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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Sodium and potassium levels in the serum of acutely irradiated and non-irradiated rats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SODIUM AND POTASSIUM LEVELS IN THE SERUM OF ACUTELY IRRADIATED AND NON-IRRADIATED RATS A Thesis By DAVID PRESTON SHEPHERD Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1967 Major Subject: Zoology SODIUM AND POTASSIUM LEVELS IN THE SERUM OF ACUTELY IRRADIATED AND NON-IRRADIATED RATS A Thesis By DAVID PRESTON SHEPHERD Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head...

Shepherd, David Preston

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Solar-thermal Water Splitting Using the Sodium Manganese Oxide Process & Preliminary H2A Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are three primary reactions in the sodium manganese oxide high temperature water splitting cycle. In the first reaction, Mn2O3 is decomposed to MnO at 1,500°C and 50 psig. This reaction occurs in a high temperature solar reactor and has a heat of reaction of 173,212 J/mol. Hydrogen is produced in the next step of this cycle. This step occurs at 700°C and 1 atm in the presence of sodium hydroxide. Finally, water is added in the hydrolysis step, which removes NaOH and regenerates the original reactant, Mn2O3. The high temperature solar?driven step for decomposing Mn2O3 to MnO can be carried out to high conversion without major complication in an inert environment. The second step to produce H2 in the presence of sodium hydroxide is also straightforward and can be completed. The third step, the low temperature step to recover the sodium hydroxide is the most difficult. The amount of energy required to essentially distill water to recover sodium hydroxide is prohibitive and too costly. Methods must be found for lower cost recovery. This report provides information on the use of ZnO as an additive to improve the recovery of sodium hydroxide.

Todd M. Francis, Paul R. Lichty, Christopher Perkins, Melinda Tucker, Peter B. Kreider, Hans H. Funke, Allan Lewandowski, and Alan W. Weimer

2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

3

Facilitated transport of sodium or potassium chloride across vesicle membranes using a ditopic salt-binding macrobicycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Facilitated transport of sodium or potassium chloride across vesicle membranes using a ditopic salt or potassium chloride as a contact ion-pair, is shown to effect- ively transport either salt across vesicle membranes. Sig- nificant transport is observed even when the transporter : phospholipid ratio is as low as 1

Smith, Bradley D.

4

Boiling behavior of sodium-potassium alloy in a bench-scale solar receiver  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During 1989-90, a 75-kW{sub t} sodium reflux pool-boiler solar receiver was successfully demonstrated at Sandia National Laboratories. Significant features of this receiver include (1) boiling sodium as the heat transfer medium and (2) electric-discharge-machined (EDM) cavities as artificial nucleation sites to stabilize boiling. Since this first demonstration, design of a second-generation pool-boiler receiver that will bring the concept closer to commercialization has begun. For long life, the new receiver uses Haynes Alloy 230. For increased safety factors against film boiling and flooding, it has a refined shape and somewhat larger dimensions. To eliminate the need for trace heating, the receiver will boil the sodium-potassium alloy NaK-78 instead of sodium. To reduce manufacturing costs, it will use one of a number of alternatives to EDM cavities for stabilization of boiling. To control incipient-boiling superheats, especially during hot restarts, it will contain a small amount of inert gas. Before the new receiver design could be finalized, bench-scale tests of some of the proposed changes were necessary. A series of bench-scale pool boilers were built from Haynes Alloy 230 and filled with NaK-78. Various boiling-stabilizer candidates were incorporated into them, including laser-drilled cavities and a number of different sintered-powder-metal coatings. These bench-scale pool boilers have been operated at temperatures up to 750{degree}C, heated by quartz lamps with incident radiant fluxes up to 95 W/cm{sup 2}. The effects of various orientations and added gases have been studied. results of these studies are presented. 15 refs.

Moreno, J.B.; Andraka, C.E.; Moss, T.A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

A High Temperature (400 to 650oC) Secondary Storage Battery Based on Liquid Sodium and Potassium Anodes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This STTR Phase I research program was on the development of high temperature (400 to 650 C), secondary batteries with roundtrip efficiency > 90% for integration with a 3 to 10 kW solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system. In fulfillment of this objective, advanced planar high temperature rechargeable batteries, comprised of an alkali metal ion conducting, highly refractory, beta'' alumina solid electrolyte (BASE) sandwiched between liquid sodium (or potassium) anode and liquid metal salt cathode, were developed at MSRI. The batteries have been successfully demonstrated at a working temperature as high as 600 C. To our knowledge, so far no work has been reported in the literature on planar rechargeable batteries based on BASE, and results obtained in Phase I for the very first time demonstrated the viability of planar batteries, though relatively low temperature tubular-based sodium-sulfur batteries and ZEBRA batteries have been actively developed by very limited non U.S. companies. The results of this Phase I work have fulfilled all the goals and stated objectives, and the achievements showed much promise for further, substantial improvements in battery design and performance. The important results of Phase I are briefly described in what follows: (1) Both Na-BASE and K-BASE discs and tubes have been successfully fabricated using MSRI's patented vapor phase process. Ionic conductivity measurements showed that Na-BASE had higher ionic conductivity than K-BASE, consistence with the literature. At 500 C, Na-BASE conductivity is 0.36 S/cm, which is more than 20 times higher than 8YSZ electrolyte used for SOFC at 800 C. The activation energy is 22.58 kJ/mol. (2) CuCl{sub 2}, FeCl{sub 2}, ZnCl{sub 2}, and AgCl were identified as suitable salts for Na/metal salt or K/metal salt electrochemical couples based on thermochemical data. Further open circuit voltage measurements matched those deduced from the thermochemical data. (3) Tubular cells with CuCl{sub 2} as the cathode and Na as the anode were constructed. However, it was discovered that CuCl{sub 2} was somewhat corrosive and dissolved iron, an element of the cathode compartment. Since protective coating technology was beyond this Phase I work scope, no further work on the CuCl{sub 2} cathode was pursued in Phase I. Notwithstanding, due to its very high OCV and high specific energy, CuCl{sub 2} cathode is a very attractive possibility for a battery capable of delivering higher specific energy with higher voltage. Further investigation of the Na-CuCl{sub 2} battery can be done by using suitable metal coating technologies developed at MSRI for high temperature applications. (4) In Phase I, FeCl{sub 2} and ZnCl{sub 2} were finalized as the potential cathodes for Na-metal salt batteries for delivering high specific energies. Planar Na-FeCl{sub 2} and Na-ZnCl{sub 2} cells were designed, constructed, and tested between 350 and 600 C. Investigation of charge/discharge characteristics showed they were the most promising batteries. Charge/discharge cycles were performed as many as 27 times, and charge/discharge current was as high as 500 mA. No failure was detected after 50 hours testing. (5) Three-cell planar stacks were designed, constructed, and evaluated. Preliminary tests showed further investigation was needed for optimization. (6) Freeze-thaw survival was remarkably good for planar BASE discs fabricated by MSRI's patented vapor phase process.

Tao, Greg; Weber, Neill

2007-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

6

The feasibility of meeting the World Health Organization guidelines for sodium and potassium: a cross-national comparison study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and meat/poultry mixed dishes, are among the most important sources of dietary sodium in the US.31 32 Processed foods, including breads, cereals and grains contribute a majority of sodium in the United Kingdom, and France as well.12 33 It is important...

Drewnowski, Adam; Rehm, Colin D.; Maillot, Matthieu; Mendoza, Alfonso; Monsivais, Pablo

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Potassium & Potassium Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Potassium & Potassium Management Carrie Laboski Department of Soil Science UW- Madison #12;Havlin Not irrigated #12;Environmental Factors Affecting K Availability to a Plant Soil moisture Low soil moisture moisture will increase K diffusion Increase soil moisture from 10 to 28 % can increase toatl K transport

Balser, Teri C.

8

E-Print Network 3.0 - acidic potassium permanganate Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

State University General Guidelines Summary: acid Aminoalkanoic acids with 6 or fewer carbon atoms and the ammonium, sodium and potassium salts... of these acids. Amino acids...

9

aqueous sodium chloride: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

made with either sodium chloride or potassium chloride. The addition of 75 or 150 porn N02 did not lower plate counts (P&0. 05... Kayfus, Timothy Jon 2012-06-07 58 Systematic...

10

E-Print Network 3.0 - aqueous potassium fluoride Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and sugar alcohols... 2+ , Mn 3+ , Mn 4+ , Mn 7+; Potassium, K +; Sodium, Na +; Strontium, Sr 2+; Tin, Sn 2+; Titanium, Ti Source: Cohen, Robert E. - Department of Chemical...

11

Down-State Model of the Voltage-Sensing Domain of a Potassium Channel Eric V. Schow,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

traveling along nerve cells are propagated via action potentials generated by sodium and potassium ionsDown-State Model of the Voltage-Sensing Domain of a Potassium Channel Eric V. Schow, J. Alfredo changes upon membrane depolarization, from a down state when the channel is at rest to an up state, all

White, Stephen

12

Reversible Sodium Ion Insertion in Single Crystalline Manganese Oxide  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0 Resource Program September 2010 B O N N Ewebfor

13

Action of manganese on puberty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Mn than adults, we wanted to determine the effects of Mn exposure on puberty-related hormones and the onset of puberty, and discern the site and mechanism of Mn action. We demonstrated that the central administration of manganese chloride (MnCl2...

Lee, Bo Yeon

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

14

Scattering lengths for collisions between sodium and potassium atoms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Venturi,V. Jamieson,M.J. Cote,R. Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics, Vol. 34 pp 4339-4347

Venturi, V.

15

New manganese catalyst for light alkane oxidation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Aluminophosphates containing manganese in the structural framework are employed for the oxidation of alkanes, for example the vapor phase oxidation of methane to methanol.

Durante, Vincent A. (West Chester, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA); Walker, Darrell W. (Visalia, CA); Marcus, Bonita K. (Radnor, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Effects of dietary potassium and sodium on magnesium and potassium balance in lambs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

allow a more adequate evaluation of the K status of an animal. Magnesium (Mg) absorption is depressed when animals are fed high levels of K (Greene, 1983a, b, c; Field and Suttle, 1979; MacGregor and Armstrong, 1979; Thomas and Potter, 1976; Suttle... reserves of K in contrast to the bone reserves of Ca, Mg, Na or P. The normal kidney functions to remove excess K from the plasma and even under dangerously low body K concentrations, renal excretion of X continues. Cowan and Phillips (1973) observed a...

Poe, Julie Hamilton

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Examining Hysteresis in Lithium- and Manganese-Rich Composite...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Hysteresis in Lithium- and Manganese-Rich Composite Cathode Materials Examining Hysteresis in Lithium- and Manganese-Rich Composite Cathode Materials 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel...

18

Addressing the Voltage Fade Issue with Lithium-Manganese-Rich...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Addressing the Voltage Fade Issue with Lithium-Manganese-Rich Oxide Cathode Materials Addressing the Voltage Fade Issue with Lithium-Manganese-Rich Oxide Cathode Materials 2013 DOE...

19

Addressing the Voltage Fade Issue with Lithium-Manganese-Rich...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Voltage Fade Issue with Lithium-Manganese-Rich Oxide Cathode Materials Addressing the Voltage Fade Issue with Lithium-Manganese-Rich Oxide Cathode Materials 2012 DOE Hydrogen and...

20

Thermodynamic Investigations of Lithium- and Manganese-Rich Transition...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Thermodynamic Investigations of Lithium- and Manganese-Rich Transition Metal Oxides Thermodynamic Investigations of Lithium- and Manganese-Rich Transition Metal Oxides 2013 DOE...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Molecular Interactions of Plutonium(VI) with SyntheticManganese...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Interactions of Plutonium(VI) with Synthetic Manganese-Substituted Goethite. Molecular Interactions of Plutonium(VI) with Synthetic Manganese-Substituted Goethite. Abstract:...

22

Hair As A Biomarker Of Environmental Manganese Exposure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neuropsychological correlates of hair arsenic, manganese,and physiology of hair. , Forensic Science International 63,D. (2010) High levels of hair manganese in children living

Eastman, Rachel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Coupling between the voltage-sensing and pore domains in a voltage-gated potassium channel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-dependent potassium (Kv), sodium (Nav), and calcium channels open and close in response to changes in transmembrane (TM) potential, thus regulating cell excitability by controlling ion flow across the membrane, but it is generally accepted that, when the channel is closed, the VSDs adopt a "down-state" configuration in which

White, Stephen

24

Original article Intestinal transfer of manganese  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Original article Intestinal transfer of manganese: resemblance to and competition with calcium Y of calcium, phosphate and the sugars lactose and sorbitol on the intestinal absorption of manganese were retention of 54Mn, while phosphate decreased it. In situ ileal loop studies indicated that Mn absorption

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

25

MANGANESE--2003 48.1 By Lisa A. Corathers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, including its ironmaking component, has accounted for most of the domestic manganese demand, presently

Torgersen, Christian

26

Preparation of anionic clay-birnessite manganese oxide composites by interlayer oxidation of oxalate ions by permanganate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oxalate intercalated anionic clay-like nickel zinc hydroxysalt was obtained starting from nickel zinc hydroxyacetate, Ni{sub 3}Zn{sub 2}(OH){sub 8}(OAc){sub 2}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O, by anion exchange. The intercalated oxalate species was reacted with potassium permanganate in such a way that the layered manganese oxide formed was within the interlayer region of the anionic clay resulting in a layered composite in which the negative charges on the birnessite type manganese oxide layers compensate the positive charges on the anionic clay layers. Birnessite to anionic clay ratio could be varied by varying the reaction time or the amount of potassium permanganate used. - Graphical abstract: Nickel zinc hydroxyoxalate was reacted with potassium permanganate to get nickel zinc hydroxide birnessite composites in which the positive charges on the hydroxide layers are neutralized by the negative charges on birnessite layers. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anionic and cationic layered solid composites prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ni-Zn hydroxyoxalate reacted with KMnO{sub 4} to deposit MnO{sub 2} in the interlayer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Birnessite layers coexist with anionic clay layers in the composites. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Birnessite/anionic clay ratio controlled by amount of KMnO{sub 4} used and reaction time.

Arulraj, James [Materials Research Group, Department of Chemistry, St. Joseph's College, 36 Langford Road, Bangalore 560 027 (India)] [Materials Research Group, Department of Chemistry, St. Joseph's College, 36 Langford Road, Bangalore 560 027 (India); Rajamathi, Michael, E-mail: mikerajamathi@rediffmail.com [Materials Research Group, Department of Chemistry, St. Joseph's College, 36 Langford Road, Bangalore 560 027 (India)] [Materials Research Group, Department of Chemistry, St. Joseph's College, 36 Langford Road, Bangalore 560 027 (India)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

27

Aerobic oxidation of anthracene in the presence of manganese porphyrinates and NaBH/sub 4/ reducing agent  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors investigate the kinetics of anthracene oxidation by molecular oxygen in the presence of manganese, iron, and cobalt porphyrinate catalysts and a sodium borohydride reducing agent at room temperature in solutions of ethanol or ethanol with chloroform and benzene. Effective rate constants for the reactions are determined based on the amount of anthraquinone formed in the reaction. In all cases with the exception of cobalt tetraphenylporphyrinate the only oxidation product was anthraquinone. Its structure was verified by NMR and IR spectroscopy.

Lukashova, E.A.; Solov'ev, A.B.; Chugreev, A.L.; Enikolopyan, N.S.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

THE STATE OF MANGANESE IN THE PHOTOSYNTHETIC APPARATUS. II. X-RAY ABSORPTION EDGE STUDIES ON MANGANESE IN PHOTOSYNTHETIC MEMBRANES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

oxygen evolving capabilities ed X) These preparations are reported to have 4-6 manganese atoms per photochemical reaction center(

Kirby, J.A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Drinking Water Problems: Iron and Manganese  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The chemical must be in the water for at least 20 minutes for oxi- dation to take place, longer if the water contains colloidal iron/manganese. After solid particles have formed they are filtered, often with a sand filter. Adding aluminum sulfate (alum...

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

2004-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

30

Igniter containing titanium hydride and potassium perchlorate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An explosive device is described which employs a particular titanium hydride-potassium perchlorate composition directly ignitible by an electrical bridgewire.

Dietzel, Russel W. (Albuquerque, NM); Leslie, William B. (Albuquerque, NM)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Manganese-Based Magnets: Manganese-Based Permanent Magnet with 40 MGOe at 200C  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

REACT Project: PNNL is working to reduce the cost of wind turbines and EVs by developing a manganese-based nano-composite magnet that could serve as an inexpensive alternative to rare-earth-based magnets. The manganese composite, made from low-cost and abundant materials, could exceed the performance of todays most powerful commercial magnets at temperature higher than 200C. Members of PNNLs research team will leverage comprehensive computer high-performance supercomputer modeling and materials testing to meet this objective. Manganese-based magnets could withstand higher temperatures than their rare earth predecessors and potentially reduce the need for any expensive, bulky engine cooling systems for the motor and generator. This would further contribute to cost savings for both EVs and wind turbines.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Submersible sodium pump  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electromagnetic submerged pump has an outer cylindrical stator with an inner cylindrical conductive core for the submerged pumping of sodium in the cylindrical interstitial volume defined between the stator and core. The cylindrical interstitial volume is typically vertically oriented, and defines an inlet at the bottom and an outlet at the top. The outer stator generates upwardly conveyed toroidal magnetic fields, which fields convey preferably from the bottom of the pump to the top of the pump liquid sodium in the cold leg of a sodium cooled nuclear reactor. The outer cylindrical stator has a vertically disposed duct surrounded by alternately stacked layers of coil units and laminates. 14 figs.

Brynsvold, G.V.; Lopez, J.T.; Olich, E.E.; West, C.W.

1989-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

33

REACTIONS OF SODIUM PEROXIDE WITH COMPONENTS OF LEGACY PLUTONIUM MATERIALS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) calcined at >900 C resists dissolution in nitric acid (HNO{sub 3})-potassium fluoride (KF) solutions, a common method for their dissolution. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has developed an alternate method for large samples of PuO{sub 2}-bearing materials using sodium peroxide (Na{sub 2}O{sub 2}) fusion as a pretreatment. The products of the reaction between Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} and PuO{sub 2} have been reported in the literature. As part of the SRNL development effort, additional data about the reaction between Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} and PuO{sub 2} were required. Also needed were data concerning the reaction of Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} with other components that may be present in the feed materials. Sodium peroxide was reacted with aluminum metal (Al), beryllium metal (Be), graphite, potassium chloride (KCl), magnesium chloride (MgCl{sub 2}), and calcium chloride (CaCl{sub 2}). The paper reports and discusses the reaction products of these and related compounds with Na{sub 2}O{sub 2}.

Pierce, R.; Missimer, D.; Crowder, M.

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

34

E-Print Network 3.0 - aqueous potassium hypochlorite Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

activated carbons Iodine acetylene, ammonia, hydrogen Mercury sulfuric... Potassium carbon tetrachloride, carbon dioxide, water Potassium chlorate sulfuric and other ......

35

Electrical behavior of natural manganese dioxide (NMD)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NMD samples from Brazil have been submitted to magnetic and particle size separations and characterized by X-ray diffraction and fluorescence and thermogravimetric analyses. Results showed that simple physical treatments can lead to more than 60% enriched MnO{sub 2} materials which could satisfy some electrochemical applications. The electrical properties of the samples conditioned as pressed pellets have been investigated by four-points direct current probe and impedance spectroscopy, varying the conditions of preparation and measurement. It is proposed that the higher frequency impedance is equivalent to the intrinsic electronic resistance of the MnO{sub 2} phases while at lower frequencies occurs an interphase charge separation coupled with a possible ionic transport. The corresponding contact resistance depends on the particle size distribution of the material, the compactation pressure of pellets and the iron content of the materials. The interphase dielectric relaxation does not behave ideally; the depression of the impedance semicircles as shown in the Nyquist plane is assumed to be related to the roughness of the bulk interfaces. Recent developments have shown the possibility of using manganese oxides as reversible electrodes for battery or supercapacitor applications for electrical vehicle. In these perspectives it is important to study the electrical and electrochemical properties of NMD in order to estimate its suitability for this kind of applications.

Gorgulho, H.F. [Fundacao de Ensino Superior de Sao Joao del Rei, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Fernandes, R.Z.D.; Pernaut, J.M. [Univ. Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

36

Xenon in Mercury-Manganese Stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Previous studies of elemental abundances in Mercury-Manganese (HgMn) stars have occasionally reported the presence of lines of the ionized rare noble gas Xe II, especially in a few of the hottest stars with Teff ~ 13000--15000 K. A new study of this element has been undertaken using observations from Lick Observatory's Hamilton Echelle Spectrograph. In this work, the spectrum synthesis program UCLSYN has been used to undertake abundance analysis assuming LTE. We find that in the Smith & Dworetsky sample of HgMn stars, Xe is vastly over-abundant in 21 of 22 HgMn stars studied, by factors of 3.1--4.8 dex. There does not appear to be a significant correlation of Xe abundance with Teff. A comparison sample of normal late B stars shows no sign of Xe II lines that could be detected, consistent with the expected weakness of lines at normal abundance. The main reason for the previous lack of widespread detection in HgMn stars is probably due to the strongest lines being at longer wavelengths than the photographic blue. The lines used in this work were 4603.03A, 4844.33A and 5292.22A.

M. M. Dworetsky; J. L. Persaud; K. Patel

2008-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

37

A first principles pseudopotential in the calculation of the phonon limited resistivity of sodium and potassium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of properties of aluminum and lithium. It is obtained from the induced electron density around an ion proprits de l'aluminium et du lithium. Il s'obtient partir de la densit lectronique induite autour d potential and from this, the phonons to calculate the electron-phonon interaction to predict the resistivity

Boyer, Edmond

38

Mechanical Properties of Sodium and Potassium Activated Metakaolin-Based Geopolymers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geopolymers (GPs) are a new class of inorganic polymers that have been considered as good candidate materials for many applications, including fire resistant and refractory panels, adhesives, and coatings, waste encapsulation material, etc. The aim...

Kim, Hyunsoo

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

39

An electron spin resonance investigation of irradiated potassium chloride crystals doped with sodium nitroprusside  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's, attention was turned. to a large extent to the topic of organic n-radicals. Electron spin resonance was first observed in free rad1cals in 1907 by Kozyrev and. Salikhov ) in the case of pentaphenyclopentadienyl. In solid penta... radical possesses mainly spin magnetism in accordance with measurements of its static magnetic susceptibility. In l949 a systematic study of electron spin resonance spectra in free radicals was initiated, i. e. molecules in which at least one electron...

Mayers, Richard Ralph

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

40

Ferroelectric and octahedral tilt twin disorder and the lead-free piezoelectric, sodium potassium niobate system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using electron diffraction, trends in the local structural behaviour of the K{sub x}Na{sub 1-x}NbO{sub 3} (KNN x) 'solid solution' system are investigated and interpreted using an order/disorder based theoretical framework. At room temperature, electron diffraction shows a single plane of transverse polarised, diffuse intensity perpendicular to [0 1 0]{sub p} Low-Asterisk (p for parent sub-structure) across the entire phase diagram, indicative of ferroelectric disorder along the [0 1 0]{sub p} direction co-existing with long range ferroelectric order along the orthogonal [1 0 0]{sub p} and [0 0 1]{sub p} directions. An additional characteristic pattern of diffuse scattering is also observed, involving rods of diffuse intensity running along the [1 0 0]{sub p}* and [0 0 1]{sub p}* directions of the perovskite sub-structure and indicative of octahedral tilt disorder about the [1 0 0]{sub p} and [0 0 1]{sub p} axes co-existing with long range ordered octahedral tilting around the [0 1 0]{sub p} direction. A possible crystal chemical explanation for the existence of this latter octahedral tilt disorder is explored through bond valence sum calculations. The possible influence of both types of disorder on the previously refined, room temperature space group/s and average crystal structure/s is examined. - Graphical abstract: [-3,0.-1]p zone axis EDP of K{sub 0.46}Na{sub 0.54}NbO{sub 3} indexed according to both the relevant Pcm21 space groups (no subscripts) and the parent perovskite subcell (denoted by a subscript p). Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characterises ferroelectric and octahedral tilt disorder in the KNN solid solution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Discusses the possible driving forces for this disorder. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Discusses the implications of this disorder for physical properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Discusses the effects of this disorder on powder diffraction data.

Schiemer, Jason [Research School of Chemistry, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)] [Research School of Chemistry, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Withers, Ray L., E-mail: withers@rsc.anu.edu.au [Research School of Chemistry, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Liu, Yun; Yi, Zhiguo [Research School of Chemistry, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)] [Research School of Chemistry, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Roderick MacKinnon and Ion Channels - Potassium Channels and Sodium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0 Resource ProgramEnergy Innovation Portal Atech

42

AN X-RAY ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY STUDY OF MANGANESE CONTAINING COMPOUNDS AND PHOTOSYNTHETIC SPINACH CHLOROPLASTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

oxygen evolving capabilities. These preparations are reported to have 4-6 manganese atoms per photochemical reaction center(

Kirby, Jon Allan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Spatially resolved characterization of biogenic manganese oxide production within a bacterial biofilm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

copper, zinc, lead, and arsenic by iron and manganese oxyhydroxide coatings on plankton in lakes polluted with mine and smelter

Toner, Brandy; Fakra, Sirine; Villalobos, Mario; Warwick, Tony; Sposito, Garrison

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Synthesis, characterization and magnetic properties of a manganese (II) silicate containing frustrated S=5/2 zigzag ladders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hydrothermal synthesis, structural characterization and magnetic properties of a manganese silicate with ideal formula of NaMn{sub 2}Si{sub 3}O{sub 8}(OH) is reported. This compound is a synthetic analog to the naturally occurring mineral Serandite. The crystal structure comprises MnO{sub 6} octahedra and SiO{sub 4} tetrahedra. The MnO{sub 6} share four edges with neighboring octahedra forming double chains. These chains are connected by silicate chains Si{sub 3}O{sub 8}(OH) resulting in an open framework structure with six-member ring channels where sodium ions are located. From the magnetic point of view, the intra-chain exchange between neighboring S=5/2 manganese ions is weak, partly due to the distortion observed in the octahedra, but also due to the frustrated topology of the chain. A successful fitting of the magnetic susceptibility was obtained by considering a double chain numerical model with Monte Carlo derived empirical parameters. -- Graphical abstract: A manganese silicate prepared hydrothermally with formula NaMn{sub 2}Si{sub 3}O{sub 8}(OH) possessing the structure of the mineral Serandite contains doubled chains of edge-sharing MnO{sub 6} octahedra. The magnetic susceptibility was measured and shows an antiferromagnetic behavior. Highlights: Characterization of a synthetic analog to the mineral Serandite: NaMn{sub 2}Si{sub 3}O{sub 8}(OH). Fitting of the magnetic susceptibility considering a classical regular chain. Weak metaloxygenmetal super-exchange interactions; antiferromagnetic in nature. Elevated degree of frustration along the chain, without sign of interchain ordering.

Brando, P., E-mail: pbrandao@ua.pt [Departamento de Qmica/CICECO, Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Santos, A.M. dos [Quantum Condensed Matter Division, Neutron Sciences Directorate, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6475 (United States); Paixo, L.S.; Reis, M.S. [Instituto de Fsica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Av. Gal. Milton Tavares de Souza s/n, 24210-346 Niteri, RJ (Brazil)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

45

Joining of highly aluminum-doped lanthanum strontium manganese oxide with tetragonal zirconia by plastic deformation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Joining of highly aluminum-doped lanthanum strontium manganese oxide with tetragonal zirconia February 2008; accepted 24 March 2008 Abstract Aluminum-doped lanthanum strontium manganese oxide, La0.77Sr at the interface. © 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Lanthanum strontium aluminum manganese oxide

Dutta, Prabir K.

46

ID-69 Sodium drain experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes experiments to determine the sodium retention and drainage from the two key areas of an ID-69. This information is then used as the initiation point for guidelines of how to proceed with washing an ID-69 in the IEM Cell Sodium Removal System.

Johnston, D.C.

1996-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

47

Sodium loop framework structural analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides the structural analysis of the Sodium Loop framework in a drop condition. The drop is similar to the US Department of Transportation non-bulk, performance-oriented packaging (Packaging Group I) drop test. The drop height evaluated for the Sodium Loop framework is 5.9 ft.

Nguyen, P.M.

1995-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

48

Manganese sulfide formation via concomitant microbial manganese oxide and thiosulfate reduction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 produced {gamma}-MnS (rambergite) nanoparticles during the concurrent reduction of MnO{sub 2} and thiosulfate coupled to H{sub 2} oxidation. To investigate effect of direct microbial reduction of MnO{sub 2} on MnS formation, two MR-1 mutants defective in outer membrane c-type cytochromes ({Delta}mtrC/{Delta}omcA and {Delta}mtrC/{Delta}omcA/{Delta}mtrF) were also used and it was determined that direct reduction of MnO{sub 2} was dominant relative to chemical reduction by biogenic sulfide generated from thiosulfate reduction. Although bicarbonate was excluded from the medium, incubations of strain MR-1 with lactate as the electron donor produced MnCO{sub 3} (rhodochrosite) as well as MnS in nearly equivalent amounts as estimated by micro X-ray diffraction (micro-XRD) analysis. It was concluded that carbonate released from lactate metabolism promoted MnCO{sub 3} formation and that Mn(II) mineralogy was strongly affected by carbonate ions even in the presence of abundant sulfide and weakly alkaline conditions expected to favor the precipitation of MnS. Formation of MnS, as determined by a combination of micro-XRD, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and selected area electron diffraction analyses was consistent with equilibrium speciation modeling predictions. Biogenic manganese sulfide may be a manganese sink in the Mn biogeochemical cycle in select environments such as deep anoxic marine basins within the Baltic Sea.

Lee, Ji-Hoon; Kennedy, David W.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Moore, Dean A.; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Reed, Samantha B.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

49

Tables of thermodynamic properties of sodium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermodynamic properties of saturated sodium, superheated sodium, and subcooled sodium are tabulated as a function of temperature. The temperature ranges are 380 to 2508 K for saturated sodium, 500 to 2500 K for subcooled sodium, and 400 to 1600 K for superheated sodium. Tabulated thermodynamic properties are enthalpy, heat capacity, pressure, entropy, density, instantaneous thermal expansion coefficient, compressibility, and thermal pressure coefficient. Tables are given in SI units and cgs units.

Fink, J.K.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Potassium emission absorption system. Topical report 12  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Potassium Emission Absorption System is one of the advanced optical diagnostics developed at Mississippi State University to provide support for the demonstration of prototype-scale coal-fired combustion magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) electrical power generation. Intended for application in the upstream of an MHD flow, the system directly measures gas temperature and neutral potassium atom number density through spectroscopic emission absorption techniques. From these measurements the electron density can be inferred from a statistical equilibrium calculation and the electron conductivity in the MHD channel found by use of an electron mobility model. The instrument has been utilized for field test measurements on MHD facilities for almost a decade and has been proven to provide useful measurements as designed for MHD nozzle, channel, and diffuser test sections. The theory of the measurements, a system description, its capabilities, and field test measurement results are reported here. During the development and application of the instrument several technical issues arose which when addressed advanced the state of the art in emission absorption measurement. Studies of these issues are also reported here and include: two-wavelength measurements for particle-laden flows, potassium D-line far wing absorption coefficient, bias in emission absorption measurements arising from dirty windows and misalignments, non-coincident multiwavelength emission absorption sampling errors, and lineshape fitting for boundary layer flow profile information. Although developed for NLHD application, the instrument could be applied to any high temperature flow with a resonance line in the 300 to 800 nm range, for instance other types of flames, rocket plumes or low temperature plasmas.

Bauman, L.E.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Federal - June 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Federal - June 2012 June 2012 Review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project -...

52

Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Contractor - June 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Contractor - June 2012 June 2012 Review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project...

53

Manganese-oxidizing photosynthesis before the rise of cyanobacteria  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Manganese-oxidizing photosynthesis before the rise of cyanobacteria Jena E. Johnsona,1 , Samuel M) The emergence of oxygen-producing (oxygenic) photosynthesis fundamentally transformed our planet; however biological innovation-- the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis (3, 4). Several bio- chemical attributes

Fischer, Woodward

54

Discovery of Chromium, Manganese, Nickel, and Copper Isotopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Twenty-seven chromium, twenty-five manganese, thirty-one nickel and twenty-six copper isotopes have so far been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

K. Garofali; R. Robinson; M. Thoennessen

2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

55

Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation and Recycle of Sodium Hydroxide and Sodium Nitrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Disposal of high-level nuclear waste is horrendously expensive, in large part because the actual radioactive matter in the tanks has been diluted over 1000-fold by ordinary inorganic chemicals. Treatment processes themselves can exacerbate the problem by adding further volume to the waste. Waste retrieval and sludge washing, for example, will require copious amounts of sodium hydroxide. If the needed sodium hydroxide could be separated from the waste and recycled, however, the addition of fresh sodium hydroxide could be avoided, ultimately reducing the final waste volume and associated disposal costs. The major objective of this research is to explore new liquid-liquid extraction approaches to the selective separation of sodium hydroxide from alkaline high-level wastes stored in underground tanks at the Hanford and Savannah River sites. Consideration is also given to separating potassium and abundant anions, including nitrate, nitrite, aluminate, and carbonate. Salts of these ions represent possible additional value for recycle, alternative disposal, or even use as commodity chemicals. A comprehensive approach toward understanding the extractive chemistry of these salts is envisioned, involving systems of varying complexity, from use of simple solvents to new bifunctional host molecules for ion-pair recognition. These extractants will ideally require no adjustment of the waste composition and will release the extracted salt into water, thereby consuming no additional chemicals and producing no additional waste volume. The overall goal of this research is to provide a scientific foundation upon which the feasibility of new liquid-liquid extraction chemistry applicable to the bulk reduction of the volume of tank waste can be evaluated.

Moyer, Bruce A.; Marchand, Alan P.

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation and Recycle of Sodium Hydroxide and Sodium Nitrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Disposal of high- level waste is horrendously expensive, in large part because the actual radioactive matter in the tanks has been diluted over 1000-fold by ordinary inorganic chemicals. Treatment processes themselves can exacerbate the problem by adding further volume to the waste. Waste retrieval and sludge washing, for example, will require copious amounts of sodium hydroxide. If the needed sodium hydroxide could be separated from the waste and recycled, however, the addition of fresh sodium hydroxide could be avoided, ultimately reducing the final waste volume and associated disposal costs. The major objective of this research is to explore new liquid- liquid extraction approaches to the selective separation of sodium hydroxide from alkaline high-level wastes stored in underground tanks at the Hanford and Savannah River sites. Consideration is also given to separating potassium and abundant anions, including nitrate, nitrite, aluminate, and carbonate. Salts of these ions represent possible additional value for recycle, alternative disposal, or even use as commodity chemicals. A comprehensive approach toward understanding the extractive chemistry of these salts is envisioned, involving systems of varying complexity, from use of simple solvents to new bifunctional host molecules for ion-pair recognition. These extractants will ideally require no adjustment of the waste composition and will release the extracted salt into water, thereby consuming no additional chemicals and producing no additional waste volume. The overall goal of this research is to provide a scientific foundation upon which the feasibility of new liquid-liquid extraction chemistry applicable to the bulk reduction of the volume of tank waste can be evaluated.

Moyer, Bruce A.; Marchand, Alan P.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Simulation of sodium boiling experiments with THERMIT sodium version  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Natural and forced convection experiments(SBTF and French) are simulated with the sodium version of the thermal-hydraulic computer code THERMIT. Simulation is done for the test secti- -on with the pressure-velocity boundary ...

Huh, Kang Yul

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Hot coal gas desulfurization with manganese-based sorbents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary major deposit of manganese in the US which can be readily mined by an in situ process is located in the Emily district of Minnesota. The US Bureau of Mines Research Centers at both the Twin Cities and Salt Lake City have developed a process for extracting and refining manganese in the form of a high-purity carbonate product. This product has been formulated into pellets by a multi-step process of drying, calcination, and induration to produce relatively high-strength formulations which are capable of being used for hot fuel gas desulfurization. These pellets, which have been developed at the University of Minnesota under joint sponsorship of the US Department of Energy and the US Bureau of Mines, appear superior to other, more expensive, formulations of zinc titanate and zinc ferrite which have previously been studied for multi-cycle loading (desulfurization) and regeneration (evolution of high-strength SO{sub 2} and restoration of pellet reactivity). Although these other formulations have been under development for the past twelve years, their prices still exceed $7 per pound. If manganese pellets perform as predicted in fixed bed testing, and if a significant number of utilities which burn high-sulfur coals incorporate combined-cycle gasification with hot coal gas desulfurization as a viable means of increasing conversion efficiencies, then the potential market for manganese pellets may be as high as 200,000 tons per year at a price not less than $3 per pound. This paper discusses the role of manganese pellets in the desulfurization process with respect to the integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) for power generation.

Hepworth, M.T.; Ben-Slimane, R.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Electron Energy-Loss Safe-Dose Limits for Manganese Valence Measurements in Environmentally Relevant Manganese Oxides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electron Energy-Loss Safe-Dose Limits for Manganese Valence Measurements in Environmentally, Baltimore, Maryland 21218, United States Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware+). In this study, the effects of beam damage during electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) in the transmission

Sparks, Donald L.

60

Marcus Douglas Hilliard Thermodynamics of Aqueous Piperazine/Potassium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/Potassium Carbonate/Carbon Dioxide Characterized by the Electrolyte NRTL Model within Aspen Plus by Marcus Douglas Characterized by the Electrolyte NRTL Model within Aspen Plus APPROVED BY SUPERVISING COMMITTEE of Aqueous Piperazine/Potassium Carbonate/Carbon Dioxide Characterized by the Electrolyte NRTL Model within

Rochelle, Gary T.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid potassium glycyrrhetinate Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

provides some chemicals which are incompatible with other compounds. Summary: Potassium carbon tetrachloride, carbon dioxide, water Potassium chlorate sulfuric and other acids...

62

A study of the chemical forms of manganese in sea water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

manganese, present as a sulphate, to the sulphite form. Manganese sulphite is then precipitated and is oxidized to MnOs on the sea floor. Goldberg (1Z) suggested that duc to the movement of bottom water, which acts as an electrolytic solution parallel...CO~ of the shells dis- solve s. The actual form of manganese in solution in sea water is in doubt. The suggested forms of manganese include a hydrous sol of the oxide, Revelle (19) and Harvey (20); a manganous aquato or chloro complex, Goldberg (21); and...

Buglio, Benjamin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

63

E-Print Network 3.0 - antioxidant manganese superoxide Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MnSOD Summary: for catalyzing the disproportionation of superoxide radical to oxygen and hydrogen peroxide. Manganese- and iron... Superoxide dismutases (SODs) are...

64

Pilot plant for CO2 capture with aqueous piperazine/potassium carbonate , Gary T. Rochelle1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GHGT-8 1 Pilot plant for CO2 capture with aqueous piperazine/potassium carbonate Eric Chen1 , Gary pilot for CO2 capture was successfully operated using potassium carbonate promoted with piperazine, potassium carbonate, piperazine Introduction Several amine-promoted potassium carbonate solvents have been

Rochelle, Gary T.

65

Pyroprocessing of Oxidized Sodium-Bonded Fast Reactor Fuel -- an Experimental Study of Treatment Options for Degraded EBR-II Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental study was conducted to assess pyrochemical treatment options for degraded EBR-II fuel. As oxidized material, the degraded fuel would need to be converted back to metal to enable electrorefining within an existing electrometallurgical treatment process. A lithium-based electrolytic reduction process was studied to assess the efficacy of converting oxide materials to metal with a particular focus on the impact of zirconium oxide and sodium oxide on this process. Bench-scale electrolytic reduction experiments were performed in LiCl-Li2O at 650 C with combinations of manganese oxide (used as a surrogate for uranium oxide), zirconium oxide, and sodium oxide. The experimental study illustrated how zirconium oxide and sodium oxide present different challenges to a lithium-based electrolytic reduction system for conversion of select metal oxides to metal.

S. D. Herrmann; L. A. Wurth; N. J. Gese

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate First Quarterly Report 2007 Quarterly Progress of this work is to improve the process for CO2 capture by alkanolamine absorption/stripping by developing

Rochelle, Gary T.

67

CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate Fourth Quarterly Report 2006 Quarterly Progress of this work is to improve the process for CO2 capture by alkanolamine absorption/stripping by developing

Rochelle, Gary T.

68

Surface-Driven Sodium Ion Energy Storage in Nanocellular Carbon...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Surface-Driven Sodium Ion Energy Storage in Nanocellular Carbon Foams. Surface-Driven Sodium Ion Energy Storage in Nanocellular Carbon Foams. Abstract: Sodium ion (Na+) batteries...

69

anticoagulant sodium citrate: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

pressure-velocity boundary ... Huh, Kang Yul 1982-01-01 38 Ground beef shelf life assessment as influenced by sodium lactate, sodium propionate, sodium diacetate, and soy...

70

Performance of MHD insulating materials in a potassium environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this study are to evaluate the compatibility of the MHD insulating materials boron nitride and silicon nitride in a potassium environment at temperatures of 1000 and 1400{degrees}F (538 and 760{degrees}C, respectively) and to measure the electrical conductivities of the specimens before and after exposure to potassium. Based on the test results, an assessment is to be made of the suitability of these materials for application as insulator materials in an MHD channel.

Natesan, K.; Park, J.H.; Rink, D.L. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Thomas, C.A. (USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States))

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

New nanocrystalline manganese oxides as cathode materials for lithium batteries : electron microscopy, electrochemical and X-ray absorption studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 New nanocrystalline manganese oxides as cathode materials for lithium batteries : electron: manganese oxide, lithium batteries, nanomaterials Corresponding author: Pierre Strobel, tel. 33 476 887 940 with lithium iodide in aqueous medium at room temperature. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

72

Formation and structural characterization of potassium titanates and the potassium ion exchange property  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the present work, K{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 5}, K{sub 2}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 9} and K{sub 2}Ti{sub 6}O{sub 13} are synthesized by solid state method. Their structures and morphologies are characterized by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectra and scanning electron microscopy. The binding energies of K, Ti and O in potassium titanates were then evaluated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and compared with those in K/TiO{sub 2}. Finally the corresponding K ion exchange properties are investigated by synthesizing NO oxidation catalysts with Co(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} precursor. It is found that the binding energy of K in K{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 5} is much higher than those in K{sub 2}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 9} and K{sub 2}Ti{sub 6}O{sub 13}, and because of which, it shows quite different catalytic performances. Compared with other potassium titanates, the K in K{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 5} is much easier to be exchanged out.

Wang Qiang, E-mail: wulihe@postech.ac.kr [Department of Catalysis Science and Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, Heilongjiang, 150001 (China); School of Environmental Science and Engineering, POSTECH, San 31, Hyoja-Dong, Nam-gu, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Guo Zhanhu [Integrated Composites Laboratory (ICL), Dan F. Smith Department of Chemical Engineering, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX 77710 (United States); Chung, Jong Shik [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, POSTECH, San 31, Hyoja-Dong, Nam-gu, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Chemical Engineering, POSTECH, San 31, Hyoja-Dong, Nam-gu, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

73

Pyroprocessing of oxidized sodium-bonded fast reactor fuel - An experimental study of treatment options for degraded EBR-II fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental study was conducted to assess pyrochemical treatment options for degraded EBR-II fuel. As oxidized material, the degraded fuel would need to be converted back to metal to enable electrorefining within an existing electro-metallurgical treatment process. A lithium-based electrolytic reduction process was studied to assess the efficacy of converting oxide materials to metal with a particular focus on the impact of zirconium oxide and sodium oxide on this process. Bench-scale electrolytic reduction experiments were performed in LiCl-Li{sub 2}O at 650 C. degrees with combinations of manganese oxide (used as a surrogate for uranium oxide), zirconium oxide, and sodium oxide. In the absence of zirconium or sodium oxide, the electrolytic reduction of MnO showed nearly complete conversion to metal. The electrolytic reduction of a blend of MnO-ZrO{sub 2} in LiCl - 1 wt% Li{sub 2}O showed substantial reduction of manganese, but only 8.5% of the zirconium was found in the metal phase. The electrolytic reduction of the same blend of MnO-ZrO{sub 2} in LiCl - 1 wt% Li{sub 2}O - 6.2 wt% Na{sub 2}O showed substantial reduction of manganese, but zirconium reduction was even less at 2.4%. This study concluded that ZrO{sub 2} cannot be substantially reduced to metal in an electrolytic reduction system with LiCl - 1 wt% Li{sub 2}O at 650 C. degrees due to the perceived preferential formation of lithium zirconate. This study also identified a possible interference that sodium oxide may have on the same system by introducing a parasitic and cyclic reaction of dissolved sodium metal between oxidation at the anode and reduction at the cathode. When applied to oxidized sodium-bonded EBR-II fuel (e.g., U-10Zr), the prescribed electrolytic reduction system would not be expected to substantially reduce zirconium oxide, and the accumulation of sodium in the electrolyte could interfere with the reduction of uranium oxide, or at least render it less efficient.

Hermann, S.D.; Gese, N.J. [Separations Department, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Wurth, L.A. [Zinc Air Inc., 5314-A US Hwy 2 West, Columbia Falls, MT 59912 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Coupled anoxic nitrification/manganese reduction in marine sediments STEFAN HULTH,1,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coupled anoxic nitrification/manganese reduction in marine sediments STEFAN HULTH,1, * ROBERT C distributions of oxygen, manganese, and nitrogen from hemipelagic and shelf sediments sometimes indicate a close by biological reworking of Mn-oxide-rich surface sediments into underlying anoxic zones. Surface sediment from

Boyer, Edmond

75

Fire suppressing apparatus. [sodium fires  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus for smothering a liquid sodium fire comprises a pan, a perforated cover on the pan, and tubed depending from the cover and providing communication between the interior of the pan and the ambient atmosphere through the perforations in the cover. Liquid caught in the pan rises above the lower ends of the tubes and thus serves as a barrier which limits the amount of air entering the pan.

Buttrey, K.E.

1980-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

76

Test Requirements and Conceptual Design for a Potassium Test Loop to Support an Advanced Potassium Rankine Cycle Power Conversion Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Parameters for continuing the design and specification of an experimental potassium test loop are identified in this report. Design and construction of a potassium test loop is part of the Phase II effort of the project ''Technology Development Program for an Advanced Potassium Rankine Power Conversion System''. This program is supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Design features for the potassium test loop and its instrumentation system, specific test articles, and engineered barriers for ensuring worker safety and protection of the environment are described along with safety and environmental protection requirements to be used during the design process. Information presented in the first portion of this report formed the basis to initiate the design phase of the program; however, the report is a living document that can be changed as necessary during the design process, reflecting modifications as additional design details are developed. Some portions of the report have parameters identified as ''to be determined'' (TBD), reflecting the early stage of the overall process. In cases where specific design values are presently unknown, the report attempts to document the quantities that remain to be defined in order to complete the design of the potassium test loop and supporting equipment.

Yoder, JR.G.L.

2006-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

77

Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation and Recycle of Sodium Hydroxide and Sodium Nitrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to explore new liquid-liquid extraction approaches to the selective separation of major sodium salts from alkaline high-level wastes stored in underground tanks at Hanford, Savannah River, and Oak Ridge sites. Disposal of high level waste is horrendously expensive, in large part because the actual radioactive matter in the tanks has been diluted over 1000-fold by ordinary inorganic chemicals. Since the residual bulk chemicals must still undergo expensive treatment and disposal after most of the hazardous radionuclides have been removed, large cost savings will result from processes that reduce the overall waste volume. It is proposed that major cost savings can be expected if sodium hydroxide needed for sludge washing can be obtained from the waste itself, thus avoiding the addition of yet another bulk chemical to the waste and still further increase of the waste volume and disposal cost. Secondary priority is given to separating potassium an d abundant anions, including nitrate, nitrite, aluminate, and carbonate. Salts of these ions represent possible additional value for recycle, alternative disposal, or even use as commodity chemicals. A comprehensive approach toward understanding the extractive chemistry of these salts is envisioned, involving systems of varying complexity, from use of simple solvents to new bifunctional host molecules for ion-pair recognition. These extractants will ideally require no adjustment of the waste composition and will release the extracted salt into water, thereby consuming no additional chemicals and producing no additional waste volume. The overall goal of this research is to provide a scientific foundation upon which the feasibility of new liquid-liquid extraction chemistry applicable to the bulk reduction of the volume of tank waste can be evaluated.

Moyer, Bruce A.; Marchand, Alan P.; Bryan, Jeffrey C.; Bonnesen, Peter V.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Radiation Doses to Hanford Workers from Natural Potassium-40  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The chemical element potassium is an essential mineral in people and is subject to homeostatic regulation. Natural potassium comprises three isotopes, 39K, 40K, and 41K. Potassium-40 is radioactive, with a half life of 1.248 billion years. In most transitions, it emits a ?? particle with a maximum energy of 0.560 MeV, and sometimes a gamma photon of 1.461 MeV. Because it is ubiquitous, 40K produces radiation dose to all human beings. This report contains the results of new measurements of 40K in 248 adult females and 2,037 adult males performed at the Department of Energy Hanford Site in 2006 and 2007. Potassium concentrations diminish with age, are generally lower in women than in men, and decrease with body mass index (BMI). The average annual effective dose from 40K in the body is 0.149 mSv y?1 for men and 0.123 mSv y?1 women respectively. Averaged over both men and women, the average effective dose per year is 0.136 mSv y?1. Calculated effective doses range from 0.069 to 0.243 mSv y?1 for adult males, and 0.067 to 0.203 mSv y?1 for adult females, a roughly three-fold variation for each gender. The need for dosimetric phantoms with a greater variety of BMI values should be investigated. From our data, it cannot be determined whether the potassium concentration in muscle in people with large BMI values differs from that in people with small BMI values. Similarly, it would be important to know the potassium concentration in other soft tissues, since much of the radiation dose is due to beta radiation, in which the source and target tissues are the same. These uncertainties should be evaluated to determine their consequences for dosimetry.

Strom, Daniel J.; Lynch, Timothy P.; Weier, Dennis R.

2009-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

79

Potassium Fixation and Supply by Soils with Mixed Clay Minerals.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

B-1090 December 1969 1 potassium Fixation and Supply By Soils With Misd Clay Minerals I KUS A&M UNIVERSITY Tcrv Agricultural Experiment Station r i 0. Kunkel, Acting Director, College Station, Texas Summary to the plants while Cameron clay... supplied onl!. Studies were made on three agriculturally important me/me of exchangeable K. The capacity of all a soils of South Texas and Northern Mexico to determine soils to fix K increased with increasing remo\\dl i their potassium (K)-supplying power...

Hipp, Billy W.

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Salt index of potassium phosphate fertilizers and its relation to germination and early plant growth of field crops  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), ammoniated potassium phosphate (AKP-1 and AKP-2) and potassium phosphate (KP). These vere typical samples prepared in a pilot plant. Scottish Industries was the source of potassium metaphosphate (KMP) and Tennessee Valley Authority for ammonium Table 2.... Fertilizer materials used in study. Fertilizer Potassium polyphosphate Desi nation Fertilizer Source Pennzoil United N-P205-K20 Anal sis %%d 0-50-40 Polyphosphate S ecies Yes Ammoniated potassium phosphate AKP-1 Ammoniated potassium phosphate...

Freeouf, Jerry Allen

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

E-Print Network 3.0 - activates atp-sensitive potassium Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

atp-sensitive potassium Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: activates atp-sensitive potassium Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 ATP-sensitive...

82

Heat transfer during film condensation of potassium vapor on a horizontal plate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The object of the investigation is to analyze the following two features of heat transfer during condensation of potassium vapor: a. Heat transfer during film condensation of a pure saturated potassium vapor on a horizontal ...

Meyrial, Paul M.

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Solvent Reclaiming by Crystallization of Potassium Sulfate Qing Xu, B. S.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

= - - . The solubility data were also correlated with the electrolyte-NRTL model in Aspen Plus. Potassium sulfate

Rochelle, Gary T.

84

E-Print Network 3.0 - atp-sensitive potassium channels Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

channels Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: atp-sensitive potassium channels...

85

E-Print Network 3.0 - atp-sensitive potassium channel Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

channel Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: atp-sensitive potassium channel...

86

Independent Oversight Assessment, Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Bearing Waste Treatment Project - November 2012 November 2012 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project This...

87

TOXICOLOGICAL AND STRUCTURAL CONSEQUENCES FROM SODIUM-WATER REACTION IN CELL CONTAINING THE SECONDARY SODIUM TANK  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The analysis will show the consequences should the solid sodium in the Secondary Sodium Tank react with a presumed layer of water in the cell. The Peer Review Checklist is attached.

MARUSICH RM

2008-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

88

A layered sodium titanate as promising anode material for sodium ion batteries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sodium ion batteries have recently received great attention for large-scale energy applications because of the abundance and low cost of sodium source. Although some cathode materials with desirable electrochemical properties ...

Wu, Di, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Electrolytic process to produce sodium hypochlorite using sodium ion conductive ceramic membranes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrochemical process for the production of sodium hypochlorite is disclosed. The process may potentially be used to produce sodium hypochlorite from seawater or low purity un-softened or NaCl-based salt solutions. The process utilizes a sodium ion conductive ceramic membrane, such as membranes based on NASICON-type materials, in an electrolytic cell. In the process, water is reduced at a cathode to form hydroxyl ions and hydrogen gas. Chloride ions from a sodium chloride solution are oxidized in the anolyte compartment to produce chlorine gas which reacts with water to produce hypochlorous and hydrochloric acid. Sodium ions are transported from the anolyte compartment to the catholyte compartment across the sodium ion conductive ceramic membrane. Sodium hydroxide is transported from the catholyte compartment to the anolyte compartment to produce sodium hypochlorite within the anolyte compartment.

Balagopal, Shekar; Malhotra, Vinod; Pendleton, Justin; Reid, Kathy Jo

2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

90

Manganese in Texas Soils and its Relation to Crops.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, mashing with hot water. Adcl 5 cc. of concentrated ' furic acid to the filtrate and evaporate to slight fumes. Add 3C of 1:3 nitric acicl and proceed as in the bismuthate method. (34 ods of the A. 0. A. C., 1925, page 101, par. '75.) In the beginnin... this work, it was noticed that the color of the solution faded ral after filtering through asbestos. To avoid this it was found necef to add potassium permanganate to the mater to be used for makin) the dilute nitric acid for washing and redistill it...

Carlyle, E. C. (Elmer Cardinal)

1931-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Mitochondrial potassium transport: the K+ Keith D. Garlid*, Petr Paucek  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; Ion channel gating; Membrane transport; Volume regulation 1. Introduction The inner membrane. This means that ion traffic across the inner membrane will be very high. Moreover, the gradients driving saltReview Mitochondrial potassium transport: the K+ cycle Keith D. Garlid*, Petr Paucek Department

Garlid, Keith

92

Short Communication Catalytic coal gasification: use of calcium versus potassium*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Short Communication Catalytic coal gasification: use of calcium versus potassium* Ljubisa R on the gasification in air and 3.1 kPa steam of North Dakota lignitic chars prepared under slow and rapid pyrolysis of calcium is related to its sintering via crystallite growth. (Keywords: coal; gasification; catalysis

93

Nanoscale Tubules Formed by Exfoliation of Potassium Hexaniobate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanoscale Tubules Formed by Exfoliation of Potassium Hexaniobate Geoffrey B. Saupe, Chad C. Waraksa. Revised Manuscript Received March 27, 2000 The exfoliation of acid-exchanged K4Nb6O17 with tetra formed early in the exfoliation process, which are found only as flat sheets. Tubules in colloidal

94

CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate Third Quarterly Report 2005 Quarterly Progress absorption/stripping by developing an alternative solvent, aqueous K2CO3 promoted by piperazine. Modeling.................................................................................................................................. 11 Task 1 ­ Modeling Performance of Absorption/Stripping of CO2 with Aqueous K2CO3 Promoted

Rochelle, Gary T.

95

CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate First Quarterly Report 2006 Quarterly Progress the process for CO2 capture by alkanolamine absorption/stripping by developing an alternative solvent, aqueous.................................................................................................................................... 8 Task 1 ­ Modeling Performance of Absorption/Stripping of CO2 with Aqueous K2CO3 Promoted

Rochelle, Gary T.

96

CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate Third Quarterly Report 2006 Quarterly Progress of this work is to improve the process for CO2 capture by alkanolamine absorption/stripping by developing...................................................................................................................................11 Task 1 ­ Modeling Performance of Absorption/Stripping of CO2 with Aqueous K2CO3 Promoted

Rochelle, Gary T.

97

CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate Second Quarterly Report 2006 Quarterly Progress of this work is to improve the process for CO2 capture by alkanolamine absorption/stripping by developing.................................................................................................................................. 10 Task 1 ­ Modeling Performance of Absorption/Stripping of CO2 with Aqueous K2CO3 Promoted

Rochelle, Gary T.

98

CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate Fourth Quarterly Report 2005 Quarterly Progress absorption/stripping by developing an alternative solvent, aqueous K2CO3 promoted by piperazine. In Campaign.................................................................................................................................... 9 Task 1 ­ Modeling Performance of Absorption/Stripping of CO2 with Aqueous K2CO3 Promoted

Rochelle, Gary T.

99

Structural Basis for the Metal-Selective Activation of the Manganese Transport Regulator of Bacillus subtilis,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-containing cofactor is at the heart of the oxygen-evolving complex (2), and in mammals, a manganese, UniVersity of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Unit 1000, Houston, Texas 77030 ReceiVed NoVember 27

Lycan, Deborah E.

100

Influences on the oceanic biogeochemical cycling of the hybrid-type metals, cobalt, iron, and manganese  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Trace metal cycling is one of many processes that influence ocean ecosystem dynamics. Cobalt, iron, and manganese are redox active trace metal micro-nutrients with oceanic distributions that are influenced by both biological ...

Noble, Abigail Emery

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Commercialization of cryptomelane-type manganese oxide (OMS-2) nanowire paper oil sorbent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cryptomelane-type Manganese oxide (OMS-2, a group of Octahedral Molecular Sieves) nanowire paper exhibits interesting properties: reversible wettability, oleophilic while being hydrophobic, and high thermal stability. These ...

Soo, Haw Yun

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Process for the electrodeposition of low stress nickel-manganese alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process for electrodepositing a low stress nickel-manganese multilayer alloy on an electrically conductive substrate is provided. The process includes the steps of immersing the substrate in an electrodeposition solution containing a nickel salt and a manganese salt and repeatedly passing an electric current through an immersed surface of the substrate. The electric current is alternately pulsed for predetermined durations between a first electrical current that is effective to electrodeposit nickel and a second electrical current that is effective to electrodeposit nickel and manganese. A multilayered alloy having adjacent layers of nickel and a nickel-manganese alloy on the immersed surface of the substrate is thereby produced. The resulting multilayered alloy exhibits low internal stress, high strength and ductility, and high strength retention upon exposure to heat.

Kelly, James John; Goods, Steven Howard; Yang, Nancy Yuan-Chi; Cadden, Charles Henry

2005-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

103

Spin-dependent electron transport in zinc- and manganese-doped adenine molecules  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The spin-dependent electron transport properties of zinc- and manganese-doped adenine molecules connected to zigzag graphene leads are studied in the zero bias regime using the non-equilibrium Green's function method. The conductance of the adenine molecule increased and became spin-dependent when a zinc or manganese atom was doped into the molecules. The effects of a transverse electric field on the spin-polarization of the transmitted electrons were investigated and the spin-polarization was controlled by changing the transverse electric field. Under the presence of a transverse electric field, both the zinc- and manganese-doped adenine molecules acted as spin-filters. The maximum spin-polarization of the manganese-doped adenine molecule was greater than the molecule doped with zinc.

Simchi, Hamidreza, E-mail: simchi@iust.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, Tehran 16844 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Semiconductor Technology Center, Tehran 16844 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Esmaeilzadeh, Mahdi, E-mail: mahdi@iust.ac.ir; Mazidabadi, Hossein [Department of Physics, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, Tehran 16844 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

104

Evaluation of frankfurters formulated with potassium lactate and sodium diacetate and innocualted with Listeria monocytogenes before and after irradiation treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

C. Incorporation of lactate/diacetate into frankfurter formulations with or without irradiation had a strong listeriostatic effect throughout 4 wk of aerobic storage. Total microbial counts for frankfurters formulated with lactate/diacetate remained constant...

Knight, Timothy David

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

105

E-Print Network 3.0 - aqueous sodium dodecyl Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate and Sodium Dodecyl Benzenesulfonate on Poly(Vinyl Chloride) Latexes Summary: 1 Adsorption of Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate and Sodium Dodecyl...

106

Atlas Sodium Automated Batch Synthesis System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atlas Sodium Automated Batch Synthesis System (Syrris) June 2013 #12;Introduction to the system · The Atlas Sodium system consists of an Atlas base equipped with a 400ºC hotplate, a stacking dry bath systemL) for automated addition and/or removal of solution. · The system is computer controlled by the Atlas software

Subramanian, Venkat

107

Sodium Heat Engine Development Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Sodium Heat Engine (SHE) is an efficient thermoelectric conversion device which directly generates electricity from a thermally regenerative electrochemical cell that relies on the unique conduction properties of {beta}{double prime}-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE). Laboratory models of a variety of SHE devices have demonstrated the feasibility and efficiency of the system, engineering development of large prototype devices has been slowed by a series of materials and fabrication problems. Failure of the electrolyte tubes has been a recurring problem and a number of possible causes have been postulated. To address these issues, a two-phase engineering development program was undertaken. This report summarizes the final results of the first phase of the program, which included extensive materials characterization activities, a study of applicable nondestructive evaluation methods, an investigation of possible stress states that would contribute to fracture, and certain operational issues associated with the electromagnetic pumps used in the SHE prototype. Mechanical and microstructural evaluation of commercially obtained BASE tubes revealed that they should be adequate for SHE applications and that sodium exposure produced no appreciable deleterious strength effects. Processing activities to produce a more uniform and smaller grain size for the BASE tubes were completed using isostatic pressing, extrusion, and slip casting. Green tubes were sintered by conventional and microwave plasma methods. Of particular interest is the residual stress state in the BASE tubes, and both analysis and nondestructive evaluation methods were employed to evaluate these stresses. X-ray and neutron diffraction experiments were performed to determine the bulk residual stresses in commercially fabricated BASE tubes; however, tube-to-tube variations and variations among the various methods employed did not allow formulation of a definitive definition of the as-fabricated stress state.

Singh, J.P.; Kupperman, D.S.; Majumdar, S.; Dorris, S.; Gopalsami, N.; Dieckman, S.L.; Jaross, R.A.; Johnson, D.L.; Gregar, J.S.; Poeppel, R.B.; Raptis, A.C.; Valentin, R.A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

In-situ method for treating residual sodium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A unique process for deactivating residual sodium in Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) systems which uses humidified (but not saturated) carbon dioxide at ambient temperature and pressure to convert residual sodium into solid sodium bicarbonate.

Sherman, Steven R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Henslee, S. Paul (Idaho Falls, ID)

2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

109

In-Situ Method for Treating Residual Sodium  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A unique process for deactivating residual sodium in Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) systems which uses humidified (but not saturated) carbon dioxide at ambient temperature and pressure to convert residual sodium into solid sodium bicarbonate.

Sherman, Steven R.; Henslee, S. Paul

2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

110

Comparative effects of sodium channel blockers in short term rat whole embryo culture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was undertaken to examine the effect on the rat embryonic heart of two experimental drugs (AZA and AZB) which are known to block the sodium channel Nav1.5, the hERG potassium channel and the L-type calcium channel. The sodium channel blockers bupivacaine, lidocaine, and the L-type calcium channel blocker nifedipine were used as reference substances. The experimental model was the gestational day (GD) 13 rat embryo cultured in vitro. In this model the embryonic heart activity can be directly observed, recorded and analyzed using computer assisted image analysis as it responds to the addition of test drugs. The effect on the heart was studied for a range of concentrations and for a duration up to 3 h. The results showed that AZA and AZB caused a concentration-dependent bradycardia of the embryonic heart and at high concentrations heart block. These effects were reversible on washout. In terms of potency to cause bradycardia the compounds were ranked AZB > bupivacaine > AZA > lidocaine > nifedipine. Comparison with results from previous studies with more specific ion channel blockers suggests that the primary effect of AZA and AZB was sodium channel blockage. The study shows that the short-term rat whole embryo culture (WEC) is a suitable system to detect substances hazardous to the embryonic heart. - Highlights: Study of the effect of sodium channel blocking drugs on embryonic heart function We used a modified method rat whole embryo culture with image analysis. The drugs tested caused a concentration dependent bradycardia and heart block. The effect of drugs acting on multiple ion channels is difficult to predict. This method may be used to detect cardiotoxicity in prenatal development.

Nilsson, Mats F, E-mail: Mats.Nilsson@farmbio.uu.se [Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences, Uppsala University (Sweden); Skld, Anna-Carin; Ericson, Ann-Christin; Annas, Anita; Villar, Rodrigo Palma [AstraZeneca R and D Sdertlje (Sweden); Cebers, Gvido [AstraZeneca R and D, iMed, 141 Portland Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Hellmold, Heike; Gustafson, Anne-Lee [AstraZeneca R and D Sdertlje (Sweden); Webster, William S [Department of Anatomy and Histology, University of Sydney (Australia)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

111

SciTech Connect: Thermodynamic and transport properties of sodium...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

on thermophysical properties of sodium have been included in this critical assessment. Thermodynamic properties of sodium liquid and vapor that have been assessed...

112

A resting bottom sodium cooled fast reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This follows ICAPP 2011 paper 11059 'Fast Reactor with a Cold Bottom Vessel', on sodium cooled reactor vessels in thermal gradient, resting on soil. Sodium is frozen on vessel bottom plate, temperature increasing to the top. The vault cover rests on the safety vessel, the core diagrid welded to a toric collector forms a slab, supported by skirts resting on the bottom plate. Intermediate exchangers and pumps, fixed on the cover, plunge on the collector. At the vessel top, a skirt hanging from the cover plunges into sodium, leaving a thin circular slit partially filled by sodium covered by argon, providing leak-tightness and allowing vessel dilatation, as well as a radial relative holding due to sodium inertia. No 'air conditioning' at 400 deg. C is needed as for hanging vessels, and this allows a large economy. The sodium volume below the slab contains isolating refractory elements, stopping a hypothetical corium flow. The small gas volume around the vessel limits any LOCA. The liner cooling system of the concrete safety vessel may contribute to reactor cooling. The cold resting bottom vessel, proposed by the author for many years, could avoid the complete visual inspection required for hanging vessels. However, a double vessel, containing support skirts, would allow introduction of inspecting devices. Stress limiting thermal gradient is obtained by filling secondary sodium in the intermediate space. (authors)

Costes, D. [Consultant (France)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

IAEA sodium void reactivity benchmark calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, the IAEA-1 992 ``Benchmark Calculation of Sodium Void Reactivity Effect in Fast Reactor Core`` problem is evaluated. The proposed design is a large axially heterogeneous oxide-fueled fast reactor as described in Section 2; the core utilizes a sodium plenum above the core to enhance leakage effects. The calculation methods used in this benchmark evaluation are described in Section 3. In Section 4, the calculated core performance results for the benchmark reactor model are presented; and in Section 5, the influence of steel and interstitial sodium heterogeneity effects is estimated.

Hill, R.N.; Finck, P.J.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

IAEA sodium void reactivity benchmark calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, the IAEA-1 992 Benchmark Calculation of Sodium Void Reactivity Effect in Fast Reactor Core'' problem is evaluated. The proposed design is a large axially heterogeneous oxide-fueled fast reactor as described in Section 2; the core utilizes a sodium plenum above the core to enhance leakage effects. The calculation methods used in this benchmark evaluation are described in Section 3. In Section 4, the calculated core performance results for the benchmark reactor model are presented; and in Section 5, the influence of steel and interstitial sodium heterogeneity effects is estimated.

Hill, R.N.; Finck, P.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

By Thomas S. Jones Manganese (Mn) is essential to iron and silicomanganese increased about 7%. consisted of, in tons, natural battery-grade ore,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. years of apparent consumption. 25. At yearend, the estimated manganese Ironmaking and steelmaking have to reported data, the rates of consumption of manganese as ore in ironmaking and as ferroalloys and metal

Torgersen, Christian

116

Radial power flattening in sodium fast reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In order to improve a new design for a uranium startup sodium cooled fast reactor which was proposed at MIT, this thesis evaluated radial power flattening by varying the fuel volume fraction at a fixed U-235 enrichment of ...

Krentz-Wee, Rebecca (Rebecca Elizabeth)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Sodium Alanate Nanoparticles for Hydrogen Storage.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Preparation and characterization of sodium alanate (NaAlH4) based hydrogen storage materials are described in this book. The effect of the NaAlH4 particle size, particularly in (more)

Bald, C.P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Kinetics of wet sodium vapor complex plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we have investigated the kinetics of wet (partially condensed) Sodium vapor, which comprises of electrons, ions, neutral atoms, and Sodium droplets (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated by light. The formulation includes the balance of charge over the droplets, number balance of the plasma constituents, and energy balance of the electrons. In order to evaluate the droplet charge, a phenomenon for de-charging of the droplets, viz., evaporation of positive Sodium ions from the surface has been considered in addition to electron emission and electron/ion accretion. The analysis has been utilized to evaluate the steady state parameters of such complex plasmas (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated; the results have been graphically illustrated. As a significant outcome irradiated, Sodium droplets are seen to acquire large positive potential, with consequent enhancement in the electron density.

Mishra, S. K., E-mail: nishfeb@rediffmail.com [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Sodha, M. S. [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)] [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

119

The Influence of Spray Water Quality on Herbicide www.btny.purdue.edu/weedscience  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for crop protection products applications, constituting more than 95% of the spray volume. The properties calcium, magnesium, iron, aluminum, zinc, manganese, sodium, potassium, cesium, and lithium can influence. Cations dissolved in water can interact with the herbicide structure and can form complexes

120

Sampling and analytical testing of groundwater and surface water at the Colorado School of Mines Research Institute (CSMRI) has been conducted on a quarterly basis since early  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is being consumed, changing the water chemistry, and leading to lower uranium concentrations with flow, Th-230, Th-232, and uranium), and metals (arsenic, barium calcium, cadmium, chromium, lead, manganese and analytical testing for radium, calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium, uranium, and zinc will continue

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The Sodium Process Facility at Argonne National Laboratory-West  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) has approximately 680,000 liters of raw sodium stored in facilities on site. As mandated by the State of Idaho and the US Department of Energy (DOE), this sodium must be transformed into a stable condition for land disposal. To comply with this mandate, ANL-W designed and built the Sodium Process Facility (SPF) for the processing of this sodium into a dry, sodium carbonate powder. The major portion of the sodium stored at ANL-W is radioactively contaminated. The sodium will be processed in three separate and distinct campaigns: the 290,000 liters of Fermi-1 primary sodium, the 50,000 liters of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) secondary sodium, and the 330,000 liters of the EBR-II primary sodium. The Fermi-1 and the EBR-II secondary sodium contain only low-level of radiation, while the EBR-II primary sodium has radiation levels up to 0.5 mSv (50 mrem) per hour at 1 meter. The EBR-II primary sodium will be processed last, allowing the operating experience to be gained with the less radioactive sodium prior to reacting the most radioactive sodium. The sodium carbonate will be disposed of in 270 liter barrels, four to a pallet. These barrels are square in cross-section, allowing for maximum utilization of the space on a pallet, minimizing the required landfill space required for disposal.

Michelbacher, J.A.; Henslee, S.P. McDermott, M.D.; Price, J.R.; Rosenberg, K.E.; Wells, P.B.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Element-and site-specific oxidation state and cation distribution in manganese ferrite films by diffraction anomalous fine structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Element- and site-specific oxidation state and cation distribution in manganese ferrite films Received 2 April 2008; accepted 9 July 2008; published online 8 August 2008 Epitaxial manganese ferrite.1063/1.2969406 Spinel ferrites represent an important class of materials that provide high permeability, moderate

Haskel, Daniel

123

E-Print Network 3.0 - atp-dependent potassium channels Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: atp-dependent potassium channels Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 www.stke.orgcgicontentfull...

124

Synthesis of nanomesh, thin film nanocomposite, nanocomposite membranes and synthesis of potassium ion selective membrane electrodes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Synthesis of nanomesh, thin film nanocomposite, nanocomposite membranes and synthesis of potassium and naofibers, which has potential use in protection of agricultural products from hailing. We developed

Singh, Jayant K.

125

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminum potassium sulfate Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

.0 None Potassium Pyrophosphate None ... Source: Farritor, Shane - Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln Collection: Engineering 7 Sulfate...

126

The connection between the damping capacity and the crystal structure of some copper-manganese alloys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE CONNECTION BETHEEN THE DANPIING CAPACIITY AND THE CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF SOME COPPER-MANGANESE ALLOYS A Thesis By Leon Eldon McCrary Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanlcai College of Texas ln partial fulfil... lment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIIENCE August 'l960 Major Sub)ect: Physics THE CONNECTION BETWEEN THE DAMPING CAPACITY AND THE CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF SOME COPPER-MANGANESE ALLOYS A Thesis By Leon E I don McC ra ry Approved...

McCrary, Leon Eldon

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

LOW TEMPERATURE VOC COMBUSTION OVER MANGANESE, COBALT AND ZINC ALPO4 MOLECULAR SIEVES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to prepare microporous aluminophosphates containing magnesium, manganese, cobalt and zinc (MeAPOs) and to evaluate their performance as oxidation catalysts for the removal of low levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from gas streams. The tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) To develop reliable synthesis methods for metal aluminophosphates containing manganese, cobalt and zinc in their framework; (2) To characterize these materials for crystallinity, phase purity, the location and nature of the incorporated metal in the framework; and (3) To evaluate the materials for their catalytic activities in the oxidation of volatile organic environmental pollutants.

Rosemarie Szostak

2003-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

128

CO2 CAPTURE BY ABSORPTION WITH POTASSIUM CARBONATE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to improve the process for CO{sub 2} capture by alkanolamine absorption/stripping by developing an alternative solvent, aqueous K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} promoted by piperazine. Progress has been made in this reporting period on three subtasks. The rigorous Electrolyte Non-Random Two-Liquid (electrolyte-NRTL) model has been regressed to represent CO{sub 2} solubility in potassium carbonate/bicarbonate solutions. An analytical method for piperazine has been developed using a gas chromatograph. Funding has been obtained and equipment has been donated to provide for modifications of the existing pilot plant system with stainless steel materials.

Gary T. Rochelle; A. Frank Seibert; J. Tim Cullinane; Terraun Jones

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Potassium sources and availability in three East Texas soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coefficient of determination values for selected parameters of Troup versus exchangeable po tas slum 63 16 Fstimated amount of mica potassium in s5um materials to a depth of 235cm 65 LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page Distribution of percent K 0 in Troup... with depth 34 Comparison of Na S 0 treated and untreated Troup 20-5um mater aI from 205-235cm depth 38 Distribution of Gapon selectivity coefficients in Troup with depth Distribution of Gapon selectivity coefficients in Boswell with depth 46 X...

Hons, F. M

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

130

Method and system for producing hydrogen using sodium ion separation membranes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of producing hydrogen from sodium hydroxide and water is disclosed. The method comprises separating sodium from a first aqueous sodium hydroxide stream in a sodium ion separator, feeding the sodium produced in the sodium ion separator to a sodium reactor, reacting the sodium in the sodium reactor with water, and producing a second aqueous sodium hydroxide stream and hydrogen. The method may also comprise reusing the second aqueous sodium hydroxide stream by combining the second aqueous sodium hydroxide stream with the first aqueous sodium hydroxide stream. A system of producing hydrogen is also disclosed.

Bingham, Dennis N; Klingler, Kerry M; Turner, Terry D; Wilding, Bruce M; Frost, Lyman

2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

131

Hot Coal Gas Desulfurization With Manganese-Based Sorbents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to develop a pellet formulation which is capable of achieving low sulfur partial pressures and a high capacity for sulfur, loaded from a hot fuel gas and which is readily regenerable. Furthermore the pellet must be strong for potential use in a fluidized and regenerable over many cycles of loading and regeneration. Regeneration should be in air or oxygen-depleted air to produce a high-concentration sulfur dioxide. Fixed-bed tests were conducted with several formulations of manganese sesquioxide and titania, and alumina. They were subject to a simplified fuel gas of the oxygen-blown Shell type spiked with a 30,000 ppmv concentration of H{sub 2}S. Pellet crush strengths for 4 and 2 mm diameter pellets was typically 12 lbs per pellet and 4 lbs per pellet, respectively. For the most favorable of the formulations tested and under the criteria of break-through at less than 100 ppmv H{sub 2}S and loading temperatures of 5000 {degrees}C and an empty-bed space velocity of 4, 000 per hour, breakthrough occurred an effective loading of sulfur of 27 to 29% over 5 loading and regeneration cycles. At 90% of this saturation condition, the observed level of H{sub 2}S was below 10 ppmv. For regeneration, a temperature of 9000 {degrees}C is required to dissociate the sulfide into sulfur dioxide using air at atmospheric pressure. The mean sulfur dioxide concentration which is achieved during regeneration is 8% with empty-bed space velocities of 700/hr. TGA tests on individual pellets indicate that bentonite is not desirable as a bonding material and that Mn/Ti ratios higher than 7:1 produce relatively non-porous pellets. Whereas the reactivity is rapid below 12% conversion, the kinetics of conversion decreased significantly above this level. This observation may be the result of plugging of the pellet pores with sulfided product creating inaccessible pore volumes or alternately an increase in diffusional resistance by formation of MnS.

Berns, J.J.; Hepworth, M.T. [Dept. of Civil Engineering, Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

132

Vasopressin, ATP and Catecholamines Differentially Control Potassium Secretion in Inner Ear Cell line  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Vasopressin, ATP and Catecholamines Differentially Control Potassium Secretion in Inner Ear Cell and catecholamines stimulate while ATP inhibits apical potassium secretion by EC5v cells. These results open new OF ABBREVIATIONS ,-Me-ATP: ,-methylene-ATP ,-Me-ATP: ,-methylene ATP InsPs: total inositol phosphates Asn1 , Val5

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

133

The effect of paramagnetic manganese cations on 1 H MR spectroscopy of the brain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effect of paramagnetic manganese cations on 1 H MR spectroscopy of the brain K. S. Madsen1 has investigated the effect of Mn on 1 H MR spectroscopy using an in vivo Mn-enhanced optic tract into a stereotactic device. Images and 1 H MR spectra were acquired using a Varian 4.7T animal scanner together

134

Parallel Polarization EPR Characterization of the Mn(III) Center of Oxidized Manganese Superoxide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Parallel Polarization EPR Characterization of the Mn(III) Center of Oxidized Manganese Superoxide polarization CW-EPR to investigate the paramagnetic Mn3+ ion of the MnSOD enzyme from Escherichia coli with a positive axial zero-field splitting value, D, are arranged as shown in Figure 1. An EPR signal from the Mn

Miller, Anne-Frances

135

X-ray Fluorescence Measurements of Manganese in Petroglyphs and Graffiti in the Bluff, Utah Area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray Fluorescence Measurements of Manganese in Petroglyphs and Graffiti in the Bluff, Utah Area the age of rock art using Mn levels, Lytle (2008). In this work we use x-ray fluorescence (XRF) to measure of methods including atomic mass spectroscopy (AMS) measurements of 14 C, Particle-induced X-ray Excitation

136

Effect of intranasal manganese administration on neurotransmission and spatial learning in rats  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of intranasal manganese chloride (MnCl{sub 2}4H{sub 2}O) exposure on spatial learning, memory and motor activity was estimated in Morris water maze task in adult rats. Three-month-old male Wistar rats received for 2 weeks MnCl{sub 2}4H{sub 2}O at two doses the following: 0.2 mg/kg b.w. (Mn0.2) or 0.8 mg/kg b.w. (Mn0.8) per day. Control (Con) and manganese-exposed groups were observed for behavioral performance and learning in water maze. ANOVA for repeated measurements did not show any significant differences in acquisition in the water maze between the groups. However, the results of the probe trial on day 5, exhibited spatial memory deficits following manganese treatment. After completion of the behavioral experiment, the regional brain concentrations of neurotransmitters and their metabolites were determined via HPLC in selected brain regions, i.e. prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and striatum. ANOVA demonstrated significant differences in the content of monoamines and metabolites between the treatment groups compared to the controls. Negative correlations between platform crossings on the previous platform position in Southeast (SE) quadrant during the probe trial and neurotransmitter turnover suggest that impairment of spatial memory and cognitive performance after manganese (Mn) treatment is associated with modulation of the serotonergic, noradrenergic and dopaminergic neurotransmission in the brain. These findings show that intranasally applied Mn can impair spatial memory with significant changes in the tissue level and metabolism of monoamines in several brain regions. -- Highlights: ? Intranasal exposure to manganese in rats impairs spatial memory in the water maze. ? Regional changes in levels of neurotransmitters in the brain have been identified. ? Cognitive disorder correlates with modulation of 5-HT, NA and DA neurotransmission.

Blecharz-Klin, Kamilla; Piechal, Agnieszka; Joniec-Maciejak, Ilona; Pyrzanowska, Justyna; Widy-Tyszkiewicz, Ewa, E-mail: etyszkiewicz@wum.edu.pl

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

137

Types of red cell potassium in seven Spanish native breeds Paquita GONZALEZ Maria Jess TUON M. VALLEJO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Note Types of red cell potassium in seven Spanish native breeds of cattle Paquita GONZALEZ Maria Madrid, Spain Summary The distribution of red-cell potassium was studied in seven Spanish native breeds-equiv/1. For HK animals the means ranged from 50.8 to 66.1 m-equiv/1. Key word : red cell potassium

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

138

In sodium tests of ultrasonic transducers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ultrasonic techniques are seen as suitable candidates for the in-service inspection and for the continuous surveillance of sodium cooled reactors (SFR). These techniques need the development and the qualification of immersed ultrasonic transducers, and materials. This paper presents some developments performed by CEA (DTN and LIST) and AREVA (NDE Solutions), and some results. (authors)

Lhuillier, C.; Descombin, O.; Baque, F. [CEA, DTN, 13108 Saint Paul lez Durance Cedex (France); Marchand, B. [CEA, LIST, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Saillant, J. F. [AREVA/NDE Solutions, 4 rue Thomas Dumorey, 71109 Chalon sur Saone Cedex (France); Augem, J. M. [EDF, 12-14 avenue Dutrievoz, 69628 Villeurbanne (France)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Gypsum and Polyacrylamide Soil Amendments Used With High Sodium Wastewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using wastewater for irrigation of crops represents an attractive alternative to disposal. Typically, municipal wastewaters are high in sodium, and the resulting high sodium absorption ratio (SAR) alters the soil structure making it more impermeable...

Gardiner, Duane

140

A potassium crown ether complex with dichloroaurate(I)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Acta Cryst. (2003). E59, m57m58 DOI: 10.1107/S1600536803000813 Md. Alamgir Hossain et al. #15; [K(C 12 H 24 O 6 )][AuCl 2 ] m57 metal-organic papers Acta Crystallographica Section E Structure Reports Online ISSN 1600-5368 A potassium crown ether...-james@ku.edu Key indicators Single-crystal X-ray study T = 100 K Mean #27;(CC) = 0.002 A R factor = 0.017 wR factor = 0.047 Data-to-parameter ratio = 27.2 For details of how these key indicators were automatically derived from the article, see http...

Hossain, Alamgir; Powell, Douglas R.; Bowman-James, Kristin

2003-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Chemical modification of surfaces: the effect of potassium on the chemisorption of molecules on transition metal crystal surfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The physical and chemical properties of pure potassium monolayers and its effect on the adsorption of oxygen, carbon monoxide and benzene on the (111) faces of platinum and rhodium single crystals are described. Potassium adsorption on both surfaces is quite similar. Potassium forms hexagonally close packed structures that are incommensurate with the substrate. The heat of desorption of potassium on these surfaces decreases with increasing potassium coverage. The surface free electron density increases and the work function decreases substantially wtih alkali adsorption, indicating charge transfer occurs from potassium to the substrate. Oxygen adsorption increases the potassium binding energy, and forms a surface complex at high potassium coverages. Oxygen adsorption is dissociative on both clean and potassium dosed Rh(111). The metal-oxygen stretching vibration increases in the presence of potassium, indicating stronger adsorption. Carbon monoxide adsorption on both metal surfaces is strongly affected. With increasing potassium coverage, the heat of desorption increases while the C-O stretching frequencies decrease. Also, substantial population shifts from the atop to the bridged site occur. Dissociation of CO is induced on Rh(111) by the presence of potassium. Benzene is found to be ..pi.. bonded oriented with the ring plane parallel to the surface with C/sub 3v/(sigma/sub d/) symmetry on both the clean and potassium dosed Rh(111) surfaces. Potassium reduces the heat of desorption of molecular benzene and induces a lower temperature pathway to decomposition. The major influence of potassium is to increase the surface electron density, which, for molecular adsorbates with low lying vacant orbitals of the correct symmetry, can lead to substantial changes in their bonding with the surface.

Crowell, J.E.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Sodium and sulfur release and recapture during black liquor burning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to provide data on sulfur and sodium volatilization during black liquor burning, and on SO2 capture by solid sodium carbonate and sodium chloride. This data was interpreted and modeled into rate equations suitable for use in computational models for recovery boilers.

Frederick, W.J.; Iisa, K.; Wag, K.; Reis, V.V.; Boonsongsup, L.; Forssen, M.; Hupa, M.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Corrosion performance of advanced structural materials in sodium.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report gives a description of the activities in design, fabrication, construction, and assembling of a pumped sodium loop for the sodium compatibility studies on advanced structural materials. The work is the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) portion of the effort on the work project entitled, 'Sodium Compatibility of Advanced Fast Reactor Materials,' and is a part of Advanced Materials Development within the Reactor Campaign. The objective of this project is to develop information on sodium corrosion compatibility of advanced materials being considered for sodium reactor applications. This report gives the status of the sodium pumped loop at Argonne National Laboratory, the specimen details, and the technical approach to evaluate the sodium compatibility of advanced structural alloys. This report is a deliverable from ANL in FY2010 (M2GAN10SF050302) under the work package G-AN10SF0503 'Sodium Compatibility of Advanced Fast Reactor Materials.' Two reports were issued in 2009 (Natesan and Meimei Li 2009, Natesan et al. 2009) which examined the thermodynamic and kinetic factors involved in the purity of liquid sodium coolant for sodium reactor applications as well as the design specifications for the ANL pumped loop for testing advanced structural materials. Available information was presented on solubility of several metallic and nonmetallic elements along with a discussion of the possible mechanisms for the accumulation of impurities in sodium. That report concluded that the solubility of many metals in sodium is low (<1 part per million) in the temperature range of interest in sodium reactors and such trace amounts would not impact the mechanical integrity of structural materials and components. The earlier report also analyzed the solubility and transport mechanisms of nonmetallic elements such as oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, and hydrogen in laboratory sodium loops and in reactor systems such as Experimental Breeder Reactor-II, Fast Flux Test Facility, and Clinch River Breeder Reactor. Among the nonmetallic elements discussed, oxygen is deemed controllable and its concentration in sodium can be maintained in sodium for long reactor life by using cold-trap method. It was concluded that among the cold-trap and getter-trap methods, the use of cold trap is sufficient to achieve oxygen concentration of the order of 1 part per million. Under these oxygen conditions in sodium, the corrosion performance of structural materials such as austenitic stainless steels and ferritic steels will be acceptable at a maximum core outlet sodium temperature of {approx}550 C. In the current sodium compatibility studies, the oxygen concentration in sodium will be controlled and maintained at {approx}1 ppm by controlling the cold trap temperature. The oxygen concentration in sodium in the forced convection sodium loop will be controlled and monitored by maintaining the cold trap temperature in the range of 120-150 C, which would result in oxygen concentration in the range of 1-2 ppm. Uniaxial tensile specimens are being exposed to flowing sodium and will be retrieved and analyzed for corrosion and post-exposure tensile properties. Advanced materials for sodium exposure include austenitic alloy HT-UPS and ferritic-martensitic steels modified 9Cr-1Mo and NF616. Among the nonmetallic elements in sodium, carbon was assessed to have the most influence on structural materials since carbon, as an impurity, is not amenable to control and maintenance by any of the simple purification methods. The dynamic equilibrium value for carbon in sodium systems is dependent on several factors, details of which were discussed in the earlier report. The current sodium compatibility studies will examine the role of carbon concentration in sodium on the carburization-decarburization of advanced structural materials at temperatures up to 650 C. Carbon will be added to the sodium by exposure of carbon-filled iron tubes, which over time will enable carbon to diffuse through iron and dissolve into sodium. The method enables addition of dissolved carbon (without carb

Natesan, K.; Momozaki, Y.; Li, M.; Rink, D.L. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2012-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

144

Effect of potassium permanganate as an oxidizing agent in the production of lignite-based fertilizers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this work was to observe the effect of potassium permanganate oxidation of lignites from Elbistan for end use as fertilizers, after being ammoniated. The experiments at each stage were designed by a 1/2 x full factorial design. The oxidation was carried out by three different methods. In the first two methods potassium permanganate in neutral or basic medium was used. In the other method two stages of oxidation were used: nitric acid followed by potassium permanganate in acidic medium. The latter proved to be more successful.

Baris, S.; Dincer, S.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Cast Stone Formulation At Higher Sodium Concentrations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A low temperature waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide supplemental Low Activity Waste (LAW) immobilization capacity for the Hanford site. Formulation of Cast Stone at high sodium concentrations is of interest since a significant reduction in the necessary volume of Cast Stone and subsequent disposal costs could be achieved if an acceptable waste form can be produced with a high sodium molarity salt solution combined with a high water to premix (or dry blend) ratio. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the factors involved with increasing the sodium concentration in Cast Stone, including production and performance properties and the retention and release of specific components of interest. Three factors were identified for the experimental matrix: the concentration of sodium in the simulated salt solution, the water to premix ratio, and the blast furnace slag portion of the premix. The salt solution simulants used in this study were formulated to represent the overall average waste composition. The cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash were sourced from a supplier in the Hanford area in order to be representative. The test mixes were prepared in the laboratory and fresh properties were measured. Fresh density increased with increasing sodium molarity and with decreasing water to premix ratio, as expected given the individual densities of these components. Rheology measurements showed that all of the test mixes produced very fluid slurries. The fresh density and rheology data are of potential value in designing a future Cast Stone production facility. Standing water and density gradient testing showed that settling is not of particular concern for the high sodium compositions studied. Heat of hydration measurements may provide some insight into the reactions that occur within the test mixes, which may in turn be related to the properties and performance of the waste form. These measurements showed that increased sodium concentration in the salt solution reduced the time to peak heat flow, and reducing the amount of slag in the premix increased the time to peak heat flow. These observations may help to describe some of the cured properties of the samples, in particular the differences in compressive strength observed after 28 and 90 days of curing. Samples were cured for at least 28 days at ambient temperature in the laboratory prior to cured properties analyses. The low activity waste form for disposal at the Hanford Site is required to have a compressive strength of at least 500 psi. After 28 days of curing, several of the test mixes had mean compressive strengths that were below the 500 psi requirement. Higher sodium concentrations and higher water to premix ratios led to reduced compressive strength. Higher fly ash concentrations decreased the compressive strength after 28 days of curing. This may be explained in that the cementitious phases matured more quickly in the mixes with higher concentrations of slag, as evidenced by the data for the time to peak heat generation. All of the test mixes exhibited higher mean compressive strengths after 90 days of curing, with only one composition having a mean compressive strength of less than 500 psi. Leachability indices were determined for the test mixes for contaminants of interest. The leaching performance of the mixes evaluated in this study was not particularly sensitive to the factors used in the experimental design. This may be beneficial in demonstrating that the performance of the waste form is robust with respect to changes in the mix composition. The results of this study demonstrate the potential to achieve significantly higher waste loadings in Cast Stone and other low temperature, cementitious waste forms. Additional work is needed to elucidate the hydration mechanisms occurring in Cast Stone formulated with highly concentrated salt solutions since these reactions are responsible for determining the performance of the cured waste form. The thermal analyses completed in this study provide some preliminary insight, although the l

Fox, K. M.; Roberts, K. A.; Edwards, T. B.

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

146

Cast Stone Formulation At Higher Sodium Concentrations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A low temperature waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide supplemental Low Activity Waste (LAW) immobilization capacity for the Hanford site. Formulation of Cast Stone at high sodium concentrations is of interest since a significant reduction in the necessary volume of Cast Stone and subsequent disposal costs could be achieved if an acceptable waste form can be produced with a high sodium molarity salt solution combined with a high water to premix (or dry blend) ratio. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the factors involved with increasing the sodium concentration in Cast Stone, including production and performance properties and the retention and release of specific components of interest. Three factors were identified for the experimental matrix: the concentration of sodium in the simulated salt solution, the water to premix ratio, and the blast furnace slag portion of the premix. The salt solution simulants used in this study were formulated to represent the overall average waste composition. The cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash were sourced from a supplier in the Hanford area in order to be representative. The test mixes were prepared in the laboratory and fresh properties were measured. Fresh density increased with increasing sodium molarity and with decreasing water to premix ratio, as expected given the individual densities of these components. Rheology measurements showed that all of the test mixes produced very fluid slurries. The fresh density and rheology data are of potential value in designing a future Cast Stone production facility. Standing water and density gradient testing showed that settling is not of particular concern for the high sodium compositions studied. Heat of hydration measurements may provide some insight into the reactions that occur within the test mixes, which may in turn be related to the properties and performance of the waste form. These measurements showed that increased sodium concentration in the salt solution reduced the time to peak heat flow, and reducing the amount of slag in the premix increased the time to peak heat flow. These observations may help to describe some of the cured properties of the samples, in particular the differences in compressive strength observed after 28 and 90 days of curing. Samples were cured for at least 28 days at ambient temperature in the laboratory prior to cured properties analyses. The low activity waste form for disposal at the Hanford Site is required to have a compressive strength of at least 500 psi. After 28 days of curing, several of the test mixes had mean compressive strengths that were below the 500 psi requirement. Higher sodium concentrations and higher water to premix ratios led to reduced compressive strength. Higher fly ash concentrations decreased the compressive strength after 28 days of curing. This may be explained in that the cementitious phases matured more quickly in the mixes with higher concentrations of slag, as evidenced by the data for the time to peak heat generation. All of the test mixes exhibited higher mean compressive strengths after 90 days of curing, with only one composition having a mean compressive strength of less than 500 psi. Leach indices were determined for the test mixes for contaminants of interest. The leaching performance of the mixes evaluated in this study was not particularly sensitive to the factors used in the experimental design. This may be beneficial in demonstrating that the performance of the waste form is robust with respect to changes in the mix composition. The results of this study demonstrate the potential to achieve significantly higher waste loadings in Cast Stone and other low temperature, cementitious waste forms. Additional work is needed to elucidate the hydration mechanisms occurring in Cast Stone formulated with highly concentrated salt solutions since these reactions are responsible for determining the performance of the cured waste form. The thermal analyses completed in this study provide some preliminary insight, although the limited

Fox, K. M.; Roberts, K. A.; Edwards, T. B.

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

147

Cast Stone Formulation At Higher Sodium Concentrations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A low temperature waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide supplemental Low Activity Waste (LAW) immobilization capacity for the Hanford site. Formulation of Cast Stone at high sodium concentrations is of interest since a significant reduction in the necessary volume of Cast Stone and subsequent disposal costs could be achieved if an acceptable waste form can be produced with a high sodium molarity salt solution combined with a high water to premix (or dry blend) ratio. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the factors involved with increasing the sodium concentration in Cast Stone, including production and performance properties and the retention and release of specific components of interest. Three factors were identified for the experimental matrix: the concentration of sodium in the simulated salt solution, the water to premix ratio, and the blast furnace slag portion of the premix. The salt solution simulants used in this study were formulated to represent the overall average waste composition. The cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash were sourced from a supplier in the Hanford area in order to be representative. The test mixes were prepared in the laboratory and fresh properties were measured. Fresh density increased with increasing sodium molarity and with decreasing water to premix ratio, as expected given the individual densities of these components. Rheology measurements showed that all of the test mixes produced very fluid slurries. The fresh density and rheology data are of potential value in designing a future Cast Stone production facility. Standing water and density gradient testing showed that settling is not of particular concern for the high sodium compositions studied. Heat of hydration measurements may provide some insight into the reactions that occur within the test mixes, which may in turn be related to the properties and performance of the waste form. These measurements showed that increased sodium concentration in the salt solution reduced the time to peak heat flow, and reducing the amount of slag in the premix increased the time to peak heat flow. These observations may help to describe some of the cured properties of the samples, in particular the differences in compressive strength observed after 28 and 90 days of curing. Samples were cured for at least 28 days at ambient temperature in the laboratory prior to cured properties analyses. The low activity waste form for disposal at the Hanford Site is required to have a compressive strength of at least 500 psi. After 28 days of curing, several of the test mixes had mean compressive strengths that were below the 500 psi requirement. Higher sodium concentrations and higher water to premix ratios led to reduced compressive strength. Higher fly ash concentrations decreased the compressive strength after 28 days of curing. This may be explained in that the cementitious phases matured more quickly in the mixes with higher concentrations of slag, as evidenced by the data for the time to peak heat generation. All of the test mixes exhibited higher mean compressive strengths after 90 days of curing, with only one composition having a mean compressive strength of less than 500 psi. Leach indices were determined for the test mixes for contaminants of interest. The leaching performance of the mixes evaluated in this study was not particularly sensitive to the factors used in the experimental design. This may be beneficial in demonstrating that the performance of the waste form is robust with respect to changes in the mix composition. The results of this study demonstrate the potential to achieve significantly higher waste loadings in Cast Stone and other low temperature, cementitious waste forms. Additional work is needed to elucidate the hydration mechanisms occurring in Cast Stone formulated with highly concentrated salt solutions since these reactions are responsible for determining the performance of the cured waste form. The thermal analyses completed in this study provide some preliminary insight, although the limited

Fox, K. M.; Edwards, T. A.; Roberts, K. B.

2013-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

148

Acid/Base Recovery From Sodium Sulfate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

escalating In price due to the Imbalance In market demand. Chlorine and caustic are produced together by the electrolysis 01 sodium chloride brine solutions. Every ECU (electrochemical unit) 01 chlorine resu~s In the production 01 one ECU 01 caustic soda... cell also produces an acid product that is contaminated with unreacted sullate. The voltage 01 a three compartment is higher, however, and the process system Is more complex. Process System Current density and efficiency determines the amount 01...

Niksa, M. J.

149

Study by IR-spectroscopy and adsorption of platinum-alumina catalysts modified by manganese  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Additions of Re are widely employed for modifying platinum-alumina catalysts (PAC). The effect of Mn on the catalysis of and the physicochemical properties of PAC has been less studied. It is only known that adding <0.2 wt. % Mn has no effect on the dispersity of the Pt crystallites. In this work the authors have studied the state of Pt in unmodified PAC by IR spectroscopy of adsorbed CO and by the adsorption of H/sub 2/ at elevated temperatures. The state of the metallic platinum in platinum-alumina catalysts modified by Mn is more heterogeneous than in the unmodified sample. When manganese is added, platinum crystallites with stronger electron-donor properties form on the surface of the catalyst. In platinum-alumina catalysts modified by manganese, there is an increase in the number of sites for the high-temperature dissociative adsorption of hydrogen located on the surface of the Mn-modified carrier.

Zaitsev, A.V.; Barkova, A.P.; Borovkov, B.Yu.; Sterligov, O.D.; Isagulyants, G.V.; Kazanskii, V.B.

1987-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

150

CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to improve the process for CO{sub 2} capture by alkanolamine absorption/stripping by developing an alternative solvent, aqueous K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} promoted by piperazine. The best K{sup +}/PZ solvent, 4.5 m K{sup +}/4.5 m PZ, requires equivalent work of 31.8 kJ/mole CO{sub 2} when used with a double matrix stripper and an intercooled absorber. The oxidative degradation of piperazine or organic acids is reduced significantly by inhibitor A, but the production of ethylenediamine is unaffected. The oxidative degradation of piperazine in 7 m MEA/2 m PZ is catalyzed by Cu{sup ++}. The thermal degradation of MEA becomes significant at 120 C. The solubility of potassium sulfate in MEA/PZ solvents is increased at greater CO{sub 2} loading. The best solvent and process configuration, matrix with MDEA/PZ, offers 22% and 15% energy savings over the baseline and improved baseline, respectively, with stripping and compression to 10 MPa. The energy requirement for stripping and compression to 10 MPa is about 20% of the power output from a 500 MW power plant with 90% CO{sub 2} removal. The stripper rate model shows that a ''short and fat'' stripper requires 7 to 15% less equivalent work than a ''tall and skinny'' one. The stripper model was validated with data obtained from pilot plant experiments at the University of Texas with 5m K{sup +}/2.5m PZ and 6.4m K{sup +}/1.6m PZ under normal pressure and vacuum conditions using Flexipac AQ Style 20 structured packing. Experiments with oxidative degradation at low gas rates confirm the effects of Cu{sup +2} catalysis; in MEA/PZ solutions more formate and acetate is produced in the presence of Cu{sup +2}. At 150 C, the half life of 30% MEA with 0.4 moles CO{sub 2}/mole amine is about 2 weeks. At 100 C, less than 3% degradation occurred in two weeks. The solubility of potassium sulfate in MEA solution increases significantly with CO{sub 2} loading and decreases with MEA concentration. The base case corrosion rate in 5 M MEA/1.2M PZ is 22 mpy. With 1 wt% heat stable salt, the corrosion rate increases by 50% to 160% in the order: thiosulfate< oxalate

Gary T. Rochelle; Andrew Sexton; Jason Davis; Marcus Hilliard; Qing Xu; David Van Wagener; Jorge M. Plaza

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

151

Nested potassium hydroxide etching and protective coatings for silicon-based microreactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have developed a multilayer, multichannel silicon-based microreactor that uses elemental fluorine as a reagent and generates hydrogen fluoride as a byproduct. Nested potassium hydroxide etching (using silicon nitride ...

de Mas, Nuria

152

E-Print Network 3.0 - adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

<< < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Neuron, Vol. 38, 417432, May 8, 2003, Copyright 2003 by Cell Press ATP-Sensitive Potassium Channel Traffic Regulation Summary: Neuron, Vol. 38, 417-432, May...

153

E-Print Network 3.0 - atp sensitive potassium Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: atp sensitive potassium Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Na'-K+-ATPase activity in medullary...

154

Potassium doses and frequency of application to alfalfa in a tropical soil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of field-grown irrigated alfalfa. Plant Soil. 1977;46:FW, Potassium nutrition of alfalfa and other forage legumes:fertilization effects on alfalfa in a Mediterranean climate.

Bernardi, Alberto C. de Campos; Rassini, Joaquim Bartolomeu

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Experimental evaluation and modeling of a turbine blade with potassium evaporative cooling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new method of turbine blade cooling, the Return Flow Cascade, has been developed in which vaporization of a liquid metal such as potassium is used to maintain the blade surface at a nearly uniform temperature. Turbine ...

Townsend, Jessica Lee

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

E-Print Network 3.0 - aqueous potassium acetate Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Heat at 70 C for 30'. 8. Add 100ml 5M potassium acetate, vortex 30". 9. Allow... to tube. 13. Invert to mix and ... Source: Singer, Mitchell - Section of Microbiology,...

157

Secondary cell with orthorhombic alkali metal/manganese oxide phase active cathode material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An alkali metal manganese oxide secondary cell is disclosed which can provide a high rate of discharge, good cycling capabilities, good stability of the cathode material, high specific energy (energy per unit of weight) and high energy density (energy per unit volume). The active material in the anode is an alkali metal and the active material in the cathode comprises an orthorhombic alkali metal manganese oxide which undergoes intercalation and deintercalation without a change in phase, resulting in a substantially linear change in voltage with change in the state of charge of the cell. The active material in the cathode is an orthorhombic structure having the formula M{sub x}Z{sub y}Mn{sub (1{minus}y)}O{sub 2}, where M is an alkali metal; Z is a metal capable of substituting for manganese in the orthorhombic structure such as iron, cobalt or titanium; x ranges from about 0.2 in the fully charged state to about 0.75 in the fully discharged state, and y ranges from 0 to 60 atomic %. Preferably, the cell is constructed with a solid electrolyte, but a liquid or gelatinous electrolyte may also be used in the cell. 11 figs.

Doeff, M.M.; Peng, M.Y.; Ma, Y.; Visco, S.J.; DeJonghe, L.C.

1996-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

158

Hot coal gas desulfurization with manganese-based sorbents. Final report, September 1992--December 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The focus of much current work being performed by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) of the Department of Energy on hot coal-derived fuel gas desulfurization is in the use of zinc-based sorbents. METC has shown interest in formulating and testing manganese-based pellets as alternative effective sulfur sorbents in the 700 to 1200{degree}C temperature range. To substantiate the potential superiority of Mn-based pellets, a systematic approach toward the evaluation of the desulfurizing power of single-metal sorbents is developed based on thermodynamic considerations. This novel procedure considered several metal-based sorbents and singled out manganese oxide as a prime candidate sorbent capable of being utilized under a wide temperature range, irrespective of the reducing power (determined by CO{sub 2}/CO ratio) of the fuel gas. Then, the thermodynamic feasibility of using Mn-based pellets for the removal of H{sub 2}S from hot-coal derived fuel gases, and the subsequent oxidative regeneration of loaded (sulfided) pellets was established. It was concluded that MnO is the stable form of manganese for virtually all commercially available coal-derived fuel gases. In addition, the objective of reducing the H{sub 2}S concentration below 150 ppMv to satisfy the integrated gasification combined cycle system requirement was shown to be thermodynamically feasible. A novel process is developed for the manufacture of Mn-based spherical pellets which have the desired physical and chemical characteristics required.

Hepworth, M.T.; Slimane, R.B.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Transcriptome Analysis of Manganese-deficient Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Provides Insight on the Chlorophyll Biosynthesis Pathway  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The biosynthesis of chlorophyll and other tetrapyrroles is a vital but poorly understood process. Recent genomic advances with the unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii have created opportunity to more closely examine the mechanisms of the chlorophyll biosynthesis pathway via transcriptome analysis. Manganese is a nutrient of interest for complex reactions because of its multiple stable oxidation states and role in molecular oxygen coordination. C. reinhardtii was cultured in Manganese-deplete Tris-acetate-phosphate (TAP) media for 24 hours and used to create cDNA libraries for sequencing using Illumina TruSeq technology. Transcriptome analysis provided intriguing insight on possible regulatory mechanisms in the pathway. Evidence supports similarities of GTR (Glutamyl-tRNA synthase) to its Chlorella vulgaris homolog in terms of Mn requirements. Data was also suggestive of Mn-related compensatory up-regulation for pathway proteins CHLH1 (Manganese Chelatase), GUN4 (Magnesium chelatase activating protein), and POR1 (Light-dependent protochlorophyllide reductase). Intriguingly, data suggests possible reciprocal expression of oxygen dependent CPX1 (coproporphyrinogen III oxidase) and oxygen independent CPX2. Further analysis using RT-PCR could provide compelling evidence for several novel regulatory mechanisms in the chlorophyll biosynthesis pathway.

Lockhart, Ainsley; Zvenigorodsky, Natasha; Pedraza, Mary Ann; Lindquist, Erika

2011-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

160

The effect of sodium chloride on the dissolution of calcium silicate hydrate gels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of cement based materials will be widespread in the long-term management of radioactive materials in the United Kingdom. One of the applications could be the Nirex reference vault backfill (NRVB) as an engineered barrier within a deep geological repository. NRVB confers alkaline conditions, which would provide a robust chemical barrier through the control of the solubility of some key radionuclides, enhanced sorption and minimised corrosion of steel containers. An understanding of the dissolution of C-S-H gels in cement under the appropriate conditions (e.g., saline groundwaters) is necessary to demonstrate the expected evolution of the chemistry over time and to provide sufficient cement to buffer the porewater conditions for the required time. A programme of experimental work has been undertaken to investigate C-S-H gel dissolution behaviour in sodium chloride solutions and the effect of calcium/silicon ratio (C/S), temperature and cation type on this behaviour. Reductions in calcium concentration and pH values were observed with samples equilibrated at 45 deg. C compared to those prepared at 25 deg. C. The effect of salt cation type on salt-concentration dependence of the dissolution of C-S-H gels was investigated by the addition of lithium or potassium chloride in place of sodium chloride for gels with a C/S of 1.0 and 1.8. With a C/S of 1.0, similar increases in dissolved calcium concentration with increasing ionic strength were recorded for the different salts. However, at a C/S of 1.8, anomalously high calcium concentrations were observed in the presence of lithium.

Hill, J. [UK Nirex Limited, Curie Avenue, Harwell, Didcot Oxfordshire, OX11 0RH (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: joanne.hill@nirex.co.uk; Harris, A.W. [UK Nirex Limited, Curie Avenue, Harwell, Didcot Oxfordshire, OX11 0RH (United Kingdom); Manning, M. [Formerly AEA Technology, Building 220, Harwell, Didcot Oxfordshire, OX11 0RA (United Kingdom); Chambers, A. [Serco Assurance, Building 150, Harwell International Business Centre, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0RA (United Kingdom); Swanton, S.W. [Serco Assurance, Building 150, Harwell International Business Centre, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0RA (United Kingdom)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Recent Sodium Technology Development for the Decommissioning of the Rapsodie and Superphenix Reactors and the Management of Sodium Wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) has recently developed and/or conducted experiments on several processes in support of the decommissioning of two French liquid-metal fast reactors (LMFRs), Rapsodie and Superphenix, as well as on the treatment of CEA sodium wastes. CEA has demonstrated that it is possible to define appropriate and efficient processes to meet the different situations encountered in decommissioning LMFRs. Mechanical techniques derived from standard technologies have been successfully applied to fast reactor decommissioning to complete primary vessel draining from sodium. In addition, specific chemical processes have been developed to deal safely with metallic sodium reactivity. Sodium-contaminated equipment has been successfully cleaned by reacting sodium with water mist in an atmosphere with carbon dioxide to form inert sodium carbonate. Bulk sodium has been successfully converted into aqueous caustic soda by injection of liquid-metallic sodium into sodium hydroxide solution. Several processes were also defined to deal with specific sodium wastes. In all cases the principle is based on a sodium/water chemical reaction where the released hydrogen and heat are controlled. With the development of a wide variety of processes, all steps in the decommissioning of LMFRs are assumed to be now properly mastered.

Rodriguez, G.; Gastaldi, O.; Baque, F. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique Cadarache (France)

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

162

Relationships between chemical forms of soil iron and manganese and their absorption by rice from 34 flooded Gulf Coast soils of Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GULF COAST SOILS OF TEXAS A Thesis by DOUGLAS P. PHILLIPS Approved as to style and content by: airman of Comnittee ea of Department em er ember Mem er Mem er Mem er December 1971 ABSTRACT Relationships Between Chemical Forms of Soil Iron... of iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn) in 34 Gulf Coast rice soils at 48 days from submergence . . . 44 6 Content of active iron and manganese, exchangeable iron and manganese (48 days from submergence), and water soluble iron and manganese (48 days from...

Phillips, Douglas Patton

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Effect of potassium carbonate on char gasification by carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A differential packed-bed reactor has been employed to study the gasification of 7.5 wt% K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-catalyzed Saran char in carbon dioxide/carbon monoxide mixtures at a total pressure near 1 atm (101.3 kPa) and temperatures between 922 and 1046 K. The rate data were tested with a model which involves two-site adsorption and subsequent dissociation of CO/sub 2/ on the char surface. The results indicate that this model adequately explains the catalyzed gasification data. Moreover, the activation energy for desorption of carbon-oxygen complex is lower for the catalyzed case than for the uncatalyzed case. Adsorption of CO and CO/sub 2/ on both catalyzed and uncatalyzed chars was also followed with a volumetric adsorption apparatus at pressures between 1 and 100 kPa and temperatures from 273 to 725 K. The catalyzed char adsorbed an order of magnitude more CO/sub 2/ at 560 K than the uncatalyzed char. Subsequent dissociation of CO/sub 2/ on the carbon surface does not appear to be catalyzed by potassium. Thus, the catalyst's role is to enhance CO/sub 2/ adsorption, thereby creating more oxygen on the surface, and lowering the activation energy for desorption of the resultant carbon-oxygen species.

Koenig, P.C.; Squires, R.G.; Laurendeau, N.M.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Report on sodium compatibility of advanced structural materials.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides an update on the evaluation of sodium compatibility of advanced structural materials. The report is a deliverable (level 3) in FY11 (M3A11AN04030403), under the Work Package A-11AN040304, 'Sodium Compatibility of Advanced Structural Materials' performed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), as part of Advanced Structural Materials Program for the Advanced Reactor Concepts. This work package supports the advanced structural materials development by providing corrosion and tensile data from the standpoint of sodium compatibility of advanced structural alloys. The scope of work involves exposure of advanced structural alloys such as G92, mod.9Cr-1Mo (G91) ferritic-martensitic steels and HT-UPS austenitic stainless steels to a flowing sodium environment with controlled impurity concentrations. The exposed specimens are analyzed for their corrosion performance, microstructural changes, and tensile behavior. Previous reports examined the thermodynamic and kinetic factors involved in the purity of liquid sodium coolant for sodium reactor applications as well as the design, fabrication, and construction of a forced convection sodium loop for sodium compatibility studies of advanced materials. This report presents the results on corrosion performance, microstructure, and tensile properties of advanced ferritic-martensitic and austenitic alloys exposed to liquid sodium at 550 C for up to 2700 h and at 650 C for up to 5064 h in the forced convection sodium loop. The oxygen content of sodium was controlled by the cold-trapping method to achieve {approx}1 wppm oxygen level. Four alloys were examined, G92 in the normalized and tempered condition (H1 G92), G92 in the cold-rolled condition (H2 G92), G91 in the normalized and tempered condition, and hot-rolled HT-UPS. G91 was included as a reference to compare with advanced alloy, G92. It was found that all four alloys showed weight loss after sodium exposures at 550 and 650 C. The weight loss of the four alloys was comparable after sodium exposures at 550 C; the weight loss of ferritic-martensitic steels, G92 and G91 is more significant than that of austenitic stainless steel, HT-UPS after sodium exposures at 650 C. Sodium exposures up to 2700 h at 550 C had no significant influence on tensile properties, while sodium exposures up to 5064 h at 650 C dramatically lowered the tensile strengths of the four alloys. The ultimate tensile strength of H1 G92, H2 G92, and G91 ferritic-martensitic steels was reduced to as much as nearly half of its initial value after sodium exposures at 650 C. Though the uniform elongation was recovered to some extent, these three ferritic-martensitic steels showed considerable strain softening after sodium exposures. The yield stress of HT-UPS austenitic stainless steel increased, the ultimate tensile strength decreased, and the total elongation was reduced after sodium exposures at 650 C. The dynamic strain aging effect observed in the as-received HT-UPS specimens became less pronounced after sodium exposures at 650 C. Microstructural characterization of sodium-exposed specimens showed no appreciable surface deterioration or grain structure changes under an optical microscope, except for the H2 G92 steel, in which the martensite structure transformed to large grain ferrite after sodium exposures at 650 C. TEM observations of the sodium-exposed H2 G92 steel showed significant recrystallization after sodium exposure for 2700 h at 550 C, and transformation of martensite to ferrite and high density of precipitates in nearly dislocation-free matrix after sodium exposures at 650 C. Further microstructural analysis and evaluation of decarburization/carburization behavior is needed to understand the dramatic changes in the tensile strengths of advanced ferritic-martensitic and austenitic steels after sodium exposures at 650 C.

Li, M.; Natesan, K.; Momozaki, Y.; Rink, D.L.; Soppet, W.K.; Listwan, J.T. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

165

Factors contributing to the breakdown of sodium beta-alumina  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Clarification of the breakdown process occurring during charge transfer in sodium beta alumina solid electrolytes was derived from: (1) studying the effects of molten sodium contact at 350/sup 0/C on single crystal sodium beta alumina and polycrystalline sodium beta alumina; (2) determination of critical current density by monitoring acoustic emissions accompanying crack growth in sodium/sodium beta alumina/sodium cells subjected to linear current ramping at 1 mA cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/; (3) failure analysis conducted on cycled electrolytes, some from commercial sodium/sulfur cells, which had been subjected to up to 703 Ahr cm/sup -2/ of charge transfer. Gray coloration developing in beta aluminas in contact with molten sodium was found to be a consequence of formation, through reduction by sodium, of oxygen vacancies charge compensated by electrons. Electronic conductivity of the electrolyte increases as a result. No second phase formation was detected. Colored electrolytes from sodium/sulfur cells show evidence of a newly recognized degradation mechanism in which fracture occurs when sodium is reduced and deposited internally under pressure as metal in regions where an electronic conductivity gradient exists. Heating colored beta aluminas in air produces reoxidation and bleaching. Kinetics and other properties of the coloration and bleaching processes were determined. Critical current density was found to bear an inverse relation to average electrolyte grain size. Evidence was found in the cycled electrolytes for a slow crack growth mechanism and a progressive mode of degradation advancing from the sulfur electrode interface. Implications of the findings for the construction and operation of sodium/sulfur battery systems are discussed.

Buechele, A.C.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Sodium fast reactor safety and licensing research plan. Volume II.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Expert panels comprised of subject matter experts identified at the U.S. National Laboratories (SNL, ANL, INL, ORNL, LBL, and BNL), universities (University of Wisconsin and Ohio State University), international agencies (IRSN, CEA, JAEA, KAERI, and JRC-IE) and private consultation companies (Radiation Effects Consulting) were assembled to perform a gap analysis for sodium fast reactor licensing. Expert-opinion elicitation was performed to qualitatively assess the current state of sodium fast reactor technologies. Five independent gap analyses were performed resulting in the following topical reports: (1) Accident Initiators and Sequences (i.e., Initiators/Sequences Technology Gap Analysis), (2) Sodium Technology Phenomena (i.e., Advanced Burner Reactor Sodium Technology Gap Analysis), (3) Fuels and Materials (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Fuels and Materials: Research Needs), (4) Source Term Characterization (i.e., Advanced Sodium Fast Reactor Accident Source Terms: Research Needs), and (5) Computer Codes and Models (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Gaps Analysis of Computer Codes and Models for Accident Analysis and Reactor Safety). Volume II of the Sodium Research Plan consolidates the five gap analysis reports produced by each expert panel, wherein the importance of the identified phenomena and necessities of further experimental research and code development were addressed. The findings from these five reports comprised the basis for the analysis in Sodium Fast Reactor Research Plan Volume I.

Ludewig, H. (Brokhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY); Powers, D. A.; Hewson, John C.; LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Wright, A. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Phillips, J.; Zeyen, R. (Institute for Energy Petten, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France); Clement, B. (IRSN/DPAM.SEMIC Bt 702, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France); Garner, Frank (Radiation Effects Consulting, Richland, WA); Walters, Leon (Advanced Reactor Concepts, Los Alamos, NM); Wright, Steve; Ott, Larry J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Suo-Anttila, Ahti Jorma; Denning, Richard (Ohio State University, Columbus, OH); Ohshima, Hiroyuki (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Ohno, S. (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Miyhara, S. (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Yacout, Abdellatif (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Farmer, M. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Wade, D. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Grandy, C. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Schmidt, R.; Cahalen, J. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Olivier, Tara Jean; Budnitz, R. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA); Tobita, Yoshiharu (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Serre, Frederic (Centre d'%C3%94etudes nucl%C3%94eaires de Cadarache, Cea, France); Natesan, Ken (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Carbajo, Juan J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Jeong, Hae-Yong (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon, Korea); Wigeland, Roald (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Corradini, Michael (University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI); Thomas, Justin (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Wei, Tom (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Sofu, Tanju (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Flanagan, George F. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Bari, R. (Brokhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY); Porter D. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Lambert, J. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Hayes, S. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Sackett, J. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Denman, Matthew R.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Sodium cobalt bronze batteries and a method for making same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A solid state secondary battery utilizing a low cost, environmentally sound, sodium cobalt bronze electrode. A method is provided for producing same.

Doeff, Marca M. (Hayward, CA); Ma, Yanping (Berkeley, CA); Visco, Steven J. (Berkeley, CA); DeJonghe, Lutgard (Lafayette, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Sodium cobalt bronze batteries and a method for making same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A solid state secondary battery utilizing a low cost, environmentally sound, sodium cobalt bronze electrode is described. A method is provided for producing same. 11 figs.

Doeff, M.M.; Ma, Y.; Visco, S.J.; DeJonghe, L.

1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

169

Idaho Site Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Idaho Site Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup Treatment March 28, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis CWI engineers Jeff Jones, David Tolman, right, and Kirk Dooley...

170

Efficacy of soluble sodium tripolyphosphate amendments for the...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of soluble sodium tripolyphosphate amendments for the in-situ immobilisation of uranium."Environmental Chemistry 4:293-300. Authors: DM Wellman EM Pierce MM Valenta...

171

aqueous sodium sulfate: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

viscosity, 771, for PDMDAAC fractions in sodium chloride solutions by viscosity, size-exclusionchromatography, and light Dubin, Paul D. 32 Structure and Dynamics in Aqueous...

172

Desiccation resistance and root growth rate of St. Augustinegrass (Stenotaphrum secundatum (Walt.) Kuntze 'Floratam') as influenced by potassium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and turfgrass quality of Floratam St. Augustinegrass were investigated in both field and greenhouse experiments. Both studies evaluated the influence of potassium on root growth and turfgrass quality from the establishment of sod, through an imposed water... in the fall field experiment, while no improvement was noted in the spring greenhouse study. The daily root growth rates were not influenced by potassium in the field study, while increased potassium fertilization rates resulted in greater daily root...

DiPaola, J. M

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Sodium dichromate expedited response action assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) recommended that the US Department of Energy (DOE) perform an expedited response action (ERA) for the Sodium Dichromate Barrel Disposal Landfill. The ERA lead regulatory agency is Ecology and EPA is the support agency. The ERA was categorized as non-time-critical, which required preparation of an engineering evaluation and cost analysis (EE/CA). The EE/CA was included in the ERA proposal. The EE/CA is a rapid, focused evaluation of available technologies using specific screening factors to assess feasibility, appropriateness, and cost. The ERA goal is to reduce the potential for any contaminant migration from the landfill to the soil column, groundwater, and Columbia River. Since the Sodium Dichromate Barrel Disposal Landfill is the only waste site within the operable unit, the removal action may be the final remediation of the 100-IU-4 Operable Unit. This ERA process started in March 1992. The ERA proposal went through a parallel review process with Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), DOE Richland Operations (RL), EPA, Ecology, and a 30-day public comment period. Ecology and EPA issued an Action Agreement Memorandum in March 1993 (Appendix A). The memorandum directed excavation of all anomalies and disposal of the collected materials at the Hanford Site Central Landfill. Primary field activities were completed by the end of April 1993. Final waste disposal of a minor quantity of hazardous waste was completed in July 1993.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopic study of the interaction of potassium with carbon monoxide and benzene on the Pt(111) surface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The interaction of potassium with carbon monoxide and benezene has been studied on the Pt(111) crystal surface by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). The adsorptive changes reported in previous studies for carbon monoxide and benzene when potassium is coadsorbed are correlated with the UPS results presented here and are explained with the aid of a molecular orbital analysis. The authors find that the valence molecular orbitals increase their binding energy slightly when the potassium is coadsorbed, implying a model in which the adsorbates sense the potassium-induced changes in dipole field at the surface. 36 references, 11 figures.

Kudo, M.; Garfunkel, E.L.; Somorjai, G.A.

1985-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

175

Magnetism in bcc and fcc Fe with carbon and manganese This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetism in bcc and fcc Fe with carbon and manganese This article has been downloaded from.1088/0953-8984/22/31/316002 Magnetism in bcc and fcc Fe with carbon and manganese N I Medvedeva1,2 , D Van Aken2 and J E Medvedeva3 1 functional theory calculations were performed to study the structure and magnetic properties of bcc

Medvedeva, Julia E.

176

MAGNESIUM MONO POTASSIUM PHOSPHATE GROUT FOR P-REACTOR VESSEL IN-SITU DECOMISSIONING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to document laboratory testing of magnesium mono potassium phosphate grouts for P-Reactor vessel in-situ decommissioning. Magnesium mono potassium phosphate cement-based grout was identified as candidate material for filling (physically stabilizing) the 105-P Reactor vessel (RV) because it is less alkaline than portland cement-based grout (pH of about 12.4). A less alkaline material ({<=} 10.5) was desired to address a potential materials compatibility issue caused by corrosion of aluminum metal in highly alkaline environments such as that encountered in portland cement grouts. Information concerning access points into the P-Reactor vessel and amount of aluminum metal in the vessel is provided elsewhere. Fresh and cured properties were measured for: (1) commercially blended magnesium mono potassium phosphate packaged grouts, (2) commercially available binders blended with inert fillers at SRNL, (3) grouts prepared from technical grade MgO and KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} and inert fillers (quartz sands, Class F fly ash), and (4) Ceramicrete{reg_sign} magnesium mono potassium phosphate-based grouts prepared at Argonne National Laboratory. Boric acid was evaluated as a set retarder in the magnesium mono potassium phosphate mixes.

Langton, C.; Stefanko, D.

2011-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

177

DAFS study of site-specific local structure of Mn in manganese ferrite films.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Manganese ferrite (MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) is a well-known magnetic material widely used in electronics for many years. It is well established that its magnetic behavior is strongly influenced by local structural properties of Mn ions, which are distributed between crystallographically inequivalent tetrahedral and octahedral sites in the unit cell. In order to understand and be able to tune properties of these structures, it is necessary to have detailed site-specific structural information on the system. Here we report on the application of diffraction-anomalous fine structure (DAFS) spectroscopy to resolve site-specific Mn local structures in manganese ferrite films. The DAFS measurements were done at undulator beamline 4-ID-D of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. The DAFS spectra (Fig. 1) were measured at several Bragg reflections in the vicinity of the Mn absorption K-edge, having probed separately contributions from tetrahedrally and octahedrally coordinated Mn sites. The DAFS data analysis done with an iterative Kramers-Kroenig algorithm made it possible to solve separately the local structure around different inequivalent Mn sites in the unit cell. The reliability of the data treatment was checked carefully, and it was showed that the site-specific structural parameters obtained with DAFS allow us to describe fluorescence EXAFS spectrum measured independently. Fig. 2 shows individual site contributions to the imaginary part of the resonant scattering amplitude obtained from the treatment of the data of Fig. 1. The analysis of the refined site-specific absorption spectra was done using EXAFS methods based on theoretical standards. We provided direct evidence for the tetrahedral Mn-O bond distance being increased relative to the corresponding Fe-O distance in bulk manganese ferrites. The first coordination shell number was found to be reduced significantly for Mn atoms at these sites. This finding is consistent with the well-known tendency of Mn to be tetrahedrally coordinated in these compounds.

Kravtsov, E.; Haskel, D.; Cady, A.; Yang, A.; Vittoria, C.; Zuo, X.; Harris, V. G.; X-Ray Science Division; Inst. of Metal Physics; Northeastern Univ.; Nankai Univ.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Reactivity of biogenic manganese oxide for metal sequestration and photochemistry: Computational solid state physics study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many microbes, including both bacteria and fungi, produce manganese (Mn) oxides by oxidizing soluble Mn(II) to form insoluble Mn(IV) oxide minerals, a kinetically much faster process than abiotic oxidation. These biogenic Mn oxides drive the Mn cycle, coupling it with diverse biogeochemical cycles and determining the bioavailability of environmental contaminants, mainly through strong adsorption and redox reactions. This mini review introduces recent findings based on quantum mechanical density functional theory that reveal the detailed mechanisms of toxic metal adsorption at Mn oxide surfaces and the remarkable role of Mn vacancies in the photochemistry of these minerals.

Kwon, K.D.; Sposito, G.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Manganese-Aluminum-Based Magnets: Nanocrystalline t-MnAI Permanent Magnets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

REACT Project: Dartmouth is developing specialized alloys with magnetic properties superior to the rare earths used in todays best magnets. EVs and renewable power generators typically use rare earths to turn the axles in their electric motors due to the magnetic strength of these minerals. However, rare earths are difficult and expensive to refine. Dartmouth will swap rare earths for a manganese-aluminum alloy that could demonstrate better performance and cost significantly less. The ultimate goal of this project is to develop an easily scalable process that enables the widespread use of low-cost and abundant materials for the magnets used in EVs and renewable power generators.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

RESEARCH Open Access Half-molar sodium lactate infusion improves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESEARCH Open Access Half-molar sodium lactate infusion improves cardiac performance in acute heart for the myocardium at rest and during stress. We tested the effects of half-molar sodium lactate infusion on cardiac by 1 ml/kg/h continuous infusion for 24 hours. The control group received only a 3 ml/kg bolus

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Mercury exosphere I. Global circulation model of its sodium component  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mercury exosphere I. Global circulation model of its sodium component Francois Leblanc a,*, R 2010 Accepted 27 April 2010 Available online 5 May 2010 Keywords: Mercury, Atmosphere Aeronomy a b s t r a c t Our understanding of Mercury's sodium exosphere has improved considerably in the last 5

Johnson, Robert E.

182

Low temperature sodium-beta battery  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A battery that will operate at ambient temperature or lower includes an enclosure, a current collector within the enclosure, an anode that will operate at ambient temperature or lower within the enclosure, a cathode that will operate at ambient temperature or lower within the enclosure, and a separator and electrolyte within the enclosure between the anode and the cathode. The anode is a sodium eutectic anode that will operate at ambient temperature or lower and is made of a material that is in a liquid state at ambient temperature or lower. The cathode is a low melting ion liquid cathode that will operate at ambient temperature or lower and is made of a material that is in a liquid state at ambient temperature or lower.

Farmer, Joseph C

2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

183

Production of sodium-22 from proton irradiated aluminum  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for selective separation of sodium-22 from a proton irradiated minum target including dissolving a proton irradiated aluminum target in hydrochloric acid to form a first solution including aluminum ions and sodium ions, separating a portion of the aluminum ions from the first solution by crystallization of an aluminum salt, contacting the remaining first solution with an anion exchange resin whereby ions selected from the group consisting of iron and copper are selectively absorbed by the anion exchange resin while aluminum ions and sodium ions remain in solution, contacting the solution with an cation exchange resin whereby aluminum ions and sodium ions are adsorbed by the cation exchange resin, and, contacting the cation exchange resin with an acid solution capable of selectively separating the adsorbed sodium ions from the cation exchange resin while aluminum ions remain adsorbed on the cation exchange resin is disclosed.

Taylor, Wayne A. (Los Alamos, NM); Heaton, Richard C. (Los Alamos, NM); Jamriska, David J. (Los Alamos, NM)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Theoretical Adiabatic Temperature and Chemical Composition of Sodium Combustion Flame  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sodium fire safety analysis requires fundamental combustion properties, e.g., heat of combustion, flame temperature, and composition. We developed the GENESYS code for a theoretical investigation of sodium combustion flame.Our principle conclusions on sodium combustion under atmospheric air conditions are (a) the maximum theoretical flame temperature is 1950 K, and it is not affected by the presence of moisture; the uppermost limiting factor is the chemical instability of the condensed sodium-oxide products under high temperature; (b) the main combustion product is liquid Na{sub 2}O in dry air condition and liquid Na{sub 2}O with gaseous NaOH in moist air; and (c) the chemical equilibrium prediction of the residual gaseous reactants in the flame is indispensable for sodium combustion modeling.

Okano, Yasushi; Yamaguchi, Akira [O-arai Engineering Center (Japan)

2003-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

185

Calcium and sodium bentonite for hydraulic containment applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hydraulic conductivity of calcium and sodium bentonites was investigated for sand-bentonite mixtures, a thin bentonite layer simulating a geosynthetic clay liner (GCL), and bentonite-cement mixtures simulating backfill for a vertical cutoff wall. The permeant liquids were tap water and distilled water containing 0.25 M calcium chloride. In general, the hydraulic performance of calcium bentonite was not significantly better than the performance of sodium bentonite for either the clay-amended sand or the GCL application, and was substantially worse than the performance of sodium bentonite in the bentonite-cement mixture. A drained angle of internal friction of 21{degree} was measured for calcium bentonite, compared to 10{degree} for sodium bentonite. Except for a larger drained shear strength, no advantage of calcium bentonite over sodium bentonite could be identified from the results of this study.

Gleason, M.H. [GeoSyntec Consultants, Columbia, MD (United States); Daniel, D.E. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Eykholt, G.R. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Decommissioning of Experimental Breeder Reactor - II Complex, Post Sodium Draining  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Experimental Breeder Reactor - II (EBR-II) was shutdown in September 1994 as mandated by the United States Department of Energy. This sodium-cooled reactor had been in service since 1964. The bulk sodium was drained from the primary and secondary systems and processed. Residual sodium remaining in the systems after draining was converted into sodium bicarbonate using humid carbon dioxide. This technique was tested at Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois under controlled conditions, then demonstrated on a larger scale by treating residual sodium within the EBR-II secondary cooling system, followed by the primary tank. This process, terminated in 2002, was used to place a layer of sodium bicarbonate over all exposed surfaces of sodium. Treatment of the remaining EBR-II sodium is governed by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality issued a RCRA Operating Permit in 2002, mandating that all hazardous materials be removed from EBR-II within a 10 year period, with the ability to extend the permit and treatment period for another 10 years. A preliminary plan has been formulated to remove the remaining sodium and NaK from the primary and secondary systems using moist carbon dioxide, steam and nitrogen, and a water flush. The moist carbon dioxide treatment was resumed in May 2004. As of August 2005, approximately 60% of the residual sodium within the EBR-II primary tank had been treated. This process will continue through the end of 2005, when it is forecast that the process will become increasingly ineffective. At that time, subsequent treatment processes will be planned and initiated. It should be noted that the processes and anticipated costs associated with these processes are preliminary. Detailed engineering has not been performed, and approval for these methods has not been obtained from the regulator or the sponsors.

J. A. (Bart) Michelbacher; S. Paul Henslee; Collin J. Knight; Steven R. sherman

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

A low cost igniter utilizing an SCB and titanium sub-hydride potassium perchlorate pyrotechnic  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A conventional NSI (NASA standard initiator) normally employs a hot-wire ignition element to ignite ZPP (zirconium potassium perchlorate). With minor modifications to the interior of a header similar to an NSI device to accommodate an SCB (semiconductor bridge), a low cost initiator was obtained. In addition, the ZPP was replaced with THKP (titanium subhydride potassium perchlorate) to obtain increased overall gas production and reduced static-charge sensitivity. This paper reports on the all-fire and no-fire levels obtained and on a dual mix device that uses THKP as the igniter mix and a thermite as the output mix.

Bickes, R.W. Jr.; Grubelich, M.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hartman, J.K.; McCampbell, C.B. [SCB Technologies, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Churchill, J.K. [Quantic-Holex, Hollister, CA (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

188

Effects of solar radiation on manganese oxide reactions with selected organic compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of sunlight on aqueous redox reactions between manganese oxides (MnO{sub x}) and selected organic substances are reported. No sunlight-induced rate enhancement was observed for the MnO{sub x} oxidation of substituted phenols, anisole, o-dichlorobenzene, or p-chloroaniline. On the other hand, solar radiation did accelerate the reduction of manganese oxides by dissolved organic matter (DOM) from aquatic environments. The photoreduction of MnO{sub x} by DOM was little affected by molecular oxygen in air-saturated water (250 {mu}M), but was inhibited by 2,6-dichloroindophenol (0.5-6 {mu}M), and excellent electron acceptor. MnO{sub x} reduction also was photosensitized by anthraquinone-2-sulfonate. These results indicate that the photoreduction probably involves electron transfer from excited states of sorbed DOM to the oxide surface. Wavelength studies indicated that ultraviolet-B radiation (280-320 nm) plays an important role in this photoreduction.

Bertino, D.J.; Zepp, R.G. (Environmental Protection Agency, Athens, GA (United States))

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Thermodynamics of Potassium Exchange in Soil Using a Kinetics Approach1 D. L. SPARKS AND P. M. JARDINEZ  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermodynamics of Potassium Exchange in Soil Using a Kinetics Approach1 D. L. SPARKS AND P. M. JARDINEZ ABSTRACT Thermodynamics of potassium (K) exchange using a kinetics ap- proach was investigated that more energy was needed to desorb K than to adsorb K. Thermodynamic and pseudother- modynamic parameters

Sparks, Donald L.

190

The effect of potassium lactate and sodium diacetate on the microbial, sensory, color and chemical characteristics of vacuum-packaged beef top loin steaks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

across and to whom I owe a great debt. Thanks is also extended to his son, Mohammad Ahmad, for helping me in so many ways. I am also grateful to my Uncle and Aunt, Mr. and Mrs. Mohammad A. Abbasi in Houston, and my cousins, Qaiser, Asad and Mohsin...

Anwar, Najia

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

E-Print Network 3.0 - acetate sodium lactate Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

sodium-high lactate infusion'. Of course, it is easy to demonstrate that high lactate infusion... . Also, sodium-lactate infusion in humans ... Source: Ecole Polytechnique, Centre...

192

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced fast sodium Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

sodium in the PFBR). The same initiating events occurring in both thermal and fast reactors could produce... specifications of demonstration fast reactors.* Thermal Sodium void...

193

Experimental investigations on sodium plugging in narrow flow channels.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of experiments was performed to investigate the potential for plugging of narrow flow channels of sodium by impurities (e.g., oxides). In the first phase of the experiments, clean sodium was circulated through the test sections simulating flow channels in a compact diffusion-bonded heat exchanger such as a printed circuit heat exchanger. The primary objective was to see if small channels whose cross sections are semicircles of 2, 4, and 6 mm in diameter are usable in liquid sodium applications where sodium purity is carefully controlled. It was concluded that the 2-mm channels, the smallest of the three, could be used in clean sodium systems at temperatures even as low as 100 to 110 C without plugging. In the second phase, sodium oxide was added to the loop, and the oxygen concentration in the liquid sodium was controlled by means of varying the cold-trap temperature. Intentional plugging was induced by creating a cold spot in the test sections, and the subsequent plugging behavior was observed. It was found that plugging in the 2-mm test section was initiated by lowering the cold spot temperature below the cold-trap temperature by 10 to 30 C. Unplugging of the plugged channels was accomplished by heating the affected test section.

Momozaki, Y.; Cho, D. H.; Sienicki, J. J.; Moisseytsev, A.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Electronic transport in Lithium Nickel Manganese Oxide, a high-voltage cathode material for Lithium-Ion batteries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Potential routes by which the energy densities of lithium-ion batteries may be improved abound. However, the introduction of Lithium Nickel Manganese Oxide (LixNi1i/2Mn3/2O4, or LNMO) as a positive electrode material appears ...

Ransil, Alan Patrick Adams

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Identification of optimum potassium nutrition of greenhouse plants grown in recirculating subirrigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of this research was to determine the optimum potassium nutrition of greenhouse plants grown in recirculating subirrigation. New Guinea impatiens 'Ovation Salmon Pink Swirl' were grown in recirculating subirrigation trays using 0 -12 mM K, with constant 1.5 mM P...

Blessington, Trisha R.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Differences in potassium forms between cutans and adjacent soil matrix in a Grey Clay Soil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Differences in potassium forms between cutans and adjacent soil matrix in a Grey Clay Soil Fan Liu1 , R. J. Gilkes, R. D. Hart, and A. Bruand2 Department of Soil Science and Plant Nutrition, Faculty are common fabric features in soil and represent foci of chemical and biological reactions. The influence

Boyer, Edmond

197

Spatial distribution of the chemical species generated under rubbing from ZDDP and dispersed potassium triborate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

triborate associated with ZDDP has a positive effect on wear prevention. KEY WORDS: boundary lubrication the formulation of lubricant additives. Thus, other additives might replace the ZDDP content of oil partially by dispersed potassium triborate in engine oil was studied. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy at the phosphorus

Gilbert, Pupa Gelsomina De Stasio

198

Genetic diversity in chlorella viruses flanking kcv, a gene that encodes a potassium ion channel protein  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Genetic diversity in chlorella viruses flanking kcv, a gene that encodes a potassium ion channel Received 23 March 2004; accepted 27 May 2004 Abstract The chlorella virus PBCV-1 encodes a 94-amino acid additional chlorella viruses and transcription in two of these viruses, as well as the effect of the three

Graves, Michael V.

199

Purdue extension Fertilizing alfalfa with phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) can  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AY-331-W Purdue extension Fertilizing alfalfa with phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) can increase information on P and K fertilization rates in alfalfa. First, we will review important P and K deficiency application, and the influence of P and K fertility on alfalfa forage quality. Essential for Plant Processes P

Jackson, Scott A.

200

Irradiation and Potassium Sorbate Compared as Preservation Treatments for Atlantic Cod, Gadus morhua  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Irradiation and Potassium Sorbate Compared as Preservation Treatments for Atlantic Cod, Gadus for seafood applications pending approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Various chemicals of these two seafood preserva- tion methods (irradiation vs. sorbate ABSTRACT-Treatments offresh Atlantic cod

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Kinetics and Mechanisms of Potassium Release from Sandy Middle Atlantic Coastal Plain Soils1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kinetics and Mechanisms of Potassium Release from Sandy Middle Atlantic Coastal Plain Soils1 M. C.) grown on these soils did not respond to K applications. The soils contained high levels of total K, and was contained in the sand fractionsof the soils. Kineticsof K release from the whole soils and from the coarse

Sparks, Donald L.

202

Recovery of manganese oxides from spent alkaline and zinccarbon batteries. An application as catalysts for VOCs elimination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Manganese oxides were synthesized using spent batteries as raw materials. Spent alkaline and zinccarbon size AA batteries were used. A biohydrometallurgical process was employed to bio-lixiviate batteries. Manganese oxides were active in the oxidation of VOCs (ethanol and heptane). - Abstract: Manganese, in the form of oxide, was recovered from spent alkaline and zinccarbon batteries employing a biohydrometallurgy process, using a pilot plant consisting in: an air-lift bioreactor (containing an acid-reducing medium produced by an Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans bacteria immobilized on elemental sulfur); a leaching reactor (were battery powder is mixed with the acid-reducing medium) and a recovery reactor. Two different manganese oxides were recovered from the leachate liquor: one of them by electrolysis (EMO) and the other by a chemical precipitation with KMnO{sub 4} solution (CMO). The non-leached solid residue was also studied (RMO). The solids were compared with a MnO{sub x} synthesized in our laboratory. The characterization by XRD, FTIR and XPS reveal the presence of Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the EMO and the CMO samples, together with some Mn{sup 4+} cations. In the solid not extracted by acidic leaching (RMO) the main phase detected was Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}. The catalytic performance of the oxides was studied in the complete oxidation of ethanol and heptane. Complete conversion of ethanol occurs at 200 C, while heptane requires more than 400 C. The CMO has the highest oxide selectivity to CO{sub 2}. The results show that manganese oxides obtained using spent alkaline and zinccarbon batteries as raw materials, have an interesting performance as catalysts for elimination of VOCs.

Gallegos, Mara V., E-mail: plapimu@yahoo.com.ar [Pla.Pi.Mu-Planta Piloto Multipropsito, (CICPBA-UNLP) Cno. Centenario y 505, M.B. Gonnet, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Falco, Lorena R., E-mail: mlfalco@quimica.unlp.edu.ar [Pla.Pi.Mu-Planta Piloto Multipropsito, (CICPBA-UNLP) Cno. Centenario y 505, M.B. Gonnet, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Peluso, Miguel A., E-mail: apelu@quimica.unlp.edu.ar [Centro de Investigacin y Desarrollo en Ciencias Aplicadas, Dr. J. Ronco CINDECA (CONICET CCT La Plata), 47 N257, La Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Sambeth, Jorge E., E-mail: sambeth@quimica.unlp.edu.ar [Centro de Investigacin y Desarrollo en Ciencias Aplicadas, Dr. J. Ronco CINDECA (CONICET CCT La Plata), 47 N257, La Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Thomas, Horacio J. [Pla.Pi.Mu-Planta Piloto Multipropsito, (CICPBA-UNLP) Cno. Centenario y 505, M.B. Gonnet, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

203

Risk Management for Sodium Fast Reactors.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accident management is an important component to maintaining risk at acceptable levels for all complex systems, such as nuclear power plants. With the introduction of self - correcting, or inherently safe, reactor designs the focus has shifted from management by operators to allowing the syste m's design to manage the accident. While inherently and passively safe designs are laudable, extreme boundary conditions can interfere with the design attributes which facilitate inherent safety , thus resulting in unanticipated and undesirable end states. This report examines an inherently safe and small sodium fast reactor experiencing a beyond design basis seismic event with the intend of exploring two issues : (1) can human intervention either improve or worsen the potential end states and (2) can a Bayes ian Network be constructed to infer the state of the reactor to inform (1). ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The author s would like to acknowledge the U.S. Department of E nergy's Office of Nuclear Energy for funding this research through Work Package SR - 14SN100303 under the Advanced Reactor Concepts program. The authors also acknowledge the PRA teams at A rgonne N ational L aborator y , O ak R idge N ational L aborator y , and I daho N ational L aborator y for their continue d contributions to the advanced reactor PRA mission area.

Denman, Matthew R; Groth, Katrina; Cardoni, Jeffrey N; Wheeler, Timothy A.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Sodium Bearing Waste Processing Alternatives Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A multidisciplinary team gathered to develop a BBWI recommendation to DOE-ID on the processing alternatives for the sodium bearing waste in the INTEC Tank Farm. Numerous alternatives were analyzed using a rigorous, systematic approach. The data gathered were evaluated through internal and external peer reviews for consistency and validity. Three alternatives were identified to be top performers: Risk-based Calcination, MACT to WIPP Calcination and Cesium Ion Exchange. A dual-path through early Conceptual design is recommended for MACT to WIPP Calcination and Cesium Ion Exchange since Risk-based Calcination does not require design. If calcination alternatives are not considered based on giving Type of Processing criteria significantly greater weight, the CsIX/TRUEX alternative follows CsIX in ranking. However, since CsIX/TRUEX shares common uncertainties with CsIX, reasonable backups, which follow in ranking, are the TRUEX and UNEX alternatives. Key uncertainties must be evaluated by the decision-makers to choose one final alternative. Those key uncertainties and a path forward for the technology roadmapping of these alternatives is provided.

Murphy, James Anthony; Palmer, Brent J; Perry, Keith Joseph

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Loop simulation capability for sodium-cooled systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A one-dimensional loop simulation capability has been implemented in the thermal-hydraulic analysis code, THERMIT-4E. This code had been used to simulate and investigate flow in test sections of experimental sodium loops ...

Adekugbe, Oluwole A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

aged sodium borophosphate: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ultraviolet flux will produce a similar variation in the column of neutral sodium for a fixed mass flux and density. However, if the cold gas is in pressure equilibrium with a hot...

207

Reactor protection system design alternatives for sodium fast reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Historically, unprotected transients have been viewed as design basis events that can significantly challenge sodium-cooled fast reactors. The perceived potential consequences of a severe unprotected transient in a ...

DeWitte, Jacob D. (Jacob Dominic)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Probabilistic transient analysis of fuel choices for sodium fast reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents the implications of using a risk-informed licensing framework to inform the design of Sodium Fast Reactors. NUREG-1860, more commonly known as the Technology Neutral Framework (TNF), is a risk-informed ...

Denman, Matthew R

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

SLAM: a sodium-limestone concrete ablation model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SLAM is a three-region model, containing a pool (sodium and reaction debris) region, a dry (boundary layer and dehydrated concrete) region, and a wet (hydrated concrete) region. The model includes a solution to the mass, momentum, and energy equations in each region. A chemical kinetics model is included to provide heat sources due to chemical reactions between the sodium and the concrete. Both isolated model as well as integrated whole code evaluations have been made with good results. The chemical kinetics and water migration models were evaluated separately, with good results. Several small and large-scale sodium limestone concrete experiments were simulated with reasonable agreement between SLAM and the experimental results. The SLAM code was applied to investigate the effects of mixing, pool temperature, pool depth and fluidization. All these phenomena were found to be of significance in the predicted response of the sodium concrete interaction. Pool fluidization is predicted to be the most important variable in large scale interactions.

Suo-Anttila, A.J.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Sodium Ion Insertion in Hollow Carbon Nanowires for Battery Applicatio...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

B Schwenzer, J Xiao, Z Nie, LV Saraf, Z Yang, and J Liu.2012."Sodium Ion Insertion in Hollow Carbon Nanowires for Battery Applications."Nano Letters 12(7):37833787....

211

Nano-sized Lithium Manganese Oxide Dispersed on Carbon Nanotubes for Energy Storage Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nano-sized lithium manganese oxide (LMO) dispersed on carbon nanotubes (CNT) has been synthesized successfully via a microwave-assisted hydrothermal reaction at 200 C for 30 min using MnO{sub 2}-coated CNT and an aqueous LiOH solution. The initial specific capacity is 99.4 mAh/g at a 1.6 C-rate, and is maintained at 99.1 mAh/g even at a 16 C-rate. The initial specific capacity is also maintained up to the 50th cycle to give 97% capacity retention. The LMO/CNT nanocomposite shows excellent power performance and good structural reversibility as an electrode material in energy storage systems, such as lithium-ion batteries and electrochemical capacitors. This synthetic strategy opens a new avenue for the effective and facile synthesis of lithium transition metal oxide/CNT nanocomposite.

Bak, S.B.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

The Salt or Sodium Chloride Content of Feeds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Sodium Chloride.--In order to test the recovery of added salt, several molasses feeds were selected, weighed out, and varying amounts of salt added, in the form of a N/10 solution of sodium chloride. The salt was added hy a different person from... ............................... . . Preliminary ~vork on laboratory methocls ........ . . ............................... Laboratory method adopted.. ............................. Tests of the laboratory niethod. ................... Application of the methold to feed mixtures...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach); Lomanitz, S. (Sebastian)

1920-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Elevated manganese and cognitive performance in school-aged children and their mothers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Background: Growing evidence suggests that excess manganese (Mn) in children is associated with neurobehavioral impairments. In Brazil, elevated hair Mn concentrations were reported in children living near a ferro-manganese alloy plant. Objectives: We investigated these children's and caregivers' cognitive function in relation to bioindicators of Mn exposure. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, the WISC-III was administered to 83 children aged between 6 and 12 years; the Raven Progressive Matrix was administered to the primary caregivers (94% mothers), who likewise responded to a questionnaire on socio demographics and birth history. Mn in hair (MnH) and blood (MnB) and blood lead (PbB) were measured by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). Results: Children's mean MnB and MnH were 8.2 {mu}g/L (2.7-23.4) and 5.83 {mu}g/g (0.1-86.68), respectively. Mean maternal MnH was 3.50 {mu}g/g (0.10-77.45) and correlated to children's MnH (rho=0.294, p=0.010). Children's MnH was negatively related to Full-Scale Intelligence Quotient (IQ) and Verbal IQ; {beta} coefficients for MnH were -5.78 (95% CI -10.71 to -0.21) and -6.72 (-11.81 to -0.63), adjusted for maternal education and nutritional status. Maternal MnH was negatively associated with performance on the Raven's ({beta}=-2.69, 95% CI -5.43 to 0.05), adjusted for education years, family income and age. Conclusions: These findings confirm that high MnH in children is associated with poorer cognitive performance, especially in the verbal domain. Primary caregiver's IQ is likewise associated to Mn exposure, suggesting that, in this situation, children's cognition may be affected directly and indirectly by Mn exposure.

Menezes-Filho, Jose A., E-mail: antomen@ufba.br [College of Pharmacy, Federal University of Bahia (Brazil); Public and Environmental Health Program, National School of Public Health, Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (Brazil); Novaes, Cristiane de O.; Moreira, Josino C.; Sarcinelli, Paula N. [Public and Environmental Health Program, National School of Public Health, Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (Brazil)] [Public and Environmental Health Program, National School of Public Health, Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (Brazil); Mergler, Donna [Centre de Recherche Interdisciplinaire sur la Biologie, la Sante, la Societe et l'Environnement (CINBIOSE), Universite du Quebec a Montreal (Canada)] [Centre de Recherche Interdisciplinaire sur la Biologie, la Sante, la Societe et l'Environnement (CINBIOSE), Universite du Quebec a Montreal (Canada)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

Advanced sodium fast reactor accident source terms : research needs.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An expert opinion elicitation has been used to evaluate phenomena that could affect releases of radionuclides during accidents at sodium-cooled fast reactors. The intent was to identify research needed to develop a mechanistic model of radionuclide release for licensing and risk assessment purposes. Experts from the USA, France, the European Union, and Japan identified phenomena that could affect the release of radionuclides under hypothesized accident conditions. They qualitatively evaluated the importance of these phenomena and the need for additional experimental research. The experts identified seven phenomena that are of high importance and have a high need for additional experimental research: High temperature release of radionuclides from fuel during an energetic eventEnergetic interactions between molten reactor fuel and sodium coolant and associated transfer of radionuclides from the fuel to the coolantEntrainment of fuel and sodium bond material during the depressurization of a fuel rod with breached claddingRates of radionuclide leaching from fuel by liquid sodiumSurface enrichment of sodium pools by dissolved and suspended radionuclidesThermal decomposition of sodium iodide in the containment atmosphereReactions of iodine species in the containment to form volatile organic iodides. Other issues of high importance were identified that might merit further research as development of the mechanistic model of radionuclide release progressed.

Powers, Dana Auburn; Clement, Bernard [IRSN/DPAM.SEMIC Bt 702, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France; Denning, Richard [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH; Ohno, Shuji [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan; Zeyen, Roland [Institute for Energy Petten, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Classification : Original Article VOLTAGE-GATED SODIUM CHANNELS POTENTIATE THE INVASIVE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- gated sodium channels in non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines. Functional voltage-gated sodium channels cancerous cell lines H23, H460 and Calu-1 possess functional sodium channels while normal and weakly metastatic cell lines do not. While all the cell lines expressed mRNA for numerous sodium channel isoforms

Boyer, Edmond

216

Method of and apparatus for removing silicon from a high temperature sodium coolant  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of and system for removing silicon from a high temperature liquid sodium coolant system for a nuclear reactor. The sodium is cooled to a temperature below the silicon saturation temperature and retained at such reduced temperature while inducing high turbulence into the sodium flow for promoting precipitation of silicon compounds and ultimate separation of silicon compound particles from the liquid sodium.

Yunker, Wayne H. (Richland, WA); Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminum sodium sulfate Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

.0 None Potassium Pyrophosphate None ... Source: Farritor, Shane - Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln Collection: Engineering 12 Sulfate...

218

By Thomas S. Jones Manganese (Mn) is essential to iron and steel production by have been among the larger producers. World production of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Steelmaking, including its ironmaking Survey to three significant digits. Table footnotes will indicate. According to reported data, the rates of consumption of manganese as ore in ironmaking and as ferroalloys

Torgersen, Christian

219

Surface characterization studies of TiO2 supported manganese oxide catalysts for low temperature SCR of NO with NH3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

through the scrubber and the electrostatic precipitator or bag-house [5]. The advantages of tail 6 May 2007 Abstract A series of TiO2 supported manganese oxide catalysts were prepared by wet

Boolchand, Punit

220

Suppression of manganese-dependent production of nitric oxide in astrocytes: implications for therapeutic modulation of glial-derived inflammatory mediators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Primary cultured astrocytes were treated with Mn in the absence and presence of proinflammatory cytokines to determine their effect upon stimulation of nitric oxide (NO) production. Treatments of manganese and cytokines raised NO production...

Wright, Tyler T.

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Investigation of the release of Si from SiO{sub 2} during the formation of manganese/ruthenium barrier layers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermodynamic and structural stability of ruthenium-manganese diffusion barriers on SiO{sub 2} is assessed. A {approx}2 nm film composed of partially oxidized manganese (MnO{sub x} where x < 1) was deposited on a 3 nm thick Ru film and the Mn-MnO{sub x}/Ru/SiO{sub 2} structure was subsequently thermally annealed. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy studies suggest the release and upward diffusion of Si from the dielectric substrate as a result of manganese-silicate formation at the Ru/SiO{sub 2} interface. The migration of Si up through the Ru film results in further manganese-silicate formation upon its interaction with the Mn-MnO{sub x} deposited layer.

McCoy, A. P.; Casey, P.; Bogan, J.; Byrne, C.; Hughes, G. [School of Physical Sciences, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland)] [School of Physical Sciences, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland)

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

222

The distribution of copper, manganese, zinc, and iron in antarctic waters and the relation of the concentrations of these metals to biological primary productivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE DISTRIBUTION OF COPPER, MANGANESE, ZINC, AND IRON IN ANTARCTIC WATERS AND THE RELATION OF THE CONCENTRATIONS OF THESE METALS TO BIOLOGICAL PRIMARY PRODUCTIVITY A Thesis By MARTIN EDWARD ARHELGER Submitted to the Graduate College... of the Texas A& 1 University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August I967 Major Subj ect: CHEMICAL OCEANOGRAPHY THE DISTRIBUTION OF COPPER, MANGANESE, ZINC, AND IRON IN ANTARCTIC WATERS AND THE RELATION...

Arhelger, Martin Edward

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Contribution of potassium channels to myogenic response in skeletal muscle arterioles: effects of age and fiber type  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In isolated skeletal muscle arterioles, increasing transmural pressure causes an increase in constriction. This active myogenic response varies with age and fiber type. Increased transmural pressure activates both Ca2+-activated (KCa) potassium...

Kim, Se Jeong

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

224

Biochemical aspects of vitamin E deficiency in fowl  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.57 Vitamins^ 1.02 Supplied the following per kilogram of diet: calcium carbonate, 16.03 gm.5 dicalcium phosphate, 60.10 gm.; sodium chloride, 5.0 gin.; manganese sulfate, 1 .1*+ gm.5 ferric citrate, 1.6 gm.5 cupric sulfate, 20.0 mg.; zinc chloride, m.O mg....; potassium iodide, l+O.O mg.; cobalt chloride, 0.5 mg.; potassium chloride, 6.0 gm.; magnesium sulfate, 5.76 gm. 2 Supplied the following per kilogram of diet: riboflavin, 8.0 mg.; calcium pantothenate, 16.0 mg.; pyridoxine, 8.0 mg.; niacin, 120 mg...

Creech, Billy Gene

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

225

Identification of genes from pattern formation, tyrosine kinase, and potassium channel families by DNA amplification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study of gene family members has been aided by the isolation of related genes on the basis of DNA homology. The authors have adapted the polymerase chain reaction to screen animal genomes very rapidly and reliably for likely gene family members. Using conserved amino acid sequences to design degenerate oligonucleotide primers, they have shown that the genome of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans contains sequences homologous to many Drosophila genes involved in pattern formation, including the segment polarity gene wingless (vertebrate int-1), and homeobox sequences characteristic of the Antennapedia, engrailed, and paired families. In addition, they have used this method to show that C. elegans contains at least five different sequences homologous to genes in the tyrosine kinase family. Lastly, they have isolated six potassium channel sequences from humans, a result that validates the utility of the method with large genomes and suggests that human potassium channel gene diversity may be extensive.

Kamb, A.; Weir, M.; Rudy, B.; Varmus, H.; Kenyon, C. (Univ. of California, San Francisco (USA))

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Potassium Rankine cycle nuclear power systems for spacecraft and lunar-mass surface power  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potassium Rankine cycle has high potential for application to nuclear power systems for spacecraft and surface power on the moon and Mars. A substantial effort on the development of Rankine cycle space power systems was carried out in the 1960`s. That effort is summarized and the status of the technology today is presented. Space power systems coupling Rankine cycle power conversion to both the SP-100 reactor and thermionic reactors as a combined power cycle are described in the paper.

Holcomb, R.S.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

The effect of sulfur, magnesium, and various rates of potassium on forage production in some sandy soils of East Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EFFECT OF SULFUR, MAGNESIUM, AND VARIOUS RATES OF POTASSIUM ON FORAGE PRODUCTION IN SOME SANDy SOILS OF EAST TEXAS A Thesis by DENNIS PAUL LANDUA Submitted to the Graduate Collccje of Texas AFM Unive, sity in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Ma 1969 Major Subject Soil Chemistr THE EFFECT OF SULFUR, MAGNESIUM, AND VARIOUS RATES OF POTASSIUM ON FORAGE PRODUCTION IN SOME SANDY SOILS OF EAST TEXAS A Thesis by DENNIS PAUL LANDUA Approved...

Landua, Dennis Paul

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

228

Inverse association of intellectual function with very low blood lead but not with manganese exposure in Italian adolescents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Background: Pediatric lead (Pb) exposure impacts cognitive function and behavior and co-exposure to manganese (Mn) may enhance neurotoxicity. Objectives: To assess cognitive and behavioral function in adolescents with environmental exposure to Pb and Mn. Methods: In this cross sectional study, cognitive function and behavior were examined in healthy adolescents with environmental exposure to metals. The Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC) and the Conners-Wells' Adolescent Self-Report Scale Long Form (CASS:L) were used to assess cognitive and behavioral function, respectively. ALAD polymorphisms rs1800435 and rs1139488 were measured as potential modifiers. Results: We examined 299 adolescents (49.2% females) aged 11-14 years. Blood lead (BPb) averaged 1.71 {mu}g/dL (median 1.5, range 0.44-10.2), mean Blood Manganese (BMn) was 11.1 {mu}g/dL (median 10.9, range 4.00-24.1). Average total IQ was 106.3 (verbal IQ=102, performance IQ=109.3). According to a multiple regression model considering the effect of other covariates, a reduction of about 2.4 IQ points resulted from a two-fold increase of BPb. The Benchmark Level of BPb associated with a loss of 1 IQ-point (BML01) was 0.19 {mu}g/dL, with a lower 95% confidence limit (BMLL01) of 0.11 {mu}g/dL. A very weak correlation resulted between BPb and the ADHD-like behavior (Kendall's tau rank correlation=0.074, p=0.07). No influence of ALAD genotype was observed on any outcome. Manganese was not associated with cognitive and behavioral outcomes, nor was there any interaction with lead. Conclusions: These findings demonstrate that very low level of lead exposure has a significant negative impact on cognitive function in adolescent children. Being an essential micro-nutrient, manganese may not cause cognitive effects at these low exposure levels.

Lucchini, Roberto G., E-mail: lucchini@med.unibs.it [Department of Preventive Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, NY (United States); Section of Occupational Medicine, University of Brescia, P.le Spedali Civili 1, 25123 Brescia (Italy); Zoni, Silvia [Section of Occupational Medicine, University of Brescia, P.le Spedali Civili 1, 25123 Brescia (Italy)] [Section of Occupational Medicine, University of Brescia, P.le Spedali Civili 1, 25123 Brescia (Italy); Guazzetti, Stefano [Public Health Service, Reggio Emilia (Italy)] [Public Health Service, Reggio Emilia (Italy); Bontempi, Elza [INSTM and Chemistry for Technologies Laboratory, University of Brescia (Italy)] [INSTM and Chemistry for Technologies Laboratory, University of Brescia (Italy); Micheletti, Serena [Cognition Psychology Neuroscience lab., University of Pavia and Unit of Child Neurology and Psychiatry, Civil Hospital of Brescia (Italy)] [Cognition Psychology Neuroscience lab., University of Pavia and Unit of Child Neurology and Psychiatry, Civil Hospital of Brescia (Italy); Broberg, Karin [Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University (Sweden)] [Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University (Sweden); Parrinello, Giovanni [Statistics and Biometry, University of Brescia (Italy)] [Statistics and Biometry, University of Brescia (Italy); Smith, Donald R. [Microbiology and Environmental Toxicology, University of California at Santa Cruz (United States)] [Microbiology and Environmental Toxicology, University of California at Santa Cruz (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

229

A green synthesis of a layered titanate, potassium lithium titanate; lower temperature solid-state reaction and improved materials performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A layered titanate, potassium lithium titanate, with the size range from 0.1 to 30 m was prepared to show the effects of the particle size on the materials performance. The potassium lithium titanate was prepared by solid-state reaction as reported previously, where the reaction temperature was varied. The reported temperature for the titanate preparation was higher than 800 C, though 600 C is good enough to obtain single-phase potassium lithium titanate. The lower temperature synthesis is cost effective and the product exhibit better performance as photocatalysts due to surface reactivity. - Graphical abstract: Finite particle of a layered titanate, potassium lithium titanate, was prepared by solid-state reaction at lower temperature to show modified materials performance. Display Omitted - Highlights: Potassium lithium titanate was prepared by solid-state reaction. Lower temperature reaction resulted in smaller sized particles of titanate. 600 C was good enough to obtain single phased potassium lithium titanate. The product exhibited better performance as photocatalyst.

Ogawa, Makoto, E-mail: waseda.ogawa@gmail.com [Graduate School of Creative Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 1-6-1 Nishiwaseda, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8050 (Japan); Department of Earth Sciences, Waseda University, 1-6-1 Nishiwaseda, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8050 (Japan); Morita, Masashi, E-mail: m-masashi@y.akane.waseda.jp [Graduate School of Creative Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 1-6-1 Nishiwaseda, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8050 (Japan); Igarashi, Shota, E-mail: uxei_yoshi_yoshi@yahoo.co.jp [Graduate School of Creative Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 1-6-1 Nishiwaseda, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8050 (Japan); Sato, Soh, E-mail: rookie_so_sleepy@yahoo.co.jp [Graduate School of Creative Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 1-6-1 Nishiwaseda, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8050 (Japan)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

230

Synthesis, structures and properties of a series of manganese coordination complexes constructed from dicarboxylic fluorene derivatives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Assembly reactions of 9,9-diethylfluorene-2,7-dicarboxylic acid (H{sub 2}DFDC) and Mn(CH{sub 3}COO){sub 2}{center_dot}4H{sub 2}O or MnCl{sub 2}{center_dot}4H{sub 2}O by tuning of various secondary ligands such as 2,2 Prime -bipyridine (2,2 Prime -bpy), 4,4 Prime -bipyridine (4,4 Prime -bpy) or 1,3-bis(4-pyridyl)propane) (bpp), gave rise to four complexes {l_brace} [Mn{sub 2}(DFDC){sub 2}(DMF){sub 2}]{center_dot}H{sub 2}O{r_brace} {sub n} (1), [Mn(DFDC)(2,2 Prime -bpy)]{sub n} (2), {l_brace} [Mn{sub 2}(DFDC){sub 2}(4,4 Prime -bpy){sub 2}]{center_dot}2CH{sub 3}OH{r_brace} {sub n} (3), and {l_brace} [Mn{sub 4}(DFDC){sub 4}(bpp){sub 2}(CH{sub 3}OH){sub 3} (H{sub 2}O){sub 3}]{center_dot}3(CH{sub 3}OH){center_dot}3(H{sub 2}O){r_brace} {sub n} (4). Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis reveal that complex 1 is three dimensional structure with rhombic channels filled by guest water molecules; 2 presents a close-packed structure with high thermal stability; 3 exhibits a three dimensional framework with micro-porous channels filled by guest methanol molecules and 4 is a two-dimensional structure. The photoluminescent properties of 1-4 have been studied, respectively, showing that the Mn(II) ions, accessorial organic ligands or crystal structures exert important influences on the photoluminescence emissions of H{sub 2}DFDC ligands. Thermogravimetric analysis show that the complexes have remarkably high thermal stability. Magnetic susceptibility measurements have been finished and discussed for the complexes. - Graphical abstract: Assembly of 9,9-diethylfluorene-2,7-dicarboxylic acid and Mn(II) salts by tuning of various accessorial ligands resulted in four manganese complexes with different topological frameworks. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Four manganese complexes based on 9,9-diethylfluorene-2,7-dicarboxylic acid were obtained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The complexes were structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The complexes 1-4 display different topological structures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermogravimetric analysis show the complexes have remarkably high thermal stability.

Li Xing, E-mail: lixing@nbu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory Base of Novel Functional Materials and Preparation Science, Faculty of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Ningbo University, Ningbo, Zhejiang, 315211 (China); Zhao Xiuhua; Bing Yue; Zha Meiqin; Xie Hongzhen; Guo Zhiyong [State Key Laboratory Base of Novel Functional Materials and Preparation Science, Faculty of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Ningbo University, Ningbo, Zhejiang, 315211 (China)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

231

Numerical Methodology to Evaluate Fast Reactor Sodium Combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the present study, a numerical methodology for sodium combustion has been developed for the safety evaluation of a liquid-metal-cooled fast reactor. The methodology includes a fast-running zone model computer program for safety evaluation, a field model program for multidimensional thermal hydraulics, and a chemical reaction analysis program based on chemical equilibrium theory. Two recently performed experiments have been analyzed using the computer programs, and the numerical results are in good agreement with the experiments. Although sodium combustion is a complex phenomenon, use of these computer programs gives better understanding of the coupled thermal hydraulics and chemical reaction.

Yamaguchi, Akira; Takata, Takashi; Okano, Yasushi [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (Japan)

2001-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

232

The magnesium nutrition of cotton as influenced by sodium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1964 Major Subject. Plant Physic logy THE MAGNESIUM NUTRITION OF COTTON AS INFLUENCED BY SODIUM A Thesis By MERVYN M. THENABADU Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of Commi. e Nun Head of Department Member Mem, er Member Member... REVIEW OF LITERATURE (a) Sodium as a plant nutrient (b) I'he role of magnesium in plant nutrition MATERIALS AND METHODS RESUL:S DISCUSSION 13 21 24 (a) The effect of treatments on grcwth and reproduction (b) The effect of treatments on the ccr...

Thenabadu, Mervyn Wellesly

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

233

Aluminum Zintl anion moieties within sodium aluminum clusters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Through a synergetic combination of anion photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory based calculations, we have established that aluminum moieties within selected sodium-aluminum clusters are Zintl anions. Sodiumaluminum cluster anions, Na{sub m}Al{sub n}{sup ?}, were generated in a pulsed arc discharge source. After mass selection, their photoelectron spectra were measured by a magnetic bottle, electron energy analyzer. Calculations on a select sub-set of stoichiometries provided geometric structures and full charge analyses for both cluster anions and their neutral cluster counterparts, as well as photodetachment transition energies (stick spectra), and fragment molecular orbital based correlation diagrams.

Wang, Haopeng; Zhang, Xinxing; Ko, Yeon Jae; Grubisic, Andrej; Li, Xiang; Gantefr, Gerd; Bowen, Kit H., E-mail: AKandalam@wcupa.edu, E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu, E-mail: kbowen@jhu.edu [Department of Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Schnckel, Hansgeorg [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany)] [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Eichhorn, Bryan W. [Department of Chemistry, University of Maryland at College Park, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, University of Maryland at College Park, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Lee, Mal-Soon; Jena, P. [Department of Physics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23284 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23284 (United States); Kandalam, Anil K., E-mail: AKandalam@wcupa.edu, E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu, E-mail: kbowen@jhu.edu [Department of Physics, West Chester University of Pennsylvania, West Chester, Pennsylvania 19383 (United States); Kiran, Boggavarapu, E-mail: AKandalam@wcupa.edu, E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu, E-mail: kbowen@jhu.edu [Department of Chemistry, McNeese State University, Lake Charles, Louisiana 70609 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, McNeese State University, Lake Charles, Louisiana 70609 (United States)

2014-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

234

Manganese Doping of Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles: Tailoring Surface Reactivity for a Regenerable Heavy Metal Sorbent  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method for tuning the analyte affinity of magnetic, inorganic nanostructured sorbents for heavy metal contaminants is described. The manganese-doped iron oxide nanoparticle sorbents have a remarkably high affinity compared to the precursor material. Sorbent affinity can be tuned toward an analyte of interest simply by adjustment of the dopant quantity. The results show that following the Mn doping process there is a large increase in affinity and capacity for heavy metals (i.e., Co, Ni, Zn, As, Ag, Cd, Hg, and Tl). Capacity measurements were carried out for the removal of cadmium from river water and showed significantly higher loading than the relevant commercial sorbents tested for comparison. The reduction in Cd concentration from 100 ppb spiked river water to 1 ppb (less than the EPA drinking water limit of 5 ppb for Cd) was achieved following treatment with the Mn-doped iron oxide nanoparticles. The Mn-doped iron oxide nanoparticles were able to load 1 ppm of Cd followed by complete stripping and recovery of the Cd with a mild acid wash. The Cd loading and stripping is shown to be consistent through multiple cycles with no loss of sorbent performance.

Warner, Cynthia L.; Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Mackie, Katherine E.; Neiner, Doinita; Saraf, Laxmikant; Droubay, Timothy C.; Warner, Marvin G.; Addleman, Raymond S.

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

235

Lithium/Manganese Dioxide (Li/MnO(2)) Battery Performance Evaluation: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In February 1997, under the auspices of the Product Realization Program, an initiative to develop performance models for lithium/manganese dioxide-based batteries began. As a part of this initiative, the performance characteristics of the cells under a variety of conditions were determined, both for model development and for model validation. As a direct result of this work, it became apparent that possible Defense Program (DP) uses for batteries based on this cell chemistry existed. A larger effort aimed at mapping the performance envelope of this chemistry was initiated in order to assess the practicality of this cell chemistry, not only for DP applications, but also for other uses. The work performed included an evaluation of the cell performance as a function of a number of variables, including cell size, manufacturer, current, pulse loads, constant current loads, safety, etc. In addition, the development of new evaluation techniques that would apply to any battery system, such as those related to reliability assessments began. This report describes the results of these evaluations.

Ingersoll, D.; Clark, N.H.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Magnesium and Manganese Silicides For Efficient And Low Cost Thermo-Electric Power Generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermoelectric Power Generation (TEPG) is the most efficient and commercially deployable power generation technology for harvesting wasted heat from such things as automobile exhausts, industrial furnaces, and incinerators, and converting it into usable electrical power. We investigated the materials magnesium silicide (Mg2Si) and manganese silicide (MnSi) for TEG. MgSi2 and MnSi are environmentally friendly, have constituent elements that are abundant in the earth's crust, non-toxic, lighter and cheaper. In Phase I, we successfully produced Mg2Si and MnSi material with good TE properties. We developed a novel technique to synthesize Mg2Si with good crystalline quality, which is normally very difficult due to high Mg vapor pressure and its corrosive nature. We produced n-type Mg2Si and p-type MnSi nanocomposite pellets using FAST. Measurements of resistivity and voltage under a temperature gradient indicated a Seebeck coefficient of roughly 120 V/K on average per leg, which is quite respectable. Results indicated however, that issues related to bonding resulted in high resistivity contacts. Determining a bonding process and bonding material that can provide ohmic contact from room temperature to the operating temperature is an essential part of successful device fabrication. Work continues in the development of a process for reproducibly obtaining low resistance electrical contacts.

Trivedi, Sudhir B. [Brimrose Technology Corporation; Kutcher, Susan W. [Brimrose Technology Corporation; Rosemeier, Cory A. [Brimrose Technology Corporation; Mayers, David [Brimrose Technology Corporation; Singh, Jogender [Pennsylvania State University

2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

237

Oxidation state of manganese in zinc pyrophosphate: Probed by luminescence and EPR studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Zn{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7}: Mn was synthesized by wet chemical route and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), photoluminescence (PL) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques. Photoluminescence spectrum shows two bands, one at 500 nm (green emission), which is attributed to the {sup 4}T{sub 1}({sup 4}G)-{sup 6}A{sub 1}({sup 6}S) transition of Mn{sup 2+} and other centered at 686 nm (red emission) is attributed to the electronic transition between {sup 2}E and {sup 4}A{sub 2} of Mn{sup 4+} accompanied with vibronic transitions. EPR spectroscopic studies also confirmed the presence of both Mn2+ and Mn4+ ions in zinc pyrophosphate with difference in the number of fine transitions and g values (Mn{sub 4+}, S=3/2, three fine transitions and g < 2.00; Mn{sup 2+} S=5/2, five fine transitions and g=2.00).Mn{sup 2+} is attributed to presence of Mn at 6-ccordinated Zn{sup 2+} site whereas Mn{sup 4+} is due to presence substitution of Mn{sup 4+} at Zn{sup 2+} site thereby invoking charge compensation by presence of interstitial oxygen ions around Mn{sup 4+} ion or due to substitution of manganese at distorted 5-coordinated zinc site.

Gupta, Santosh K., E-mail: santoshg@barc.gov.in; Kadam, R. M., E-mail: santoshg@barc.gov.in; Natarajan, V., E-mail: santoshg@barc.gov.in; Godbole, S. V., E-mail: santoshg@barc.gov.in [Radiochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

238

Influence of nitrogen sufficiency and manganese deficiency on PAH degradation by Bjerkandera sp.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of Mn and N nutrients on the biodegradation of the model polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compound, anthracene, by the N-deregulated ligninolytic fungus Bjerkandera sp. BOS55 was studied. Organic N supplements in the form of an amino acid mixture or peptone resulted in 10- to 14-fold increases in the extracellular peroxidase titers compared to those obtained in the basal N-limited medium. Although these enzymes are involved in the initial attack on PAH, the peptone supplement only increased the rate of anthracene elimination by 2.5 fold. The absence of Mn, which decreased the manganese peroxidase (MnP) titer and increased the lignin peroxidase (LiP) titer, was associated with a large improvement in the anthracene degradation. Mn deficiency also increased the yield of anthraquinone, a known product from peroxidase-mediated conversions of anthracene. Under the best conditions, with peptone N supplementing Mn-free medium, the anthracene degradation rate was 31 mg L{sup {minus}1} day{sup {minus}1}.

Kotterman, M.J.J.; Wasseveld, R.; Field, J.A. [Wageningen Agricultural Univ. (Netherlands). Div. of Industrial Microbiology

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

239

Hyperoxaluria after modern bariatric surgery: case series and literature review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnesium Oxalate pH Phosphorous Potassium Sodium Sulfateuric acid, creatinine, phosphorous, sodium, potassium, andCreatinine Magnesium Oxalate Phosphorous Table 3 Mean 24-h

Whitson, Jared M.; Stackhouse, G. Bennett; Stoller, Marshall L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation and Recycle of Sodium Hydroxide and Sodium Nitrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research has focused on new liquid-liquid extraction chemistry applicable to separation of major sodium salts from alkaline tank waste. It was the overall goal to provide the scientific foundation upon which the feasibility of liquid-liquid extraction chemistry for bulk reduction of the volume of tank waste can be evaluated. Sodium hydroxide represented the initial test case and primary focus. It is a primary component of the waste1 and has the most value for recycle. A full explanation of the relevance of this research to USDOE Environmental Management needs will be given in the Relevance, Impact, and Technology Transfer section below. It should be noted that this effort was predicated on the need for sodium removal primarily from low-activity waste, whereas evolving needs have shifted attention to volume reduction of the high-activity waste. The results of the research to date apply to both applications, though treatment of high-activity wastes raises new questions that will be addressed in the renewal period. Toward understanding the extractive chemistry of sodium hydroxide and other sodium salts, it was the intent to identify candidate extractants and determine their applicable basic properties regarding selectivity, efficiency, speciation, and structure. A hierarchical strategy was to be employed in which the type of liquid-liquid-extraction system varied in sophistication from simple, single-component solvents to solvents containing designer host molecules. As an aid in directing this investigation toward addressing the fundamental questions having the most value, a conceptualization of an ideal process was advanced. Accordingly, achieving adequate selectivity for sodium hydroxide represented a primary goal, but this result is worthwhile for waste applications only if certain conditions are met.

Moyer, Bruce A.; Marchand, Alan P.; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Bryan, Jeffrey C.; Haverlock, Tamara J.

2002-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

FATE OF INGESTED SODIUM BICARBONATE IN THE FOWL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 100 calcium while rations 3 and4contained 3.85 p. 100 calcium. Sodium bicarbonate was added at a level. The duodenum was entered at the top of the loop and the electrode tip immersed its full length down the posterior side of the loop. The #12;mid-intestinal reading was taken with the incision at approximately

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

242

Electrochemical Recovery of Sodium Hydroxide from Alkaline Salt Solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A statistically designed set of tests determined the effects of current density, temperature, and the concentrations of nitrate/nitrite, hydroxide and aluminate on the recovery of sodium as sodium hydroxide (caustic) from solutions simulating those produced from the Savannah River Site (SRS) In-Tank Precipitation process. These tests included low nitrate and nitrite concentrations which would be produced by electrolytic nitrate/nitrite destruction. The tests used a two compartment electrochemical cell with a Nafion Type 324 ion-exchange membrane. Caustic was successfully recovered from the waste solutions. Evaluation of the testing results indicated that the transport of sodium across the membrane was not significantly affected by any of the varied parameters. The observed variance in the sodium flux is attributed to experimental errors and variations in the performance characteristics of individual pieces of the organic-based Nafion membrane.Additional testing is recommended to determine the maximum current density, to evaluate the chemical durability of the organic membrane as a function of current density and to compare the durability and performance characteristics of the organic-based Nafion membrane with that of other commercially available organic membranes and the inorganic class of membranes under development by Ceramatec and PNNL.

Hobbs, D.T. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Edwards, T.B.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Process for making boron nitride using sodium cyanide and boron  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This a very simple process for making boron nitride by mixing sodium cyanide and boron phosphate and heating the mixture in an inert atmosphere until a reaction takes place. The product is a white powder of boron nitride that can be used in applications that require compounds that are stable at high temperatures and that exhibit high electrical resistance.

Bamberger, Carlos E. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

ORIGINAL RESEARCH Systematic family-wide analysis of sodium bicarbonate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL RESEARCH Systematic family-wide analysis of sodium bicarbonate cotransporter NBCn1/SLC4A7/NBCn1 pulled down syntrophin c2 and con- versely GST/syntrophin c2 pulled down NBCn1. Moreover normally moves Na+ and HCO3 ? into cells and protects intracel- lular pH (pHi) from falling below normal

Hall, Randy A

245

Laboratory-scale sodium-carbonate aggregate concrete interactions. [LMFBR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of laboratory-scale experiments was made at 600/sup 0/C to identify the important heat-producing chemical reactions between sodium and carbonate aggregate concretes. Reactions between sodium and carbonate aggregate were found to be responsible for the bulk of heat production in sodium-concrete tests. Exothermic reactions were initiated at 580+-30/sup 0/C for limestone and dolostone aggregates as well as for hydrated limestone concrete, and at 540+-10/sup 0/C for dehydrated limestone concrete, but were ill-defined for dolostone concrete. Major reaction products included CaO, MgO, Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, Na/sub 2/O, NaOH, and elemental carbon. Sodium hydroxide, which forms when water is released from cement phases, causes slow erosion of the concrete with little heat production. The time-temperature profiles of these experiments have been modeled with a simplified version of the SLAM computer code, which has allowed derivation of chemical reaction rate coefficients.

Westrich, H.R.; Stockman, H.W.; Suo-Anttila, A.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Method of Manufacturing Micro-Disperse Particles of Sodium Borohydride  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compact solid source of hydrogen gas, where the gas is generated by contacting water with micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in the presence of a catalyst, such as cobalt or ruthenium. The micro-disperse particles can have a substantially uniform diameter of 1-10 microns, and preferably about 3-5 microns. Ruthenium or cobalt catalytic nanoparticles can be incorporated in the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride, which allows a rapid and complete reaction to occur without the problems associated with caking and scaling of the surface by the reactant product sodium metaborate. A closed loop water management system can be used to recycle wastewater from a PEM fuel cell to supply water for reacting with the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in a compact hydrogen gas generator. Capillary forces can wick water from a water reservoir into a packed bed of micro-disperse fuel particles, eliminating the need for using an active pump.

Kravitz, Stanley H. (Placitas, NM); Hecht, Andrew M. (Sandia Park, NM); Sylwester. Alan P. (Albuquerque, NM); Bell, Nelson S. (Albuquerque, NM)

2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

247

Method of generating hydrogen gas from sodium borohydride  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compact solid source of hydrogen gas, where the gas is generated by contacting water with micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in the presence of a catalyst, such as cobalt or ruthenium. The micro-disperse particles can have a substantially uniform diameter of 1-10 microns, and preferably about 3-5 microns. Ruthenium or cobalt catalytic nanoparticles can be incorporated in the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride, which allows a rapid and complete reaction to occur without the problems associated with caking and scaling of the surface by the reactant product sodium metaborate. A closed loop water management system can be used to recycle wastewater from a PEM fuel cell to supply water for reacting with the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in a compact hydrogen gas generator. Capillary forces can wick water from a water reservoir into a packed bed of micro-disperse fuel particles, eliminating the need for using an active pump.

Kravitz, Stanley H. (Placitas, NM); Hecht, Andrew M. (Sandia Park, NM); Sylwester, Alan P. (Albuquerque, NM); Bell, Nelson S. (Albuquerque, NM)

2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

248

Immobilization of sodium nitrate waste with polymers: Topical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the development of solidification systems for sodium nitrate waste. Sodium nitrate waste was solidified in the polymers polyethylene, polyester-styrene (PES), and water-extendible polyester-styrene (WEP). Evaluations were made of the properties of waste forms containing various amounts of sodium nitrate by leaching immersion in water, measuring compressive strengths and by the EPA Extraction Procedure. Results of the leaching test are presented as cumulative fraction leached (CFL), incremental leaching rate, and average leaching indices (LI). For waste forms containing 30 to 70 wt% sodium nitrate, the CFL ranged from 9.0 x 10/sup -3/ to 7.3 x 10/sup -1/ and the LI from 11 to 7.8. After ninety days immersion in water, the compressive strengths ranged from 720 psi to 2550 psi. The nitrate releases from these samples using the EPA Extraction Procedure were below 500 ppM. The nitrate releases from PES waste forms were similar to those from polyethylene waste forms at the same waste loadings. The compressive yield strengths, measured after ninety-day immersion in water, ranged between 2070 and 7710 psi. In the case of WEP waste forms, only 30 wt% loaded samples passed the immersion test. 23 refs., 24 figs., 12 tabs.

Franz, E.M.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Compatibility Assessment of Advanced Stainless Steels in Sodium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Type 316L stainless steel capsules containing commercially pure sodium and miniature tensile specimens of HT-UPS (austenitic, 14Cr-16Ni), NF-616 (ferritic/martensitic, 9Cr-2W-0.5Mo), or 316L (austenitic, 17Cr-10Ni-2Mo) stainless steel were exposed at 600 or 700 C for 100 and 400 h as a screening test for compatibility. Using weight change, tensile testing, and metallographic analysis, HT-UPS and 316L were found to be largely immune to changes resulting from sodium exposure, but NF-616 was found susceptible to substantial decarburization at 700 C. Subsequently, two thermal convection loops (TCLs) constructed of 316L and loaded with commercially pure sodium and miniature tensile specimens of HT-UPS and 316L were operated for 2000 h each one between 500 and 650 C, the other between 565 and 725 C at a flow rate of about 1.5 cm/s. Changes in specimen appearance, weight, and tensile properties were observed to be very minor in all cases, and there was no metallographic evidence of microstructure changes, composition gradients, or mass transfer resulting from prolonged exposure in a TCL. Thus, it appears that HT-UPS and 316L stainless steels are similarly compatible with commercially pure sodium under these exposure conditions.

Pawel, Steven J [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Chemistry of Petroleum Crude Oil Deposits: Sodium Naphthenates 2009 NHMFL Science Highlight for NSF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry of Petroleum Crude Oil Deposits: Sodium Naphthenates 2009 NHMFL Science Highlight for NSF-355. Chemistry of Petroleum Crude Oil Deposits: Sodium Naphthenates 2009 NHMFL Science Highlight for NSF DMR

Weston, Ken

251

apical sodium-chloride cotransporter: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

g magnesium chloride, 3.24 g magnesium sulfate bromide, 34 mg strontium chloride, 22 mg boric acid, 4 mg sodium silicate, 2.4 mg sodium fluoride, 1.6 mg Bae, Jin-Woo 302 The...

252

Determination of thorium, uranium, and potassium elemental concentrations in surface soils in Cyprus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A comprehensive study was conducted to determine thorium, uranium and potassium elemental concentrations in surface soils throughout the accessible area of Cyprus using high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry. A total of 115 soil samples was collected from all over the bedrock surface of the island based on the different lithological units of the study area. The soil samples were sieved through a fine mesh, sealed in 1000-mL plastic Marinelli beakers, and measured in the laboratory in terms of their gamma radioactivity for a counting time of 18 hours each. From the measured gamma-ray spectra, elemental concentrations were determined for thorium (range from 2.5x10^-3 to 9.8 micro g g-1), uranium (from 8.1x10^-4 to 3.2 micro g g-1) and potassium (from 1.3x10^-4 to 1.9 %). The Arithmetic mean values (A.M. +- S.D.) calculated are (1.2 +- 1.7) micro g g-1, (0.6 +- 0.7) micro g g-1, and (0.4 +- 0.3) %, for thorium, uranium and potassium, respectively, which are by a factor of three to six lower than the world average values of 7.4 micro g g-1 (Th), 2.8 micro g g-1 (U) and 1.3 % (K) derived from all data available worldwide. The best-fitting relation between the concentrations of Th and K versus U, and also of K versus Th, is essentially of linear type with a correlation coefficient of 0.93, 0.84, and 0.90, respectively. The Th/U, K/U, and K/Th ratios (slopes) calculated are equal to 2.0, 2.8x10^3,and 1.4x10^3, respectively.

Michalis Tzortzis; Haralabos Tsertos

2004-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

253

Method of and apparatus for removing silicon from a high temperature sodium coolant  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This patent discloses a method of and system for removing silicon from a high temperature liquid sodium coolant system for a nuclear reactor. The sodium is cooled to a temperature below the silicon saturation temperature and retained at such reduced temperature while inducing high turbulence into the sodium flow for promoting precipitation of silicon compounds and ultimate separation of silicon compound particles from the liquid sodium.

Yunker, W.H.; Christiansen, D.W.

1983-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

254

Go No-Go Recommendation for Sodium Borohydride for On-Board Vehicular Hydrogen Storage  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

Independent review panel recommendation for go/no go decision on use of hydrolysis of sodium borohydride for hydrogen storage.

255

Note: Enhancement of the extreme ultraviolet emission from a potassium plasma by dual laser irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Emission spectra from multiply charged potassium ions ranging from K{sup 3+} to K{sup 5+} have been obtained in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectral region. A strong emission feature peaking around 38?nm, corresponding to a photon energy of 32.6 eV, is the dominant spectral feature at time-averaged electron temperatures in the range of 8?12 eV. The variation of this emission with laser intensity and the effects of pre-pulses on the relative conversion efficiency (CE) have been explored experimentally and indicate that an enhancement of about 30% in EUV CE is readily attainable.

Higashiguchi, Takeshi, E-mail: higashi@cc.utsunomiya-u.ac.jp; Yamaguchi, Mami; Otsuka, Takamitsu; Nagata, Takeshi [Department of Advanced Interdisciplinary Sciences and Center for Optical Research (CORE), Utsunomiya University, Yoto 7-1-2, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-8585 Japan (Japan); Ohashi, Hayato [Graduate School of Science and Engineering for Research, University of Toyama, Toyama, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Li, Bowen [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, 730000 (China); School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); DArcy, Rebekah; Dunne, Padraig; OSullivan, Gerry [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

256

Site-specific local structure of Mn in artificial manganese ferrite films E. Kravtsov,1,2 D. Haskel,1 A. Cady,1 A. Yang,3 C. Vittoria,3 X. Zuo,4 and V. G. Harris3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Site-specific local structure of Mn in artificial manganese ferrite films E. Kravtsov,1,2 D. Haskel in manganese ferrite films grown under nonequilibrium conditions. The DAFS spectra were measured at a number. INTRODUCTION There has been considerable long-term interest in spinel ferrite materials due

Haskel, Daniel

257

Search for new manganese-cobalt oxides as positive electrode materials for lithium batteries P. Strobel, J. Tillier, A. Diaz, A. Ibarra-Palos, F. Thiry and J.B. Soupart *  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

positive electrode material for lithium batteries ; last but not least, copper or cobalt substitutionSearch for new manganese-cobalt oxides as positive electrode materials for lithium batteries P new mixed manganese-cobalt oxides for lithium battery positive electrode materials were obtained using

Boyer, Edmond

258

Ultracold Molecules from Ultracold Atoms: Interactions in Sodium and Lithium Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ultracold Molecules from Ultracold Atoms: Interactions in Sodium and Lithium Gas by Caleb from Ultracold Atoms: Interactions in Sodium and Lithium Gas by Caleb A Christensen Submitted of Philosophy Abstract The thesis presents results from experiments in which ultracold Sodium-6 and Lithium-23

259

Synthesis of highly ordered mesoporous silica materials using sodium silicate and amphiphilic block copolymers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Synthesis of highly ordered mesoporous silica materials using sodium silicate and amphiphilic block) structures, using sodium silicate as the silica source and amphiphilic block copolymers as the structure of mesoporous silica material using nonionic surfac- tant and sodium silicate in the pH range 3­10.5. However

Kim, Ji Man

260

Spatially resolved characterization of biogenic manganese oxideproduction within a bacterial biofilm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pseudomonas putida strain MnB1, a biofilm forming bacteria, was used as a model for the study of bacterial Mn oxidation in freshwater and soil environments. The oxidation of Mn{sub (aq)}{sup +2} by P. putida was characterized by spatially and temporally resolving the oxidation state of Mn in the presence of a bacterial biofilm using scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) combined with near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy at the Mn-L{sub 2,3} absorption edges. Subsamples were collected from growth flasks containing 0.1 mM and 1 mM total Mn at 16, 24, 36 and 48 hours after inoculation. Immediately after collection, the unprocessed hydrated subsamples were imaged at 40 nm resolution. Manganese NEXAFS spectra were extracted from x-ray energy sequences of STXM images (stacks) and fit with linear combinations of well characterized reference spectra to obtain quantitative relative abundances of Mn(II), Mn(III) and Mn(IV). Careful consideration was given to uncertainty in the normalization of the reference spectra, choice of reference compounds, and chemical changes due to radiation damage. The STXM results confirm that Mn{sub (aq)}{sup +2} was removed from solution by P. putida and was concentrated as Mn(III) and Mn(IV) immediately adjacent to the bacterial cells. The Mn precipitates were completely enveloped by bacterial biofilm material. The distribution of Mn oxidation states was spatially heterogeneous within and between the clusters of bacterial cells. Scanning transmission x-ray microscopy is a promising tool to advance the study of hydrated interfaces between minerals and bacteria, particularly in cases where the structure of bacterial biofilms needs to be maintained.

Toner, Brandy; Fakra, Sirine; Villalobos, Mario; Warwick, Tony; Sposito, Garrison

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Measurement of Ultra-Low Potassium Contaminations with Accelerator Mass Spectrometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Levels of trace radiopurity in active detector materials is a subject of major concern in low-background experiments. Among the radio-isotopes, $\\k40$ is one of the most abundant and yet whose signatures are difficult to reject. Procedures were devised to measure trace potassium concentrations in the inorganic salt CsI as well as in organic liquid scintillator (LS) with Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS), giving, respectively, the $\\k40$-contamination levels of $\\sim 10^{-10}$ and $\\sim 10^{-13}$ g/g. Measurement flexibilities and sensitivities are improved over conventional methods. The projected limiting sensitivities if no excess of potassium signals had been observed over background are $8 \\times 10^{-13}$ g/g and $3 \\times 10^{-17}$ g/g for the CsI and LS, respectively. Studies of the LS samples indicate that the radioactive contaminations come mainly in the dye solutes, while the base solvents are orders of magnitude cleaner. The work demonstrate the possibilities of measuring naturally-occurring isotopes with the AMS techniques.

K. J. Dong

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Measurement of Ultra-Low Potassium Contaminations with Accelerator Mass Spectrometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Levels of trace radiopurity in active detector materials is a subject of major concern in low-background experiments. Among the radio-isotopes, $\\k40$ is one of the most abundant and yet whose signatures are difficult to reject. Procedures were devised to measure trace potassium concentrations in the inorganic salt CsI as well as in organic liquid scintillator (LS) with Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS), giving, respectively, the $\\k40$-contamination levels of $\\sim 10^{-10}$ and $\\sim 10^{-13}$ g/g. Measurement flexibilities and sensitivities are improved over conventional methods. The projected limiting sensitivities if no excess of potassium signals had been observed over background are $8 \\times 10^{-13}$ g/g and $3 \\times 10^{-17}$ g/g for the CsI and LS, respectively. Studies of the LS samples indicate that the radioactive contaminations come mainly in the dye solutes, while the base solvents are orders of magnitude cleaner. The work demonstrate the possibilities of measuring naturally-occurring isoto...

Dong, K J

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Clinch River breeder reactor sodium fire protection system design and development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To assure the protection of the public and plant equipment, improbable accidents were hypothesized to form the basis for the design of safety systems. One such accident is the postulated failure of the Intermediate Heat Transfer System (IHTS) piping within the Steam Generator Building (SGB), resulting in a large-scale sodium fire. This paper discusses the design and development of plant features to reduce the consequences of the accident to acceptable levels. Additional design solutions were made to mitigate the sodium spray contribution to the accident scenario. Sodium spill tests demonstrated that large sodium leaks can be safely controlled in a sodium-cooled nuclear power plant.

Foster, K.W.; Boasso, C.J.; Kaushal, N.N.

1984-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

264

Selective Adsorption of Sodium Aluminum Fluoride Salts from Molten Aluminum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aluminum is produced in electrolytic reduction cells where alumina feedstock is dissolved in molten cryolite (sodium aluminum fluoride) along with aluminum and calcium fluorides. The dissolved alumina is then reduced by electrolysis and the molten aluminum separates to the bottom of the cell. The reduction cell is periodically tapped to remove the molten aluminum. During the tapping process, some of the molten electrolyte (commonly referred as bath in the aluminum industry) is carried over with the molten aluminum and into the transfer crucible. The carryover of molten bath into the holding furnace can create significant operational problems in aluminum cast houses. Bath carryover can result in several problems. The most troublesome problem is sodium and calcium pickup in magnesium-bearing alloys. Magnesium alloying additions can result in Mg-Na and Mg-Ca exchange reactions with the molten bath, which results in the undesirable pickup of elemental sodium and calcium. This final report presents the findings of a project to evaluate removal of molten bath using a new and novel micro-porous filter media. The theory of selective adsorption or removal is based on interfacial surface energy differences of molten aluminum and bath on the micro-porous filter structure. This report describes the theory of the selective adsorption-filtration process, the development of suitable micro-porous filter media, and the operational results obtained with a micro-porous bed filtration system. The micro-porous filter media was found to very effectively remove molten sodium aluminum fluoride bath by the selective adsorption-filtration mechanism.

Leonard S. Aubrey; Christine A. Boyle; Eddie M. Williams; David H. DeYoung; Dawid D. Smith; Feng Chi

2007-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

265

Cleaning Cesium Radionuclides from BN-350 Primary Sodium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports the successful design and operation of a system to remove highly radioactive cesium from the sodium coolant of the BN-350 reactor in Aktau, Kazakhstan. As an international effort between the United States and the Republic of Kazakhstan, a cesium-trapping system was jointly designed, fabricated, installed, and successfully operated. The results are significant for a number of reasons, including (a) a significant reduction of radioactivity levels of the BN-350 coolant and reactor surfaces, thereby reducing exposure to workers during shutdown operations; (b) demonstration of scientific ideas; and (c) the engineering application of effective cesium trap deployment for commercial-sized liquid-metal reactors. About 255 300 GBq (6900 Ci) of cesium was trapped, and the {sup 137}Cs specific activity in BN-350 primary sodium was decreased from 296 MBq/kg (8000 {mu}Ci/kg) to 0.37 MBq/kg (10 {mu}Ci/kg) by using seven cesium traps containing reticulated vitreous carbon (RVC) as the cesium adsorbent. Cesium trapping was accomplished by pumping sodium from the primary circuit, passing it through a block of RVC within each trap, and returning the cleaned sodium to the primary circuit. Both to predict and to analyze the behavior of the cesium traps in the BN-350 reactor primary circuit, a model was developed that satisfactorily describes the observed results of the cesium trapping. By using this model, thermodynamic parameters, such as the heat of adsorption of cesium atoms on RVC and on internal piping surfaces of the BN-350 reactor primary circuit, -22.7 and -5.0 kJ/mole, respectively, were extracted from the experimental data.

Romanenko, O.G.; Allen, K.J.; Wachs, D.M.; Planchon, H.P.; Wells, P.B.; Michelbacher, J.A.; Nazarenko, P.; Dumchev, I.; Maev, V.; Zemtzev, B.; Tikhomirov, L.; Yakovlev, V.; Synkov, A

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

266

Sodium boiling dryout correlation for LMFBR fuel assemblies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under certain postulated accident conditions for a Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR), such as the failure of the shutdown heat removal system (SHRS), sodium boiling and clad dryout might occur in the fuel assemblies. It is important to predict the time from boiling inception to dryout, since sustained clad dryout will result in core damage. In this paper a dryout correlation is presented. This correlation is based on 21 boiling tests which resulted in dryout from the THORS BUNDLE 6A, a 19-pin full-length simulated LMFBR fuel assembly and from the THORS Bundle 9, a 61-pin full-length simulated LMFBR fuel assembly. All these tests were performed as follows: for each specified bundle power, an initial steady-state high sodium flow was established, for which sodium boiling did not occur in the bundle. The temperature at the outlet of the test section was approx. 700/sup 0/C. Then, using a programmable pump control system, the flow was reduced to a low value and boiling occurred.

Carbajo, J.J.; Rose, S.D.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment, Applied Technology Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho mandates treatment of sodium-bearing waste at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center within the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. One of the requirements of the Settlement Agreement is to complete treatment of sodium-bearing waste by December 31, 2012. Applied technology activities are required to provide the data necessary to complete conceptual design of four identified alternative processes and to select the preferred alternative. To provide a technically defensible path forward for the selection of a treatment process and for the collection of needed data, an applied technology plan is required. This document presents that plan, identifying key elements of the decision process and the steps necessary to obtain the required data in support of both the decision and the conceptual design. The Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment Applied Technology Plan has been prepared to provide a description/roadmap of the treatment alternative selection process. The plan details the results of risk analyzes and the resulting prioritized uncertainties. It presents a high-level flow diagram governing the technology decision process, as well as detailed roadmaps for each technology. The roadmaps describe the technical steps necessary in obtaining data to quantify and reduce the technical uncertainties associated with each alternative treatment process. This plan also describes the final products that will be delivered to the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office in support of the office's selection of the final treatment technology.

Lance Lauerhass; Vince C. Maio; S. Kenneth Merrill; Arlin L. Olson; Keith J. Perry

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Electrodeposited Manganese Oxides on Three-Dimensional Carbon Nanotube Substrate: Supercapacitive Behaviour in Aqueous and Organic Electrolytes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thin amorphous manganese oxide layers with a thickness of 3-5nm are electrodeposited on a carbon nanotube (CNT) film substrate that has a three-dimensional nanoporous structure (denoted asMnO2/CNT electrode). For the purpose of comparison, manganese oxide films are also electrodeposited on a flat Pt-coated Si wafer substrate (denoted as MnO2 film electrode). The pseudocapacitive properties of the MnO2 film and MnO2/CNT electrodes are examined in both aqueous electrolyte (1.0M KCl) and nonaqueousorganic electrolyte (1.0M LiClO4 in propylene carbonate). While both types of electrode showpseudocapacitive behaviour in the aqueous electrolyte, only the MnO2/CNT electrode does so in the organic electrolyte, due to its high oxide/electrolyte interfacial area and improved electron conduction through the CNT substrate. Compared with the MnO2 film electrode, the MnO2/CNT electrode shows a much higher specific capacitance and better high-rate capability, regardless of the electrolyte used.Use of the organic electrolyte results in a ?6 times higher specific energy compared with that obtained with the aqueous electrolyte, while maintaining a similar specific power. The construction of a threedimensional nanoporous network structure consisting of a thin oxide layer on a CNT film substrate at the nm scale and the use of an organic electrolyte are promising approaches to improving the specific energyof supercapacitors.

Nam,K.W.; Yang,X.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Manganese reduction/oxidation reaction on graphene composites as a reversible process for storing enormous energy at a fast rate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oxygen reduction/evolution reaction (ORR/OER) is a basic process for fuel cells or metal air batteries. However, ORR/OER generally requires noble metal catalysts and suffers from low solubility (10-3 molar per liter) of O2, low kinetics rate (10-6 cm2/s) and low reversibility. We report a manganese reduction/oxidation reaction (MRR/MOR) on graphene/MnO2 composites, delivering a high capacity (4200 mAh/g), fast kinetics (0.0024 cm2/s, three orders higher than ORR/OER), high solubility (three orders than O2), and high reversibility (100%). We further use MRR/MOR to invent a rechargeable manganese ion battery (MIB), which delivers an energy density of 1200 Wh/Kg (several times of lithium ion battery), a fast charge ability (3 minutes), and a long cycle life (10,000 cycles). MRR/MOR renders a new class of energy conversion or storage systems with a very high energy density enabling electric vehicles run much more miles at one charge.

Chen, Yanyi; Shi, Shan; Li, Jia; Kang, Feiyu; Wei, Chunguang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Correlation between structural, magnetic, and dielectric properties of manganese substituted cobalt ferrite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Manganese (Mn) substituted cobalt ferrites (CoFe{sub 2?x}Mn{sub x}O{sub 4}, referred to CFMO) were synthesized and their structural, magnetic, and dielectric properties were evaluated. X-ray diffraction measurements coupled with Rietveld refinement indicate that the CFMO materials crystallize in the inverse cubic spinel phase. Temperature (T?=?300?K and 10?K) dependent magnetization (M(H)) measurements indicate the long range ferromagnetic ordering in CoFe{sub 2?x}Mn{sub x}O{sub 4} (x?=?0.000.15) ferrites. The cubic anisotropy constant (K{sub 1}(T)) and saturation magnetization (M{sub s}(T)) were derived by using the law of approach to saturation that describes the field dependence of M(H) for magnetic fields much higher than the coercive field (H{sub c}). Saturation magnetization (M{sub s}), obtained from the model, decreases with increasing temperature. For CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, M{sub s} decreases from 3.63??{sub B} per formula unit (f.u.) to 3.47??{sub B}/f.u. with increasing temperature from 10 to 300?K. CFMO (0.000.15) exhibit the similar trend while the magnitude of M{sub s} is dependent on Mn-concentration. M{sub s}-T functional relationship obeys the Bloch's law. The lattice parameter and magnetic moment calculated for CFMO reveals that Mn ions occupying the Fe and Co position at the octahedral site in the inverse cubic spinel phase. The structure and magnetism in CFMO are further corroborated by bond length and bond angle calculations. The dielectric constant dispersion of CFMO in the frequency range of 20?Hz1?MHz fits to the modified Debye's function with more than one ion contributing to the relaxation. The relaxation time and spread factor derived from modeling the experimental data are ?10{sup ?4}?s and ?0.35(0.05), respectively.

Ramana, C. V., E-mail: rvchintalapalle@utep.edu; Kolekar, Y. D.; Kamala Bharathi, K. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, Texas 79968 (United States); Sinha, B. [Functional Nanopowder Material Division, Korea Institute of Material Science, Changwon 642-831, Gyeongnam (Korea, Republic of); Ghosh, K. [Department of Physics, Astronomy and Materials Science, Missouri State University, Springfield, Missouri 65897 (United States)

2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

271

ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels are found in pancreatic _cells, heart, smooth and skeletal muscle and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels are found in pancreatic â_cells, heart, smooth and skeletal al. 1997). Kir6.2 serves as an ATP-sensitive pore while SUR is a regulatory subunit that modulates the channel gating properties, enhances the apparent ATP sensitivity and acts as the target for sulphonylurea

Tucker, Stephen J.

272

ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels are found in pancreatic _cells, cardiac, smooth and skeletal muscles, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels are found in pancreatic â_cells, cardiac, smooth ATP and ADP bind to cause channel inhibition. SUR is a regulatory subunit that modulates the channel gating properties, enhances the apparent ATP sensitivity and acts as the target for sulphonylurea drugs

Tucker, Stephen J.

273

Mercury Emissions Control in Coal Combustion Systems Using Potassium Iodide: Bench-Scale and Pilot-Scale Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

power plant exhaust gases using conventional air pollution control devices (APCDs) is significantly Act list of sources of hazardous air pollutants. Both the reversal and the CAMR were vacated by the UMercury Emissions Control in Coal Combustion Systems Using Potassium Iodide: Bench-Scale and Pilot

Li, Ying

274

Effect of intracellular diffusion on current-voltage curves in potassium channels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the effect of intracellular ion diffusion on ionic currents permeating through the cell membrane. Ion flux across the cell membrane is mediated by special proteins forming specific channels. The structure of potassium channels have been widely studied in recent years with remarkable results: very precise measurements of the true current across a single channel are now available. Nevertheless, a complete understanding of the behavior of the channel is still lacking, though molecular dynamics and kinetic models have provided partial insights. In this paper we demonstrate, by analyzing the KcsA current-voltage currents via a suitable lattice model, that intracellular diffusion plays a crucial role in the permeation phenomenon. The interplay between the selectivity filter behavior and the ion diffusion in the intracellular side allows a full explanation of the current-voltage curves.

Andreucci, D; Cirillo, E N M; Marconi, S

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Potassium Rankine cycle power conversion systems for lunar-Mars surface power  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potassium Rankine cycle has good potential for application to nuclear power systems for surface power on the moon and Mars. A substantial effort on the development of the power conversion was carried out in the 1960`s which demonstrated successful operation of components made of stainless steel at moderate temperatures. This technology could be applied in the near term to produce a 360 kW(e) power system by coupling a stainless steel power conversion system to the SP-100 reactor. Improved performance could be realized in later systems by utilizing niobium or tantalum refractory metal alloys in the reactor and power conversion system. The design characteristics and estimated mass of power systems for each of three technology levels are presented in the paper. 8 refs.

Holcomb, R.S.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Detection of frozen salt in pipes using gamma-ray spectrometry of potassium self-activity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solar plants that use molten salts as heat transfer fluid need careful control to avoid the freezing of the salt in the pipes; if such a problem occurs, a diagnostic instrument to localize where is the frozen salt plug and to determine its length is useful. If the salt contains potassium (as is the case of the most common mixture used in solar plants, NaNO{sub 3}/KNO{sub 3} 60/40% by weight), the gamma decay of the natural unstable isotope {sup 40}K can be exploited to detect the frozen salt in a non-invasive way. Simulations and experimental results regarding the detectability of such plugs with different masses/lengths are presented. (author)

Grena, Roberto; Scafe, Raffaele; Pisacane, Fabrizio; Pilato, Renzo; Crescenzi, Tommaso; Mazzei, Domenico [ENEA, Casaccia Research Centre, via Anguillarese 301, 00123 S. Maria di Galeria, Rome (Italy)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

277

The determination of exchangeable potassium in the canine with the aid of whole body counting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The a~changeable potassium measured at 0. 65-0. 85 hours post-injection was 37. 51+ 3. 85 mEq/kg. It is therefore possible to make the measurement soon after injection and note whether there is a possible electrolyte imbalance, but it is recommended... of the lesser beta energies in its decay as compared to the decay of K (Jo69). (2. 4h ' 4RK IS (&) d)~ 1. 44 L2$ o I 19 O. OS% 4. 4 %144 0. 14% 4. / I ?it 10% P. 0 ? L22LO. SSD5 0 - LST (Myw) 42% ?to 4+ 4R aoCa N (12. 41)t B 2, n. -1. 141 atomtc...

Followill, David

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

278

Practical features of illumination with high pressure sodium lamps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A number of concerns raised about the health effects of high pressure sodium lamps (HPS) are discussed. The notion of a ''natural'' human photic environment based on sunlight is disputed. Humans are better adapted to the ''greenish'' spectral composition of forest light than to direct sunlight. It is ironic that the artificial light source which has received the most disapproval, cool white flourescent lamp, has a spectral composition similar to that of forest light. HPS is also available in a full range of colors. Some successful examples of HPS--from North Division High School, in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, to museum exhibits at National Geographic in Washington--are listed.

Corth, R.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Dynamic stability experiments in sodium-heated steam generators. [LMFBR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seventy-two dynamic stability tests were performed in the sodium-heated boiling-water test facility at Argonne National Laboratory. A full-scale LMFBR steam generator tube was employed as the test section operating over the water parameter ranges of 6.9 to 15.9 MPa pressure and 170 to 800 kg/m/sup 2/.s mass flux. The stability thresholds from the test compared well to the predictions of a modified version of a correlation equation recently published by other investigators. Typical experimental data and the modified correlation equation are presented.

France, D.M.; Roy, R.; Carlson, R.D.; Chiang, T.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Interaction Between Trace Metals, Sodium and Sorbents in Combustion.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proposed research is directed at an understanding of how to exploit interactions between sodium, toxic metals and sorbents, in order to optimize sorbents injection procedures, which can be used to capture and transform these metals into environmentally benign forms. The research will use a 17kW downflow, laboratory combustor, to yield data that can be interpreted in terms of fundamental kinetic mechanisms. Metals to be considered are lead, cadmium, and arsenic. Sorbents will be kaolinite, bauxite, and limestone. The role of sulfur will also be determined.

Wendt, O.L.; Davis, S.

1997-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Nanofriction on Sodium Polystyrene Sulfonate Brushes in Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigated the frictional properties of sodium polystyrene sulfonate (NaPSS) brushes in water by frictional force microscopy (FFM). Polyelectrolyte brushes were prepared on silicon wafers by the grafting-to method. The brushes considerably reduce the frictional force and coefficient of kinetic friction compared to hydrodynamic lubrication on a smooth Si wafer. Frictional force is independent of sliding speed, but is lower for lower degrees of NaPSS polymerization. Nanoindentation tests indicate that the polymer chains in a brush are stretched strongly away from the substrate. These results suggest that polymer chains point support the FFM probe tip in water and reduced contact area and friction.

Takuya Fujima; Eitaro Futakuchi; Fumihiro Kino

2014-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

282

Sodium Ion Insertion in Hollow Carbon Nanowires for Battery Applications. |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSite CulturalDepartment ofat Home |EMSL Sodium Ion Insertion

283

ELECTROCHEMICAL RESEARCH IN CHEMICAL HYDROGEN STORAGE MATERIALS: SODIUM BOROHYDRIDE AND ORGANOTIN HYDRIDES.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Chemical storage of hydrogen involves release of hydrogen in a controlled manner from materials in which the hydrogen is covalently bound. Sodium borohydride and aminoborane (more)

McLafferty, Jason

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

E-Print Network 3.0 - affecting sodium hypochlorite Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Workshop Summary: equipment, vehicles Sodium hypochlorite (bleach) 200-500 ppm Nets, boots, clothing. Surfaces must be clean... hypochlorite solution.Note: Bleach is 5.25%...

285

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline sodium borohydride Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aardahl, PNNL) The most critical hurdle for the use of sodium ... Source: DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure...

286

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminum sodium chloride Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

agents Water Acetyl chloride, alkaline and alkaline... hypochlorite, all oxidizing agents Carbon tetrachloride Sodium ... Source: Hall, Sharon J. - School of Life Sciences, Arizona...

287

Modeling Study of Proposed Field Calibration Source Using K-40 Source and High-Z Targets for Sodium Iodide Detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

isotope potassium-40 (40K) are not subject to these restrictions. Potassium-40s beta spectrum and 1460.8 keV gamma ray can be used to induce K-shell fluorescence x rays in high-Z metals between 60 and 80 keV. A gamma ray calibration source is thus...

Rogers, Jeremy 1987-

2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

288

Structural Study of Biotic and Abiotic Poorly-crystalline Manganese Oxides Using Atomic Pair Distribution Function Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Manganese (Mn) oxides are among the most reactive natural minerals and play an important role in elemental cycling in oceanic and terrestrial environments. A large portion of naturally-occurring Mn oxides tend to be poorly-crystalline and/or nanocrystalline, with not fully resolved crystal structures. In this study, the crystal structures of their synthetic analogs including acid birnessite (AcidBir), {delta}-MnO{sub 2}, polymeric MnO{sub 2} (PolyMnO{sub 2}) and a bacteriogenic Mn oxide (BioMnO{sub x}), have been revealed using atomic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis. Results unambiguously verify that these Mn oxides are layered materials. The best models that accurately allow simulation of pair distribution functions (PDFs) belong to the monoclinic C12/m1 space group with a disk-like shape. The single MnO{sub 6} layers in the average structures deviate significantly from hexagonal symmetry, in contrast to the results of previous studies based on X-ray diffraction analysis in reciprocal space. Manganese occupancies in MnO{sub 6} layers are estimated to be 0.936, 0.847, 0.930 and 0.935, for AcidBir, BioMnO{sub x}, {delta}-MnO{sub 2} and PolyMnO{sub 2}, respectively; however, occupancies of interlayer cations and water molecules cannot be accurately determined using the models in this study. The coherent scattering domains (CSDs) of PolyMnO{sub 2}, {delta}-MnO{sub 2} and BioMnO{sub x} are at the nanometer scale, comprising one to three MnO{sub 6} layers stacked with a high disorder in the crystallographic c-axis direction. Overall, the results of this study advance our understanding of the mineralogy of Mn oxide minerals in the environment.

Billinge S. J.; Zhu, M.; Farrow, C.L.; Post, J.E.; Livi, K.J.T.; Ginder-Vogel, M.; Sparks, D.L.

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

289

Structural study of biotic and abiotic poorly-crystalline manganese oxides using atomic pair distribution function analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Manganese (Mn) oxides are among the most reactive natural minerals and play an important role in elemental cycling in oceanic and terrestrial environments. A large portion of naturally-occurring Mn oxides tend to be poorly-crystalline and/or nanocrystalline, with not fully resolved crystal structures. In this study, the crystal structures of their synthetic analogs including acid birnessite (AcidBir), {delta}-MnO{sub 2}, polymeric MnO{sub 2} (PolyMnO{sub 2}) and a bacteriogenic Mn oxide (BioMnO{sub x}), have been revealed using atomic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis. Results unambiguously verify that these Mn oxides are layered materials. The best models that accurately allow simulation of pair distribution functions (PDFs) belong to the monoclinic C12/m1 space group with a disk-like shape. The single MnO{sub 6} layers in the average structures deviate significantly from hexagonal symmetry, in contrast to the results of previous studies based on X-ray diffraction analysis in reciprocal space. Manganese occupancies in MnO{sub 6} layers are estimated to be 0.936, 0.847, 0.930 and 0.935, for AcidBir, BioMnOx, {delta}-MnO{sub 2} and PolyMnO{sub 2}, respectively; however, occupancies of interlayer cations and water molecules cannot be accurately determined using the models in this study. The coherent scattering domains (CSDs) of PolyMnO{sub 2}, {delta}-MnO{sub 2} and BioMnO{sub x} are at the nanometer scale, comprising one to three MnO{sub 6} layers stacked with a high disorder in the crystallographic c-axis direction. Overall, the results of this study advance our understanding of the mineralogy of Mn oxide minerals in the environment.

Zhu, Mengqiang; Farrow, Christopher L.; Post, Jeffrey E.; Livi, Kenneth J.T.; Billinge, Simon J.L.; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew; Sparks, Donald L. (Delaware); (Columbia); (JHU); (Smithsonian)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

290

Sodium fast reactor safety and licensing research plan. Volume I.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report proposes potential research priorities for the Department of Energy (DOE) with the intent of improving the licensability of the Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR). In support of this project, five panels were tasked with identifying potential safety-related gaps in available information, data, and models needed to support the licensing of a SFR. The areas examined were sodium technology, accident sequences and initiators, source term characterization, codes and methods, and fuels and materials. It is the intent of this report to utilize a structured and transparent process that incorporates feedback from all interested stakeholders to suggest future funding priorities for the SFR research and development. While numerous gaps were identified, two cross-cutting gaps related to knowledge preservation were agreed upon by all panels and should be addressed in the near future. The first gap is a need to re-evaluate the current procedures for removing the Applied Technology designation from old documents. The second cross-cutting gap is the need for a robust Knowledge Management and Preservation system in all SFR research areas. Closure of these and the other identified gaps will require both a reprioritization of funding within DOE as well as a re-evaluation of existing bureaucratic procedures within the DOE associated with Applied Technology and Knowledge Management.

Sofu, Tanju (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Bari, R. (Brokhaven National Laboratory Upton, NY); Wigeland, Roald (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Denman, Matthew R.; Flanagan, George F. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Preliminary engineering design of sodium-cooled CANDLE core  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CANDLE burning process is characterized by the autonomous shifting of burning region with constant reactivity and constant spacial power distribution. Evaluations of such critical burning process by using widely used neutron diffusion and burning codes under some realistic engineering constraints are valuable to confirm the technical feasibility of the CANDLE concept and to put the idea into concrete core design. In the first part of this paper, it is discussed that whether the sustainable and stable CANDLE burning process can be reproduced even by using conventional core analysis tools such as SLAROM and CITATION-FBR. As a result, it is certainly possible to demonstrate it if the proper core configuration and initial fuel composition required as CANDLE core are applied to the analysis. In the latter part, an example of a concrete image of sodium cooled, metal fuel, 2000MWt rating CANDLE core has been presented by assuming an emerging inevitable technology of recladding. The core satisfies engineering design criteria including cladding temperature, pressure drop, linear heat rate, and cumulative damage fraction (CDF) of cladding, fast neutron fluence and sodium void reactivity which are defined in the Japanese FBR design project. It can be concluded that it is feasible to design CANDLE core by using conventional codes while satisfying some realistic engineering design constraints assuming that recladding at certain time interval is technically feasible.

Takaki, Naoyuki; Namekawa, Azuma; Yoda, Tomoyuki; Mizutani, Akihiko; Sekimoto, Hiroshi [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Tokai University, Kitakaname, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan); AISA, Fuchu, Ishioka, Ibaraki 315-0013 (Japan); Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo, 152-8550 (Japan)

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

292

TRUEX partitioning studies applied to ICPP sodium-bearing waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP), located in southeast Idaho at the USDOE Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, formerly reprocessed highly enriched spent nuclear fuel to recover fissionable uranium. The HLW raffinates from the combined PUREX/REDOX type uranium recovery process were converted to solid oxides (calcine) in a high temperature fluidized bed. Liquid effluents from the calcination process were combined with liquid sodium bearing waste (SBW) generated primarily in conjunction with decontamination activities. Due to the high sodium content in the SBW, this secondary waste stream is not directly amenable to solidification via calcination. Currently, approximately 1.5 millon gallons of liquid SBW are stored at the ICPP in large tanks. Several treatment options for the SBW are currently being considered, including the TRansUranic EXtraction (TRUEX) process developed by Horwitz and co-workers at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), in preparation for the final disposition of SBW. Herein described are experimental results of radionuclide tracer studies with simulated SBW using the TRUEX process solvent.

Herbst, R.S.; Brewer, K.N.; Law, J.D.; Tranter, T.J.; Todd, T.A.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Selection of materials for sodium fast reactor steam generators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) is considered in France as the most mature technology of the different Generation IV systems. In the short-term the designing work is focused on the identification of the potential tracks to demonstrate licensing capability, availability, in-service inspection capability and economical performance. In that frame materials selection for the major components, as the steam generator, is a particularly key point managed within a French Research and Development program launched by AREVA, CEA and EDF. The choice of the material for the steam generator is indeed complex because various aspects shall be considered like mechanical and thermal properties at high temperature, interaction with sodium on one side and water and steam on the other side, resistance to wastage, procurement, fabrication, weldability and ability for inspection and in-situ intervention. The following relevant options are evaluated: the modified 9Cr1Mo ferritic-martensitic grade and the Alloy 800 austenitic grade. The objective of this paper is to assess for both candidates their abilities to reach the current SFR needs regarding material design data, from AFCEN RCC-MRx Code in particular, compatibility with environments and manufacturability. (authors)

Dubiez-Le Goff, S.; Garnier, S.; Gelineau, O. [AREVA (France); Dalle, F. [Commissariat a l'energie atomique et aux energies alternatives - CEA (France); Blat-Yrieix, M.; Augem, J. M. [Electricite de France - EDF (France)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Physiological changes in cultured Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench cells in response to induced water stress: osmotic potential, relative water content, carbohydrates, organic acids, potassium, and amino acids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UUZEZCLUUZCRL CIIEUEE IE CULTURED ~8OR ICE RICCICR IL ) MOBMCH CELLS IE RESPONSE TO INDUCED WATER STRESS OSMOTIC POTEMTZAL E RELATIVE WATER CONTENT E CARBOHYDRATES U ORGANIC ACIDS@ POTASSIUM E AED AMINO ACIDS A Thesis by RICARDO DIQUEZ... ZN RESPONSB TO IHDUCBD WATBR STRESS'- OSMOTIC POTENTIAL~ RELATIVE WATER CONTENT~ CARBOHYDRATES, ORGANIC ACIDS, POTASSIUM, AND AMINO ACIDS A Thesis by RICARDO DIQUEZ Approved as to style and content by: Roberta H. Smith (Chair of Committee...

Diquez, Ricardo

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

4June2013 Page 1 of 8 Sodium Hydroxide (Pellets) SOP Standard Operating Procedures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4June2013 Page 1 of 8 Sodium Hydroxide (Pellets) SOP Standard Operating Procedures Strong Corrosives ­ Strong Bases (SB) Sodium Hydroxide (Pellets) PrintOH Form: pellets Color: white Melting point/freezing point: 318 °C (604 °F

Cohen, Ronald C.

296

Sequential Treatment by Ionizing Radiation and Sodium Arsenite Dramatically Accelerates TRAIL-Mediated Apoptosis of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is critically important in the translocation of death receptor to the cell surface. Moreover, sodium arsenite and further down-regulates cFLIP levels in melanoma cells. We have evaluated the effects of sequentialSequential Treatment by Ionizing Radiation and Sodium Arsenite Dramatically Accelerates TRAIL

297

Effect of sodium chloride concentration on the heat resistance and recovery of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of sodium chloride concentration on the heat resistance and recovery of Salmonella inhibitory effect in the recovery media. Keywords : Salmonella typhimurium, Sodium chloride, Heat treatment, but they also generate damaged cells. The ability of heated cells to survive depends on the recovery conditions

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

298

Atomistic structure of sodium and calcium silicate intergranular films in alumina  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atomistic structure of sodium and calcium silicate intergranular films in alumina David A. Litton March 1998; accepted 21 October 1998) Sodium silicate intergranular films (IGF) in contact. The results were compared to previous simulations of calcium silicate and sol-gel silica IGF's in contact

Garofalini, Stephen H.

299

Measuring the x-ray resolving power of bent potassium acid phthalate diffraction crystals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results from measuring the X-ray resolving power of a curved potassium acid phthalate (KAP(001)) spectrometer crystal using two independent methods. It is part of a continuing effort to measure the fundamental diffraction properties of bent crystals that are used to study various characteristics of high temperature plasmas. Bent crystals like KAP(001) do not usually have the same diffraction properties as corresponding flat crystals. Models that do exist to calculate the effect of bending the crystal on the diffraction properties have simplifying assumptions and their accuracy limits have not been adequately determined. The type of crystals that we measured is being used in a spectrometer on the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The first technique for measuring the crystal resolving power measures the X-ray spectral line width of the characteristic lines from several metal anodes. The second method uses a diode X-ray source and a double crystal diffractometer arrangement to measure the reflectivity curve of the KAP(001) crystal. The width of that curve is inversely proportional to the crystal resolving power. The measurement results are analyzed and discussed.

Haugh, M. J., E-mail: haughmj@nv.doe.gov; Jacoby, K. D. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Wu, M.; Loisel, G. P. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

300

FEASIBILITY STUDY FOR POTASSIUM IODIDE (KI) DISTRIBUTION IN NEW YORK CITY.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH), Bureau of Environmental Science and Engineering, Office of Radiological Health (ORH) [as the primary local technical consultant in the event of a radiological or nuclear incident within the boundaries of New York City] requested the assistance of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) with the development of a Feasibility Study for Potassium Iodide (KI) distribution in the unlikely event of a significant release of radioactive iodine in or near New York City. Brookhaven National Laboratory had previously provided support for New York City with the development of the radiological/nuclear portions of its All Hazards Emergency Response Plans. The work is funded by Medical and Health Research Association (MHRA) of New York City, Inc., under a work grant by the Federal Centers for Disease Control (CDC) for Public Health Preparedness and Response for Bioterrorism. This report is part of the result of that effort. The conclusions of this report are that: (1) There is no credible radiological scenario that would prompt the need for large segments of the general population of New York City to take KI as a result of a projected plume exposure to radioiodine reaching even the lowest threshold of 5 rem to the thyroid; and (2) KI should be stockpiled in amounts and locations sufficient for use by first responders/emergency responders in response to any localized release of radioiodine.

MOSS, STEVEN

2005-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Determination of free acid by standard addition method in potassium thiocyanate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The free acid content of solutions containing hydrolyzable ions has been determined potentiometrically by a standard addition method. Two increments of acid are added to the sample in 1M potassium thiocyanate solution. The sample concentration is calculated by solution of three simultaneous Nernst equations. The method has been demonstrated for solutions containing Al/sup 3 +/, Cr/sup 3 +/, Fe/sup 3 +/, Hg/sup 2 +/, Ni/sup 2 +/, Th/sup 4 +/, or UO/sub 2//sup 2 +/ with a metal-to-acid ratio of < 2.5. The method is suitable for determination of 10 ..mu..moles acid in 10 mL total volume. The accuracy can be judged from the agreement of the Nernst slopes found in the presence and absence of hydrolyzable ions. The relative standard deviation is < 2.5%. The report includes a survey of experiments with thermometric, pH, and Gran plot titrations in a variety of complexants, from which the method was evolved. Also included is a literature survey of sixty references, a discussion of the basic measurements, and a complete analytical procedure.

Baumann, E W

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

GLIA 46:1827 (2004) Potassium Attenuates Zinc-Induced Death of Cultured Cortical Astrocytes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

zinc toxicity; neurons; astrocytes; intracellular zinc; depolarization; zinc accumulation Transient global ischemia induces CA1 hippocampal neuronal death without astrocyte death, perhaps mediated in part by the toxic translocation of zinc from presynaptic terminals to postsynaptic neurons. We tested the hypothesis that cellular depolarization, which occurs in the ischemic brain due to increased extracellular potassium and energy failure, might contribute to astrocyte resistance to zinc-induced death. We previously reported that neurons in mixed cortical neuronal-astrocyte cultures were more vulnerable to a 515-min exposure to Zn 2 ? than astrocytes in the same cultures. In the present report, we show that (1) neurons in isolation or in conjunction with astrocytes were 23-fold more sensitive to a 15-min nondepolarizing Zn 2 ? exposure than are glia; (2) KCl-induced depolarization attenuated glial vulnerability to zinc toxicity but potentiated neuronal vulnerability to zinc toxicity; (3) Zn 2 ?-induced glial death was attenuated by T-type Ca 2 ? channel blockade, as well as compounds that increase NAD ?

Christian T. Sheline; Toshihiro Takata; Howard Ying; Lorella M. T. Canzoniero; Aizhen Yang; Shan Ping Yu; Dennis; W. Choi; Key Words

303

Sodium fast reactor fuels and materials : research needs.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An expert panel was assembled to identify gaps in fuels and materials research prior to licensing sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR) design. The expert panel considered both metal and oxide fuels, various cladding and duct materials, structural materials, fuel performance codes, fabrication capability and records, and transient behavior of fuel types. A methodology was developed to rate the relative importance of phenomena and properties both as to importance to a regulatory body and the maturity of the technology base. The technology base for fuels and cladding was divided into three regimes: information of high maturity under conservative operating conditions, information of low maturity under more aggressive operating conditions, and future design expectations where meager data exist.

Denman, Matthew R.; Porter, Douglas (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Art (Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL); Lambert, John (Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL); Hayes, Steven (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Natesan, Ken (Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL); Ott, Larry J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Garner, Frank (Radiation Effects Consulting. Richland, WA); Walters, Leon (Advanced Reactor Concepts, Idaho Falls, ID); Yacout, Abdellatif (Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment Alternatives Implementation Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to discuss issues related to the implementation of each of the five down-selected INEEL/INTEC radioactive liquid waste (sodium-bearing waste - SBW) treatment alternatives and summarize information in three main areas of concern: process/technical, environmental permitting, and schedule. Major implementation options for each treatment alternative are also identified and briefly discussed. This report may touch upon, but purposely does not address in detail, issues that are programmatic in nature. Examples of these include how the SBW will be classified with respect to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA), status of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) permits and waste storage availability, available funding for implementation, stakeholder issues, and State of Idaho Settlement Agreement milestones. It is assumed in this report that the SBW would be classified as a transuranic (TRU) waste suitable for disposal at WIPP, located in New Mexico, after appropriate treatment to meet transportation requirements and waste acceptance criteria (WAC).

Charles M. Barnes; James B. Bosley; Clifford W. Olsen

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Feasibility Study for Vitrification of Sodium-Bearing Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Treatment of sodium-bearing waste (SBW) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) within the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory is mandated under a Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. One of the requirements of the Settlement Agreement is the complete calcination (i.e., treatment) of all SBW by December 31, 2012. One of the proposed options for treatment of SBW is vitrification. This study will examine the viability of SBW vitrification. This study describes the process and facilities to treat the SBW, from beginning waste input from INTEC Tank Farm to the final waste forms. Schedules and cost estimates for construction and operation of a Vitrification Facility are included. The study includes a facility layout with drawings, process description and flow diagrams, and preliminary equipment requirements and layouts.

J. J. Quigley; B. D. Raivo; S. O. Bates; S. M. Berry; D. N. Nishioka; P. J. Bunnell

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Sodium Heat Engine Development Program. Phase 1, Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Sodium Heat Engine (SHE) is an efficient thermoelectric conversion device which directly generates electricity from a thermally regenerative electrochemical cell that relies on the unique conduction properties of {beta}{double_prime}-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE). Laboratory models of a variety of SHE devices have demonstrated the feasibility and efficiency of the system, engineering development of large prototype devices has been slowed by a series of materials and fabrication problems. Failure of the electrolyte tubes has been a recurring problem and a number of possible causes have been postulated. To address these issues, a two-phase engineering development program was undertaken. This report summarizes the final results of the first phase of the program, which included extensive materials characterization activities, a study of applicable nondestructive evaluation methods, an investigation of possible stress states that would contribute to fracture, and certain operational issues associated with the electromagnetic pumps used in the SHE prototype. Mechanical and microstructural evaluation of commercially obtained BASE tubes revealed that they should be adequate for SHE applications and that sodium exposure produced no appreciable deleterious strength effects. Processing activities to produce a more uniform and smaller grain size for the BASE tubes were completed using isostatic pressing, extrusion, and slip casting. Green tubes were sintered by conventional and microwave plasma methods. Of particular interest is the residual stress state in the BASE tubes, and both analysis and nondestructive evaluation methods were employed to evaluate these stresses. X-ray and neutron diffraction experiments were performed to determine the bulk residual stresses in commercially fabricated BASE tubes; however, tube-to-tube variations and variations among the various methods employed did not allow formulation of a definitive definition of the as-fabricated stress state.

Singh, J.P.; Kupperman, D.S.; Majumdar, S.; Dorris, S.; Gopalsami, N.; Dieckman, S.L.; Jaross, R.A.; Johnson, D.L.; Gregar, J.S.; Poeppel, R.B.; Raptis, A.C.; Valentin, R.A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility closure plan. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site, located northwest of the city of Richland, Washington, houses reactors, chemical-separation systems, and related facilities used for the production of special nuclear materials, and activities associated with nuclear energy development. The 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility (LSFF), which was in operation from about 1972 to 1986, was a research laboratory that occupied the former ventilation supply room on the southwest side of the 105-DR Reactor facility. The LSFF was established to provide a means of investigating fire and safety aspects associated with large sodium or other metal alkali fires in the liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) facilities. The 105-DR Reactor facility was designed and built in the 1950`s and is located in the 100-D Area of the Hanford Site. The building housed the 105-DR defense reactor, which was shut down in 1964. The LSFF was initially used only for engineering-scale alkali metal reaction studies. In addition, the Fusion Safety Support Studies program sponsored intermediate-size safety reaction tests in the LSFF with lithium and lithium lead compounds. The facility has also been used to store and treat alkali metal waste, therefore the LSFF is subject to the regulatory requirements for the storage and treatment of dangerous waste. Closure will be conducted pursuant to the requirements of the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610. This closure plan presents a description of the facility, the history of waste managed, and the procedures that will be followed to close the LSFF as an Alkali Metal Treatment Facility. No future use of the LSFF is expected.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Collogue CI, supplement au n 4, Tome 38, Avril 1977, page Cl-27 PERMEABILITY MECHANISMS IN MANGANESE ZINC FERRITES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MECHANISMS IN MANGANESE ZINC FERRITES J. E. KNOWLES Mullard Research Laboratories Redhill, Surrey RH1 5HA des parois et des rotations à la perméabilité. Dans un ferrite à perméabilité élevée /iT et iï" sont ferrite à petits grains et faibles pertes fiT est alors maximal mais /iw et v sont minima. Ceci est

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

309

Mercury's sodium exosphere: Magnetospheric ion recycling Service d'Aeronomie du CNRS/IPSL, Verrie`res-Le-Buisson, France  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mercury's sodium exosphere: Magnetospheric ion recycling F. Leblanc Service d'Ae´ronomie du CNRS December 2003. [1] A three-dimensional Monte Carlo model of Mercury's neutral sodium exosphere was used in the surface concentration of sodium along Mercury's motion around the Sun [Leblanc and Johnson, 2003]. Four

Johnson, Robert E.

310

Kinetic models for uncatalyzed and potassium-catalyzed gasification of char by carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A differential packed-bed reactor has been employed to study the gasification of uncatalyzed and 7.5 wt% K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-catalyzed Saran char in carbon dioxide/carbon monoxide mixtures at a total pressure near 1 atm (101.3 kPa). The gasification temperature was varied between 1131 and 1229 K for the uncatalyzed case, and between 922 and 1046 K for the catalyzed case. Gasification rate data were tested with a model which involves two-site adsorption and subsequent dissociation of CO/sub 2/ on the char surface. The results indicate that this model adequately explains both the uncatalyzed and catalyzed gasification data. However, higher concentrations of carbon-oxygen complex, (C(O)), exist on the surface during catalyzed gasification. The increase in (C(O)) weakens carbon-carbon bonds and thus lowers the activation energy for desorption of the C(O) complex. Adsorption of CO and CO/sub 2/ on both catalyzed and uncatalyzed chars was also followed with a volumetric adsorption apparatus at pressures between 1 and 100 kPa and temperatures from 273 to 725 K. The catalyzed char adsorbed an order of magnitude more CO/sub 2/ at 559 K than the uncatalyzed char. Subsequent dissociation of CO/sub 2/ on the carbon surface does not appear to be catalyzed by potassium. Thus, the catalysts' role is to augment the efficiency and/or number of sites for CO/sub 2/ adsorption, thereby creating more oxygen on the surface. The higher rate during catalyzed gasification can be attributed to a combination of increased (C(O)) and a smaller activation energy for desorption of C(O).

Koenig, P.C.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Analysis and methodology for measuring oxygen concentration in liquid sodium with a plugging meter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oxygen concentration in liquid sodium is a critical measurement in assessing the potential for corrosion damage in sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFRs). There has been little recent work on sodium reactors and oxygen detection. Thus, the technical expertise dealing with oxygen measurements within sodium is no longer readily available in the U.S. Two methods of oxygen detection that have been investigated are the plugging meter and the galvanic cell. One of the overall goals of the Univ. of Wisconsin's sodium research program is to develop an affordable, reliable galvanic cell oxygen sensor. Accordingly, attention must first be dedicated to a well-known standard known as a plugging meter. Therefore, a sodium loop has been constructed on campus in effort to develop the plugging meter technique and gain experience working with liquid metal. The loop contains both a galvanic cell test section and a plugging meter test section. Consistent plugging results have been achieved below 20 [wppm], and a detailed process for achieving effective plugging has been developed. This paper will focus both on an accurate methodology to obtain oxygen concentrations from a plugging meter, and on how to easily control the oxygen concentration of sodium in a test loop. Details of the design, materials, manufacturing, and operation will be presented. Data interpretation will also be discussed, since a modern discussion of plugging data interpretation does not currently exist. (authors)

Nollet, B. K.; Hvasta, M.; Anderson, M. [Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Engineering Dr., Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Environmental, health, and safety issues of sodium-sulfur batteries for electric and hybrid vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines the shipping regulations that govern the shipment of dangerous goods. Since the elemental sodium contained in both sodium-sulfur and sodium-metal-chloride batteries is classified as a dangerous good, and is listed on both the national and international hazardous materials listings, both national and international regulatory processes are considered in this report The interrelationships as well as the differences between the two processes are highlighted. It is important to note that the transport regulatory processes examined in this report are reviewed within the context of assessing the necessary steps needed to provide for the domestic and international transport of sodium-beta batteries. The need for such an assessment was determined by the Shipping Sub-Working Group (SSWG) of the EV Battery Readiness Working Group (Working Group), created in 1990. The Working Group was created to examine the regulatory issues pertaining to in-vehicle safety, shipping, and recycling of sodium-sulfur batteries, each of which is addressed by a sub-working group. The mission of the SSWG is to establish basic provisions that will ensure the safe and efficient transport of sodium-beta batteries. To support that end, a proposal to the UN Committee of Experts was prepared by the SSWG, with the goal of obtaining a proper shipping name and UN number for sodium-beta batteries and to establish the basic transport requirements for such batteries (see the appendix for the proposal as submitted). It is emphasized that because batteries are large articles containing elemental sodium and, in some cases, sulfur, there is no existing UN entry under which they can be classified and for which modal transport requirements, such as the use of packaging appropriate for such large articles, are provided for. It is for this reason that a specific UN entry for sodium-beta batteries is considered essential.

Hammel, C.J.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Primary explosives  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a compound of the formula (Cat).sup.+.sub.z[M.sup.++(5-nitro-1H-tetrazolato-N2).sup.-.sub.x(H.sub.2- O).sub.y] where x is 3 or 4, y is 2 or 3, x+y is 6, z is 1 or 2, and M.sup.++ is selected from the group consisting of iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, zinc, chromium, and manganese, and (Cat).sup.+ is selected from the group consisting of ammonium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and cesium. A method of preparing the compound of that formula is also disclosed.

Hiskey, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM); Huynh, My Hang V. (Los Alamos, NM)

2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

314

Primary explosives  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a compound of the formula (Cat).sup.+.sub.z[M.sup.++(5-nitro-1H-tetrazolato-N2).sup.-.sub.x(H.sub.2- O).sub.y] where x is 3 or 4, y is 2 or 3, x+y is 6, z is 1 or 2, and M.sup.++ is selected from the group consisting of iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, zinc, chromium, and manganese, and (Cat).sup.+ is selected from the group consisting of ammonium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and cesium. A method of preparing the compound of that formula is also disclosed.

Hiskey, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM); Huynh, My Hang V. (Los Alamos, NM)

2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

315

Protective effects of ebselen (Ebs) and para-aminosalicylic acid (PAS) against manganese (Mn)-induced neurotoxicity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chronic, excessive exposure to manganese (Mn) may induce neurotoxicity and cause an irreversible brain disease, referred to as manganism. Efficacious therapies for the treatment of Mn are lacking, mandating the development of new interventions. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the efficacy of ebselen (Ebs) and para-aminosalicylic acid (PAS) in attenuating the neurotoxic effects of Mn in an in vivo rat model. Exposure biomarkers, inflammatory and oxidative stress biomarkers, as well as behavioral parameters were evaluated. Co-treatment with Mn plus Ebs or Mn plus PAS caused a significant decrease in blood and brain Mn concentrations (compared to rats treated with Mn alone), concomitant with reduced brain E{sub 2} prostaglandin (PGE{sub 2}) and enhanced brain glutathione (GSH) levels, decreased serum prolactin (PRL) levels, and increased ambulation and rearing activities. Taken together, these results establish that both PAS and Ebs are efficacious in reducing Mn body burden, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress and locomotor activity impairments in a rat model of Mn-induced toxicity. -- Highlights: ? The manuscript is unique in its approach to the neurotoxicity of Mn. ? The manuscript incorporates molecular, cellular and functional (behavioral) analyses. ? Both PAS and Ebs are effective in restoring Mn behavioral function. ? Both PAS and Ebs are effective in reducing Mn-induced oxidative stress. ? Both PAS and Ebs led to a decrease in Mn-induced neuro-inflammation.

Marreilha dos Santos, A.P., E-mail: apsantos@ff.ul.pt [I-Med.UL, Department of Toxicology and Food Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Lisbon, Lisbon (Portugal); Lucas, Rui L.; Andrade, Vanda; Mateus, M. Lusa [I-Med.UL, Department of Toxicology and Food Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Lisbon, Lisbon (Portugal)] [I-Med.UL, Department of Toxicology and Food Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Lisbon, Lisbon (Portugal); Milatovic, Dejan; Aschner, Michael [Department of Pediatrics, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States)] [Department of Pediatrics, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Batoreu, M. Camila [I-Med.UL, Department of Toxicology and Food Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Lisbon, Lisbon (Portugal)] [I-Med.UL, Department of Toxicology and Food Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Lisbon, Lisbon (Portugal)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Tolerance Test of Eisenia Fetida for Sodium Chloride  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Saltwater spills that make soil excessively saline often occur at petroleum exploration and production (E&P) sites and are ecologically damaging. Brine scars appear when produced water from an E&P site is spilled onto surrounding soil, causing loss of vegetation and subsequent soil erosion. Revegetating lands damaged by brine water can be difficult. The research reported here considers earthworms as a bioremedial treatment for increasing the salt mobility in this soil and encouraging plant growth and a healthy balance of soil nutrients. To determine the practical application of earthworms to remediate brine-contaminated soil, a 17-d test was conducted to establish salt tolerance levels for the common compost earthworm (Eisenia fetida) and relate those levels to soil salinity at brine-spill sites. Soil samples were amended with sodium chloride in concentrations ranging from 1 to 15 g/kg, which represent contamination levels at some spill sites. The survival rate of the earthworms was near 90% in all tested concentrations. Also, reproduction was noted in a number of the lower-concentration test replicates but absent above the 3-g/kg concentrations. Information gathered in this investigation can be used as reference in further studies of the tolerance of earthworms to salty soils, as results suggest that E. fetida is a good candidate to enhance remediation at brine-damaged sites.

Kerr, M.; Stewart, A.J.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Sodium-bearing Waste Treatment Technology Evaluation Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sodium-bearing waste (SBW) disposition is one of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Idaho Operation Offices (NE-ID) and State of Idahos top priorities at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL has been working over the past several years to identify a treatment technology that meets NE-ID and regulatory treatment requirements, including consideration of stakeholder input. Many studies, including the High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), have resulted in the identification of five treatment alternatives that form a short list of perhaps the most appropriate technologies for the DOE to select from. The alternatives are (a) calcination with maximum achievable control technology (MACT) upgrade, (b) steam reforming, (c) cesium ion exchange (CsIX) with immobilization, (d) direct evaporation, and (e) vitrification. Each alternative has undergone some degree of applied technical development and preliminary process design over the past four years. This report presents a summary of the applied technology and process design activities performed through February 2004. The SBW issue and the five alternatives are described in Sections 2 and 3, respectively. Details of preliminary process design activities for three of the alternatives (steam reforming, CsIX, and direct evaporation) are presented in three appendices. A recent feasibility study provides the details for calcination. There have been no recent activities performed with regard to vitrification; that section summarizes and references previous work.

Charles M. Barnes; Arlin L. Olson; Dean D. Taylor

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Process Flow Chart for Immobilizing of Radioactive High Concentration Sodium Hydroxide Product from the Sodium Processing Facility at the BN-350 Nuclear power plant in Aktau, Kazakhstan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the results of a joint research investigations carried out by the group of Kazakhstan, British and American specialists in development of a new material for immobilization of radioactive 35% sodium hydroxide solutions from the sodium coolant processing facility of the BN-350 nuclear power plant. The resulting solid matrix product, termed geo-cement stone, is capable of isolating long lived radionuclides from the environment. The physico-mechanical properties of geo-cement stone have been investigated and the flow chart for its production verified in a full scale experiments. (author)

Burkitbayev, M.; Omarova, K.; Tolebayev, T. [Ai-Farabi Kazakh National University, Chemical Faculty, Republic of Kazakhstan (Kazakhstan); Galkin, A. [KATEP Ltd., Republic of Kazakhstan (Kazakhstan); Bachilova, N. [NIISTROMPROEKT Ltd., Republic of Kazakhstan (Kazakhstan); Blynskiy, A. [Nuclear Technology Safety Centre, Republic of Kazakhstan (Kazakhstan); Maev, V. [MAEK-Kazatomprom Ltd., Republic of Kazakhstan (Kazakhstan); Wells, D. [NUKEM Limited- a member of the Freyssinet Group, Winfrith Technology Centre, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom); Herrick, A. [NUKEM Limited- a member of the Freyssinet Group, Caithness (United Kingdom); Michelbacher, J. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Development of a model to predict flow oscillations in low-flow sodium boiling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An experimental and analytical program has been carried out in order to better understand the cause and effect of flow oscillations in boiling sodium systems. These oscillations have been noted in previous experiments with ...

Levin, Alan Edward

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

EIS-0306: Treatment and Management of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear Fuel  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS evaluates thepotential environmental impacts of the proposed electrometallurgical treatment of DOE-owned sodium bonded spent nuclear fuel in the Fuel Conditioning Facility at Argonne...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Metal corrosion in a supercritical carbon dioxide - liquid sodium power cycle.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A liquid sodium cooled fast reactor coupled to a supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton power cycle is a promising combination for the next generation nuclear power production process. For optimum efficiency, a microchannel heat exchanger, constructed by diffusion bonding, can be used for heat transfer from the liquid sodium reactor coolant to the supercritical carbon dioxide. In this work, we have reviewed the literature on corrosion of metals in liquid sodium and carbon dioxide. The main conclusions are (1) pure, dry CO{sub 2} is virtually inert but can be highly corrosive in the presence of even ppm concentrations of water, (2) carburization and decarburization are very significant mechanism for corrosion in liquid sodium especially at high temperature and the mechanism is not well understood, and (3) very little information could be located on corrosion of diffusion bonded metals. Significantly more research is needed in all of these areas.

Moore, Robert Charles; Conboy, Thomas M.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

An Evaluation of the Annular Fuel and Bottle-Shaped Fuel Concepts for Sodium Fast Reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two innovative fuel concepts, the internally and externally cooled annular fuel and the bottle-shaped fuel, were investigated with the goal of increasing the power density and reduce the pressure drop in the sodium-cooled ...

Memmott, Matthew

323

Ultracold molecules from ultracold atoms : interactions in sodium and lithium gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The thesis presents results from experiments in which ultracold Sodium-6 and Lithium-23 atomic gases were studied near a Feshbach resonance at high magnetic fields. The enhanced interactions between atoms in the presence ...

Christensen, Caleb A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

The Beta-Neutrino Correlation in Sodium-21 and Other Nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RIA?INTproc?abetanu THE BETA-NEUTRINO CORRELATION IN SODIUM-electrons shaken off in beta decay. High detection ef?ciencyTOF template spectra for beta decays to 21 Ne + , are shown

Vetter, Paul A.; Abo-Shaeer, Jamil; Freedman, Stuart J.; Maruyama, Reina

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Application of the Technology Neutral Framework to Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sodium cooled fast reactors (SFRs) are considered as a novel example to exercise the Technology Neutral Framework (TNF) proposed in NUREG-1860. One reason for considering SFRs is that they have historically had a licensing ...

Johnson, Brian C.

326

Applying risk informed methodologies to improve the economics of sodium-cooled fast reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In order to support the increasing demand for clean sustainable electricity production and for nuclear waste management, the Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) is being developed. The main drawback has been its high capital ...

Nitta, Christopher C

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Population strategies to decrease sodium intake : a global cost-effectiveness analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Excessive sodium consumption is both prevalent and very costly in many countries around the world. Recent research has found that more than 90% of the world's adult population live in countries with mean intakes exceeding ...

Webb, Michael William, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Application of the technology neutral framework to sodium cooled fast reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sodium cooled fast reactors (SFRs) are considered as a novel example to exercise the Technology Neutral Framework (TNF) proposed in NUREG- 1860. One reason for considering SFRs is that they have historically had a licensing ...

Johnson, Brian C. (Brian Carl)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Materials issues in high temperature ultrasonic transducers for under-sodium viewing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquid sodium is used as the coolant in some fast spectrum nuclear reactors. This material is optically opaque. To facilitate operations and maintenance activities, an ultrasonic under-sodium viewing system has been developed. In the USA, the technology was successfully demonstrated in the 1970s and, over the intervening 30+ years, the capability was lost. This paper reports materials challenges encountered in developing both single-element and linear phased-array 2-MHz transducers that must operate at temperatures up to 260 deg. C. The critical issues are fundamentally material selection: the ability of a transducer to be immersed into liquid sodium and function at 260 deg. C, to achieve wetting and transmission of ultrasound into the sodium, and to be able to be removed and re-used.

Bond, L. J.; Griffin, J. W.; Posakony, G. J.; Harris, R. V.; Baldwin, D. L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)

2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

330

Thermal-hydraulic analysis of innovative fuel configurations for the sodium fast reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The sodium fast reactor (SFR) is currently being reconsidered as an instrument for actinide management throughout the world, thanks in part to international programs such as the Generation-IV and especially the Global ...

Memmott, Matthew J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Tools for supercritical carbon dioxide cycle analysis and the cycle's applicability to sodium fast reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) and the Supercritical Carbon Dioxide (S-C0?) Recompression cycle are two technologies that have the potential to impact the power generation landscape of the future. In order for their ...

Ludington, Alexander R. (Alexander Rockwell)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

E-Print Network 3.0 - actual ineel sodium-bearing Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for: actual ineel sodium-bearing Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 RAC Report No. 4-CDC-Task Order 1-1999-Final FINAL REPORT Summary: Dose Reconstruction Study at the INEEL Centers for...

333

Sodium-Copper Exchange on Wyoming Montmorillonite in Chloride, Perchlorate, Nitrate, and Sulfate Solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sodium-Copper Exchange on Wyoming Montmorillonite in Chloride, Perchlorate, Nitrate, and Sulfate. The copper exchange capacity (CuEC) and Na-Cu exchange reactions on Wyoming montmo- rillonite were studied

Sparks, Donald L.

334

The role of sodium bicarbonate in the nucleation of noctilucent clouds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the sublimation of H2O to bulk ice. A 1-dimensional model of sodium chemistry was then employed to show and particles; cloud physics and chemistry; middle atmosphere ± composition and chemistry) Introduction

Boyer, Edmond

335

Photoregulated potassium ion permeation through dihexadecyl phosphate bilayers containing azobenzene and stilbene surfactants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Photoresponsive asymmetrically organized systems based upon small unilamellar dihexadecyl phosphate (DHP) vehicles were constructed by entrapping high concentrations of potassium ion within the vesicular aqueous core and incorporating either an amphiphilic trans-azobenzene-containing phosphate monoester or an amphiphilic trans-stilbene-containing carboxylic acid into its membrane structure. Spectroscopic measurements indicated that the azobenzene derivative was molecularly dispersed in the hydrocarbon phase of the vesicle and that the extent of aggregation of the membrane-localized stilbene derivative was minor. Thermal K{sup +} leak rates from the doped vesicles were very low, with calculated permeability coefficients (P) of {approximately}4 {times} 10{sup {minus}12} cm/s at 40 C for DHP vesicles containing 5.5 mol % of the trans-azobenzene derivative and {approximately}1.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}11} cm/s at 38 C for vesicles containing 5.5 mol % of the trans-stilbene derivative; for comparison, P {approx_equal} 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}12} cm/s for undoped vesicles at 40 C. Photoexcitation of the azobenzene-doped vesicles at 360 nm caused >90% trans {r_arrow} cis photoisomerization over the measured temperature range (25--40 C), with complete reversion to the trans isomer upon photoexcitation at 450 nm. Photoexcitation of deoxygenated suspensions of the stilbene-doped vesicles at 315 nm gave {approximately}80% conversion to the cis isomer in the photostationary state, which was not reversible. At 25 C, K{sup +} leak rates for the isomeric azobenzene-doped vesicles were nearly identical; at 40 C, K{sup +} leakage for the DHP vesicles containing the cis-azobenzene isomer corresponded to P {approx_equal} 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}11} cm/s, 5-fold greater than that of the trans isomer. In trans {r_arrow} cis {r_arrow} trans photocycling experiments, K{sup +} leak rates alternately increased and decreased, indicating that the vesicles remained intact. At 40 C, K{sup +} leakage from the vesicles containing predominantly cis-stilbene was {approximately}2-fold greater than that from vesicles with the corresponding trans isomer. In electrochemical experiments, viologen-mediated reduction of the DHP-bound trans-azobenzene occurred at E < {minus}0.44 V, with hydrazobenzene reoxidation at E {approx_equal} {minus}0.16 V; addition of viologen radicals to aqueous suspensions of the trans-azobenzene-doped DHP vesicles caused immediate decolorization of the dye.

Lei, Y.; Hurst, J.K. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry] [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

1999-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

336

Growth and bone development in weanling quarter horses fed diets supplemented with sodium zeolite-A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GROWTH AND BONE DEVELOPMENT IN WEANLING QUARTER HORSES FED DIETS SUPPLEMENTED WITH SODIUM ZEOLITE-A A Thesis by KIMBERLY SUZANNE FREY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991 Major Subject: Nutrition GROWTH AND BONE DEVELOPMENT IN WEANLING QUARTER HORSES FED DIETS SUPPLER WITH SODIUM ZEOLITE-A A Thesis by KIMBERLY SUZPZPK FREY Approved as to style and content by...

Frey, Kimberly Suzanne

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Evolution of Sodium Technology R and D Actions Supporting French Liquid-Metal Fast Breeder Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the evolution of sodium technology research and development in parallel to sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor (FBR) developments in France and provides information concerning operating plants and existing projects. This paper also discusses how supporting research has adapted to the decline in FBR activities since the decommissioning of Superphenix, while capitalizing on knowledge acquired over more than four decades to be passed down to future generations.

Rodriguez, G.; Baque, F.; Astegiano, J.C. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, Cadarache (France)

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

338

Characterization of the liquid sodium spray generated by a pipework hole  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to its advantageous thermodynamic characteristics at high temperature (550 deg. C), liquid sodium is the main candidate to be the cooling fluid for Generation TV nuclear reactors SFR (Sodium-cooled Fast Reactors). Now, sodium reacts very violently, both with the water and the oxygen of the air. Only few data were known about the liquid sodium behaviour when spread in the environment through micro defects. These are often present in a cooling circuit in welded or sealed joints and more rarely in the pipes. Micro defects, on the other hand, can be also generated in a cooling circuit because of the vibrations always present in a circuit into which a fluid runs. A new set-up, named LISOF, was built for testing high temperature liquid sodium when passing through micro defects and generating sprays or jets. Sprays and jets were generated by means of nozzles embedding sub milli-metric holes the diameter of which was: 0.2 mm, 0.4 mm, 0.5 mm. Tests were performed by pressurizing liquid sodium (550 deg. C) at: 3, 6 and 9 barg. Normal and high speed cinematography were used for the direct observation of the liquid sodium sprays while Phase Doppler Interferometry was used for the measurement of the droplets characteristics and velocity. Tests concerning the behaviour of the high temperature liquid sodium firing in air or in contact with the cement cover applied to a scaled down core catcher simulacrum were also performed. The paper presents the built set-up and the collected results. (authors)

Torsello, G.; Parozzi, F.; Nericcio, L. [RSE - Nuclear and Industrial Plant Safety Team, Power Generation System Dept., via Rubattino 54, 20134 Milano (Italy); Araneo, L.; Cozzi, F. [Politecnico di Milano, Energy Dept., via Lambruschini 4, 20156 Milano (Italy); Carcassi, M.; Mattei, N. [Universita di Pisa-Facolta d'Ingegneria DIMNP-Mechanical, Nuclear and Production Dep., Largo L. Lazzarino 2, 56126 Pisa (Italy)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

The tolerance of two varieties of cotton to relatively high levels of sodium and magnesium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE TO'ERANCE OF TNO VARIETIES OF COTTON TO RELATIVELY HIGH LEVELS OF SODIUM AND MAGNESIUM A Tnesis by Msnhar C. Parekh Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...) (Nember) (Nemb ) August 1969 ABSTRACT The Tolerance of Two Varieties of Cotton to Relatively High Levels of Sodium and Magnesium. (August 1969) Masher C. Parekh, B. S. , Gujarat University, Directed by: Dr. H. E. Joham An experiment was conducted...

Parekh, Manhar C

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

340

Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this research involving collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is to explore new approaches to the separation of sodium hydroxide, sodium nitrate, and other sodium salts from high-level alkaline tank waste. The principal potential benefit is a major reduction in disposed waste volume, obviating the building of expensive new waste tanks and reducing the costs of vitrification. Principles of ion recognition are being researched toward discovery of liquid-liquid extraction systems that selectively separate sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrate from other waste components. The successful concept of pseudo hydroxide extraction using fluorinated alcohols and phenols is being developed at ORNL and PNNL toward a greater understanding of the controlling equilibria, role of solvation, and of synergistic effects involving crown ethers. Synthesis efforts are being directed toward enhanced sodium binding by crown ethers, both neutral and proton-ionizable. Studies with real tank waste at PNNL will provide feedback toward solvent compositions that have promising properties.

Moyer, Bruce A.; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Custelcean, Radu; Delmau, Laetitia H.; Engle, Nancy L.; Kang, Hyun-Ah; Keever, Tamara J.; Marchand, Alan P.; Gadthula, Srinivas; Gore, Vinayak K.; Huang, Zilin; Sivappa, Rasapalli; Tirunahari, Pavan K.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Lumetta, Gregg J.

2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

An evaluation of neutralization for processing sodium-bearing liquid waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses an alternative concept for potentially managing the sodium-bearing liquid waste generated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant from the current method of calcining a blend of sodium waste and high-level liquid waste. The concept is based on removing the radioactive components from sodium-bearing waste by neutralization and grouting the resulting low-level waste for on-site near-surface disposal. Solidifying the sodium waste as a remote-handled transuranic waste is not considered to be practical because of excessive costs and inability to dispose of the waste in a timely fashion. Although neutralization can remove most radioactive components to provide feed for a solidified low-level waste, and can reduce liquid inventories four to nine years more rapidly than the current practice of blending sodium-bearing liquid waste with first-cycle raffinite, the alternative will require major new facilities and will generate large volumes of low-level waste. Additional facility and operating costs are estimated to be at least $500 million above the current practice of blending and calcining. On-site, low-level waste disposal may be technically difficult and conflict which national and state policies. Therefore, it is recommended that the current practice of calcining a blend of sodium-bearing liquid waste and high-level liquid waste be continued to minimize overall cost and process complexities. 17 refs., 4 figs., 16 tabs.

Chipman, N.A.; Engelgau, G.O.; Berreth, J.R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

A Novel Low-Cost Sodium-Zinc Chloride Battery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The sodium-metal halide (ZEBRA) battery has been considered as one of the most attractive energy storage systems for stationary and transportation applications. Even though Na-NiCl2 battery has been widely investigated, there is still a need to develop a more economical system to make this technology more attractive for commercialization. In the present work, a novel low-cost Na-ZnCl2 battery with a thin planar ??-Al2O3 solid electrolyte (BASE) was proposed, and its electrochemical reactions and battery performance were investigated. Compared to the Na-NiCl2 chemistry, the ZnCl2-based chemistry was more complicated, in which multiple electrochemical reactions including liquid-phase formation occurred at temperatures above 253C. During the first stage of charge, NaCl reacted with Zn to form Na in the anode and Na2ZnCl4 in the cathode. Once all the residual NaCl was consumed, further charging led to the formation of a NaCl-ZnCl2 liquid phase. At the end of charge, the liquid phase reacted with Zn to produce solid ZnCl2. To identify the effects of liquid-phase formation on electrochemical performance, button cells were assembled and tested at 280C and 240C. At 280C where the liquid phase formed during cycling, cells revealed quite stable cyclability. On the other hand, more rapid increase in polarization was observed at 240C where only solid-state electrochemical reactions occurred. SEM analysis indicated that the stable performance at 280C was due to the suppressed growth of Zn and NaCl particles, which were generated from the liquid phase during discharge of each cycle.

Lu, Xiaochuan; Li, Guosheng; Kim, Jin Yong; Lemmon, John P.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Yang, Zhenguo

2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

343

Long-Term Reduction in 137Cs Concentration in Food Crops on Coral Atolls Resulting from Potassium Treatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bikini Island was contaminated March 1, 1954 by the Bravo detonation (U.S nuclear test series, Castle) at Bikini Atoll. About 90% of the estimated dose from nuclear fallout to potential island residents is from cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) transferred from soil to plants that are consumed by residents. Thus, radioecology research efforts have been focused on removing {sup 137}Cs from soil and/or reducing its uptake into vegetation. Most effective was addition of potassium (K) to soil that reduces {sup 137}Cs concentration in fruits to 3-5% of pretreatment concentrations. Initial observations indicated this low concentration continued for some time after K was last applied. Long-term studies were designed to evaluate this persistence in more detail because it is very important to provide assurance to returning populations that {sup 137}Cs concentrations in food (and, therefore, radiation dose) will remain low for extended periods, even if K is not applied annually or biennially. Potassium applied at 300, 660, 1260, and 2070 kg ha{sup -1} lead to a {sup 137}Cs concentration in drinking coconut meat that is 34, 22, 10, and about 4% of original concentration, respectively. Concentration of {sup 137}Cs remains low 8 to 10 y after K is last applied. An explanation for this unexpected result is discussed.

Robison, W L; Stone, E L; Hamilton, T F; Conrado, C L

2004-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

344

Long-Term Reduction in 137Cs Concentration in Food Crops on Coral Atolls Resulting from Potassium Treatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bikini Island was contaminated March 1, 1954 by the Bravo detonation (U.S nuclear test series, Castle) at Bikini Atoll. About 90% of the estimated dose from nuclear fallout to potential island residents is from cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) transferred from soil to plants that are consumed by residents. Thus, radioecology research efforts have been focused on removing {sup 137}Cs from soil and/or reducing its uptake into vegetation. Most effective was addition of potassium (K) to soil that reduces {sup 137}Cs concentration in fruits to 3-5% of pretreatment concentrations. Initial observations indicated this low concentration continued for some time after K was last applied. Long-term studies were designed to evaluate this persistence in more detail because it is very important to provide assurance to returning populations that {sup 137}Cs concentrations in food (and, therefore, radiation dose) will remain low for extended periods, even if K is not applied annually or biennially. Potassium applied at 300, 660, 1260, and 1970 kg ha{sup -1} lead to a {sup 137}Cs concentration in drinking coconut meat that is 34, 22, 10, and about 4 % of original concentration, respectively. Concentration of {sup 137}Cs remains low 8 to 10 y after K is last applied. An explanation for this unexpected result is discussed.

Robison, W; Stone, E; Hamilton, T; Conrado, C

2005-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

345

Hydrothermal Synthesis of Pure r-Phase Manganese(II) Sulfide without the Use of Organic Reagents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent studies exploring the role of metal sulfides as (photo)catalysts in prebiotic synthesis reactions provide the impetus for finding carbon-free synthesis methods for metal sulfides. The decomposition of organosulfur and organometallic precursor compounds is often the protocol for synthesizing bulk metal chalcogenides, such as manganese sulfide (MnS). Here we report a hydrothermal synthesis method for the formation of MnS in which a MnCl{sub 2} solution is injected into a preheated sulfide solution. By varying the temperature of injection and subsequent aging time, we can control the specific crystal phase of the product. Three MnS polymorphs are known, and two of these, {alpha}-MnS and {gamma}-MnS, form as pure phases in aqueous systems. The initial precipitate formed upon mixing of aqueous solutions of Mn{sup 2+} and S{sup 2-} at ambient temperature is nanocrystalline and is composed of a mixture of {gamma}-MnS (wurtzite structure) and {beta}-MnS (zinc blende structure). {beta}-MnS has not previously been identified as forming under aqueous conditions. The initial binary-phase precipitate can be transformed to pure, highly crystalline {gamma}-MnS by aging at temperatures as low as 150 C within 3 days. Aging to yield pure {alpha}-MnS requires temperatures in excess of 200 C for 3 days. Characterization of the products was performed using powder X-ray diffraction, total scattering and pair distribution function analysis, dynamic light scattering, and transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Chemical analyses were performed using colorimetric techniques.

Michel, F.M.; Schoonen, M.A.A.; Zhang, X.V.; Martin, S.T.; Parise, J.B. (SBU); (Harvard)

2008-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

346

Preparation of polyaniline/sodium alanate hybrid using a spray-drying process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nowadays, hydrogen is highly interesting as an energy source, in particular in the automotive field. In fact, hydrogen is attractive as a fuel because it prevents air pollution and greenhouse emissions. One of the main problems with the utilization of hydrogen as a fuel is its on-board storage. The purpouse of this work was to develop a new hybrid material consisting of a polyaniline matrix with sodium alanate (NaAlH{sub 4}) using a spray-drying process. The polyaniline used for this experiment was synthesized by following a well-established method for the synthesis of the emeraldine base form of polyaniline using dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid as dopant. Micro particles of polyaniline/sodium alanate hybrids with 30 and 50 wt% of sodium alanate were prepared by using a spray-drying technique. Dilute solutions of polyaniline/sodium alanate were first prepared, 10g of the solid materials were mixed with 350 ml of toluene under stirring at room temperature for 24h and the solutions were dried using spray-dryer (Bchi, Switzerland) with 115C of an inlet temperature. The hybrids were analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry, FT-IR and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The addition of sodium alanate decreased the glass transition temperature of the hybrids when compared to neat polyaniline. FT-IR spectrum analysis was performed to identify the bonding environment of the synthesized material and was observed that simply physically mixture occurred between polyaniline and sodium alanate. The SEM images of the hybrids showed the formation of microspheres with sodium alanate dispersed in the polymer matrix.

Moreira, B. R., E-mail: bru-rms@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: fabiopassador@gmail.com, E-mail: pessan@ufscar.br; Passador, F. R., E-mail: bru-rms@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: fabiopassador@gmail.com, E-mail: pessan@ufscar.br; Pessan, L. A., E-mail: bru-rms@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: fabiopassador@gmail.com, E-mail: pessan@ufscar.br [Dep. de Engenharia de Materiais, Federal University of So Carlos (Brazil)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

347

Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this project, now completing its third year of its second renewal period, a collaborative project involving Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and the University of North Texas has been addressing outstanding questions regarding the separation of the bulk sodium constituents of alkaline tank waste. The principal potential benefit of this research is a major reduction in the volume of radioactive tank waste, obviating the building of expensive new tanks and reducing the costs of vitrification. As a general approach, principles of ion recognition are being explored toward discovery and basic understanding of liquid-liquid extraction systems that selectively separate sodium hydroxide and sodium salts from waste-like matrices. Questions being addressed pertain to applicable extraction equilibria and how extraction properties relate to extractant structure. Progress has included the elucidation of the promising concept of pseudo hydroxide extraction (PHE), demonstration of crown-ether synergized PHE, demonstration of combined sodium hydroxide/sodium nitrate separation, and synthesis of novel ditopic receptors for ditopic PHE. In future efforts (pending renewal), a thermochemical study of PHE relating extractant acidity to extraction strength is proposed, and this study will be extended to systems containing crown ethers, including proton-ionizable ones. A series of crown ethers will be synthesized for this purpose and to investigate the extraction of bulk sodium salts (e.g., nitrate, nitrite, and sulfate), possibly in combination with sodium hydroxide. Simple proof-of-principle tests with real tank waste at PNNL will provide feedback toward solvent designs that have desirable properties. In view of the upcoming milestone of completion of the second renewal period, this report will, in addition to providing a summary of the past year's progress, summarize all of the work completed since the start of this project.

Moyer, Bruce A.; Marchand, Alan P.; Lumetta, Gregg J.

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

348

Sustained Recycle in Light Water and Sodium-Cooled Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From a physics standpoint, it is feasible to sustain recycle of used fuel in either thermal or fast reactors. This paper examines multi-recycle potential performance by considering three recycling approaches and calculating several fuel cycle parameters, including heat, gamma, and neutron emission of fresh fuel; radiotoxicity of waste; and uranium utilization. The first recycle approach is homogeneous mixed oxide (MOX) fuel assemblies in a light water reactor (LWR). The transuranic portion of the MOX was varied among Pu, NpPu, NpPuAm, or all-TRU. (All-TRU means all isotopes through Cf-252.) The Pu case was allowed to go to 10% Pu in fresh fuel, but when the minor actinides were included, the transuranic enrichment was kept below 8% to satisfy the expected void reactivity constraint. The uranium portion of the MOX was enriched uranium. That enrichment was increased (to as much as 6.5%) to keep the fuel critical for a typical LWR irradiation. The second approach uses heterogeneous inert matrix fuel (IMF) assemblies in an LWR - a mix of IMF and traditional UOX pins. The uranium-free IMF fuel pins were Pu, NpPu, NpPuAm, or all-TRU. The UOX pins were limited to 4.95% U-235 enrichment. The number of IMF pins was set so that the amount of TRU in discharged fuel from recycle N (from both IMF and UOX pins) was made into the new IMF pins for recycle N+1. Up to 60 of the 264 pins in a fuel assembly were IMF. The assembly-average TRU content was 1-6%. The third approach uses fast reactor oxide fuel in a sodium-cooled fast reactor with transuranic conversion ratio of 0.50 and 1.00. The transuranic conversion ratio is the production of transuranics divided by destruction of transuranics. The FR at CR=0.50 is similar to the CR for the MOX case. The fast reactor cases had a transuranic content of 33-38%, higher than IMF or MOX.

Steven J. Piet; Samuel E. Bays; Michael A. Pope; Gilles J. Youinou

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Manganese and Ceria Sorbents for High Temperature Sulfur Removal from Biomass-Derived Syngas -- The Impact of Steam on Capacity and Sorption Mode  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Syngas derived from biomass and coal gasification for fuel synthesis or electricity generation contains sulfur species that are detrimental to downstream catalysts or turbine operation. Sulfur removal in high temperature, high steam conditions has been known to be challenging, but experimental reports on methods to tackle the problem are not often reported. We have developed sorbents that can remove hydrogen sulfide from syngas at high temperature (700 C), both in dry and high steam conditions. The syngas composition chosen for our experiments is derived from statistical analysis of the gasification products of wood under a large variety of conditions. The two sorbents, Cu-ceria and manganese-based, were tested in a variety of conditions. In syngas containing steam, the capacity of the sorbents is much lower, and the impact of the sorbent in lowering H{sub 2}S levels is only evident in low space velocities. Spectroscopic characterization and thermodynamic consideration of the experimental results suggest that in syngas containing 45% steam, the removal of H{sub 2}S is primarily via surface chemisorptions. For the Cu-ceria sorbent, analysis of the amount of H{sub 2}S retained by the sorbent in dry syngas suggests both copper and ceria play a role in H{sub 2}S removal. For the manganese-based sorbent, in dry conditions, there is a solid state transformation of the sorbent, primarily into the sulfide form.

Cheah, S.; Parent, Y. O.; Jablonski, W. S.; Vinzant, T.; Olstad, J. L.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Effects of potassium and calcination pretreatment on the adsorption and chemical/physical properties of Fe/SiO/sub 2/  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies of the effects of potassium on CO, CO/sub 2/, and hydrogen adsorptions on iron indicate that potassium promotion increases heats of adsorption of CO and H/sub 2/, enhances the rate of CO dissociation, increases CO saturation coverage, and decreases the CO sticking coefficient. The purpose of this work was to investigate the effects of potassium promoter and calcination of the stoichiometries and kinetics of CO, CO/sub 2/, and H/sub 2/ adsorptions on Fe/SiO/sub 2/ and to relate these effects to changes in the physical and chemical properties of the catalyst. The results reveal important differences in behavior for CO and H/sub 2/ adsorptions on precalcined Fe/SiO/sub 2/ and Fe/K/SiO/sub 2/ compared to the adsorptions on single crystal or polycrystalline iron, which may relate to changes in the surface and bulk properties of iron such as potassium coverage and extent of reduction. 33 references.

Rankin, J.L.; Bartholomew, C.H.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Combined Utilization of Cation Exchanger and Neutral Receptor to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report, novel approaches to the selective liquid-liquid extraction separation of sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrate from high-level alkaline tank waste will be discussed. Sodium hydroxide can be successfully separated from alkaline tank-waste supernatants by weakly acidic lipophilic hydroxy compounds via a cation-exchange mechanism referred to as pseudo hydroxide extraction. In a multi-cycle process, as sodium hydroxide in the aqueous phase becomes depleted, it is helpful to have a neutral sodium receptor in the extraction system to exploit the high nitrate concentration in the waste solution to promote sodium removal by an ion-pair extraction process. Simultaneous utilization of an ionizable organic hydroxy compound and a neutral extractant (crown ether) in an organic phase results in the synergistic enhancement of ion exchange and improved separation selectivity due to the receptor's strong and selective sodium binding. Moreover, combination of the hydroxy compound and the crown ether provides for mutually increased solubility, even in a non-polar organic solvent. Accordingly, application of Isopar{reg_sign} L, a kerosene-like alkane solvent, becomes feasible. This investigation involves examination of such dual-mechanism extraction phases for sodium extraction from simulated and actual salt cake waste solutions. Sodium salts can be regenerated upon the contact of the loaded extraction phases with water. Finally, conditions of potential extraction/strip cycling will be discussed.

Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Moyer, Bruce A.

2004-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

352

New precision mass measurements of neutron-rich calcium and potassium isotopes and three-nucleon forces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present precision Penning-trap mass measurements of neutron-rich calcium and potassium isotopes in the vicinity of neutron number N=32. Using the TITAN system the mass of $^{51}$K was measured for the first time, and the precision of the $^{51,52}$Ca mass values were improved significantly. The new mass values show a dramatic increase of the binding energy compared to those reported in the atomic mass evaluation. In particular, $^{52}$Ca is more bound by 1.74 MeV, and the behavior with neutron number deviates substantially from the tabulated values. An increased binding was predicted recently based on calculations that include three-nucleon (3N) forces. We present a comparison to improved calculations, which agree remarkably with the evolution of masses with neutron number, making neutron-rich calcium isotopes an exciting region to probe 3N forces at neutron-rich extremes.

A. T. Gallant; J. C. Bale; T. Brunner; U. Chowdhury; S. Ettenauer; A. Lennarz; D. Robertson; V. V. Simon; A. Chaudhuri; J. D. Holt; A. A. Kwiatkowski; E. Man; J. Menndez; B. E. Schultz; M. C. Simon; C. Andreoiu; P. Delheij; M. R. Pearson; H. Savajols; A. Schwenk; J. Dilling

2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

353

Two-dimensional computational modeling of sodium boiling in simulated LMFBR fuel-pin bundles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extensive sodium boiling tests have been carried out in two simulated LMFBR fuel pin bundles in the Thermal-Hydraulic Out-of-Reactor Safety (THORS) Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Experimental results from a 19-pin bundle (THORS Bundle 6A) have been previously reported, and experimental results from a 61-pin bundle (THORS Bundle 9) will be reported soon. The results discussed here are from the 19-pin bundle. Preliminary analysis has shown that the computational methods used and conclusions reached are equally valid for the 61-pin bundle, as well as the 19-pin in-reactor Sodium Loop Safety Facility (SLSF) W-1 experiment. The main result of THORS sodium boiling experimentation is that boiling behavior is determined by two-dimensional effects, i.e., the rates of mass, momentum and energy transfer in the direction perpendicular to the axes of the fuel pins.

Dearing, J.F.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Development and application of modeling tools for sodium fast reactor inspection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To support the development of in-service inspection methods for the Advanced Sodium Test Reactor for Industrial Demonstration (ASTRID) project led by the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), several tools that allow situations specific to Sodium cooled Fast Reactors (SFR) to be modeled have been implemented in the CIVA software and exploited. This paper details specific applications and results obtained. For instance, a new specular reflection model allows the calculation of complex echoes from scattering structures inside the reactor vessel. EMAT transducer simulation models have been implemented to develop new transducers for sodium visualization and imaging. Guided wave analysis tools have been developed to permit defect detection in the vessel shell. Application examples and comparisons with experimental data are presented.

Le Bourdais, Florian; Marchand, Benot; Baronian, Vahan [CEA LIST, Centre de Saclay F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

355

Hemodynamic characterization of chronic bile duct-ligated rats: effect of pentobarbital sodium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Systemic and splanchnic hemodynamics of the chronic bile duct-ligated rat were characterized by radioactive microspheres. Conscious and pentobarbital sodium-anesthetized, bile duct-ligated and sham-operated rats had cardiac output and regional organ blood flows determined. The conscious bile duct-ligated rat compared with the sham-operated showed a hyperdynamic circulation with an increased cardiac output and portal tributary blood flow. Pentobarbital sodium anesthesia induced marked hemodynamic changes in both sham-operated and bile duct-ligated rats. The latter group was especially sensitive to its effects; thus, comparison of cardiac output and portal tributary blood flow between anesthetized bile duct-ligated and sham-operated rats showed no significant differences. The authors conclude that the rat with cirrhosis due to chronic bile duct ligation is an excellent model for hemodynamic investigations but should be studied in the conscious state, since pentobarbital sodium anesthesia eliminated the hyperdynamic circulation.

Lee, S.S.; Girod, C.; Braillon, A.; Hadengue, A.; Lebrec, D.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

GIF sodium fast reactor project R and D on safety and operation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 'Safety and Operation' project is started in 2009 within the framework of Generation-IV International Forum (GIF) Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) research and development program. In the safety area, the project involves R and D activities on phenomenological model development and experimental programs, conceptual studies in support of the design of safety provisions, preliminary assessment of safety systems, framework and methods for analysis of safety architecture. In the operation area, the project involves R and D activities on fast reactors safety tests and analysis of reactor operations, feedback from decommissioning, in-service inspection technique development, under-sodium viewing and sodium chemistry. This paper presents a summary of such activities and the main achievements. (authors)

Vasile, A.; Sofu, T.; Jeong, H. Y.; Sakai, T. [CEA DEN Cadarache, DER, 13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Design and development of a high-temperature sodium compatibility testing facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of advanced alloys within sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFRs) has been identified as a means of increasing plant efficiency and reducing construction costs. In particular, alloys such as NF-616, NF-709 and HT-UPS are promising because they exhibit greater strength than traditional structural materials such as 316-SS. However, almost nothing is known about the sodium compatibility of these new alloys. Therefore, research taking place at the Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison is focused on studying the effects of sodium corrosion on these materials under prototypic SFR operating conditions (600 [ deg. C], V Na=10 [m/s], C 0{approx} 1 [wppm]). This paper focuses on the design and construction of the testing facility with an emphasis on moving magnet pumps (MMPs). Corrosion data from a preliminary 500 [hr] natural convection test will also be presented. (authors)

Hvasta, M. G.; Nolet, B. K.; Anderson, M. H. [Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Engineering Dr., Madison - ERB 841, WI 53705 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Journal of the Geological Society, London, Vol. 168, 2011, pp. 805815. doi: 10.1144/0016-76492010-132. Hydrothermal origin of elevated iron, manganese and redox-sensitive trace  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.1144/0016-76492010-132. 805 Hydrothermal origin of elevated iron, manganese and redox-sensitive trace elements in the c. 635 Ma Doushantuo cap carbonate JING HUANG1,2 , XUELEI CHU1,2 *, GANQING JIANG3 , LIANJUN FENG1 & HUAJIN, including REE, concentrations of the Doushantuo cap carbonate (c. 635 Ma) in South China show enrichment

Jiang, Ganqing

359

Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Treatment and Management of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes the U.S. Department of Energy's ''Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Treatment and Management of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear Fuel''. In addition to information concerning the background, purpose and need for the proposed action, and the National Environmental Policy Act process, this summary describes the characteristics of sodium-bonded spent nuclear fuel, the proposed treatment methods, the proposed facilities, the alternatives considered, and the environmental consequences of these alternatives. A glossary is included at the end to assist the reader with some of the technical terms used in this document.

N /A

1999-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

360

Galvanic corrosion of structural aluminum coupled with mild steel in a dilute sodium dichromate electrolyte  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GALVANIC COP?'SION OF STRUCTURAL ALI'I'lINUl'I COUPLED WITH MILD STEEL IN A OILLrl'E SODIUM DICHPOliATE FLECTROLY'I E A Tl. esi, ROBERT FRANKLIN FORD, JR. Submitted to the Graduate Co11ege of Texas AEM University in Partia1 fuifiilment.... Approved as to style and content by: + ~J Co-Chairman of Commii:t C Co-Chair n of Committe~e Member+ I Head of D=p rtm t) Januar; IDIO ABSTRACT Calvanic Corrosion of Structural Aluminum Coup'led with Mild Steel in a Dilute Sodium Dichromate...

Ford, Robert Franklin

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Method of making a current collector for a sodium/sulfur battery  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This specification is directed to a method of making a current collector for a sodium/sulfur battery. The current collector so-made is electronically conductive and resistant to corrosive attack by sulfur/polysulfide melts. The method includes the step of forming the current collector for the sodium/sulfur battery from a composite material formed of aluminum filled with electronically conductive fibers selected from the group of fibers consisting essentially of graphite fibers having a diameter up to 10 microns and silicon carbide fibers having a diameter in a range of 500--1,000 angstroms. 2 figs.

Tischer, R.P.; Winterbottom, W.L.; Wroblowa, H.S.

1987-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

362

Method of making a current collector for a sodium/sulfur battery  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This specification is directed to a method of making a current collector (14) for a sodium/sulfur battery (10). The current collector so-made is electronically conductive and resistant to corrosive attack by sulfur/polysulfide melts. The method includes the step of forming the current collector for the sodium/sulfur battery from a composite material (16) formed of aluminum filled with electronically conductive fibers selected from the group of fibers consisting essentially of graphite fibers having a diameter up to 10 microns and silicon carbide fibers having a diameter in a range of 500-1000 angstroms.

Tischer, Ragnar P. (Birmingham, MI); Winterbottom, Walter L. (Farmington Hills, MI); Wroblowa, Halina S. (West Bloomfield, MI)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Preliminary analysis of patent trends for sodium/sulfur battery technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes development trends in sodium/sulfur battery technology based on data from US patents. Purpose of the study was to use the activity, timing and ownership of 285 US patents to identify and describe broad patterns of change in sodium/sulfur battery technology. The analysis was conducted using newly developed statistical and computer graphic techniques for describing technology development trends from patent data. This analysis suggests that for some technologies trends in patent data provide useful information for public and private R and D planning.

Triplett, M.B.; Winter, C.; Ashton, W.B.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Simplified modeling of liquid sodium medium with temperature and velocity gradient using real thermal-hydraulic data. Application to ultrasonic thermometry in sodium fast reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the framework of the French R and D program for the Generation IV reactors and specifically for the sodium cooled fast reactors (SFR), studies are carried out on innovative instrumentation methods in order to improve safety and to simplify the monitoring of fundamental physical parameters during reactor operation. The aim of the present work is to develop an acoustic thermometry method to follow up the sodium temperature at the outlet of subassemblies. The medium is a turbulent flow of liquid sodium at 550 Degree-Sign C with temperature inhomogeneities. To understand the effect of disturbance created by this medium, numerical simulations are proposed. A ray tracing code has been developed with Matlab Copyright-Sign in order to predict acoustic paths in this medium. This complex medium is accurately described by thermal-hydraulic data which are issued from a simulation of a real experiment in Japan. The analysis of these results allows understanding the effects of medium inhomogeneities on the further thermometric acoustic measurement.

Massacret, N.; Jeannot, J. P. [DEN/DTN/STPA/LIET, CEA Cadarache, Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Moysan, J.; Ploix, M. A.; Corneloup, G. [Aix-Marseille Univ, LMA UPR 7051 CNRS, site LCND, 13625 Aix-en-Provence (France)

2013-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

365

Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors and the Pyro-Process: Conversion of Nuclear Waste into a Fuel Source  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors and the Pyro-Process: Conversion of Nuclear Waste into a Fuel Source. Belanger Chair, Department of Physics #12;2 Abstract A review of the sodium cooled fast reactor........................................................................................23 1.3.5 Reactor Startup

Belanger, David P.

366

Structure and hydrogen dynamics of pure and Ti-doped sodium alanate Jorge iguez,1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structure and hydrogen dynamics of pure and Ti-doped sodium alanate Jorge iguez,1,2 T. Yildirim,1, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822, USA (Received 2 June 2004; published 3 August 2004) We have studied the structure, energetics, and dynamics of pure and Ti-doped sodium alanate NaAlH4 , focusing on the possibility

Yildirim, Taner

367

Nature and distribution of iron sites in a sodium silicate glass investigated by neutron diffraction and EPSR simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Nature and distribution of iron sites in a sodium silicate glass investigated by neutron distributed in the silicate network and shares corner with silicate tetrahedra. The existence of a majority, such as the increase of the elastic modulus of sodium silicate glasses with increasing Fe-concentration. Our data

Boyer, Edmond

368

Simultaneous measurement of the surface temperature and the release of atomic sodium from a burning black liquor droplet  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Simultaneous measurement of the concentration of released atomic sodium, swelling, surface and internal temperature of a burning black liquor droplet under a fuel lean and rich condition has been demonstrated. Two-dimensional two-colour optical pyrometry was employed to determine the distribution of surface temperature and swelling of a burning black liquor droplet while planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) was used to assess the temporal release of atomic sodium. The key findings of these studies are: (i) the concentration of atomic sodium released during the drying and devolatilisation stages was found to be correlated with the external surface area; and (ii) the insignificant presence of atomic sodium during the char consumption stage shows that sodium release is suppressed by the lower temperature and by the high CO{sub 2} content in and around the particle. (author)

Saw, Woei L.; Nathan, Graham J. [Centre for Energy Technology, The University of Adelaide, SA 5006 (Australia); School of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Adelaide (Australia); Ashman, Peter J.; Alwahabi, Zeyad T. [Centre for Energy Technology, The University of Adelaide, SA 5006 (Australia); School of Chemical Engineering, The University of Adelaide (Australia); Hupa, Mikko [Process Chemistry Centre, Aabo Akademi, Biskopsgatan 8 FI-20500 Aabo (Finland)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

369

Sodium shortage as a constraint on the carbon cycle in an inland tropical rainforest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sodium shortage as a constraint on the carbon cycle in an inland tropical rainforest Michael- composition of pure cellulose by up to 50%, compared with stream water alone. These effects emerged after 134). We provide experimental evidence that Na shortage slows the carbon cycle. Because 80% of global

Kaspari, Mike

370

Advanced Materials for Sodium-Beta Alumina Batteries: Status, Challenges and Perspectives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The increasing penetration of renewable energy and the trend toward clean, efficient transportation have spurred growing interests in sodium-beta alumina batteries that store electrical energy via sodium ion transport across a ?"-Al2O3 solid electrolyte at elevated temperatures (typically 300~350C). Currently, the negative electrode or anode is metallic sodium in molten state during battery operation; the positive electrode or cathode can be molten sulfur (Na-S battery) or solid transition metal halides plus a liquid phase secondary electrolyte (e.g., ZEBRA battery). Since the groundbreaking works in the sodium-beta alumina batteries a few decades ago, encouraging progress has been achieved in improving battery performance, along with cost reduction. However there remain issues that hinder broad applications and market penetration of the technologies. To better the Na-beta alumina technologies require further advancement in materials along with component and system design and engineering. This paper offers a comprehensive review on materials of electrodes and electrolytes for the Na-beta alumina batteries and discusses the challenges ahead for further technology improvement.

Lu, Xiaochuan; Xia, Guanguang; Lemmon, John P.; Yang, Zhenguo

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Review of FY2001 Development Work for Vitrification of Sodium Bearing Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Treatment of sodium-bearing waste (SBW) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) within the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory is mandated by the Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. This report discusses significant findings from vitrification technology development during 2001 and their impacts on the design basis for SBW vitrification.

Barnes, C.M.; Taylor, D.D.

2002-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

372

Deficiencies of sodium and iodine in grazing sheep in northern China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deficiencies of sodium and iodine in grazing sheep in northern China DG Masters JR Lindsay SX Yu DX of Traditional Veterinary Medicine, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Science, Xiaoxihu, Lanzhou, Gansu, China An examination of the mineral status of grazing sheep at 3 sites in northern China has provided evidence

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

373

Bonding in Sodium Chloride Nanotubes: A New Analysis via Madelung Constants and Cohesive Energies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Bonding in Sodium Chloride Nanotubes: A New Analysis via Madelung Constants and Cohesive Energies is introduced which employs a linear relationship between nanotube cohesive energies determined via Density between ionic and cohesive bonding energies indicate that, as the nanotubes become longer, ionic bonding

Hanusa, Christopher

374

Ice iron/sodium film as cause for high noctilucent cloud radar reflectivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ice iron/sodium film as cause for high noctilucent cloud radar reflectivity P. M. Bellan1 Received] Noctilucent clouds, tiny cold electrically charged ice grains located at about 85 km altitude, exhibit by assuming the ice grains are coated by a thin metal film; substantial evidence exists indicating

Bellan, Paul M.

375

indirect study, coal was oxidatively de-graded with sodium dichromate and the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cleaning Technology (Noyes Data Corporation, Park Ridge, N.J., 1981). 10. Z. Hussain, E. Umbach, D. Aindirect study, coal was oxidatively de- graded with sodium dichromate and the esterified products- vestigators concluded (17, p. 380) that "thiophene derivatives must be indige- nous to coal." The direct XANES

Howat, Ian M.

376

Pressure-Induced Structural Transformations of the Zintl Phase Sodium Silicide Ral Quesada Cabreraa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and reduction of Na+ to metallic sodium. We have combined our experimental studies with DFT calculations and germanides belong to the family of Zintl phases, in which polyanionic species, formed of the tetrelide atoms counterbalance the electropositive metal cations [1-3]. These compounds are interesting because the Si and Ge

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

377

Molecular Dynamic Simulation of Sodium in 7-Pin LMFBR Bundle Under Hypothetical Accident Conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the frame of safety analysis of liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs) under hypothetical Unprotected Loss of Flow (ULOF) conditions two-phase flow of sodium is simulated in a 7-pin bundle, with hexagonal lattice. Molecular dynamics, with the application of the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method, and a macroscopic model describing rewetting sequences due to the flow of a sodium liquid film along the pin surfaces, are applied to simulate the coolant in the bundle. The pin surfaces and the inner surface of the hexagonal canning are treated in the Monte Carlo simulation as diffusively reflecting surfaces. Collisions of sodium molecules are computed with the 'hard-sphere' model. With respect to previous work the following improvements of the computational code were made: i) The full bundle is simulated, thus allowing for asymmetries, like a skewed power distribution, to be accounted for; ii) A pin model calculates detailed temperature distributions in the pins, so that temperature boundary conditions are computed and not imposed; iii) Post processing visualisation of computed results was developed. An out of pile sodium boiling experiment run at the Nuclear Research Center of Karlsruhe, Germany, is simulated and conclusions are drawn about the applicability of the methodology in computer codes dedicated to breeder reactors safety analysis. (authors)

Bottoni, Maurizio [University of Ferrara, Physics Department, Via Paradiso 12, I-44100 Ferrara (Italy); Bottoni, Claudio; Scanu, John [University of Pisa, Lungarno Pacinotti, 43 - 56126 Pisa (Italy)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Original article Increased late sodium current in myocytes from a canine heart failure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Original article Increased late sodium current in myocytes from a canine heart failure model and from failing human heart Carmen R. Valdivia, William W. Chu, Jielin Pu 1 , Jason D. Foell, Robert A December 2004 Abstract Electrophysiological remodeling of ion channels in heart failure causes action

Kamp, Tim

379

Mechanism and kinetics of a sodium-driven bacterial flagellar motor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mechanism and kinetics of a sodium-driven bacterial flagellar motor Chien-Jung Loa,b , Yoshiyuki potential difference. It consists of an 50-nm rotor and up to 10 independent stators anchored to the cell of electrical and chemical potential. All 25 torque­speed curves had the same concave-down shape as fully

Berry, Richard

380

determines the number of sodium spikes fired per event by individual cells (Maruta  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

determines the number of sodium spikes fired per event by individual cells (Maruta et al., 2007; Mathy et al., 2009) and may thereby mediate the direction and speed of learning in Purkinje cells (Mathy, apparently even down to the level of electrical synapses of the infe- rior olive (Lefler et al., 2014; Mathy

Oertner, Thomas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Room-temperature stationary sodium-ion batteries for large-scale electric energy storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy and utility applications, such as pump hydro, compressed air, y-wheel and electrochemicalRoom-temperature stationary sodium-ion batteries for large-scale electric energy storage Huilin Pan attention particularly in large- scale electric energy storage applications for renewable energy and smart

Wang, Wei Hua

382

Evaluation of a sodium/Hastelloy-X heat pipe for wing leading edge cooling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers assembly of a sodium heat pipe, testing to verify performance during start-up and under steady-state conditions with stagnation point heat loads to about 80 W/cm{sup 2}, performance analysis and evaluation. Evaluation of this leading edge cooling concept is offered and recommendations for further research discussed.

Merrigan, M.A.; Sena, J.T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Glass, D.E. [Analytical Services and Materials, Hampton, VA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

383

Effects of Sodium Chloride Particles, Ozone, UV, and Relative Humidity on Atmospheric Corrosion of Silver  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects of Sodium Chloride Particles, Ozone, UV, and Relative Humidity on Atmospheric Corrosion The corrosion of Ag contaminated with NaCl particles in gaseous environments containing humidity and ozone analyzed using a coulometric reduction technique. The atmospheric corrosion of Ag was greatly accelerated

384

Review of FY 2001 Development Work for Vitrification of Sodium Bearing Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Treatment of sodium-bearing waste (SBW) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) within the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory is mandated by the Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. This report discusses significant findings from vitrification technology development during 2001 and their impacts on the design basis for SBW vitrification.

Taylor, Dean Dalton; Barnes, Charles Marshall

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Behavioral/Systems/Cognitive Sodium and Calcium Current-Mediated Pacemaker Neurons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Behavioral/Systems/Cognitive Sodium and Calcium Current-Mediated Pacemaker Neurons and Respiratory excitability, which is inconsistent with a pacemaker-essential mechanism of respiratory rhythmogenesis evaluate here in the mamma- lian respiratory network. The cellular mechanisms that underlie respiratory

Del Negro, Christopher A.

386

Effect of lasalocid sodium on rumen fermentation and digestion in sheep  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of lasalocid sodium on rumen fermentation and digestion in sheep P. THIVEND, J.-P. JOUANY Laboratoire de la Digestion des Ruminants, 1. N. R. A., Theix, 63122 Ceyrat France. Summary. Four adult sheep had taken place in the rumen bacterial population (table 3). Overall digestive utilization of organic

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

387

Continuous-wave sodium D2 resonance radiation generated in single-pass sum-frequency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-frequency generation. The demonstrated conversion efficiency is 3.2% W-1 cm-1 . This compact solid-state light source applications involving the high- resolution sodium spectrum, including laser remote sensing, biology, communications, display technology [1], and Bose­Einstein condensation [2]. A narrow- band solid-state source

388

Modeling Zinc and Sodium Chloride Migration in Vadose Zone Soils Beneath Stormwater Infiltration Devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be seen in the field. Based on model results, shallow groundwater will be rapidly and highly impactedModeling Zinc and Sodium Chloride Migration in Vadose Zone Soils Beneath Stormwater Infiltration device. Introduction Urbanization has increased the amount of impervious surfaces, leading to an increase

Clark, Shirley E.

389

Advanced Recombinant Manganese Peroxidase for Biosynthesis of Lignin Bioproducts, Phase I Final Report, STTR Grant #: DE-SC0007503.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The core purpose of this Phase I STTR was to evaluate the feasibility of a new method of producing a recombinant version of manganese peroxidase (MnP) enzyme. MnP is a potentially valuable enzyme for producing high value lignin products and also for industrial de-coloring operations such as biobleaching of pulp and color removal from textile dye effluents. This lignin-modifying enzyme is produced in small amounts by the native host, a white rot fungus. Previous work by Oregon State University developed a secreted recombinant version of the enzyme in the yeast Pichia pastoris. Unfortunately, the expression is barely moderate and the enzyme is heavily glycosylated, which inhibits purification. In this work, the gene for the enzyme is given a tag which targets production of the enzyme to the peroxisome. This is a promising approach since this location is also where heme and hydrogen peroxide are sequestered, which are both necessary cofactors for MnP. More than ten recombinant strains were constructed, verified, and expressed in the Pichia system. Constitutive (GAP) and methanol-induced promoters (AOX) were tried for peroxisomal targeted, cytosolic, and secreted versions of MnP. Only the secreted strains showed activity. The amount of expression was not significantly changed. The degree of glycosylation was lessened using the AOX (methanol) promotoer, but the resulting enzyme was still not able to be purified using immobilized metal affinity chromatography. Additional work beyond the scope of the defined Phase I project was undertaken to construct, verify, and express Pichia strains that mutated the MnP glycosylation sites to inhibit this process. These strains did not show significant activity. The cause is not known, but it is possible that these sites are important to the structure of the enzyme. Also beyond the scope proposed for our Phase I STTR, the team collaborated with AbSci, a startup with a new E. coli based expression system focused on the production of antibodies and enzymes containing disulfide bonds and requiring folding/post-translational modification. With only limited time remaining in the Phase I schedule, a single construct was made to produce MnP with this system. The enzyme was produced in the soluble fraction of the cell lysate, but no activity was measured. MnP from the existing recombinant source was used to act on lignin. The lignin was from a Kraft process and had a molecular weight of about 10,000 Da. Using 1000 Da dialysis membranes and UV-visible spectroscopy, no modification of either lignin was evident in the dialysate or the retentate. Assays using 2,6 dimethoxy phenol (DMP) as a substrate showed consistent activity throughout the project. In summary, these results fell far short of our expectations. A Phase II proposal was not submitted. Possible reasons for the failure of peroxisomal targeting include destruction by native hydrogen peroxide, native proteases, or unforeseen causes. The AbSci system was only lighted tested and further work may yield a strain with active enzyme. The lack of evidence for lignin modification may be due to the techniques employed. NMR or GC-MS studies may reveal evidence of modification.

Beatty, Christopher; Kitner, Joshua; Lajoie, Curtis; McClain, Sean; Potochnik, Steve

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

390

Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Treatment and Management of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE is responsible for the safe and efficient management of its sodium-bonded spent nuclear fuel. This fuel contains metallic sodium, a highly reactive material; metallic uranium, which is also reactive; and in some cases, highly enriched uranium. The presence of reactive materials could complicate the process of qualifying and licensing DOE's sodium-bonded spent nuclear fuel inventory for disposal in a geologic repository. Currently, more than 98 percent of this inventory is located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), near Idaho Falls, Idaho. In addition, in a 1995 agreement with the State of Idaho, DOE committed to remove all spent nuclear fuel from Idaho by 2035. This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts associated with the treatment and management of sodium-bonded spent nuclear fuel in one or more facilities located at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) at INEEL and either the F-Canyon or Building 105-L at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. DOE has identified and assessed six proposed action alternatives in this EIS. These are: (1) electrometallurgical treatment of all fuel at ANL-W, (2) direct disposal of blanket fuel in high-integrity cans with the sodium removed at ANL-W, (3) plutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) processing of blanket fuel at SRS, (4) melt and dilute processing of blanket fuel at ANL-W, (5) melt and dilute processing of blanket fuel at SRS, and (6) melt and dilute processing of all fuel at ANL-W. In addition, Alternatives 2 through 5 include the electrometallurgical treatment of driver fuel at ANL-W. Under the No Action Alternative, the EIS evaluates both the continued storage of sodium-bonded spent nuclear fuel until the development of a new treatment technology or direct disposal without treatment. Under all of the alternatives, the affected environment is primarily within 80 kilometers (50 miles) of spent nuclear fuel treatment facilities. Analyses indicate little difference in the environmental impacts among alternatives. DOE has identified electrometallurgical treatment as its Preferred Alternative for the treatment and management of all sodium-bonded spent nuclear fuel, except for the Fermi-1 blanket fuel. The No Action Alternative is preferred for the Fermi-1 blanket spent nuclear fuel.

N /A

2000-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

391

Effect of Sodium Carboxymethyl Celluloses on Water-catalyzed Self-degradation of 200-degree C-heated Alkali-Activated Cement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigated the usefulness of sodium carboxymethyl celluloses (CMC) in promoting self-degradation of 200C-heated sodium silicate-activated slag/Class C fly ash cementitious material after contact with water. CMC emitted two major volatile compounds, CO2 and acetic acid, creating a porous structure in cement. CMC also reacted with NaOH from sodium silicate to form three water-insensitive solid reaction products, disodium glycolate salt, sodium glucosidic salt, and sodium bicarbonate. Other water-sensitive solid reaction products, such as sodium polysilicate and sodium carbonate, were derived from hydrolysates of sodium silicate. Dissolution of these products upon contact with water generated heat that promoted cements self-degradation. Thus, CMC of high molecular weight rendered two important features to the water-catalyzed self-degradation of heated cement: One was the high heat energy generated in exothermic reactions in cement; the other was the introduction of extensive porosity into cement.

Sugama T.; Pyatina, T.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

A Highly Reactive Mononuclear Non-Heme Manganese(IV)?Oxo Complex That Can Activate the Strong C?H Bonds of Alkanes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A mononuclear non-heme manganese(IV)-oxo complex has been synthesized and characterized using various spectroscopic methods. The Mn(IV)-oxo complex shows high reactivity in oxidation reactions, such as C-H bond activation, oxidations of olefins, alcohols, sulfides, and aromatic compounds, and N-dealkylation. In C-H bond activation, the Mn(IV)-oxo complex can activate C-H bonds as strong as those in cyclohexane. It is proposed that C-H bond activation by the non-heme Mn(IV)-oxo complex does not occur via an oxygen-rebound mechanism. The electrophilic character of the non-heme Mn(IV)-oxo complex is demonstrated by a large negative {rho} value of {approx}4.4 in the oxidation of para-substituted thioanisoles.

Wu, Xiujuan; Seo, Mi Sook; Davis, Katherine M.; Lee, Yong-Min; Chen, Junying; Cho, Kyung-Bin; Pushkar, Yulia N.; Nam, Wonwoo (Ewha); (Purdue)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

393

Manganese peroxidase mRNA and enzyme activity levels during bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-contaminated soil with Phanerochaete chrysosporium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

mRNA extraction from soil and quantitation by competitive reverse transcription-PCR were combined to study the expression of three manganese peroxidase (MnP) genes during removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from cultures of Phanerochaete chrysosporium grown in presterilized soil. Periods of high mnp transcript levels and extractable MnP enzyme activity were temporally correlated, although separated by a short (1- to 2-day) lag period. This time frame also coincided with maximal rates of fluorene oxidation and chrysene disappearance in soil cultures, supporting the hypothesis that high ionization potential polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are oxidized in soil via MnP-dependent mechanisms. The patterns of transcript abundance over time in soil-grown P. chrysosporium were similar for all three of the mnp mRNAs studied, indicating that transcription of this gene family may be coordinately regulated under these growth conditions. 47 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Bogan, B.W. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Schoenike, B.; Lamar, R.T.; Cullen, D. [Forest Service Forest Products Lab., Madison, WI (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Assimilation and respiration of radioactive ethylene glycol, in the presence of high sodium chloride concentrations, by a sodium chloride requiring bacterium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the contents distilled over into 5 ml of a 2X boric acid solution containing 3 ml of a O. l%%d ethanolic solution of methyl red and 5. 7 ml of a 0. 1X ethanolic 29 solution of brom cresol green. The samples were titrated, with 0. 1N HC1 using a... limits. Sodium requirement Effect of pH on growth Utilization of carbon sources. Respiration studies. Quantitation of ethylene glycol carbon Disappearance of. glucose and ammonia-nitrogen from cultures of Bacterium T-52. Possible pathways...

Gonzalez, Carlos Francisco

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Liquid-Metal Electrode to Enable Ultra-Low Temperature Sodium-Beta Alumina Batteries for Renewable Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metal electrodes have a high capacity for energy storage but have found limited applications in batteries because of dendrite formation and other problems. In this paper, we report a new alloying strategy that can significantly reduce the melting temperature and improve wetting with the electrolyte to allow the use of liquid metal as anode in sodium-beta alumina batteries (NBBs) at much lower temperatures (e.g., 95 to 175C). Commercial NBBs such as sodium-sulfur (Na-S) battery and sodium-metal halide (ZEBRA) batteries typically operate at relatively high temperatures (e.g., 300-350C) due to poor wettability of sodium on the surface of ?"-Al2O3. Our combined experimental and computational studies suggest that Na-Cs alloy can replace pure sodium as the anode material, which provides a significant improvement in wettability, particularly at lower temperatures (i.e., <200C). Single cells with the Na-Cs alloy anode exhibit excellent cycling life over those with pure sodium anode at 175 and 150C. The cells can even operate at 95C, which is below the melting temperature of pure sodium. These results demonstrate that NBB can be operated at ultra lower temperatures with successfully solving the wetting issue. This work also suggests a new strategy to use liquid metal as the electrode materials for advanced batteries that can avoid the intrinsic safety issues associated with dendrite formation on the anode.

Lu, Xiaochuan; Li, Guosheng; Kim, Jin Yong; Mei, Donghai; Lemmon, John P.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Liu, Jun

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Calcitriol inhibits Ether-a go-go potassium channel expression and cell proliferation in human breast cancer cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Antiproliferative actions of calcitriol have been shown to occur in many cell types; however, little is known regarding the molecular basis of this process in breast carcinoma. Ether-a-go-go (Eag1) potassium channels promote oncogenesis and are implicated in breast cancer cell proliferation. Since calcitriol displays antineoplastic effects while Eag1 promotes tumorigenesis, and both factors antagonically regulate cell cycle progression, we investigated a possible regulatory effect of calcitriol upon Eag1 as a mean to uncover new molecular events involved in the antiproliferative activity of this hormone in human breast tumor-derived cells. RT real-time PCR and immunocytochemistry showed that calcitriol suppressed Eag1 expression by a vitamin D receptor (VDR)-dependent mechanism. This effect was accompanied by inhibition of cell proliferation, which was potentiated by astemizole, a nonspecific Eag1 inhibitor. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot demonstrated that Eag1 and VDR abundance was higher in invasive-ductal carcinoma than in fibroadenoma, and immunoreactivity of both proteins was located in ductal epithelial cells. Our results provide evidence of a novel mechanism involved in the antiproliferative effects of calcitriol and highlight VDR as a cancer therapeutic target for breast cancer treatment and prevention.

Garcia-Becerra, Rocio [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)] [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Diaz, Lorenza, E-mail: lorenzadiaz@gmail.com [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)] [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Camacho, Javier [Department of Pharmacology, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional 2508, San Pedro Zacatenco 07360, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)] [Department of Pharmacology, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional 2508, San Pedro Zacatenco 07360, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Barrera, David; Ordaz-Rosado, David; Morales, Angelica [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)] [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Ortiz, Cindy Sharon [Department of Pathology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)] [Department of Pathology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Avila, Euclides [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)] [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Bargallo, Enrique [Department of Breast Tumors, Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, Av. San Fernando No. 22, Tlalpan 14080, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)] [Department of Breast Tumors, Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, Av. San Fernando No. 22, Tlalpan 14080, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Arrecillas, Myrna [Department of Pathology, Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, Av. San Fernando No. 22, Tlalpan 14080, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)] [Department of Pathology, Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, Av. San Fernando No. 22, Tlalpan 14080, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Halhali, Ali; Larrea, Fernando [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)] [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Technology Development Program for an Advanced Potassium Rankine Power Conversion System Compatible with Several Space Reactor Designs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the work performed during the first phase of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), National Research Announcement (NRA) Technology Development Program for an Advanced Potassium Rankine Power Conversion System Compatible with Several Space Reactor Designs. The document includes an optimization of both 100-kW{sub e} and 250-kW{sub e} (at the propulsion unit) Rankine cycle power conversion systems. In order to perform the mass optimization of these systems, several parametric evaluations of different design options were investigated. These options included feed and reheat, vapor superheat levels entering the turbine, three different material types, and multiple heat rejection system designs. The overall masses of these Nb-1%Zr systems are approximately 3100 kg and 6300 kg for the 100- kW{sub e} and 250-kW{sub e} systems, respectively, each with two totally redundant power conversion units, including the mass of the single reactor and shield. Initial conceptual designs for each of the components were developed in order to estimate component masses. In addition, an overall system concept was presented that was designed to fit within the launch envelope of a heavy lift vehicle. A technology development plan is presented in the report that describes the major efforts that are required to reach a technology readiness level of 6. A 10-year development plan was proposed.

Yoder, G.L.

2005-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

398

Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment Research and Development FY-2002 Status Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is considering several optional processes for disposal of liquid sodium-bearing waste. During fiscal year 2002, immobilization-related research included of grout formulation development for sodium-bearing waste, absorption of the waste on silica gel, and off-gas system mercury collection and breakthrough using activated carbon. Experimental results indicate that sodium-bearing waste can be immobilized in grout at 70 weight percent and onto silica gel at 74 weight percent. Furthermore, a loading of 11 weight percent mercury in sulfur-impregnated activated carbon was achieved with 99.8% off-gas mercury removal efficiency.

Herbst, Alan Keith; Deldebbio, John Anthony; Mc Cray, John Alan; Kirkham, Robert John; Olson, Lonnie Gene; Scholes, Bradley Adams

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Sodium/sulfur battery engineering for stationary energy storage. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of modular systems to distribute power using batteries to store off-peak energy and a state of the art power inverter is envisioned to offer important national benefits. A 4-year, cost- shared contract was performed to design and develop a modular, 300kVA/300-kWh system for utility and customer applications. Called Nas-P{sub AC}, this system uses advanced sodium/sulfur batteries and requires only about 20% of the space of a lead-acid-based system with a smaller energy content. Ten, 300-VDC, 40-kWh sodium/sulfur battery packs are accommodated behind a power conversion system envelope with integrated digital control. The resulting design facilities transportation, site selection, and deployment because the system is quiet and non-polluting, and can be located in proximity to the load. This report contains a detailed description of the design and supporting hardware development performed under this contract.

Koenig, A.; Rasmussen, J. [Silent Power, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) Sodium Bearing Waste - Waste Incidental to Reprocessing Determination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U.S. Department of Energy Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management, Section I.1.C, requires that all radioactive waste subject to Department of Energy Order 435.1 be managed as high-level radioactive waste, transuranic waste, or low-level radioactive waste. Determining the radiological classification of the sodium-bearing waste currently in the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Tank Farm Facility inventory is important to its proper treatment and disposition. This report presents the technical basis for making the determination that the sodium-bearing waste is waste incidental to spent fuel reprocessing and should be managed as mixed transuranic waste. This report focuses on the radiological characteristics of the sodiumbearing waste. The report does not address characterization of the nonradiological, hazardous constituents of the waste in accordance with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act requirements.

Jacobson, Victor Levon

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Two-dimensional modeling of sodium boiling in a simulated LMFBR loss-of-flow test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Loss-of-flow (LOF) accidents are of major importance in LMFBR safety. Tests have been performed to simulate the simultaneous failure of all primary pumps and reactor shutdown systems in a 37-pin electrically heated test bundle installed in the KNS sodium boiling loop at the Institute of Reactor Development, Karlsruhe. The tests simulated LOF conditions of the German prototype LMFBR, the SNR 300. The main objectives of these tests were to characterize the transient boiling development to cladding dryout and to provide data for validation of sodium boiling codes. One particular LOF test, designated L22, at full power was selected as a benchmark exercise for comparison of several codes at the Eleventh Meeting of the Liquid Metal Boiling Working Group (LMBWG) held in Grenoble, France, in October 1984. In this paper, the results of the calculations performed at ORNL with the two-dimensional (2-D) boiling code THORAX are presented.

Rose, S.D.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Development of a neutronics calculation method for designing commercial type Japanese sodium-cooled fast reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the R and D project to improve the modeling accuracy for the design of fast breeder reactors the authors are developing a neutronics calculation method for designing a large commercial type sodium- cooled fast reactor. The calculation method is established by taking into account the special features of the reactor such as the use of annular fuel pellet, inner duct tube in large fuel assemblies, large core. The Verification and Validation, and Uncertainty Qualification (V and V and UQ) of the calculation method is being performed by using measured data from the prototype FBR Monju. The results of this project will be used in the design and analysis of the commercial type demonstration FBR, known as the Japanese Sodium fast Reactor (JSFR). (authors)

Takeda, T.; Shimazu, Y.; Hibi, K.; Fujimura, K. [Research Inst. of Nuclear Engineering, Univ. of Fukui, 1cho-me 2gaiku 4, Kanawa-cho, Tsuruga-shi, Fukui 914-0055 (Japan)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Two dimensional, two fluid model for sodium boiling in LMFBR fuel assemblies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A two dimensional numerical model for the simulation of sodium boiling transient was developed using the two fluid set of conservation equations. A semiimplicit numerical differencing scheme capable of handling the problems associated with the ill-posedness implied by the complex characteristic roots of the two fluid problems was used, which took advantage of the dumping effect of the exchange terms. Of particular interest in the development of the model was the identification of the numerical problems caused by the strong disparity between the axial and radial dimensions of fuel assemblies. A solution to this problem was found which uses the particular geometry of fuel assemblies to accelerate the convergence of the iterative technique used in the model. Three sodium boiling experiments were simulated with the model, with good agreement between the experimental results and the model predictions.

Granziera, M.R.; Kazimi, M.S.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

The influence of dikegulac sodium on growth of Syngonium podophyllum 'White Butterfly'  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991 Major Subject: Floriculture THE INFLUENCE OF DIKEGULAC SODIUM ON GROWTH OF SYNGONIUM PODOPHYLLUM 'WHITE BUTTERFLY' A Thesis by WILLIAM MICHAEL WOMACK Approved as to style and content by: f~ J~ Yin... and concentrations of dikegulac Shoot dry weight of Syngonium podophyJ1um 'White Butterfly' treated with various application methods and concentrations of dikegulac, Plant height, shoot length, internode length, leaf number, and average petiole length...

Womack, William Michael

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

The electrochemical analysis of sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate in solutions containing oilfield impurities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

molecules, and above the CMC they diffuse to the drop as micelles. An alternate explanation for this behavior concerns the surface- active properties of nitrated SOBS. It is very likely that adsorption of nitrated SDBS onto the mercury surface takes... of concentration determinat1on would help fill this need. Four different determination methods were investigated using either the rotating-disc electrode or the dropping-mercury electrode. Direct limiting current measurements of the concentration of sodium...

Becker, Michael Carl

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Under-sodium viewing technology for improvement of fast-reactor safeguards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current safeguards approach for fast reactors relies exclusively on maintenance of continuity of knowledge to track the movement of fuel assemblies through these facilities. The remote handling of fuel assemblies, the visual opacity of the liquid metal coolant. and the chemical reactivity of sodium all combine and result in significant limitations on the available options to verify fuel assembly identification numbers or the integrity of these assemblies. These limitations also serve to frustrate attempts to restore the continuity-of-knowledge in instances where the information is under a variety of scenarios. The technology of ultrasonic under-sodium viewing offers new options to the safeguards community for recovering continuity-of-knowledge and applying more traditional item accountancy to fast reactor facilities. We have performed a literature review to investigate the development of under-sodium viewing technologies. In this paper we will summarize our findings and report the state of development of this technology and we will present possible applications to the fast reactor system to improve the existing safeguards approach at these reactors and in future fast reactors.

Beddingfield, David H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gerhart, Jeremy J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kawakubo, Yoko [JAEA

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Intermediate-scale tests of sodium interactions with calcite and dolomite aggregate concretes. [LMFBR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two intermediate-scale tests were performed to compare the behavior of calcite and dolomite aggregate concretes when attacked by molten sodium. The tests were performed as part of an interlaboratory comparison between Sandia National Laboratories and Hanford Engineering Development Laboratories. Results of the tests at Sandia National Laboratories are reported here. The results show that both concretes exhibit similar exothermic reactions with molten sodium. The large difference in reaction vigor suggested by thermodynamic considerations of CO/sub 2/ release from calcite and dolomite was not realized. Penetration rates of 1.4 to 1.7 mm/min were observed for short periods of time with reaction zone temperatures in excess of 800/sup 0/C during the energetic attack. The penetration was not uniform over the entire sodium-concrete contact area. Rapid attack may be localized due to inhomogeneities in the concrete. The chemical reaction zone is less then one cm thick for the calcite concrete but is about seven cm thick for the dolomite concrete.

Randich, E.; Acton, R.U.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Phase 2 THOR Steam Reforming Tests for Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

About one million gallons of acidic, hazardous, and radioactive sodium-bearing waste is stored in stainless steel tanks at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), which is a major operating facility of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Steam reforming is a candidate technology being investigated for converting the waste into a road ready waste form that can be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico for interment. A steam reforming technology patented by Studsvik, Inc., and licensed to THOR Treatment Technologies has been tested in two phases using a Department of Energy-owned fluidized bed test system located at the Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) Science and Technology Applications Research Center located in Idaho Falls, Idaho. The Phase 1 tests were reported earlier in 2003. The Phase 2 tests are reported here. For Phase 2, the process feed rate, stoichiometry, and chemistry were varied to identify and demonstrate process operation and product characteristics under different operating conditions. Two test series were performed. During the first series, the process chemistry was designed to produce a sodium carbonate product. The second series was designed to produce a more leach-resistant, mineralized sodium aluminosilicate product. The tests also demonstrated the performance of a MACT-compliant off-gas system.

Nicholas R. Soelberg

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Integrated fuel performance and thermal-hydraulic sub-channel models for analysis of sodium fast reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sodium Fast Reactors (SFR) show promise as an effective way to produce clean safe nuclear power while properly managing the fuel cycle. Accurate computer modeling is an important step in the design and eventual licensing ...

Fricano, Joseph William

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Modelling of thermo-mechanical and irradiation behavior of metallic and oxide fuels for sodium fast reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A robust and reliable code to model the irradiation behavior of metal and oxide fuels in sodium cooled fast reactors is developed. Modeling capability was enhanced by adopting a non-empirical mechanistic approach to the ...

Karahan, Aydin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

A four-equation two-phase flow model for sodium boiling simulation of LMFBR fuel assemblies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A three-dimensional numerical model for the simulation of sodium boiling transients has been developed. The model uses mixture mass and energy equations, while employing a separate momentum equation for each phase. Thermal ...

Schor, Andrei L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Mechanical relaxation behavior of polyurethanes reinforced with the in situ-generated sodium silica-polyphosphate nanophase  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Further exploration of hybrid organic/inorganic composites (polyurethane based with inorganic material sodium silica polyphosphate) properties with mechanical relaxometer gives ability to analyze microstructure of such materials in terms of chain reptation tubes filler's fractal aggregates and stress amplification.

V. O. Dupanov; S. M. Ponomarenko

2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

413

Development of models for the two-dimensional, two-fluid code for sodium boiling NATOF-2D  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Several features were incorporated into NATOF-2D, a twodimensional, two fluid code developed at M.I.T. for the purpose of analysis of sodium boiling transients under LMFBR conditions. They include improved interfacial mass, ...

Zielinski, R. G.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Development of Surface Complexation Models of Cr(VI) Adsorption on Soils, Sediments and Model Mixtures of Kaolinite, Montmorillonite, ?-Alumina, Hydrous Manganese and Ferric Oxides and Goethite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hexavalent chromium is a highly toxic contaminant that has been introduced into aquifers and shallow sediments and soils via many anthropogenic activities. Hexavalent chromium contamination is a problem or potential problem in the shallow subsurface at several DOE sites, including Hanford, Idaho National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Oak Ridge Reservation (DOE, 2008). To accurately quantify the fate and transport of hexavalent chromium at DOE and other contaminated sites, robust geochemical models, capable of correctly predicting changes in chromium chemical form resulting from chemical reactions occurring in subsurface environments are needed. One important chemical reaction that may greatly impact the bioavailability and mobility of hexavalent chromium in the subsurface is chemical binding to the surfaces of particulates, termed adsorption or surface complexation. Quantitative thermodynamic surface complexation models have been derived that can correctly calculate hexavalent chromium adsorption on well-characterized materials over ranges in subsurface conditions, such pH and salinity. However, models have not yet been developed for hexavalent chromium adsorption on many important constituents of natural soils and sediments, such as clay minerals. Furthermore, most of the existing thermodynamic models have been developed for relatively simple, single solid systems and have rarely been tested for the complex mixtures of solids present in real sediments and soils. In this study, the adsorption of hexavalent chromium was measured as a function of pH (3-10), salinity (0.001 to 0.1 M NaNO3), and partial pressure of carbon dioxide(0-5%) on a suite of naturally-occurring solids including goethite (FeOOH), hydrous manganese oxide (MnOOH), hydrous ferric oxide (Fe(OH)3), ?-alumina (Al2O3), kaolinite (Al2Si2O5(OH)4), and montmorillonite (Na3(Al, Mg)2Si4O10(OH)2?nH2O). The results show that all of these materials can bind substantial quantities of hexavalent chromium, especially at low pH. Unexpectedly, experiments with the clay minerals kaolinite and montmorillonite suggest that hexavalent chromium may interact with these solids over much longer periods of time than expected. Furthermore, hexavalent chromium may irreversibly bind to these solids, perhaps because of oxidation-reduction reactions occurring on the surfaces of the clay minerals. More work should be done to investigate and quantify these chemical reactions. Experiments conducted with mixtures of goethite, hydrous manganese oxide, hydrous ferric oxide, ?-alumina, montmorillonite and kaolinite demonstrate that it is possible to correctly predict hexavalent chromium binding in the presence of multiple minerals using thermodynamic models derived for the simpler systems. Further, these models suggest that of the six solid considered in this study, goethite is typically the solid to which most of the hexavalent chromium will bind. Experiments completed with organic-rich and organic-poor natural sediments demonstrate that in organic-rich substrates, organic matter is likely to control uptake of the hexavalent chromium. The models derived and tested in this study for hexavalent chromium binding to ?-alumina, hydrous manganese oxide, goethite, hydrous ferric oxide and clay minerals can be used to better predict changes in hexavalent chromium bioavailability and mobility in contaminated sediments and soils.

Koretsky, Carla [Western Michigan University] [Western Michigan University

2013-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

415

Effects of Potassium Doping on CO Hydrogenation Over MoS2 Catalysts: A First-Principles Investigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Periodic density functional theory calculations were performed to explore the effects of doping potassium (K) on the reactivity of CO hydrogenation to mixed higher alcohols over MoS2 catalysts. We found that the doped K species over the model MoS2(100) catalyst surface acts as a unique site for CO adsorption where either the K-C or the K-O bonding is allowed. The charge transfer from the K 4s electron to the conduction band of the MoS2(100) surface slightly enhances CO adsorption at the edge Mo sites. Due to the large electropositive nature, the presence of the surface K species, however, will hinder the dissociative adsorption of hydrogen. As a result, the doping K species drive CO hydrogenation selectivity toward the C2+ alcohols instead of hydrocarbons by increasing CO and decreasing hydrogen coverages on the MoS2 catalysts. To further elucidate the effect of doping K on the shifting of the selectivity toward CO hydrogenation, we calculated several key reaction steps leading to the H2CCO precursor formation, i.e., CO hydrogenation, the C-O bond scission and the C-C coupling (CH2+CO). The C-C coupling step is favorable for both the Mo and S edges. However, the undoped S edge has an overall more thermodynamically favorable reaction profile up to C-O scission compared with the Mo edge. This work was funded by a CRADA project (No. PNNL/297) with Range Fuels. The research was performed using EMSL, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The work involving the results analysis and mansucript writing was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences.

Andersen, Amity; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Lilga, Michael A.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Hallen, Richard T.; Mei, Donghai

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Studies on L-citrulline doped potassium dihydrogen phosphate- A non linear crystal with significant nonlinear properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Potassium Dihydrogen Phosphate (KDP) single crystal is considered as one of the best representative of nonlinear optical crystals. Recently, amino acids having excellent nonlinear optical characteristics are being investigated as prospective dopants to improve the non linear optical characteristics of KDP. The present work is an attempt in this direction and L citrulline, one of the non essential amino acids showing good non linear optical characteristics is used as the dopant for KDP. Good quality crystals of L-citrulline doped KDP crystals were grown by slow evaporation technique. From the powder X-ray diffraction studies of doped KDP crystal, the structure of the doped crystals was determined by direct method and refined by Pawley method employing Topaz version program using the single crystal X-ray data for pure KDP. The lattice parameters for L citrulline doped KDP are a=7.467A{sup 0}, b=7.467 A{sup 0}, c=6.977 A{sup 0}. The crystal falls into the tetragonal crystal system with space group I42 d. The presence of carbon and oxygen, which are primary components of amino acids, in the EDAX spectrum confirms the effectiveness of doping. The absorption spectra of the doped samples show that the crystals are transparent in the entire visible region. The second harmonic generation efficiency of the doped samples was determined by Kurtz powder technique using the Q-switched Nd:YAG laser beam and is found to be 2.2 times that of KDP. The nonlinear optical properties can be well studied by the open aperture Z scan technique. The open aperture curve exhibits a normalized transmittance valley. The nonlinear absorption coefficient ? is obtained by theoretical fitting for two photon absorption. It is inferred that doping KDP with L citrulline has enhanced the nonlinearity considerably. This obviously suggests the potentiality of the crystal as an optical power limiter and also for various optical device applications.

Sreevalsa, V. G., E-mail: sreevalsavg@gmail.com, E-mail: jayalekshmi@cusat.ac.in; Jayalekshmi, S., E-mail: sreevalsavg@gmail.com, E-mail: jayalekshmi@cusat.ac.in [Division for Research in Advanced Materials, Department of Physics, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Kochi, 682022, Kerala (India)

2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

417

Thermochemical cyclic system for decomposing H/sub 2/O and/or CO/sub 2/ by means of cerium-titanium-sodium-oxygen compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermochemical closed cyclic process for the decomposition of water and/or carbon dioxide to hydrogen and/or carbon monoxide begins with the reaction of ceric oxide (CeO/sub 2/), titanium dioxide (TiO/sub 2/) and sodium titanate (Na/sub 2/TiO/sub 3/) to form sodium cerous titanate (NaCeTi/sub 2/O/sub 6/) and oxygen. Sodium cerous titanate (NaCeTi/sub 2/O/sub 6/) reacted with sodium carbonate (Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/) in the presence of steam, produces hydrogen. The same reaction, in the absence of steam, produces carbon monoxide. The products, ceric oxide and sodium titanate, obtained in either case, are treated with carbon dioxide and water to produce ceric oxide, titanium dioxide, sodium titanate, and sodium bicarbonate. After dissolving sodium bicarbonate from the mixture in water, the remaining insoluble compounds are used as starting materials for a subsequent cycle. The sodium bicarbonate can be converted to sodium carbonate by heating and returned to the cycle.

Bamberger, C.E.

1980-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

418

Thermochemical cyclic system for decomposing H.sub.2 O and/or CO.sub.2 by means of cerium-titanium-sodium-oxygen compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A thermochemical closed cyclic process for the decomposition of water and/or carbon dioxide to hydrogen and/or carbon monoxide begins with the reaction of ceric oxide (CeO.sub.2), titanium dioxide (TiO.sub.2) and sodium titanate (Na.sub.2 TiO.sub.3) to form sodium cerous titanate (NaCeTi.sub.2 O.sub.6) and oxygen. Sodium cerous titanate (NaCeTi.sub.2 O.sub.6) reacted with sodium carbonate (Na.sub.2 CO.sub.3) in the presence of steam, produces hydrogen. The same reaction, in the absence of steam, produces carbon monoxide. The products, ceric oxide and sodium titanate, obtained in either case, are treated with carbon dioxide and water to produce ceric oxide, titanium dioxide, sodium titanate, and sodium bicarbonate. After dissolving sodium bicarbonate from the mixture in water, the remaining insoluble compounds are used as starting materials for a subsequent cycle. The sodium bicarbonate can be converted to sodium carbonate by heating and returned to the cycle.

Bamberger, Carlos E. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

--No Title--  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

components: Solid hydroxides of iron, calcium, cerium, lanthanum, neodymium, nickel, strontium, and zirconium; and manganese dioxide solids in a supernate matrix comprising sodium...

420

Structural And Physical Characterization of Tetranuclear [Mn**II(3)Mn**IV] And [Mn**II(2)Mn**III(2)] Valence-Isomer Manganese Complexes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two tetranuclear Mn complexes with an average Mn oxidation state of +2.5 have been prepared. These valence isomers have been characterized by a combination of X-ray crystallography, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and magnetic susceptibility. The Mn{sup II}{sub 3}Mn{sup IV} tetramer has the Mn ions arranged in a distorted tetrahedron, with an S = 6 ground spin state, dominated by ferromagnetic exchange among the manganese ions. The Mn{sup II}{sub 2}Mn{sup III}{sub 2} tetramer also has a distorted tetrahedral arrangement of Mn ions but shows magnetic behavior, suggesting that it is a single-molecule magnet. The X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra for the two complexes are similar, suggesting that, while Mn XANES has sufficient sensitivity to distinguish between trinuclear valence isomers (Alexiou et al. Inorg. Chem. 2003, 42, 2185), similar distinctions are difficult for tetranuclear complexes such as that found in the photosynthetic oxygen-evolving complex.

Zaleski, C.M.; Weng, T.-C.; Dendrinou-Samara, C.; Alexiou, M.; Kanakaraki, P.; Hsieh, W.-Y.; Kampf, J.; Penner-Hahn, J.E.; Pecoraro, V.L.; Kessissoglou, D.P.

2009-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Evaluation of lithium as a toxicant and the modifying effect of sodium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Routine compliance tests conducted for a groundwater treatment facility at the Y-12 Plant on the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), TN, showed that the effluent was acutely toxic to Ceriodaphnia dubia and fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) larvae. An evaluation of suspected contaminants revealed that increased toxicity coincided with increased concentrations of lithium. Lithium is a light, strong metal that is used in DOE operations, including fusion weapons and fission reactors. Little has been published about lithium toxicity. Toxicity tests were conducted with fathead minnows and C. dubia using lithium chloride and lithium tetraborate. Dilute mineral water (DMW) or the receiving stream water (East Fork Poplar Creek) was used as the dilution water in the toxicity evaluation. A concentration of 1 mg Li/L in DMW reduced the survival of both test species; 0.5 mg Li/L in DMW reduced C. dubia reproduction and minnow growth. Sodium appears to influence the toxicity of Li; the metal was six times more toxic in the low-sodium DMW than in stream water containing 30 mg Na/L. Tests with LiCl in combination with NaCl and NA{sub 2}SO{sub 4} demonstrated that the presence of sodium reduced the toxicity of Li to C. dubia. In laboratory tests with a snail (Elimia clavaeformis) common on the ORR, the feeding rate declined in 0.15 mg Li/L. Because Li has also been demonstrated to be toxic to several plant species, tests with LiCi were also conducted using buttercrunch lettuce (Lactuca saliva). The EC{sub 50} for seed growth after 8 d incubation was 37.5 mg Li/L. These findings are significant because of widespread industrial use and potential accumulation of Li in soils.

Kszos, L.A.; Stewart, A.J.; O`Reilly, S.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

422

Probing the Failure Mechanism of SnO2 Nanowires for Sodium-ion Batteries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Non-lithium metals such as sodium have attracted wide attention as a potential charge carrying ion for rechargeable batteries, performing the same role as lithium in lithium- ion batteries. As sodium and lithium have the same +1 charge, it is assumed that what has been learnt about the operation of lithium ion batteries can be transferred directly to sodium batteries. Using in-situ TEM, in combination with DFT calculations, we probed the structural and chemical evolution of SnO2 nanowire anodes in Na-ion batteries and compared them quantitatively with results from Li-ion batteries [Science 330 (2010) 1515]. Upon Na insertion into SnO2, a displacement reaction occurs, leading to the formation of amorphous NaxSn nanoparticles covered by crystalline Na2O shell. With further Na insertion, the NaxSn core crystallized into Na15Sn4 (x=3.75). Upon extraction of Na (desodiation), the NaxSn core transforms to Sn nanoparticles. Associated with a volume shrinkage, nanopores appear and metallic Sn particles are confined in hollow shells of Na2O, mimicking a peapod structure. These pores greatly increase electrical impedance, therefore naturally accounting for the poor cyclability of SnO2. DFT calculations indicate that Na+ diffuses 30 times slower than Li+ in SnO2, in agreement with in-situ TEM measurement. Insertion of Na can chemo-mechanically soften the reaction product to greater extent than in lithiation. Therefore, in contrast to the lithiation of SnO2, no dislocation plasticity was seen ahead of the sodiation front. This direct comparison of the results from Na and Li highlights the critical role of ionic size and electronic structure of different ionic species on the charge/discharge rate and failure mechanisms in these batteries.

Gu, Meng; Kushima, Akihiro; Shao, Yuyan; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun; Browning, Nigel D.; Li, Ju; Wang, Chong M.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

423

SWAAM-LT: The long-term, sodium/water reaction analysis method computer code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SWAAM-LT Code, developed for analysis of long-term effects of sodium/water reactions, is discussed. The theoretical formulation of the code is described, including the introduction of system matrices for ease of computer programming as a general system code. Also, some typical results of the code predictions for available large scale tests are presented. Test data for the steam generator design with the cover-gas feature and without the cover-gas feature are available and analyzed. The capabilities and limitations of the code are then discussed in light of the comparison between the code prediction and the test data.

Shin, Y.W.; Chung, H.H.; Wiedermann, A.H. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Tanabe, H. [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Feed Composition for Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment Process, Rev. 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Treatment of sodium-bearing waste (SBW) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) within the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory is mandated by a Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. One of the requirements of the Settlement Agreement is to complete treatment of SBW by December 31, 2012. To support both design and development studies for the SBW treatment process, detailed feed compositions are needed. This report contains the expected compositions of these feed streams and the sources and methods used in obtaining these compositions.

Barnes, Charles Marshall

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Pre-Decisional Sodium Bearing Waste Technology Development Roadmap FY-01 Update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides an update to the Sodium Bearing Waste (SBW) Technology Development Roadmap generated a year ago. It outlines progress made to date and near-term plans for the technology development work necessary to support processing SBW. In addition, it serves as a transition document to the Risk Management Plan (RMP) required by the Project per DOE Order 413.3, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets. Technical uncertainties have been identified as design basis elements (DBEs) and captured in a technical baseline database. As the risks are discovered, assessed, and mitigated, the status of the DBEs in the database will be updated and tracked to closure.

Mc Dannel, Gary Eidson

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Tracers for monitoring the activity of sodium/glucose cotransporters in health and disease  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Radiolabeled tracers for sodium/glucose cotransporters (SGLTs), their synthesis, and their use are provided. The tracers are methyl or ethyl pyranosides having an equatorial hydroxyl group at carbon-2 and a C 1 preferred conformation, radiolabeled with .sup.18F, .sup.123I, or .sup.124I, or free hexoses radiolabeled with .sup.18F, .sup.123I, or .sup.124. Also provided are in vivo and in vitro techniques for using these and other tracers as analytical and diagnostic tools to study glucose transport, in health and disease, and to evaluate therapeutic interventions.

Wright, Ernest M; Barrio, Jorge R; Hirayama, Bruce A; Kepe, Vladimir

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

427

Under-Sodium Viewing: A Review of Ultrasonic Imaging Technology for Liquid Metal Fast Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This current report is a summary of information obtained in the "Information Capture" task of the U.S. DOE-funded "Under Sodium Viewing (USV) Project." The goal of the multi-year USV project is to design, build, and demonstrate a state-of-the-art prototype ultrasonic viewing system tailored for periodic reactor core in-service monitoring and maintenance inspections. The study seeks to optimize system parameters, improve performance, and re-establish this key technology area which will be required to support any new U.S. liquid-metal cooled fast reactors.

Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Peters, Timothy J.; Posakony, Gerald J.; Chien, Hual-Te; Bond, Leonard J.; Denslow, Kayte M.; Sheen, Shuh-Haw; Raptis, Paul

2009-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

428

Adhesion of sodium dodecyl sulfate surfactant monolayers with TiO2 (rutile and anatase) surfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Surfactants are widely used as templates to control the nucleation and growth of nanostructured metal oxides such as titania. To gain insight into the origin of surfactant-titania interactions responsible for polymorph and orientation selection, we simulate the self-assembly of an anionic surfactant monolayer on various low-index titania surfaces and for a range of densities. We characterize the binding in each case and compute the adhesion energies, finding anatase (100) and rutile (110) to be the strongest-binding surfaces. The sodium counterions in the monolayer are found to dominate the adhesion. It is also observed that the assembly is directed predominantly by surface-monolayer electrostatic complementarity.

Darkins, Robert; Sushko, Maria L.; Liu, Jun; Duffy, Dorothy M.

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

429

Thermal analysis for fuel handling system for sodium cooled reactor considering minor actinide-bearing metal fuel.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) is one of the components of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) used to close the fuel cycle. ABR is a sodium-cooled fast reactor that is used to consume transuranic elements resulting from the reprocessing of light water reactor spent nuclear fuel. ABR-1000 [1000 MW(thermal)] is a fast reactor concept created at Argonne National Laboratory to be used as a reference concept for various future trade-offs. ABR-1000 meets the GNEP goals although it uses what is considered base sodium fast reactor technology for its systems and components. One of the considerations of any fast reactor plant concept is the ability to perform fuel-handling operations with new and spent fast reactor fuel. The transmutation fuel proposed as the ABR fuel has a very little experience base, and thus, this paper investigates a fuel-handling concept and potential issues of handling fast reactor fuel containing minor actinides. In this study, two thermal analyses supporting a conceptual design study on the ABR-1000 fuel-handling system were carried out. One analysis investigated passive dry spent fuel storage, and the other analysis investigated a fresh fuel shipping cask. Passive dry storage can be made suitable for the ABR-1000 spent fuel storage with sodium-bonded metal fuel. The thermal analysis shows that spent fast reactor fuel with a decay heat of 2 kW or less can be stored passively in a helium atmosphere. The 2-kW value seems to be a reasonable and practical level, and a combination of reasonably-sized in-sodium storage followed by passive dry storage could be a candidate for spent fuel storage for the next-generation sodium-cooled reactor with sodium-bonded metal fuel. Requirements for the shipping casks for minor actinide-bearing fuel with a high decay heat level are also discussed in this paper. The shipping cask for fresh sodium-cooled-reactor fuel should be a dry type to reduce the reaction between residual moisture on fresh fuel and the sodium coolant. The cladding temperature requirement is maintained below the creep temperature limit to avoid any damage before core installation. The thermal analysis shows that a helium gas-filled cask can accommodate ABR-1000 fresh minor actinide-bearing fuel with 700-W decay heat. The above analysis results revealed the overall requirement for minor actinide-bearing metal fuel handling. The information is thought to be helpful in the design of the ABR-1000 and future sodium-cooled-reactor fuel-handling system.

Chikazawa, Y.; Grandy, C.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Catalytic conversion of canola oil over potassium-impregnated HZSM-5 catalysts: C{sub 2}-C{sub 4} olefin production and model reaction studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The influence of catalyst acidity, reaction temperature, and canola oil space velocity on the conversion of canola oil was evaluated using a fixed-bed microreactor at atmospheric pressure at reaction temperatures and space velocities (WHSV) in the ranges 400--500 C and 1.8--3.6 h{sup {minus}1}, respectively, over potassium-impregnated HZSMs-5 catalysts. These catalysts were thoroughly characterized using XRD, N{sub 2} adsorption measurements, {sup 1}H NMR, TPD of NH{sub 3}, FT-IR, C{sub 2}-C{sub 4} olefins from canola oil were determined. The incorporation of potassium into HZSM-5 catalyst resulted in both the dilution and poisoning of Bronsted and total acid sites. These acidity changes only severely affected the acid catalyzed reactions, such as oligomerization and aromatization, and resulted in drastic modifications in product distribution. The maximum C{sub 2}C{sub 4} olefin yield of 25.8 wt % was obtained at 500 C and 1.8 h{sup {minus}1} space velocity with catalyst K1 of relatively low Bronsted and total acidity.

Katikaneni, S.P.R.; Adjaye, J.D.; Idem, R.O.; Bakhshi, N.N. [Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon (Canada). Catalysis and Chemical Reaction Engineering Lab.] [Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon (Canada). Catalysis and Chemical Reaction Engineering Lab.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Neutronic Assessment of Transmutation Target Compositions in Heterogeneous Sodium Fast Reactor Geometries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The sodium fast reactor is under consideration for consuming the transuranic waste in the spent nuclear fuel generated by light water reactors. This work is concerned with specialized target assemblies for an oxide-fueled sodium fast reactor that are designed exclusively for burning the americium and higher mass actinide component of light water reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The associated gamma and neutron radioactivity, as well as thermal heat, associated with decay of these actinides may significantly complicate fuel handling and fabrication of recycled fast reactor fuel. The objective of using targets is to isolate in a smaller number of assemblies these concentrations of higher actinides, thus reducing the volume of fuel having more rigorous handling requirements or a more complicated fabrication process. This is in contrast to homogeneous recycle where all recycled actinides are distributed among all fuel assemblies. Several heterogeneous core geometries were evaluated to determine the fewest target assemblies required to burn these actinides without violating a set of established fuel performance criteria. The DIF3D/REBUS code from Argonne National Laboratory was used to perform the core physics and accompanying fuel cycle calculations in support of this work. Using the REBUS code, each core design was evaluated at the equilibrium cycle condition.

Samuel E. Bays; Rodolfo M. Ferrer; Michael A. Pope; Benoit Forget; Mehdi Asgari

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Synthesis and radiosensitization properties of hydrogen peroxide and sodium hyaluronate complex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cancer cells which are large in size are resistant towards radiation therapy due to the presence of large amount of anti-oxidative enzymes and hypoxic cancer cells. Thus radiosensitizer agents have been developed to enhance the therapeutic effect of radiotherapy by increasing the sensitivity of these cancer cells towards radiation. This study is conducted to investigate the radiosensitization properties of radiosensitizer complex containing hydrogen peroxide and sodium hyaluronate. Combination with sodium hyaluronate may decrease reactivity of hydrogen peroxide but maintain the oxygen concentration needed for radiosensitizing effect. HepG2 cancer cells are cultured as the mean of test subject. Cancer cell samples which are targeted and not targeted with these radiosensitizers are irradiated with 2Gy single fractionated dose. Results obtained shows that the cancer cells which are not targeted with radiosensitizers has a cell viability of 98.800.37% after a time interval of 48 hours and has even repopulated over 100% after a 72 hour time interval. This shows that the cancer cells are resistant towards radiation. However, when the cancer cells are targeted with radiosensitizers prior to irradiation, there is a reduction of cell viability by 25.5010.81% and 10.305.10% at time intervals of 48 and 72 hours respectively. This indicates that through the use of these radiosensitizers, cancer cells are more sensitive towards radiation.

Rosli, Nur Ratasha Alia Md.; Mohamed, Faizal; Heng, Cheong Kai; Rahman, Irman Abdul; Ahmad, Ainee Fatimah; Mohamad, Hur Munawar Kabir [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

2014-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

433

Pressure-induced structural transformations of the Zintl phase sodium silicide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The high-pressure behaviour of NaSi has been studied using Raman spectroscopy and angle-dispersive synchrotron X-ray diffraction to observe the onset of structural phase transformations and potential oligomerisation into anionic Si nanoclusters with extended dimensionality. Our studies reveal a first structural transformation occurring at 8-10 GPa, followed by irreversible amorphisation above 15 GPa, suggesting the formation of Si-Si bonds with oxidation of the Si{sup -} species and reduction of Na{sup +} to metallic sodium. We have combined our experimental studies with DFT calculations to assist in the analysis of the structural behaviour of NaSi at high pressure. - Abstract: The high-pressure behaviour of NaSi has been studied using Raman spectroscopy and angle-dispersive synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Our studies reveal a first structural transformation occurring at 8-10 GPa, followed by irreversible amorphisation, suggesting the formation of Si-Si bonds with oxidation of the Si{sup -} species and reduction of Na{sup +} to metallic sodium. We have combined our experimental studies with DFT calculations to assist in the analysis of the structural behaviour of NaSi at high pressure. Display Omitted

Cabrera, Raul Quesada; Salamat, Ashkan; Barkalov, Oleg I. [Department of Chemistry and Materials Chemistry Centre, Christopher Ingold Laboratories, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom); Leynaud, Olivier [Department of Crystallography, Birkbeck College, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HX (United Kingdom); Hutchins, Peter; Daisenberger, Dominik [Department of Chemistry and Materials Chemistry Centre, Christopher Ingold Laboratories, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom); Machon, Denis [Universite de Lyon, F-69000, France-Univ. Lyon 1, Laboratoire PMCN, CNRS, UMR 5586, F-69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Sella, Andrea; Lewis, Dewi W. [Department of Chemistry and Materials Chemistry Centre, Christopher Ingold Laboratories, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom); McMillan, Paul F., E-mail: p.f.mcmillan@ucl.ac.u [Department of Chemistry and Materials Chemistry Centre, Christopher Ingold Laboratories, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

434

Enhancement of the inherent self-protection of the fast sodium reactor cores with oxide fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the development and research into the generation IV fast sodium reactors, great attention is paid to the enhancement of the core inherent self-protection characteristics. One of the problems dealt here is connected with the reduction of the reactivity margin so that the control rods running should not result in the core overheating and melting. In this paper we consider the possibilities of improving the core of BN-1200 with oxide fuel by a known method of introducing an axial fertile layer into the core. But unlike earlier studies this paper looks at the possibility of using such a layer not only for improving breeding, but also for reducing sodium void reactivity effect (SVRE). This proposed improvement of the BN-1200 core does not solve the problem of strong interference in control and protection system (CPS) rods of BN-1200, but they reduce significantly the reactivity margin for burn-up compensation. This helps compensate all the reactivity balances in the improved core configurations without violating constraints on SVRE value.

Eliseev, V.A.; Malisheva, I.V.; Matveev, V.I.; Egorov, A.V.; Maslov, P.A. [SSC RF - IPPE, Obninsk, Kaluga region (Russian Federation)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Selecting the suitable dopants: electronic structures of transition metal and rare earth doped thermoelectric sodium cobaltate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineered Na0.75CoO2 is considered a prime candidate to achieve high efficiency thermoelectric systems to regenerate electricity from waste heat. In this work, three elements with outmost electronic configurations, (1) an open d shell (Ni), (2) a closed d shell (Zn), and (3) an half fill f shell (Eu) with a maximum unpaired electrons, were selected to outline the dopants' effects on electronic and crystallographic structures of Na0.75CoO2. Systematic ab initio density functional calculations showed that the formation energy of these dopants was found to be lowest when residing on sodium layer and ranked as -1.1 eV, 0.44 eV and 3.44 eV for Eu, Ni and Zn respectively. Furthermore Ni was also found to be stable when substituting Co ion. As these results show great harmony with existing experimental data, they provide new insights into the fundamental principle of dopant selection for manipulating the physical properties in the development of high performance sodium cobaltate based thermoelectric materials.

Assadi, M H N; Yu, A B

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Inhibition of phospholipase A/sub 2/ from human plasma by sodium bisulfite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The anti-oxidant sodium bisulfite has been shown to inhibit acid active(lysosomal), non-Ca/sup + +/-dependent phospholipase A/sub 2/ (PLA/sub 2/), and to interact reversibly with unsaturated fatty acids, altering their chromatographic mobility. The authors examined the effect of bisulfite on neutral active, Ca/sup + +/-dependent PLA/sub 2/ from human plasma. Using (1-/sup 14/C)oleate-labelled autoclaved E. coli as substrate, PLA/sub 2/ activity was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by bisulfite. Maximal inhibition occurred at 100..mu..M bisulfite. Preincubation of plasma for 0-30 minutes with bisulfite resulted in a time-dependent increase in PLA/sub 2/ inhibition. Preincubation of substrate with bisulfite had no such effect. When the plasma PLA/sub 2/ was purified 25-fold by SP-Sephadex chromatography it was no longer inhibited by bisulfite. The SP-Sephadex wash through fraction, which contained greater than 95% of the applied protein but not PLA/sub 2/ activity, did not inhibit the purified enzyme. When incubated with bisulfite however, the SP-wash through fraction produced dose-dependent inhibition of the purified enzyme. These results indicate that sodium bisulfite inhibits human plasma PLA/sub 2/, in vitro, indirectly by interaction with a factor(s) present in plasma and suggests that anti-oxidants may similarly influence expression of extracellular PLA/sub 2/ in vivo.

Wiggins, C.W.; Franson, R.C.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Experimental Development and Demonstration of Ultrasonic Measurement Diagnostics for Sodium Fast Reactor Thermal-hydraulics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research project will address some of the principal technology issues related to sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFR), primarily the development and demonstration of ultrasonic measurement diagnostics linked to effective thermal convective sensing under normatl and off-normal conditions. Sodium is well-suited as a heat transfer medium for the SFR. However, because it is chemically reactive and optically opaque, it presents engineering accessibility constraints relative to operations and maintenance (O&M) and in-service inspection (ISI) technologies that are currently used for light water reactors. Thus, there are limited sensing options for conducting thermohydraulic measurements under normal conditions and off-normal events (maintenance, unanticipated events). Acoustic methods, primarily ultrasonics, are a key measurement technology with applications in non-destructive testing, component imaging, thermometry, and velocimetry. THis project would have yielded a better quantitative and qualitative understanding of the thermohydraulic condition of solium under varied flow conditions. THe scope of work will evaluate and demonstrate ultrasonic technologies and define instrumentation options for the SFR.

Tokuhiro, Akira; Jones, Byron

2013-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

438

Calibration of the On-Line Aerosol Monitor (OLAM) with ammonium chloride and sodium chloride aerosols  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The On-Line Aerosol Monitor (OLAM) is a light attenuation device designed and built at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) by EG&G Idaho. Its purpose is to provide an on-line indication of aerosol concentration in the PHEBUS-FP tests. It does this by measuring the attenuation of a light beam across a tube through which an aerosol is flowing. The OLAM does not inherently give an absolute response and must be calibrated. A calibration has been performed at Sandia National Laboratories` (SNL) Sandia Aerosol Research Laboratory (SARL) and the results are described here. Ammonium chloride and sodium chloride calibration aerosols are used for the calibration and the data for the sodium chloride aerosol is well described by a model presented in this report. Detectable instrument response is seen over a range of 0.1 cm{sup 3} of particulate material per m{sup 3} of gas to 10 cm{sup 3} of particulate material per m{sup 3} of gas.

Brockmann, J.E.; Lucero, D.A.; Romero, T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pentecost, G. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Further Investigations of the Effect of Replacing Lithium by Sodium on Lithium Silicate Scintillating Glass Efficiency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ce3+ doped lithium (6Li) silicate glasses are thermal neutron detectors. Prior work showed that when sodium (Na) is substituted for Li the scintillation efficiency, under beta particle stimulation, increased and then decreased as the sodium (Na) content was increased [1]. When all the 6Li was replaced by Na no scintillation was observed. Raman spectra, acquired using a visible excitation source provided no evidence of anomalous behavior. SEM microscopy did show some phase separation, but there was no obvious correlation with the scintillation efficiency. We have reexamined these glass samples using deep UV Raman excitation which reduces fluorescence interference. The newly acquired spectra show evidence of phase separation in the glasses. Specifically we see a peak at 800 cm-1 Raman shift which can be assigned to a vitreous silica moiety that results from phase separation. There is a strong correlation between this peak's area, the scintillation efficiency, and the Na content. The observed trend suggests that phase separation enhances scintillation and addition of Na reduces the amount of phase separation. We also see evidence of at least two defect structures that can be tentatively assigned to a three-membered ring structure and an oxygen vacancy. The latter is fairly strongly correlated with enhanced scintillation efficiency.

Bliss, Mary; Aker, Pamela M.; Windisch, Charles F.

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

440

Final report-passive safety optimization in liquid sodium-cooled reactors.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a three-year collaboration between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) to identify and quantify the performance of innovative design features in metallic-fueled, sodium-cooled fast reactor designs. The objective of the work was to establish the reliability and safety margin enhancements provided by design innovations offering significant potential for construction, maintenance, and operating cost reductions. The project goal was accomplished with a combination of advanced model development (Task 1), analysis of innovative design and safety features (Tasks 2 and 3), and planning of key safety experiments (Task 4). Task 1--Computational Methods for Analysis of Passive Safety Design Features: An advanced three-dimensional subassembly thermal-hydraulic model was developed jointly and implemented in ANL and KAERI computer codes. The objective of the model development effort was to provide a high-accuracy capability to predict fuel, cladding, coolant, and structural temperatures in reactor fuel subassemblies, and thereby reduce the uncertainties associated with lower fidelity models previously used for safety and design analysis. The project included model formulation, implementation, and verification by application to available reactor tests performed at EBR-II. Task 2--Comparative Analysis and Evaluation of Innovative Design Features: Integrated safety assessments of innovative liquid metal reactor designs were performed to quantify the performance of inherent safety features. The objective of the analysis effort was to identify the potential safety margin enhancements possible in a sodium-cooled, metal-fueled reactor design by use of passive safety mechanisms to mitigate low-probability accident consequences. The project included baseline analyses using state-of-the-art computational models and advanced analyses using the new model developed in Task 1. Task 3--Safety Implications of Advanced Technology Power Conversion and Design Innovations and Simplifications: Investigations of supercritical CO{sub 2} gas turbine Brayton cycles coupled to the sodium-cooled reactors and innovative concepts for sodium-to-CO{sub 2} heat exchangers were performed to discover new designs for high efficiency electricity production. The objective of the analyses was to characterize the design and safety performance of equipment needed to implement the new power cycle. The project included considerations of heat transfer and power conversion systems arrangements and evaluations of systems performance. Task 4--Post Accident Heat Removal and In-Vessel Retention: Test plans were developed to evaluate (1) freezing and plugging of molten metallic fuel in subassembly geometry, (2) retention of metallic fuel core melt debris within reactor vessel structures, and (3) consequences of intermixing of high pressure CO{sub 2} and sodium. The objective of the test plan development was to provide planning for measurements of data needed to characterize the consequences of very low probability accident sequences unique to metallic fuel and CO{sub 2} Brayton power cycles. The project produced three test plans ready for execution.

Cahalana, J. E.; Hahn, D.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst.

2007-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle Energy Conversion for Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors/Advanced Burner Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An optimized supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycle power converter has been developed for the 100 MWe (250 MWt) Advanced Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) eliminating the potential for sodium-water reactions and achieving a small power converter and turbine generator building. Cycle and plant efficiencies of 39.1 and 38.3 %, respectively, are calculated for the ABTR core outlet temperature of 510 deg. C. The ABTR S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle will incorporate Printed Circuit Heat Exchanger{sup TM} units in the Na-to-CO{sub 2} heat exchangers, high and low temperature recuperators, and cooler. A new sodium test facility is being completed to investigate the potential for transient plugging of narrow sodium channels typical of a Na-to-CO{sub 2} heat exchanger under postulated off-normal or accident conditions. (authors)

Sienicki, James J.; Moisseytsev, Anton; Cho, Dae H.; Momozaki, Yoichi; Kilsdonk, Dennis J.; Haglund, Robert C.; Reed, Claude B.; Farmer, Mitchell T. [Argonne National Laboratory 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Calcium-Mediated Regulation of Proton-Coupled Sodium Transport - Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The long-term goal of our experiments was to understand mechanisms that regulate energy coupling by ion currents in plants. Activities of living organisms require chemical, mechanical, osmotic or electrical work, the energy for which is supplied by metabolism. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) has long been recognized as the universal energy currency, with metabolism supporting the synthesis of ATP and the hydrolysis of ATP being used for the subsequent work. However, ATP is not the only energy currency in living organisms. A second and very different energy currency links metabolism to work by the movement of ions passing from one side of a membrane to the other. These ion currents play a major role in energy capture and they support a range of physiological processes from the active transport of nutrients to the spatial control of growth and development. In Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis), the activity of a plasma membrane Na+/H+ exchanger, SALT OVERLY SENSITIVE1 (SOS1), is essential for regulation of sodium ion homeostasis during plant growth in saline conditions. Mutations in SOS1 result in severely reduced seedling growth in the presence of salt compared to the growth of wild type. SOS1 is a secondary active transporter coupling movement of sodium ions out of the cell using energy stored in the transplasma membrane proton gradient, thereby preventing the build-up of toxic levels of sodium in the cytosol. SOS1 is regulated by complexes containing the SOS2 and CALCINEURIN B-LIKE10 (CBL10) or SOS3 proteins. CBL10 and SOS3 (also identified as CBL4) encode EF-hand calcium sensors that interact physically with and activate SOS2, a serine/threonine protein kinase. The CBL10/SOS2 or SOS3/SOS2 complexes then activate SOS1 Na+/H+ exchange activity. We completed our studies to understand how SOS1 activity is regulated. Specifically, we asked: (1) how does CBL10 regulate SOS1 activity? (2) What role do two putative CBL10-interacting proteins play in SOS1 regulation? (3) Are there differences in the regulation and/or activity of SOS1 in plants differing in their adaptation to salinity?

Schumaker, Karen S [Professor] [Professor

2013-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

443

Sodium pumps adapt spike bursting to stimulus Sara Arganda1,2,4, Raul Guantes1,3,4 & Gonzalo G de Polavieja1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sodium pumps adapt spike bursting to stimulus statistics Sara Arganda1,2,4, Rau´l Guantes1,3,4 & Gonzalo G de Polavieja1,2 Pump activity is a homeostatic mechanism that maintains ionic gradients. Here we examined whether the slow reduction in excitability induced by sodium-pump activity that has been seen

Guantes, Raúl

444

Process Options Description for Vitrification Flowsheet Model of INEEL Sodium Bearing Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to provide the technical information to Savannah River Site (SRS) personnel that is required for the development of a basic steady-state process simulation of the vitrification treatment train of sodium bearing waste (SBW) at Idaho National Engineering and nvironmental Laboratory (INEEL). INEEL considers simulation to have an important role in the integration/optimization of treatment process trains for the High Level Waste (HLW) Program. This project involves a joint Technical Task Plan (TTP ID77WT31, Subtask C) between SRS and INEEL. The work scope of simulation is different at the two sites. This document addresses only the treatment of SBW at INEEL. The simulation model(s) is to be built by SRS for INEEL in FY-2001.

Nichols, Todd Travis; Taylor, Dean Dalton; Lauerhass, Lance; Barnes, Charles Marshall

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Thermal Response of the Hybrid Loop-Pool Design for Sodium Cooled Faster Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An innovative hybrid loop-pool design for the sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR) has been recently proposed with the primary objective of achieving cost reduction and safety enhancement. With the hybrid loop-pool design, closed primary loops are immersed in a secondary buffer tank. This design takes advantage of features from conventional both pool and loop designs to further improve economics and safety. This paper will briefly introduce the hybrid loop-pool design concept and present the calculated thermal responses for unproctected (without reactor scram) loss of forced circulation (ULOF) transients using RELAP5-3D. The analyses examine both the inherent reactivity shutdown capability and decay heat removal performance by passive safety systems.

Zhang, Hongbin; Zhao, Haihua; Davis, Cliff

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Two-dimensional modeling of sodium boiling transients in simulated LMFBR fuel bundles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A two-dimensional code for analysis of sodium boiling in LMFBR fuel assemblies has been developed at ORNL. This code, THORAX, has been used to analyze tests in 19- and 61-pin electrically-heated, simulated LMFBR fuel assemblies in the THORS facility. THORAX has simulated well the transient growth of the two-dimensional boiling region and the resulting static flow instability leading to dryout. Extrapolation of results to a full size fuel pin bundle shows that two-dimensional effects are reduced but still significant. The code will be extended to include a loop model in support of forthcoming tests in the THORS-SHRS Assembly 1 loop, which will include two parallel 19-pin simulated driver bundles.

Rose, S.D.; Dearing, J.F; Carbajo, J.J.; Levin, A.E.; Montgomery, B.H.; Wantland, J.L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Effect of sodium monofluorophosphate treatment on microstructure and frost salt scaling durability of slag cement paste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sodium-monofluorophosphate (Na-MFP) is currently in use as a surface applied corrosion inhibitor in the concrete industry. Its basic mechanism is to protect the passive layer of the reinforcement steel against disruption due to carbonation. Carbonation is known as the most detrimental environmental effect on blast furnace slag cement (BFSC) concrete with respect to frost salt scaling. In this paper the effect of Na-MFP on the microstructure and frost salt scaling resistance of carbonated BFSC paste is presented. The results of electron microscopy, mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) are discussed. It is found that the treatment modifies the microstructure and improves the resistance of carbonated BFSC paste against frost salt attack.

Copuroglu, O. [Delft University of Technology, Faculty of CiTG, Micromechanics Laboratory (MICROLAB) (Netherlands)]. E-mail: o.copuroglu@citg.tudelft.nl; Fraaij, A.L.A. [Delft University of Technology, Faculty of CiTG, Materials Science and Sustainable Construction (Netherlands); Bijen, J.M.J.M. [Delft University of Technology, Faculty of CiTG, Materials Science and Sustainable Construction (Netherlands)

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

448

FLOWSHEET EVALUATION FOR THE DISSOLVING AND NEUTRALIZATION OF SODIUM REACTOR EXPERIMENT USED NUCLEAR FUEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report includes the literature review, hydrogen off-gas calculations, and hydrogen generation tests to determine that H-Canyon can safely dissolve the Sodium Reactor Experiment (SRE; thorium fuel), Ford Nuclear Reactor (FNR; aluminum alloy fuel), and Denmark Reactor (DR-3; silicide fuel, aluminum alloy fuel, and aluminum oxide fuel) assemblies in the L-Bundles with respect to the hydrogen levels in the projected peak off-gas rates. This is provided that the number of L-Bundles charged to the dissolver is controlled. Examination of SRE dissolution for potential issues has aided in predicting the optimal batching scenario. The calculations detailed in this report demonstrate that the FNR, SRE, and DR-3 used nuclear fuel (UNF) are bounded by MURR UNF and may be charged using the controls outlined for MURR dissolution in a prior report.

Daniel, W. E.; Hansen, E. K.; Shehee, T. C.

2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

449

Malignant hyperthermia-like reaction in a family with a sodium channel mutation at residue 1306  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Malignant hyperthermia susceptibility (MHS) is an autosomal dominant, hypermetabolic disorder, triggered by potent inhalational anesthetics. We have previously suggeste the skeletal muscle sodium channel {alpha}-subunit (SCN4A) as a gene candidate to explain some forms of MHS. To evaluate this gene for mutations that might lead to a MHS-like episode, we amplified genomic DNA by PCR and used SSCP to screen each exon. We studied multiple MHS families which may be linked to this gene. The proband and a sibling from one of these families suspected of having MHS experienced trismus and body rigidity after induction of anesthesia. The caffiene and halothane contracture test proved diagnostic in these individuals and EMG studies suggested a form of myotomia. A mutation co-segregating with the myotonia/MHS phenotype was found in the region of exon 22.

Vita, G.M.; Jedlicka, A.E.; Levitt, R.C. [Johns Hopkins Medical Institute, Baltimore, MD (United States)] [and others

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Energy savings with solid-state ballasted high-pressure sodium lamps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The performance of three types of solid-state ballasts used to operate high-pressure sodium lamps is discussed. Each type of solid-state ballast has been designed to operate an HPS lamp of a different wattage (150, 200, and 400 watts). The performance of these ballasts compared to standard core-coil ballasts operating the same HPS lamps shows that system efficiency improves as much as 17%. The solid-state ballasted HPS system also demonstrates excellent regulation with respect to input voltage and output power. These new ballasts can dim the HPS lamps and reduce flicker from more than 60% to less than 3%. Refitting street lighting with these new HPS systims provides an attractive return on initial capital investment.

Verderber, R.R.; Morse, O.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Sensitivity Analysis of Reprocessing Cooling Times on Light Water Reactor and Sodium Fast Reactor Fuel Cycles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to quantify the effects of variations of the Light Water Reactor (LWR) Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) and fast reactor reprocessing cooling time on a Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) assuming a single-tier fuel cycle scenario. The results from this study show the effects of different cooling times on the SFRs transuranic (TRU) conversion ratio (CR) and transuranic fuel enrichment. Also, the decay heat, gamma heat and neutron emission of the SFRs fresh fuel charge were evaluated. A 1000 MWth commercial-scale SFR design was selected as the baseline in this study. Both metal and oxide CR=0.50 SFR designs are investigated.

R. M. Ferrer; S. Bays; M. Pope

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

R and D program for core instrumentation improvements devoted for French sodium fast reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the framework of French R and D studies for Generation IV reactors and more specifically for sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFR); the CEA, EDF and AREVA have launched a joint coordinated research programme. This paper deals with the R and D sets out to achieve better inspection, maintenance, availability and decommissioning. In particular the instrumentation requirements for core monitoring and detection in the case of accidental events. Requirements mainly involve diversifying the means of protection and improving instrumentation performance in terms of responsiveness and sensitivity. Operation feedback from the Phenix and Superphenix prototype reactors and studies, carried out within the scope of the EFR projects, has been used to define the needs for instrumentation enhancement. (authors)

Jeannot, J. P.; Rodriguez, G.; Jammes, C.; Bernardin, B.; Portier, J. L.; Jadot, F. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, 13108 (France); Maire, S.; Verrier, D. [Advanced Projects and Decommissioning Div. Plant Sector AREVA NP - NEPL-FT, Lyon, 69000 (France); Loisy, F. [EDF - EDF R and D STEP Dept., 6 Quai Watier, Chatou, 78401 (France); Prele, G. [EDF, Generation/Nuclear Engineering, Basic Design Dept., Villeurbanne, 69628 (France)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Near fifty percent sodium substituted lanthanum manganitesA potential magnetic refrigerant for room temperature applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nearly half of lanthanum sites in lanthanum manganites were substituted with monovalent ion-sodium and the compound possessed distorted orthorhombic structure. Ferromagnetic ordering at 300?K and the magnetic isotherms at different temperature ranges were analyzed for estimating magnetic entropy variation. Magnetic entropy change of 1.5?Jkg{sup ?1}K{sup ?1} was observed near 300?K. An appreciable magnetocaloric effect was also observed for a wide range of temperatures near 300?K for small magnetic field variation. Heat capacity was measured for temperatures lower than 300?K and the adiabatic temperature change increases with increase in temperature with a maximum of 0.62?K at 280?K.

Sethulakshmi, N.; Anantharaman, M. R., E-mail: mraiyer@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Cochin 682022, Kerala (India); Al-Omari, I. A. [Department of Physics, Sultan Qaboos University, PC 123 Muscat, Sultanate of Oman (Oman); Suresh, K. G. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076 (India)

2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

454

Crystallization of Sodium Phosphate Dodecahydrate and Re-Crystallization to Natrophosphate in Simulated Hanford Nuclear Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nuclear waste at the Hanford site near Richland, WA, has large concentrations of phosphate in the form of the phosphate ion, sodium phosphate dodecahydrate (Na3PO4.12H2O.(1/4)NaOH) and natrophosphate (Na7F(PO4)3.19H2O). Sodium phosphate dodecahydrate can form a gel and natrophosphate can crystallize large particles, complicating the processing of slurries of both salts. The gel is regarded as more problematic, so natrophosphate has historically been crystallized to prevent phosphate gelling. This study determined that natrophosphate crystals can grow to large size in short time periods (a few weeks), time periods relevant to short process shutdowns. Solutions of NaOH and NaAl(OH)4 were blended at different ratios with stock solutions containing NaOH, NaF, and Na3PO4 at 50 C. The mixtures were allowed to cool to 22 C, and the crystal growth was monitored by Polarized Light Microscopy (PLM) for 17 days. Four of the six blends investigated gelled rapidly due to Na3PO4.12H2O.(1/4)NaOH precipitation. The gel slowly dissipated over time as the solids recrystallized into natrophosphate. In one case, the natrophosphate reached sizes of greater than 1000 microns in diameter in just 4 days. This rapid gelling and crystallization kinetics is important to engineers trying to manage nuclear wastes high in phosphates. Hanford tank farm engineers are developing sampling plans to support temperature and process control strategies for preventing the formation of solid phosphates. They are also developing methods of suspending large natrophosphate crystals.

Reynolds, J. G.

2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

455

Sodium reflux pool-boiler solar receiver on-sun test results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The efficient operation of a Stirling engine requires the application of a high heat flux to the relatively small area occupied by the heater head tubes. Previous attempts to couple solar energy to Stirling engines generally involved directly illuminating the heater head tubes with concentrated sunlight. In this study, operation of a 75-kW{sub t} sodium reflux pool-boiler solar receiver has been demonstrated and its performance characterized on Sandia's nominal 75-kW{sub t} parabolic-dish concentrator, using a cold-water gas-gap calorimeter to simulate Stirling engine operation. The pool boiler (and more generally liquid-metal reflux receivers) supplies heat to the engine in the form of latent heat released from condensation of the metal vapor on the heater head tubes. The advantages of the pool boiler include uniform tube temperature, leading to longer life and higher temperature available to the engine, and decoupling of the design of the solar absorber from the engine heater head. The two-phase system allows high input thermal flux, reducing the receiver size and losses, therefore improving system efficiency. The receiver thermal efficiency was about 90% when operated at full power and 800{degree}C. Stable sodium boiling was promoted by the addition of 35 equally spaced artificial cavities in the wetted absorber surface. High incipient boiling superheats following cloud transients were suppressed passively by the addition of small amounts of xenon gas to the receiver volume. Stable boiling without excessive incipient boiling superheats was observed under all operating conditions. The receiver developed a leak during performance evaluation, terminating the testing after accumulating about 50 hours on sun. The receiver design is reported here along with test results including transient operations, steady-state performance evaluation, operation at various temperatures, infrared thermography, x-ray studies of the boiling behavior, and a postmortem analysis.

Andraka, C E; Moreno, J B; Diver, R B; Moss, T A [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

A High Temperature Electrochemical Energy Storage System Based on Sodium Beta-Alumina Solid Electrolyte (Base)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work done during the period September 1, 2005 and March 31, 2008. Work was conducted in the following areas: (1) Fabrication of sodium beta{double_prime} alumina solid electrolyte (BASE) using a vapor phase process. (2) Mechanistic studies on the conversion of {alpha}-alumina + zirconia into beta{double_prime}-alumina + zirconia by the vapor phase process. (3) Characterization of BASE by X-ray diffraction, SEM, and conductivity measurements. (4) Design, construction and electrochemical testing of a symmetric cell containing BASE as the electrolyte and NaCl + ZnCl{sub 2} as the electrodes. (5) Design, construction, and electrochemical evaluation of Na/BASE/ZnCl{sub 2} electrochemical cells. (6) Stability studies in ZnCl{sub 2}, SnCl{sub 2}, and SnI{sub 4} (7) Design, assembly and testing of planar stacks. (8) Investigation of the effect of porous surface layers on BASE on cell resistance. The conventional process for the fabrication of sodium ion conducting beta{double_prime}-alumina involves calcination of {alpha}-alumina + Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} + LiNO{sub 3} at 1250 C, followed by sintering powder compacts in sealed containers (platinum or MgO) at {approx}1600 C. The novel vapor phase process involves first sintering a mixture of {alpha}-alumina + yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) into a dense ceramic followed by exposure to soda vapor at {approx}1450 C to convert {alpha}-alumina into beta{double_prime}-alumina. The vapor phase process leads to a high strength BASE, which is also resistant to moisture attack, unlike BASE made by the conventional process. The PI is the lead inventor of the process. Discs and tubes of BASE were fabricated in the present work. In the conventional process, sintering of BASE is accomplished by a transient liquid phase mechanism wherein the liquid phase contains NaAlO{sub 2}. Some NaAlO{sub 2} continues to remain at grain boundaries; and is the root cause of its water sensitivity. In the vapor phase process, NaAlO{sub 2} is never formed. Conversion occurs by a coupled transport of Na{sup +} through BASE formed and of O{sup 2-} through YSZ to the reaction front. Transport to the reaction front is described in terms of a chemical diffusion coefficient of Na{sub 2}O. The conversion kinetics as a function of microstructure is under investigation. The mechanism of conversion is described in this report. A number of discs and tubes of BASE have been fabricated by the vapor phase process. The material was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), before and after conversion. Conductivity (which is almost exclusively due to sodium ion transport at the temperatures of interest) was measured. Conductivity was measured using sodium-sodium tests as well as by impedance spectroscopy. Various types of both planar and tubular electrochemical cells were assembled and tested. In some cases the objective was to determine if there was any interaction between the salt and BASE. The interaction of interest was mainly ion exchange (possible replacement of sodium ion by the salt cation). It was noted that Zn{sup 2+} did not replace Na+ over the conditions of interest. For this reason much of the work was conducted with ZnCl{sub 2} as the cathode salt. In the case of Sn-based, Sn{sup 2+} did ion exchange, but Sn{sup 4+} did not. This suggests that Sn{sup 4+} salts are viable candidates. These results and implications are discussed in the report. Cells made with Na as the anode and ZnCl{sub 2} as the cathode were successfully charged/discharged numerous times. The key advantages of the batteries under investigation here over the Na-S batteries are: (1) Steel wool can be used in the cathode compartment unlike Na-S batteries which require expensive graphite. (2) Planar cells can be constructed in addition to tubular, allowing for greater design flexibility and integration with other devices such as planar SOFC. (3) Comparable or higher open circuit voltage (OCV) than the Na-S battery. (4) Wider operating temperature range and higher temper

Anil Virkar

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

457

High-Pressure Synthesis and Structure Determination of K6(SeO4)(SeO5), The First Potassium Orthoselenate(VI)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors report on the first synthesis of a potassium orthoselenate(VI), K{sub 6}(SeO{sub 4})(SeO{sub 5}), and the structure determination from synchrotron powder diffraction data. The title compound crystallizes in the tetragonal space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 with a = 8.1259(1) {angstrom}, c = 17.4953(2) {angstrom}, V = 1155.21(2) {angstrom}{sup 3}, and Z = 4. Selenium displays two different complex anions, tetrahedral SeO{sub 4}{sup 2-} and trigonal-bipyramidal SeO{sub 5}{sup 4-}. When the formula is reduced to A{sub 3}B, the spatial arrangement of the constituting building units can be derived from the Li{sub 3}Bi type of structure.

Orosel,D.; Dinnebeier, R.; Jansen, M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Tetrodotoxin binding sites in human heart and human brain sodium channels. Final report, 28 June 1991-27 June 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tetrodotoxin (TTX) and saxitoxin (STX) are potent and lethal threats to exposed soldiers. The development of an antidote or site-specific antibodies for low affinity TTX/STX cardiac sodium channels and high affinity TTX/STX brain and peripheral nerve sodium channels requires a data base not only of the primary structure of the toxin receptor site(s) but also insight into the secondary structures of these site(s). Five goals or tasks were attempted and the first three were completed. Full-length human cardiac and brain sodium channel cDNAs have been cloned and expressed as functional proteins in Xenopus oocytes. Silent restriction sites have been introduced around the pore or P-region of the Na+ channel repeats. Site-directed mutagenesis has identified critical residues in the pore from the primary structure involved in sensitivity to TTX and STX and other pore properties. Chemical modification of cysteine mutants of these initial residues by methanethiosulfonate compounds produces an expanded data base of the secondary structure of the toxins` receptors. Specific peptides which mimic these receptors will be made to compete with the natural receptor for the toxins. We have successfully cloned the cDNAs for both human heart and brain sodium channels and expressed functional proteins. The initial chemical modification data suggests file receptor sites for TTX/STX are not interchangeable and are not the same site.

Brown, A.M.; Hartmann, H.A.

1994-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

459

F POWER MEASUREMENT FOR GENERATION IV SODIUM FAST R. COULON, S. NORMAND, M. MICHEL, L. BARBOT, T. DOMENECH,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.F-84500 Bollène, France. ABSTRACT The Phénix nuclear power plant has been a French Sodium Fast Reactor. Drift between the measured ex-core neutron flux and the instant released thermal power (fission rate the research of power tagging agents. Then, simulation study has been done to evaluate measurability using high

Boyer, Edmond

460

Stable aqueous dispersions of graphitic nanoplatelets via the reduction of exfoliated graphite oxide in the presence of poly(sodium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stable aqueous dispersions of graphitic nanoplatelets via the reduction of exfoliated graphite be prepared via an exfoliation/in-situ reduction of graphite oxide in the presence of poly(sodium 4 prepare graphite nanoplatelets via the chemical reduction of exfoliated graphite oxide nanoplatelets

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manganese potassium sodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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461

Physiological responses to training and racing in two year-old Quarter Horses fed Sodium Zeolite A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Table 82A Page Packed cell volume ('/0) at recovery 10 minutes in two- year-old Quarter Horses fed varying amounts of Sodium Zeolite A Table 83A. Packed cell volume (/o) at recovery 20 minutes in two- year-old Quarter Horses fed varying amounts...

Reynolds, Judith Amy Lundgren

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

462

Phosphatidylinositol 4-Phosphate 5-Kinase Reduces Cell Surface Expression of the Epithelial Sodium Channel (ENaC)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Phosphatidylinositol 4-Phosphate 5-Kinase Reduces Cell Surface Expression of the Epithelial Sodium levels and reduced apical surface expression of ENaC in CCD cells, down-regulating amiloride- sensitive Channel (ENaC) in Cultured Collecting Duct Cells* Received for publication,May 14, 2007, and in revised

Weisz, Ora A.

463

Inhibition of Sodium/Proton Exchange by a Rab-GTPase-activating Protein Regulates Endosomal Traffic in Yeast*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inhibition of Sodium/Proton Exchange by a Rab-GTPase-activating Protein Regulates Endosomal Traffic- boxypeptidase Y to the cell surface. We conclude that Gyp6 is a negative regulator of Nhx1-dependent traffick and down- stream events in the PVC to Golgi pathway. Our findings provide a possible molecular link between

Rao, Rajini

464

Small angle neutron scattering study of deuterated sodium dodecylsulfate micellization in dilute poly((2edimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Small angle neutron scattering study of deuterated sodium dodecylsulfate micellization in dilute 2010 Keywords: Poly((2edimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) Micelle Small angle neutron scattering a b angle neutron scattering. We found three transitions of the poly ((2edimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate

Kofinas, Peter

465

Influence of misonidazole on the radiation response of murine tumors of different size: possible artifacts caused by pentobarbital sodium anesthesia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radiosensitivity of a transplantable murine adenocarcinoma decreased with increasing tumor volume. In unanesthetized mice this phenomenon (based on the effect of the hypoxic cell sensitizer misonidazole), in the range of volumes studied, can largely be explained by the appearance of hypoxic cells in the tumor during growth. The use of pentobarbital sodium during irradiation is confiremd to be a disturbing factor, as it may increase the hypoxic cell fraction in the tumors. No evidence was found for a direct radiochemical protection because of pentobarbital sodium. The radioprotective effect of the anesthetic could only be demonstrated in conditions where there is already a fraction of hypoxic cells; no influence of the anesthesia was found in small tumors in which the fraction of hypoxic cells was relatively small. This may account for the previously conflicting data on the influence of pentobarbital sodium anesthesia. The vascularization of larger tumors is apparently inferior to smaller tumors and this has important repercussions in the case of anesthesia. Changes in blood flow induced by pentobarbital sodium in larger tumors cause an insufficient oxygenation and hence acute hypoxia.

Wondergem, J.; Haveman, J.; van der Schueren, E.; van den Hoeven, H.; Breur, K.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Mercury Lamps Recycling Fluorescent light-tubes, compact fluorescent bulbs, mercury and sodium vapor lamps, ultraviolet and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mercury Lamps Recycling Fluorescent light-tubes, compact fluorescent bulbs, mercury and sodium vapor lamps, ultraviolet and HID (high-intensity discharge) lamps and all other mercury containing labeled for shipment to a recycling plant for mercury, glass and aluminum recovery. The beneficial re

Baker, Chris I.

467

Progress reports for Gen IV sodium fast reactor activities FY 2007.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An important goal of the US DOE Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) program is to develop the technology necessary to increase safety margins in future fast reactor systems. Although no decision has been made yet about who will build the next demonstration fast reactor, it seems likely that the construction team will include a combination of international companies, and the safety design philosophy for the reactor will reflect a consensus of the participating countries. A significant amount of experience in the design and safety analysis of Sodium Fast Reactors (SFR) using oxide fuel has been developed in both Japan and France during last few decades. In the US, the traditional approach to reactor safety is based on the principle of defense-in-depth, which is usually expressed in physical terms as multiple barriers to release of radioactive material (e.g. cladding, reactor vessel, containment building), but it is understood that the 'barriers' may consist of active systems or even procedures. As implemented in a reactor design, defense-in-depth is classed in levels of safety. Level 1 includes measures to specify and build a reliable design with significant safety margins that will perform according to the intentions of the designers. Level 2 consists of additional design measures, usually active systems, to protect against unlikely accidental events that may occur during the life of the plant. Level 3 design measures are intended to protect the public in the event of an extremely unlikely accident not foreseen to occur during the plant's life. All of the design measures that make up the first three levels of safety are within the design basis of the plant. Beyond Level 3, and beyond the normal design basis, there are accidents that are not expected to occur in a whole generation of plants, and it is in this class that severe accidents, i.e. accidents involving core melting, are included. Beyond design basis measures to address severe accidents are usually identified as being for prevention of progression into severe accident conditions (prevention of core melting) or for mitigation of severe accident consequences (mitigation of the impact of core melting to protect public health and safety). Because design measures for severe accident prevention and mitigation are beyond the normal design basis, established regulatory guidelines and codes do not provide explicit identification of the design performance requirements for severe accident accommodation. The treatment of severe accidents is one of the key issues of R&D plans for the Gen IV systems in general, and for the Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) in particular. Despite the lack of an unambiguous definition of safety approach applicable for severe accidents, there is an emerging consensus on the need for their consideration for the design. The US SFR program and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in particular have actively studied the potential scenarios and consequences of Hypothetical Core Disruptive Accidents (HCDA) for SFRs with oxide fuel during the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) and Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) programs in the 70s and 80s. Later, the focus of the US SFR safety R&D activities shifted to the prevention of all HCDAs through passive safety features of the SFRs with metal fuel in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) program, and the study of severe accident consequences was de-emphasized. The goal of this paper is to provide an overview of the current SFR safety approach and the role of severe accidents in Japan and France, in preparation for an expected and more active collaboration in this area between the US, Japan, and France.

Cahalan, J. E.; Tentner, A. M.; Nuclear Engineering Division