by the formation of a protective film that effectively eliminates further corrosion after the first 100h of exposure. Hastelloy B, however, corrodes rapidly in Na/sub 2/S/sub 3/, with corrosion rates approaching those of pure nickel under the same conditions. After the first 4h of exposure, the kinetics for the corrosion of Hastelloy B in Na/sub 2/S/sub 3/ follows a linear rate law. The scale morphology has multiple spalled layers of NiS/sub 2/, with some crystallites of NiS/sub 2/ appearing on the leading face of the scale and between the individual scale layers. This spalling causes smaller coupons of the Hastelloy B to corrode faster than larger coupons.

Brown, A.P.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Interactions between mica surfaces in sodium polyacrylate solutions containing calcium ions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Polyacrylic acid (PAA) and its salts find use in a number of different applications, such as in fluids for secondary oil recovery, as dispersing agents for mineral suspensions in, for example, ceramic and paper coating applications, and as flocculants for waste-water treatment. The forces acting between negatively charged muscovite mica surfaces immersed in solutions containing sodium polyacrylate (NaPAA) have been studied. No evidence for PAA adsorption in the absence of calcium ions in the solution was found. However, at a CaCl[sub 2] concentration of about 3 [times] 10[sup [minus]3] M a layer of PAA adsorbed on each surface. At large separations, the forces between the PAA-coated surfaces were dominated by repulsive double-layer forces. At separations below 50--80 [angstrom], depending on the solution conditions, an attractive force in excess of the van der Waals attraction was observed. The adhesion force between the layers was 7-8 mN / m at pH 6 and increased somewhat with increasing pH to about 9 mN/m at pH 10. The authors argue that both the long-range attraction and the adhesion force primarily are due to COO[sup [minus

Berg, J.M.; Claesson, P.M. (Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept of Physical Chemistry); Neuman, R.D. (Auburn Univ., AL (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Development and Testing of an Americium/Lanthanide Separation Flowsheet Using Sodium Bismuthate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The separation of Am from the lanthanides and curium is a key step in proposed advanced fuel cycle scenarios. The partitioning and transmutation of Am is desirable to minimize the long-term heat load of material interred in a future high-level waste repository. A separation process amenable to process scale-up remains elusive. Given only subtle chemistry differences within and between the ions of the trivalent actinide and lanthanide series this separation is challenging ; however, higher oxidation states of americium can be prepared using sodium bismuthate and separated via solvent extraction using diamylamylphosphonate (DAAP) extraction. Among the other trivalent metals only Ce is also oxidized and extracted. Due to the long-term instability of Am(VI) , the loaded organic phase is readily selectively stripped to partition the actinide to a new acidic aqueous phase. Batch extraction distribution ratio measurements were used to design a flowsheet to accomplish this separation. Additionally, crossflow filtration was investigated as a method to filter the bismuthate solids from the feed solution prior to extraction. Results of the filtration studies, flowsheet development work and flowsheet performance testing using a centrifugal contactor are detailed.

Jack Law; Bruce Mincher; Troy Garn; Mitchell Greenhalgh; Nicholas Schmitt; Veronica Rutledge

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

A Reliable Steam Generator That Will Allow the Elimination of the Secondary Sodium Circuit in an LMFBR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A particular weakness of the commercial liquid-metal fast breeder reactor is the design of the steam generator (SG). Any small leak in the SG allows the hot sodium (Na) to come into contact with the water/steam, and this results in a violent reaction and SG damage. A secondary circuit is normally used to prevent such reactions causing damage to the reactor core and primary vessel.NNC Ltd. has developed a copper (Cu)-bonded SG system, the objective of which