Sample records for managing treatment storage

  1. EIS-0200: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    EIS evaluates the potential environmental and cost impacts of strategic managment alternatives for managing five types of radioactive and hazardous wastes that have resulted and...

  2. Secondary Storage Management Himanshu Gupta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Himanshu

    Secondary Storage Management Himanshu Gupta Storage­1 #12;Outline · Memory Hierarchy · Disk Records/Fields · Deletions and Insertions of Records Himanshu Gupta Storage­2 #12;Himanshu Gupta Storage­3 Memory Hierarchy Cache (1 MB; 1-5 nsec) Main Memory (GBs; 10-100 nsec) Secondary Storage

  3. Storage management solutions Buyer's guide: purchasing criteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Storage management solutions Buyer's guide: purchasing criteria Manage your storage to meet service storage environment cohesively As new guidelines or regulations surface, storage administrators receive increasing numbers of requests for change (RFCs) in storage provisioning. Simultaneously, routine changes

  4. Energy Storage Management for VG Integration (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirby, B.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation describes how you economically manage integration costs of storage and variable generation.

  5. Enterprise Storage Management System Dan Glasser1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayad, Mohamed

    Enterprise Storage Management System Dan Glasser1 , Madeline Hardojo1 , Anand Sundaram1 , Nate.fayad@sjsu.edu Abstract: Enterprise Storage Management System is an interactive and user-friendly program that will enable the Lincoln Telephone Company to efficiently manage their storage system. With this system, the Lincoln

  6. Presented by Robust Storage Management in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vazhkudai, Sudharshan

    , intermediate checkpoint storage or a staging ground ­ Job's own allocated nodes can contribute storage spacePresented by Robust Storage Management in the Machine Room and Beyond Sudharshan Vazhkudai Computer Problem space: HPC storage crisis · Data checkpointing, staging, and offloading are all affected by data

  7. Medical Management Treatment Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bezrukov, Sergey M.

    Medical Management Treatment Manual: A Clinical Guide for Researchers and Clinicians) This manual is an adaptation of: Medical Management Treatment Manual: A Clinical Research Guide for Medically, Maryland #12;Message to the Users of this Medical Management (MM) Manual from the Editors Background

  8. Underground storage tank management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Underground Storage Tank (UST) Management Program at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant was established to locate UST systems in operation at the facility, to ensure that all operating UST systems are free of leaks, and to establish a program for the removal of unnecessary UST systems and upgrade of UST systems that continue to be needed. The program implements an integrated approach to the management of UST systems, with each system evaluated against the same requirements and regulations. A common approach is employed, in accordance with Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) regulations and guidance, when corrective action is mandated. This Management Plan outlines the compliance issues that must be addressed by the UST Management Program, reviews the current UST inventory and compliance approach, and presents the status and planned activities associated with each UST system. The UST Management Plan provides guidance for implementing TDEC regulations and guidelines for petroleum UST systems. (There are no underground radioactive waste UST systems located at Y-12.) The plan is divided into four major sections: (1) regulatory requirements, (2) implementation requirements, (3) Y-12 Plant UST Program inventory sites, and (4) UST waste management practices. These sections describe in detail the applicable regulatory drivers, the UST sites addressed under the Management Program, and the procedures and guidance used for compliance with applicable regulations.

  9. Presented by Robust Storage Management in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /memory to present a collective, intermediate checkpoint storage or a staging ground ­ Job's own allocated nodes canPresented by Robust Storage Management in the Machine Room and Beyond Sudharshan Vazhkudai Computer_Freeloading_SC10 Problem space: HPC storage crisis · Data checkpointing, staging, and offloading are all affected

  10. Efficient Management of Idleness in Storage Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smirni, Evgenia

    -off between the performance of fore- ground and background tasks. As a result, the storage system is better4 Efficient Management of Idleness in Storage Systems NINGFANG MI College of William and Mary ALMA of storage sys- tems are scheduled with low priority and served during idle times. Under such conditions

  11. Management issues for high performance storage systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louis, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Burris, R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Managing distributed high-performance storage systems is complex and, although sharing common ground with traditional network and systems management, presents unique storage-related issues. Integration technologies and frameworks exist to help manage distributed network and system environments. Industry-driven consortia provide open forums where vendors and users cooperate to leverage solutions. But these new approaches to open management fall short addressing the needs of scalable, distributed storage. We discuss the motivation and requirements for storage system management (SSM) capabilities and describe how SSM manages distributed servers and storage resource objects in the High Performance Storage System (HPSS), a new storage facility for data-intensive applications and large-scale computing. Modem storage systems, such as HPSS, require many SSM capabilities, including server and resource configuration control, performance monitoring, quality of service, flexible policies, file migration, file repacking, accounting, and quotas. We present results of initial HPSS SSM development including design decisions and implementation trade-offs. We conclude with plans for follow-on work and provide storage-related recommendations for vendors and standards groups seeking enterprise-wide management solutions.

  12. EIS-0423: Storage and Management of Elemental Mercury | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    23: Storage and Management of Elemental Mercury EIS-0423: Storage and Management of Elemental Mercury Summary This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts associated with the...

  13. Management and Storage of Surface Waters (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Environmental Protection regulates the use and storage of surface waters in the state. A permit from either the Department or the local Water Management District is required for...

  14. Bottling Electricity: Storage as a Strategic Tool for Managing...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Bottling Electricity: Storage as a Strategic Tool for Managing Variability and Capacity Concerns in the Modern Grid - EAC Report (December 2008) Bottling Electricity: Storage as a...

  15. Records Management Procedures for Storage, Transfer and Retrieval...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Procedures for Storage, Transfer and Retrieval of Records from WNRC Records Management Procedures for Storage, Transfer and Retrieval of Records from WNRC Develop and maintain a...

  16. Supplemental analysis of accident sequences and source terms for waste treatment and storage operations and related facilities for the US Department of Energy waste management programmatic environmental impact statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Folga, S.; Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Kohout, E.; Mishima, J.

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents supplemental information for the document Analysis of Accident Sequences and Source Terms at Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities for Waste Generated by US Department of Energy Waste Management Operations. Additional technical support information is supplied concerning treatment of transuranic waste by incineration and considering the Alternative Organic Treatment option for low-level mixed waste. The latest respirable airborne release fraction values published by the US Department of Energy for use in accident analysis have been used and are included as Appendix D, where respirable airborne release fraction is defined as the fraction of material exposed to accident stresses that could become airborne as a result of the accident. A set of dominant waste treatment processes and accident scenarios was selected for a screening-process analysis. A subset of results (release source terms) from this analysis is presented.

  17. A Linear Storage-Retrieval Policy for Robust Warehouse Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcus Ang

    2008-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Nov 10, 2008 ... A Linear Storage-Retrieval Policy for Robust Warehouse Management ... Keywords: Dynamic programming, Transportation, Materials handling, ...

  18. Optimal Demand Response with Energy Storage Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Longbo; Ramchandran, Kannan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we consider the problem of optimal demand response and energy storage management for a power consuming entity. The entity's objective is to find an optimal control policy for deciding how much load to consume, how much power to purchase from/sell to the power grid, and how to use the finite capacity energy storage device and renewable energy, to minimize his average cost, being the disutility due to load- shedding and cost for purchasing power. Due to the coupling effect of the finite size energy storage, such problems are challenging and are typically tackled using dynamic programming, which is often complex in computation and requires substantial statistical information of the system dynamics. We instead develop a low-complexity algorithm called Demand Response with Energy Storage Management (DR-ESM). DR-ESM does not require any statistical knowledge of the system dynamics, including the renewable energy and the power prices. It only requires the entity to solve a small convex optimization pr...

  19. B Plant treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) units inspection plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beam, T.G.

    1996-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This inspection plan is written to meet the requirements of WAC 173-303 for operations of a TSD facility. Owners/operators of TSD facilities are required to inspection their facility and active waste management units to prevent and/or detect malfunctions, discharges and other conditions potentially hazardous to human health and the environment. A written plan detailing these inspection efforts must be maintained at the facility in accordance with Washington Administrative Code (WAC), Chapter 173-303, ``Dangerous Waste Regulations`` (WAC 173-303), a written inspection plan is required for the operation of a treatment, storage and disposal (TSD) facility and individual TSD units. B Plant is a permitted TSD facility currently operating under interim status with an approved Part A Permit. Various operational systems and locations within or under the control of B Plant have been permitted for waste management activities. Included are the following TSD units: Cell 4 Container Storage Area; B Plant Containment Building; Low Level Waste Tank System; Organic Waste Tank System; Neutralized Current Acid Waste (NCAW) Tank System; Low Level Waste Concentrator Tank System. This inspection plan complies with the requirements of WAC 173-303. It addresses both general TSD facility and TSD unit-specific inspection requirements. Sections on each of the TSD units provide a brief description of the system configuration and the permitted waste management activity, a summary of the inspection requirements, and details on the activities B Plant uses to maintain compliance with those requirements.

  20. Sandia's research spans generation, storage, and load management at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    kW diesel genset, fuel cells, and additional interchangeable generators. Storage capabilitiesSandia's research spans generation, storage, and load management at the component and systems participate in the generation of industry guidelines, protocols, electric codes, and national

  1. Colorado River Storage Project Management Center Customer Meeting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    River Storage Project Management Center Customer Meeting May 21, 2015 TABLE OF CONTENTS RATES 1 RATES PRESENTATION HANDOUTS 2 REPAYMENT MILESTONE AND STATUS OF REPAYMENT 3 CURRENT...

  2. 3718-F Alkali Metal Treatment and Storage Facility Closure Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1987, Westinghouse Hanford Company has been a major contractor to the U.S. Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office and has served as co-operator of the 3718-F Alkali Metal Treatment and Storage Facility, the waste management unit addressed in this closure plan. The closure plan consists of a Part A Dangerous waste Permit Application and a RCRA Closure Plan. An explanation of the Part A Revision (Revision 1) submitted with this document is provided at the beginning of the Part A section. The closure plan consists of 9 chapters and 5 appendices. The chapters cover: introduction; facility description; process information; waste characteristics; groundwater; closure strategy and performance standards; closure activities; postclosure; and references.

  3. INCREASING STORAGE CAPAPCITY OF DREDGED MATERIAL MANAGEMENT AREAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INCREASING STORAGE CAPAPCITY OF DREDGED MATERIAL MANAGEMENT AREAS Timothy D. Stark, Ph.D., P 39180 Paper Published in the Proceedings of: 15th Annual Meeting of Western Dredging Association (WEDA XV) San Diego, CA May 1994 #12;2 INCREASING STORAGE CAPAPCITY OF DREDGED MAERIAL MANAGEMENT AREAS

  4. PodBase: Transparent storage management for personal devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Druschel, Peter

    PodBase: Transparent storage management for personal devices Ansley Post Petr Kuznetsov PeterBase, a system that automatically manages the data and storage across a household's personal devices and frees Druschel Max Planck Institute for Software Systems Rice University 1. INTRODUCTION Personal electronic

  5. ORS 466 - Storage, Treatment, and Disposal of Hazardous Waste...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ORS 466 - Storage, Treatment, and Disposal of Hazardous Waste and Materials Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: ORS...

  6. SciTech Connect: Control and Size Energy Storage for Managing...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Control and Size Energy Storage for Managing Energy balance of Variable Generation Resources Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Control and Size Energy Storage for Managing...

  7. Storage Management for Object-Oriented Database Management Systems: A Comparative Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waterloo, University of

    Storage Management for Object-Oriented Database Management Systems: A Comparative Survey David Dueck, Yiwen Jiang, and Archana Sawhney Contents 1 Introduction * * 71 2 The O2 Object Manager 71 2.1 Object

  8. Autonomous storage management for personal devices with Ansley Post

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Druschel, Peter

    Autonomous storage management for personal devices with PodBase Ansley Post Juan Navarro¶ Petr MPI-SWS-2011-001 Abstract People use an increasing number of personal elec- tronic devices like on personal devices. The system takes advantage of unused storage and in- cidental connectivity to propagate

  9. Design and implementation of wavescope storage manager and access scheduler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Jeremy Elliot

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, I designed, implemented, and analyzed the performance of an optimized storage manager for the Wavescope project. In doing this, I implemented an importation system that converts CENSAM data into a format ...

  10. Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Mercury Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury In addition to banning the export of elemental mercury from the United States as of January 1, 2013, the Mercury...

  11. Energy Storage R&D - Thermal Management Studies and Modeling

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Merit Review Energy Storage R&D Thermal Management Studies and Modeling Ahmad A. Pesaran, Ph. D. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado February 25-28, 2008 DOE...

  12. Plutonium Finishing Plan (PFP) Treatment and Storage Unit Interim Status Closure Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PRIGNANO, A.L.

    2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the planned activities and performance standards for closing the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Treatment and Storage Unit. The PFP Treatment and Storage Unit is located within the 234-52 Building in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility. Although this document is prepared based upon Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 265, Subpart G requirements, closure of the unit will comply with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 regulations pursuant to Section 5.3 of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Action Plan (Ecology et al. 1996). Because the PFP Treatment and Storage Unit manages transuranic mixed (TRUM) waste, there are many controls placed on management of the waste. Based on the many controls placed on management of TRUM waste, releases of TRUM waste are not anticipated to occur in the PFP Treatment and Storage Unit. Because the intention is to clean close the PFP Treatment and Storage Unit, postclosure activities are not applicable to this closure plan. To clean close the unit, it will be demonstrated that dangerous waste has not been left onsite at levels above the closure performance standard for removal and decontamination. If it is determined that clean closure is not possible or is environmentally impractical, the closure plan will be modified to address required postclosure activities. The PFP Treatment and Storage Unit will be operated to immobilize and/or repackage plutonium-bearing waste in a glovebox process. The waste to be processed is in a solid physical state (chunks and coarse powder) and will be sealed into and out of the glovebox in closed containers. The containers of immobilized waste will be stored in the glovebox and in additional permitted storage locations at PFP. The waste will be managed to minimize the potential for spills outside the glovebox, and to preclude spills from reaching soil. Containment surfaces will be maintained to ensure integrity. In the unlikely event that a waste spill does occur outside the glovebox, operating methods and administrative controls will require that waste spills be cleaned up promptly and completely, and a notation will be made in the operating record. Because dangerous waste does not include source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this documentation. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge.

  13. SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT PHASE 1 SLUDGE STORAGE OPTIONS ASSESSMENT OF T PLANT VERSUS ALTERNATE STORAGE FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RUTHERFORD WW; GEUTHER WJ; STRANKMAN MR; CONRAD EA; RHOADARMER DD; BLACK DM; POTTMEYER JA

    2009-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) has recommended to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) a two phase approach for removal and storage (Phase 1) and treatment and packaging for offsite shipment (Phase 2) of the sludge currently stored within the 105-K West Basin. This two phased strategy enables early removal of sludge from the 105-K West Basin by 2015, allowing remediation of historical unplanned releases of waste and closure of the 100-K Area. In Phase 1, the sludge currently stored in the Engineered Containers and Settler Tanks within the 105-K West Basin will be transferred into sludge transport and storage containers (STSCs). The STSCs will be transported to an interim storage facility. In Phase 2, sludge will be processed (treated) to meet shipping and disposal requirements and the sludge will be packaged for final disposal at a geologic repository. The purpose of this study is to evaluate two alternatives for interim Phase 1 storage of K Basin sludge. The cost, schedule, and risks for sludge storage at a newly-constructed Alternate Storage Facility (ASF) are compared to those at T Plant, which has been used previously for sludge storage. Based on the results of the assessment, T Plant is recommended for Phase 1 interim storage of sludge. Key elements that support this recommendation are the following: (1) T Plant has a proven process for storing sludge; (2) T Plant storage can be implemented at a lower incremental cost than the ASF; and (3) T Plant storage has a more favorable schedule profile, which provides more float, than the ASF. Underpinning the recommendation of T Plant for sludge storage is the assumption that T Plant has a durable, extended mission independent of the K Basin sludge interim storage mission. If this assumption cannot be validated and the operating costs of T Plant are borne by the Sludge Treatment Project, the conclusions and recommendations of this study would change. The following decision-making strategy, which is dependent on the confidence that DOE has in the long term mission for T Plant, is proposed: (1) If the confidence level in a durable, extended T Plant mission independent of sludge storage is high, then the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) would continue to implement the path forward previously described in the Alternatives Report (HNF-39744). Risks to the sludge project can be minimized through the establishment of an Interface Control Document (ICD) defining agreed upon responsibilities for both the STP and T Plant Operations regarding the transfer and storage of sludge and ensuring that the T Plant upgrade and operational schedule is well integrated with the sludge storage activities. (2) If the confidence level in a durable, extended T Plant mission independent of sludge storage is uncertain, then the ASF conceptual design should be pursued on a parallel path with preparation of T Plant for sludge storage until those uncertainties are resolved. (3) Finally, if the confidence level in a durable, extended T Plant mission independent of sludge storage is low, then the ASF design should be selected to provide independence from the T Plant mission risk.

  14. Managing Aging Effects on Dry Cask Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    Because there is currently no designated disposal site for used nuclear fuel in the United States transportation of used fuel at operating and decommissioned nuclear power plant sites. Under U.S. federal for an Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) must not exceed 40 years from the date of issuance

  15. Low-level waste inventory, characteristics, generation, and facility assessment for treatment, storage, and disposal alternatives considered in the US Department of Energy waste management programmatic environmental impact statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goyette, M.L.; Dolak, D.A.

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides technical support information for use in analyzing environmental impacts associated with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) low-level radioactive waste (LLW) management alternatives in the Waste-Management (WM) Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). Waste loads treated and disposed of for each of the LLW alternatives considered in the DOE WM PEIS are presented. Waste loads are presented for DOE Waste Management (WM) wastes, which are generated from routine operations. Radioactivity concentrations and waste quantities for treatment and disposal under the different LLW alternatives are described for WM waste. 76 refs., 14 figs., 42 tabs.

  16. Draft Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for managing treatment, storage, and disposal of radioactive and hazardous waste. Volume 3, Appendix A: Public response to revised NOI, Appendix B: Environmental restoration, Appendix C, Environmental impact analysis methods, Appendix D, Risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume three contains appendices for the following: Public comments do DOE`s proposed revisions to the scope of the waste management programmatic environmental impact statement; Environmental restoration sensitivity analysis; Environmental impacts analysis methods; and Waste management facility human health risk estimates.

  17. Information related to low-level mixed waste inventory, characteristics, generation, and facility assessment for treatment, storage, and disposal alternatives considered in the U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilkins, B.D.; Dolak, D.A.; Wang, Y.Y.; Meshkov, N.K.

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was prepared to support the analysis of risks and costs associated with the proposed treatment of low-level mixed waste (LLMW) under management of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The various waste management alternatives for treatment of LLMW have been defined in the DOE`s Office of Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement. This technical memorandum estimates the waste material throughput expected at each proposed LLMW treatment facility and analyzes potential radiological and chemical releases at each DOE site resulting from treatment of these wastes. Models have been developed to generate site-dependent radiological profiles and waste-stream-dependent chemical profiles for these wastes. Current site-dependent inventories and estimates for future generation of LLMW have been obtained from DOE`s 1994 Mixed Waste Inventory Report (MWIR-2). Using treatment procedures developed by the Mixed Waste Treatment Project, the MWIR-2 database was analyzed to provide waste throughput and emission estimates for each of the different waste types assessed in this report. Uncertainties in the estimates at each site are discussed for waste material throughputs and radiological and chemical releases.

  18. Management of a complex cavern storage facility for natural gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Epe cavern storage facility operated by Ruhrgas AG has developed into one of the largest gas cavern storage facilities in the world. Currently, there are 32 caverns and 18 more are planned in the future. Working gas volume will increase from approximately 1.5 {times} 10{sup 9} to 2 {times} 10{sup 9} m{sup 3}. The stratified salt deposit containing the caverns has a surface area of approximately 7 km{sup 2} and is 250 m thick at the edge and 400 m thick in the center. Caverns are leached by a company that uses the recovered brine in the chlorine industry. Cavern dimensions are determined before leaching. The behavior of each cavern, as well as the thermodynamic properties of natural gas must be considered in cavern management. The full-length paper presents the components of a complex management system covering the design, construction, and operation of the Epe gas-storage caverns.

  19. Managing Wind-based Electricity Generation and Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadeh, Norman M.

    not exacerbate the global warming problem. However, renewable energy is inherently intermittent and variableManaging Wind-based Electricity Generation and Storage by Yangfang Zhou Submitted to the Tepper, and to meet increasing electricity demand without harming the environment. Two of the most promising solutions

  20. Managing Wind-based Electricity Generation and Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and solar energy--is free, abundant, and most importantly, does not exacerbate the global warming problemManaging Wind-based Electricity Generation and Storage by Yangfang Zhou Submitted to the Tepper.S. strive to reduce reliance on the import of fossil fuels, and to meet increasing electricity demand

  1. Optimal Energy Management for a Hybrid Energy Storage System Combining Batteries and Double

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paderborn, Universität

    Optimal Energy Management for a Hybrid Energy Storage System Combining Batteries and Double Layer storage for operation. High demands concerning power and energy density, small volume and weight is to combine storage technologies with complementary characteristics as a hybrid energy storage system. Thus

  2. Energy Management for an Onboard Storage System Based on Multi-Objective Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paderborn, Universität

    Energy Management for an Onboard Storage System Based on Multi-Objective Optimization Tobias Knoke an onboard energy storage, the overhead line peak power and energy consumption can be reduced. The storage. This can be achieved by using an onboard energy storage, which recuperates the power during the braking

  3. Managing the Storage and Battery Resources in an Image Capture Device (Digital Camera) using Dynamic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vahdat, Amin

    Managing the Storage and Battery Resources in an Image Capture Device (Digital Camera) using to be matched with intel- ligent image storage mechanisms that are aware of local storage and battery the consumed battery and storage resources in digital cameras. Such application aware technologies

  4. Risk assessment of CST-7 proposed waste treatment and storage facilities Volume I: Limited-scope probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) of proposed CST-7 waste treatment & storage facilities. Volume II: Preliminary hazards analysis of proposed CST-7 waste storage & treatment facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sasser, K.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In FY 1993, the Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Management Group [CST-7 (formerly EM-7)] requested the Probabilistic Risk and Hazards Analysis Group [TSA-11 (formerly N-6)] to conduct a study of the hazards associated with several CST-7 facilities. Among these facilities are the Hazardous Waste Treatment Facility (HWTF), the HWTF Drum Storage Building (DSB), and the Mixed Waste Receiving and Storage Facility (MWRSF), which are proposed for construction beginning in 1996. These facilities are needed to upgrade the Laboratory`s storage capability for hazardous and mixed wastes and to provide treatment capabilities for wastes in cases where offsite treatment is not available or desirable. These facilities will assist Los Alamos in complying with federal and state requlations.

  5. Multiobjective Search for the Management of a Hybrid Energy Storage System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paderborn, Universität

    Multiobjective Search for the Management of a Hybrid Energy Storage System Simon Boxnick, Stefan Kl objective search algorithm. The algorithm is designed for the management of a hybrid energy storage module-board hybrid energy storage system (HES) of the novel autonomous rail-bound vehicle RailCab developed

  6. Energy Management Strategy for Commercial Buildings Integrating PV and Storage Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Energy Management Strategy for Commercial Buildings Integrating PV and Storage Systems He ZHANG1 by using the solution proposed. Keywords: Photovoltaic (PV) systems, fuzzy logic, storage system, energy connected to the power network and associated to photovoltaic and storage system. Some energy management

  7. Optimal Energy Management for a Hybrid Energy Storage System for Electric Vehicles Based on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paderborn, Universität

    Optimal Energy Management for a Hybrid Energy Storage System for Electric Vehicles Based are used as energy storage. The size of the battery depends not only on the driving range, but also Deterministic Dynamic Programming. To determine an energy management to control the power flows to the storage

  8. 3718-F Alkali Metal Treatment and Storage Facility Closure Plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Site, located northwest of the city of Richland, Washington, houses reactors, chemical-separation systems, and related facilities used for the production of special nuclear materials, as well as for activities associated with nuclear energy development. The 300 Area of the Hanford Site contains reactor fuel manufacturing facilities and several research and development laboratories. The 3718-F Alkali Metal Treatment and Storage Facility (3718-F Facility), located in the 300 Area, was used to store and treat alkali metal wastes. Therefore, it is subject to the regulatory requirements for the storage and treatment of dangerous wastes. Closure will be conducted pursuant to the requirements of the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 (Ecology 1989) and 40 CFR 270.1. Closure also will satisfy the thermal treatment facility closure requirements of 40 CFR 265.381. This closure plan presents a description of the 3718-F Facility, the history of wastes managed, and the approach that will be followed to close the facility. Only hazardous constituents derived from 3718-F Facility operations will be addressed.

  9. Harvesting-Aware Energy Management for Multicore Platforms with Hybrid Energy Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasricha, Sudeep

    possesses several advantages, including (i) a battery- supercapacitor hybrid energy storage module for more, Supercapacitor, Dynamic Power Management, Dynamic Voltage and Frequency Scaling, Task Scheduling 1. INTRODUCTION

  10. Relaxations of Approximate Linear Programs for the Real Option Management of Commodity Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadeh, Norman M.

    Relaxations of Approximate Linear Programs for the Real Option Management of Commodity Storage in practice. Focusing on commodity storage, we identify a deficiency of approximate linear programming, which their corresponding ALPs. Applied to existing natural gas storage instances, our ALP relaxations significantly

  11. September 11, 2012 NIST Key Management Workshop 2012 Secure Key Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    September 11, 2012 NIST Key Management Workshop 2012 Secure Key Storage and True Random Number Storage via PUFs - Main Idea - Reliability - Randomness -- InstantiationsInstantiations 3. True Random, including side channel resistance ° Trusted security policy routines ° Secure and authentic key storage

  12. Description & Careers Supply Chain Management is how business gets done. Supply chain management spans all movement and storage of raw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Xiaodong

    management spans all movement and storage of raw materials, work-in-process inventory, and finished goods managers of supply chains, resource managers of material or manufacturing resources planning (MRPDescription & Careers The Field Supply Chain Management is how business gets done. Supply chain

  13. Autonomous storage management for personal devices with PodBase Ansley Post

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Druschel, Peter

    Autonomous storage management for personal devices with PodBase Ansley Post Juan Navarro¶ Petr an increasing number of personal elec- tronic devices like notebook computers, MP3 players and smart phonesBase, a system that automates storage management on personal devices. The system takes advantage of unused

  14. Hanford Site waste treatment/storage/disposal integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MCDONALD, K.M.

    1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1998 Waste Management Federal Services of Hanford, Inc. began the integration of all low-level waste, mixed waste, and TRU waste-generating activities across the Hanford site. With seven contractors, dozens of generating units, and hundreds of waste streams, integration was necessary to provide acute waste forecasting and planning for future treatment activities. This integration effort provides disposition maps that account for waste from generation, through processing, treatment and final waste disposal. The integration effort covers generating facilities from the present through the life-cycle, including transition and deactivation. The effort is patterned after the very successful DOE Complex EM Integration effort. Although still in the preliminary stages, the comprehensive onsite integration effort has already reaped benefits. These include identifying significant waste streams that had not been forecast, identifying opportunities for consolidating activities and services to accelerate schedule or save money; and identifying waste streams which currently have no path forward in the planning baseline. Consolidation/integration of planned activities may also provide opportunities for pollution prevention and/or avoidance of secondary waste generation. A workshop was held to review the waste disposition maps, and to identify opportunities with potential cost or schedule savings. Another workshop may be held to follow up on some of the long-term integration opportunities. A change to the Hanford waste forecast data call would help to align the Solid Waste Forecast with the new disposition maps.

  15. Waste Management Effluent Treatment Facility: Phase I. CAC basic data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gemar, D.W.; O'Leary, C.D.

    1984-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to expedite design and construction of the Waste Management Effluent Treatment Facility (WMETF), the project has been divided into two phases. Phase I consists of four storage basins and the associated transfer lines, diversion boxes, and control rooms. The design data pertaining to Phase I of the WMETF project are presented together with general background information and objectives for both phases. The project will provide means to store and decontaminate wastewater streams that are currently discharged to the seepage basins in F Area and H Area. This currently includes both routine process flows sent directly to the seepage basins and diversions of contaminated cooling water or storm water runoff that are stored in the retention basins before being pumped to the seepage basins.

  16. Radioactive Waste Management, Inspection Criteria; Approach,...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    except for storage for decay or otherwise authorized by the Field Element Manager? Are radioactive waste storage, treatment, and disposal activities performed in a manner that...

  17. Monitoring effective use of household water treatment and safe storage technologies in Ethiopia and Ghana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, Matthew M

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Household water treatment and storage (HWTS) technologies dissemination is beginning to scale-up to reach the almost 900 million people without access to an improved water supply (WHO/UNICEF/JMP, 2008). Without well-informed ...

  18. Household water treatment and safe storage options for Northern Region Ghana : consumer preference and relative cost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, Vanessa (Vanessa Layton)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A range of household water treatment and safe storage (HWTS) products are available in Northern Region Ghana which have the potential to significantly improve local drinking water quality. However, to date, the region has ...

  19. Description & Careers Supply Chain Management is how business gets done. Supply chain management spans all movement and storage of raw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Xiaodong

    management spans all movement and storage of raw materials, work-in-process inventory, and finished goods of supply chains, resource managers of material or manufacturing resources planning (MRP), and processDescription & Careers The Field Supply Chain Management is how business gets done. Supply chain

  20. RCRA, superfund and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: RCRA treatment, storage, and disposal facilities (40 cfr parts 264/265, subparts a-e) updated July 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The management of hazardous waste at treatment, storage, and disposal facilities (TSDFs) plays a large and critical role in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulatory scheme. The training module presents an overview of the general TSDF standards found in 40 CFR Parts 264/265, Subparts A through E.

  1. An energy management IC for bio-implants using ultracapacitors for energy storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez, William R.

    We present the first known energy management IC to allow low-power systems, such as biomedical implants, to optimally use ultracapacitors instead of batteries as their chief energy storage elements. The IC, fabricated in ...

  2. Using supply chain management techniques to make wind plant and energy storage operation more profitable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saran, Prashant

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our research demonstrates that supply chain management techniques can improve the incremental gross profits of wind plant and storage operations by up to five times. Using Monte-Carlo simulation we create and test scenarios ...

  3. Evaluation of potential for MSRE spent fuel and flush salt storage and treatment at the INEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ougouag, A.M.; Ostby, P.A.; Nebeker, R.L.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential for interim storage as well as for treatment of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment spent fuel at INEL has been evaluated. Provided that some minimal packaging and chemical stabilization prerequisites are satisfied, safe interim storage of the spent fuel at the INEL can be achieved in a number of existing or planned facilities. Treatment by calcination in the New Waste Calcining Facility at the INEL can also be a safe, effective, and economical alternative to treatment that would require the construction of a dedicated facility. If storage at the INEL is chosen for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) spent fuel salts, their transformation to the more stable calcine solid would still be desirable as it would result in a lowering of risks. Treatment in the proposed INEL Remote-Handled Immobilization Facility (RHIF) would result in a waste form that would probably be acceptable for disposal at one of the proposed national repositories. The cost increment imputable to the treatment of the MSRE salts would be a small fraction of the overall capital and operating costs of the facility or the cost of building and operating a dedicated facility. Institutional and legal issues regarding shipments of fuel and waste to the INEL are summarized. The transfer of MSRE spent fuel for interim storage or treatment at the INEL is allowed under existing agreements between the State of idaho and the Department of energy and other agencies of the Federal Government. In contrast, current agreements preclude the transfer into Idaho of any radioactive wastes for storage or disposal within the State of Idaho. This implies that wastes and residues produced from treating the MSRE spent fuel at locations outside Idaho would not be acceptable for storage in Idaho. Present agreements require that all fuel and high-level wastes stored at the INEL, including MSRE spent fuel if received at the INEL, must be moved to a location outside Idaho by the year 2035.

  4. Disk storage management for LHCb based on Data Popularity estimator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hushchyn, Mikhail; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a system providing recommendations for optimizing the LHCb data storage. The LHCb data storage system is a hybrid system. All datasets are kept as archives on magnetic tapes. The most popular datasets are kept on disks. The recommendation system takes the dataset usage history and metadata (size, type, configuration etc.) to generate a recommendation report. In this article present how we use machine learning algorithms to predict future data popularity. Using these predictions it is possible to estimate which datasets should be removed from disk. We use regression algorithms and time series analysis to find the optimal number of replicas for datasets that are kept on disk. Based on the data popularity and the number of replicas optimization, the recommendation system minimizes a loss function to find the optimal data distribution. The loss function represents all requirements for data distribution in the data storage system. We demonstrate how the recommendation system helps to save disk ...

  5. Biohazardous Waste Disposal GuidelinesDescriptionStorage& LabelingTreatmentDisposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wikswo, John

    Waste Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Any of these devices if contaminated with biohazardousBiohazardous Waste Disposal GuidelinesDescriptionStorage& packaging LabelingTreatmentDisposal Mixed container. Container must be leakproof, ridgid, puncture resistant, clearly marked for biohazardous waste

  6. Karlsruhe Database for Radioactive Wastes (KADABRA) - Accounting and Management System for Radioactive Waste Treatment - 12275

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Himmerkus, Felix; Rittmeyer, Cornelia [WAK Rueckbau- und Entsorgungs- GmbH, 76339 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The data management system KADABRA was designed according to the purposes of the Cen-tral Decontamination Department (HDB) of the Wiederaufarbeitungsanlage Karlsruhe Rueckbau- und Entsorgungs-GmbH (WAK GmbH), which is specialized in the treatment and conditioning of radioactive waste. The layout considers the major treatment processes of the HDB as well as regulatory and legal requirements. KADABRA is designed as an SAG ADABAS application on IBM system Z mainframe. The main function of the system is the data management of all processes related to treatment, transfer and storage of radioactive material within HDB. KADABRA records the relevant data concerning radioactive residues, interim products and waste products as well as the production parameters relevant for final disposal. Analytical data from the laboratory and non destructive assay systems, that describe the chemical and radiological properties of residues, production batches, interim products as well as final waste products, can be linked to the respective dataset for documentation and declaration. The system enables the operator to trace the radioactive material through processing and storage. Information on the actual sta-tus of the material as well as radiological data and storage position can be gained immediately on request. A variety of programs accessed to the database allow the generation of individual reports on periodic or special request. KADABRA offers a high security standard and is constantly adapted to the recent requirements of the organization. (authors)

  7. EIS-0200: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of98-F, Western22,EERE Solar5:RecordtheRecord ofAmendment to

  8. Sandia National Laboratories: metal hydride storage thermal-management...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    thermal-management issues ECIS, Boeing, Caltrans, and Others: Fuel-Cell-Powered Mobile Lighting Applications On March 29, 2013, in Capabilities, CRF, Energy, Energy Efficiency,...

  9. Safety Aspects of Dry Spent Fuel Storage and Spent Fuel Management - 13559

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Botsch, W.; Smalian, S.; Hinterding, P. [TUV NORD Nuclear c/o TUV NORD EnSys Hannover GmbH and Co.KG, Dept. Radiation Protection and Waste Disposal, Am TueV 1, 30519 Hannover (Germany)] [TUV NORD Nuclear c/o TUV NORD EnSys Hannover GmbH and Co.KG, Dept. Radiation Protection and Waste Disposal, Am TueV 1, 30519 Hannover (Germany); Voelzke, H.; Wolff, D.; Kasparek, E. [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing Division 3.4 Safety of Storage Containers Unter den Eichen 44-46, 12203 Berlin (Germany)] [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing Division 3.4 Safety of Storage Containers Unter den Eichen 44-46, 12203 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dry storage systems are characterized by passive and inherent safety systems ensuring safety even in case of severe incidents or accidents. After the events of Fukushima, the advantages of such passively and inherently safe dry storage systems have become more and more obvious. As with the storage of all radioactive materials, the storage of spent nuclear fuel (SF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) must conform to safety requirements. Following safety aspects must be achieved throughout the storage period: - safe enclosure of radioactive materials, - safe removal of decay heat, - securing nuclear criticality safety, - avoidance of unnecessary radiation exposure. The implementation of these safety requirements can be achieved by dry storage of SF and HLW in casks as well as in other systems such as dry vault storage systems or spent fuel pools, where the latter is neither a dry nor a passive system. Furthermore, transport capability must be guaranteed during and after storage as well as limitation and control of radiation exposure. The safe enclosure of radioactive materials in dry storage casks can be achieved by a double-lid sealing system with surveillance of the sealing system. The safe removal of decay heat must be ensured by the design of the storage containers and the storage facility. The safe confinement of radioactive inventory has to be ensured by mechanical integrity of fuel assembly structures. This is guaranteed, e.g. by maintaining the mechanical integrity of the fuel rods or by additional safety measures for defective fuel rods. In order to ensure nuclear critically safety, possible effects of accidents have also to be taken into consideration. In case of dry storage it might be necessary to exclude the re-positioning of fissile material inside the container and/or neutron moderator exclusion might be taken into account. Unnecessary radiation exposure can be avoided by the cask or canister vault system itself. In Germany dry storage of SF in casks fulfills both transport and storage requirements. Mostly, storage facilities are designed as concrete buildings above the ground, but due to regional constraints, one storage facility has also been built as a rock tunnel. The decay heat is always removed by natural air flow; further technical equipment is not needed. The removal of decay heat and shielding had been modeled and calculated by state-of-the-art computer codes before such a facility has been built. TueV and BAM present their long experience in the licensing process for sites and casks and inform about spent nuclear fuel management and issues concerning dry storage of spent nuclear fuel. Different storage systems and facilities in Germany, Europe and world-wide are compared with respect to the safety aspects mentioned above. Initial points are the safety issues of wet storage of SF, and it is shown how dry storage systems can ensure the compliance with the mentioned safety criteria over a long storage period. The German storage concept for dry storage of SF and HLW is presented and discussed. Exemplarily, the process of licensing, erection and operation of selected German dry storage facilities is presented. (authors)

  10. Model-Free Learning-Based Online Management of Hybrid Electrical Energy Storage Systems in Electric Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    Model-Free Learning-Based Online Management of Hybrid Electrical Energy Storage Systems in Electric@elpl.snu.ac.kr Abstract--To improve the cycle efficiency and peak output power density of energy storage systems in electric vehicles (EVs), supercapacitors have been proposed as auxiliary energy storage elements

  11. Final Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Environmental Impact Statement Volume1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pursuant to the Mercury Export Ban Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-414), DOE was directed to designate a facility or facilities for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury generated within the United States. Therefore, DOE has analyzed the storage of up to 10,000 metric tons (11,000 tons) of elemental mercury in a facility(ies) constructed and operated in accordance with the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (74 FR 31723).DOE prepared this Final Mercury Storage EIS in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.), the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) implementing regulations (40 CFR 1500–1508), and DOE’s NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021) to evaluate reasonable alternatives for a facility(ies) for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury. This Final Mercury Storage EIS analyzes the potential environmental, human health, and socioeconomic impacts of elemental mercury storage at seven candidate locations:Grand Junction Disposal Site near Grand Junction, Colorado; Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; Hawthorne Army Depot near Hawthorne, Nevada; Idaho National Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho;Kansas City Plant in Kansas City, Missouri; Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina; and Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas. As required by CEQ NEPA regulations, the No Action Alternative was also analyzed as a basis for comparison. DOE intends to decide (1) where to locate the elemental mercury storage facility(ies) and (2) whether to use existing buildings, new buildings, or a combination of existing and new buildings. DOE’s Preferred Alternative for the long-term management and storage of mercury is the Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas.

  12. Final Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Environmental Impact Statement Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pursuant to the Mercury Export Ban Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-414), DOE was directed to designate a facility or facilities for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury generated within the United States. Therefore, DOE has analyzed the storage of up to 10,000 metric tons (11,000 tons) of elemental mercury in a facility(ies) constructed and operated in accordance with the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (74 FR 31723). DOE prepared this Final Mercury Storage EIS in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.), the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) implementing regulations (40 CFR 1500–1508), and DOE’s NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021) to evaluate reasonable alternatives for a facility(ies) for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury. This Final Mercury Storage EIS analyzes the potential environmental, human health, and socioeconomic impacts of elemental mercury storage at seven candidate locations: Grand Junction Disposal Site near Grand Junction, Colorado; Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; Hawthorne Army Depot near Hawthorne, Nevada; Idaho National Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; Kansas City Plant in Kansas City, Missouri; Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina; and Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas. As required by CEQ NEPA regulations, the No Action Alternative was also analyzed as a basis for comparison. DOE intends to decide (1) where to locate the elemental mercury storage facility(ies) and (2) whether to use existing buildings, new buildings, or a combination of existing and new buildings. DOE’s Preferred Alternative for the long-term management and storage of mercury is the Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas.

  13. Demand-Side and Supply-Side Load Management: Optimizing with Thermal Energy Storage (TES) for the Restructuring Energy Marketplace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrepont, J. S.

    -side regarding power generation. Thermal Energy Storage (TES) can provide the flexibility essential to the economical management of power. In large industrial applications, the added value of TES has been demonstrated, not only in managing operating costs...

  14. Underground natural gas storage reservoir management: Phase 2. Final report, June 1, 1995--March 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ortiz, I.; Anthony, R.V.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage operators are facing increased and more complex responsibilities for managing storage operations under Order 636 which requires unbundling of storage from other pipeline services. Low cost methods that improve the accuracy of inventory verification are needed to optimally manage this stored natural gas. Migration of injected gas out of the storage reservoir has not been well documented by industry. The first portion of this study addressed the scope of unaccounted for gas which may have been due to migration. The volume range was estimated from available databases and reported on an aggregate basis. Information on working gas, base gas, operating capacity, injection and withdrawal volumes, current and non-current revenues, gas losses, storage field demographics and reservoir types is contained among the FERC Form 2, EIA Form 191, AGA and FERC Jurisdictional databases. The key elements of this study show that gas migration can result if reservoir limits have not been properly identified, gas migration can occur in formation with extremely low permeability (0.001 md), horizontal wellbores can reduce gas migration losses and over-pressuring (unintentionally) storage reservoirs by reinjecting working gas over a shorter time period may increase gas migration effects.

  15. Progress and Status of the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant's New Solid Waste Management and Storage Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rausch, J.; Henderson, R.W. [NUKEM Technologies GmbH, Alzenau (Germany); Penkov, V. [State Enterprise Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant, Visaginas (Lithuania)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A considerable amount of dry radioactive waste from former NPP operation has accumulated up to date and is presently stored at the Ignalina NPP site, Lithuania. Current storage capacities are nearly exhausted and more waste is to come from future decommissioning of the two RMBKtype reactors. Additionally, the existing storage facilities does not comply to the state-of-the-art technology for handling and storage of radioactive waste. In 2005, INPP faced this situation of a need for waste processing and subsequent interim storage of these wastes by contracting NUKEM with the design, construction, installation and commissioning of new waste management and storage facilities. The subject of this paper is to describe the scope and the status of the new solid waste management and storage facilities at the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant. In summary: The turnkey contract for the design, supply and commission of the SWMSF was awarded in December 2005. The realisation of the project was initially planned within 48 month. The basic design was finished in August 2007 and the Technical Design Documentation and Preliminary Safety Analyses Report was provided to Authorities in October 2007. The construction license is expected in July 2008. The procurement phase was started in August 2007, start of onsite activities is expected in November 2007. The start of operation of the SWMSF is scheduled for end of 2009. (authors)

  16. Spent fuel storage and waste management fuel cycle optimization using CAFCA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brinton, S.; Kazimi, M. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge MA 02139 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spent fuel storage modeling is at the intersection of nuclear fuel cycle system dynamics and waste management policy. A model that captures the economic parameters affecting used nuclear fuel storage location options, which complements fuel cycle economic assessment has been created using CAFCA (Code for Advanced Fuel Cycles Assessment) of MIT. Research has also expanded to the study on dependency of used nuclear fuel storage economics, environmental impact, and proliferation risk. Three options of local, regional, and national storage were studied. The preliminary product of this research is the creation of a system dynamics tool known as the Waste Management Module which provides an easy to use interface for education on fuel cycle waste management economic impacts. Storage options costs can be compared to literature values with simple variation available for sensitivity study. Additionally, a first of a kind optimization scheme for the nuclear fuel cycle analysis is proposed and the applications of such an optimization are discussed. The main tradeoff for fuel cycle optimization was found to be between economics and most of the other identified metrics. (authors)

  17. SECONDARY WASTE MANAGEMENT STRATEGY FOR EARLY LOW ACTIVITY WASTE TREATMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CRAWFORD TW

    2008-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This study evaluates parameters relevant to River Protection Project secondary waste streams generated during Early Low Activity Waste operations and recommends a strategy for secondary waste management that considers groundwater impact, cost, and programmatic risk. The recommended strategy for managing River Protection Project secondary waste is focused on improvements in the Effiuent Treatment Facility. Baseline plans to build a Solidification Treatment Unit adjacent to Effluent Treatment Facility should be enhanced to improve solid waste performance and mitigate corrosion of tanks and piping supporting the Effiuent Treatment Facility evaporator. This approach provides a life-cycle benefit to solid waste performance and reduction of groundwater contaminants.

  18. Managing high-bandwidth real-time data storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bigelow, David D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brandt, Scott A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bent, John M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chen, Hsing-Bung [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    There exist certain systems which generate real-time data at high bandwidth, but do not necessarily require the long-term retention of that data in normal conditions. In some cases, the data may not actually be useful, and in others, there may be too much data to permanently retain in long-term storage whether it is useful or not. However, certain portions of the data may be identified as being vitally important from time to time, and must therefore be retained for further analysis or permanent storage without interrupting the ongoing collection of new data. We have developed a system, Mahanaxar, intended to address this problem. It provides quality of service guarantees for incoming real-time data streams and simultaneous access to already-recorded data on a best-effort basis utilizing any spare bandwidth. It has built in mechanisms for reliability and indexing, can scale upwards to meet increasing bandwidth requirements, and handles both small and large data elements equally well. We will show that a prototype version of this system provides better performance than a flat file (traditional filesystem) based version, particularly with regard to quality of service guarantees and hard real-time requirements.

  19. The development of a management strategy for interim storage and final disposal of nuclear wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engelmann, H.J.; Popp, F.W. [Deutsche Gesellschaft zum Bau and Betrieb von Endglagern fuer Abfallostofe mbH, Peine (Germany); Arntzen, P.; Botzem, W. [NUKEM GmbH, Alzenau (Germany); Soucek, B. [Czech Power Board, Prague (Czech Republic)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall waste management strategy for alternative routes from reactor to final disposal, including dry interim storage, is discussed. Within the framework of a preliminary structure plan possible technical solutions must be investigated, and with sufficient relevant information available the future progress of the project, can be addressed on the base of a decision analysis.

  20. Stochastic Programming Model for Fuel Treatment Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kabli, Mohannad Reda A

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to the increased number and intensity of wild fires, the need for solutions that minimize the impact of fire are needed. Fuel treatment is one of the methods used to mitigate the effects of fire at a certain area. In this thesis, a two...

  1. Stochastic Programming Model for Fuel Treatment Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kabli, Mohannad Reda A

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to the increased number and intensity of wild fires, the need for solutions that minimize the impact of fire are needed. Fuel treatment is one of the methods used to mitigate the effects of fire at a certain area. In this thesis, a two...

  2. Conceptual design report: Nuclear materials storage facility renovation. Part 1, Design concept. Part 2, Project management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was a Fiscal Year (FY) 1984 line-item project completed in 1987 that has never been operated because of major design and construction deficiencies. This renovation project, which will correct those deficiencies and allow operation of the facility, is proposed as an FY 97 line item. The mission of the project is to provide centralized intermediate and long-term storage of special nuclear materials (SNM) associated with defined LANL programmatic missions and to establish a centralized SNM shipping and receiving location for Technical Area (TA)-55 at LANL. Based on current projections, existing storage space for SNM at other locations at LANL will be loaded to capacity by approximately 2002. This will adversely affect LANUs ability to meet its mission requirements in the future. The affected missions include LANL`s weapons research, development, and testing (WRD&T) program; special materials recovery; stockpile survelliance/evaluation; advanced fuels and heat sources development and production; and safe, secure storage of existing nuclear materials inventories. The problem is further exacerbated by LANL`s inability to ship any materials offsite because of the lack of receiver sites for mate rial and regulatory issues. Correction of the current deficiencies and enhancement of the facility will provide centralized storage close to a nuclear materials processing facility. The project will enable long-term, cost-effective storage in a secure environment with reduced radiation exposure to workers, and eliminate potential exposures to the public. This document provides Part I - Design Concept which describes the selected solution, and Part II - Project Management which describes the management system organization, the elements that make up the system, and the control and reporting system.

  3. EIS-0109: Long-Term Management of the Existing Radioactive Wastes and Residues at the Niagara Falls Storage Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed this statement to evaluate the environmental impacts of several alternatives for management and control of the radioactive wastes and residues at the Niagara Falls Storage Site, including a no action alternative, an alternative to manage wastes on-site, and two off-site management alternatives.

  4. CPP-603 Underwater Fuel Storage Facility Site Integrated Stabilization Management Plan (SISMP), Volume I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denney, R.D.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CPP-603 Underwater Fuel Storage Facility (UFSF) Site Integrated Stabilization Management Plan (SISMP) has been constructed to describe the activities required for the relocation of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from the CPP-603 facility. These activities are the only Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) actions identified in the Implementation Plan developed to meet the requirements of the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 94-1 to the Secretary of Energy regarding an improved schedule for remediation in the Defense Nuclear Facilities Complex. As described in the DNFSB Recommendation 94-1 Implementation Plan, issued February 28, 1995, an INEL Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Plan is currently under development to direct the placement of SNF currently in existing INEL facilities into interim storage, and to address the coordination of intrasite SNF movements with new receipts and intersite transfers that were identified in the DOE SNF Programmatic and INEL Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement Record, of Decision. This SISMP will be a subset of the INEL Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Plan and the activities described are being coordinated with other INEL SNF management activities. The CPP-603 relocation activities have been assigned a high priority so that established milestones will be meet, but there will be some cases where other activities will take precedence in utilization of available resources. The Draft INEL Site Integrated Stabilization Management Plan (SISMP), INEL-94/0279, Draft Rev. 2, dated March 10, 1995, is being superseded by the INEL Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Plan and this CPP-603 specific SISMP.

  5. Use of transportable storage casks in the nuclear waste management system: Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study was performed to determine the viability of the use of transportable storage casks (TSCs), and other metal casks that are designed primarily for storage but which might be used to ship their stored contents to DOE on a one-time use basis (referred to in this study as storage only casks, or SOCs), in the combined utility/DOE spent fuel management system. The viability of the use of TSCs and SOCs was assessed in terms of the costs and savings involved in their use, the sensitivity of these costs and savings to changes in the capacity and cost of fabrication of the casks, the impacts of variation in cask design features on cost and radiation exposure of personnel, and their prospective use in connection with the transport of defense high level wastes. Estimates were developed of the costs of acquiring and handling of TSCs and SOCs at reactor sites. For comparison purposes, similar costs were developed for the use of concrete storage casks at reactor sites. Estimates of the savings involved to the DOE system as a result of receiving spent fuel in TSCs or SOCs were separately developed. These costs are developed and presented in Volume 2, Appendices A through J.

  6. MRS (monitored retrievable storage) systems study Task G report: The role and functions of surface storage of radioactive material in the federal waste management system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, T.W.; Short, S.M.; Woodruff, M.G.; Altenhofen, M.K.; MacKay, C.A.

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is one of nine studies undertaken by contractors to the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), to provide a technical basis for re-evaluating the role of a monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility. The study investigates the functions that could be performed by surface storage of radioactive material within the federal radioactive waste management system, including enabling acceptance of spent fuel from utility owners, scheduling of waste-preparation processes within the system, enhancement of system operating reliability, and conditioning the thermal (decay heat) characteristics of spent fuel emplaced in a repository. The analysis focuses particularly on the effects of storage capacity and DOE acceptance schedule on power reactors. Figures of merit developed include the storage capacity (in metric tons of uranium (MTU)) required to be added beyond currently estimated maximum spent fuel storage capacities and its associated cost, and the number of years that spent fuel pools would remain open after last discharge (in pool-years) and the cost of this period of operation. 27 refs., 36 figs., 18 tabs.

  7. Integrated Waste Treatment Unit GFSI Risk Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. A. Owca

    2007-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This GFSI Risk Management Plan (RMP) describes the strategy for assessing and managing project risks for the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU) that are specifically within the control and purview of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and identifies the risks that formed the basis for the DOE contingency included in the performance baseline. DOE-held contingency is required to cover cost and schedule impacts of DOE activities. Prior to approval of the performance baseline (Critical Decision-2) project cost contingency was evaluated during a joint meeting of the Contractor Management Team and the Integrated Project Team for both contractor and DOE risks to schedule and cost. At that time, the contractor cost and schedule risk value was $41.3M and the DOE cost and schedule risk contingency value is $39.0M. The contractor cost and schedule risk value of $41.3M was retained in the performance baseline as the contractor's management reserve for risk contingency. The DOE cost and schedule risk value of $39.0M has been retained in the performance baseline as the DOE Contingency. The performance baseline for the project was approved in December 2006 (Garman 2006). The project will continue to manage to the performance baseline and change control thresholds identified in PLN-1963, ''Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment Project Execution Plan'' (PEP).

  8. Managing Aging Effects on Dry Cask Storage Systems for Extended Long Term

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetterEconomyDr.Energy University ofOverviewManagementStorage

  9. NDE to Manage Atmospheric SCC in Canisters for Dry Storage of Spent Fuel: An Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Pardini, Allan F.; Cuta, Judith M.; Adkins, Harold E.; Casella, Andrew M.; Qiao, Hong (Amy); Larche, Michael R.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents efforts to assess representative horizontal (Transuclear NUHOMS®) and vertical (Holtec HI-STORM) storage systems for the implementation of non-destructive examination (NDE) methods or techniques to manage atmospheric stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in canisters for dry storage of used nuclear fuel. The assessment is conducted by assessing accessibility and deployment, environmental compatibility, and applicability of NDE methods. A recommendation of this assessment is to focus on bulk ultrasonic and eddy current techniques for direct canister monitoring of atmospheric SCC. This assessment also highlights canister regions that may be most vulnerable to atmospheric SCC to guide the use of bulk ultrasonic and eddy current examinations. An assessment of accessibility also identifies canister regions that are easiest and more difficult to access through the ventilation paths of the concrete shielding modules. A conceivable sampling strategy for canister inspections is to sample only the easiest to access portions of vulnerable regions. There are aspects to performing an NDE inspection of dry canister storage system (DCSS) canisters for atmospheric SCC that have not been addressed in previous performance studies. These aspects provide the basis for recommendations of future efforts to determine the capability and performance of eddy current and bulk ultrasonic examinations for atmospheric SCC in DCSS canisters. Finally, other important areas of investigation are identified including the development of instrumented surveillance specimens to identify when conditions are conducive for atmospheric SCC, characterization of atmospheric SCC morphology, and an assessment of air flow patterns over canister surfaces and their influence on chloride deposition.

  10. ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS ASSOCIATED WITH STORAGE, TREATMENT, AND DISPOSAL OF SOLID RADIOACTIVE AND CHEMICALLY HAZARDOUS WASTE AT THE HANFORD SITE, RICHLAND, WASHINGTON

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Wayne L.; Nelson, Iral C.; Payson, David R.; Rhoads, Kathleen

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program Environmental Impact Statement (HSW EIS) provides environmental and technical information concerning U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposed waste management practices for certain solid radioactive wastes at the Hanford Site through the year 2046. The HSW EIS covers four primary aspects of waste management at Hanford – storage, treatment, transportation, and disposal. It also addresses four types of solid waste – low-level waste, mixed low-level waste that contains both radioactive and chemically hazardous constituents, immobilized low-activity waste from processing Hanford tank waste, and transuranic waste. The HSW EIS was prepared to assist DOE in determining which specific Hanford Site facilities will continue to be used, will be modified, or need to be constructed, to safely treat, store, and dispose of these wastes.

  11. Engineering analysis report for the long-term management of depleted uranium hexafluoride : storage of depleted uranium metal.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Folga, S.M.; Kier, P.H.; Thimmapuram, P.R.

    2001-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains an engineering analysis of long-term storage of uranium metal in boxes as an option for long-term management of depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}). Three storage facilities are considered: buildings, vaults, and mined cavities. Three cases are considered: either all, half, or a quarter of the depleted uranium metal that would be produced from the conversion of depleted UF{sub 6} is stored at the facility. The analysis of these alternatives is based on a box design used in the Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride, report DOE/EIS-0269, published in 1999 by the US Department of Energy. This box design does not appear to effectively use space within the box. Hence, an alternative box design that allows for a reduced storage area is addressed in the appendices for long-term storage in buildings.

  12. Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Treatment and Management of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2000-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE is responsible for the safe and efficient management of its sodium-bonded spent nuclear fuel. This fuel contains metallic sodium, a highly reactive material; metallic uranium, which is also reactive; and in some cases, highly enriched uranium. The presence of reactive materials could complicate the process of qualifying and licensing DOE's sodium-bonded spent nuclear fuel inventory for disposal in a geologic repository. Currently, more than 98 percent of this inventory is located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), near Idaho Falls, Idaho. In addition, in a 1995 agreement with the State of Idaho, DOE committed to remove all spent nuclear fuel from Idaho by 2035. This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts associated with the treatment and management of sodium-bonded spent nuclear fuel in one or more facilities located at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) at INEEL and either the F-Canyon or Building 105-L at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. DOE has identified and assessed six proposed action alternatives in this EIS. These are: (1) electrometallurgical treatment of all fuel at ANL-W, (2) direct disposal of blanket fuel in high-integrity cans with the sodium removed at ANL-W, (3) plutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) processing of blanket fuel at SRS, (4) melt and dilute processing of blanket fuel at ANL-W, (5) melt and dilute processing of blanket fuel at SRS, and (6) melt and dilute processing of all fuel at ANL-W. In addition, Alternatives 2 through 5 include the electrometallurgical treatment of driver fuel at ANL-W. Under the No Action Alternative, the EIS evaluates both the continued storage of sodium-bonded spent nuclear fuel until the development of a new treatment technology or direct disposal without treatment. Under all of the alternatives, the affected environment is primarily within 80 kilometers (50 miles) of spent nuclear fuel treatment facilities. Analyses indicate little difference in the environmental impacts among alternatives. DOE has identified electrometallurgical treatment as its Preferred Alternative for the treatment and management of all sodium-bonded spent nuclear fuel, except for the Fermi-1 blanket fuel. The No Action Alternative is preferred for the Fermi-1 blanket spent nuclear fuel.

  13. Knowledge Management Initiatives Used to Maintain Regulatory Expertise in Transportation and Storage of Radioactive Materials - 12177

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindsay, Haile; Garcia-Santos, Norma; Saverot, Pierre; Day, Neil; Gambone Rodriguez, Kimberly; Cruz, Luis; Sotomayor-Rivera, Alexis; Vechioli, Lucieann; Vera, John; Pstrak, David [United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Mail Stop EBB-03D-02M, 6003 Executive Boulevard, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) was established in 1974 with the mission to license and regulate the civilian use of nuclear materials for commercial, industrial, academic, and medical uses in order to protect public health and safety, and the environment, and promote the common defense and security. Currently, approximately half (?49%) of the workforce at the NRC has been with the Agency for less than six years. As part of the Agency's mission, the NRC has partial responsibility for the oversight of the transportation and storage of radioactive materials. The NRC has experienced a significant level of expertise leaving the Agency due to staff attrition. Factors that contribute to this attrition include retirement of the experienced nuclear workforce and mobility of staff within or outside the Agency. Several knowledge management (KM) initiatives have been implemented within the Agency, with one of them including the formation of a Division of Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation (SFST) KM team. The team, which was formed in the fall of 2008, facilitates capturing, transferring, and documenting regulatory knowledge for staff to effectively perform their safety oversight of transportation and storage of radioactive materials, regulated under Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR) Part 71 and Part 72. In terms of KM, the SFST goal is to share critical information among the staff to reduce the impact from staff's mobility and attrition. KM strategies in place to achieve this goal are: (1) development of communities of practice (CoP) (SFST Qualification Journal and the Packaging and Storing Radioactive Material) in the on-line NRC Knowledge Center (NKC); (2) implementation of a SFST seminar program where the seminars are recorded and placed in the Agency's repository, Agency-wide Documents Access and Management System (ADAMS); (3) meeting of technical discipline group programs to share knowledge within specialty areas; (4) development of written guidance to capture 'administrative and technical' knowledge (e.g., office instructions (OIs), generic communications (e.g., bulletins, generic letters, regulatory issue summary), standard review plans (SRPs), interim staff guidance (ISGs)); (5) use of mentoring strategies for experienced staff to train new staff members; (6) use of Microsoft SharePoint portals in capturing, transferring, and documenting knowledge for staff across the Division from Division management and administrative assistants to the project managers, inspectors, and technical reviewers; and (7) development and implementation of a Division KM Plan. A discussion and description of the successes and challenges of implementing these KM strategies at the NRC/SFST will be provided. (authors)

  14. Final Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Environmental Impact Statement Summary and Guide for Stakeholders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pursuant to the Mercury Export Ban Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-414), DOE was directed to designate a facility or facilities for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury generated within the United States. Therefore, DOE has analyzed the storage of up to 10,000 metric tons (11,000 tons) of elemental mercury in a facility(ies) constructed and operated in accordance with the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (74 FR 31723). DOE prepared this Final Mercury Storage EIS in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.), the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) implementing regulations (40 CFR 1500–1508), and DOE’s NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021) to evaluate reasonable alternatives for a facility(ies) for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury. This Final Mercury Storage EIS analyzes the potential environmental, human health, and socioeconomic impacts of elemental mercury storage at seven candidate locations: Grand Junction Disposal Site near Grand Junction, Colorado; Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; Hawthorne Army Depot near Hawthorne, Nevada; Idaho National Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; Kansas City Plant in Kansas City, Missouri; Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina; and Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas. As required by CEQ NEPA regulations, the No Action Alternative was also analyzed as a basis for comparison. DOE intends to decide (1) where to locate the elemental mercury storage facility(ies) and (2) whether to use existing buildings, new buildings, or a combination of existing and new buildings. DOE’s Preferred Alternative for the long-term management and storage of mercury is the Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas.

  15. Storage System and IBM System Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IBM® XIV® Storage System and IBM System Storage® SAN Volume Controller deliver high performance and smart management for SAP® landscapes IBM SAP International Competence Center #12;"The combination of the XIV Storage System and SAN Volume Controller gives us a smarter way to manage our storage. If we need

  16. Control and Size Energy Storage for Managing Energy balance of Variable Generation Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ke, Xinda; Lu, Ning; Jin, Chunlian

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents control algorithms and sizing strategies for using energy storage to manage energy balance for variable generation resources. The control objective is to minimize the hourly generation imbalance between the actual and the scheduled generation of the wind farm. Three control algorithms are compared: tracking power imbalance, post-compensation, and pre-compensation. Measurement data from a wind farm located in South-central Washington State are used in the study. The results show that tracking power imbalance yields the best performance by keeping the hourly energy imbalances zero. However, the energy storage system (ESS) will be significantly oversized. Post-compensation reduces power rating of the ESS but the hourly imbalance may not be kept as zero when large and long-lasting energy imbalances occur. A linear regression forecasting algorithm is developed for the pre-compensation algorithm to pre-charge or pre-discharge the ESS based on predicted energy imbalances. The performance comparison shows that the pre-compensation method significantly reduces the size of the ESS while maintaining satisfactory performance.

  17. Active Management of Integrated Geothermal-CO2 Storage Reservoirs in Sedimentary Formations

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Buscheck, Thomas A.

    The purpose of phase 1 is to determine the feasibility of integrating geologic CO2 storage (GCS) with geothermal energy production. Phase 1 includes reservoir analyses to determine injector/producer well schemes that balance the generation of economically useful flow rates at the producers with the need to manage reservoir overpressure to reduce the risks associated with overpressure, such as induced seismicity and CO2 leakage to overlying aquifers. This submittal contains input and output files of the reservoir model analyses. A reservoir-model "index-html" file was sent in a previous submittal to organize the reservoir-model input and output files according to sections of the FY1 Final Report to which they pertain. The recipient should save the file: Reservoir-models-inputs-outputs-index.html in the same directory that the files: Section2.1.*.tar.gz files are saved in.

  18. Active Management of Integrated Geothermal-CO2 Storage Reservoirs in Sedimentary Formations

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Buscheck, Thomas A.

    The purpose of phase 1 is to determine the feasibility of integrating geologic CO2 storage (GCS) with geothermal energy production. Phase 1 includes reservoir analyses to determine injector/producer well schemes that balance the generation of economically useful flow rates at the producers with the need to manage reservoir overpressure to reduce the risks associated with overpressure, such as induced seismicity and CO2 leakage to overlying aquifers. Based on a range of well schemes, techno-economic analyses of the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) are conducted to determine the economic benefits of integrating GCS with geothermal energy production. In addition to considering CO2 injection, reservoir analyses are conducted for nitrogen (N2) injection to investigate the potential benefits of incorporating N2 injection with integrated geothermal-GCS, as well as the use of N2 injection as a potential pressure-support and working-fluid option. Phase 1 includes preliminary environmental risk assessments of integrated geothermal-GCS, with the focus on managing reservoir overpressure. Phase 1 also includes an economic survey of pipeline costs, which will be applied in Phase 2 to the analysis of CO2 conveyance costs for techno-economics analyses of integrated geothermal-GCS reservoir sites. Phase 1 also includes a geospatial GIS survey of potential integrated geothermal-GCS reservoir sites, which will be used in Phase 2 to conduct sweet-spot analyses that determine where promising geothermal resources are co-located in sedimentary settings conducive to safe CO2 storage, as well as being in adequate proximity to large stationary CO2 sources.

  19. EIS-0063: Waste Management Operations, Double-Shell Tanks for Defense High Level Radioactive Waste Storage, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed this statement to evaluate the existing tank design and consider additional specific design and safety feature alternatives for the thirteen tanks being constructed for storage of defense high-level radioactive liquid waste at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. This statement supplements ERDA-1538, "Final Environmental Statement on Waste Management Operation."

  20. Managing aging effects on dry cask storage systems for extended long-term storage and transportation of used fuel - rev. 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chopra, O.K.; Diercks, D.; Fabian, R.; Ma, D.; Shah, V.; Tam, S.W.; Liu, Y. (Decision and Information Sciences); ( EVS); ( NE)

    2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The cancellation of the Yucca Mountain repository program in the United States raises the prospect of extended long-term storage (i.e., >120 years) and deferred transportation of used fuel at operating and decommissioned nuclear power plant sites. Under U.S. federal regulations contained in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 72.42, the initial license term for an Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) must not exceed 40 years from the date of issuance. Licenses may be renewed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at the expiration of the license term upon application by the licensee for a period not to exceed 40 years. Application for ISFSI license renewals must include the following: (1) Time-limited aging analyses (TLAAs) that demonstrate that structures, systems, and components (SSCs) important to safety will continue to perform their intended function for the requested period of extended operation; and (2) a description of the aging management program (AMP) for management of issues associated with aging that could adversely affect SSCs important to safety. In addition, the application must also include design bases information as documented in the most recent updated final safety analysis report as required by 10 CFR 72.70. Information contained in previous applications, statements, or reports filed with the Commission under the license may be incorporated by reference provided that those references are clear and specific. The NRC has recently issued the Standard Review Plan (SRP) for renewal of used-fuel dry cask storage system (DCSS) licenses and Certificates of Compliance (CoCs), NUREG-1927, under which NRC may renew a specific license or a CoC for a term not to exceed 40 years. Both the license and the CoC renewal applications must contain revised technical requirements and operating conditions (fuel storage, surveillance and maintenance, and other requirements) for the ISFSI and DCSS that address aging effects that could affect the safe storage of the used fuel. The information contained in the license and CoC renewal applications will require NRC review to verify that the aging effects on the SSCs in DCSSs/ ISFSIs are adequately managed for the period of extended operation. To date, all of the ISFSIs located across the United States with more than 1,500 dry casks loaded with used fuel have initial license terms of 20 years; three ISFSIs (Surry, H.B. Robinson and Oconee) have received their renewed licenses for 20 years, and two other ISFSIs (Calvert Cliffs and Prairie Island) have applied for license renewal for 40 years. This report examines issues related to managing aging effects on the SSCs in DCSSs/ISFSIs for extended long-term storage and transportation of used fuels, following an approach similar to that of the Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL) report, NUREG-1801, for the aging management and license renewal of nuclear power plants. The report contains five chapters and an appendix on quality assurance for aging management programs for used-fuel dry storage systems. Chapter I of the report provides an overview of the ISFSI license renewal process based on 10 CFR 72 and the guidance provided in NUREG-1927. Chapter II contains definitions and terms for structures and components in DCSSs, materials, environments, aging effects, and aging mechanisms. Chapter III and Chapter IV contain generic TLAAs and AMPs, respectively, that have been developed for managing aging effects on the SSCs important to safety in the dry cask storage system designs described in Chapter V. The summary descriptions and tabulations of evaluations of AMPs and TLAAs for the SSCs that are important to safety in Chapter V include DCSS designs (i.e., NUHOMS{reg_sign}, HI-STORM 100, Transnuclear (TN) metal cask, NAC International S/T storage cask, ventilated storage cask (VSC-24), and the Westinghouse MC-10 metal dry storage cask) that have been and continue to be used by utilities across the country for dry storage of used fuel to date. The goal of this report is to help establish the technical

  1. Analysis of interrelationships between photovoltaic power and battery storage for electric utility load management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chowdhury, B.H.; Rahman, S.

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of photovoltaic power generation on the electric utility's load shape under supply-side peak load management conditions is explored. Results show that some utilities employing battery storage for peak load shaving might benefit from use of photovoltaic (PV) power, the extent of its usefulness being dependent on the specific load shapes as well as the photovoltaic array orientations. Typical utility load shapes both in the eastern and in the western parts of the U.S. are examined for this purpose. While photovoltaic power generation seems to present a bigger impact on the load of the western utility, both utilities will experience considerable savings on the size of the battery system required to shave the peak loads and also in the night-time base capacity required to charge the battery. Results show that when the cost of 2-axis tracking PV systems drop to $2/Wp, the southwestern utility will experience net cost savings when the PV-battery hybrid system is employed for load management. On the other hand, because of lesser availability of solar energy, the southeastern utility shows adverse economics for such a system.

  2. Underground storage tank management plan, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Underground Storage Tank (UST) Program at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant was established to locate UST systems at the facility and to ensure that all operating UST systems are free of leaks. UST systems have been removed or upgraded in accordance with Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) regulations and guidance. With the closure of a significant portion of the USTs, the continuing mission of the UST Management Program is to manage the remaining active UST systems and continue corrective actions in a safe regulatory compliant manner. This Program outlines the compliance issues that must be addressed, reviews the current UST inventory and compliance approach, and presents the status and planned activities associated with each UST system. The UST Program provides guidance for implementing TDEC regulations and guidelines for petroleum UST systems. The plan is divided into three major sections: (1) regulatory requirements, (2) active UST sites, and (3) out-of-service UST sites. These sections describe in detail the applicable regulatory drivers, the UST sites addressed under the Program, and the procedures and guidance for compliance.

  3. Decommissioning and Dismantling of Liquid Waste Storage and Liquid Waste Treatment Facility from Paldiski Nuclear Site, Estonia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varvas, M. [AS ALARA, Leetse tee 21, Paldiski, 76806 (Estonia); Putnik, H. [Delegation of the European Commission to Russia, Kadashevskaja nab. 14/1 119017 Moscow (Russian Federation); Nirvin, B.; Pettersson, S. [SKB, Box 5864, Stockholm, SE-102 40 (Sweden); Johnsson, B. [Studsvik RadWaste, Nykoping, SE-611 82 (Sweden)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Paldiski Nuclear Facility in Estonia, with two nuclear reactors was owned by the Soviet Navy and was used for training the navy personnel to operate submarine nuclear reactors. After collapse of Soviet Union the Facility was shut down and handed over to the Estonian government in 1995. In co-operation with the Paldiski International Expert Reference Group (PIERG) decommission strategy was worked out and started to implement. Conditioning of solid and liquid operational waste and dismantling of contaminated installations and buildings were among the key issues of the Strategy. Most of the liquid waste volume, remained at the Facility, was processed in the frames of an Estonian-Finnish co-operation project using a mobile wastewater purification unit NURES (IVO International OY) and water was discharged prior to the site take-over. In 1999-2002 ca 120 m{sup 3} of semi-liquid tank sediments (a mixture of ion exchange resins, sand filters, evaporator and flocculation slurry), remained after treatment of liquid waste were solidified in steel containers and stored into interim storage. The project was carried out under the Swedish - Estonian co-operation program on radiation protection and nuclear safety. Contaminated installations in buildings, used for treatment and storage of liquid waste (Liquid Waste Treatment Facility and Liquid Waste Storage) were then dismantled and the buildings demolished in 2001-2004. (authors)

  4. Cost estimate report for the long-term management of depleted uranium hexafluoride : storage of depleted uranium metal.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Folga, S.M.; Kier, P.H.; Thimmapuram, P.R.

    2001-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains a cost analysis of the long-term storage of depleted uranium in the form of uranium metal. Three options are considered for storage of the depleted uranium. These options are aboveground buildings, partly underground vaults, and mined cavities. Three cases are presented. In the first case, all the depleted uranium metal that would be produced from the conversion of depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) generated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) prior to July 1993 would be stored at the storage facility (100% Case). In the second case, half the depleted uranium metal would be stored at this storage facility (50% Case). In the third case, one-quarter of the depleted uranium metal would be stored at the storage facility (25% Case). The technical basis for the cost analysis presented in this report is principally found in the companion report, ANL/EAD/TM-100, ''Engineering Analysis Report for the Long-Term Management of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride: Storage of Depleted Uranium Metal'', prepared by Argonne National Laboratory.

  5. EIS-0306: Treatment and Management of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear Fuel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE prepared a EIS that evaluated the potential environmental impacts of treatment and management of DOE-owned sodium bonded spent nuclear fuel.

  6. Collection and representation of GIS data to aid household water treatment and safe storage technology implementation in the northern region of Ghana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VanCalcar, Jenny E. (Jenny Elizabeth)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2005, a start-up social business called Pure Home Water (PHW) was begun in Ghana to promote and sell household water treatment and safe storage (HWTS) technologies. The original aim of the company was to offer a variety ...

  7. THE WIDE-AREA ENERGY STORAGE AND MANAGEMENT SYSTEM PHASE II Final Report - Flywheel Field Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Ning; Makarov, Yuri V.; Weimar, Mark R.; Rudolph, Frank; Murthy, Shashikala; Arseneaux, Jim; Loutan, Clyde; Chowdhury, S.

    2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This research was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operated for the U.S. department of Energy (DOE) by Battelle Memorial Institute for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), California Institute for Energy and Environment (CIEE) and California Energy Commission (CEC). A wide-area energy management system (WAEMS) is a centralized control system that operates energy storage devices (ESDs) located in different places to provide energy and ancillary services that can be shared among balancing authorities (BAs). The goal of this research is to conduct flywheel field tests, investigate the technical characteristics and economics of combined hydro-flywheel regulation services that can be shared between Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and California Independent System Operator (CAISO) controlled areas. This report is the second interim technical report for Phase II of the WAEMS project. This report presents: 1) the methodology of sharing regulation service between balancing authorities, 2) the algorithm to allocate the regulation signal between the flywheel and hydro power plant to minimize the wear-and-tear of the hydro power plants, 3) field results of the hydro-flywheel regulation service (conducted by the Beacon Power), and 4) the performance metrics and economic analysis of the combined hydro-flywheel regulation service.

  8. Risk perception on management of nuclear high-level and transuranic waste storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dees, L.A.

    1994-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy`s program for disposing of nuclear High-Level Waste (HLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste has been impeded by overwhelming political opposition fueled by public perceptions of actual risk. Analysis of these perceptions shows them to be deeply rooted in images of fear and dread that have been present since the discovery of radioactivity. The development and use of nuclear weapons linked these images to reality and the mishandling of radioactive waste from the nations military weapons facilities has contributed toward creating a state of distrust that cannot be erased quickly or easily. In addition, the analysis indicates that even the highly educated technical community is not well informed on the latest technology involved with nuclear HLW and TRU waste disposal. It is not surprising then, that the general public feels uncomfortable with DOE`s management plans for with nuclear HLW and TRU waste disposal. Postponing the permanent geologic repository and use of Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) would provide the time necessary for difficult social and political issues to be resolved. It would also allow time for the public to become better educated if DOE chooses to become proactive.

  9. Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    trates a design load profile for a partial storage system.load management / full storage / ice storage / partialfor partial storage) because part of the cooling load is

  10. NGLW RCRA Storage Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. J. Waters; R. Ochoa; K. D. Fritz; D. W. Craig

    2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory contains radioactive liquid waste in underground storage tanks at the INTEC Tank Farm Facility (TFF). INTEC is currently treating the waste by evaporation to reduce the liquid volume for continued storage, and by calcination to reduce and convert the liquid to a dry waste form for long-term storage in calcine bins. Both treatment methods and activities in support of those treatment operations result in Newly Generated Liquid Waste (NGLW) being sent to TFF. The storage tanks in the TFF are underground, contained in concrete vaults with instrumentation, piping, transfer jets, and managed sumps in case of any liquid accumulation in the vault. The configuration of these tanks is such that Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations apply. The TFF tanks were assessed several years ago with respect to the RCRA regulations and they were found to be deficient. This study considers the configuration of the current tanks and the RCRA deficiencies identified for each. The study identifies four potential methods and proposes a means of correcting the deficiencies. The cost estimates included in the study account for construction cost; construction methods to minimize work exposure to chemical hazards, radioactive contamination, and ionizing radiation hazards; project logistics; and project schedule. The study also estimates the tank volumes benefit associated with each corrective action to support TFF liquid waste management planning.

  11. Energy Storage R&D: Thermal Management Studies and Modeling (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pesaran, A. A.

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we summarize NREL's FY09 energy storage R&D studies in the areas of 1. thermal characterization and analysis, 2. cost, life, and performance trade-off studies, and 3. thermal abuse modeling.

  12. International management of spent fuel storage : technical alternatives and constraints, topical report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Marvin M.

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Some of the important technical issues involved in the implementation of a spent fuel storage regime under international auspices are discussed. In particular, we consider: the state of the art as far as the different ...

  13. Promotional Effects of H2O Treatment on NOx Storage over Fresh...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aged Pt-BaOAl2O3 Lean NOx Trap Catalysts . Abstract: A simple liquid water treatment applied to fresh and thermally aged Pt(2wt%)-BaO(20wt%)Al2O3 lean NOx trap catalysts at...

  14. An Intelligent Portfolio Management Approach to Gas Storage Field Deliverability Maintenance and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    ;Outline Introduction Methodology & Software Results Objective Conclusions #12;Energy consumption by fuel Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA) Introduction #12;Introduction Typical gas storage fields operations in the same way. This is an optimization problem. Gaining the highest return with minimum risk

  15. Critical Review of Desalination Concentrate Management, Treatment and Beneficial Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and diversify fresh water sources. The lack of economically and ecologically feasible concentrate management1,3 1 Engineering Research Center for Re-Inventing the Nation's Urban Water Infrastructure (Re Desalination of seawater, brackish water, and reclaimed water is increasingly utilized worldwide to augment

  16. Impact-driven pressure management via targeted brine extraction Conceptual studies of CO2 storage in saline formations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birkholzer, J.T.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of CO 2 Storage for Full-Scale Deployment, Ground Water, 48(connect the storage formation with the ground surface. ToStorage Systems—Application of a New Analytical Solution, submitted to Ground

  17. Thermal treatment effects on charge storage performance of graphene-based materials for supercapacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Hongxin [ORNL; Bhat, Vinay V [ORNL; Gallego, Nidia C [ORNL; Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphene materials were synthesized by reduction of exfoliated graphene oxide sheets by hydrazine hydrate and then thermally treated in nitrogen to improve the surface area and their electrochemical performance as electrical double-layer capacitor electrodes. The structural and surface properties of the prepared reduced graphite oxide (RGO) were investigated using atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectra, X-ray diffraction, and nitrogen adsorption / desorption. RGO forms a continuous network of crumpled sheets, which consist of numerous few-layer and single-layer graphenes. Electrochemical studies were conducted by cyclic voltammetry, impedance spectroscopy, and galvanostatic charge-discharge measurements. The modified RGO materials showed enhanced electrochemical performance, with maximum specific capacitance of 96 F/g, energy density of 12.8 Wh/kg, and power density of 160 kW/kg. The results demonstrate that thermal treatment of RGO at selected conditions is a convenient and efficient method for improving specific capacitance, energy, and power density.

  18. TRI-PARTY AGREEMENT TREATMENT, STORAGE AND DISPOSAL UNITS PROJECT MANAGERS LIST

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesis of 2D Alloys & HeterostructuresOPERABLE

  19. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Niagara Falls Storage Site NY - NY 17

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling CorpNew MexicoUtah MexicanNiagara Falls Storage

  20. Technical Competencies for the Safe Interim Storage and Management of 233U at U.S. Department of Energy Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, D.O.; Krichinsky, A.M.; Laughlin, S.S.; Van Essen, D.C.; Yong, L.K.

    1999-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Uranium-233 (with concomitant {sup 232}U) is a man-made fissile isotope of uranium with unique nuclear characteristics which require high-integrity alpha containment biological shielding, and remote handling. The special handling considerations and the fact that much of the {sup 233}U processing and large-scale handling was performed over a decade ago underscore the importance of identifying the people within the DOE complex who are currently working with or have worked with {sup 233}U. The availability of these key personnel is important in ensuring safe interim storage, management and ultimate disposition of {sup 233}U at DOE facilities. Significant programs are ongoing at several DOE sites with actinides. The properties of these actinide materials require many of the same types of facilities and handling expertise as does {sup 233}U.

  1. GridOPTICS(TM) A Novel Software Framework for Integrating Power Grid Data Storage, Management and Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorton, Ian; Yin, Jian; Akyol, Bora A.; Ciraci, Selim; Critchlow, Terence; Liu, Yan; Gibson, Tara D.; Purohit, Sumit; Sharma, Poorva; Vlachopoulou, Maria

    2013-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the architecture and design of GridOPTICSTM, a novel software framework to integrate a collection of software tools developed by PNNL’s Future Power Grid Initiative (FPGI) into a coherent, powerful operations and planning tool for the power grid of the future. GridOPTICSTM enables plug-and-play of various analysis, modeling and visualization software tools for fast and accurate control of the power grid. To bridge the data access for different control purposes, GridOPTICSTM provides a scalable and thin layer of event processing that hides the complexity of data storage and management. The initial prototype of GridOPTICSTM was demonstrated with several use cases from PNNL’s FPGI.

  2. Production management techniques for water-drive gas reservoirs. Field No. 4; mid-continent aquifer gas storage reservoir. Volume 1. Topical report, January 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, T.L.; Obernyer, S.L.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed reservoir characterization and numerical simulation study is presented for a mid-continent aquifer gas storage field. It is demonstrated that rate optimization during both injection and withdrawal cycles can significantly improve the performance of the storage reservoir. Performance improvements are realized in the form of a larger working volume of gas, a reduced cushion volume of gas, and decrease in field water production. By utilizing these reservoir management techniques gas storage operators will be able to minimize their base gas requirements, improve their economics, and determine whether the best use for a particular storage field is base loading or meeting peak day requirements. Volume I of this two-volume set contains a detailed technical discussion.

  3. Flood Assessment at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site and the Proposed Hazardous Waste Storage Unit, DOE/Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmeltzer, J. S., Millier, J. J., Gustafson, D. L.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A flood assessment at the Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) and the proposed Hazardous Waste Storage Unit (HWSU) in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) was performed to determine the 100-year flood hazard at these facilities. The study was conducted to determine whether the RWMS and HWSU are located within a 100-year flood hazard as defined by the Federal Emergency Management Agency, and to provide discharges for the design of flood protection.

  4. Covered Product Category: Residential Gas Storage Water Heaters...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Gas Storage Water Heaters Covered Product Category: Residential Gas Storage Water Heaters The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for gas storage...

  5. Title: Networking the Cloud: Enabling Enterprise Computing and Storage Cloud computing has been changing how enterprises run and manage their IT systems. Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Networking the Cloud: Enabling Enterprise Computing and Storage Abstract: Cloud computing has been changing how enterprises run and manage their IT systems. Cloud computing platforms provide introduction on Cloud Computing. We propose a Virtual Cloud Pool abstraction to logically unify cloud

  6. Waste management system alternatives for treatment of wastes from spent fuel reprocessing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKee, R.W.; Swanson, J.L.; Daling, P.M.; Clark, L.L.; Craig, R.A.; Nesbitt, J.F.; McCarthy, D.; Franklin, A.L.; Hazelton, R.F.; Lundgren, R.A.

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was performed to help identify a preferred TRU waste treatment alternative for reprocessing wastes with respect to waste form performance in a geologic repository, near-term waste management system risks, and minimum waste management system costs. The results were intended for use in developing TRU waste acceptance requirements that may be needed to meet regulatory requirements for disposal of TRU wastes in a geologic repository. The waste management system components included in this analysis are waste treatment and packaging, transportation, and disposal. The major features of the TRU waste treatment alternatives examined here include: (1) packaging (as-produced) without treatment (PWOT); (2) compaction of hulls and other compactable wastes; (3) incineration of combustibles with cementation of the ash plus compaction of hulls and filters; (4) melting of hulls and failed equipment plus incineration of combustibles with vitrification of the ash along with the HLW; (5a) decontamination of hulls and failed equipment to produce LLW plus incineration and incorporation of ash and other inert wastes into HLW glass; and (5b) variation of this fifth treatment alternative in which the incineration ash is incorporated into a separate TRU waste glass. The six alternative processing system concepts provide progressively increasing levels of TRU waste consolidation and TRU waste form integrity. Vitrification of HLW and intermediate-level liquid wastes (ILLW) was assumed in all cases.

  7. Remote Handled Transuranic Sludge Retrieval Transfer And Storage System At Hanford

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raymond, Rick E. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States); Frederickson, James R. [AREVA, Avignon (France); Criddle, James [AREVA, Avignon (France); Hamilton, Dennis [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States); Johnson, Mike W. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States)

    2012-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the systems developed for processing and interim storage of the sludge managed as remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU). An experienced, integrated CH2M HILL/AFS team was formed to design and build systems to retrieve, interim store, and treat for disposal the K West Basin sludge, namely the Sludge Treatment Project (STP). A system has been designed and is being constructed for retrieval and interim storage, namely the Engineered Container Retrieval, Transfer and Storage System (ECRTS).

  8. Final Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement, for Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and Hazardous Waste, Summary

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysisDarby/%2AO 474.2Y-12 Press98918, 2014

  9. EA-1120: Solid Residues Treatment, Repackaging and Storage at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, Colorado

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to stabilize, if necessary, and/or repackage the residues for safe interim storage at the Site while awaiting the completion and opening...

  10. Recent Improvements In Interface Management For Hanfords Waste Treatment And Immobilization Plant - 13263

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arm, Stuart T. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, WA (United States); Pell, Michael J. [Bechtel National, Inc., Richland, WA (United States); Van Meighem, Jeffery S. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, WA (United States); Duncan, Garth M. [Bechtel National, Inc., Richland, WA (United States); Harrington, Christopher C. [Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Richland, Washington (United States)

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for management and completion of the River Protection Project (RPP) mission, which comprises both the Hanford Site tank farms operations and the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The RPP mission is to store, retrieve and treat Hanford's tank waste; store and dispose of treated wastes; and close the tank farm waste management areas and treatment facilities by 2047. The WTP is currently being designed and constructed by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) for DOE-ORP. BNI relies on a number oftechnical services from other Hanford contractors for WTP's construction and commissioning. These same services will be required of the future WTP operations contractor. The WTP interface management process has recently been improved through changes in organization and technical issue management documented in an Interface Management Plan. Ten of the thirteen active WTP Interface Control Documents (ICDs) have been revised in 2012 using the improved process with the remaining three in progress. The value of the process improvements is reflected by the ability to issue these documents on schedule.

  11. Recent Improvements in Interface Management for Hanford's Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - 13263

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arm, Stuart T.; Van Meighem, Jeffery S. [Washington River Protection Solutions, P.O. Box 850, Richland, Washington, 99352 (United States)] [Washington River Protection Solutions, P.O. Box 850, Richland, Washington, 99352 (United States); Duncan, Garth M.; Pell, Michael J. [Bechtel National Inc., 2435 Stevens Center Place, Richland, Washington, 99352 (United States)] [Bechtel National Inc., 2435 Stevens Center Place, Richland, Washington, 99352 (United States); Harrington, Christopher C. [Department of Energy - Office of River Protection, 2440 Stevens Center Place, Richland, Washington, 99352 (United States)] [Department of Energy - Office of River Protection, 2440 Stevens Center Place, Richland, Washington, 99352 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for management and completion of the River Protection Project (RPP) mission, which includes the Hanford Site tank farms operations and the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The RPP mission is to store, retrieve and treat Hanford's tank waste; store and dispose of treated wastes; and close the tank farm waste management areas and treatment facilities by 2047. The WTP is currently being designed and constructed by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) for DOE-ORP. BNI relies on a number of technical services from other Hanford contractors for WTP's construction and commissioning. These same services will be required of the future WTP operations contractor. Partly in response to a DNFSB recommendation, the WTP interface management process managing these technical services has recently been improved through changes in organization and issue management. The changes are documented in an Interface Management Plan. The organizational improvement is embodied in the One System Integrated Project Team that was formed by integrating WTP and tank farms staff representing interfacing functional areas into a single organization. A number of improvements were made to the issue management process but most notable was the formal appointment of technical, regulatory and safety subject matter experts to ensure accurate identification of issues and open items. Ten of the thirteen active WTP Interface Control Documents have been revised in 2012 using the improved process with the remaining three in progress. The value of the process improvements is reflected by the ability to issue these documents on schedule and accurately identify technical, regulatory and safety issues and open items. (authors)

  12. Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Treatment and Management of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    1999-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes the U.S. Department of Energy's ''Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Treatment and Management of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear Fuel''. In addition to information concerning the background, purpose and need for the proposed action, and the National Environmental Policy Act process, this summary describes the characteristics of sodium-bonded spent nuclear fuel, the proposed treatment methods, the proposed facilities, the alternatives considered, and the environmental consequences of these alternatives. A glossary is included at the end to assist the reader with some of the technical terms used in this document.

  13. Prevalence and Treatment Management of Oropharyngeal Candidiasis in Cancer Patients: Results of the French Candidoscope Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gligorov, Joseph [APHP Tenon, APREC, University Paris VI, Paris (France); Bastit, Laurent [Centre Frederic Joliot, Rouen (France); Gervais, Honorine [Hopital Saint Antoine, Paris (France); Henni, Mehdi [Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, Paris (France); Kahila, Widad [Centre Jean Perrin, Clermont-Ferrand (France); Lepille, Daniel [Clinique Chirurgicale Pasteur, Evreux (France); Luporsi, Elisabeth [Centre Alexis Vautrin, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Sasso, Giuseppe [Centre Medical Forcilles, Ferolles-Attily (France); Varette, Charles [Centre Hospitalier Prive Claude Galien, Quincy-sous-Senart (France); Azria, David, E-mail: David.Azria@valdorel.fnclcc.f [Crlc Val d'Aurelle, Inserm U860, Universite Montpellier I, Montpellier (France)

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The aim of this pharmaco-epidemiological study was to evaluate the prevalence of oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) in cancer patients treated with chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Signs and symptoms of OPC were noted for all patients. Antifungal therapeutic management was recorded in OPC patients. Patients receiving local antifungal treatments were monitored until the end of treatment. Results: Enrolled in the study were 2,042 patients with solid tumor and/or lymphoma treated with chemotherapy and/or another systemic cancer treatment and/or radiotherapy. The overall prevalence of OPC was 9.6% (95% confidence interval, 8.4%-11.0%]in this population. It was most frequent in patients treated with combined chemoradiotherapy (22.0%) or with more than two cytotoxic agents (16.9%). Local antifungal treatments were prescribed in 75.0% of OPC patients as recommended by guidelines. The compliance to treatment was higher in patients receiving once-daily miconazole mucoadhesive buccal tablet (MBT; 88.2%) than in those treated with several daily mouthwashes of amphotericin B (40%) or nystatin (18.8%). Conclusion: OPC prevalence in treated cancer patients was high. Local treatments were usually prescribed as per guidelines. Compliance to local treatments was better with once-daily drugs.

  14. Review of private sector and Department of Energy treatment, storage, and disposal capabilities for low-level and mixed low-level waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willson, R.A.; Ball, L.W.; Mousseau, J.D.; Piper, R.B.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Private sector capacity for treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) of various categories of radioactive waste has been researched and reviewed for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) by Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company, the primary contractor for the INEL. The purpose of this document is to provide assistance to the INEL and other US Department of Energy (DOE) sites in determining if private sector capabilities exist for those waste streams that currently cannot be handled either on site or within the DOE complex. The survey of private sector vendors was limited to vendors currently capable of, or expected within the next five years to be able to perform one or more of the following services: low-level waste (LLW) volume reduction, storage, or disposal; mixed LLW treatment, storage, or disposal; alpha-contaminated mixed LLW treatment; LLW decontamination for recycling, reclamation, or reuse; laundering of radioactively-contaminated laundry and/or respirators; mixed LLW treatability studies; mixed LLW treatment technology development. Section 2.0 of this report will identify the approach used to modify vendor information from previous revisions of this report. It will also illustrate the methodology used to identify any additional companies. Section 3.0 will identify, by service, specific vendor capabilities and capacities. Because this document will be used to identify private sector vendors that may be able to handle DOE LLW and mixed LLW streams, it was decided that current DOE capabilities should also be identified. This would encourage cooperation between DOE sites and the various states and, in some instances, may result in a more cost-effective alternative to privatization. The DOE complex has approximately 35 sites that generate the majority of both LLW and mixed LLW. Section 4.0 will identify these sites by Operations Office, and their associated LLW and mixed LLW TSD units.

  15. A client management system for criminal justice referrals to drug abuse treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pate, Wayland Gordon

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    over the years of research. Therapeutic communities are typically residential, drug-free programs offering 24-hour care and they concentrate on rehabilitation through resocialization of the addict toward more adaptive and productive pursuits. Drug...A CLIENT MANAGEMENT SYSTEM FOR CRIMINAL JUSTICE REFERRALS TO DRUG ABUSE TREATMENT A Thesis by WAYLAND GORDON PATE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER...

  16. Shoring up Infrastructure Weaknesses with Hybrid Cloud Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Surajit

    Shoring up Infrastructure Weaknesses with Hybrid Cloud Storage #12;2StorSimple White Pages: Shoring Up Infrastructure Weaknesses with Hybrid Cloud Storage Table of Contents The Hybrid Cloud Context for IT Managers ............................................................. 3 The Bottleneck of Managing Storage

  17. #53 DrugTreatment and Data Management:AnAnalysis of InformationTechnology Infrastructure J. P. Wisdom1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    #53 DrugTreatment and Data Management:AnAnalysis of InformationTechnology Infrastructure Abstract extent do agencies use electronic records and what factors influence their methods of record keeping? (2 Data mapping, a process improvement tool from business and management fields, was combined

  18. HEATS: Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HEATS Project: The 15 projects that make up ARPA-E’s HEATS program, short for “High Energy Advanced Thermal Storage,” seek to develop revolutionary, cost-effective ways to store thermal energy. HEATS focuses on 3 specific areas: 1) developing high-temperature solar thermal energy storage capable of cost-effectively delivering electricity around the clock and thermal energy storage for nuclear power plants capable of cost-effectively meeting peak demand, 2) creating synthetic fuel efficiently from sunlight by converting sunlight into heat, and 3) using thermal energy storage to improve the driving range of electric vehicles (EVs) and also enable thermal management of internal combustion engine vehicles.

  19. THEORETICAL STUDIES IN LONG-TERM THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.F.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mathematical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers.of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrencethe Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage program managed by

  20. THEORETICAL STUDIES IN LONG-TERM THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.F.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mathematical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers.of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrencewithin the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage program managed

  1. THEORETICAL STUDIES IN LONG-TERM THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.F.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mathematical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers.Proceedings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop,within the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage program managed

  2. Final environmental assessment for the U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations receipt and storage of uranium materials from the Fernald Environmental Management Project site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Through a series of material transfers and sales agreements over the past 6 to 8 years, the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) has reduced its nuclear material inventory from 14,500 to approximately 6,800 metric tons of uranium (MTU). This effort is part of the US Department of energy`s (DOE`s) decision to change the mission of the FEMP site; it is currently shut down and the site is being remediated. This EA focuses on the receipt and storage of uranium materials at various DOE-ORO sites. The packaging and transportation of FEMP uranium material has been evaluated in previous NEPA and other environmental evaluations. A summary of these evaluation efforts is included as Appendix A. The material would be packaged in US Department of Transportation-approved shipping containers and removed from the FEMP site and transported to another site for storage. The Ohio Field Office will assume responsibility for environmental analyses and documentation for packaging and transport of the material as part of the remediation of the site, and ORO is preparing this EA for receipt and storage at one or more sites.

  3. Hydrogen Storage CODES & STANDARDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    automotive start-up. · Air/Thermal/Water Management ­ improved air systems, high temperature membranes, heat to pump Hydrogen Fuel/ Storage/ Infrastructure $45/kW (2010) $30kW (2015) 325 W/kg 220 W/L 60% (hydrogen system Component Air management, sensors, MEA's, membranes, Bipolar Plates, fuel processor reactor zones

  4. A Hierarchical Control Algorithm for Managing Electrical Energy Storage Systems in Homes Equipped with PV Power Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    use their PV-based generation and controllable storage devices for peak shaving on their power demand controller should possess the ability of forecasting future PV-based power generation and load power consumption profiles for better performance. In this paper we present novel PV power generation and load power

  5. An Integrated Water Treatment Technology Solution for Sustainable Water Resource Management in the Marcellus Shale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthew Bruff; Ned Godshall; Karen Evans

    2011-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This Final Scientific/ Technical Report submitted with respect to Project DE-FE0000833 titled 'An Integrated Water Treatment Technology Solution for Sustainable Water Resource Management in the Marcellus Shale' in support of final reporting requirements. This final report contains a compilation of previous reports with the most current data in order to produce one final complete document. The goal of this research was to provide an integrated approach aimed at addressing the increasing water resource challenges between natural gas production and other water stakeholders in shale gas basins. The objective was to demonstrate that the AltelaRain{reg_sign} technology could be successfully deployed in the Marcellus Shale Basin to treat frac flow-back water. That objective has been successfully met.

  6. COMPARISON OF FINAL TREATMENT & PROCESS METHODS FOR THE PREPARATION & INTERIM STORAGE OF K BASIN KNOCKOUT POT SLUDGE ENGINEERING STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ERPENBECK, E.G.

    2004-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluor Hanford (FH) directed British Nuclear Fuels, Inc. (BNFL) to prepare a Knock Out Pot (KOP) study ''using cold vacuum drying (CVD) to dry the KOP sludge with a final disposition to Canister Storage Building (CSB) or evaluate a process to corrode the sludge in water and grout it to meet the end state criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP).'' BNFL initially identified four process options: (1) Incorporate sludges into grout with no pre-conditioning; (2) Corrode the Uranium metal in the sludges then incorporate the resulting sludge into grout; (3) Separate sludge into two streams by washing/size separation with: Larger particle/Uranium metal rich stream being vacuum dried at CVD; and Smaller particle/lower Uranium metal stream being incorporated into grout; and (4) Cold vacuum dry all sludge at CVD. A coarse down selection meeting discounted option 1 as the number of drums required was prohibitive in terms of cost and schedule; and option 4 due to the technical inability of CVD to dry this waste.

  7. Thermal Storage with Ice Harvesting Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knebel, D. E.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Application of Harvesting Ice Storage Systems. Thermal storage systems are becoming widely accepted techniques for utility load management. This paper discusses the principles of ice harvesting equipment and their application to the multi...

  8. Wide-Area Energy Storage and Management system to Balance Intermittent Resources in the Bonneville Power Administration and California ISO Control Areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makarov, Yuri V.; Yang, Bo; DeSteese, John G.; Lu, Shuai; Miller, Carl H.; Nyeng, Preben; Ma, Jian; Hammerstrom, Donald J.; Vishwanathan, Vilanyur V.

    2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The entire project addresses the issue of mitigating additional intermittency and fast ramps that occur at higher penetration of intermittent resources, including wind genera-tion, in the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the California Independent Sys-tem Operator (California ISO) control areas. The proposed Wide Area Energy Storage and Management System (WAEMS) will address the additional regulation requirement through the energy exchange between the participating control areas and through the use of energy storage and other generation resources. For the BPA and California ISO control centers, the new regulation service will look no different comparing with the traditional regulation resources. The proposed project will benefit the regulation service in these service areas, regardless of the actual degree of penetration of the intermittent resources in the regions. The project develops principles, algorithms, market integration rules, functional de-sign and technical specifications for the WAEMS system. The project is sponsored by BPA and supported in kind by California ISO, Beacon Power Corporation, and the Cali-fornia Energy Commission (CEC).

  9. Niagara Falls Storage Site, Annual site environmental report, Lewiston, New York, Calendar year 1986: Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During 1986, the environmental monitoring program was continued at the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS), a US Department of Energy (DOE) surplus facility located in Niagara County, New York, presently used for the interim storage of radioactive residues and contaminated soils and rubble. The monitoring program is being conducted by Bechtel National, Inc. The monitoring program at the NFSS measures radon gas concentrations in air; external gamma radiation levels; and uranium and radium concentrations in surface water, groundwater, and sediment. To verify that the site is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard and to assess its potential effect on public health, the radiation dose was calculated for the maximally exposed individual. Based on the conservative scenario described in the report, this individual would receive an annual external exposure approximately equivalent to 6% of the DOE radiation protection standard of 100 mrem/yr. By comparison, the incremental dose received from living in a brick house versus a wooden house is 10 mrem/yr above background. The cumulative dose to the population within an 80-km (50-mi) radius of the NFSS that would result from radioactive materials present at the site would be indistinguishable from the dose that the same population would receive from naturally occurring radioactive sources. Results of the 1986 monitoring show that the NFSS is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard. 14 refs., 11 figs., 14 tabs.

  10. Coalbed methane produced water management guide treatment and discharge to surface waters: Black Warrior Basin, Alabama. Final report, April 1991-May 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, H.A.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To assist coalbed methane in their efforts to manage produced waters in an environmentally acceptable manner, GRI, in cooperation with the member companies of the Coalbed Methane Association of Alabama, developed a guidance manual that presents the state-of-the-art methodology for managing Black Warrior Basin produced water through the use of treatment ponds and National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits. Six treatment pond systems were studied to develop information for the manual. Topics included in the manual are produced water characteristics, NPDES permit requirements, sample collection and testing, pond based treatment methods, treatment pond management, and process troubleshooting.

  11. Technical Safety Requirements for the Waste Storage Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, H L

    2007-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) for the Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, which include Area 612 (A612) and the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) Storage Area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The TSRs constitute requirements regarding the safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. These TSRs are derived from the Documented Safety Analysis for the Waste Storage Facilities (DSA) (LLNL 2006). The analysis presented therein determined that the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are low-chemical hazard, Hazard Category 2 non-reactor nuclear facilities. The TSRs consist primarily of inventory limits and controls to preserve the underlying assumptions in the hazard and accident analyses. Further, appropriate commitments to safety programs are presented in the administrative controls sections of the TSRs. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are used by RHWM to handle and store hazardous waste, TRANSURANIC (TRU) WASTE, LOW-LEVEL WASTE (LLW), mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL as well as small amounts from other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, as described in the DSA. In addition, several minor treatments (e.g., drum crushing, size reduction, and decontamination) are carried out in these facilities. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are located in two portions of the LLNL main site. A612 is located in the southeast quadrant of LLNL. The A612 fenceline is approximately 220 m west of Greenville Road. The DWTF Storage Area, which includes Building 693 (B693), Building 696 Radioactive Waste Storage Area (B696R), and associated yard areas and storage areas within the yard, is located in the northeast quadrant of LLNL in the DWTF complex. The DWTF Storage Area fenceline is approximately 90 m west of Greenville Road. A612 and the DWTF Storage Area are subdivided into various facilities and storage areas, consisting of buildings, tents, other structures, and open areas as described in Chapter 2 of the DSA. Section 2.4 of the DSA provides an overview of the buildings, structures, and areas in the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, including construction details such as basic floor plans, equipment layout, construction materials, controlling dimensions, and dimensions significant to the hazard and accident analysis. Chapter 5 of the DSA documents the derivation of the TSRs and develops the operational limits that protect the safety envelope defined for the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. This TSR document is applicable to the handling, storage, and treatment of hazardous waste, TRU WASTE, LLW, mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste received or generated in the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. Section 5, Administrative Controls, contains those Administrative Controls necessary to ensure safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. Programmatic Administrative Controls are in Section 5.6. This Introduction to the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES TSRs is not part of the TSR limits or conditions and contains no requirements related to WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES operations or to the safety analyses of the DSA.

  12. Device-transparent personal storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strauss, Jacob A. (Jacob Alo), 1979-

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Users increasingly store data collections such as digital photographs on multiple personal devices, each of which typically presents the user with a storage management interface isolated from the contents of all other ...

  13. Niagara falls storage site: Annual site environmental report, Lewiston, New York, Calendar Year 1988: Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The monitoring program at the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) measures radon concentrations in air; external gamma radiation levels; and uranium and radium concentrations in surface water, groundwater, and sediment. To verify that the site is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard and to assess its potential effect on public health, the radiation dose was calculated for a hypothetical maximally exposed individual. Based on the conservative scenario described in this report, this hypothetical individual receives an annual external exposure approximately equivalent to 6 percent of the DOE radiation protection standard of 100 mrem/yr. This exposure is less than a person receives during two round-trip flights from New York to Los Angeles (because of the greater amounts of cosmic radiation at higher altitudes). The cumulative dose to the population within an 80-km (50-mi) radius of the NFSS that results from radioactive materials present at the site is indistinguishable from the dose that the same population receives from naturally occurring radioactive sources. Results of the 1988 monitoring show that the NFSS is in compliance with applicable DOE radiation protection standards. 17 refs., 31 figs., 20 tabs.

  14. Bottling Electricity: Storage as a Strategic Tool for Managing Variability and Capacity Concerns in the Modern Grid

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of Bad CholesteroliManage Presentation3 DATE: March 14,6 (Annual

  15. PhD student in Energy Technology, specifically in Energy storage in the The School of Industrial Engineering and Management at the Royal Institute of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazachkov, Ivan

    PhD student in Energy Technology, specifically in Energy storage in the ground The School Technology, specifically Energy storage in the ground. KTH is the largest technical university in Sweden the possibility to finance a Ph.D. student for studies of storage of energy, primarily as heat in borehole rock

  16. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2007 through June 30, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: (1) Organizing and hosting the 2007 GSTC Spring Meeting; (2) Identifying the 2007 GSTC projects, issuing award or declination letters, and begin drafting subcontracts; (3) 2007 project mentoring teams identified; (4) New NETL Project Manager; (5) Preliminary planning for the 2007 GSTC Fall Meeting; (6) Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC project final reports; and (7) Outreach and communications.

  17. The Petascale Data Storage Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibson, Garth [Carnegie Mellon University; Long, Darrell [The Regents of the University of California, Santa Cruz; Honeyman, Peter [University of Michigan at Ann Arbor; Grider, Gary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kramer, William [National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center; Shalf, John [National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center; Roth, Philip [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Felix, Evan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Ward, Lee [Sandia National Laboratory

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Petascale computing infrastructures for scientific discovery make petascale demands on information storage capacity, performance, concurrency, reliability, availability, and manageability. The Petascale Data Storage Institute focuses on the data storage problems found in petascale scientific computing environments, with special attention to community issues such as interoperability, community buy-in, and shared tools. The Petascale Data Storage Institute is a collaboration between researchers at Carnegie Mellon University, National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, University of Michigan, and the University of California at Santa Cruz.

  18. RCRA/UST, superfund, and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: Treatment, storage, and disposal facilities (40 CFR parts 264/265, subparts A-E) updated as of July 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The module presents an overview of the general treatment, storage, and disposal facility (TSDF) standards found in 40 CFR parts 264/265, subparts A through E. It identifies and explains each exclusion from parts 264/265, and provides definitions of excluded units, such as wastewater treatment unit and elementary neutralization unit. It locates and describes the requirements for waste analysis and personnel training. It also describes the purpose of a contingency plan and lists the emergency notification procedures. It describes manifest procedures and responsibilities, and lists the unmanifested waste reporting requirements.

  19. Technical Safety Requirements for the Waste Storage Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laycak, D T

    2008-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) for the Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, which include Area 625 (A625) and the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) Storage Area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The TSRs constitute requirements regarding the safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. These TSRs are derived from the 'Documented Safety Analysis for the Waste Storage Facilities' (DSA) (LLNL 2008). The analysis presented therein determined that the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are low-chemical hazard, Hazard Category 2 non-reactor nuclear facilities. The TSRs consist primarily of inventory limits and controls to preserve the underlying assumptions in the hazard and accident analyses. Further, appropriate commitments to safety programs are presented in the administrative controls sections of the TSRs. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are used by RHWM to handle and store hazardous waste, TRANSURANIC (TRU) WASTE, LOW-LEVEL WASTE (LLW), mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL as well as small amounts from other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, as described in the DSA. In addition, several minor treatments (e.g., size reduction and decontamination) are carried out in these facilities. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are located in two portions of the LLNL main site. A625 is located in the southeast quadrant of LLNL. The A625 fenceline is approximately 225 m west of Greenville Road. The DWTF Storage Area, which includes Building 693 (B693), Building 696 Radioactive Waste Storage Area (B696R), and associated yard areas and storage areas within the yard, is located in the northeast quadrant of LLNL in the DWTF complex. The DWTF Storage Area fenceline is approximately 90 m west of Greenville Road. A625 and the DWTF Storage Area are subdivided into various facilities and storage areas, consisting of buildings, tents, other structures, and open areas as described in Chapter 2 of the DSA. Section 2.4 of the DSA provides an overview of the buildings, structures, and areas in the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, including construction details such as basic floor plans, equipment layout, construction materials, controlling dimensions, and dimensions significant to the hazard and accident analysis. Chapter 5 of the DSA documents the derivation of the TSRs and develops the operational limits that protect the safety envelope defined for the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. This TSR document is applicable to the handling, storage, and treatment of hazardous waste, TRU WASTE, LLW, mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste received or generated in the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. Section 5, Administrative Controls, contains those Administrative Controls necessary to ensure safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. Programmatic Administrative Controls are in Section 5.6.

  20. Technical Safety Requirements for the Waste Storage Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laycak, D T

    2010-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) for the Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, which include Area 625 (A625) and the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) Storage Area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The TSRs constitute requirements regarding the safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. These TSRs are derived from the Documented Safety Analysis for the Waste Storage Facilities (DSA) (LLNL 2009). The analysis presented therein determined that the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are low-chemical hazard, Hazard Category 2 non-reactor nuclear facilities. The TSRs consist primarily of inventory limits and controls to preserve the underlying assumptions in the hazard and accident analyses. Further, appropriate commitments to safety programs are presented in the administrative controls sections of the TSRs. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are used by RHWM to handle and store hazardous waste, TRANSURANIC (TRU) WASTE, LOW-LEVEL WASTE (LLW), mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL as well as small amounts from other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, as described in the DSA. In addition, several minor treatments (e.g., size reduction and decontamination) are carried out in these facilities. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are located in two portions of the LLNL main site. A625 is located in the southeast quadrant of LLNL. The A625 fenceline is approximately 225 m west of Greenville Road. The DWTF Storage Area, which includes Building 693 (B693), Building 696 Radioactive Waste Storage Area (B696R), and associated yard areas and storage areas within the yard, is located in the northeast quadrant of LLNL in the DWTF complex. The DWTF Storage Area fenceline is approximately 90 m west of Greenville Road. A625 and the DWTF Storage Area are subdivided into various facilities and storage areas, consisting of buildings, tents, other structures, and open areas as described in Chapter 2 of the DSA. Section 2.4 of the DSA provides an overview of the buildings, structures, and areas in the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, including construction details such as basic floor plans, equipment layout, construction materials, controlling dimensions, and dimensions significant to the hazard and accident analysis. Chapter 5 of the DSA documents the derivation of the TSRs and develops the operational limits that protect the safety envelope defined for the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. This TSR document is applicable to the handling, storage, and treatment of hazardous waste, TRU WASTE, LLW, mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste received or generated in the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. Section 5, Administrative Controls, contains those Administrative Controls necessary to ensure safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. Programmatic Administrative Controls are in Section 5.4.

  1. Closure of Lagoons and Earthen Manure Storage Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib; Walker, Jerry

    2002-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication explains the regulations, options and procedures for closing earthen storage and treatment structures for livestock or poultry manure....

  2. Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paranthaman, Parans

    2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    ORNL Distinguished Scientist Parans Paranthaman is discovering new materials with potential for greatly increasing batteries' energy storage capacity and bring manufacturing back to the US.

  3. Energy Storage

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Paranthaman, Parans

    2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    ORNL Distinguished Scientist Parans Paranthaman is discovering new materials with potential for greatly increasing batteries' energy storage capacity and bring manufacturing back to the US.

  4. Terrestrial Water Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodell, M; Chambers, D P; Famiglietti, Jay

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    T. E. Reilly, 2002: Flow and storage in groundwater systems.storage ..2013: Global ocean storage of anthropogenic carbon.

  5. Stasis: Flexible Transactional Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sears, Russell C.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .example system based on log-structured storage 10.1 SystemA storage bottleneck. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  6. GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert W. Watson

    2004-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and is scheduled for completion on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project includes the creation of the GSTC structure, development of constitution (by-laws) for the consortium, and development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with the second 3-months of the project and encompasses the period December 31, 2003, through March 31, 2003. During this 3-month, the dialogue of individuals representing the storage industry, universities and the Department of energy was continued and resulted in a constitution for the operation of the consortium and a draft of the initial Request for Proposals (RFP).

  7. Final Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement For Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and Hazardous Waste, Response To Public Comments

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysisDarby/%2AO 474.2Y-12 Press98918, 2014

  8. Final Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement For Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and Hazardous Waste, Vol. I of V

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysisDarby/%2AO 474.2Y-12 Press98918, 2014

  9. GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert W. Watson

    2004-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and was completed on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project included the creation of the GSTC structure, development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with Phase 1B and encompasses the period July 1, 2004, through September 30, 2004. During this time period there were three main activities. First was the ongoing negotiations of the four sub-awards working toward signed contracts with the various organizations involved. Second, an Executive Council meeting was held at Penn State September 9, 2004. And third, the GSTC participated in the SPE Eastern Regional Meeting in Charleston, West Virginia, on September 16th and 17th. We hosted a display booth with the Stripper Well Consortium.

  10. GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert W. Watson

    2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and was completed on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project included the creation of the GSTC structure, development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with Phase 1B and encompasses the period April 1, 2004, through June 30, 2004. During this 3-month period, a Request for Proposals (RFP) was made. A total of 17 proposals were submitted to the GSTC. A proposal selection meeting was held June 9-10, 2004 in Morgantown, West Virginia. Of the 17 proposals, 6 were selected for funding.

  11. Assessment of sludge management options in a waste water treatment plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Jong hyun, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis is part of a larger project which began in response to a request by the Spanish water agengy, Cadagua, for advice on life cycle assessment (LCA) and environmental impacts of Cadagua operated wastewater treatment ...

  12. EPA ENERGY STAR Webcast: Benchmarking Water/Wastewater Treatment Facilities in Portfolio Manager

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Learn how to track the progress of energy efficiency efforts and compare the energy use of wastewater treatment plants to other peer facilities across the country. Attendees will learn how to...

  13. Georgia Hazardous Waste Management Act

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Georgia Hazardous Waste Management Act (HWMA) describes a comprehensive, Statewide program to manage hazardous wastes through regulating hazardous waste generation, transportation, storage,...

  14. Groundwater under stress: the importance of management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaux, Henry

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for managed under- ground storage of recoverable water.Beyond that, ground- water storage capacity can be managedstorage and enhance the general water supply. The value of ground-

  15. Hydrogen Storage

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen storage technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains the different ways in which hydrogen can be stored, as well a

  16. Safety Issues Chemical Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Robert E.

    Safety Issues · Chemical Storage ·Store in compatible containers that are in good condition to store separately. #12;Safety Issues · Flammable liquid storage -Store bulk quantities in flammable storage cabinets -UL approved Flammable Storage Refrigerators are required for cold storage · Provide

  17. Device Transparency: a New Model for Mobile Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strauss, Jacob A.

    This paper proposes a new storage model, device transparency, in which users view and manage their entire data collection from any of their devices, even from disconnected storage-limited devices holding only a subset of ...

  18. Management of Transuranic Contaminated Material

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1982-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish guidelines for the generation, treatment, packaging, storage, transportation, and disposal of transuranic (TRU) contaminated material.

  19. DOE Issues Final Mercury Storage Environmental Impact Statement: Texas Site Is Preferred for Long-Term Mercury Storage

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON – The Department of Energy has prepared a Final Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Environmental Impact Statement to analyze the potential environmental, human health, and socioeconomic impacts of elemental mercury storage at seven locations

  20. Italian WEEE management system and treatment of end-of-life cooling and freezing equipments for CFCs removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sansotera, M., E-mail: maurizio.sansotera@polimi.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Materiali e Ingegneria Chimica, Politecnico di Milano, via Mancinelli 7, I-20131 Milano (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali (INSTM), via Giusti 9, I-50121 Firenze (Italy); Navarrini, W. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Materiali e Ingegneria Chimica, Politecnico di Milano, via Mancinelli 7, I-20131 Milano (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali (INSTM), via Giusti 9, I-50121 Firenze (Italy); Talaeemashhadi, S.; Venturini, F. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Materiali e Ingegneria Chimica, Politecnico di Milano, via Mancinelli 7, I-20131 Milano (Italy)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • Italian data about WEEE management in the period 2005–2010 have been reported. • In 2001–2004 CFC release was monitored and Po Valley resulted as main source region. • The Italian directive on WEEE management was enacted in 2005 but took effect in 2008. • The CFC analytic procedures of the audit assessments have been discussed. - Abstract: This study presents and analyzes the data of the Italian system for take-back and recovery of waste electrical and electronic equipments (WEEEs) in the start-up period 2008–2010. The analysis was focused particularly on the data about the treatment of end-of-life cooling and freezing equipments. In fact, the wastes of cooling and freezing equipments have a high environmental impact. Indeed, in their compressor oil and insulation polyurethane (PU) foams chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) ozone-depleting gases are still present. In the period 2001–2004 Northern Italy resulted the main source in Europe of CFCs. The European Directive on WEEE management was enacted in 2002, but in Italy it was implemented by the legislative Decree in 2005 and it became operational in 2008. Actually, in 2008 the national WEEE Coordination Centre was founded in order to organize the WEEE pick-up process and to control collection, recovery and recycling targets. As a result, in 2010 the average WEEE collection per capita exceeded the threshold of more than 4 kg per inhabitant, as well as cooling and freezing appliances represented more than one fourth of the Italian WEEE collection stream. During the treatment of end-of-life cooling and freezing equipments, CFCs were recovered and disposed principally by burner methods. The analyses of defined specimens collected in the treatment facilities were standardized to reliably determine the amount of recovered CFCs. Samples of alkaline solid salt, alkaline saline solution, polyurethane matrix and compressor oil collected during the audit assessment procedure were analyzed and the results were discussed. In particular, the analysis of PU samples after the shredding and the warm pressing procedures measured a residual CFCs content around 500–1300 mg/kg of CFCs within the foam matrix.

  1. TREATMENT OF HYDROCARBON, ORGANIC RESIDUE AND PRODUCTION CHEMICAL DAMAGE MECHANISMS THROUGH THE APPLICATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE IN NATURAL GAS STORAGE WELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence J. Pekot

    2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Two gas storage fields were studied for this project. Overisel field, operated by Consumer's Energy, is located near the town of Holland, Michigan. Huntsman Storage Unit, operated by Kinder Morgan, is located in Cheyenne County, Nebraska near the town of Sidney. Wells in both fields experienced declining performance over several years of their annual injection/production cycle. In both fields, the presence of hydrocarbons, organic materials or production chemicals was suspected as the cause of progressive formation damage leading to the performance decline. Core specimens and several material samples were collected from these two natural gas storage reservoirs. Laboratory studies were performed to characterize the samples that were believed to be representative of a reservoir damage mechanism previously identified as arising from the presence of hydrocarbons, organic residues or production chemicals. A series of laboratory experiments were performed to identify the sample materials, use these materials to damage the flow capacity of the core specimens and then attempt to remove or reduce the induced damage using either carbon dioxide or a mixture of carbon dioxide and other chemicals. Results of the experiments showed that pure carbon dioxide was effective in restoring flow capacity to the core specimens in several different settings. However, in settings involving asphaltines as the damage mechanism, both pure carbon dioxide and mixtures of carbon dioxide and other chemicals provided little effectiveness in damage removal.

  2. RCRA Part A Permit Application for Waste Management Activities at the Nevada Test Site, Part B Permit Application Hazardous Waste Storage Unit, Nevada Test Site, and Part B Permit Application - Explosives Ordnance Disposal Unit (EODU)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Programs

    2010-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Area 5 Hazardous Waste Storage Unit (HWSU) was established to support testing, research, and remediation activities at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), a large-quantity generator of hazardous waste. The HWSU, located adjacent to the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS), is a prefabricated, rigid steel-framed, roofed shelter used to store hazardous nonradioactive waste generated on the NTS. No offsite generated wastes are managed at the HWSU. Waste managed at the HWSU includes the following categories: Flammables/Combustibles; Acid Corrosives; Alkali Corrosives; Oxidizers/Reactives; Toxics/Poisons; and Other Regulated Materials (ORMs). A list of the regulated waste codes accepted for storage at the HWSU is provided in Section B.2. Hazardous wastes stored at the HWSU are stored in U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) compliant containers, compatible with the stored waste. Waste transfer (between containers) is not allowed at the HWSU and containers remain closed at all times. Containers are stored on secondary containment pallets and the unit is inspected monthly. Table 1 provides the metric conversion factors used in this application. Table 2 provides a list of existing permits. Table 3 lists operational Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) units at the NTS and their respective regulatory status.

  3. Waste management facilities cost information for hazardous waste. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shropshire, D.; Sherick, M.; Biagi, C.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains preconceptual designs and planning level life-cycle cost estimates for managing hazardous waste. The report`s information on treatment, storage, and disposal modules can be integrated to develop total life-cycle costs for various waste management options. A procedure to guide the US Department of Energy and its contractor personnel in the use of cost estimation data is also summarized in this report.

  4. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlined aboveModeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers," Proceed-ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

  5. SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassenzahl, W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Superconducting 30-MJ Energy Storage Coil", Proc. 19 80 ASC,Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Plant", IEEE Trans.SlIperconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Unit", in Advances

  6. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlined abovean Aquifer Used for Hot Water Storage: Digital Simulation ofof Aquifer Systems for Cyclic Storage of Water," of the Fall

  7. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    using aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

  8. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    using aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"Proceed- ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop,

  9. Stasis: Flexible Transactional Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sears, Russell C.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stasis: Flexible Transactional Storage by Russell C. Sears AR. Larson Fall 2009 Stasis: Flexible Transactional StorageC. Sears Abstract Stasis: Flexible Transactional Storage by

  10. Management of Respiratory Motion in Extracorporeal High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Treatment in Upper Abdominal Organs: Current Status and Perspectives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muller, A., E-mail: arnaud.muller@chu-lyon.fr [Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Service de Radiologie, Hospices Civils de Lyon (France); Petrusca, L.; Auboiroux, V. [University of Geneva, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine (Switzerland)] [University of Geneva, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine (Switzerland); Valette, P. J. [Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Service de Radiologie, Hospices Civils de Lyon (France)] [Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Service de Radiologie, Hospices Civils de Lyon (France); Salomir, R. [University of Geneva, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine (Switzerland)] [University of Geneva, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine (Switzerland); Cotton, F. [Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Service de Radiologie, Hospices Civils de Lyon (France)] [Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Service de Radiologie, Hospices Civils de Lyon (France)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Extracorporeal high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a minimally invasive therapy considered with increased interest for the ablation of small tumors in deeply located organs while sparing surrounding critical tissues. A multitude of preclinical and clinical studies have showed the feasibility of the method; however, concurrently they showed several obstacles, among which the management of respiratory motion of abdominal organs is at the forefront. The aim of this review is to describe the different methods that have been proposed for managing respiratory motion and to identify their advantages and weaknesses. First, we specify the characteristics of respiratory motion for the liver, kidneys, and pancreas and the problems it causes during HIFU planning, treatment, and monitoring. Second, we make an inventory of the preclinical and clinical approaches used to overcome the problem of organ motion. Third, we analyze their respective benefits and drawbacks to identify the remaining physical, technological, and clinical challenges. We thereby consider the outlook of motion compensation techniques and those that would be the most suitable for clinical use, particularly under magnetic resonance thermometry monitoring.

  11. Graphical visualization of implemented storage databases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, C.; Hamp, H.P. [Admintec GmbH, Pforzheim (Germany)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The PC-program LANUC, developed from Admintec, supports a decentralized or centralized storage management of radioactive waste. It gives the storekeeper a graphical view of a storage area and its contents which are otherwise only represented in lists and databases. The storekeeper can plan any movements within the storage area and once they are confirmed, the data in the database are automatically altered. Any implemented database can be represented by simulating a human operator with a program.

  12. Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Storage rings are circular machines that store particle beams at a constant energy. Beams are stored in rings without acceleration for a number of reasons (Tab. 1). Storage rings are used in high-energy, nuclear, atomic, and molecular physics, as well as for experiments in chemistry, material and life sciences. Parameters for storage rings such as particle species, energy, beam intensity, beam size, and store time vary widely depending on the application. The beam must be injected into a storage ring but may not be extracted (Fig. 1). Accelerator rings such as synchrotrons are used as storage rings before and after acceleration. Particles stored in rings include electrons and positrons; muons; protons and anti-protons; neutrons; light and heavy, positive and negative, atomic ions of various charge states; molecular and cluster ions, and neutral polar molecules. Spin polarized beams of electrons, positrons, and protons were stored. The kinetic energy of the stored particles ranges from 10{sup -6} eV to 3.5 x 10{sup 12} eV (LHC, 7 x 10{sup 12} eV planned), the number of stored particles from one (ESR) to 1015 (ISR). To store beam in rings requires bending (dipoles) and transverse focusing (quadrupoles). Higher order multipoles are used to correct chromatic aberrations, to suppress instabilities, and to compensate for nonlinear field errors of dipoles and quadrupoles. Magnetic multipole functions can be combined in magnets. Beams are stored bunched with radio frequency systems, and unbunched. The magnetic lattice and radio frequency system are designed to ensure the stability of transverse and longitudinal motion. New technologies allow for better storage rings. With strong focusing the beam pipe dimensions became much smaller than previously possible. For a given circumference superconducting magnets make higher energies possible, and superconducting radio frequency systems allow for efficient replenishment of synchrotron radiation losses of large current electron or positron beams. Storage rings have instrumentation to monitor the electrical and mechanical systems, and the beam quality. Computers are used to control the operation. Large storage rings have millions of control points from all systems. The time dependent beam intensity I(t) can often be approximated by an exponential function I(t) = I(0) exp(-t/{tau}) (1) where the decay time {tau} and, correspondingly, the store time ranges from a few turns to 10 days (ISR). {tau} can be dominated by a variety of effects including lattice nonlinearities, beam-beam, space charge, intrabeam and Touschek scattering, interaction with the residual gas or target, or the lifetime of the stored particle. In this case, the beam lifetime measurement itself can be the purpose of a storage ring experiment. The main consideration in the design of a storage ring is the preservation of the beam quality over the store length. The beam size and momentum spread can be reduced through cooling, often leading to an increase in the store time. For long store times vacuum considerations are important since the interaction rate of the stored particles with the residual gas molecules is proportional to the pressure, and an ultra-high vacuum system may be needed. Distributed pumping with warm activated NEG surfaces or cold surfaces in machines with superconducting magnets are ways to provide large pumping speeds and achieve low pressures even under conditions with dynamic gas loads. The largest application of storage rings today are synchrotron light sources, of which about 50 exist world wide. In experiments where the beam collides with an internal target or another beam, a storage ring allows to re-use the accelerated beam many times if the interaction with the target is sufficiently small. In hadron collider and ion storage rings store times of many hours or even days are realized, corresponding to up to 1011 turns and thereby target passages. Ref. [3] is the first proposal for a collider storage ring. A number of storage rings exist where the beam itself or its decay products are the object of s

  13. Improved Management of the Technical Interfaces Between the Hanford Tank Farm Operator and the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant - 13383

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, Garth M. [Bechtel National Inc., 2435 Stevens Center Place, Richland, Washington, 99352 (United States)] [Bechtel National Inc., 2435 Stevens Center Place, Richland, Washington, 99352 (United States); Saunders, Scott A. [Washington River Protection Solutions, P.O. Box 850, Richland, Washington, 99352 (United States)] [Washington River Protection Solutions, P.O. Box 850, Richland, Washington, 99352 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is constructing the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at the Hanford site in Washington to treat and immobilize approximately 114 million gallons of high level radioactive waste (after all retrievals are accomplished). In order for the WTP to be designed and operated successfully, close coordination between the WTP engineering, procurement, and construction contractor, Bechtel National, Inc. and the tank farms operating contractor (TOC), Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, is necessary. To develop optimal solutions for DOE and for the treatment of the waste, it is important to deal with the fact that two different prime contractors, with somewhat differing contracts, are tasked with retrieving and delivering the waste and for treating and immobilizing that waste. The WTP and the TOC have over the years cooperated to manage the technical interface. To manage what is becoming a much more complicated interface as the WTP design progresses and new technical issues have been identified, an organizational change was made by WTP and TOC in November of 2011. This organizational change created a co-located integrated project team (IPT) to deal with mutual and interface issues. The Technical Organization within the One System IPT includes employees from both TOC and WTP. This team has worked on a variety of technical issues of mutual interest and concern. Technical issues currently being addressed include: - The waste acceptance criteria; - Waste feed delivery and the associated data quality objectives (DQO); - Evaluation of the effects of performing a riser cut on a single shell tank on WTP operations; - The disposition of secondary waste from both TOC and WTP; - The close coordination of the TOC double shell tank mixing and sampling program and the Large Scale Integrated Test (LSIT) program for pulse jet mixers at WTP along with the associated responses to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 2010-2; - Development of a set of alternatives to the current baseline that involve aspects of direct feed, feed conditioning, and design changes. The One System Technical Organization has served WTP, TOC, and DOE well in managing and resolving issues at the interface. This paper describes the organizational structure used to improve the interface and several examples of technical interface issues that have been successfully addressed by the new organization. (authors)

  14. Cool Storage Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eppelheimer, D. M.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . This article covers three thermal storage topics. The first section catalogs various thermal storage systems and applications. Included are: load shifting and load leveling, chilled water storage systems, and ice storage systems using Refrigerant 22 or ethylene...

  15. President Reagan Calls for a National Spent Fuel Storage Facility...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Reagan Calls for a National Spent Fuel Storage Facility | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile...

  16. ARPA-E Announces $43 Million for Transformational Energy Storage...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    (AMPED) and Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) - and will focus on innovations in battery management and storage to advance electric vehicle technologies, help improve the...

  17. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Discharge Using Ground- Water Storage," Transactions1971. "Storage of Solar Energy in a Sandy-Gravel Ground,"

  18. VideoSTAR (Video STorage And Retrieval) is an experimental database frame-work for video information management. The development of this framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ABSTRACT VideoSTAR (Video STorage And Retrieval) is an experimental database frame- work for video of traditional video tape archives are facing and by the multimedia technology that makes integrated, digital video archives feasible. Speci cally, VideoSTAR addresses issues related to sharing of video information

  19. TREATMENT OF HYDROCARBON, ORGANIC RESIDUE AND PRODUCTION CHEMICAL DAMAGE MECHANISMS THROUGH THE APPLICATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE IN NATURAL GAS STORAGE WELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence J. Pekot; Ron Himes

    2004-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Core specimens and several material samples were collected from two natural gas storage reservoirs. Laboratory studies were performed to characterize the samples that were believed to be representative of a reservoir damage mechanism previously identified as arising from the presence of hydrocarbons, organic residues or production chemicals. A series of laboratory experiments were performed to identify the sample materials, use these materials to damage the flow capacity of the core specimens and then attempt to remove or reduce the induced damage using either carbon dioxide or a mixture of carbon dioxide and other chemicals. Results of the experiments showed that pure carbon dioxide was effective in restoring flow capacity to the core specimens in several different settings. However, in settings involving asphaltines as the damage mechanism, both pure carbon dioxide and mixtures of carbon dioxide and other chemicals provided little effectiveness in damage removal.

  20. Storage Device Performance Prediction with Selective Bagging Classification and Regression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Storage Device Performance Prediction with Selective Bagging Classification and Regression Tree Lei}@eng.wayne.edu, cheneh@ustc.edu.cn Abstract. Storage device performance prediction is a key element of self-managed storage systems and application planning tasks, such as data assignment and configuration. Based

  1. TIGER:Thermal-Aware File Assignment in Storage Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qin, Xiao

    energy efficiency of data centers housing storage clusters. Disks have non-negligible thermal impactTIGER:Thermal-Aware File Assignment in Storage Clusters Ajit Chavan, Xunfei Jiang, Mohemmad I/O performance. I. INTRODUCTION Thermal management for power-dense storage clusters can address cooling problems

  2. Eyo: Device-Transparent Personal Storage Jacob Strauss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gummadi, Ramakrishna

    Eyo: Device-Transparent Personal Storage Jacob Strauss Justin Mazzola Paluska Chris Lesniewski on multiple personal devices, each of which typically offers a storage management interface oblivious. This paper presents Eyo, a novel personal storage sys- tem that provides device transparency: a user can

  3. Device-Transparent Personal Storage Jacob Alo Strauss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gummadi, Ramakrishna

    Device-Transparent Personal Storage by Jacob Alo Strauss S.B., Massachusetts Institute personal devices, each of which typically presents the user with a storage management interface isolated and drift out of sync. This thesis presents Eyo, a novel personal storage system that provides device trans

  4. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material, such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  5. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  6. Enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Ralph T; Li, Yingwei; Lachawiec, Jr., Anthony J

    2013-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage are disclosed. One embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the hydrogen receptor to ultrasonication as doping occurs. Another embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the doped hydrogen receptor to a plasma treatment.

  7. Enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Ralph T. (Ann Arbor, MI); Li, Yingwel (Ann Arbor, MI); Lachawiec, Jr., Anthony J. (Ann Arbor, MI)

    2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage are disclosed. One embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the hydrogen receptor to ultrasonification as doping occurs. Another embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the doped hydrogen receptor to a plasma treatment.

  8. The High Performance Storage System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coyne, R.A.; Hulen, H. [IBM Federal Systems Co., Houston, TX (United States); Watson, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Storage Laboratory (NSL) was organized to develop, demonstrate and commercialize technology for the storage system that will be the future repositories for our national information assets. Within the NSL four Department of Energy laboratories and IBM Federal System Company have pooled their resources to develop an entirely new High Performance Storage System (HPSS). The HPSS project concentrates on scalable parallel storage system for highly parallel computers as well as traditional supercomputers and workstation clusters. Concentrating on meeting the high end of storage system and data management requirements, HPSS is designed using network-connected storage devices to transfer data at rates of 100 million bytes per second and beyond. The resulting products will be portable to many vendor`s platforms. The three year project is targeted to be complete in 1995. This paper provides an overview of the requirements, design issues, and architecture of HPSS, as well as a description of the distributed, multi-organization industry and national laboratory HPSS project.

  9. Solid-State Hydrogen Storage: Storage Capacity,Thermodynamics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen Storage: Storage Capacity,Thermodynamics and Kinetics. Solid-State Hydrogen Storage: Storage Capacity,Thermodynamics and Kinetics. Abstract: Solid-state reversible...

  10. Battery energy storage and superconducting magnetic energy storage for utility applications: A qualitative analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akhil, A.A.; Butler, P.; Bickel, T.C.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was prepared at the request of the US Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Management for an objective comparison of the merits of battery energy storage with superconducting magnetic energy storage technology for utility applications. Conclusions are drawn regarding the best match of each technology with these utility application requirements. Staff from the Utility Battery Storage Systems Program and the superconductivity Programs at Sandia National contributed to this effort.

  11. AN OBJECT-ORIENTED SGML/HYTIME COMPLIANT MULTIMEDIA DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szafron, Duane

    management system (DBMS) technology. Mostly they have used DBMSs to store meta-information and have stored of a large amount of data. The development of multimedia computing systems can benefit from traditional DBMS-information in some DBMS. Finally, the size and complexity of multimedia objects require special treatment in storage

  12. Original article Effect of desiccation during cold storage on planting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Original article Effect of desiccation during cold storage on planting stock quality and field, 1.4°C, 87% RH). An additional treatment consisted in a cold storage for 4 weeks in sealed polythene exhibited lower survival and RGP (except in pine) than those lifted in January and March. Cold storage

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Storage Sandian Spoke at the New York Energy Storage Expo On December 12, 2014, in Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Grid Integration, Infrastructure Security, News,...

  14. Sandia National Laboratories: hydrogen storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    storage Energy Department Awards 7M to Advance Hydrogen Storage Systems On June 12, 2014, in CRF, Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Facilities, Infrastructure...

  15. Photon Storage Cavities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, K.-J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sessler, "Analysis of Photon Storage Cavities for a Free-configuration of coupled storage cavity and PEL cavity. TheFig. 2. A ring resonator storage cavity coupled through a

  16. Seasonal thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, R.D.; Kannberg, L.D.; Raymond, J.R.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the following: (1) the US Department of Energy Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program, (2) aquifer thermal energy storage technology, (3) alternative STES technology, (4) foreign studies in seasonal thermal energy storage, and (5) economic assessment.

  17. Storage and IO Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Burst Buffer User Defined Images Archive Home R & D Storage and IO Technologies Storage and IO Technologies Burst Buffer NVRAM and Burst Buffer Use Cases In collaboration...

  18. NERSC HPSS Storage Statistics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Storage Trends and Summaries Storage by Scientific Discipline Troubleshooting IO Resources for Scientific Applications at NERSC Optimizing IO performance on the Lustre file...

  19. SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassenzahl, W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to MW/40 MWI-IR Battery Energy Storage Facility", proc. 23rdcompressed air, and battery energy storage are all only 65

  20. Second thermal storage applications workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wyman, C.E.; Larson, R.W.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On February 7 and 8, 1980, approximately 20 persons representing the management of both the Solar Thermal Power Systems Program (TPS) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Division of Central Solar Technology (CST) and the Thermal Energy Storage Program (TES) of the DOE Division of Energy Storage Systems (STOR) met in San Antonio, Texas, for the Second Thermal Storage Applications Workshop. The purpose of the workshop was to review the joint Thermal Energy Storage for Solar Thermal Applications (TESSTA) Program between CST and STOR and to discuss important issues in implementing it. The meeting began with summaries of the seven major elements of the joint program (six receiver-related, storage development elements, and one advanced technology element). Then, a brief description along with supporting data was given of several issues related to the recent joint multiyear program plan (MYPP). Following this session, the participants were divided into three smaller groups representing the program elements that mainly supported large power, small power, and advanced technology activities. During the afternoon of the first day, each group prioritized the program elements through program budgets and discussed the issues defined as well as others of concern. On the morning of the second day, representatives of each group presented the group's results to the other participants. Major conclusions arising from the workshop are presented regarding program and budget. (LEW)

  1. Anesthesia management of patients undergoing hyperthermic isolated limb perfusion with melphalan for melanoma treatment: an analysis of 17 cases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from the Department of Anesthesia & Perioperative Care,details Department of Anesthesia & Perioperative Care,as: Ruschulte et al. : Anesthesia management of patients

  2. DOE/EIS-0200 Amendement to the Record of Decision for the Department of Energy's Waste Management Program: Treatment and Storage of Transuranic Waste (03/07/08)

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,Office of Policy, OAPMMilestone | DepartmentEA - 0942 E N v m o N M E N7526401

  3. Superconducting energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giese, R.F.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the status of energy storage involving superconductors and assesses what impact the recently discovered ceramic superconductors may have on the design of these devices. Our description is intended for R&D managers in government, electric utilities, firms, and national laboratories who wish an overview of what has been done and what remains to be done. It is assumed that the reader is acquainted with superconductivity, but not an expert on the topics discussed here. Indeed, it is the author`s aim to enable the reader to better understand the experts who may ask for the reader`s attention, support, or funding. This report may also inform scientists and engineers who, though expert in related areas, wish to have an introduction to our topic.

  4. Proceedings of the tenth annual DOE low-level waste management conference: Session 4: Waste treatment minimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains eleven papers on various aspects of low-level radioactive waste management. Topics in this volume include: volume reduction plans; incentitives; and cost proposals; acid detoxification and reclamation; decontamination of lead; leach tests; West Valley demonstration project status report; and DOE's regional management strategies. Individual papers were processed separately for the data base. (TEM)

  5. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel Morrison; Elizabeth Wood; Barbara Robuck

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The EMS Energy Institute at The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) has managed the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC) since its inception in 2003. The GSTC infrastructure provided a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. The GSTC received base funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Oil & Natural Gas Supply Program. The GSTC base funds were highly leveraged with industry funding for individual projects. Since its inception, the GSTC has engaged 67 members. The GSTC membership base was diverse, coming from 19 states, the District of Columbia, and Canada. The membership was comprised of natural gas storage field operators, service companies, industry consultants, industry trade organizations, and academia. The GSTC organized and hosted a total of 18 meetings since 2003. Of these, 8 meetings were held to review, discuss, and select proposals submitted for funding consideration. The GSTC reviewed a total of 75 proposals and committed co-funding to support 31 industry-driven projects. The GSTC committed co-funding to 41.3% of the proposals that it received and reviewed. The 31 projects had a total project value of $6,203,071 of which the GSTC committed $3,205,978 in co-funding. The committed GSTC project funding represented an average program cost share of 51.7%. Project applicants provided an average program cost share of 48.3%. In addition to the GSTC co-funding, the consortium provided the domestic natural gas storage industry with a technology transfer and outreach infrastructure. The technology transfer and outreach were conducted by having project mentoring teams and a GSTC website, and by working closely with the Pipeline Research Council International (PRCI) to jointly host technology transfer meetings and occasional field excursions. A total of 15 technology transfer/strategic planning workshops were held.

  6. Closure report: Nevada Test Site Underground Storage Tank (UST) number 25-3123-1: Nevada Division of Emergency Management case number H940825D corrective action unit 450

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document has been prepared as a final closure report documenting the assessment and corrective actions taken for the petroleum hydrocarbon release associated with underground storage tank (UST) UST25-3123-1. UST25-3123-1 was located at Area 25 within the Nevada Test Site. The UST was identified as abandoned to be closed under the U.S. Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office Environmental Restoration Division Program during Fiscal Year 1994. The scope of work for closure of the UST included evaluating site conditions and closing the tank in accordance with all applicable regulations. Site evaluation analytic results of a soil sample collected below the tank showed a diesel concentration of 120 mg/kg at a depth of 3 meters. During remedial excavation, approximately 3.8 cubic meters of hydrocarbon impacted soil was removed. Laboratory analysis of the soil sample collected from the excavation bottom confirms that total petroleum hydrocarbon concentrations greater than 100 mg/kg are no longer present. Therefore, it is requested that the site be closed without further action. 4 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Solid Waste Management Act (Pennsylvania)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act provides for the planning and regulation of solid waste storage, collection, transportation, processing, treatment, and disposal. It requires that municipalities submit plans for municipal...

  8. Predictive Treatment Management: Incorporating a Predictive Tumor Response Model Into Robust Prospective Treatment Planning for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Pengpeng, E-mail: zhangp@mskcc.org [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Yorke, Ellen; Hu, Yu-Chi; Mageras, Gig [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Rimner, Andreas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Deasy, Joseph O. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: We hypothesized that a treatment planning technique that incorporates predicted lung tumor regression into optimization, predictive treatment planning (PTP), could allow dose escalation to the residual tumor while maintaining coverage of the initial target without increasing dose to surrounding organs at risk (OARs). Methods and Materials: We created a model to estimate the geometric presence of residual tumors after radiation therapy using planning computed tomography (CT) and weekly cone beam CT scans of 5 lung cancer patients. For planning purposes, we modeled the dynamic process of tumor shrinkage by morphing the original planning target volume (PTV{sub orig}) in 3 equispaced steps to the predicted residue (PTV{sub pred}). Patients were treated with a uniform prescription dose to PTV{sub orig}. By contrast, PTP optimization started with the same prescription dose to PTV{sub orig} but linearly increased the dose at each step, until reaching the highest dose achievable to PTV{sub pred} consistent with OAR limits. This method is compared with midcourse adaptive replanning. Results: Initial parenchymal gross tumor volume (GTV) ranged from 3.6 to 186.5 cm{sup 3}. On average, the primary GTV and PTV decreased by 39% and 27%, respectively, at the end of treatment. The PTP approach gave PTV{sub orig} at least the prescription dose, and it increased the mean dose of the true residual tumor by an average of 6.0 Gy above the adaptive approach. Conclusions: PTP, incorporating a tumor regression model from the start, represents a new approach to increase tumor dose without increasing toxicities, and reduce clinical workload compared with the adaptive approach, although model verification using per-patient midcourse imaging would be prudent.

  9. Porous polymeric materials for hydrogen storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, Luping; Liu, Di-Jia; Yuan, Shengwen; Yang, Junbing

    2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A porous polymer, poly-9,9'-spirobifluorene and its derivatives for storage of H.sub.2 are prepared through a chemical synthesis method. The porous polymers have high specific surface area and narrow pore size distribution. Hydrogen uptake measurements conducted for these polymers determined a higher hydrogen storage capacity at the ambient temperature over that of the benchmark materials. The method of preparing such polymers, includes oxidatively activating solids by CO.sub.2/steam oxidation and supercritical water treatment.

  10. Management of Low-Level Radioactive Waste from Research, Hospitals and Nuclear Medical Centers in Egypt - 13469

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hasan, M.A.; Selim, Y.T.; Lasheen, Y.F. [Hot Labs and Waste Management Center, Atomic Energy Authority, 3 Ahmed El-Zomor St., El-Zohour District, Naser City, 11787, Cairo (Egypt)] [Hot Labs and Waste Management Center, Atomic Energy Authority, 3 Ahmed El-Zomor St., El-Zohour District, Naser City, 11787, Cairo (Egypt)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The application of radioisotopes and radiation sources in medical diagnosis and therapy is an important issue. Physicians can use radioisotopes to diagnose and treat diseases. Methods of treatment, conditioning and management of low level radioactive wastes from the use of radiation sources and radioisotopes in hospitals and nuclear medicine application, are described. Solid Radioactive waste with low-level activity after accumulation, minimization, segregation and measurement, are burned or compressed in a compactor according to the international standards. Conditioned drums are transported to the interim storage site at the Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority (EAEA) represented in Hot Labs and Waste Management Center (HLWMC) for storage and monitoring. (authors)

  11. Distributed storage with communication costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Armstrong, Craig Kenneth

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    5 Introduction to Coding for Distributed Storage The Repairflow graph for 1 repair with varying storage capac- itythe Capacity of Storage Nodes . . . 4.1 Characterizing

  12. Storage Space Request Aurora Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    Storage Space Request Aurora Facility (1855 Marika) Department and Division: _______________________________________________________ Storage Contact: ____________________________________________________________ Name Phone and fax Fiscal Footage required: ______________ Brief Description of storage items

  13. Energy Storage | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Storage Energy Storage The challenge of creating new advanced batteries and energy storage technologies is one of Argonne's key initiatives. By creating a multidisciplinary...

  14. Idaho Waste Vitrification Facilities Project Vitrified Waste Interim Storage Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonnema, Bruce Edward

    2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This feasibility study report presents a draft design of the Vitrified Waste Interim Storage Facility (VWISF), which is one of three subprojects of the Idaho Waste Vitrification Facilities (IWVF) project. The primary goal of the IWVF project is to design and construct a treatment process system that will vitrify the sodium-bearing waste (SBW) to a final waste form. The project will consist of three subprojects that include the Waste Collection Tanks Facility, the Waste Vitrification Facility (WVF), and the VWISF. The Waste Collection Tanks Facility will provide for waste collection, feed mixing, and surge storage for SBW and newly generated liquid waste from ongoing operations at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. The WVF will contain the vitrification process that will mix the waste with glass-forming chemicals or frit and turn the waste into glass. The VWISF will provide a shielded storage facility for the glass until the waste can be disposed at either the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant as mixed transuranic waste or at the future national geological repository as high-level waste glass, pending the outcome of a Waste Incidental to Reprocessing determination, which is currently in progress. A secondary goal is to provide a facility that can be easily modified later to accommodate storage of the vitrified high-level waste calcine. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of the VWISF, which would be constructed in compliance with applicable federal, state, and local laws. This project supports the Department of Energy’s Environmental Management missions of safely storing and treating radioactive wastes as well as meeting Federal Facility Compliance commitments made to the State of Idaho.

  15. Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Storage Multimedia Gallery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    StorageEnergy Storage Multimedia Gallery Energy Storage Multimedia Gallery Images Videos Energy Storage Image Gallery Energy Storage B-Roll Videos Battery Abuse Testing Laboratory...

  16. Model NOx storage systems: Storage capacity and thermal aging...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Model NOx storage systems: Storage capacity and thermal aging of BaOtheta- Al2O3NiAl(100). Model NOx storage systems: Storage capacity and thermal aging of BaOtheta- Al2O3...

  17. Storage Ring Operation Modes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Longitudinal bunch profile and Up: APS Storage Ring Parameters Previous: Source Parameter Table Storage Ring Operation Modes Standard Operating Mode, top-up Fill pattern: 102 mA in...

  18. Underground Storage Tank Regulations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Underground Storage Tank Regulations is relevant to all energy projects that will require the use and building of pipelines, underground storage of any sorts, and/or electrical equipment. The...

  19. Cool Storage Performance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eppelheimer, D. M.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Utilities have promoted the use of electric heat and thermal storage to increase off peak usage of power. High daytime demand charges and enticing discounts for off peak power have been used as economic incentives to promote thermal storage systems...

  20. Safe Home Food Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Laanen, Peggy

    2002-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Proper food storage can preserve food quality and prevent spoilage and food/borne illness. The specifics of pantry, refrigerator and freezer storage are given, along with helpful information on new packaging, label dates, etc. A comprehensive table...

  1. Structural Integrity Program for INTEC Calcined Solids Storage Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffrey Bryant

    2008-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the activities of the structural integrity program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center relevant to the high-level waste Calcined Solids Storage Facilities and associated equipment, as required by DOE M 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual'. Based on the evaluation documented in this report, the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities are not leaking and are structurally sound for continued service. Recommendations are provided for continued monitoring of the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities.

  2. Advances in mass storage technology are producing devices capable of holding terabytes of data. These new devices, often called tertiary storage devices, have dramatically different performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Irvine, University of

    1 ABSTRACT Advances in mass storage technology are producing devices capable of holding terabytes of data. These new devices, often called tertiary storage devices, have dramatically different performance disk, and so are unsuited to manage tertiary storage devices. A layer of abstrac- tion has been

  3. Washington Environmental Permit Handbook - Dangerous Waste Treatment...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Washington Environmental Permit Handbook - Dangerous Waste Treatment Storage Disposal Facility New Permit Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web...

  4. Energy Storage Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conover, David R.

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Storage Systems – An Old Idea Doing New Things with New Technology article for the International Assoication of ELectrical Inspectors

  5. Documentation on currently operating low-level radioactive waste treatment systems: National Low-Level Waste Management Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In May 1985, the US Department of Energy issued a Program Research and Development Announcement requesting documentation on currently operating low-level radioactive waste treatment systems. Six grants were awarded to support that documentation. Final reports for the following grants and grantees are compiled in this document: Shredder/Compactor Report by Impell Corp., Volume Reduction and Solidification System for Low-Level Radwaste Treatment by Waste Chem Corp., Low-Level Radioactive Waste Treatment Systems in Northern Europe by Pacific Nuclear Services/Nuclear Packaging Inc., The University of Missouri Research Reactor Facility Can Melter System by the University of Missouri, Drying of Ion-Exchange Resin and Filter Media by Nuclear Packaging Inc., and Operational Experience with Selective Ion-Exchange Media in Sluiceable Pressurized Demineralizers at Nuclear Power Plants by Analytical Resources Inc. 65 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs.

  6. The Integrated Waste Tracking System - A Flexible Waste Management Tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Robert Stephen

    2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) has fully embraced a flexible, computer-based tool to help increase waste management efficiency and integrate multiple operational functions from waste generation through waste disposition while reducing cost. The Integrated Waste Tracking System (IWTS)provides comprehensive information management for containerized waste during generation,storage, treatment, transport, and disposal. The IWTS provides all information necessary for facilities to properly manage and demonstrate regulatory compliance. As a platformindependent, client-server and Web-based inventory and compliance system, the IWTS has proven to be a successful tracking, characterization, compliance, and reporting tool that meets the needs of both operations and management while providing a high level of management flexibility.

  7. FOREST CENTRE STORAGE BUILDING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deYoung, Brad

    FOREST CENTRE STORAGE BUILDING 3 4 5 6 7 8 UniversityDr. 2 1 G r e n f e l l D r i v e MULTI PURPOSE COURT STUDENT RESIDENCES GREEN HOUSE STUDENT RESIDENCES STUDENT RESIDENCES RECPLEX STORAGE BUILDING STORAGE BUILDING LIBRARY & COMPUTING FINE ARTS FOREST CENTRE ARTS &SCIENCE BUILDING ARTS &SCIENCE

  8. Waste Management Facilities Cost Information Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feizollahi, F.; Shropshire, D.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Waste Management Facility Cost Information (WMFCI) Report, commissioned by the US Department of Energy (DOE), develops planning life-cycle cost (PLCC) estimates for treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. This report contains PLCC estimates versus capacity for 26 different facility cost modules. A procedure to guide DOE and its contractor personnel in the use of estimating data is also provided. Estimates in the report apply to five distinctive waste streams: low-level waste, low-level mixed waste, alpha contaminated low-level waste, alpha contaminated low-level mixed waste, and transuranic waste. The report addresses five different treatment types: incineration, metal/melting and recovery, shredder/compaction, solidification, and vitrification. Data in this report allows the user to develop PLCC estimates for various waste management options.

  9. Utility Battery Storage Systems Program report for FY93

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butler, P.C.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, conducts the Utility Battery Storage Systems Program, which is sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Management. In this capacity, Sandia is responsible for the engineering analyses, contract development, and testing of rechargeable batteries and systems for utility-energy-storage applications. This report details the technical achievements realized during fiscal year 1993.

  10. Carbon Storage in Young Growth Coast Redwood Stands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    515 Carbon Storage in Young Growth Coast Redwood Stands Dryw A. Jones1 and Kevin L. O'Hara1 Abstract Carbon sequestration is an emerging forest management objective within California and around the dynamics of carbon sequestration and to accurately measure carbon storage is essential to insure successful

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Infrastructure Research and Innovation (CIRI), Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Facilities, Infrastructure Security, Materials...

  12. Groundwater and Terrestrial Water Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodell, M; Chambers, D P; Famiglietti, J S

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    T. E. Reilly, 2002: Flow and storage in groundwater systems.Estimating ground water storage changes in the Mississippistorage..

  13. Enhanced Reliability of Photovoltaic Systems with Energy Storage and Controls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manz, D.; Schelenz, O.; Chandra, R.; Bose, S.; de Rooij, M.; Bebic, J.

    2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes efforts to reconfigure loads during outages to allow individual customers the opportunity to enhance the reliability of their electric service through the management of their loads, photovoltaics, and energy storage devices.

  14. Designing a Thermal Energy Storage Program for Electric Utilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niehus, T. L.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electric utilities are looking at thermal energy storage technology as a viable demand side management (DSM) option. In order for this DSM measure to be effective, it must be incorporated into a workable, well-structured utility program. This paper...

  15. Storage : DAS / SAN / NAS Dploiement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collette. Sébastien

    CH8 Divers Agenda · Storage : DAS / SAN / NAS · Déploiement · VLAN ­ 802.1Q · Gestion d · Sécurisation de Windows · Sécurisation de UNIX · Qu'est-ce que... ­ Firewall, VPN, IDS/IPS, PKI Storage : DAS, NAS, SAN #12;Storage : DAS, NAS, SAN · Direct Attached Storage · Network Attached Storage · Storage

  16. Storage Ring Revised March 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory - Experiment 821

    Chapter 8. Storage Ring Revised March 1994 8.1. Introduction -- 107 -- #12; 108 Storage Ring 8.2. Magnetic Design and Field Calculations 8.2.1. Conceptual Approach #12; Storage Ring 109 #12; 110 Storage Ring 8.2.2. Computer Aided Refined Pole Designs #12; Storage Ring 111 #12; 112 Storage Ring #12

  17. Earthen Liquid Manure Storage/Lagoon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the storage to function as intended. Best Environmental Management Practices Farm Animal Production Inspecting Water Diversions Is the surface water diversion adequate? Diverting excess clean water away is key to carry storm flows. Are diversions and diversion outlets properly vegetated and maintained to minimize

  18. Safety analysis report for the Waste Storage Facility. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bengston, S.J.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This safety analysis report outlines the safety concerns associated with the Waste Storage Facility located in the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The three main objectives of the report are: define and document a safety basis for the Waste Storage Facility activities; demonstrate how the activities will be carried out to adequately protect the workers, public, and environment; and provide a basis for review and acceptance of the identified risk that the managers, operators, and owners will assume.

  19. Hazardous Waste Management (Oklahoma)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This article states regulations for the disposal of hazardous waste. It also provides information about permit requirements for the transport, treatment and storage of such waste. It also mentions...

  20. A Low-Tech, Low-Budget Storage Solution for High Level Radioactive Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brett Carlsen; Ted Reed; Todd Johnson; John Weathersby; Joe Alexander; Dave Griffith; Douglas Hamelin

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The need for safe, secure, and economical storage of radioactive material becomes increasingly important as beneficial uses of radioactive material expand (increases inventory), as political instability rises (increases threat), and as final disposal and treatment facilities are delayed (increases inventory and storage duration). Several vendor-produced storage casks are available for this purpose but are often costly — due to the required design, analyses, and licensing costs. Thus the relatively high costs of currently accepted storage solutions may inhibit substantial improvements in safety and security that might otherwise be achieved. This is particularly true in areas of the world where the economic and/or the regulatory infrastructure may not provide the means and/or the justification for such an expense. This paper considers a relatively low-cost, low-technology radioactive material storage solution. The basic concept consists of a simple shielded storage container that can be fabricated locally using a steel pipe and a corrugated steel culvert as forms enclosing a concrete annulus. Benefits of such a system include 1) a low-tech solution that utilizes materials and skills available virtually anywhere in the world, 2) a readily scalable design that easily adapts to specific needs such as the geometry and radioactivity of the source term material), 3) flexible placement allows for free-standing above-ground or in-ground (i.e., below grade or bermed) installation, 4) the ability for future relocation without direct handling of sources, and 5) a long operational lifetime . ‘Le mieux est l’ennemi du bien’ (translated: The best is the enemy of good) applies to the management of radioactive materials – particularly where the economic and/or regulatory justification for additional investment is lacking. Development of a low-cost alternative that considerably enhances safety and security may lead to a greater overall risk reduction than insisting on solutions that remain economically and/or politically ‘out of reach’.

  1. Economics of cool storage for electric load leveling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asbury, J.G. (Argonne National Lab., IL); Dougherty, D.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Equipment and methods for cold storage in commercial buildings to effect reduced summer peak load demands for electric utilities are described and the economics of this load leveling means is examined using the Potomac Electric Power Co. (PEPCO) studies and data. This examination reveals that investments in this technology can offer attractive paybacks (3 to 5 y) in new building applications. Partial storage, because of chiller-capacity savings, offers faster payback than full-storage systems. Estimates of its market potential indicate that cool storage will play an important role in PEPCO's Energy Use Management Plan. (LCL)

  2. Florida International University Technical Report TR-2006-09-02 STORM: An Approach to Database Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rangaswami, Raju

    Storage Management in Data Center Environments Kaushik Dutta Raju Rangaswami Florida International University Miami, FL 33199 kaushik.dutta@fiu.edu raju@cs.fiu.edu #12;STORM: An Approach to Database Storage Sciences Florida International University Miami, FL - 33199, USA raju@cs.fiu.edu Abstract Database storage

  3. The application of PHREEQCi, a geochemical computer program, to aid in the management of a wastewater treatment wetland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitzman, Stephanie

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to Enhance Treatment Capability at the TMPA Site. . Step 1 . . Step 2. . Step 3 . . Page nl IV V I I IX 4 4 10 10 13 18 18 20 26 26 28 29 29 32 32 33 33 36 43 43 44 55 59 59 59 62 62 64 64 CONCLUSIONS . . PHREEQCI... 6 8 pH 10 12 B 20 15 10 A C B -10 -15 -20 -0 Eh 05 Figure 1. Theoretical speciation curves as a function of saturation index (SI), pH (A) and Eh (B). Horizontal dashed lines represent a SI value of zero, indicating the species...

  4. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document analyzes at a pregrammatic level the potential environmental consequences over the next 40 years of alternatives related to the transportation, receipt, processing, and storage of spent nuclear fuel under the responsibility of the US Department of Energy. It also analyzes the site-specific consequences of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory sitewide actions anticipated over the next 10 years for waste and spent nuclear fuel management and environmental restoration. For pregrammatic spent nuclear fuel management, this document analyzes alternatives of no action, decentralization, regionalization, centralization and the use of the plans that existed in 1992/1993 for the management of these materials. For the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, this document analyzes alternatives of no action, ten-year plan, minimum and maximum treatment, storage, and disposal of US Department of Energy wastes.

  5. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 2, Part A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document analyzes at a programmatic level the potential environmental consequences over the next 40 years of alternatives related to the transportation, receipt, processing, and storage of spent nuclear fuel under the responsibility of the US Department of Energy. It also analyzes the site-specific consequences of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory sitewide actions anticipated over the next 10 years for waste and spent nuclear fuel management and environmental restoration. For programmatic spent nuclear fuel management this document analyzes alternatives of no action, decentralization, regionalization, centralization and the use of the plans that existed in 1992/1993 for the management of these materials. For the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, this document analyzes alternatives of no action, ten-year plan, minimum and maximum and maximum treatment, storage, and disposal of US Department of Energy wastes.

  6. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs draft environmental impact statement. Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document analyzes at a programmatic level the potential environmental consequences over the next 40 years of alternatives related to the transportation, receipt, processing, and storage of spent nuclear fuel under the responsibility of the US Department of Energy. It also analyzes the site-specific consequences of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory sitewide actions anticipated over the next 10 years for waste and spent nuclear fuel management and environmental restoration. For programmatic spent nuclear fuel management, this document analyzes alternatives of no action, decentralization, regionalization, centralization and the use of the plans that existed in 1992/1993 for the management of these materials. For the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, this document analyzes alternatives of no action, ten-year plan, minimum and maximum treatment, storage, and disposal of US Department of Energy wastes.

  7. Hanford Site Waste Management Units Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Hanford Site Waste Management Units Report (HSWMUR) was originated to provide information responsive to Section 3004(u) of the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) of the 1984 United States Code (USC). The report provides a comprehensive inventory of all types of waste management units at the Hanford Site and consists of waste disposal units, including (1) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) disposal units, (2) Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) disposal units, (3) unplanned releases, (4) inactive contaminated structure, (5) RCRA treatment and storage units, and (6) other storage areas. Because of the comprehensive nature of this report, the listing of sites is more extensive than required by Section 3004(u) of HSWA. In support of the Hanford RCRA permit, a field was added to designate whether the waste management unit is a solid waste management unit (SWMU). As SWMUs are identified, they will added to the Hanford Waste Information Data System (WIDS), which is the database supporting this report, and added to the report at its next annual update. A quality review of the WIDS was conducted this past year. The review included checking all data against their reference and making appropriate changes, updating the data elements using the most recent references, marking duplicate units for deletion, and addition additional information. 6 refs.

  8. Hanford Site Waste Management Units Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Hanford Site Waste Management Units Report (HSWMUR) was originated to provide information responsive to Section 3004(u) of the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) of the 1984 United States Code (USC). The report provides a comprehensive inventory of all types of waste management units at the Hanford Site and consists of waste disposal units, including (1) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) disposal units, (2) Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) disposal units, (3) unplanned releases, (4) inactive contaminated structures, (5) RCRA treatment and storage units, and (6) other storage areas. Because of the comprehensive nature of this report, the listing of sites is more extensive than required by Section 3004(u) of HSWA. In support of the Hanford RCRA permit, a field was added to designate whether the waste management unit is a solid waste management unit (SWMU). As SWMUs are identified, they will added to the Hanford Waste Information Data System (WIDS), which is the database supporting this report, and added to the report at its next annual update. A quality review of the WIDS was conducted this past year. The review included checking all data against their reference and making appropriate changes, updating the data elements using the most recent references, marking duplicate units for deletion, and adding additional information. 6 refs.

  9. Regulatory Approaches for Solid Radioactive Waste Storage in Russia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffith, A.; Testov, S.; Diaschev, A.; Nazarian, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.

    2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Russian Navy under the Arctic Military Environmental Cooperation (AMEC) Program has designated the Polyarninsky Shipyard as the regional recipient for solid radioactive waste (SRW) pretreatment and storage facilities. Waste storage technologies include containers and lightweight modular storage buildings. The prime focus of this paper is solid radioactive waste storage options based on the AMEC mission and Russian regulatory standards. The storage capability at the Polyarninsky Shipyard in support of Mobile Pretreatment Facility (MPF) operations under the AMEC Program will allow the Russian Navy to accumulate/stage the SRW after treatment at the MPF. It is anticipated that the MPF will operate for 20 years. This paper presents the results of a regulatory analysis performed to support an AMEC program decision on the type of facility to be used for storage of SRW. The objectives the study were to: analyze whether a modular storage building (MSB), referred in the standards as a lightweight building, would comply with the Russian SRW storage building standard, OST 95 10517-95; analyze the Russian SRW storage pad standard OST 95 10516-95; and compare the two standards, OST 95 10517-95 for storage buildings and OST 95 10516-95 for storage pads.

  10. Heat storage duration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Both the amount and duration of heat storage in massive elements of a passive building are investigated. Data taken for one full winter in the Balcomb solar home are analyzed with the aid of sub-system simulation models. Heat storage duration is tallied into one-day intervals. Heat storage location is discussed and related to overall energy flows. The results are interpreted and conclusions drawn.

  11. Energy Storage Program Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Barriers HEV & PHEV Technology Roadmaps R&D Timeline Overview 3 Develop electrochemical energy storage technologies which support the commercialization of hybrid and electric...

  12. Hydrogen Storage Related Links

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following resources provide details about DOE-funded hydrogen storage activities, research plans and roadmaps, models and tools, and additional related links.

  13. Culex quinquefasciatus Storage Proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and hemolymph proteins of Cx. quinquefasciatus . A and B:of typical storage proteins in Cx. quinquefasciatus.Fourth-instar Cx. quinquefasciatus larvae and early pupae

  14. SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassenzahl, W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and R. W . BOOIll, "Superconductive Energy Storage Inducand H. A. Peterson, "Superconductive E nergy S torage forMeeting, Janua ry N. Mohan, "Superconductive Energy S torage

  15. SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassenzahl, W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Design of the BPA Superconducting 30-MJ Energy Storagefor a Utility Scale Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storagefor a Lnrge Scale Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage

  16. Durability study of a vehicle-scale hydrogen storage system.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Terry Alan; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Behrens, Richard, Jr.

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a vehicle-scale demonstration hydrogen storage system as part of a Work for Others project funded by General Motors. This Demonstration System was developed based on the properties and characteristics of sodium alanates which are complex metal hydrides. The technology resulting from this program was developed to enable heat and mass management during refueling and hydrogen delivery to an automotive system. During this program the Demonstration System was subjected to repeated hydriding and dehydriding cycles to enable comparison of the vehicle-scale system performance to small-scale sample data. This paper describes the experimental results of life-cycle studies of the Demonstration System. Two of the four hydrogen storage modules of the Demonstration System were used for this study. A well-controlled and repeatable sorption cycle was defined for the repeated cycling, which began after the system had already been cycled forty-one times. After the first nine repeated cycles, a significant hydrogen storage capacity loss was observed. It was suspected that the sodium alanates had been affected either morphologically or by contamination. The mechanisms leading to this initial degradation were investigated and results indicated that water and/or air contamination of the hydrogen supply may have lead to oxidation of the hydride and possibly kinetic deactivation. Subsequent cycles showed continued capacity loss indicating that the mechanism of degradation was gradual and transport or kinetically limited. A materials analysis was then conducted using established methods including treatment with carbon dioxide to react with sodium oxides that may have formed. The module tubes were sectioned to examine chemical composition and morphology as a function of axial position. The results will be discussed.

  17. Linking Heroin Users in China to Drug Treatment and Other Resources in the Community: Effect of a Recovery Management Intervention Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Fei

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    substance abuse treatment: Reexamining “Comprehensive” care.abuse include: intake processing/assessment, treatment plan, pharmacotherapy, continuing care,

  18. Optimal Storage Allocation for Serial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yechiali, Uri

    Optimal Storage Allocation for Serial Haim Mendelson, Joseph S. Pliskin, and Uri Yechiali Tel Aviv reside on a direct-access storage device in which storage space is limited. Records are added allocating storage space to the files. Key Words and Phrases: serial files, storage allocation

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: implement energy storage projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    implement energy storage projects Sandian Spoke at the New York Energy Storage Expo On December 12, 2014, in Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Grid Integration,...

  20. Sandia National Laboratories: Stationary Energy Storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    StorageStationary Energy Storage Stationary Energy Storage The 1 MW Energy Storage Test Pad integrated with renewable energy generation at Sandia's Distributed Energy Technology...

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: Batteries & Energy Storage Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    StorageBatteries & Energy Storage Publications Batteries & Energy Storage Publications Batteries & Energy Storage Fact Sheets Achieving Higher Energy Density in Flow Batteries at...

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: evaluate energy storage opportunity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    energy storage opportunity Sandian Spoke at the New York Energy Storage Expo On December 12, 2014, in Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Grid Integration,...

  3. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Legalization of Ground Water Storage," Water Resourcesprocedure to above ground storage of heat in huge insulatedthis project is heat storage in ground-water regions storage

  4. Sandia Energy - Energy Storage Test Pad (ESTP)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Storage Test Pad (ESTP) Home Energy Permalink Gallery Evaluating Powerful Batteries for Modular Electric Grid Energy Storage Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Energy...

  5. Storage Management in Virtualized Cloud Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Ling

    the performance bottlenecks in a virtualized setup and understanding the implications of workload combinations present the measurement results of detailed experiments conducted on a virtualized setup focusing/applications enable ubiquitous access to data besides the ability to harness massive computing power even from

  6. Underground Storage Tank Management (District of Columbia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The  installation, upgrade and operation of any petroleum UST (>110 gallons) or hazardous substance UST System, including heating oil tanks over 1,100 gallons capacity in the District requires a...

  7. DC Hazardous Waste Management (District of Columbia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This regulation regulates the generation, storage, transportation, treatment, and disposal of hazardous waste, and wherever feasible, reduces or eliminates waste at the source. It is the policy of...

  8. Vermont Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (Vermont)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations are intended to protect public health and the environment by comprehensively regulating the generation, storage, collection, transport, treatment, disposal, use, reuse, and...

  9. Energy storage capacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarjeant, W.J.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The properties of capacitors are reviewed in general, including dielectrics, induced polarization, and permanent polarization. Then capacitance characteristics are discussed and modelled. These include temperature range, voltage, equivalent series resistance, capacitive reactance, impedance, dissipation factor, humidity and frequency effects, storage temperature and time, and lifetime. Applications of energy storage capacitors are then discussed. (LEW)

  10. Porous polymeric materials for hydrogen storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, Luping (Hoffman Estates, IL); Liu, Di-Jia (Naperville, IL); Yuan, Shengwen (Chicago, IL); Yang, Junbing (Westmont, IL)

    2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Porous polymers, tribenzohexazatriphenylene, poly-9,9'-spirobifluorene, poly-tetraphenyl methane and their derivatives for storage of H.sub.2 prepared through a chemical synthesis method. The porous polymers have high specific surface area and narrow pore size distribution. Hydrogen uptake measurements conducted for these polymers determined a higher hydrogen storage capacity at the ambient temperature over that of the benchmark materials. The method of preparing such polymers, includes oxidatively activating solids by CO.sub.2/steam oxidation and supercritical water treatment.

  11. Fifteenth annual U.S. Department of Energy low-level radioactive waste management conference: Agenda and abstracts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the conference was to give the opportunity to identify and discuss low-level radioactive waste management issues, share lessons learned, and hear about some of the latest advances in technology. Abstracts of the presentations are arranged into the following topical sections: (1) Performance Management Track: Performance assessment perspectives; Site characterization; Modeling and performance assessment; and Remediation; (2) Technical Track: Strategic planning; Tools and options; Characterization and validation; Treatment updates; Technology development; and Storage; (3) Institutional Track: Orders and regulatory issues; Waste management options; Legal, economic, and social issues; Public involvement; Siting process; and Low-level radioactive waste policy amendment acts.

  12. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission & distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1 to June 30, 2006. Key activities during this time period include: (1) Develop and process subcontract agreements for the eight projects selected for cofunding at the February 2006 GSTC Meeting; (2) Compiling and distributing the three 2004 project final reports to the GSTC Full members; (3) Develop template, compile listserv, and draft first GSTC Insider online newsletter; (4) Continue membership recruitment; (5) Identify projects and finalize agenda for the fall GSTC/AGA Underground Storage Committee Technology Transfer Workshop in San Francisco, CA; and (6) Identify projects and prepare draft agenda for the fall GSTC Technology Transfer Workshop in Pittsburgh, PA.

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Storage Electric Car Challenge Sparks Students' STEM Interest On January 9, 2015, in Energy, Energy Storage, News, News & Events, Partnership, Transportation Energy Aspiring...

  14. Improving energy storage devices | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    energy storage devices Improving energy storage devices Released: April 15, 2014 Lithium-sulfur batteries last longer with nanomaterial-packed cathode A new PNNL-developed...

  15. Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Capture & Storage, Center for Infrastructure Research and Innovation (CIRI), Energy, Energy Storage, Facilities, Livermore Valley Open Campus (LVOC), Materials Science, News,...

  16. Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Collaboration On May 28, 2014, in Biofuels, CRF, Distribution Grid Integration, Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Energy Surety, Facilities, Grid Integration,...

  17. This article has been accepted for inclusion in a future issue of this journal. Content is final as presented, with the exception of pagination. Battery Energy Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    as presented, with the exception of pagination. INVITED P A P E R Battery Energy Storage System (BESS of battery management systems for grid-scale energy storage applications. By Matthew T. Lawder, Bharatkumar using battery energy storage systems (BESS) for grid storage, advanced modeling is required

  18. Ultrafine hydrogen storage powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA); Ellis, Timothy W. (Doylestown, PA); Pecharsky, Vitalij K. (Ames, IA); Ting, Jason (Ames, IA); Terpstra, Robert (Ames, IA); Bowman, Robert C. (La Mesa, CA); Witham, Charles K. (Pasadena, CA); Fultz, Brent T. (Pasadena, CA); Bugga, Ratnakumar V. (Arcadia, CA)

    2000-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of making hydrogen storage powder resistant to fracture in service involves forming a melt having the appropriate composition for the hydrogen storage material, such, for example, LaNi.sub.5 and other AB.sub.5 type materials and AB.sub.5+x materials, where x is from about -2.5 to about +2.5, including x=0, and the melt is gas atomized under conditions of melt temperature and atomizing gas pressure to form generally spherical powder particles. The hydrogen storage powder exhibits improved chemcial homogeneity as a result of rapid solidfication from the melt and small particle size that is more resistant to microcracking during hydrogen absorption/desorption cycling. A hydrogen storage component, such as an electrode for a battery or electrochemical fuel cell, made from the gas atomized hydrogen storage material is resistant to hydrogen degradation upon hydrogen absorption/desorption that occurs for example, during charging/discharging of a battery. Such hydrogen storage components can be made by consolidating and optionally sintering the gas atomized hydrogen storage powder or alternately by shaping the gas atomized powder and a suitable binder to a desired configuration in a mold or die.

  19. The Role of Energy Storage in Commercial Building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Subbarao, Krishnappa; Prakash Kumar, Nirupama; Bandyopadhyay, Gopal K.; Finley, C.; Koritarov, V. S.; Molburg, J. C.; Wang, J.; Zhao, Fuli; Brackney, L.; Florita, A. R.

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Motivation and Background of Study This project was motivated by the need to understand the full value of energy storage (thermal and electric energy storage) in commercial buildings, the opportunity of benefits for building operations and the potential interactions between a building and a smart grid infrastructure. On-site or local energy storage systems are not new to the commercial building sector; they have been in place in US buildings for decades. Most building-scale storage technologies are based on thermal or electrochemical storage mechanisms. Energy storage technologies are not designed to conserve energy, and losses associated with energy conversion are inevitable. Instead, storage provides flexibility to manage load in a building or to balance load and generation in the power grid. From the building owner's perspective, storage enables load shifting to optimize energy costs while maintaining comfort. From a grid operations perspective, building storage at scale could provide additional flexibility to grid operators in managing the generation variability from intermittent renewable energy resources (wind and solar). To characterize the set of benefits, technical opportunities and challenges, and potential economic values of storage in a commercial building from both the building operation's and the grid operation's view-points is the key point of this project. The research effort was initiated in early 2010 involving Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to quantify these opportunities from a commercial buildings perspective. This report summarizes the early discussions, literature reviews, stakeholder engagements, and initial results of analyses related to the overall role of energy storage in commercial buildings. Beyond the summary of roughly eight months of effort by the laboratories, the report attempts to substantiate the importance of active DOE/BTP R&D activities in this space.

  20. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January 1, 2006 through March 31, 2006. Activities during this time period were: (1) Organize and host the 2006 Spring Meeting in San Diego, CA on February 21-22, 2006; (2) Award 8 projects for co-funding by GSTC for 2006; (3) New members recruitment; and (4) Improving communications.

  1. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created - the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January1, 2007 through March 31, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: {lg_bullet} Drafting and distributing the 2007 RFP; {lg_bullet} Identifying and securing a meeting site for the GSTC 2007 Spring Proposal Meeting; {lg_bullet} Scheduling and participating in two (2) project mentoring conference calls; {lg_bullet} Conducting elections for four Executive Council seats; {lg_bullet} Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC Final Project Reports; and {lg_bullet} Outreach and communications.

  2. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel Morrison

    2005-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2005 through June 30, 2005. During this time period efforts were directed toward (1) GSTC administration changes, (2) participating in the American Gas Association Operations Conference and Biennial Exhibition, (3) issuing a Request for Proposals (RFP) for proposal solicitation for funding, and (4) organizing the proposal selection meeting.

  3. River Protection Project (RPP) Project Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SEEMAN, S.E.

    2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), in accordance with the Strom Thurmond National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1999, established the Office of River Protection (ORP) to successfully execute and manage the River Protection Project (RPP), formerly known as the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS). The mission of the RPP is to store, retrieve, treat, and dispose of the highly radioactive Hanford tank waste in an environmentally sound, safe, and cost-effective manner. The team shown in Figure 1-1 is accomplishing the project. The ORP is providing the management and integration of the project; the Tank Farm Contractor (TFC) is responsible for providing tank waste storage, retrieval, and disposal; and the Privatization Contractor (PC) is responsible for providing tank waste treatment.

  4. Nuclear waste treatment program. Annual report for FY 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, J.A. (ed.)

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) nuclear waste management-related goals are: (1) to ensure that waste management is not an obstacle to the further deployment of light-water reactors (LWR) and the closure of the nuclear fuel cycle and (2) to fulfill its institutional responsibility for providing safe storage and disposal of existing and future nuclear wastes. As part of its approach to achieving these goals, the Office of Terminal Waste Disposal and Remedial Action of DOE established what is now called the Nuclear Waste Treatment Program (NWTP) at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) during the second half of FY 1982. To support DOE's attainment of its goals, the NWTP is to provide (1) documented technology necessary for the design and operation of nuclear waste treatment facilities by commercial enterprises as part of a licensed waste management system and (2) problem-specific treatment approaches, waste form and treatment process adaptations, equipment designs, and trouble-shooting assistance, as required, to treat existing wastes. This annual report describes progress during FY 1985 toward meeting these two objectives. The detailed presentation is organized according to the task structure of the program.

  5. Storage Exchange: A Global Trading Platform for Storage Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melbourne, University of

    Storage Exchange: A Global Trading Platform for Storage Services Martin Placek and Rajkumar Buyya,raj}@csse.unimelb.edu.au Abstract. The Storage Exchange (SX) is a new platform allowing stor- age to be treated as a tradeable resource. Organisations with varying storage requirements can use the SX platform to trade and exchange

  6. Building Trust in Storage Outsourcing: Secure Accounting of Utility Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Building Trust in Storage Outsourcing: Secure Accounting of Utility Storage Vishal Kher Yongdae Kim are witnessing a revival of Storage Service Providers (SSP) in the form of new vendors as well as traditional players. While storage outsourcing is cost-effective, many companies are hesitating to outsource

  7. South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops 2013 FARM-STORED GRAIN INSECT MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    , clean up all spilled grain. Keep ground around bins clear of weeds and debris. Proper storage management the grain is loaded into the bin for storage. After loading the best you can do is to try to maintain this level of quality. Thus, it is important to maximize the quality of your grain prior to storage

  8. Carbon Aerogels for Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baumann, T F; Worsley, M; Satcher, J H

    2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This effort is focused on the design of new nanostructured carbon-based materials that meet the DOE 2010 targets for on-board vehicle hydrogen storage. Carbon aerogels (CAs) are a unique class of porous materials that possess a number of desirable structural features for the storage of hydrogen, including high surface areas (over 3000 m{sup 2}/g), continuous and tunable porosities, and variable densities. In addition, the flexibility associated with CA synthesis allows for the incorporation of modifiers or catalysts into the carbon matrix in order to alter hydrogen sorption enthalpies in these materials. Since the properties of the doped CAs can be systematically modified (i.e. amount/type of dopant, surface area, porosity), novel materials can be fabricated that exhibit enhanced hydrogen storage properties. We are using this approach to design new H{sub 2} sorbent materials that can storage appreciable amounts of hydrogen at room temperature through a process known as hydrogen spillover. The spillover process involves the dissociative chemisorption of molecular hydrogen on a supported metal catalyst surface (e.g. platinum or nickel), followed by the diffusion of atomic hydrogen onto the surface of the support material. Due to the enhanced interaction between atomic hydrogen and the carbon support, hydrogen can be stored in the support material at more reasonable operating temperatures. While the spillover process has been shown to increase the reversible hydrogen storage capacities at room temperature in metal-loaded carbon nanostructures, a number of issues still exist with this approach, including slow kinetics of H{sub 2} uptake and capacities ({approx} 1.2 wt% on carbon) below the DOE targets. The ability to tailor different structural aspects of the spillover system (i.e. the size/shape of the catalyst particle, the catalyst-support interface and the support morphology) should provide valuable mechanistic information regarding the critical aspects of the spillover process (i.e. kinetics of hydrogen dissociation, diffusion and recombination) and allow for optimization of these materials to meet the DOE targets for hydrogen storage. In a parallel effort, we are also designing CA materials as nanoporous scaffolds for metal hydride systems. Recent work by others has demonstrated that nanostructured metal hydrides show enhanced kinetics for reversible hydrogen storage relative to the bulk materials. This effect is diminished, however, after several hydriding/dehydriding cycles, as the material structure coarsens. Incorporation of the metal hydride into a porous scaffolding material can potentially limit coarsening and, therefore, preserve the enhanced kinetics and improved cycling behavior of the nanostructured metal hydride. Success implementation of this approach, however, requires the design of nanoporous solids with large accessible pore volumes (> 4 cm{sup 3}/g) to minimize the gravimetric and volumetric capacity penalties associated with the use of the scaffold. In addition, these scaffold materials should be capable of managing thermal changes associated with the cycling of the incorporated metal hydride. CAs are promising candidates for the design of such porous scaffolds due to the large pore volumes and tunable porosity of aerogel framework. This research is a joint effort with HRL Laboratories, a member of the DOE Metal Hydride Center of Excellence. LLNL's efforts have focused on the design of new CA materials that can meet the scaffolding requirements, while metal hydride incorporation into the scaffold and evaluation of the kinetics and cycling performance of these composites is performed at HRL.

  9. SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassenzahl, W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Encrgy Storage Plant" , EPRI Report EM-3457, April 1984. [4521st century. REFERENCES The EPRI Regional Systems preparedby J. J. Mulvaney, EPRI Report EPRI P-19S0SR, (1981). [2J O.

  10. Marketing Cool Storage Technology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCannon, L.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the field. The International Thermal Storage Advisory Council was formed to help meet this perceived need. This paper will review activities of EPRI and ITSAC to achieve widespread acceptance of the technology....

  11. Hydrogen storage compositions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Wen; Vajo, John J.; Cumberland, Robert W.; Liu, Ping

    2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Compositions for hydrogen storage and methods of making such compositions employ an alloy that exhibits reversible formation/deformation of BH4- anions. The composition includes a ternary alloy including magnesium, boron and a metal and a metal hydride. The ternary alloy and the metal hydride are present in an amount sufficient to render the composition capable of hydrogen storage. The molar ratio of the metal to magnesium and boron in the alloy is such that the alloy exhibits reversible formation/deformation of BH4- anions. The hydrogen storage composition is prepared by combining magnesium, boron and a metal to prepare a ternary alloy and combining the ternary alloy with a metal hydride to form the hydrogen storage composition.

  12. Hydrogen storage compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Wen; Vajo, John J.; Cumberland, Robert W.; Liu, Ping

    2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Compositions for hydrogen storage and methods of making such compositions employ an alloy that exhibits reversible formation/deformation of BH.sub.4.sup.- anions. The composition includes a ternary alloy including magnesium, boron and a metal and a metal hydride. The ternary alloy and the metal hydride are present in an amount sufficient to render the composition capable of hydrogen storage. The molar ratio of the metal to magnesium and boron in the alloy is such that the alloy exhibits reversible formation/deformation of BH.sub.4.sup.- anions. The hydrogen storage composition is prepared by combining magnesium, boron and a metal to prepare a ternary alloy and combining the ternary alloy with a metal hydride to form the hydrogen storage composition.

  13. APS Storage Ring Parameters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Main Parameters APS Storage Ring Parameters M. Borland, G. Decker, L. Emery, W. Guo, K. Harkay, V. Sajaev, C.-Y. Yao Advanced Photon Source September 8, 2010 This document list the...

  14. Stasis: Flexible Transactional Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sears, Russell C.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    He and Bowei Du implemented Oasys, and helped with my firstwas built on top of a C++ object persistence library, Oasys.Oasys uses plug-in storage modules that implement persistent

  15. Gas Storage Act (Illinois)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Any corporation which is engaged in or desires to engage in, the distribution, transportation or storage of natural gas or manufactured gas, which gas, in whole or in part, is intended for ultimate...

  16. SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassenzahl, W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    World's First 290 MW Gas Turbine Air Storage Peaking Plant",hydro e lectric plants and gas turbines, are less effectedelectricity. For a gas turbine the conversion efficiency may

  17. Storage Tanks (Arkansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Storage Tanks regulations is a set of rules and permit requirements mandated by the Arkansas Pollution and Ecology Commission in order to protect the public health and the lands and the waters...

  18. Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutberg, Michael; Hastbacka, Mildred; Cooperman, Alissa; Bouza, Antonio

    2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The article discusses thermal energy storage technologies. This article addresses benefits of TES at both the building site and the electricity generation source. The energy savings and market potential of thermal energy store are reviewed as well.

  19. Energy Storage 101

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the storage of heat or cold between opposing seasons in deep aquifers or bedrock. A wind-up clock stores potential energy, in this case mechanical, in the spring tension. ...

  20. Proceedings of the 1993 international conference on nuclear waste management and environmental remediation. Volume 3: Environmental remediation and environmental management issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baschwitz, R.; Kohout, R.; Marek, J.; Richter, P.I.; Slate, S.C. [eds.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This conference was held in 1993 in Prague, Czech Republic to provide a forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on radioactive waste management. Papers are divided into the following sections: Low/Intermediate level waste disposal from an international viewpoint; Solid waste volume reduction, treatment and packaging experience; Design of integrated systems for management of nuclear wastes; Mixed waste (hazardous and radioactive) treatment and disposal; Advanced low/intermediate level waste conditioning technologies including incineration; National programs for low/intermediate waste management; Low/Intermediate waste characterization, assay, and tracking systems; Disposal site characterization and performance assessment; Radioactive waste management and practices in developing countries; Waste management from unconventional (e.g. VVER) nuclear power reactors; Waste minimization, avoidance and recycling in nuclear power plants; Liquid waste treatment processes and experience; Low/Intermediate waste storage facilities--design and experience; Low/Intermediate waste forms and acceptance criteria for disposal; Management of non-standard or accident waste; and Quality assurance and control in nuclear waste management. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  1. Calcined solids storage facility closure study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahlmeir, M.M.; Tuott, L.C.; Spaulding, B.C. [and others] [and others

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The disposal of radioactive wastes now stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory is currently mandated under a {open_quotes}Settlement Agreement{close_quotes} (or {open_quotes}Batt Agreement{close_quotes}) between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. Under this agreement, all high-level waste must be treated as necessary to meet the disposal criteria and disposed of or made road ready to ship from the INEEL by 2035. In order to comply with this agreement, all calcined waste produced in the New Waste Calcining Facility and stored in the Calcined Solids Facility must be treated and disposed of by 2035. Several treatment options for the calcined waste have been studied in support of the High-Level Waste Environmental Impact Statement. Two treatment methods studied, referred to as the TRU Waste Separations Options, involve the separation of the high-level waste (calcine) into TRU waste and low-level waste (Class A or Class C). Following treatment, the TRU waste would be sent to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for final storage. It has been proposed that the low-level waste be disposed of in the Tank Farm Facility and/or the Calcined Solids Storage Facility following Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure. In order to use the seven Bin Sets making up the Calcined Solids Storage Facility as a low-level waste landfill, the facility must first be closed to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) standards. This study identifies and discusses two basic methods available to close the Calcined Solids Storage Facility under the RCRA - Risk-Based Clean Closure and Closure to Landfill Standards. In addition to the closure methods, the regulatory requirements and issues associated with turning the Calcined Solids Storage Facility into an NRC low-level waste landfill or filling the bin voids with clean grout are discussed.

  2. Waste management project fiscal year 1998 multi-year work plan WBS 1.2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slaybaugh, R.R.

    1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The MYWP technical baseline describes the work to be accomplished by the Project and the technical standards which govern that work. The Waste Management Project manages and integrates (non-TWRS) waste management activities at the site. Activities include management of Hanford wastes as well as waste transferred to Hanford from other DOE, Department of Defense, or other facilities. This work includes handling, treatment, storage, and disposition of radioactive, nonradioactive, hazardous, and mixed solid and liquid wastes. Major Waste Management Projects are the Solid Waste Project (SW), Liquid Effluents Project (LEP), and Analytical Services. Existing facilities (e.g., grout vaults and canyons) shall be evaluated for reuse for these purposes to the maximum extent possible. The paper tabulates the major facilities that interface with this Project, identifying the major facilities that generate waste, materials, or infrastructure for this Project and the major facilities that will receive waste and materials from this Project.

  3. Storage In C Matt Bishop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bishop, Matt

    Storage In C Matt Bishop Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science NASA Ames Research Center. Intimately bound with the idea of scope is that of storage. When a program defines a variable, the compiler storage (such as on a stack) or as more permanent storage (in data space.) Recall that the format of a C

  4. Storage In C Matt Bishop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bishop, Matt

    Storage In C Matt Bishop Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science NASA Ames Research Center. Intimately bound with the idea of scope is that of storage. When a program deŢnes a variable, the compiler storage (such as on a stack) or as more permanent storage (in data space.) Recall that the format of a C

  5. Comparison of cask and drywell storage concepts for a monitored retrievable storage/interim storage system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasmussen, D.E.

    1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy, through its Richland Operations Office is evaluating the feasibility, timing, and cost of providing a federal capability for storing the spent fuel, high-level wastes, and transuranic wastes that DOE may be obligated by law to manage until permanent waste disposal facilities are available. Three concepts utilizing a monitored retrievable storage/interim storage (MRS/IS) facility have been developed and analyzed. The first concept, co-location with a reprocessing plant, has been developed by staff of Allied General Nuclear Services. the second concept, a stand-alone facility, has been developed by staff of the General Atomic Company. The third concept, co-location with a deep geologic repository, has been developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory with the assistance of the Westinghouse Hanford Company and Kaiser Engineers. The objectives of this study are: to develop preconceptual designs for MRS/IS facilities: to examine various issues such as transportation of wastes, licensing of the facilities, and environmental concerns associated with operation of such facilities; and to estimate the life-cycle costs of the facilities when operated in response to a set of scenarios that define the quantities and types of waste requiring storage in specific time periods, generally spanning the years 1989 to 2037. Three scenarios are examined to develop estimates of life-cycle costs for the MRS/IS facilities. In the first scenario, the reprocessing plant is placed in service in 1989 and HLW canisters are stored until a repository is opened in the year 1998. Additional reprocessing plants and repositories are placed in service at intervals as needed to meet the demand. In the second scenario, the reprocessing plants are delayed in starting operations by 10 years, but the repositories open on schedule. In the third scenario, the repositories are delayed 10 years, but the reprocessing plants open on schedule.

  6. Utility battery storage systems program report for FY 94

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butler, P.C.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, conducts the Utility Battery Storage Systems Program, which is sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Management. The goal of this program is to assist industry in developing cost-effective battery systems as a utility resource option by 2000. Sandia is responsible for the engineering analyses, contracted development, and testing of rechargeable batteries and systems for utility energy storage applications. This report details the technical achievements realized during fiscal year 1994.

  7. Specific systems studies of battery energy storage for electric utilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akhil, A.A.; Lachenmeyer, L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jabbour, S.J. [Decision Focus, Inc., Mountain View, CA (United States); Clark, H.K. [Power Technologies, Inc., Roseville, CA (United States)

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, conducts the Utility Battery Storage Systems Program, which is sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Management. As a part of this program, four utility-specific systems studies were conducted to identify potential battery energy storage applications within each utility network and estimate the related benefits. This report contains the results of these systems studies.

  8. Oregon Procedure and Criteria for Hazardous Waste Treatment,...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Oregon Procedure and Criteria for Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage or Disposal Permits Fact Sheet Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Permitting...

  9. DOE Global Energy Storage Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The DOE International Energy Storage Database has more than 400 documented energy storage projects from 34 countries around the world. The database provides free, up-to-date information on grid-connected energy storage projects and relevant state and federal policies. More than 50 energy storage technologies are represented worldwide, including multiple battery technologies, compressed air energy storage, flywheels, gravel energy storage, hydrogen energy storage, pumped hydroelectric, superconducting magnetic energy storage, and thermal energy storage. The policy section of the database shows 18 federal and state policies addressing grid-connected energy storage, from rules and regulations to tariffs and other financial incentives. It is funded through DOE’s Sandia National Laboratories, and has been operating since January 2012.

  10. Proceedings of the 1993 international conference on nuclear waste management and environmental remediation. Volume 1: Low and intermediate level radioactive waste management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexandre, D.; Baker, R.; Kohout, R.; Marke, J. [eds.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This conference was held in 1993 in Prague, Czech Republic to provide a forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on radioactive waste management. Sections of the proceedings include the following: engineered and geological barriers; radioactive transportation and related issues; national programs for HLW and spent fuel management; recent advances in HLW treatment; science and engineering of the repository system; national examples of spent fuel storage systems; disposal systems for HLW and spent fuel--design and status; reprocessing and its influence on waste quantities; qualification methods for HLW; site characterization and underground testing; science and engineering of HLW and spent fuel storage systems; transmutation and separations of radioactivity; disposal site selection approaches and issues; and safety assessments and methodology for repositories.

  11. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created-the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of July 1, 2006 to September 30, 2006. Key activities during this time period include: {lg_bullet} Subaward contracts for all 2006 GSTC projects completed; {lg_bullet} Implement a formal project mentoring process by a mentor team; {lg_bullet} Upcoming Technology Transfer meetings: {sm_bullet} Finalize agenda for the American Gas Association Fall Underground Storage Committee/GSTC Technology Transfer Meeting in San Francisco, CA. on October 4, 2006; {sm_bullet} Identify projects and finalize agenda for the Fall GSTC Technology Transfer Meeting, Pittsburgh, PA on November 8, 2006; {lg_bullet} Draft and compile an electronic newsletter, the GSTC Insider; and {lg_bullet} New members update.

  12. Storage Performance Virtualization via Throughput and Latency Control Jianyong Zhang Alma Riska Anand Sivasubramaniam Qian Wang Erik Riedel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riska, Alma

    Storage Performance Virtualization via Throughput and Latency Control Jianyong Zhang Alma Riska and managing storage systems. A consequence of this trend is the need to serve multiple users that can be built on top of an existing storage utility. This frame- work uses a low-level feedback

  13. Thermal Energy Storage for Space Cooling--Federal Technology Alert

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Daryl R

    2000-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Cool storage technology can be used to significantly reduce energy costs by allowing energy-intensive, electrically driven cooling equipment to be predominantly operated during off peak hours when electricity rates are lower. This Federal Technology Alert, which is sponsored by DOE's Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), describes the basic types of cool storage technologies and cooling system integration options. In addition, it defines the savings potential in the federal sector, presents application advice, and describes the performance experience of specific federal users. The results of a case study of a GSA building using cool storage technology are also provided.

  14. Solid low level waste forms and extended storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohout, R. [R. Kohout & Associates, Ltd., Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents regulatory, technical, and economic aspects of selecting solid waste forms for the extended on-site storage of power plant low level wastes (LLW) in the United States. The author explains current uncertainties and disposal site shortages, defines power plant waste types, addresses regulatory requirements for disposal, discusses basic waste form storage considerations, outlines possible strategies for the management of individual waste types, and offers methodological steps for selecting a waste form for extended storage. Broader issues closely associated with waste form selection are also presented.

  15. A Fresh Perspective for Managing Water in California: Insights from Applying the European Water Framework Directive to the Russian River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grantham, Ted; Christian-Smith, Juliet; Kondolf, G. Mathias; Scheuer, Stefan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stormwater Management Hydropower Generation Wastewateragricultural irrigation, hydropower, industry, fishing,dams for water storage and hydropower and diversions for

  16. Waste Management Assistance Act (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This section promotes the proper and safe storage, treatment, and disposal of solid, hazardous, and low-level radioactive wastes in Iowa, and calls on Iowans to assume responsibility for waste...

  17. SCFA lead lab technical assistance at Oak Ridge Y-12 national security complex: Evaluation of treatment and characterization alternatives of mixed waste soil and debris at disposal area remedial action DARA solids storage facility (SSF)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazen, Terry

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TREATMENT AND CHARACTERIZATION ALTERNATIVES OF MIXED WASTE SOIL AND DEBRIS AT DISPOSAL AREA REMEDIAL ACTION (DARA) SOLIDSTreatment and Characterization Alternatives for Mixed Waste Soil and Debris at Disposal Area Remedial Action (DARA) Solids

  18. Energy storage connection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benedict, Eric L.; Borland, Nicholas P.; Dale, Magdelena; Freeman, Belvin; Kite, Kim A.; Petter, Jeffrey K.; Taylor, Brendan F.

    2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A power system for connecting a variable voltage power source, such as a power controller, with a plurality of energy storage devices, at least two of which have a different initial voltage than the output voltage of the variable voltage power source. The power system includes a controller that increases the output voltage of the variable voltage power source. When such output voltage is substantially equal to the initial voltage of a first one of the energy storage devices, the controller sends a signal that causes a switch to connect the variable voltage power source with the first one of the energy storage devices. The controller then causes the output voltage of the variable voltage power source to continue increasing. When the output voltage is substantially equal to the initial voltage of a second one of the energy storage devices, the controller sends a signal that causes a switch to connect the variable voltage power source with the second one of the energy storage devices.

  19. Hanford facility dangerous waste permit application, PUREX storage tunnels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haas, C. R.

    1997-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application is considered to be a single application organized into a General Information Portion (document number DOE/RL-91-28) and a Unit-Specific Portion. The scope of the Unit-Specific Portion is limited to Part B permit application documentation submitted for individual, `operating` treatment, storage, and/or disposal units, such as the PUREX Storage Tunnels (this document, DOE/RL-90-24).

  20. CHEMICAL STORAGE: MYTHS VERSUS REALITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, F

    2007-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A large number of resources explaining proper chemical storage are available. These resources include books, databases/tables, and articles that explain various aspects of chemical storage including compatible chemical storage, signage, and regulatory requirements. Another source is the chemical manufacturer or distributor who provides storage information in the form of icons or color coding schemes on container labels. Despite the availability of these resources, chemical accidents stemming from improper storage, according to recent reports (1) (2), make up almost 25% of all chemical accidents. This relatively high percentage of chemical storage accidents suggests that these publications and color coding schemes although helpful, still provide incomplete information that may not completely mitigate storage risks. This manuscript will explore some ways published storage information may be incomplete, examine the associated risks, and suggest methods to help further eliminate chemical storage risks.

  1. Solar Energy Collection and Management for Networked Infomechanical Systems (NIMS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Networked Sensing Solar Energy Collection and Management forProposed Solution: Solar Energy Harvesting Why is Solarbeing recharged • Solar energy harvesting and storage allow

  2. Optimization Online - Optimal management and sizing of energy ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavithra Harsha

    2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Jul 30, 2012 ... Optimal management and sizing of energy storage under dynamic pricing for the efficient integration of renewable energy. Pavithra Harsha ...

  3. TREATMENT SYSTEMS AN INTEGRATED APPROACH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heal, Kate

    for on-site management and treatment of effluent and solid waste 3. Provide for surface water attenuationECOLOGICAL TREATMENT SYSTEMS AN INTEGRATED APPROACH TO THE TREATMENT OF WASTE AND WASTE WATER biological removal efficiencies in excess of 95% Treatment system averages 92% reduction in suspended solids

  4. Removal plan for Shippingport pressurized water reactor core 2 blanket fuel assemblies form T plant to the canister storage building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lata

    1996-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the current strategy and path forward for removal of the Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor Core 2 blanket fuel assemblies from their existing storage configuration (wet storage within the T Plant canyon) and transport to the Canister Storage Building (designed and managed by the Spent Nuclear Fuel. Division). The removal plan identifies all processes, equipment, facility interfaces, and documentation (safety, permitting, procedures, etc.) required to facilitate the PWR Core 2 assembly removal (from T Plant), transport (to the Canister storage Building), and storage to the Canister Storage Building. The plan also provides schedules, associated milestones, and cost estimates for all handling activities.

  5. Evaluation of alternative treatments for spent fuel rod consolidation wastes and other miscellaneous commercial transuranic wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, W.A.; Schneider, K.J.; Oma, K.H.; Smith, R.I.; Bunnell, L.R.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Eight alternative treatments (and four subalternatives) are considered for both existing commercial transuranic wastes and future wastes from spent fuel consolidation. Waste treatment is assumed to occur at a hypothetical central treatment facility (a Monitored Retrieval Storage facility was used as a reference). Disposal in a geologic repository is also assumed. The cost, process characteristics, and waste form characteristics are evaluated for each waste treatment alternative. The evaluation indicates that selection of a high-volume-reduction alternative can save almost $1 billion in life-cycle costs for the management of transuranic and high-activity wastes from 70,000 MTU of spent fuel compared to the reference MRS process. The supercompaction, arc pyrolysis and melting, and maximum volume reduction alternatives are recommended for further consideration; the latter two are recommended for further testing and demonstration.

  6. Storage Ring Parameters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebookScholarshipSpiralingSecurity217,354 217,814 218,494StorageStorage

  7. Spent-fuel-storage alternatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Spent Fuel Storage Alternatives meeting was a technical forum in which 37 experts from 12 states discussed storage alternatives that are available or are under development. The subject matter was divided into the following five areas: techniques for increasing fuel storage density; dry storage of spent fuel; fuel characterization and conditioning; fuel storage operating experience; and storage and transport economics. Nineteen of the 21 papers which were presented at this meeting are included in this Proceedings. These have been abstracted and indexed. (ATT)

  8. Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Storage Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandian Spoke at the New York Energy Storage Expo On December 12, 2014, in Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Grid Integration, Infrastructure Security, News, News &...

  9. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High temperature underground thermal energy storage, inProceedings, Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Workshop:underground thermal energy storage, in ATES newsletter:

  10. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Coupled withconcept of thermal energy storage in aquifers was suggestedLow Temperature Thermal Energy Storage Program of Oak Ridge

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: DOE International Energy Storage...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    International Energy Storage Database Has Logged 420 Energy Storage Projects Worldwide with 123 GW of Installed Capacity DOE International Energy Storage Database Has Logged 420...

  12. Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tiles for thermal energy storage,” working paper, Colorado1991). Wallboard with latent heat storage for passive solarR. (2000). Thermal energy storage for space cooling, Pacific

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: Electricity Storage Handbook

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electricity Storage Handbook Published On July 31, 2013, in Energy, Energy Assurance, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Energy Surety, Grid Integration, Infrastructure...

  14. Nanostructured Materials for Energy Generation and Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Javed Miller

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Electrochemical Energy Storage Nanostructured ElectrodesCells for Energy Storage and Generation . . . . . . . . . .batteries and their energy storage efficiency. vii Contents

  15. NERSC Frontiers in Advanced Storage Technology Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Storage R&D Frontiers in Advanced Storage Technologies (FAST) project Working with vendors to develop new functionality in storage technologies generally not yet available to...

  16. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Coupled withAnnual Thermal Energy Storage Contractors' InformationLarge-Scale Thermal Energy Storage for Cogeneration and

  17. Nanostructured Materials for Energy Generation and Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Javed Miller

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of new energy generation and storage technologies arenew energy generation and storage technologies is importantBased Energy Storage and Generation Technologies The world

  18. Water Heaters (Storage Oil) | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Oil) Water Heaters (Storage Oil) Water Heater, Storage Oil - v1.0.xlsx More Documents & Publications Water Heaters (Tankless Electric) Water Heaters (Storage Electric)...

  19. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1978, High temperature underground thermal energy storage,in Proceedings, Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Workshop:High temperature underground thermal energy storage, in ATES

  20. NV Energy Electricity Storage Valuation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellison, James F.; Bhatnagar, Dhruv; Samaan, Nader A.; Jin, Chunlian

    2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examines how grid-level electricity storage may benet the operations of NV Energy in 2020, and assesses whether those benets justify the cost of the storage system. In order to determine how grid-level storage might impact NV Energy, an hourly production cost model of the Nevada Balancing Authority (\\BA") as projected for 2020 was built and used for the study. Storage facilities were found to add value primarily by providing reserve. Value provided by the provision of time-of-day shifting was found to be limited. If regulating reserve from storage is valued the same as that from slower ramp rate resources, then it appears that a reciprocating engine generator could provide additional capacity at a lower cost than a pumped storage hydro plant or large storage capacity battery system. In addition, a 25-MW battery storage facility would need to cost $650/kW or less in order to produce a positive Net Present Value (NPV). However, if regulating reserve provided by storage is considered to be more useful to the grid than that from slower ramp rate resources, then a grid-level storage facility may have a positive NPV even at today's storage system capital costs. The value of having storage provide services beyond reserve and time-of-day shifting was not assessed in this study, and was therefore not included in storage cost-benefit calculations.

  1. Underground pumped hydroelectric storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, R.D.; Doherty, T.J.; Kannberg, L.D.

    1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Underground pumped hydroelectric energy storage was conceived as a modification of surface pumped storage to eliminate dependence upon fortuitous topography, provide higher hydraulic heads, and reduce environmental concerns. A UPHS plant offers substantial savings in investment cost over coal-fired cycling plants and savings in system production costs over gas turbines. Potential location near load centers lowers transmission costs and line losses. Environmental impact is less than that for a coal-fired cycling plant. The inherent benefits include those of all pumped storage (i.e., rapid load response, emergency capacity, improvement in efficiency as pumps improve, and capacity for voltage regulation). A UPHS plant would be powered by either a coal-fired or nuclear baseload plant. The economic capacity of a UPHS plant would be in the range of 1000 to 3000 MW. This storage level is compatible with the load-leveling requirements of a greater metropolitan area with population of 1 million or more. The technical feasibility of UPHS depends upon excavation of a subterranean powerhouse cavern and reservoir caverns within a competent, impervious rock formation, and upon selection of reliable and efficient turbomachinery - pump-turbines and motor-generators - all remotely operable.

  2. Storage Ring | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Electron Storage Ring The 7-GeV electrons are injected into the 1104-m-circumference storage ring, a circle of more than 1,000 electromagnets and associated equipment, located...

  3. Chit-based Remote Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paluska, Justin Mazzola

    We propose a model for reliable remote storage founded on contract law. Consumers submit their bits to storage providers in exchange for a chit. A chit is a cryptographically secure, verifiable contract between a consumer ...

  4. Gaseous and Liquid Hydrogen Storage

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Today's state of the art for hydrogen storage includes 5,000- and 10,000-psi compressed gas tanks and cryogenic liquid hydrogen tanks for on-board hydrogen storage.

  5. Feasibility study: Assess the feasibility of siting a monitored retrievable storage facility. Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, J.W.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of phase one of this study are: To understand the waste management system and a monitored retrievable storage facility; and to determine whether the applicant has real interest in pursuing the feasibility assessment process. Contents of this report are: Generating electric power; facts about exposure to radiation; handling storage, and transportation techniques; description of a proposed monitored retrievable storage facility; and benefits to be received by host jurisdiction.

  6. PROGRAMMATIC ASSESSMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT NUCLEAR FUEL AND WASTE PROGRAMS. Operational Planning and Development (Activity No. AR OS 10 05 K; ONL-WN06)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Gilbert/Commonwealth (G/C) has performed an assessment of the waste management operations at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The objective of this study was to review radioactive waste management as practiced at ORNL and to recommend improvements or alternatives for further study. The study involved: 1) an on-site survey of ORNL radioactive waste management operations; 2) a review of radioactive waste source data, records, and regulatory requirements; 3) an assessment of existing and planned treatment, storage, and control facilities; and 4) identification of alternatives for improving waste management operations. Information for this study was obtained from both personal interviews and written reports. The G/C suggestions for improving ORNL waste management operations are summarized. Regulatory requirements governing ORNL waste management operations are discussed. Descriptions and discussions of the radioactive liquid, solid, and gaseous waste systems are presented. The waste operations control complex is discussed.

  7. Silo Storage Preconceptual Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephanie L. Austad; Patrick W. Bragassa; Kevin M Croft; David S Ferguson; Scott C Gladson; Annette L Shafer; John H Weathersby

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has a need to develop and field a low-cost option for the long-term storage of a variety of radiological material. The storage option’s primary requirement is to provide both environmental and physical protection of the materials. Design criteria for this effort require a low initial cost and minimum maintenance over a 50-year design life. In 1999, Argonne National Laboratory-West was tasked with developing a dry silo storage option for the BN-350 Spent Fuel in Aktau Kazakhstan. Argon’s design consisted of a carbon steel cylinder approximately 16 ft long, 18 in. outside diameter and 0.375 in. wall thickness. The carbon steel silo was protected from corrosion by a duplex coating system consisting of zinc and epoxy. Although the study indicated that the duplex coating design would provide a design life well in excess of the required 50 years, the review board was concerned because of the novelty of the design and the lack of historical use. In 2012, NNSA tasked Idaho National Laboratory (INL) with reinvestigating the silo storage concept and development of alternative corrosion protection strategies. The 2012 study, “Silo Storage Concepts, Cathodic Protection Options Study” (INL/EST-12-26627), concludes that the option which best fits the design criterion is a passive cathotic protection scheme, consisting of a carbon steel tube coated with zinc or a zinc-aluminum alloy encapsulated in either concrete or a cement grout. The hot dipped zinc coating option was considered most efficient, but the flame-sprayed option could be used if a thicker zinc coating was determined to be necessary.

  8. Webinar: Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video recording and text version of the webinar titled, Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements, originally presented on June 25, 2013.

  9. The Power of Energy Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadoulet, Elisabeth

    The Power of Energy Storage How to Increase Deployment in California to Reduce Greenhouse Gas;1Berkeley Law \\ UCLA Law The Power of Energy Storage: How to Increase Deployment in California to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions Executive Summary: Expanding Energy Storage in California Sunshine and wind, even

  10. HIERARCHICAL STORAGE SYSTEMS FOR INTERACTIVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobagi, Fouad

    HIERARCHICAL STORAGE SYSTEMS FOR INTERACTIVE VIDEO­ON­DEMAND Shueng­Han Gary Chan and Fouad A; Hierarchical Storage Systems for Interactive Video­On­Demand Shueng­Han Gary Chan and Fouad A. Tobagi Technical­9040 pubs@shasta.stanford.edu Abstract On­demand video servers based on hierarchical storage systems

  11. GETTING CARBON CAPTURE AND STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haszeldine, Stuart

    GETTING CARBON CAPTURE AND STORAGE TECHNOLOGIES TO MARKET BREAKING THE DEADLOCK Report of a Science: Carbon Capture and Storage © OECD/IEA 2009, fig. 1, p. 6 Figures 2 and 3 reprinted with permission from `UK Carbon storage and capture, where is it?' by Stuart Haszeldine, Professor of Carbon Capture

  12. Normal matter storage of antiprotons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, L.J.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Various simple issues connected with the possible storage of anti p in relative proximity to normal matter are discussed. Although equilibrium storage looks to be impossible, condensed matter systems are sufficiently rich and controllable that nonequilibrium storage is well worth pursuing. Experiments to elucidate the anti p interactions with normal matter are suggested. 32 refs.

  13. Above Ground Storage Tank (AST) Inspection Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    Above Ground Storage Tank (AST) Inspection Form Petroleum Bulk Storage Form Facility Name.ehs.cornell.edu/env/bulk-material-storage/petroleum-bulk-storage/Documents/AST_Inspection_Form.pdf #12;

  14. Panel 4, Hydrogen Energy Storage Policy Considerations

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Storage Policy Considerations Hydrogen Storage Workshop Jeffrey Reed Southern California Gas Company May 15, 2014 0 Methane is a Great Storage Medium 1 SoCalGas' storage...

  15. Central Storage for Unsealed Radioactive Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    Central Storage for Unsealed Radioactive Materials Radiation Safety Form PERMIT HOLDER NAME:______________________________ PHONE #: ____________________________ ADDRESS/DEPT.: _______________________________ Storage Location: Refrigerator Freezer Dry Storage List each item being transferred to storage separately: EH&S LAB WIPE SURVEY

  16. Predictive control and thermal energy storage for optimizing a multi-energy district boiler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Predictive control and thermal energy storage for optimizing a multi- energy district boiler Julien energy storage. 1. Introduction Managing energy demand, promoting renewable energy and finding ways of the OptiEnR research project, the present paper deals with optimizing the multi-energy district boiler

  17. Coal laboratory characterisation for CO2 geological storage E.C. Gaucher1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Coal laboratory characterisation for CO2 geological storage E.C. Gaucher1 *, P.D.C. Défossez1 storage of CO2 in unmineable coal seams could be a very interesting option in the sustainable management of coal basins. However, the various chemical and physical parameters that determine the success

  18. Production Planning and Inventories Optimization : A Backward Approach in the Convex Storage Cost Case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Production Planning and Inventories Optimization : A Backward Approach in the Convex Storage Cost : Production planning, inventory management, integro-differential backward equations. 1 #12;Introduction We, and by the cost of storage of the current inventories. Our approach of this production planning and inventory

  19. NANO-DEVICES FOR ENHANCED C S SCOOLING, STORAGE AND SENSING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banerjee, Debjyoti

    NANO-DEVICES FOR ENHANCED C S SCOOLING, STORAGE AND SENSING Debjyoti Banerjee, Ph device for nano-optics ­ Thermal Management (3 Ph.D., 2 M.S.) · Nanostructures· Nanostructures ­ ONR-On-Chip: ­ AFRL: Portable water quality monitor ­ DARPA/MF3: Micro-Chamber Filling » (1) Vaccine Storage/ Paper

  20. A VRLA battery energy storage system for Metlakatla, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, N.W.; Zrebiec, R.S.; Delmerico, R.W. [GE Power Systems Engineering, Schenectady, NY (United States); Hunt, G. [GNB Industrial Battery, Lombard, IL (United States); Achenbach, H.A. [Metlakatla Power and Light, AK (United States)

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The emergence of new power electronics and improved battery technology has created renewed interest in Battery Energy Storage Systems (BESS). These new systems provide electric utilities with alternatives to conventional storage technologies, such as pumped hydro. BESs has the potential to provide substantial benefits in terms of energy management, improved voltage, spinning reserve and protection from interruptions when compared to large centralized storage. This paper describes a commercial, economically justified, application of the new Battery Energy Storage Systems which is presently under construction in the Metlakatla Power and Light system. The paper outlines the system performance requirements which lead to consideration of BESS as an option; the economic factors which provided the justification for BESS as an economic alternative; and the overall BES system design and performance.

  1. Handbook of environmental management and technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmes, G. (Doucet and Mainka, Peekskill, NY (United States)); Singh, B.R. (Environmental Protection Agency, New York, NY (United States)); Theodore, L. (Manhattan Coll., Riverdale, NY (United States))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The book is divided into six parts. Part 1 provides an introduction to background issues such as regulatory approaches, international effects of pollution, and sources of pollutants. Part 2 covers issues related to air pollution. Dispersion and control of pollutants is discussed, as well as the popular topics of acid rain and the greenhouse effect. The relatively new topic of indoor air quality is also described. Part 3 is devoted to dispersion of pollutants in water systems and control and treatment of wastewaters. Solid and hazardous waste management issues are covered in Part 4. The general topics of municipal, medical, and hazardous waste control programs are introduced in the first portion of this section. Five individual hazardous pollutants are then discussed: underground storage tanks, asbestos, household hazardous waste, used oil, and metals. Part 5 addresses the miscellaneous areas of noise pollution, domestic and architectural considerations, pollution prevention approaches, and energy conservation. Finally, Part 6 is devoted to issues faced daily by management. Concerns regarding worker training and safety, emergency management, and monitoring of background levels of contaminants are addressed. The topic of risk assessment is introduced, and methods for environmental and risk communication are presented. Economic considerations are discussed, because in many instances this factor plays an ultimate determination on how an environmental management program will proceed. Individual chapters are processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  2. High Performance Computing Managing world-class supercomputing centers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - 1 - High Performance Computing Managing world-class supercomputing centers Read caption Leader The High Performance Computing (HPC) Division supports the Laboratory mission by managing world high performance computing, storage, and emerging data-intensive information science production systems

  3. Monitored Retrievable Storage System Requirements Document. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Monitored Retrievable Storage System Requirements Document (MRS-SRD) describes the functions to be performed and technical requirements for a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility subelement and the On-Site Transfer and Storage (OSTS) subelement. The MRS facility subelement provides for temporary storage, at a Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) operated site, of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) contained in an NRC-approved Multi-Purpose Canister (MPC) storage mode, or other NRC-approved storage modes. The OSTS subelement provides for transfer and storage, at Purchaser sites, of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) contained in MPCs. Both the MRS facility subelement and the OSTS subelement are in support of the CRWMS. The purpose of the MRS-SRD is to define the top-level requirements for the development of the MRS facility and the OSTS. These requirements include design, operation, and decommissioning requirements to the extent they impact on the physical development of the MRS facility and the OSTS. The document also presents an overall description of the MRS facility and the OSTS, their functions (derived by extending the functional analysis documented by the Physical System Requirements (PSR) Store Waste Document), their segments, and the requirements allocated to the segments. In addition, the top-level interface requirements of the MRS facility and the OSTS are included. As such, the MRS-SRD provides the technical baseline for the MRS Safety Analysis Report (SAR) design and the OSTS Safety Analysis Report design.

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Storage Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reserve University On January 28, 2014, in Computational Modeling & Simulation, Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Infrastructure Security, Materials Science,...

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Storage Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Center for Infrastructure Research and Innovation (CIRI), Energy, Energy Assurance, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Facilities, Infrastructure Security, Materials...

  6. Project Profile: Thermochemical Storage with Anhydrous Ammonia...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Storage with Anhydrous Ammonia: Optimizing the Synthesis Reactor for Direct Production of Supercritical Steam Project Profile: Thermochemical Storage with Anhydrous...

  7. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1975. Underground Storage of Treated Water: A Field Test.1975. "Underground Storage of Treated Water: A Field Test,"

  8. Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction Workshop Addendum Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction Workshop Addendum Document states additional...

  9. Combinatorial Approaches for Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Approaches for Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation) Combinatorial Approaches for Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation) Presentation on NIST Combinatorial Methods at the...

  10. Realization of the German Concept for Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel - Current Situation and Prospects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomauske, B. R.

    2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The German government has determined a phase out of nuclear power. With respect to the management of spent fuel it was decided to terminate transports to reprocessing plants by 2005 and to set up interim storage facilities on power plant sites. This paper gives an overview of the German concept for spent fuel management focused on the new on-site interim storage concept and the applied interim storage facilities. Since the end of the year 1998, the utilities have applied for permission of on-site interim storage in 13 storage facilities and 5 storage areas; one application for the interim storage facility Stade was withdrawn due to the planned final shut down of Stade nuclear power plant in autumn 2003. In 2001 and 2002, 3 on-site storage areas and 2 on-site storage facilities for spent fuel were licensed by the Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS). A main task in 2002 and 2003 has been the examination of the safety and security of the planned interim storage facilities and the verification of the licensing prerequisites. In the aftermath of September 11, 2001, BfS has also examined the attack with a big passenger airplane. Up to now, these aircraft crash analyses have been performed for three on-site interim storage facilities; the fundamental results will be presented. It is the objective of BfS to conclude the licensing procedures for the applied on-site interim storage facilities in 2003. With an assumed construction period for the storage buildings of about two years, the on-site interim storage facilities could then be available in the year 2005.

  11. State-of-the-Art Thermal Energy Storage Retrofit at a Large Manufacturing Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiorino, D.

    This paper will describe the existing conditions, strategic planning, feasibility study, economic analysis, design, specification, construction, and project management for the 2.9 megawatt “full shift” chilled water thermal energy storage retrofit...

  12. Thermal Energy Storage: It's not Just for Electric Cost Savings Anymore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrepont, J. S.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large cool Thermal Energy Storage (TES), typically ice TES or chilled water (CHW) TES, has traditionally been thought of, and used for, managing time-of-day electricity use to reduce the cost associated with electric energy and demand charges...

  13. REPORT OF SURVEY OF OAK RIDGE BUILDING 3597 HOT STORAGE GARDEN

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    REPORT OF SURVEY OF OAK RIDGE BUILDING 3597 HOT STORAGE GARDEN U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management & Office of Science Report of Survey of Oak Ridge...

  14. Preconceptual design for a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) transfer facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woods, W.D.; Jowdy, A.K. (Parsons (Ralph M.) Co., Pasadena, CA (USA)); Smith, R.I. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The contract between the DOE and the utilities specifies that the DOE will receive spent fuel from the nuclear utilities in 1998. This study investigates the feasibility of employing a simple Transfer Facility which can be constructed quickly, and operate while the full-scale MRS facilities are being constructed. The Transfer Facility is a hot cell designed only for the purpose of transferring spent fuel assemblies from the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) transport casks (shipped from the utility sites) into onsite concrete storage casks. No operational functions other than spent fuel assembly transfers and the associated cask handling, opening, and closing would be performed in this facility. Radioactive waste collected in the Transfer Facility during operations would be stored until the treatment facilities in the full-scale MRS facility became operational, approximately 2 years after the Transfer Facility started operation. An alternate wherein the Transfer Facility was the only waste handling building on the MRS site was also examined and evaluated. 6 figs., 26 tabs.

  15. Management Plan Management Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plan, Management Plan Page MP­ 1 #12;Management Plan water quality standards, instream flows, privateManagement Plan Management Plan "Management and restoration programs for native salmonids have communities" J. Lichatowich et al. 1998. A Conceptual Foundation for the Management of Native Salmonids

  16. Commercial experience with facility deactivation to safe storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sype, T.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fischer, S.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Lee, J.H. Jr.; Sanchez, L.C.; Ottinger, C.A.; Pirtle, G.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has shutdown many production reactors; the Department has begun a major effort to also shutdown a wide variety of other nuclear facilities. Because so many facilities are being closed, it is necessary to place many of them into a safe- storage status, i.e., deactivation, before conducting decommissioning- for perhaps as long as 20 years. The challenge is to achieve this safe-storage condition in a cost-effective manner while remaining in compliance with applicable regulations. The DOE Office of Environmental Management, Office of Transition and Management, commissioned a lessons-learned study of commercial experience with safe storage and decommissioning. Although the majority of the commercial experience has been with reactors, many of the lessons learned presented in this document can provide insight into transitioning challenges that Will be faced by the DOE weapons complex.

  17. Nanoscale data storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. C. Li

    2007-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The object of this article is to review the development of ultrahigh-density, nanoscale data storage, i.e., nanostorage. As a fundamentally new type of storage system, the recording mechanisms of nanostorage may be completely different to those of the traditional devices. Currently, two types of molecules are being studied for potential application in nanostorage. One is molecular electronic elements including molecular wires, rectifiers, switches, and transistors. The other approach employs nanostructured materials such as nanotubes, nanowires, and nanoparticles. The challenges for nanostorage are not only the materials, ultrahigh data-densities, fabrication-costs, device operating temperatures and large-scale integration, but also the development of the physical principles and models. There are already some breakthroughs obtained, but it is still unclear what kind of nanostorage systems can ultimately replace the current silicon based transistors. A promising candidate may be a molecular-nanostructure hybrid device with sub-5 nm dimensions.

  18. Superconducting magnetic energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassenzahl, W.

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent programmatic developments in Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) have prompted renewed and widespread interest in this field. In mid 1987 the Defense Nuclear Agency, acting for the Strategic Defense Initiative Office, issued a request for proposals for the design and construction of SMES Engineering Test Model (ETM). Two teams, one led by Bechtel and the other by Ebasco, are now engaged in the first phase of the development of a 10 to 20 MWhr ETM. This report presents the rationale for energy storage on utility systems, describes the general technology of SMES, and explains the chronological development of the technology. The present ETM program is outlined; details of the two projects for ETM development are described in other papers in these proceedings. The impact of high T/sub c/ materials on SMES is discussed. 69 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. HYDROGEN USAGE AND STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    It is thought that it will be useful to inform society and people who are interested in hydrogen energy. The study below has been prepared due to this aim can be accepted as an article to exchange of information between people working on this subject. This study has been presented to reader to be utilized as a “technical note”. Main Energy sources coal, petroleum and natural gas are the fossil fuels we use today. They are going to be exhausted since careless usage in last decades through out the world, and human being is going to face the lack of energy sources in the near future. On the other hand as the fossil fuels pollute the environment makes the hydrogen important for an alternative energy source against to the fossil fuels. Due to the slow progress in hydrogen’s production, storage and converting into electrical energy experience, extensive usage of Hydrogen can not find chance for applications in wide technological practices. Hydrogen storage stands on an important point in the development of Hydrogen energy Technologies. Hydrogen is volumetrically low energy concentration fuel. Hydrogen energy, to meet the energy quantity necessary for the nowadays technologies and to be accepted economically and physically against fossil fuels, Hydrogen storage technologies have to be developed in this manner. Today the most common method in hydrogen storage may be accepted as the high pressurized composite tanks. Hydrogen is stored as liquid or gaseous phases. Liquid hydrogen phase can be stored by using composite tanks under very high pressure conditions. High technology composite material products which are durable to high pressures, which should not be affected by hydrogen embrittlement and chemical conditions.[1

  20. UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY, SYDNEY PRIVACY MANAGEMENT PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University of Technology, Sydney

    1 UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY, SYDNEY PRIVACY MANAGEMENT PLAN Title: A Management Plan to comply a Privacy Management Plan in operation by the effective date. A Plan is a statement of how the agency storage (such as paper files) but also electronic records, video recordings, biometric information

  1. Maui energy storage study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellison, James; Bhatnagar, Dhruv; Karlson, Benjamin

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report investigates strategies to mitigate anticipated wind energy curtailment on Maui, with a focus on grid-level energy storage technology. The study team developed an hourly production cost model of the Maui Electric Company (MECO) system, with an expected 72 MW of wind generation and 15 MW of distributed photovoltaic (PV) generation in 2015, and used this model to investigate strategies that mitigate wind energy curtailment. It was found that storage projects can reduce both wind curtailment and the annual cost of producing power, and can do so in a cost-effective manner. Most of the savings achieved in these scenarios are not from replacing constant-cost diesel-fired generation with wind generation. Instead, the savings are achieved by the more efficient operation of the conventional units of the system. Using additional storage for spinning reserve enables the system to decrease the amount of spinning reserve provided by single-cycle units. This decreases the amount of generation from these units, which are often operated at their least efficient point (at minimum load). At the same time, the amount of spinning reserve from the efficient combined-cycle units also decreases, allowing these units to operate at higher, more efficient levels.

  2. Successful Waste Treatment Methods at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rast, D.M.; Thompson, J.J.; Cooper, T.W.; Stockham, D.J

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the remediation of the waste landfills at Sandia National Laboratory in Albuquerque, New Mexico nine drums of mock high explosives were generated. This mixed waste stream was proposed to several offsite vendors for treatment and prices ranged from $2.50 to $10 per gram a total cost estimated to be in excess of $2 million dollars. This cost represents more than 30 percent of the annual budget for the Sandia Waste Management Operations. Concentrated solutions of common oxidizers, such as nitrates, nitrites, and peroxides, will also act as oxidizers and will give positive results in the Hazard Categorization oxidizer test. These solutions carry an EPA Hazardous Waste Number D001, Ignitable Waste, and Oxidizer as defined in 49 CFR 173.151. Sandia decided that given budget and time constraints to meet a Federal Facilities Compliance Act milestone, a process for onsite treatment should be evaluated. Clean samples of mock high explosive materials were obtained from Pantex excess inventory and treatability studies initiated to develop a treatment formula and process. The following process was developed and implemented in the summer of 2006: - Size reduction to allow for dissolution of the barium nitrate in water; - Dissolution of the Mock HE in water; - Deactivation of the oxidizer; - Stabilization of the barium and the cadmium contamination present as an underlying hazardous constituent. This project was completed and the treatment milestone achieved for less than $300,000. The Disassembly Sanitization Operation (DSO) is a process that was implemented to support weapon disassembly and disposition using recycling and waste minimization while achieving the demilitarization mission. The Department of Energy is faced with disassembling and disposition of a huge inventory of retired weapons, components, training equipment, spare parts, and weapon maintenance equipment. Environmental regulations have caused a dramatic increase for information needed to support the disposal and handling of these parts and materials. Manufacturing information from past decades often does not meet the needs for regulatory decisions of today to assure proper management of weapons components. Huge inventories of classified weapon components were required to have long-term storage at Sandia and many other locations throughout the complex. These materials are stored because they are classified, they may also contain radiological and/or hazardous components and disposal options may not have existed for this material. Long-term storage is costly and somewhat problematic. It requires a secured storage area, monitoring, auditing and it also has the potential for loss or theft of this material. Overall recycling rates for materials sent through the DSO process have enabled 70 to 80% of these components to be recycled. These components are made to extreme standards and are made of high quality materials. Once the material has been sanitized, the demand for these metals is very high. The DSO process for the NGPF classified components established the credibility of this technique as a viable process for addressing the long-term storage requirements of classified weapons component inventory. The success of this operation has generated interest from other Sandia Organization other locations throughout the complex. Other organizations are soliciting the help of the DSO team and the DSO is responding to these solicitations by expanding its scope to include work for other projects. For example, Pantex has asked the DSO team to assist with the destruction of their classified components. The operation is full scale and continues to grow and serve SNL/NM and DoE by providing a solution to this evolving issue. On an ongoing basis, SNL has been incurring expenses for the management and storage of classified components. It is estimated that this project will save the DoE and Sandia several hundreds of thousands of dollars until the excess inventory is eliminated. This innovative approach eliminates the need for long-term storage of classified weapons components and the

  3. Utility -Owned Central Plant Load Management at the Domain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lilley, D.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dennis Lilley, CEM, PMP Customer Energy Solutions, Austin Energy Mission: Deliver clean, affordable, reliable energy and excellent customer service. Utility Owned Load Management – Thermal Energy Storage ESL-KT-13-12-12 CATEE 2013: Clean Air... District – Ice Storage • Two (2) localized plants – Chilled Water Storage • An estimated 112,000 ton-hours of storage capacity 4 Austin Energy – Thermal Utility ESL-KT-13-12-12 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas...

  4. Bocconea 7 -1997 219 Some lessons drawn from twelve years of dynamic management of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of these collections are maintained in the form of seed samples, kept in cold storage, in genebanks, e.g. those managed are protected in cold storage rooms or freezers, parasites evolve and the climate may change. These resources

  5. Modeling Hydrogen Generation Rates in the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Camaioni, Donald M.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Hallen, Richard T.; Sherwood, David J.; Stock, Leon M.

    2004-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation describes a project in which Hanford Site and Environmental Management Science Program investigators addressed issues concerning hydrogen generation rates in the Hanford waste treatment and immobilization plant. The hydrogen generation rates of radioactive wastes must be estimated to provide for safe operations. While an existing model satisfactorily predicts rates for quiescent wastes in Hanford underground storage tanks, pretreatment operations will alter the conditions and chemical composition of these wastes. Review of the treatment process flowsheet identified specific issues requiring study to ascertain whether the model would provide conservative values for waste streams in the plant. These include effects of adding hydroxide ion, alpha radiolysis, saturation with air (oxygen) from pulse-jet mixing, treatment with potassium permanganate, organic compounds from degraded ion exchange resins and addition of glass-former chemicals. The effects were systematically investigated through literature review, technical analyses and experimental work.

  6. Depleted uranium management alternatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hertzler, T.J.; Nishimoto, D.D.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report evaluates two management alternatives for Department of Energy depleted uranium: continued storage as uranium hexafluoride, and conversion to uranium metal and fabrication to shielding for spent nuclear fuel containers. The results will be used to compare the costs with other alternatives, such as disposal. Cost estimates for the continued storage alternative are based on a life-cycle of 27 years through the year 2020. Cost estimates for the recycle alternative are based on existing conversion process costs and Capital costs for fabricating the containers. Additionally, the recycle alternative accounts for costs associated with intermediate product resale and secondary waste disposal for materials generated during the conversion process.

  7. antiretroviral treatment adherence: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sessions in a Randomized Field Trial of Case Management: The Criminal JusticeDrug Abuse Treatment Studies Transitional Case Management Study University of California...

  8. Reducing Energy Consumption of Disk Storage Using PowerAware Cache Qingbo Zhu, Francis M. David, Christo F. Devaraj, Zhenmin Li, Yuanyuan Zhou and Pei Cao*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yuanyuan

    Reducing Energy Consumption of Disk Storage Using Power­Aware Cache Management Qingbo Zhu, Francis implications. Among various components of a data center, storage is one of the biggest consumers of energy. A recent indus­ try report [1] shows that storage devices account for almost 27% of the total energy

  9. Reducing Energy Consumption of Disk Storage Using Power-Aware Cache Qingbo Zhu, Francis M. David, Christo F. Devaraj, Zhenmin Li, Yuanyuan Zhou and Pei Cao*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yuanyuan

    Reducing Energy Consumption of Disk Storage Using Power-Aware Cache Management Qingbo Zhu, Francis various components of a data center, storage is one of the biggest consumers of energy. A recent indus- try report [1] shows that storage devices account for almost 27% of the total energy consumed

  10. The Metropolitan Surface Water Management Act (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Metropolitan Surface Water Management Act aims to protect, preserve, and use natural, surface, and groundwater storage and retention systems; identify and plan for means to improve and protect...

  11. Asset Management Equipment Disposal Form -Refrigerant Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sin, Peter

    Asset Management Equipment Disposal Form - Refrigerant Recovery Safe Disposal Requirements Under refrigeration, cold storage warehouse refrigeration, chillers, and industrial process refrigeration) has to have the refrigerant recovered in accordance with EPA's requirements for servicing. However, equipment that typically

  12. GARS ESH Management Review GARS Research Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    with their ESH Coordinator. #12;Environmental Aspects and OSH Hazards Environmental Aspects · Industrial Waste · Hazardous Waste · Mixed Waste · Radioactive Waste · Atmospheric Discharges · Liquid Fischarges · Storage No Findings. 5 Records Management April 2012 OFI ­ identification & inventory of electronic records needs

  13. Methods of forming thermal management systems and thermal management methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gering, Kevin L.; Haefner, Daryl R.

    2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal management system for a vehicle includes a heat exchanger having a thermal energy storage material provided therein, a first coolant loop thermally coupled to an electrochemical storage device located within the first coolant loop and to the heat exchanger, and a second coolant loop thermally coupled to the heat exchanger. The first and second coolant loops are configured to carry distinct thermal energy transfer media. The thermal management system also includes an interface configured to facilitate transfer of heat generated by an internal combustion engine to the heat exchanger via the second coolant loop in order to selectively deliver the heat to the electrochemical storage device. Thermal management methods are also provided.

  14. Neutrino signals in electron-capture storage-ring experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avraham Gal

    2015-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino signals in electron-capture storage-ring experiments at GSI are reconsidered, with special emphasis placed on the quasi-circular motion of the daughter ions in two-body decays. Whereas parent-ion decay rates cannot exhibit modulation with the several-second period reported in these experiments, the time evolution of the detected daughter ions is shown to produce oscillations that under certain conditions may provide resolution of the `GSI Oscillations' puzzle. New dedicated storage-ring or trap experiments could look up for these oscillations.

  15. Use of Treated Municipal Wastewater as Power Plant Cooling System Makeup Water: Tertiary Treatment versus Expanded Chemical Regimen for Recirculating Water Quality Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Dzombak; Radisav Vidic; Amy Landis

    2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Treated municipal wastewater is a common, widely available alternative source of cooling water for thermoelectric power plants across the U.S. However, the biodegradable organic matter, ammonia-nitrogen, carbonate and phosphates in the treated wastewater pose challenges with respect to enhanced biofouling, corrosion, and scaling, respectively. The overall objective of this study was to evaluate the benefits and life cycle costs of implementing tertiary treatment of secondary treated municipal wastewater prior to use in recirculating cooling systems. The study comprised bench- and pilot-scale experimental studies with three different tertiary treated municipal wastewaters, and life cycle costing and environmental analyses of various tertiary treatment schemes. Sustainability factors and metrics for reuse of treated wastewater in power plant cooling systems were also evaluated. The three tertiary treated wastewaters studied were: secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected to acid addition for pH control (MWW_pH); secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected to nitrification and sand filtration (MWW_NF); and secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected nitrification, sand filtration, and GAC adsorption (MWW_NFG). Tertiary treatment was determined to be essential to achieve appropriate corrosion, scaling, and biofouling control for use of secondary treated municipal wastewater in power plant cooling systems. The ability to control scaling, in particular, was found to be significantly enhanced with tertiary treated wastewater compared to secondary treated wastewater. MWW_pH treated water (adjustment to pH 7.8) was effective in reducing scale formation, but increased corrosion and the amount of biocide required to achieve appropriate biofouling control. Corrosion could be adequately controlled with tolytriazole addition (4-5 ppm TTA), however, which was the case for all of the tertiary treated waters. For MWW_NF treated water, the removal of ammonia by nitrification helped to reduce the corrosivity and biocide demand. Also, the lower pH and alkalinity resulting from nitrification reduced the scaling to an acceptable level, without the addition of anti-scalant chemicals. Additional GAC adsorption treatment, MWW_NFG, yielded no net benefit. Removal of organic matter resulted in pitting corrosion in copper and cupronickel alloys. Negligible improvement was observed in scaling control and biofouling control. For all of the tertiary treatments, biofouling control was achievable, and most effectively with pre-formed monochloramine (2-3 ppm) in comparison with NaOCl and ClO2. Life cycle cost (LCC) analyses were performed for the tertiary treatment systems studied experimentally and for several other treatment options. A public domain conceptual costing tool (LC3 model) was developed for this purpose. MWW_SF (lime softening and sand filtration) and MWW_NF were the most cost-effective treatment options among the tertiary treatment alternatives considered because of the higher effluent quality with moderate infrastructure costs and the relatively low doses of conditioning chemicals required. Life cycle inventory (LCI) analysis along with integration of external costs of emissions with direct costs was performed to evaluate relative emissions to the environment and external costs associated with construction and operation of tertiary treatment alternatives. Integrated LCI and LCC analysis indicated that three-tiered treatment alternatives such as MWW_NSF and MWW_NFG, with regular chemical addition for treatment and conditioning and/or regeneration, tend to increase the impact costs and in turn the overall costs of tertiary treatment. River water supply and MWW_F alternatives with a single step of tertiary treatment were associated with lower impact costs, but the contribution of impact costs to overall annual costs was higher than all other treatment alternatives. MWW_NF and MWW_SF alternatives exhibited moderate external impact costs with moderate infrastructure and chemical conditioner dosing, which makes them (especially

  16. Systems analysis of thermal storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copeland, R.J.

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During FY 1981, analyses were conducted on thermal storage concepts for solar thermal applications. These studies include estimates of both the obtainable costs of thermal storage concepts and their worth to a user (i.e., value). Based on obtainable costs and performance, an in-depth study evaluated thermal storage concepts for water/steam, organic fluid, and gas/Brayton solar thermal receivers. Promising and nonpromising concepts were identified. A study to evaluate thermal storage concepts for a liquid metal receiver was initiated. The value of thermal storage in a solar thermal industrial process heat application was analyzed. Several advanced concepts are being studied, including ground-mounted thermal storage for parabolic dishes with Stirling engines.

  17. Entanglement Storage Units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Caneva; T. Calarco; S. Montangero

    2012-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a protocol based on optimal control to drive many body quantum systems into long-lived entangled states, protected from decoherence by big energy gaps, without requiring any apriori knowledge of the system. With this approach it is possible to implement scalable entanglement-storage units. We test the protocol in the Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick model, a prototype many-body quantum system that describes different experimental setups, and in the ordered Ising chain, a model representing a possible implementation of a quantum bus.

  18. Interim storage study report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rawlins, J.K.

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-level radioactive waste (HLW) stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) in the form of calcine and liquid and liquid sodium-bearing waste (SBW) will be processed to provide a stable waste form and prepare the waste to be transported to a permanent repository. Because a permanent repository will not be available when the waste is processed, the waste must be stored at ICPP in an Interim Storage Facility (ISF). This report documents consideration of an ISF for each of the waste processing options under consideration.

  19. Multiported storage devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grande, Marcus Bryan

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of niultiported storage device 3 Linux file I/O subsystem 4 Windows NT layered I/O driver model 10 15 5 Location of multiported module in I/O stack 17 6 The bulfer cache . . . 20 7 Queuing of I/O requests 8 Processing of I/O requests by smart blkfiltcr 9... Registering of filter applet via Linux stacked module mechanism . 21 22 . . 26 10 Table of registered filter applets (functions) . . 27 11 Overhead due to presence of smart blkfilter alone . 12 Overhead of smart blkfilter using rot13 filter port 31 33...

  20. Storage | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you sure you want toworldPower 2010 1 TNews & Solar Solar How much doStorage

  1. Warehouse and Storage Buildings

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,397 125 Q 69 (Million Cubic58 810 0 0349,980Warehouse and Storage

  2. Storage Ring Parameters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary900Steep SlopeStochastic Weekly DownloadRegionalStorage Ring

  3. Sandia Energy - Energy Storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand RequirementsCoatingsUltra-High-Voltage SiliconEnergy Council ExecutivegeochemStorage

  4. Storage Ring Parameters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebookScholarshipSpiralingSecurity217,354 217,814 218,494Storage Ring

  5. Storage Ring Parameters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebookScholarshipSpiralingSecurity217,354 217,814 218,494Storage

  6. NERSC HPSS Storage Statistics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your1AllocationsNOVA Portal: Submit2014ftp ftp Storage Trends

  7. Safety of interim storage solutions of used nuclear fuel during extended term

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shelton, C.; Bader, S.; Issard, H.; Arslan, M. [AREVA, 7135 Minstrel Way, Suite 300 Columbia, MD 21045 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2013, the total amount of stored used nuclear fuel (UNF) in the world will reach 225,000 T HM. The UNF inventory in wet storage will take up over 80% of the available total spent fuel pool (SFP) capacity. Interim storage solutions are needed. They give flexibility to the nuclear operators and ensure that nuclear reactors continue to operate. However, we need to keep in mind that they are also an easy way to differ final decision and implementation of a UNF management approach (recycling or final disposal). In term of public perception, they can have a negative impact overtime as it may appear that nuclear industry may have significant issues to resolve. In countries lacking an integrated UNF management approach, the UNF are being discharged from the SFPs to interim storage (mostly to dry storage) at the same rate as UNF is being discharged from reactors, as the SFPs at the reactor sites are becoming full. This is now the case in USA, Taiwan, Switzerland, Spain, South Africa and Germany. For interim storage, AREVA has developed different solutions in order to allow the continued operation of reactors while meeting the current requirements of Safety Authorities: -) Dry storage canisters on pads, -) Dual-purpose casks (dry storage and transportation), -) Vault dry storage, and -) Centralized pool storage.

  8. Thermal management systems and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gering, Kevin L.; Haefner, Daryl R.

    2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal management system for a vehicle includes a heat exchanger having a thermal energy storage material provided therein, a first coolant loop thermally coupled to an electrochemical storage device located within the first coolant loop and to the heat exchanger, and a second coolant loop thermally coupled to the heat exchanger. The first and second coolant loops are configured to carry distinct thermal energy transfer media. The thermal management system also includes an interface configured to facilitate transfer of heat generated by an internal combustion engine to the heat exchanger via the second coolant loop in order to selectively deliver the heat to the electrochemical storage device. Thermal management methods are also provided.

  9. Technology development for DOE SNF management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hale, D.L. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Einziger, R.E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Murphy, J.R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the process used to identify technology development needs for the same management of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in the US Department of Energy (DOE) inventory. Needs were assessed for each of the over 250 fuel types stores at DOE sites around the country for each stage of SNF management--existing storage, transportation, interim storage, and disposal. The needs were then placed into functional groupings to facilitate integration and collaboration among the sites.

  10. Solid Waste Management Written Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    Solid Waste Management Program Written Program Cornell University 8/28/2012 #12;Solid Waste.................................................................... 4 4.2.1 Compost Solid Waste Treatment Facility.................................................................... 4 4.2.2 Pathological Solid Waste Treatment Facility

  11. Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Sludge Treatment Proiject, September 17-28, 2013

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagementOPAM PolicyOf Environmental ManagementRollout -Summary by

  12. Storage Viability and Optimization Web Service

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Christ; Lai, Judy; Siddiqui, Afzal; Limpaitoon, Tanachai; Phan, Trucy; Megel, Olivier; Chang, Jessica; DeForest, Nicholas

    2010-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-residential sectors offer many promising applications for electrical storage (batteries) and photovoltaics (PVs). However, choosing and operating storage under complex tariff structures poses a daunting technical and economic problem that may discourage potential customers and result in lost carbon and economic savings. Equipment vendors are unlikely to provide adequate environmental analysis or unbiased economic results to potential clients, and are even less likely to completely describe the robustness of choices in the face of changing fuel prices and tariffs. Given these considerations, researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) have designed the Storage Viability and Optimization Web Service (SVOW): a tool that helps building owners, operators and managers to decide if storage technologies and PVs merit deeper analysis. SVOW is an open access, web-based energy storage and PV analysis calculator, accessible by secure remote login. Upon first login, the user sees an overview of the parameters: load profile, tariff, technologies, and solar radiation location. Each parameter has a pull-down list of possible predefined inputs and users may upload their own as necessary. Since the non-residential sectors encompass a broad range of facilities with fundamentally different characteristics, the tool starts by asking the users to select a load profile from a limited cohort group of example facilities. The example facilities are categorized according to their North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code. After the load profile selection, users select a predefined tariff or use the widget to create their own. The technologies and solar radiation menus operate in a similar fashion. After these four parameters have been inputted, the users have to select an optimization setting as well as an optimization objective. The analytic engine of SVOW is LBNL?s Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM), which is a mixed-integer linear program (MILP) written and executed in the General Algebraic Modeling System (GAMS) optimization software. LBNL has released version 1.2.0.11 of SVOW. Information can be found at http://der.lbl.gov/microgrids-lbnl/current-project-storage-viability-website.

  13. Third Generation Flywheels for electric storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ricci, Michael, R.; Fiske, O. James

    2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Electricity is critical to our economy, but growth in demand has saturated the power grid causing instability and blackouts. The economic penalty due to lost productivity in the US exceeds $100 billion per year. Opposition to new transmission lines and power plants, environmental restrictions, and an expected $100 billion grid upgrade cost have slowed system improvements. Flywheel electricity storage could provide a more economical, environmentally benign alternative and slash economic losses if units could be scaled up in a cost effective manner to much larger power and capacity than the present maximum of a few hundred kW and a few kWh per flywheel. The goal of this project is to design, construct, and demonstrate a small-scale third generation electricity storage flywheel using a revolutionary architecture scalable to megawatt-hours per unit. First generation flywheels are built from bulk materials such as steel and provide inertia to smooth the motion of mechanical devices such as engines. They can be scaled up to tens of tons or more, but have relatively low energy storage density. Second generation flywheels use similar designs but are fabricated with composite materials such as carbon fiber and epoxy. They are capable of much higher energy storage density but cannot economically be built larger than a few kWh of storage capacity due to structural and stability limitations. LaunchPoint is developing a third generation flywheel — the "Power Ring" — with energy densities as high or higher than second generation flywheels and a totally new architecture scalable to enormous sizes. Electricity storage capacities exceeding 5 megawatt-hours per unit appear both technically feasible and economically attractive. Our design uses a new class of magnetic bearing – a radial gap “shear-force levitator” – that we discovered and patented, and a thin-walled composite hoop rotated at high speed to store kinetic energy. One immediate application is power grid frequency regulation, where Power Rings could cut costs, reduce fuel consumption, eliminate emissions, and reduce the need for new power plants. Other applications include hybrid diesel-electric locomotives, grid power quality, support for renewable energy, spinning reserve, energy management, and facility deferral. Decreased need for new generation and transmission alone could save the nation $2.5 billion per year. Improved grid reliability could cut economic losses due to poor power quality by tens of billions of dollars per year. A large export market for this technology could also develop. Power Ring technology will directly support the EERE mission, and the goals of the Distributed Energy Technologies Subprogram in particular, by helping to reduce blackouts, brownouts, electricity costs, and emissions, by relieving transmission bottlenecks, and by greatly improving grid power quality.

  14. Article for thermal energy storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

    2000-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal energy storage composition is provided which is in the form of a gel. The composition includes a phase change material and silica particles, where the phase change material may comprise a linear alkyl hydrocarbon, water/urea, or water. The thermal energy storage composition has a high thermal conductivity, high thermal energy storage, and may be used in a variety of applications such as in thermal shipping containers and gel packs.

  15. Gas hydrate cool storage system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ternes, M.P.; Kedl, R.J.

    1984-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention presented relates to the development of a process utilizing a gas hydrate as a cool storage medium for alleviating electric load demands during peak usage periods. Several objectives of the invention are mentioned concerning the formation of the gas hydrate as storage material in a thermal energy storage system within a heat pump cycle system. The gas hydrate was formed using a refrigerant in water and an example with R-12 refrigerant is included. (BCS)

  16. Underground caverns for hydrocarbon storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barron, T.F. [Exeter Energy Services, Houston, TX (United States)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Large, international gas processing projects and growing LPG imports in developing countries are driving the need to store large quantities of hydrocarbon liquids. Even though underground storage is common in the US, many people outside the domestic industry are not familiar with the technology and the benefits underground storage can offer. The latter include lower construction and operating costs than surface storage, added safety, security and greater environmental acceptance.

  17. Standard Guide for Preparing Waste Management Plans for Decommissioning Nuclear Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This guide addresses the development of waste management plans for potential waste streams resulting from decommissioning activities at nuclear facilities, including identifying, categorizing, and handling the waste from generation to final disposal. 1.2 This guide is applicable to potential waste streams anticipated from decommissioning activities of nuclear facilities whose operations were governed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) or Agreement State license, under Department of Energy (DOE) Orders, or Department of Defense (DoD) regulations. 1.3 This guide provides a description of the key elements of waste management plans that if followed will successfully allow for the characterization, packaging, transportation, and off-site treatment or disposal, or both, of conventional, hazardous, and radioactive waste streams. 1.4 This guide does not address the on-site treatment, long term storage, or on-site disposal of these potential waste streams. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address ...

  18. Energy Storage Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Energy Storage Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. At NREL's Energy Storage Laboratory in the Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF), research focuses on the integration of energy storage systems (both stationary and vehicle-mounted) and interconnection with the utility grid. Focusing on battery technologies, but also hosting ultra-capacitors and other electrical energy storage technologies, the laboratory will provide all resources necessary to develop, test, and prove energy storage system performance and compatibility with distributed energy systems. The laboratory will also provide robust vehicle testing capability, including a drive-in environmental chamber, which can accommodate commercial-sized hybrid, electric, biodiesel, ethanol, compressed natural gas, and hydrogen fueled vehicles. The Energy Storage Laboratory is designed to ensure personnel and equipment safety when testing hazardous battery systems or other energy storage technologies. Closely coupled with the research electrical distribution bus at ESIF, the Energy Storage Laboratory will offer megawatt-scale power testing capability as well as advanced hardware-in-the-loop and model-in-the-loop simulation capabilities. Some application scenarios are: The following types of tests - Performance, Efficiency, Safety, Model validation, and Long duration reliability. (2) Performed on the following equipment types - (a) Vehicle batteries (both charging and discharging V2G); (b) Stationary batteries; (c) power conversion equipment for energy storage; (d) ultra- and super-capacitor systems; and (e) DC systems, such as commercial microgrids.

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Simulations Reveal Ion Dynamics in Polymer Electrolyte On November 13, 2012, in Energy Storage, News, News & Events Improving battery electrolytes is highly desirable, particularly...

  20. Holographic Storage of Biphoton Entanglement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han-Ning Dai; Han Zhang; Sheng-Jun Yang; Tian-Ming Zhao; Jun Rui; You-Jin Deng; Li Li; Nai-Le Liu; Shuai Chen; Xiao-Hui Bao; Xian-Min Jin; Bo Zhao; Jian-Wei Pan

    2012-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Coherent and reversible storage of multi-photon entanglement with a multimode quantum memory is essential for scalable all-optical quantum information processing. Although single photon has been successfully stored in different quantum systems, storage of multi-photon entanglement remains challenging because of the critical requirement for coherent control of photonic entanglement source, multimode quantum memory, and quantum interface between them. Here we demonstrate a coherent and reversible storage of biphoton Bell-type entanglement with a holographic multimode atomic-ensemble-based quantum memory. The retrieved biphoton entanglement violates Bell's inequality for 1 microsecond storage time and a memory-process fidelity of 98% is demonstrated by quantum state tomography.

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: Carbon Storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from improved climate models to performance models for underground waste storage to 3D printing and digital rock physics. Marianne Walck (Director ... Joint SandiaUniversity of...

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from improved climate models to performance models for underground waste storage to 3D printing and digital rock physics. Marianne Walck (Director ... Recent Sandia Secure,...

  3. Underground Storage Tanks (West Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This rule governs the construction, installation, upgrading, use, maintenance, testing, and closure of underground storage tanks, including certification requirements for individuals who install,...

  4. CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Division staff, in partnership with the Kentucky Geological Survey (KGS), continued to support projects to investigate and demonstrate the technical feasibility of geologic storage of carbon...

  5. Underground Storage Tanks (New Jersey)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter constitutes rules for all underground storage tank facilities- including registration, reporting, permitting, certification, financial responsibility and to protect human health and...

  6. Underground Storage Tank Program (Vermont)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These rules are intended to protect public health and the environment by establishing standards for the design, installation, operation, maintenance, monitoring, and closure of underground storage...

  7. 1993 Department of Energy Records Management Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document consists of viewgraphs from the presentations at the conference. Topics included are: DOE records management overview, NIRMA and ARMA resources, NARA records management training, potential quality assurance records, filing systems, organizing and indexing technical records, DOE-HQ initiatives, IRM reviews, status of epidemiologic inventory, disposition of records and personal papers, inactive records storage, establishing administrative records, managing records at Hanford, electronic mail -- legal and records issues, NARA-GAO reports status, consultive selling, automated indexing, decentralized approach to scheduling at a DOE office, developing specific records management programs, storage and retrieval at Savannah River Plant, an optical disk case study, and special interest group reports.

  8. Flywheel energy storage workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Kain, D.; Carmack, J. [comps.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the November 1993 Flywheel Workshop, there has been a major surge of interest in Flywheel Energy Storage. Numerous flywheel programs have been funded by the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA), by the Department of Energy (DOE) through the Hybrid Vehicle Program, and by private investment. Several new prototype systems have been built and are being tested. The operational performance characteristics of flywheel energy storage are being recognized as attractive for a number of potential applications. Programs are underway to develop flywheels for cars, buses, boats, trains, satellites, and for electric utility applications such as power quality, uninterruptible power supplies, and load leveling. With the tremendous amount of flywheel activity during the last two years, this workshop should again provide an excellent opportunity for presentation of new information. This workshop is jointly sponsored by ARPA and DOE to provide a review of the status of current flywheel programs and to provide a forum for presentation of new flywheel technology. Technology areas of interest include flywheel applications, flywheel systems, design, materials, fabrication, assembly, safety & containment, ball bearings, magnetic bearings, motor/generators, power electronics, mounting systems, test procedures, and systems integration. Information from the workshop will help guide ARPA & DOE planning for future flywheel programs. This document is comprised of detailed viewgraphs.

  9. Electrochemical hydrogen Storage Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Digby Macdonald

    2010-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    As the global need for energy increases, scientists and engineers have found a possible solution by using hydrogen to power our world. Although hydrogen can be combusted as a fuel, it is considered an energy carrier for use in fuel cells wherein it is consumed (oxidized) without the production of greenhouse gases and produces electrical energy with high efficiency. Chemical storage of hydrogen involves release of hydrogen in a controlled manner from materials in which the hydrogen is covalently bound. Sodium borohydride and aminoborane are two materials given consideration as chemical hydrogen storage materials by the US Department of Energy. A very significant barrier to adoption of these materials as hydrogen carriers is their regeneration from 'spent fuel,' i.e., the material remaining after discharge of hydrogen. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) formed a Center of Excellence for Chemical Hydrogen Storage, and this work stems from that project. The DOE has identified boron hydrides as being the main compounds of interest as hydrogen storage materials. The various boron hydrides are then oxidized to release their hydrogen, thereby forming a 'spent fuel' in the form of a lower boron hydride or even a boron oxide. The ultimate goal of this project is to take the oxidized boron hydrides as the spent fuel and hydrogenate them back to their original form so they can be used again as a fuel. Thus this research is essentially a boron hydride recycling project. In this report, research directed at regeneration of sodium borohydride and aminoborane is described. For sodium borohydride, electrochemical reduction of boric acid and sodium metaborate (representing spent fuel) in alkaline, aqueous solution has been investigated. Similarly to literature reports (primarily patents), a variety of cathode materials were tried in these experiments. Additionally, approaches directed at overcoming electrostatic repulsion of borate anion from the cathode, not described in the previous literature for electrochemical reduction of spent fuels, have been attempted. A quantitative analytical method for measuring the concentration of sodium borohydride in alkaline aqueous solution has been developed as part of this work and is described herein. Finally, findings from stability tests for sodium borohydride in aqueous solutions of several different compositions are reported. For aminoborane, other research institutes have developed regeneration schemes involving tributyltin hydride. In this report, electrochemical reduction experiments attempting to regenerate tributyltin hydride from tributyltin chloride (a representative by-product of the regeneration scheme) are described. These experiments were performed in the non-aqueous solvents acetonitrile and 1,2-dimethoxyethane. A non-aqueous reference electrode for electrolysis experiments in acetonitrile was developed and is described. One class of boron hydrides, called polyhedral boranes, became of interest to the DOE due to their ability to contain a sufficient amount of hydrogen to meet program goals and because of their physical and chemical safety attributes. Unfortunately, the research performed here has shown that polyhedral boranes do not react in such a way as to allow enough hydrogen to be released, nor do they appear to undergo hydrogenation from the spent fuel form back to the original hydride. After the polyhedral boranes were investigated, the project goals remained the same but the hydrogen storage material was switched by the DOE to ammonia borane. Ammonia borane was found to undergo an irreversible hydrogen release process, so a direct hydrogenation was not able to occur. To achieve the hydrogenation of the spent ammonia borane fuel, an indirect hydrogenation reaction is possible by using compounds called organotin hydrides. In this process, the organotin hydrides will hydrogenate the spent ammonia borane fuel at the cost of their own oxidation, which forms organotin halides. To enable a closed-loop cycle, our task was then to be able to hydrogenate the organotin halides back to th

  10. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Waste Management Plan, fiscal year 1994. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, J.W. [ed.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A was promulgated in final form on September 26, 1988. The order requires heads of field organizations to prepare and to submit updates on the waste management plans for all operations under their purview according to the format in Chap. 6, {open_quotes}Waste Management Plan Outline.{close_quotes} These plans are to be submitted by the DOE Oak Ridge Operations Office (DOE-ORO) in December of each year and distributed to the DP-12, ES&H-1, and other appropriate DOE Headquarters (DOE-HQ) organizations for review and comment. This document was prepared in response to this requirement for fiscal year (FY) 1994. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) waste management mission is reduction, collection, storage, treatment, and disposal of DOE wastes, generated primarily in pursuit of ORNL missions, in order to protect human health and safety and the environment. In carrying out this mission, waste management staff in the Waste Management and Remedial Action Division (WMRAD) will (1) guide ORNL in optimizing waste reduction and waste management capabilities and (2) conduct waste management operations in a compliant, publicly acceptable, technically sound, and cost-efficient manner. Waste management requirements for DOE radioactive wastes are detailed in DOE Order 5820.2A, and the ORNL Waste Management Program encompasses all elements of this order. The requirements of this DOE order and other appropriate DOE orders, along with applicable Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation and US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) rules and regulations, provide the principal source of regulatory guidance for waste management operations at ORNL. The objective of this document is compilation and consolidation of information on how the ORNL Waste Management Program is conducted, which waste management facilities are being used to manage wastes, what activities are planned for FY 1994, and how all of the activities are documented.

  11. Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center Center of Excellence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carver, Jeffrey C.

    Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center Center of Excellence for Chemical Hydrogen Storage William Tumas proprietary or confidential information #12;2 Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center Overview Project Start Date: FY Barriers Addressed #12;3 Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center National

  12. Bike Storage on McMaster University BIKE STORAGE ON CAMPUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hitchcock, Adam P.

    Bike Storage on Campus McMaster University BIKE STORAGE ON CAMPUS Secure Bike Storage on Campus Located on the west side of Chester New Hall, the Secure Bike Storage facility features video surveillance

  13. Documented Safety Analysis for the Waste Storage Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laycak, D

    2008-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This documented safety analysis (DSA) for the Waste Storage Facilities was developed in accordance with 10 CFR 830, Subpart B, 'Safety Basis Requirements', and utilizes the methodology outlined in DOE-STD-3009-94, Change Notice 3. The Waste Storage Facilities consist of Area 625 (A625) and the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) Storage Area portion of the DWTF complex. These two areas are combined into a single DSA, as their functions as storage for radioactive and hazardous waste are essentially identical. The B695 Segment of DWTF is addressed under a separate DSA. This DSA provides a description of the Waste Storage Facilities and the operations conducted therein; identification of hazards; analyses of the hazards, including inventories, bounding releases, consequences, and conclusions; and programmatic elements that describe the current capacity for safe operations. The mission of the Waste Storage Facilities is to safely handle, store, and treat hazardous waste, transuranic (TRU) waste, low-level waste (LLW), mixed waste, combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL (as well as small amounts from other DOE facilities).

  14. Documented Safety Analysis for the Waste Storage Facilities March 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laycak, D T

    2010-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) for the Waste Storage Facilities was developed in accordance with 10 CFR 830, Subpart B, 'Safety Basis Requirements,' and utilizes the methodology outlined in DOE-STD-3009-94, Change Notice 3. The Waste Storage Facilities consist of Area 625 (A625) and the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) Storage Area portion of the DWTF complex. These two areas are combined into a single DSA, as their functions as storage for radioactive and hazardous waste are essentially identical. The B695 Segment of DWTF is addressed under a separate DSA. This DSA provides a description of the Waste Storage Facilities and the operations conducted therein; identification of hazards; analyses of the hazards, including inventories, bounding releases, consequences, and conclusions; and programmatic elements that describe the current capacity for safe operations. The mission of the Waste Storage Facilities is to safely handle, store, and treat hazardous waste, transuranic (TRU) waste, low-level waste (LLW), mixed waste, combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL (as well as small amounts from other DOE facilities).

  15. Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Storage Test Pad (ESTP)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Storage Test Pad (ESTP) Evaluating Powerful Batteries for Modular Electric Grid Energy Storage On December 12, 2014, in Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems,...

  16. Sandia National Laboratories: DOE Energy Storage Systems program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE Energy Storage Systems program 2013 Electricity Storage Handbook Published On July 31, 2013, in Energy, Energy Assurance, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Energy Surety,...

  17. Sandia National Laboratories: NM Renewable Energy Storage Task...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Renewable Energy Storage Task Force New Mexico Renewable Energy Storage Task Force On January 28, 2014, in Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Infrastructure Security,...

  18. Sandia National Laboratories: incentivize renewable-energy storage...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    incentivize renewable-energy storage infrastructure development New Mexico Renewable Energy Storage Task Force On January 28, 2014, in Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage...

  19. The value of underground storage in today`s natural gas industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report consists of three chapters and four appendices. Chapter 1 provides basic information on the role of storage in today`s marketplace where natural gas is treated as a commodity. Chapter 2 provides statistical analyses of the relationship between storage and spot prices on both a monthly and daily basis. For the daily analysis, temperature data were used a proxy for storage withdrawals, providing a new means of examining the short-term relationship between storage and spot prices. Chapter 3 analyzes recent trends in storage management and use, as well as plans for additions to storage capacity. It also reviews the status of the new uses of storage resulting from Order 636, that is, market-based rates and capacity release. Appendix A serves as a stand-along primer on storage operations, and Appendix B provides further data on plans for the expansion of storage capacity. Appendix C explains recent revisions made to working gas and base gas capacity on the part of several storage operators in 1991 through 1993. The revisions were significant, and this appendix provides a consistent historical data series that reflects these changes. Finally, Appendix D presents more information on the regression analysis presented in Chapter 2. 19 refs., 21 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Hazardous Waste Management Act (South Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is the public policy of the state of South Dakota to regulate the control and generation, transportation, treatment, storage, and disposal of hazardous wastes. The state operates a comprehensive...

  1. Nanostructured materials for hydrogen storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williamson, Andrew J. (Pleasanton, CA); Reboredo, Fernando A. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for hydrogen storage comprising a porous nano-structured material with hydrogen absorbed on the surfaces of the porous nano-structured material. The system of hydrogen storage comprises absorbing hydrogen on the surfaces of a porous nano-structured semiconductor material.

  2. COLD STORAGE DESIGN REFRIGERATION EQUIPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COLD STORAGE DESIGN AND REFRIGERATION EQUIPMENT REFRIGERATION OF FISH - PART 1 \\ "..\\- ,,, T I Fishery Leaflet 427 Washington 25, D. C. June 1956 REFRIGERATION OF FISH - PART em; COlD STORAGE DESIGN AND REFRIGERATION EQUIPMENT By Charles Butler (Section 1), Joseph W. Slavin (Sections 1, 2, and 3), Max Patashnik

  3. Catalytically Enhanced Hydrogen Storage Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with the Freedom CAR hydrogen storage system targets (Key parameters: cost, specific energy, and energy density). #12;Objectives I. Determination of the chemical nature of the titanium species responsible that are compatible with the Freedom CAR hydrogen storage system targets. Key parameters: cost, specific energy

  4. MATERIAL HANDLING, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Materials shall be stored in a manner that allows easy identification and access to labels, identification entering storage areas. All persons shall be in a safe position while materials are being loadedEM 385-1-1 XX Jun 13 14-1 SECTION 14 MATERIAL HANDLING, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL 14.A MATERIAL

  5. Reversible hydrogen storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ritter, James A. (Lexington, SC); Wang, Tao (Columbia, SC); Ebner, Armin D. (Lexington, SC); Holland, Charles E. (Cayce, SC)

    2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In accordance with the present disclosure, a process for synthesis of a complex hydride material for hydrogen storage is provided. The process includes mixing a borohydride with at least one additive agent and at least one catalyst and heating the mixture at a temperature of less than about 600.degree. C. and a pressure of H.sub.2 gas to form a complex hydride material. The complex hydride material comprises MAl.sub.xB.sub.yH.sub.z, wherein M is an alkali metal or group IIA metal, Al is the element aluminum, x is any number from 0 to 1, B is the element boron, y is a number from 0 to 13, and z is a number from 4 to 57 with the additive agent and catalyst still being present. The complex hydride material is capable of cyclic dehydrogenation and rehydrogenation and has a hydrogen capacity of at least about 4 weight percent.

  6. March 29, 2008 OS: Mass Storage Structure 1 Mass-Storage Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adam, Salah

    March 29, 2008 OS: Mass Storage Structure 1 Mass-Storage Structure Chapter 12 #12;March 29, 2008 OS: Mass Storage Structure 2 Objectives Describe the physical structure of secondary and tertiary storage of mass-storage devices Discuss operating-system services provided for mass storage, including RAID

  7. Cooperative Repair with Minimum-Storage Regenerating Codes for Distributed Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Baochun

    Cooperative Repair with Minimum-Storage Regenerating Codes for Distributed Storage Jun Li, Baochun--Distributed storage systems store redundant data to tolerate failures of storage nodes and lost data should be repaired when storage nodes fail. A class of MDS codes, called minimum- storage regenerating (MSR) codes

  8. March 24, 2008 ADBS: Storage 1 Disk Storage, Basic File Structures, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adam, Salah

    March 24, 2008 ADBS: Storage 1 Disk Storage, Basic File Structures, and Hashing. #12;March 24, 2008 ADBS: Storage 2 Chapter Outline The Storage Hierarchy How Far is Your Data Disk Storage Devices Records Blocking Files of Records Unordered Files Ordered Files Hashed Files RAID Technology Storage Area Network

  9. Systems analysis of thermal storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copeland, R. J.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During FY80 analyses were conducted on thermal storage concepts for solar thermal applications. These studies include both estimates of the obtainable costs of thermal storage concepts and their worth to a user (i.e., value). Based on obtainable costs and performance, promising thermal storage concepts are being identified. A preliminary screening was completed in FY80 and a more in-depth study was initiated. Value studies are being conducted to establish cost goals. A ranking of storage concepts based on value in solar thermal electric plants was conducted for both diurnal and long duration applications. Ground mounted thermal storage concepts for a parabolic dish/Stirling systtem are also being evaluated.

  10. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    solid-fluid heat storage systems in the ground; extractions0 Thermal storage of cold water in ground water aquifers forA. 8 1971, Storage of solar energy in a sandy-gravel ground:

  11. On Storage Rings for Short Wavelength FELs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chattopadhyay, S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for a hypothetical 144 m long storage ring optimized for FELin the Proceedings On Storage Rings for Short WavelengthLBL-28483 ESG Note-92 ON STORAGE RINGS FOR SHORT WAVELENGTH

  12. Storage Viability and Optimization Web Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on MicrogridEPRI-DOE Handbook of Energy Storage for Transmission andLong- vs. Short-Term Energy Storage Technologies Analysis, A

  13. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and J. Schwarz, Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in AquifersLow Temperature Thermal Energy Storage Program of Oak RidgeAquifers for Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage: An Overview of

  14. Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in floor tiles for thermal energy storage,” working paper,D. R. (2000). Thermal energy storage for space cooling,A simple model of thermal energy storage is developed as a

  15. Nanostructured Materials for Energy Generation and Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Javed Miller

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy generation and battery storage via the use ofenergy generation and battery storage via the use of nanos-and storage (e.g lithium-ion rechargeable battery)

  16. NATURAL GAS STORAGE ENGINEERING Kashy Aminian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    NATURAL GAS STORAGE ENGINEERING Kashy Aminian Petroleum & Natural Gas Engineering, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, USA. Shahab D. Mohaghegh Petroleum & Natural Gas Engineering, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, USA. Keywords: Gas Storage, Natural Gas, Storage, Deliverability, Inventory

  17. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    must be if mal energy storage technologies as means for con-Robert Thorne. Energy Storage is more technology-orientedEnergy with Heat Storage Wells," Environmental Science and Technology,

  18. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and J. Schwarz, Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in AquifersB. Quale. Seasonal storage of thermal energy in water in theSecond Annual Thermal Energy Storage Contractors'

  19. Highly enriched uranium (HEU) storage and disposition program plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arms, W.M.; Everitt, D.A.; O`Dell, C.L.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent changes in international relations and other changes in national priorities have profoundly affected the management of weapons-usable fissile materials within the United States (US). The nuclear weapon stockpile reductions agreed to by the US and Russia have reduced the national security requirements for these fissile materials. National policies outlined by the US President seek to prevent the accumulation of nuclear weapon stockpiles of plutonium (Pu) and HEU, and to ensure that these materials are subjected to the highest standards of safety, security and international accountability. The purpose of the Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) Storage and Disposition Program Plan is to define and establish a planned approach for storage of all HEU and disposition of surplus HEU in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Fissile Material Disposition Program. Elements Of this Plan, which are specific to HEU storage and disposition, include program requirements, roles and responsibilities, program activities (action plans), milestone schedules, and deliverables.

  20. Coal pile leachate treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, E C; Kimmitt, R R

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The steam plant located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory was converted from oil- to coal-fired boilers. In the process, a diked, 1.6-ha coal storage yard was constructed. The purpose of this report is to describe the treatment system designed to neutralize the estimated 18,000 m/sup 3/ of acidic runoff that will be produced each year. A literature review and laboratory treatability study were conducted which identified two treatment systems that will be employed to neutralize the acidic runoff. The first, a manually operated system, will be constructed at a cost of $200,000 and will operate for an interim period of four years. This system will provide for leachate neutralization until a more automated system can be brought on-line. The second, a fully automated system, is described and will be constructed at an estimated cost of $650,000. This automated runoff treatment system will ensure that drainage from the storage yard meets current National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Standards for pH and total suspended solids, as well as future standards, which are likely to include several metals along with selected trace elements.

  1. Fact Sheet: Energy Storage Technology Advancement Partnership...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    flywheels, electrochemical capacitors, superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES), power electronics, and control systems, visit the Energy Storage page. Fact Sheet: Energy...

  2. DRAFT "Energy Advisory Committee" - Energy Storage Subcommittee...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Report: Revision 2 DRAFT "Energy Advisory Committee" - Energy Storage Subcommittee Report: Revision 2 Energy storage plays a vital role in all forms of business and affects the...

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: energy storage resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Power Outages With New 'Smart Grid' System On June 20, 2013, in Energy, Energy Assurance, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Energy Surety, Grid Integration, Infrastructure...

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: energy storage requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Accomplishments On March 3, 2015, in Capabilities, Distribution Grid Integration, Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Energy Surety, Grid Integration, Infrastructure...

  5. JCESR | Joint Center for Energy Storage Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    want. More Sandia: High Density Storage JCESR Partner Sandia discusses high density energy storage for electric vehicles and the grid More JCESR and NASA team up JCESR and...

  6. Sandia National Laboratories: solar thermal energy storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    energy storage Sandia Solar Energy Test System Cited in National Engineering Competition On May 16, 2013, in Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Energy Storage, Facilities, National...

  7. Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Storage Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Address Flooding, Water, and Power Systems On June 11, 2013, in Energy, Energy Assurance, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Energy Surety, Infrastructure Security, Microgrid,...

  8. Webinar Presentation: Energy Storage Solutions for Microgrids...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Presentation: Energy Storage Solutions for Microgrids (November 2012) Webinar Presentation: Energy Storage Solutions for Microgrids (November 2012) On November 7, 2012, Clean...

  9. Carbon Storage Atlas, Employee Newsletter Earn International...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    NETL's Carbon Storage Atlas IV and FE's internal employee newsletter, inTouch, earned 2013 National Association of Government Communicators awards. NETL's Carbon Storage Atlas IV...

  10. Panel 3, Electrolysis for Grid Energy Storage

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electrolysis for Grid Energy Storage DOE-Industry Canada Workshop May 15, 2014 INTRODUCTION HYDROGEN ENERGY SYSTEMS FOR ENERGY STORAGE AND CLEAN FUEL PRODUCTION ITM POWER INC. ITM...

  11. Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 1, Session 1 Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 1, Session 1 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems...

  12. Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    : Poster Session Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 3: Poster Session The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a record-breaking...

  13. Hydrogen Storage Materials Workshop Proceedings Workshop, October...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Proceedings Workshop, October 16th, 2002 Hydrogen Storage Materials Workshop Proceedings Workshop, October 16th, 2002 A workshop on compressed and liquefied hydrogen storage was a...

  14. Station Footprint: Separation Distances, Storage Options, and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Station Footprint: Separation Distances, Storage Options, and Pre-Cooling Station Footprint: Separation Distances, Storage Options, and Pre-Cooling This presentation by Aaron...

  15. Combinatorial Approach for Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Center of Excellence Recommended Best Practices for the Characterization of Storage Properties of Hydrogen Storage Materials High ThroughputCombinatorial Screening of...

  16. BNL Gas Storage Achievements, Research Capabilities, Interests...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Metal Hydride Center of Excellence Recommended Best Practices for the Characterization of Storage Properties of Hydrogen Storage Materials EA-1321: Final Environmental Assessment...

  17. Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements (Text Version) | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Requirements (Text Version) Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements (Text Version) Below is the text version of the webinar titled "Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements,"...

  18. Underground Storage Tank Act (West Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New underground storage tank construction standards must include at least the following requirements: (1) That an underground storage tank will prevent releases of regulated substances stored...

  19. Georgia Underground Storage Tank Act (Georgia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Georgia Underground Storage Act (GUST) provides a comprehensive program to prevent, detect, and correct releases from underground storage tanks (“USTs”) of “regulated substances” other than...

  20. Agenda: Natural Gas: Transmission, Storage and Distribution ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas: Transmission, Storage and Distribution Agenda: Natural Gas: Transmission, Storage and Distribution A Public Meeting on the Quadrennial Energy Review, Hosted by the...