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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "managing treatment storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

EIS-0200: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIS-0200: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and Hazardous Waste EIS-0200: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and Hazardous Waste...

2

EIS-0200: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

00: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive 00: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and Hazardous Waste EIS-0200: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and Hazardous Waste SUMMARY This EIS evaluates the potential environmental and cost impacts of strategic managment alternatives for managing five types of radioactive and hazardous wastes that have resulted and will continue to result from nuclear defense and research activities at a variety of sites around the United States. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 7, 2011 EIS-0200-SA-03: Supplement Analysis Treatment of Transuranic Waste at the Idaho National Laboratory, Carlsbad Field Office March 7, 2008 EIS-0200: Amendment to the Record of Decision Treatment and Storage of Transuranic Waste

3

EIS-0200: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIS-0200: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive EIS-0200: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and Hazardous Waste EIS-0200: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and Hazardous Waste SUMMARY Final Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement examines the potential environmental and cost impacts of strategic managment alternatives for managing five types of radioactive and hazardous wastes that have resulted and will continue to result from nuclear defense and research activities at a variety of sites around the United States. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 7, 2011 EIS-0200-SA-03: Supplement Analysis Treatment of Transuranic Waste at the Idaho National Laboratory, Carlsbad Field Office March 7, 2008

4

EIS-0200: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

environmental and cost impacts of strategic managment alternatives for managing five types of radioactive and hazardous wastes that have resulted and will continue to result...

5

Energy Storage Management for VG Integration (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation describes how you economically manage integration costs of storage and variable generation.

Kirby, B.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Record of Decision for the Department of Energy's Waste Management Program; Treatment and Storage of Transuranic Waste  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3630 3630 Federal Register / Vol. 63, No. 15 / Friday, January 23, 1998 / Notices to agreements DOE has entered into, such as those with States, relating to the treatment and storage of TRU waste. Future NEPA review could include, but would not necessarily be limited to, analysis of the need to supplement existing environmental reviews. DOE would conduct all such TRU waste shipments between sites in accordance with applicable transportation requirements and would coordinate these shipments with appropriate State, Tribal and local authorities. This Record of Decision was prepared in coordination with the Record of Decision issued on January 16, 1998, on disposal of DOE's TRU waste, which is based on the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Disposal Phase Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (WIPP

7

Underground storage tank management plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Underground Storage Tank (UST) Management Program at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant was established to locate UST systems in operation at the facility, to ensure that all operating UST systems are free of leaks, and to establish a program for the removal of unnecessary UST systems and upgrade of UST systems that continue to be needed. The program implements an integrated approach to the management of UST systems, with each system evaluated against the same requirements and regulations. A common approach is employed, in accordance with Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) regulations and guidance, when corrective action is mandated. This Management Plan outlines the compliance issues that must be addressed by the UST Management Program, reviews the current UST inventory and compliance approach, and presents the status and planned activities associated with each UST system. The UST Management Plan provides guidance for implementing TDEC regulations and guidelines for petroleum UST systems. (There are no underground radioactive waste UST systems located at Y-12.) The plan is divided into four major sections: (1) regulatory requirements, (2) implementation requirements, (3) Y-12 Plant UST Program inventory sites, and (4) UST waste management practices. These sections describe in detail the applicable regulatory drivers, the UST sites addressed under the Management Program, and the procedures and guidance used for compliance with applicable regulations.

NONE

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Mixed Waste Storage and Treatment: Regulatory Compliance Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The management and storage of mixed wastes represents one of the most challenging regulatory issues currently facing NRC licensees. This report provides instructions and guidance regarding the on-site storage and treatment of mixed waste in compliance with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

9

Transuranic waste inventory, characteristics, generation, and facility assessment for treatment, storage, and disposal alternatives considered in the U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect

Transuranic waste (TRUW) loads and potential contaminant releases at and en route to treatment, storage, and disposal sites in the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex are important considerations in DOE`s Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). Waste loads are determined in part by the level of treatment the waste has undergone and the complex-wide configuration of origination, treatment, storage, and disposal sites selected for TRUW management. Other elements that impact waste loads are treatment volumes, waste characteristics, and the unit operation parameters of the treatment technologies. Treatment levels and site configurations have been combined into six TRUW management alternatives for study in the WM PEIS. This supplemental report to the WM PEIS gives the projected waste loads and contaminant release profiles for DOE treatment sites under each of the six TRUW management alternatives. It gives TRUW characteristics and inventories for current DOE generation and storage sites, describes the treatment technologies for three proposed levels of TRUW treatment, and presents the representative unit operation parameters of the treatment technologies. The data presented are primary inputs to developing the costs, health risks, and socioeconomic and environmental impacts of treating, packaging, and shipping TRUW for disposal.

Hong, K.; Kotek, T.; Folga, S.; Koebnick, B.; Wang, Y.; Kaicher, C.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Analysis of accident sequences and source terms at treatment and storage facilities for waste generated by US Department of Energy waste management operations  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the methodology, computational framework, and results of facility accident analyses performed for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The accident sequences potentially important to human health risk are specified, their frequencies assessed, and the resultant radiological and chemical source terms evaluated. A personal-computer-based computational framework and database have been developed that provide these results as input to the WM PEIS for the calculation of human health risk impacts. The WM PEIS addresses management of five waste streams in the DOE complex: low-level waste (LLW), hazardous waste (HW), high-level waste (HLW), low-level mixed waste (LLMW), and transuranic waste (TRUW). Currently projected waste generation rates, storage inventories, and treatment process throughputs have been calculated for each of the waste streams. This report summarizes the accident analyses and aggregates the key results for each of the waste streams. Source terms are estimated, and results are presented for each of the major DOE sites and facilities by WM PEIS alternative for each waste stream. Key assumptions in the development of the source terms are identified. The appendices identify the potential atmospheric release of each toxic chemical or radionuclide for each accident scenario studied. They also discuss specific accident analysis data and guidance used or consulted in this report.

Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Roglans-Ribas, J.; Folga, S.; Policastro, A.; Freeman, W.; Jackson, R.; Mishima, J.; Turner, S.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Management and Storage of Surface Waters (Florida)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Environmental Protection regulates the use and storage of surface waters in the state. A permit from either the Department or the local Water Management District is required for...

12

Managing Aging Effects on Dry Cask Storage Systems for Extended...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Managing Aging Effects on Dry Cask Storage Systems for Extended Long Term Storage and Transportation of Used Fuel Rev0 Managing Aging Effects on Dry Cask Storage Systems for...

13

EA-1120: Solid Residues Treatment, Repackaging and Storage at...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0: Solid Residues Treatment, Repackaging and Storage at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, Colorado EA-1120: Solid Residues Treatment, Repackaging and Storage...

14

Bottling Electricity: Storage as a Strategic Tool for Managing...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bottling Electricity: Storage as a Strategic Tool for Managing Variability and Capacity Concerns in the Modern Grid - EAC Report (December 2008) Bottling Electricity: Storage as a...

15

Status of load management storage demonstrations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

DOE is funding a nationwide demonstration of electric load management through the use of utility-controlled, customer-side thermal energy storage for residential space conditioning. The general concept of the projects was developed with the assistance of a broadly based working group drawn from the utility industry. This paper presents the current status of these demonstrations. Ten demonstrations are underway - five heat storage and five cool storage - using between 30 and 50 near-commercial thermal storage devices. The installations and experimental program are designed to: (1) collect reliable load research data for assessing the impact on the utility system; (2) delineate and solve installation problems; (3) establish maintainability; (4) illuminate customer and utility acceptance; and (5) generate cost data. The results obtained are expected to assist utilities in making local load-management decisions, to assist DOE in establishing priorities for R and D efforts in load management, and to provide objective information related to the electric system impact, energy conservation, and cost-effectiveness of this form of load management.

Long, H M; Mohre, D L

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Optimal Demand Response with Energy Storage Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we consider the problem of optimal demand response and energy storage management for a power consuming entity. The entity's objective is to find an optimal control policy for deciding how much load to consume, how much power to purchase from/sell to the power grid, and how to use the finite capacity energy storage device and renewable energy, to minimize his average cost, being the disutility due to load- shedding and cost for purchasing power. Due to the coupling effect of the finite size energy storage, such problems are challenging and are typically tackled using dynamic programming, which is often complex in computation and requires substantial statistical information of the system dynamics. We instead develop a low-complexity algorithm called Demand Response with Energy Storage Management (DR-ESM). DR-ESM does not require any statistical knowledge of the system dynamics, including the renewable energy and the power prices. It only requires the entity to solve a small convex optimization pr...

Huang, Longbo; Ramchandran, Kannan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Managing Aging Effects on Dry Cask Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Managing Aging Effects Managing Aging Effects on Dry Cask Storage Systems for Extended Long-Term Storage and Transportation of Used Fuel Rev. 0 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Used Fuel Disposition Campaign O.K. Chopra, D. Diercks, R. Fabian, D. Ma, V. Shah, S-W Tam, and Y.Y. Liu Argonne National Laboratory June 30, 2012 FCRD-USED-2012-000119 ANL-12/29 DISCLAIMER This information was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the U.S. Government. Neither the U.S. Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness, of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately

18

Supplemental analysis of accident sequences and source terms for waste treatment and storage operations and related facilities for the US Department of Energy waste management programmatic environmental impact statement  

SciTech Connect

This report presents supplemental information for the document Analysis of Accident Sequences and Source Terms at Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities for Waste Generated by US Department of Energy Waste Management Operations. Additional technical support information is supplied concerning treatment of transuranic waste by incineration and considering the Alternative Organic Treatment option for low-level mixed waste. The latest respirable airborne release fraction values published by the US Department of Energy for use in accident analysis have been used and are included as Appendix D, where respirable airborne release fraction is defined as the fraction of material exposed to accident stresses that could become airborne as a result of the accident. A set of dominant waste treatment processes and accident scenarios was selected for a screening-process analysis. A subset of results (release source terms) from this analysis is presented.

Folga, S.; Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Kohout, E.; Mishima, J.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Gas Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas Storage Water Heaters to someone by E-mail Gas Storage Water Heaters to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Gas Storage Water Heaters on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Gas Storage Water Heaters on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Gas Storage Water Heaters on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Gas Storage Water Heaters on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Gas Storage Water Heaters on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Gas Storage Water Heaters on AddThis.com... Energy-Efficient Products Federal Requirements Covered Product Categories

20

Ursa: Scalable Load and Power Management in Cloud Storage Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Enterprise and cloud data centers are comprised of tens of thousands of servers providing petabytes of storage to a large number of users and applications. At such a scale, these storage systems face two key challenges: (1) hot-spots due to the dynamic ... Keywords: Load management, linear programming, optimization, power management, storage

Gae-Won You; Seung-Won Hwang; Navendu Jain

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "managing treatment storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Storage DUF6 Health Risks line line Accidents Storage Conversion Manufacturing Disposal Transportation Storage A discussion of depleted UF6 cylinder storage activities and associated risks. Management Activities for Cylinders in Storage The long-term management of the existing DUF6 storage cylinders and the continual effort to remediate and maintain the safe condition of the DUF6 storage cylinders will remain a Departmental responsibility for many years into the future. The day to day management of the DUF6 cylinders includes actions designed to cost effectively maintain and improve their storage conditions, such as: General storage cylinder and storage yard maintenance; Performing regular inspections of cylinders; Restacking and respacing the cylinders to improve drainage and to

22

Bottling Electricity: Storage as a Strategic Tool for Managing Variability  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bottling Electricity: Storage as a Strategic Tool for Managing Bottling Electricity: Storage as a Strategic Tool for Managing Variability and Capacity Concerns in the Modern Grid - EAC Report (December 2008) Bottling Electricity: Storage as a Strategic Tool for Managing Variability and Capacity Concerns in the Modern Grid - EAC Report (December 2008) The objectives of this report are to provide the Secretary of Energy with the Electricity Advisory Committee's proposed five-year plan for integrating basic and applied research on energy storage technology applications. This report recommends policies that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) should consider as it develops and implements an energy storage technologies program, as authorized by the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007. Bottling Electricity: Storage as a Strategic Tool for Managing Variability

23

B Plant treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) units inspection plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This inspection plan is written to meet the requirements of WAC 173-303 for operations of a TSD facility. Owners/operators of TSD facilities are required to inspection their facility and active waste management units to prevent and/or detect malfunctions, discharges and other conditions potentially hazardous to human health and the environment. A written plan detailing these inspection efforts must be maintained at the facility in accordance with Washington Administrative Code (WAC), Chapter 173-303, ``Dangerous Waste Regulations`` (WAC 173-303), a written inspection plan is required for the operation of a treatment, storage and disposal (TSD) facility and individual TSD units. B Plant is a permitted TSD facility currently operating under interim status with an approved Part A Permit. Various operational systems and locations within or under the control of B Plant have been permitted for waste management activities. Included are the following TSD units: Cell 4 Container Storage Area; B Plant Containment Building; Low Level Waste Tank System; Organic Waste Tank System; Neutralized Current Acid Waste (NCAW) Tank System; Low Level Waste Concentrator Tank System. This inspection plan complies with the requirements of WAC 173-303. It addresses both general TSD facility and TSD unit-specific inspection requirements. Sections on each of the TSD units provide a brief description of the system configuration and the permitted waste management activity, a summary of the inspection requirements, and details on the activities B Plant uses to maintain compliance with those requirements.

Beam, T.G.

1996-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

24

EIS-0423: Storage and Management of Elemental Mercury | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

23: Storage and Management of Elemental Mercury 23: Storage and Management of Elemental Mercury EIS-0423: Storage and Management of Elemental Mercury Summary This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts associated with the reasonable alternatives for managing and storing elemental mercury at seven candidate locations (i.e., Colorado, Idaho, Missouri, Nevada, South Carolina, Texas, and Washington). The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, and the Mesa County Board of Commissioners (Mesa County, Colorado) are cooperating agencies in the preparation of this EIS. Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. Documents Available for Download June 5, 2012 EIS-0423-S1: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury

25

Analysis of accident sequences and source terms at waste treatment and storage facilities for waste generated by U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Operations, Volume 3: Appendixes C-H  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains the Appendices for the Analysis of Accident Sequences and Source Terms at Waste Treatment and Storage Facilities for Waste Generated by the U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Operations. The main report documents the methodology, computational framework, and results of facility accident analyses performed as a part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The accident sequences potentially important to human health risk are specified, their frequencies are assessed, and the resultant radiological and chemical source terms are evaluated. A personal computer-based computational framework and database have been developed that provide these results as input to the WM PEIS for calculation of human health risk impacts. This report summarizes the accident analyses and aggregates the key results for each of the waste streams. Source terms are estimated and results are presented for each of the major DOE sites and facilities by WM PEIS alternative for each waste stream. The appendices identify the potential atmospheric release of each toxic chemical or radionuclide for each accident scenario studied. They also provide discussion of specific accident analysis data and guidance used or consulted in this report.

Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Roglans-Ribas, J. [and others

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Use belowground storage tanks to manage stormwater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To meet performance and operating requirements under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), BP Oil`s Toledo Refinery installed two 10-million-gallon (MMgal) concrete belowground storage tanks to replace the existing impoundment ponds. Environmental, safety and operating criteria influenced how this older refinery could cost-effectively replace impoundment ponds without interrupting the production schedule. The north stormwater impoundment pond at BP Oil`s Toledo Refinery had received primary sludge, a RCRA-listed hazardous waste and material exceeding the toxic characteristic limit for benzene (0.5 ppm). Because the pond could not be adapted to meet RCRA standards, it had to be replaced by a system that met these standards and New Source Performance Standards (NSPS). Under normal operating conditions, stormwater was commingled with process wastewater and processed at the wastewater treatment unit (WWTU) before final disposal. However, when flow in the sewer system exceeded the capacity of the WWTU, excess flow was stored in an impoundment system. The case history shows how BP Oil`s project engineers, working with a consulting engineering group and a general contractor (GC), cost-effectively replaced the impoundment pond to handle stormwater runoff for the refinery.

Nedrow, J. [BP Oil Co., Toledo, OH (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Underground natural gas storage reservoir management  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study is to research technologies and methodologies that will reduce the costs associated with the operation and maintenance of underground natural gas storage. This effort will include a survey of public information to determine the amount of natural gas lost from underground storage fields, determine the causes of this lost gas, and develop strategies and remedial designs to reduce or stop the gas loss from selected fields. Phase I includes a detailed survey of US natural gas storage reservoirs to determine the actual amount of natural gas annually lost from underground storage fields. These reservoirs will be ranked, the resultant will include the amount of gas and revenue annually lost. The results will be analyzed in conjunction with the type (geologic) of storage reservoirs to determine the significance and impact of the gas loss. A report of the work accomplished will be prepared. The report will include: (1) a summary list by geologic type of US gas storage reservoirs and their annual underground gas storage losses in ft{sup 3}; (2) a rank by geologic classifications as to the amount of gas lost and the resultant lost revenue; and (3) show the level of significance and impact of the losses by geologic type. Concurrently, the amount of storage activity has increased in conjunction with the net increase of natural gas imports as shown on Figure No. 3. Storage is playing an ever increasing importance in supplying the domestic energy requirements.

Ortiz, I.; Anthony, R.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Dispersed storage and generation impacts on energy management systems  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines the various technologies for small-scale generation or storage of electricity known collectively as dispersed storage and generation, DSG. DSGs are seen to be an inhomogeneous group. The impact on energy management due to the integration of DSGs into the power system is examined, with emphasis on control, monitoring and operating problems.

Kirkham, H.; Klein, J.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Revision to the Record of Decision for the Department of Energy's Waste Management Program: Treatment and Storage of Transuranic Waste 9/6/02)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

989 989 Federal Register / Vol. 67, No. 173 / Friday, September 6, 2002 / Notices 1 The only exception to this decision was the Sandia National Laboratory in New Mexico, which will ship its TRU waste to the Los Alamos National Laboratory for disposal preparation and storage before disposal at WIPP. SANDEL, E. A. MS. SAUL, E. L. MR. SCHAEFER, J. C. MR. SCHAEFER JR, W. J. MR. SCHNEIDER, P. A. MR. SCHREGARDOUS, D. R. MR. SCHUBERT, D. CAPT SHEA, R. M. MAJGEN SHECK, E. E. MR. SHEPHARD, M. R. MS. SIMON, E. A. MR. SOMOROFF, A. R. DR. STELLOH-GARNER, C. MS. STOREY, R. C. MR. STUSSIE, W. A. MR. SULLIVAN, P. E. RADML TAMBURRINO, P. M. MR. TARRANT, N. J. MS. TESCH, T. G. MR. THOMAS, J. R. BGEN THOMAS, R. O. MR. THOMPSON, R. C. MR. THROCKMORTON JR., E. L. MR. TOWNSEND, D. K. MS.

30

Revision to the Record of Decision for the Department of Energy's Waste Management Program: Treatment and Storage of Transuranic Waste (07/25/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

46 46 Federal Register / Vol. 66, No. 143 / Wednesday, July 25, 2001 / Notices the Director of OMB provide interested Federal agencies and the public an early opportunity to comment on information collection requests. The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) may amend or waive the requirement for public consultation to the extent that public participation in the approval process would defeat the purpose of the information collection, violate State or Federal law, or substantially interfere with any agency's ability to perform its statutory obligations. The Leader, Information Management Group, Office of the Chief Information Officer, publishes this notice containing proposed information collection requests at the beginning of the Departmental review of the information collection. Each proposed information

31

Plutonium Finishing Plan (PFP) Treatment and Storage Unit Waste Analysis Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this waste analysis plan (WAP) is to document waste analysis activities associated with the Plutonium Finishing Plant Treatment and Storage Unit (PFP Treatment and Storage Unit) to comply with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-300(1), (2), (4)(a) and (5). The PFP Treatment and Storage Unit is an interim status container management unit for plutonium bearing mixed waste radiologically managed as transuranic (TRU) waste. TRU mixed (TRUM) waste managed at the PFP Treatment and Storage Unit is destined for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and therefore is not subject to land disposal restrictions [WAC 173-303-140 and 40 CFR 268]. The PFP Treatment and Storage Unit is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland Washington (Figure 1). Because dangerous waste does not include source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this documentation. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge.

PRIGNANO, A.L.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Revision to the Record of Decision for the Department of Energy's Waste Management Program: Treatment and Storage of Transuranic Waste (DOE/EIS-0200) (12/29/00)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

985 985 Federal Register / Vol. 65, No. 251 / Friday, December 29, 2000 / Notices collection; and (6) Reporting and/or Recordkeeping burden. OMB invites public comment. The Department of Education is especially interested in public comment addressing the following issues: (1) Is this collection necessary to the proper functions of the Department; (2) will this information be processed and used in a timely manner; (3) is the estimate of burden accurate; (4) how might the Department enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and (5) how might the Department minimize the burden of this collection on the respondents, including through the use of information technology. Dated: December 22, 2000. John Tressler, Leader, Regulatory Information Management,

33

DOE/EIS-0200 Amendement to the Record of Decision for the Department of Energy's Waste Management Program: Treatment and Storage of Transuranic Waste (03/07/08)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

401 Federal Register 401 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 46 / Friday, March 7, 2008 / Notices DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Fossil Energy Ultra-Deepwater Advisory Committee; Correction AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of Open Meeting Correction. The Department of Energy published a notice of open meeting announcing a meeting of the Ultra-Deepwater Advisory Committee, 73 FR 8863. In FR Doc. E8-2891, published on Friday, February 15, 2008, page 8863, under SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION, first column, forty-sixth line, remove ''onshore unconventional'' and add in its place ''ultra-deepwater''. Issued in Washington, DC on March 3, 2008. Rachel Samuel, Deputy Committee Management Officer. [FR Doc. E8-4536 Filed 3-6-08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6450-01-P DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

34

Analysis of accident sequences and source terms at waste treatment and storage facilities for waste generated by U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Operations, Volume 1: Sections 1-9  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the methodology, computational framework, and results of facility accident analyses performed for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The accident sequences potentially important to human health risk are specified, their frequencies are assessed, and the resultant radiological and chemical source terms are evaluated. A personal computer-based computational framework and database have been developed that provide these results as input to the WM PEIS for calculation of human health risk impacts. The methodology is in compliance with the most recent guidance from DOE. It considers the spectrum of accident sequences that could occur in activities covered by the WM PEIS and uses a graded approach emphasizing the risk-dominant scenarios to facilitate discrimination among the various WM PEIS alternatives. Although it allows reasonable estimates of the risk impacts associated with each alternative, the main goal of the accident analysis methodology is to allow reliable estimates of the relative risks among the alternatives. The WM PEIS addresses management of five waste streams in the DOE complex: low-level waste (LLW), hazardous waste (HW), high-level waste (HLW), low-level mixed waste (LLMW), and transuranic waste (TRUW). Currently projected waste generation rates, storage inventories, and treatment process throughputs have been calculated for each of the waste streams. This report summarizes the accident analyses and aggregates the key results for each of the waste streams. Source terms are estimated and results are presented for each of the major DOE sites and facilities by WM PEIS alternative for each waste stream. The appendices identify the potential atmospheric release of each toxic chemical or radionuclide for each accident scenario studied. They also provide discussion of specific accident analysis data and guidance used or consulted in this report.

Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Roglans-Ribas, J. [and others

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Storage Hierarchy Management for Scientific Computing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the driving forces behind the design of computer systems. As a result, many advances in CPU architecture were-terabyte tertiary storage system attached to a high- speed computer. The analysis finds that the number of files instead of the two separate views of the system studied. This finding was a major motivation of the design

Miller, Ethan L.

36

Market Driven Distributed Energy Storage Requirements for Load Management Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric energy storage systems are an enabling technology that could help meet the needs of electric utility by managing peak energy demands, helping shift the peak loads to off peak hours and improving the load factor of the electric distribution system. Applications of distributed energy storage systems (DESS) could also provide power quality and reliability benefits to customers and to the electric system. EPRI collaborated with several investor owned utilities to conduct a study to understand the te...

2007-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

37

Draft Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for managing treatment, storage, and disposal of radioactive and hazardous waste. Volume 3, Appendix A: Public response to revised NOI, Appendix B: Environmental restoration, Appendix C, Environmental impact analysis methods, Appendix D, Risk  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volume three contains appendices for the following: Public comments do DOE`s proposed revisions to the scope of the waste management programmatic environmental impact statement; Environmental restoration sensitivity analysis; Environmental impacts analysis methods; and Waste management facility human health risk estimates.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Solid Waste Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground Storage Act (Tennessee) Solid Waste Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground Storage Act (Tennessee) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Tennessee Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Tennessee Department Of Environment and Conservation The Solid Waste Disposal Laws and Regulations are found in Tenn. Code 68-211. These rules are enforced and subject to change by the Public Waste Board (PWB), which is established by the Division of Solid and Hazardous

39

SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT PHASE 1 SLUDGE STORAGE OPTIONS ASSESSMENT OF T PLANT VERSUS ALTERNATE STORAGE FACILITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) has recommended to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) a two phase approach for removal and storage (Phase 1) and treatment and packaging for offsite shipment (Phase 2) of the sludge currently stored within the 105-K West Basin. This two phased strategy enables early removal of sludge from the 105-K West Basin by 2015, allowing remediation of historical unplanned releases of waste and closure of the 100-K Area. In Phase 1, the sludge currently stored in the Engineered Containers and Settler Tanks within the 105-K West Basin will be transferred into sludge transport and storage containers (STSCs). The STSCs will be transported to an interim storage facility. In Phase 2, sludge will be processed (treated) to meet shipping and disposal requirements and the sludge will be packaged for final disposal at a geologic repository. The purpose of this study is to evaluate two alternatives for interim Phase 1 storage of K Basin sludge. The cost, schedule, and risks for sludge storage at a newly-constructed Alternate Storage Facility (ASF) are compared to those at T Plant, which has been used previously for sludge storage. Based on the results of the assessment, T Plant is recommended for Phase 1 interim storage of sludge. Key elements that support this recommendation are the following: (1) T Plant has a proven process for storing sludge; (2) T Plant storage can be implemented at a lower incremental cost than the ASF; and (3) T Plant storage has a more favorable schedule profile, which provides more float, than the ASF. Underpinning the recommendation of T Plant for sludge storage is the assumption that T Plant has a durable, extended mission independent of the K Basin sludge interim storage mission. If this assumption cannot be validated and the operating costs of T Plant are borne by the Sludge Treatment Project, the conclusions and recommendations of this study would change. The following decision-making strategy, which is dependent on the confidence that DOE has in the long term mission for T Plant, is proposed: (1) If the confidence level in a durable, extended T Plant mission independent of sludge storage is high, then the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) would continue to implement the path forward previously described in the Alternatives Report (HNF-39744). Risks to the sludge project can be minimized through the establishment of an Interface Control Document (ICD) defining agreed upon responsibilities for both the STP and T Plant Operations regarding the transfer and storage of sludge and ensuring that the T Plant upgrade and operational schedule is well integrated with the sludge storage activities. (2) If the confidence level in a durable, extended T Plant mission independent of sludge storage is uncertain, then the ASF conceptual design should be pursued on a parallel path with preparation of T Plant for sludge storage until those uncertainties are resolved. (3) Finally, if the confidence level in a durable, extended T Plant mission independent of sludge storage is low, then the ASF design should be selected to provide independence from the T Plant mission risk.

RUTHERFORD WW; GEUTHER WJ; STRANKMAN MR; CONRAD EA; RHOADARMER DD; BLACK DM; POTTMEYER JA

2009-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

40

Storage Resource Managers: Recent International Experience on Requirements and Multiple Co-Operating Implementations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Storage management is one of the most important enabling technologies for large-scale scientific investigations. Having to deal with multiple heterogeneous storage and file systems is one of the major bottlenecks in managing, replicating, and accessing ...

Lana Abadie; Paolo Badino; Jean-Philippe Baud; Ezio Corso; Matt Crawford; Shaun De Witt; Flavia Donno; Alberto Forti; Akos Frohner; Patrick Fuhrmann; Gilbert Grosdidier; Junmin Gu; Jens Jensen; Birger Koblitz; Sophie Lemaitre; Maarten Litmaath; Dmitry Litvinsev; Giuseppe Lo Presti; Luca Magnoni; Tigran Mkrtchan; Alexander Moibenko; Remi Mollon; Vijaya Natarajan; Gene Oleynik; Timur Perelmutov; Don Petravick; Arie Shoshani; Alex Sim; David Smith; Massimo Sponza; Paolo Tedesco; Riccardo Zappi

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "managing treatment storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Plutonium Finishing Plan (PFP) Treatment and Storage Unit Interim Status Closure Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes the planned activities and performance standards for closing the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Treatment and Storage Unit. The PFP Treatment and Storage Unit is located within the 234-52 Building in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility. Although this document is prepared based upon Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 265, Subpart G requirements, closure of the unit will comply with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 regulations pursuant to Section 5.3 of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Action Plan (Ecology et al. 1996). Because the PFP Treatment and Storage Unit manages transuranic mixed (TRUM) waste, there are many controls placed on management of the waste. Based on the many controls placed on management of TRUM waste, releases of TRUM waste are not anticipated to occur in the PFP Treatment and Storage Unit. Because the intention is to clean close the PFP Treatment and Storage Unit, postclosure activities are not applicable to this closure plan. To clean close the unit, it will be demonstrated that dangerous waste has not been left onsite at levels above the closure performance standard for removal and decontamination. If it is determined that clean closure is not possible or is environmentally impractical, the closure plan will be modified to address required postclosure activities. The PFP Treatment and Storage Unit will be operated to immobilize and/or repackage plutonium-bearing waste in a glovebox process. The waste to be processed is in a solid physical state (chunks and coarse powder) and will be sealed into and out of the glovebox in closed containers. The containers of immobilized waste will be stored in the glovebox and in additional permitted storage locations at PFP. The waste will be managed to minimize the potential for spills outside the glovebox, and to preclude spills from reaching soil. Containment surfaces will be maintained to ensure integrity. In the unlikely event that a waste spill does occur outside the glovebox, operating methods and administrative controls will require that waste spills be cleaned up promptly and completely, and a notation will be made in the operating record. Because dangerous waste does not include source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this documentation. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge.

PRIGNANO, A.L.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Key management and encryption under the bounded storage model.  

SciTech Connect

There are several engineering obstacles that need to be solved before key management and encryption under the bounded storage model can be realized. One of the critical obstacles hindering its adoption is the construction of a scheme that achieves reliable communication in the event that timing synchronization errors occur. One of the main accomplishments of this project was the development of a new scheme that solves this problem. We show in general that there exist message encoding techniques under the bounded storage model that provide an arbitrarily small probability of transmission error. We compute the maximum capacity of this channel using the unsynchronized key-expansion as side-channel information at the decoder and provide tight lower bounds for a particular class of key-expansion functions that are pseudo-invariant to timing errors. Using our results in combination with Dziembowski et al. [11] encryption scheme we can construct a scheme that solves the timing synchronization error problem. In addition to this work we conducted a detailed case study of current and future storage technologies. We analyzed the cost, capacity, and storage data rate of various technologies, so that precise security parameters can be developed for bounded storage encryption schemes. This will provide an invaluable tool for developing these schemes in practice.

Draelos, Timothy John; Neumann, William Douglas; Lanzone, Andrew J.; Anderson, William Erik

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Excess Weapons Plutonium Disposition: Plutonium Packaging, Storage and Transportation and Waste Treatment, Storage and Disposal Activities  

SciTech Connect

A fifth annual Excess Weapons Plutonium Disposition meeting organized by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was held February 16-18, 2004, at the State Education Center (SEC), 4 Aerodromnya Drive, St. Petersburg, Russia. The meeting discussed Excess Weapons Plutonium Disposition topics for which LLNL has the US Technical Lead Organization responsibilities. The technical areas discussed included Radioactive Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal, Plutonium Oxide and Plutonium Metal Packaging, Storage and Transportation and Spent Fuel Packaging, Storage and Transportation. The meeting was conducted with a conference format using technical presentations of papers with simultaneous translation into English and Russian. There were 46 Russian attendees from 14 different Russian organizations and six non-Russian attendees, four from the US and two from France. Forty technical presentations were made. The meeting agenda is given in Appendix B and the attendance list is in Appendix C.

Jardine, L J; Borisov, G B

2004-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

44

Treatment, packaging, and storage of bundle scrap hardware  

SciTech Connect

A study was performed to identify and evaluate the various technical options for treatment, packaging and storing the bundle scrap hardware that results from rod consolidation. The three general scenarios addressed were keeping the treated scrap in the pool, moving it to on-site dry storage, or immediate disposal. The study concluded that practical alternatives existed for all three cases. Use of novel scrap packaging techniques achieved an overall net consolidation ratio of two. The most economical concept was found to be using advanced technology in the pool storage scenario with dry storage schemes a close second. The project also provides information on scrap characterization and provides tools to assist in classifying the scrap hardware.

Fuierer, A. (Rochester Gas and Electric Corp., NY (United States)); Dabolt, R. (Chem-Nuclear Systems, Inc., Columbia, SC (United States))

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Managing Aging Effects on Dry Cask Storage Systems for Extended Long Term  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Managing Aging Effects on Dry Cask Storage Systems for Extended Managing Aging Effects on Dry Cask Storage Systems for Extended Long Term Storage and Transportation of Used Fuel Rev0 Managing Aging Effects on Dry Cask Storage Systems for Extended Long Term Storage and Transportation of Used Fuel Rev0 The report is intended to help assess and establish the technical basis for extended long-term storage and transportation of used nuclear fuel. It provides: 1) an overview of the ISFSI license renewal process based on 10 CFR 72 and the guidance provided in NUREG-1927; 2) definitions and terms for structures and components in DCSSs, materials, environments, aging effects, and aging mechanisms; 3) TLAAs and AMPs, respectively, that have been developed for managing aging effects on the SSCs important to safety in the dry cask storage system designs; and 4) AMPs and TLAAs for the SSCs

46

State of health aware charge management in hybrid electrical energy storage systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is the first to present an efficient charge management algorithm focusing on extending the cycle life of battery elements in hybrid electrical energy storage (HEES) systems while simultaneously improving the overall cycle efficiency. In particular, ... Keywords: charge management, hybrid electrical energy storage system, state of health

Qing Xie; Xue Lin; Yanzhi Wang; Massoud Pedram; Donghwa Shin; Naehyuck Chang

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Risk assessment of CST-7 proposed waste treatment and storage facilities Volume I: Limited-scope probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) of proposed CST-7 waste treatment & storage facilities. Volume II: Preliminary hazards analysis of proposed CST-7 waste storage & treatment facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In FY 1993, the Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Management Group [CST-7 (formerly EM-7)] requested the Probabilistic Risk and Hazards Analysis Group [TSA-11 (formerly N-6)] to conduct a study of the hazards associated with several CST-7 facilities. Among these facilities are the Hazardous Waste Treatment Facility (HWTF), the HWTF Drum Storage Building (DSB), and the Mixed Waste Receiving and Storage Facility (MWRSF), which are proposed for construction beginning in 1996. These facilities are needed to upgrade the Laboratory`s storage capability for hazardous and mixed wastes and to provide treatment capabilities for wastes in cases where offsite treatment is not available or desirable. These facilities will assist Los Alamos in complying with federal and state requlations.

Sasser, K.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Summary Final Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Impact Statement Environmental Impact Statement Final LONG-TERM MANAGEMENT AND STORAGE OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement LONG-TERM MANAGEMENT AND STORAGE OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY DOE/EIS-0423-S1 September 2013 SUMMARY AND GUIDE FOR STAKEHOLDERS U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management Washington, DC AVAILABILITY OF THIS FINAL LONG-TERM MANAGEMENT AND STORAGE OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY SUPPLEMENTAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT For additional information on this Mercury Storage SEIS, contact: David Levenstein, Document Manager Office of Environmental Compliance (EM-11) U.S. Department of Energy Post Office Box 2612 Germantown, MD 20874 Website: http://www.mercurystorageeis.com Printed with soy ink on recycled paper FINAL LONG-TERM MANAGEMENT AND

49

Dynamic Thermal Management for High-Performance Storage Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal-aware design of disk drives is important because high temperatures can cause reliability problems. Dynamic Thermal Management (DTM) techniques have been proposed to operate the disk at the average case temperature, rather than at the worse case by modulating the activities to avoid thermal emergencies. The thermal emergencies can be caused by unexpected events, such as fan-breaks, increased inlet air temperature, etc. One of the DTM techniques is a delay-based approach that adjusts the disk seek activities, cooling down the disk drives. Even if such a DTM approach could overcome thermal emergencies without stopping disk activity, it suffers from long delays when servicing the requests. Thus, in this chapter, we investigate the possibility of using a multispeed disk-drive (called dynamic rotations per minute (DRPM)) that dynamically modulates the rotational speed of the platter for implementing the DTM technique. Using a detailed performance and thermal simulator of a storage system, we evaluate two possible DTM policies (- time-based and watermark-based) with a DRPM disk-drive and observe that dynamic RPM modulation is effective in avoiding thermal emergencies. However, we find that the time taken to transition between different rotational speeds of the disk is critical for the effectiveness of the DRPM based DTM techniques.

Kim, Youngjae [ORNL; Gurumurthi, Dr Sudhanva [University of Virginia; Sivasubramaniam, Anand [Pennsylvania State University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Risks » Storage Environmental Risks » Storage Depleted UF6 Environmental Risks line line Storage Conversion Manufacturing Disposal Environmental Risks of Depleted UF6 Storage Discussion of the potential environmental impacts from storage of depleted UF6 at the three current storage sites, as well as potential impacts from the storage of depleted uranium after conversion to an oxide form. Impacts Analyzed in the PEIS The PEIS included an analysis of the potential environmental impacts from continuing to store depleted UF6 cylinders at the three current storage sites, as well as potential impacts from the storage of depleted uranium after conversion to an oxide form. Impacts from Continued Storage of UF6 Cylinders Continued storage of the UF6 cylinders would require extending the use of a

51

An Intelligent Portfolio Management Approach to Gas Storage Field Deliverability Maintenance and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Intelligent Portfolio Management Approach to Gas Storage Field Deliverability Maintenance. #12;Objective To modify and apply the state-of-the-art intelligent, optimum portfolio management Intelligence Tool can predict Skin with high confidence The Portfolio Management for re-stimulation candidate

Mohaghegh, Shahab

52

Umbrella file system: Storage management across heterogeneous devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the advent of and recent developments in Flash storage, device characteristic diversity is becoming both more prevalent and more distinct. In this article, we describe the Umbrella File System (UmbrellaFS), a stackable file system designed to provide ... Keywords: Device characteristics, flash drives, namespaces, policy-driven storage

John A. Garrison; A. L. Narasimha Reddy

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

An energy management IC for bio-implants using ultracapacitors for energy storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the first known energy management IC to allow low-power systems, such as biomedical implants, to optimally use ultracapacitors instead of batteries as their chief energy storage elements. The IC, fabricated in ...

Sanchez, William R.

54

Using supply chain management techniques to make wind plant and energy storage operation more profitable  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Our research demonstrates that supply chain management techniques can improve the incremental gross profits of wind plant and storage operations by up to five times. Using Monte-Carlo simulation we create and test scenarios ...

Saran, Prashant

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

EA-1120: Solid Residues Treatment, Repackaging and Storage at the Rocky  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0: Solid Residues Treatment, Repackaging and Storage at the 0: Solid Residues Treatment, Repackaging and Storage at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, Colorado EA-1120: Solid Residues Treatment, Repackaging and Storage at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, Colorado SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to stabilize, if necessary, and/or repackage the residues for safe interim storage at the Site while awaiting the completion and opening of a suitable repository to which they would be shipped for disposal from the U.S. Department of Energy Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site in Golden, Colorado. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD April 1, 1996 EA-1120: Finding of No Significant Impact Solid Residues Treatment, Repackaging and Storage at the Rocky Flats

56

Hanford Site waste treatment/storage/disposal integration  

SciTech Connect

In 1998 Waste Management Federal Services of Hanford, Inc. began the integration of all low-level waste, mixed waste, and TRU waste-generating activities across the Hanford site. With seven contractors, dozens of generating units, and hundreds of waste streams, integration was necessary to provide acute waste forecasting and planning for future treatment activities. This integration effort provides disposition maps that account for waste from generation, through processing, treatment and final waste disposal. The integration effort covers generating facilities from the present through the life-cycle, including transition and deactivation. The effort is patterned after the very successful DOE Complex EM Integration effort. Although still in the preliminary stages, the comprehensive onsite integration effort has already reaped benefits. These include identifying significant waste streams that had not been forecast, identifying opportunities for consolidating activities and services to accelerate schedule or save money; and identifying waste streams which currently have no path forward in the planning baseline. Consolidation/integration of planned activities may also provide opportunities for pollution prevention and/or avoidance of secondary waste generation. A workshop was held to review the waste disposition maps, and to identify opportunities with potential cost or schedule savings. Another workshop may be held to follow up on some of the long-term integration opportunities. A change to the Hanford waste forecast data call would help to align the Solid Waste Forecast with the new disposition maps.

MCDONALD, K.M.

1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

57

Energy Storage Management for VG Integration (Presentation), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Storage Management for VG Integration Energy Storage Management for VG Integration UWIG FALL TECHNIICAL WORKSHOP Brendan Kirby National Renewable Energy Laboratory Consultant October 13, 2011 NREL/PR-5500-53295 Photo by NREL/PIX 19498 National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future Increases Value Through Optimized Ancillary Service (AS) Provision: Pumped Storage Generator Example (320 MW pump, 200-400 MW gen, 40 MW reg, 200 MW spin, 400 MW non) * Total profits increased 133%; * Energy profits reduced -48%; * Regulation profits added +41%; * Spinning profits added +89%; * Non-Spin profits added +50%. CAISO market modeled for all 2010

58

Managing Wind-based Electricity Generation and Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on renewable energy, and to develop efficient electricity storage. Renewable energy--such as wind energy. However, most renewable energy is inh, who is extremely instrumental in guiding my research on energy. His insights have significantly

59

Fast Flux Test Facility, Sodium Storage Facility project-specific project management plan  

SciTech Connect

This Project-Specific Project Management Plan describes the project management methods and controls used by the WHC Projects Department to manage Project 03-F-031. The Sodium Storage Facility provides for storage of the 260,000 gallons of sodium presently in the FFTF Plant. The facility will accept the molten sodium transferred from the FFTF sodium systems, and store the sodium in a solid state under an inert cover gas until such time as a Sodium Reaction Facility is available for final disposal of the sodium.

Shank, D.R.

1994-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

60

GRR/Section 18-HI-b - RCRA - Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8-HI-b - RCRA - Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and 8-HI-b - RCRA - Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Permit (TSD) < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 18-HI-b - RCRA - Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Permit (TSD) 18HIB - RCRAHazardousWasteTreatmentStorageAndDisposalPermitTSD.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Hawaii Department of Health Solid and Hazardous Waste Branch United States Environmental Protection Agency Regulations & Policies Resource Conversation and Recovery Act (42 U.S.C. 6901, et seq.) 40 CFR 270 Hawaii Administrative Rules Title 11, Chapter 261 Hawaii Administrative Rules Title 11, Chapter 265 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "managing treatment storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

GRR/Section 18-HI-b - RCRA - Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8-HI-b - RCRA - Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Permit (TSD) < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help...

62

Household water treatment and safe storage options for Northern Region Ghana : consumer preference and relative cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A range of household water treatment and safe storage (HWTS) products are available in Northern Region Ghana which have the potential to significantly improve local drinking water quality. However, to date, the region has ...

Green, Vanessa (Vanessa Layton)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Monitoring effective use of household water treatment and safe storage technologies in Ethiopia and Ghana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Household water treatment and storage (HWTS) technologies dissemination is beginning to scale-up to reach the almost 900 million people without access to an improved water supply (WHO/UNICEF/JMP, 2008). Without well-informed ...

Stevenson, Matthew M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Thermal Management of Onboard Cryogenic Hydrogen Storage Systems...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plan: (A) System Weight and Volume (C) Efficiency (E) ChargingDischarging Rates (J) Thermal Management Technical Targets In this project, studies are being conducted to develop...

65

Independent review of inappropriate identification, storage and treatment methods of polychlorinated biphenyl waste streams  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the review was to evaluate incidents involving the inappropriate identification, storage, and treatment methods associated with polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) waste streams originating from the V-tank system at the Test Area North (TAN). The team was instructed to perform a comprehensive review of Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (LMITCO`s) compliance programs related to these incidents to assess the adequacy and effectiveness of the management program in all respects including: adequacy of the waste management program in meeting all LMITCO requirements and regulations; adequacy of policies, plans, and procedures in addressing and implementing all federal and state requirements and regulations; and compliance status of LMITCO, LMITCO contract team members, and LMITCO contract/team member subcontractor personnel with established PCB management policies, plans, and procedures. The V-Tanks are part of an intermediate waste disposal system and are located at the Technical Support Facility (TSF) at TAN at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The IRT evaluated how a waste was characterized, managed, and information was documented; however, they did not take control of wastes or ensure followup was performed on all waste streams that may have been generated from the V-Tanks. The team has also subsequently learned that the Environmental Restoration (ER) program is revising the plans for the decontamination and decommissioning of the intermediate waste disposal system based on new information listed and PCB wastes. The team has not reviewed those in-process changes. The source of PCB in the V-Tank is suspected to be a spill of hydraulic fluid in 1968.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Steam Generator Management Program: Long-Term Data Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the years, steam generator inspections have generated a large amount of historical inspection data, stored on many different types of media. There have been issues accessing the data because of media degradation or the reader no longer being available. With the constant changes in media technology, a review of current types of media was needed to determine what may be accessible in 20 to 30 years. This report documents a literature search conducted of all storage devices and provides an assessment o...

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

67

ARPA-E's 19 New Projects Focus on Battery Management and Storage |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ARPA-E's 19 New Projects Focus on Battery Management and Storage ARPA-E's 19 New Projects Focus on Battery Management and Storage ARPA-E's 19 New Projects Focus on Battery Management and Storage August 7, 2012 - 1:17pm Addthis Principal Deputy Director Eric Toone, former ARPA-E Director Arun Majumdar, the Honorable Bart Gordon and IBM Research Senior Director Kathleen Kingscott discuss the future of energy innovation at an ITIF event on August 2. | Energy Department photo. Principal Deputy Director Eric Toone, former ARPA-E Director Arun Majumdar, the Honorable Bart Gordon and IBM Research Senior Director Kathleen Kingscott discuss the future of energy innovation at an ITIF event on August 2. | Energy Department photo. Alexa McClanahan Communications Support Contractor to ARPA-E What are the key facts? The 19 new ARPA-E projects span 14 states.

68

EA-1120: Solid Residues Treatment, Repackaging and Storage at the Rocky  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

20: Solid Residues Treatment, Repackaging and Storage at the 20: Solid Residues Treatment, Repackaging and Storage at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, Colorado EA-1120: Solid Residues Treatment, Repackaging and Storage at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, Colorado SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to stabilize, if necessary, and/or repackage the residues for safe interim storage at the Site while awaiting the completion and opening of a suitable repository to which they would be shipped for disposal from the U.S. Department of Energy Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site in Golden, Colorado. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD April 1, 1996 EA-1120: Finding of No Significant Impact

69

Final Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Environmental Impact Statement Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

Pursuant to the Mercury Export Ban Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-414), DOE was directed to designate a facility or facilities for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury generated within the United States. Therefore, DOE has analyzed the storage of up to 10,000 metric tons (11,000 tons) of elemental mercury in a facility(ies) constructed and operated in accordance with the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (74 FR 31723). DOE prepared this Final Mercury Storage EIS in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.), the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) implementing regulations (40 CFR 15001508), and DOEs NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021) to evaluate reasonable alternatives for a facility(ies) for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury. This Final Mercury Storage EIS analyzes the potential environmental, human health, and socioeconomic impacts of elemental mercury storage at seven candidate locations: Grand Junction Disposal Site near Grand Junction, Colorado; Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; Hawthorne Army Depot near Hawthorne, Nevada; Idaho National Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; Kansas City Plant in Kansas City, Missouri; Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina; and Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas. As required by CEQ NEPA regulations, the No Action Alternative was also analyzed as a basis for comparison. DOE intends to decide (1) where to locate the elemental mercury storage facility(ies) and (2) whether to use existing buildings, new buildings, or a combination of existing and new buildings. DOEs Preferred Alternative for the long-term management and storage of mercury is the Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas.

Not Available

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Final Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Environmental Impact Statement Volume1  

SciTech Connect

Pursuant to the Mercury Export Ban Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-414), DOE was directed to designate a facility or facilities for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury generated within the United States. Therefore, DOE has analyzed the storage of up to 10,000 metric tons (11,000 tons) of elemental mercury in a facility(ies) constructed and operated in accordance with the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (74 FR 31723).DOE prepared this Final Mercury Storage EIS in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.), the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) implementing regulations (40 CFR 15001508), and DOEs NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021) to evaluate reasonable alternatives for a facility(ies) for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury. This Final Mercury Storage EIS analyzes the potential environmental, human health, and socioeconomic impacts of elemental mercury storage at seven candidate locations:Grand Junction Disposal Site near Grand Junction, Colorado; Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; Hawthorne Army Depot near Hawthorne, Nevada; Idaho National Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho;Kansas City Plant in Kansas City, Missouri; Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina; and Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas. As required by CEQ NEPA regulations, the No Action Alternative was also analyzed as a basis for comparison. DOE intends to decide (1) where to locate the elemental mercury storage facility(ies) and (2) whether to use existing buildings, new buildings, or a combination of existing and new buildings. DOEs Preferred Alternative for the long-term management and storage of mercury is the Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas.

Not Available

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Underground natural gas storage reservoir management: Phase 2. Final report, June 1, 1995--March 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect

Gas storage operators are facing increased and more complex responsibilities for managing storage operations under Order 636 which requires unbundling of storage from other pipeline services. Low cost methods that improve the accuracy of inventory verification are needed to optimally manage this stored natural gas. Migration of injected gas out of the storage reservoir has not been well documented by industry. The first portion of this study addressed the scope of unaccounted for gas which may have been due to migration. The volume range was estimated from available databases and reported on an aggregate basis. Information on working gas, base gas, operating capacity, injection and withdrawal volumes, current and non-current revenues, gas losses, storage field demographics and reservoir types is contained among the FERC Form 2, EIA Form 191, AGA and FERC Jurisdictional databases. The key elements of this study show that gas migration can result if reservoir limits have not been properly identified, gas migration can occur in formation with extremely low permeability (0.001 md), horizontal wellbores can reduce gas migration losses and over-pressuring (unintentionally) storage reservoirs by reinjecting working gas over a shorter time period may increase gas migration effects.

Ortiz, I.; Anthony, R.V.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

72

EMSL Research and Capability Development Proposals Facility-Wide Management and Storage for Scientific Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility-Wide Management and Storage for Scientific Data Facility-Wide Management and Storage for Scientific Data Project Start Date: Summer 2008 EMSL Lead Investigator Ken Auberry Instrumentation Development Laboratory, EMSL, PNNL As greater numbers of collaborators, journals, and funding agencies require data retention associated with a given project, preservation of experimentally generated results has become an increasingly important challenge in science. In many small- to medium-scale laboratory environments, this task has traditionally been carried out using offline optical media (recordable CDs and DVDs) or externally connected commercial hard drive units. Along with the raw storage issues that must be addressed, additional challenges await in the correlation of stored data to contextual information about the experiments and

73

CRAD, Management - Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility CRAD, Management - Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility May 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a May, 2007 readiness assessment of the Management at the MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory, Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Management - Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility More Documents & Publications CRAD, Engineering - Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility

74

The Middle Ground for Nuclear Waste Management: Social and Ethical Aspects of Shallow Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2001 terrorist attacks in the USA and the 2011 seismic events in Japan have brought into sharp relief the vulnerabilities involved in storing nuclear waste on the land's surface. Nuclear engineers and waste managers are deciding that disposing nuclear ... Keywords: Ethics, Inter-Generational Equity, Nuclear Waste, Shallow Storage, Waste Disposal

Alan Marshall

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

An ICT-based energy management system to integrate renewable energy and storage for grid balancing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Among the different renewable sources the "green" energy coming from wind or solar farms is often injected into the grid when it is not expected or there is no demand. The integration of photovoltaic and wind energy into the grid entails the need to ... Keywords: electric grid balancing, energy management systems, energy storage, renewable sources integration

Diego Arnone, Massimo Bertoncini, Alessandro Rossi, Fabrizio D'Errico, Carlos Garca-Santiago, Diana Moneta, Cristiano D'Orinzi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Optimal Energy Management for a Hybrid Energy Storage System for Electric Vehicles Based on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

}@lea.uni-paderborn.de Abstract--For electric and hybrid electric cars, commonly nickel-metal hydride and lithium-ion batteries. The BMW Mini-E is an all electric powered car field-tested in the United States, United KingdomOptimal Energy Management for a Hybrid Energy Storage System for Electric Vehicles Based

Noé, Reinhold

77

Management of Leaks in Hydrogen Production, Delivery, and Storage Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A systematic approach to manage hydrogen leakage from components is presented. Methods to evaluate the quantity of hydrogen leakage and permeation from a system are provided by calculation and testing sensitivities. The following technology components of a leak management program are described: (1) Methods to evaluate hydrogen gas loss through leaks; (2) Methods to calculate opening areas of crack like defects; (3) Permeation of hydrogen through metallic piping; (4) Code requirements for acceptable flammability limits; (5) Methods to detect flammable gas; (6) Requirements for adequate ventilation in the vicinity of the hydrogen system; (7) Methods to calculate dilution air requirements for flammable gas mixtures; and (8) Concepts for reduced leakage component selection and permeation barriers.

Rawls, G

2006-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

78

EIS-0423: Storage and Management of Elemental Mercury  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts associated with the reasonable alternatives for managing and storing elemental mercury at seven candidate locations (i.e., Colorado, Idaho, Missouri, Nevada, South Carolina, Texas, and Washington). The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, and the Mesa County Board of Commissioners (Mesa County, Colorado) are cooperating agencies in the preparation of this EIS.

79

Evaluation of potential for MSRE spent fuel and flush salt storage and treatment at the INEL  

SciTech Connect

The potential for interim storage as well as for treatment of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment spent fuel at INEL has been evaluated. Provided that some minimal packaging and chemical stabilization prerequisites are satisfied, safe interim storage of the spent fuel at the INEL can be achieved in a number of existing or planned facilities. Treatment by calcination in the New Waste Calcining Facility at the INEL can also be a safe, effective, and economical alternative to treatment that would require the construction of a dedicated facility. If storage at the INEL is chosen for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) spent fuel salts, their transformation to the more stable calcine solid would still be desirable as it would result in a lowering of risks. Treatment in the proposed INEL Remote-Handled Immobilization Facility (RHIF) would result in a waste form that would probably be acceptable for disposal at one of the proposed national repositories. The cost increment imputable to the treatment of the MSRE salts would be a small fraction of the overall capital and operating costs of the facility or the cost of building and operating a dedicated facility. Institutional and legal issues regarding shipments of fuel and waste to the INEL are summarized. The transfer of MSRE spent fuel for interim storage or treatment at the INEL is allowed under existing agreements between the State of idaho and the Department of energy and other agencies of the Federal Government. In contrast, current agreements preclude the transfer into Idaho of any radioactive wastes for storage or disposal within the State of Idaho. This implies that wastes and residues produced from treating the MSRE spent fuel at locations outside Idaho would not be acceptable for storage in Idaho. Present agreements require that all fuel and high-level wastes stored at the INEL, including MSRE spent fuel if received at the INEL, must be moved to a location outside Idaho by the year 2035.

Ougouag, A.M.; Ostby, P.A.; Nebeker, R.L.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

#53 DrugTreatment and Data Management:AnAnalysis of InformationTechnology Infrastructure J. P. Wisdom1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#53 DrugTreatment and Data Management:AnAnalysis of InformationTechnology Infrastructure Abstract, and training for system development and implementation. Conclusions This analysis provides a snapshot of drug.ti, a program designed to aid in the storage, coding, retrieval, and analysis of qualitative data. Agency

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "managing treatment storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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81

Shadow Review of the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project Transuranic Storage Area Retrieval Enclosue Restrieval Restart DOE Readiness Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ID-2011-09-22 ID-2011-09-22 Site: Idaho Site - Idaho Cleanup Project Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Shadow Review of the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) Transuranic Storage Area-Retrieval Enclosure (TSA-RE) Retrieval Restart Department of Energy Readiness Assessment Dates of Activity : 09/20/2011 - 09/22/2011 Report Preparer: Aleem Boatright Activity Description/Purpose: A review of nuclear safety implementation verification review (IVR) procedures and processes was conducted at the Idaho Site from September 12-22, 2011. The scope originally included shadowing of the Department of Energy (DOE) Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) Idaho Cleanup Project IVR for the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project (SBWTP).

82

Shadow Review of the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project Transuranic Storage Area Retrieval Enclosue Restrieval Restart DOE Readiness Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ID-2011-09-22 ID-2011-09-22 Site: Idaho Site - Idaho Cleanup Project Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Shadow Review of the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) Transuranic Storage Area-Retrieval Enclosure (TSA-RE) Retrieval Restart Department of Energy Readiness Assessment Dates of Activity : 09/20/2011 - 09/22/2011 Report Preparer: Aleem Boatright Activity Description/Purpose: A review of nuclear safety implementation verification review (IVR) procedures and processes was conducted at the Idaho Site from September 12-22, 2011. The scope originally included shadowing of the Department of Energy (DOE) Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) Idaho Cleanup Project IVR for the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project (SBWTP).

83

Conceptual design report: Nuclear materials storage facility renovation. Part 1, Design concept. Part 2, Project management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was a Fiscal Year (FY) 1984 line-item project completed in 1987 that has never been operated because of major design and construction deficiencies. This renovation project, which will correct those deficiencies and allow operation of the facility, is proposed as an FY 97 line item. The mission of the project is to provide centralized intermediate and long-term storage of special nuclear materials (SNM) associated with defined LANL programmatic missions and to establish a centralized SNM shipping and receiving location for Technical Area (TA)-55 at LANL. Based on current projections, existing storage space for SNM at other locations at LANL will be loaded to capacity by approximately 2002. This will adversely affect LANUs ability to meet its mission requirements in the future. The affected missions include LANL`s weapons research, development, and testing (WRD&T) program; special materials recovery; stockpile survelliance/evaluation; advanced fuels and heat sources development and production; and safe, secure storage of existing nuclear materials inventories. The problem is further exacerbated by LANL`s inability to ship any materials offsite because of the lack of receiver sites for mate rial and regulatory issues. Correction of the current deficiencies and enhancement of the facility will provide centralized storage close to a nuclear materials processing facility. The project will enable long-term, cost-effective storage in a secure environment with reduced radiation exposure to workers, and eliminate potential exposures to the public. This document provides Part I - Design Concept which describes the selected solution, and Part II - Project Management which describes the management system organization, the elements that make up the system, and the control and reporting system.

NONE

1995-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

84

Drilling Waste Management Fact Sheet: Thermal Treatment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

range from 75 to 150ton (Bansal and Sugiarto 1999). Many factors can impact treatment costs, including oil and moisture content of the waste, particle size distribution of the...

85

Summary of treatment, storage, and disposal facility usage data collected from U.S. Department of Energy sites  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an analysis for the US Department of Energy (DOE) to determine the level and extent of treatment, storage, and disposal facility (TSDF) assessment duplication. Commercial TSDFs are used as an integral part of the hazardous waste management process for those DOE sites that generate hazardous waste. Data regarding the DOE sites` usage have been extracted from three sets of data and analyzed in this report. The data are presented both qualitatively and quantitatively, as appropriate. This information provides the basis for further analysis of assessment duplication to be documented in issue papers as appropriate. Once the issues have been identified and adequately defined, corrective measures will be proposed and subsequently implemented.

Jacobs, A.; Oswald, K. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Trump, C. [EG and G Rocky Flats, Golden, CO (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Review of private sector treatment, storage, and disposal capacity for radioactive waste. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This report is an update of a report that summarized the current and near-term commercial and disposal of radioactive and mixed waste. This report was capacity for the treatment, storage, dating and written for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) with the objective of updating and expanding the report entitled ``Review of Private Sector Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Capacity for Radioactive Waste``, (INEL-95/0020, January 1995). The capacity to process radioactively-contaminated protective clothing and/or respirators was added to the list of private sector capabilities to be assessed. Of the 20 companies surveyed in the previous report, 14 responded to the request for additional information, five did not respond, and one asked to be deleted from the survey. One additional company was identified as being capable of performing LLMW treatability studies and six were identified as providers of laundering services for radioactively-contaminated protective clothing and/or respirators.

Smith, M.; Harris, J.G.; Moore-Mayne, S.; Mayes, R.; Naretto, C.

1995-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

87

Managing Environmental and Human Safety Risks Associated with Geologic Storage of CO2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.0 Natural Gas Storage.0 Yaggy Natural Gas Storage Field: A Case Study................................................. 41 7 storage can be learned from other functionally similar activities such as underground natural gas storage

88

MRS (monitored retrievable storage) systems study Task G report: The role and functions of surface storage of radioactive material in the federal waste management system  

SciTech Connect

This is one of nine studies undertaken by contractors to the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), to provide a technical basis for re-evaluating the role of a monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility. The study investigates the functions that could be performed by surface storage of radioactive material within the federal radioactive waste management system, including enabling acceptance of spent fuel from utility owners, scheduling of waste-preparation processes within the system, enhancement of system operating reliability, and conditioning the thermal (decay heat) characteristics of spent fuel emplaced in a repository. The analysis focuses particularly on the effects of storage capacity and DOE acceptance schedule on power reactors. Figures of merit developed include the storage capacity (in metric tons of uranium (MTU)) required to be added beyond currently estimated maximum spent fuel storage capacities and its associated cost, and the number of years that spent fuel pools would remain open after last discharge (in pool-years) and the cost of this period of operation. 27 refs., 36 figs., 18 tabs.

Wood, T.W.; Short, S.M.; Woodruff, M.G.; Altenhofen, M.K.; MacKay, C.A.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

MRS (monitored retrievable storage) Systems Study Task 1 report: Waste management system reliability analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is one of nine studies undertaken by contractors to the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), to provide a technical basis for re-evaluating the role of a monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility. The study evaluates the relative reliabilities of systems with and without an MRS facility using current facility design bases. The principal finding of this report is that the MRS system has several operational advantages that enhance system reliability. These are: (1) the MRS system is likely to encounter fewer technical issues, (2) the MRS would assure adequate system surface storage capacity to accommodate repository construction and startup delays of up to five years or longer if the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act (NWPAA) were amended, (3) the system with an MRS has two federal acceptance facilities with parallel transportation routing and surface storage capacity, and (4) the MRS system would allow continued waste acceptance for up to a year after a major disruption of emplacement operations at the repository.

Clark, L.L.; Myers, R.S.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Injection and Reservoir Hazard Management: Mechanical Deformation and Geochemical Alteration at the InSalah CO2 Storage Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Injection and Reservoir Hazard Injection and Reservoir Hazard Management: Mechanical Deformation and Geochemical Alteration at the In Salah CO 2 Storage Project Background Safe and permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in geologic reservoirs is critical to geologic sequestration. The In Salah Project (joint venture of British Petroleum (BP), Sonatrach, and StatoilHydro) has two fundamental goals: (1) 25-30 years of 9 billion cubic feet per year (bcfy) natural gas production from 8 fields in the Algerian

91

8-Waste treatment and disposal A. Responsibility for waste management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

8- Waste treatment and disposal A. Responsibility for waste management 1. Each worker is responsible for correctly bagging and labeling his/her own waste. 2. A BSL3 technician will be responsible for transporting and autoclaving the waste. Waste will be autoclaved once or twice per day, depending on use

92

Final Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Environmental Impact Statement Summary and Guide for Stakeholders  

SciTech Connect

Pursuant to the Mercury Export Ban Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-414), DOE was directed to designate a facility or facilities for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury generated within the United States. Therefore, DOE has analyzed the storage of up to 10,000 metric tons (11,000 tons) of elemental mercury in a facility(ies) constructed and operated in accordance with the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (74 FR 31723). DOE prepared this Final Mercury Storage EIS in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.), the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) implementing regulations (40 CFR 15001508), and DOEs NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021) to evaluate reasonable alternatives for a facility(ies) for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury. This Final Mercury Storage EIS analyzes the potential environmental, human health, and socioeconomic impacts of elemental mercury storage at seven candidate locations: Grand Junction Disposal Site near Grand Junction, Colorado; Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; Hawthorne Army Depot near Hawthorne, Nevada; Idaho National Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; Kansas City Plant in Kansas City, Missouri; Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina; and Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas. As required by CEQ NEPA regulations, the No Action Alternative was also analyzed as a basis for comparison. DOE intends to decide (1) where to locate the elemental mercury storage facility(ies) and (2) whether to use existing buildings, new buildings, or a combination of existing and new buildings. DOEs Preferred Alternative for the long-term management and storage of mercury is the Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas.

Not Available

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Integrated Waste Treatment Unit GFSI Risk Management Plan  

SciTech Connect

This GFSI Risk Management Plan (RMP) describes the strategy for assessing and managing project risks for the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU) that are specifically within the control and purview of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and identifies the risks that formed the basis for the DOE contingency included in the performance baseline. DOE-held contingency is required to cover cost and schedule impacts of DOE activities. Prior to approval of the performance baseline (Critical Decision-2) project cost contingency was evaluated during a joint meeting of the Contractor Management Team and the Integrated Project Team for both contractor and DOE risks to schedule and cost. At that time, the contractor cost and schedule risk value was $41.3M and the DOE cost and schedule risk contingency value is $39.0M. The contractor cost and schedule risk value of $41.3M was retained in the performance baseline as the contractor's management reserve for risk contingency. The DOE cost and schedule risk value of $39.0M has been retained in the performance baseline as the DOE Contingency. The performance baseline for the project was approved in December 2006 (Garman 2006). The project will continue to manage to the performance baseline and change control thresholds identified in PLN-1963, ''Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment Project Execution Plan'' (PEP).

W. A. Owca

2007-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

94

Integrated Waste Treatment Unit GFSI Risk Management Plan  

SciTech Connect

This GFSI Risk Management Plan (RMP) describes the strategy for assessing and managing project risks for the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU) that are specifically within the control and purview of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and identifies the risks that formed the basis for the DOE contingency included in the performance baseline. DOE-held contingency is required to cover cost and schedule impacts of DOE activities. Prior to approval of the performance baseline (Critical Decision-2) project cost contingency was evaluated during a joint meeting of the Contractor Management Team and the Integrated Project Team for both contractor and DOE risks to schedule and cost. At that time, the contractor cost and schedule risk value was $41.3M and the DOE cost and schedule risk contingency value is $39.0M. The contractor cost and schedule risk value of $41.3M was retained in the performance baseline as the contractor's management reserve for risk contingency. The DOE cost and schedule risk value of $39.0M has been retained in the performance baseline as the DOE Contingency. The performance baseline for the project was approved in December 2006 (Garman 2006). The project will continue to manage to the performance baseline and change control thresholds identified in PLN-1963, ''Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment Project Execution Plan'' (PEP).

W. A. Owca

2007-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

95

Storage/Handling | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

StorageHandling StorageHandling Records Management Procedures for Storage, Transfer & Retrieval of Records from the Washington National Records Center (WNRC) or Legacy Management...

96

Proceedings of the 6th Annual Meeting for Excess Weapons Plutonium Disposition: Plutonium Packaging, Storage and Transportation and WasteTreatment, Storage and Disposal Activities  

SciTech Connect

The sixth annual Excess Weapons Plutonium Disposition meeting organized by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was held November 15-17, 2004, at the State Education Center (SEC), 4 Aerodromnya Drive, St. Petersburg, Russia. The meeting discussed Excess Weapons Plutonium Disposition topics for which LLNL has the US Technical Lead Organization responsibilities. The technical areas discussed included Radioactive Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal, and Plutonium Oxide and Plutonium Metal Packaging, Storage and Transportation and Spent Fuel Packaging, Storage and Transportation. The meeting was conducted with a conference format using technical presentations of papers with simultaneous translation into English and Russian. There were 55 Russian attendees from 16 different Russian organizations and four non-Russian attendees from the US. Forty technical presentations were made. The meeting agenda is given in Appendix B and the attendance list is in Appendix C. The 16 different Russian design, industrial sites, and scientific organizations in attendance included staff from Rosatom/Minatom, Federal Nuclear and Radiation Safety Authority of Russia (GOSATOMNADZOR, NIERA/GAN), All Russian Designing & Scientific Research Institute of Complex Power Technology (VNIPIET), Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI), A. A. Bochvar All Russian Scientific Research Institute of Inorganic Materials (VNIINM), All Russian & Design Institute of Production Engineering (VNIPIPT), Ministry of Atomic Energy of Russian Federation Specialized State Designing Institute (GSPI), State Scientific Center Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (RIAR), Siberian Chemical Combine Tomsk (SCC), Mayak PO, Mining Chemical Combine (MCC K-26), Institute of Biophysics (IBPh), Sverdlosk Scientific Research Institute of Chemical Machine Building (SNIIChM), Kurchatov Institute (KI), Institute of Physical Chemistry Russian Academy of Science (IPCh RAS) and Radon PO-Moscow. The four non-Russian attendees included one representative from DOE NNSA, and LLNL, and two from Duratek, The meeting was organized into three major sessions: (1) Waste Treatment, Storage and Disposal; (2) Plutonium Packaging, Storage and Transportation; (3) Spent Fuel Packaging, Storage and Transportation. Twenty presentations were made on the topic of Waste Treatment, Storage and Disposal (Session II), ten presentations on Plutonium Packaging, Storage and Transportation (Session III), and four presentations on Spent Fuel Packaging, Storage and Transportation (Session IV). In addition, DOE/NNSA, Minatom/Rosatom and TVEL summarized the bases for the conference at the beginning of the meeting (Session I). Nine months had passed since the last LLNL contracts review meeting. During that time period, LLNL and TVEL have been able to sign six contracts for a total of $1,700,000 in the areas of: (1) Waste treatment, storage and disposal; and (2) Plutonium packaging, storage and transportation. The scope of several other work projects are now in various stages of development in these areas. It is anticipated that more contracts will be signed before the next meeting of this type. These events have allowed us to start work in our technical activities under new direction from TVEL, which is now the single Russian organization to coordinate and conclude contracts with LLNL. The meeting presentations and discussions have defined where we are and where we are going in the near term in regard to our joint interests in excess weapons plutonium disposition. Each topical section of this Proceedings is introduced by a summary of the presentations in that section.

Jardine, L J

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

97

An Energy Management IC for Bio-Implants Using Ultracapacitors for Energy Storage William Sanchez, Charles Sodini, and Joel L. Dawson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy storage elements. The IC, fabricated in a 0.18 m CMOS process, consists of a switched-capacitor DC-DCAn Energy Management IC for Bio-Implants Using Ultracapacitors for Energy Storage William Sanchez of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA Abstract We present the first known energy management IC to allow low

Dawson, Joel

98

EIS-0423-S1: Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for the Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This SEIS supplements the January 2011 Environmental Impact Statement for the Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury. It will analyze the potential environmental impact for a facility at and in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant near Carlsbad, New Mexico.

99

Underground storage tank management plan, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Underground Storage Tank (UST) Program at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant was established to locate UST systems at the facility and to ensure that all operating UST systems are free of leaks. UST systems have been removed or upgraded in accordance with Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) regulations and guidance. With the closure of a significant portion of the USTs, the continuing mission of the UST Management Program is to manage the remaining active UST systems and continue corrective actions in a safe regulatory compliant manner. This Program outlines the compliance issues that must be addressed, reviews the current UST inventory and compliance approach, and presents the status and planned activities associated with each UST system. The UST Program provides guidance for implementing TDEC regulations and guidelines for petroleum UST systems. The plan is divided into three major sections: (1) regulatory requirements, (2) active UST sites, and (3) out-of-service UST sites. These sections describe in detail the applicable regulatory drivers, the UST sites addressed under the Program, and the procedures and guidance for compliance.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Managing aging effects on dry cask storage systems for extended long-term storage and transportation of used fuel - rev. 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cancellation of the Yucca Mountain repository program in the United States raises the prospect of extended long-term storage (i.e., >120 years) and deferred transportation of used fuel at operating and decommissioned nuclear power plant sites. Under U.S. federal regulations contained in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 72.42, the initial license term for an Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) must not exceed 40 years from the date of issuance. Licenses may be renewed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at the expiration of the license term upon application by the licensee for a period not to exceed 40 years. Application for ISFSI license renewals must include the following: (1) Time-limited aging analyses (TLAAs) that demonstrate that structures, systems, and components (SSCs) important to safety will continue to perform their intended function for the requested period of extended operation; and (2) a description of the aging management program (AMP) for management of issues associated with aging that could adversely affect SSCs important to safety. In addition, the application must also include design bases information as documented in the most recent updated final safety analysis report as required by 10 CFR 72.70. Information contained in previous applications, statements, or reports filed with the Commission under the license may be incorporated by reference provided that those references are clear and specific. The NRC has recently issued the Standard Review Plan (SRP) for renewal of used-fuel dry cask storage system (DCSS) licenses and Certificates of Compliance (CoCs), NUREG-1927, under which NRC may renew a specific license or a CoC for a term not to exceed 40 years. Both the license and the CoC renewal applications must contain revised technical requirements and operating conditions (fuel storage, surveillance and maintenance, and other requirements) for the ISFSI and DCSS that address aging effects that could affect the safe storage of the used fuel. The information contained in the license and CoC renewal applications will require NRC review to verify that the aging effects on the SSCs in DCSSs/ ISFSIs are adequately managed for the period of extended operation. To date, all of the ISFSIs located across the United States with more than 1,500 dry casks loaded with used fuel have initial license terms of 20 years; three ISFSIs (Surry, H.B. Robinson and Oconee) have received their renewed licenses for 20 years, and two other ISFSIs (Calvert Cliffs and Prairie Island) have applied for license renewal for 40 years. This report examines issues related to managing aging effects on the SSCs in DCSSs/ISFSIs for extended long-term storage and transportation of used fuels, following an approach similar to that of the Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL) report, NUREG-1801, for the aging management and license renewal of nuclear power plants. The report contains five chapters and an appendix on quality assurance for aging management programs for used-fuel dry storage systems. Chapter I of the report provides an overview of the ISFSI license renewal process based on 10 CFR 72 and the guidance provided in NUREG-1927. Chapter II contains definitions and terms for structures and components in DCSSs, materials, environments, aging effects, and aging mechanisms. Chapter III and Chapter IV contain generic TLAAs and AMPs, respectively, that have been developed for managing aging effects on the SSCs important to safety in the dry cask storage system designs described in Chapter V. The summary descriptions and tabulations of evaluations of AMPs and TLAAs for the SSCs that are important to safety in Chapter V include DCSS designs (i.e., NUHOMS{reg_sign}, HI-STORM 100, Transnuclear (TN) metal cask, NAC International S/T storage cask, ventilated storage cask (VSC-24), and the Westinghouse MC-10 metal dry storage cask) that have been and continue to be used by utilities across the country for dry storage of used fuel to date. The goal of this report is to help establish the technical

Chopra, O.K.; Diercks, D.; Fabian, R.; Ma, D.; Shah, V.; Tam, S.W.; Liu, Y. (Decision and Information Sciences); ( EVS); ( NE)

2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "managing treatment storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Managing aging effects on dry cask storage systems for extended long-term storage and transportation of used fuel - rev. 0  

SciTech Connect

The cancellation of the Yucca Mountain repository program in the United States raises the prospect of extended long-term storage (i.e., >120 years) and deferred transportation of used fuel at operating and decommissioned nuclear power plant sites. Under U.S. federal regulations contained in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 72.42, the initial license term for an Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) must not exceed 40 years from the date of issuance. Licenses may be renewed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at the expiration of the license term upon application by the licensee for a period not to exceed 40 years. Application for ISFSI license renewals must include the following: (1) Time-limited aging analyses (TLAAs) that demonstrate that structures, systems, and components (SSCs) important to safety will continue to perform their intended function for the requested period of extended operation; and (2) a description of the aging management program (AMP) for management of issues associated with aging that could adversely affect SSCs important to safety. In addition, the application must also include design bases information as documented in the most recent updated final safety analysis report as required by 10 CFR 72.70. Information contained in previous applications, statements, or reports filed with the Commission under the license may be incorporated by reference provided that those references are clear and specific. The NRC has recently issued the Standard Review Plan (SRP) for renewal of used-fuel dry cask storage system (DCSS) licenses and Certificates of Compliance (CoCs), NUREG-1927, under which NRC may renew a specific license or a CoC for a term not to exceed 40 years. Both the license and the CoC renewal applications must contain revised technical requirements and operating conditions (fuel storage, surveillance and maintenance, and other requirements) for the ISFSI and DCSS that address aging effects that could affect the safe storage of the used fuel. The information contained in the license and CoC renewal applications will require NRC review to verify that the aging effects on the SSCs in DCSSs/ ISFSIs are adequately managed for the period of extended operation. To date, all of the ISFSIs located across the United States with more than 1,500 dry casks loaded with used fuel have initial license terms of 20 years; three ISFSIs (Surry, H.B. Robinson and Oconee) have received their renewed licenses for 20 years, and two other ISFSIs (Calvert Cliffs and Prairie Island) have applied for license renewal for 40 years. This report examines issues related to managing aging effects on the SSCs in DCSSs/ISFSIs for extended long-term storage and transportation of used fuels, following an approach similar to that of the Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL) report, NUREG-1801, for the aging management and license renewal of nuclear power plants. The report contains five chapters and an appendix on quality assurance for aging management programs for used-fuel dry storage systems. Chapter I of the report provides an overview of the ISFSI license renewal process based on 10 CFR 72 and the guidance provided in NUREG-1927. Chapter II contains definitions and terms for structures and components in DCSSs, materials, environments, aging effects, and aging mechanisms. Chapter III and Chapter IV contain generic TLAAs and AMPs, respectively, that have been developed for managing aging effects on the SSCs important to safety in the dry cask storage system designs described in Chapter V. The summary descriptions and tabulations of evaluations of AMPs and TLAAs for the SSCs that are important to safety in Chapter V include DCSS designs (i.e., NUHOMS{reg_sign}, HI-STORM 100, Transnuclear (TN) metal cask, NAC International S/T storage cask, ventilated storage cask (VSC-24), and the Westinghouse MC-10 metal dry storage cask) that have been and continue to be used by utilities across the country for dry storage of used fuel to date. The goal of this report is to help establish the technical

Chopra, O.K.; Diercks, D.; Fabian, R.; Ma, D.; Shah, V.; Tam, S.W.; Liu, Y. (Decision and Information Sciences); ( EVS); ( NE)

2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

102

Agent-based micro-storage management for the Smart Grid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of energy storage devices in homes has been advocated as one of the main ways of saving energy and reducing the reliance on fossil fuels in the future Smart Grid. However, if micro-storage devices are all charged at the same time using power ... Keywords: agent-based simulation, energy, micro-storage, smart grid

Perukrishnen Vytelingum; Thomas D. Voice; Sarvapali D. Ramchurn; Alex Rogers; Nicholas R. Jennings

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Risk perception on management of nuclear high-level and transuranic waste storage  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy`s program for disposing of nuclear High-Level Waste (HLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste has been impeded by overwhelming political opposition fueled by public perceptions of actual risk. Analysis of these perceptions shows them to be deeply rooted in images of fear and dread that have been present since the discovery of radioactivity. The development and use of nuclear weapons linked these images to reality and the mishandling of radioactive waste from the nations military weapons facilities has contributed toward creating a state of distrust that cannot be erased quickly or easily. In addition, the analysis indicates that even the highly educated technical community is not well informed on the latest technology involved with nuclear HLW and TRU waste disposal. It is not surprising then, that the general public feels uncomfortable with DOE`s management plans for with nuclear HLW and TRU waste disposal. Postponing the permanent geologic repository and use of Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) would provide the time necessary for difficult social and political issues to be resolved. It would also allow time for the public to become better educated if DOE chooses to become proactive.

Dees, L.A.

1994-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

104

THE WIDE-AREA ENERGY STORAGE AND MANAGEMENT SYSTEM PHASE II Final Report - Flywheel Field Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operated for the U.S. department of Energy (DOE) by Battelle Memorial Institute for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), California Institute for Energy and Environment (CIEE) and California Energy Commission (CEC). A wide-area energy management system (WAEMS) is a centralized control system that operates energy storage devices (ESDs) located in different places to provide energy and ancillary services that can be shared among balancing authorities (BAs). The goal of this research is to conduct flywheel field tests, investigate the technical characteristics and economics of combined hydro-flywheel regulation services that can be shared between Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and California Independent System Operator (CAISO) controlled areas. This report is the second interim technical report for Phase II of the WAEMS project. This report presents: 1) the methodology of sharing regulation service between balancing authorities, 2) the algorithm to allocate the regulation signal between the flywheel and hydro power plant to minimize the wear-and-tear of the hydro power plants, 3) field results of the hydro-flywheel regulation service (conducted by the Beacon Power), and 4) the performance metrics and economic analysis of the combined hydro-flywheel regulation service.

Lu, Ning; Makarov, Yuri V.; Weimar, Mark R.; Rudolph, Frank; Murthy, Shashikala; Arseneaux, Jim; Loutan, Clyde; Chowdhury, S.

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

105

Vision and framework for technical and management support to facilitate foreign spent fuel storage and geologic disposal in Russia  

SciTech Connect

This ''Technical and Management Support'' program would facilitate the transfer of spent fuel from commercial power plants in Taiwan to a storage and geologic repository site near Krasnoyarsk, Russia. This program resolves issues of disposition of Taiwan spent fuel (including US origin fuel) and provides revenue for Russia to develop an integrated spent fuel storage and radioactive waste management system including a geologic repository. LLNL has ongoing contracts and collaborations with all the principal parties and is uniquely positioned to facilitate the development of such a program. A three-phase approach over 20 years is proposed: namely, an initial feasibility investigation followed by an engineering development phase, and then implementation.

Halsey, W G; Jardine, L J; Smith, C F

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Risk management program for the 283-W water treatment facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Risk Management (RM) Program covers the 283-W Water Treatment Facility (283W Facility), located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. A RM Program is necessary for this facility because it stores chlorine, a listed substance, in excess of or has the potential to exceed the threshold quantities defined in Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 68 (EPA, 1998). The RM Program contains data that will be used to prepare a RM Plan, which is required by 40 CFR 68. The RM Plan is a summary of the RM Program information, contained within this document, and will be submitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ultimately for distribution to the public. The RM Plan will be prepared and submitted separately from this document.

GREEN, W.E.

1999-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

107

A method for managing the storage of fissile materials using criticality indices  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a method for criticality control at fissile material storage facilities. The method involves the use criticiality indices for storage canisters. The logic, methodology, and results for selected canisters are presented. A concept for an interactive computer program using the method is also introduced. The computer program can be used in real time (using precalulated data) to select a Criticality Index (CI) for a container when it is delivered to or packaged at a site. Criticality safety is assured by controlling the sum of the CIs at each storage location below a defined Emit value when containers are moved.

Philbin, J.S.; Harms, G.A.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

The market for self-storage in Greater Boston : an analysis of facilities, management and potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The core objective of this thesis was to undertake a comprehensive study of the Boston-area self-storage market and determine where and what to build in order to achieve the highest profitability. The study begins with a ...

DeNunzio, Dustin J. (Dustin James), 1976-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Lachesis: robust database storage management based on device-specific performance characteristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Database systems work hard to tune I/O performance, but do not always achieve the full performance potential of modern disk systems. Their abstracted view of storage components hides useful device-specific characteristics, such as disk track boundaries ...

Jiri Schindler; Anastassia Ailamaki; Gregory R. Ganger

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Energy Storage R&D: Thermal Management Studies and Modeling (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Here we summarize NREL's FY09 energy storage R&D studies in the areas of 1. thermal characterization and analysis, 2. cost, life, and performance trade-off studies, and 3. thermal abuse modeling.

Pesaran, A. A.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

International management of spent fuel storage : technical alternatives and constraints, topical report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some of the important technical issues involved in the implementation of a spent fuel storage regime under international auspices are discussed. In particular, we consider: the state of the art as far as the different ...

Miller, Marvin M.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Energy Storage R&D: Thermal Management Studies and Modeling (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Here we summarize NREL's FY09 energy storage R&D studies in the areas of 1. thermal characterization and analysis, 2. cost, life, and performance trade-off studies, and 3. thermal abuse modeling.

Pesaran, A. A.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

EIS-0306: Treatment and Management of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear Fuel |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

306: Treatment and Management of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear 306: Treatment and Management of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear Fuel EIS-0306: Treatment and Management of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear Fuel Summary This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of the proposed electrometallurgical treatment of DOE-owned sodium bonded spent nuclear fuel in the Fuel Conditioning Facility at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W). Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. Documents Available for Download September 19, 2000 EIS-0306: Record of Decision Treatment and Management of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear Fuel July 1, 2000 EIS-0306: Final Environmental Impact Statement Treatment and Management of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear Fuel July 1, 1999 EIS-0306: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Treatment of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear Fuel

114

NGLW RCRA Storage Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory contains radioactive liquid waste in underground storage tanks at the INTEC Tank Farm Facility (TFF). INTEC is currently treating the waste by evaporation to reduce the liquid volume for continued storage, and by calcination to reduce and convert the liquid to a dry waste form for long-term storage in calcine bins. Both treatment methods and activities in support of those treatment operations result in Newly Generated Liquid Waste (NGLW) being sent to TFF. The storage tanks in the TFF are underground, contained in concrete vaults with instrumentation, piping, transfer jets, and managed sumps in case of any liquid accumulation in the vault. The configuration of these tanks is such that Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations apply. The TFF tanks were assessed several years ago with respect to the RCRA regulations and they were found to be deficient. This study considers the configuration of the current tanks and the RCRA deficiencies identified for each. The study identifies four potential methods and proposes a means of correcting the deficiencies. The cost estimates included in the study account for construction cost; construction methods to minimize work exposure to chemical hazards, radioactive contamination, and ionizing radiation hazards; project logistics; and project schedule. The study also estimates the tank volumes benefit associated with each corrective action to support TFF liquid waste management planning.

R. J. Waters; R. Ochoa; K. D. Fritz; D. W. Craig

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Niagara Falls Storage Site NY - NY 17  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Niagara Falls Storage Site NY - NY Niagara Falls Storage Site NY - NY 17 FUSRAP Considered Sites Niagara Falls Storage Site, NY Alternate Name(s): Lake Ontario Ordnance Works (LOOW) Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) DOE-Niagara Falls Storage Site NY.17-1 NY.17-3 Location: Lewiston, New York NY.17-5 Historical Operations: Stored, shipped, and buried radioactive equipment and waste for MED and AEC containing uranium, radium, and thorium. Contains Interim Waste Containment Structure. NY.17-1 NY.17-2 NY.17-14 Eligibility Determination: Eligible NY.17-4 Radiological Survey(s): Assessment Surveys NY.17-3 NY.17-5 NY.17-6 NY.17-7 NY.17-8 NY.17-9 NY.17-10 NY.17-11 NY.17-12 NY.17-14 Site Status: Cleanup in progress by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. NY.17-13 NY.17-14 NY.17-15 NY.17-16 USACE Website Long-term Care Requirements: To be determined upon completion.

116

Harvesting-aware energy management for multicore platforms with hybrid energy storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose a novel framework for energy and workload management in multi-core embedded systems with solar energy harvesting and a periodic hard real-time task set as the workload. Compared to prior work, our energy management framework ... Keywords: dynamic power management, dynamic voltage and frequency scaling, energy harvesting, supercapacitor, task scheduling

Yi Xiang; Sudeep Pasricha

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Record of Decision for a Dry Storage Container System for the Management of Navel Spent Nuclear Fuel, January 7, 1997  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 Federal Register / Vol. 62, No. 5 / Wednesday, January 8, 1997 / Notices Department of the Navy Record of Decision for a Dry Storage Container System for the Management of Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel SUMMARY: Pursuant to section 102(2) of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969; the Council on Environmental Quality regulations implementing NEPA procedures, 40 CFR Parts 1500-1508; and Chief of Naval Operations Environmental and Natural Resources Program Manual, OPNAV Instruction 5090.1B; the Department of the Navy announces its decision to implement the preferred alternative (dual-purpose canisters) identified in the final Environmental Impact Statement for a Container System for the Management of Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel (EIS) dated November 1996. The Department of

118

Collection and representation of GIS data to aid household water treatment and safe storage technology implementation in the northern region of Ghana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2005, a start-up social business called Pure Home Water (PHW) was begun in Ghana to promote and sell household water treatment and safe storage (HWTS) technologies. The original aim of the company was to offer a variety ...

VanCalcar, Jenny E. (Jenny Elizabeth)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Systems engineering management and implementation plan for Project W-464, immobilized high-level waste storage  

SciTech Connect

The Systems Engineering Management and Implementation Plan (SEMIP) for TWRS Project W-46 describes the project implementation of the Tank Waste Remediation System Systems Engineering Management Plan. (TWRS SEMP), Rev. 1. The SEMIP outlines systems engineering (SE) products and processes to be used by the project for technical baseline development. A formal graded approach is used to determine the products necessary for requirements, design, and operational baseline completion. SE management processes are defined, and roles and responsibilities for management processes and major technical baseline elements are documented.

Wecks, M.D.

1998-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

120

Nondestructive Evaluation: Data Conversion, Data Storage, and Records Management Study for NDE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the past 20 years, there has been a dramatic increase in the use of digital systems in nondestructive evaluation (NDE). The constant drive toward better acquisition technology, increased data storage capacity, and enhanced system capability has actually decreased the likelihood of being able to access digital data created and stored only a few years ago. For users to be able to extract the maximum benefit from their digital records, they need to identify and adopt appropriate strategies for handling t...

2011-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "managing treatment storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Peak Load Management of Thermal Loads Using Advanced Thermal Energy Storage Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Almost 50% of electric energy delivered to residences is converted into some sort of thermal energyhot water, air conditioning, and refrigeration. Storing energy in thermal form is cheaper especially when the medium used to store the energy is an end-use medium for example, hot water. This technical update evaluates two different technologies for storing energyin cold water and in hot water.GreenPeak technology, a storage condensing unit (SCU) from IE Technologies, uses an ...

2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

122

Impact-driven pressure management via targeted brine extraction Conceptual studies of CO2 storage in saline formations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water Associated with Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage,and Detection of Carbon Dioxide in Dilute Aquifers, 9 thGeological Storage of Carbon Dioxide and Amending Council

Birkholzer, J.T.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Expanding the potential for saline formations : modeling carbon dioxide storage, water extraction and treatment for power plant cooling.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Water, Energy and Carbon Sequestration simulation model (WECSsim) is being developed to address the question, 'Where in the current and future U.S. fossil fuel based electricity generation fleet are there opportunities to couple CO{sub 2} storage and extracted water use, and what are the economic and water demand-related impacts of these systems compared to traditional power systems?' The WECSsim collaborative team initially applied this framework to a test case region in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico. Recently, the model has been expanded to incorporate the lower 48 states of the U.S. Significant effort has been spent characterizing locations throughout the U.S. where CO{sub 2} might be stored in saline formations including substantial data collection and analysis efforts to supplement the incomplete brine data offered in the NatCarb database. WECSsim calculates costs associated with CO{sub 2} capture and storage (CCS) for the power plant to saline formation combinations including parasitic energy costs of CO{sub 2} capture, CO{sub 2} pipelines, water treatment options, and the net benefit of water treatment for power plant cooling. Currently, the model can identify the least-cost deep saline formation CO{sub 2} storage option for any current or proposed coal or natural gas-fired power plant in the lower 48 states. Initial results suggest that additional, cumulative water withdrawals resulting from national scale CCS may range from 676 million gallons per day (MGD) to 30,155 MGD depending on the makeup power and cooling technologies being utilized. These demands represent 0.20% to 8.7% of the U.S. total fresh water withdrawals in the year 2000, respectively. These regional and ultimately nation-wide, bottom-up scenarios coupling power plants and saline formations throughout the U.S. can be used to support state or national energy development plans and strategies.

Not Available

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Geologic Sequestration Software Suite (GS3): a collaborative approach to the management of geological GHG storage projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geologic storage projects associated with large anthropogenic sources of greenhouse gases (GHG) will have lifecycles that may easily span a century, involve several numerical simulation cycles, and have distinct modeling teams. The process used for numerical simulation of the fate of GHG in the subsurface follows a generally consistent sequence of steps that often are replicated by scientists and engineers around the world. Site data is gathered, assembled, interpreted, and assimilated into conceptualizations of a solid-earth model; assumptions are made about the processes to be modeled; a computational domain is specified and spatially discretized; driving forces and initial conditions are defined; the conceptual models, computational domain, and driving forces are translated into input files; simulations are executed; and results are analyzed. Then, during and after the GHG injection, a continuous monitoring of the reservoir is done and models are updated with the newly collected data. Typically the working files generated during all these steps are maintained on workstations with local backups and archived once the project has concluded along with any modeling notes and records. We are proposing a new concept for supporting the management of full-scale GHG storage projects where collaboration, flexibility, accountability and long-term access will be essential features: the Geologic Sequestration Software Suite, GS3.

Bonneville, Alain HR; Black, Gary D.; Gorton, Ian; Hui, Peter SY; Murphy, Ellyn M.; Murray, Christopher J.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Schuchardt, Karen L.; Sivaramakrishnan, Chandrika; White, Mark D.; Williams, Mark D.; Wurstner, Signe K.

2011-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

125

H[sub 2]OTREAT: An acid for evaluating water treatment requirements for Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A public-domain software package is available to aid engineers in the design of water treatment systems for Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES). Geochemical phenomena that cause problems in ATES systems include formation of scale in heat exchangers, clogging of wells, corrosion in piping and heat exchangers, and degradation of aquifer materials. Preventing such problems frequently requires employing water treatment systems. Individual water treatment methods vary in cost. effectiveness, environmental impact, corrosion potential, and acceptability to regulatory bodies. Evaluating these water treatment options is generally required to determine the feasibility of ATFS systems. The H20TREAT software was developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for use by engineers with limited or no experience in geochemistry. At the feasibility analysis and design stages, the software utilizes a recently revised geochemical model,MINTEQ, to calculate the saturation indices of selected carbonate, oxide, and hydroxide minerals based on water chemistry and temperature data provided by the user. The saturation indices of key calcium, iron. silica, and manganese carbonates, oxides, and hydroxides (calcite, rhodochrosite, siderite, Fe(OH)[sub 3][a], birnessite, chalcedony, and SiO[sub 2]) are calculated. Currently, H20TREAT does not perform cost calculations; however, treatment capacity requirements are provided. Treatments considered include (1) Na and H ion exchangers and pellet reactors to avoid calcite precipitation, and (2) in situ nitrate addition and cascade precipitation. The H20TREAT software also provides the user with guidance on other geochemical problems that must be considered, such as SiO[sub 2] precipitation, corrosion, and environmental considerations. The sodium adsorption ratio and sodium hazard are calculated to evaluate the likelihood of clay swelling and dispersion caused by high Na concentrations. H20TREAT is available for DOS and UNIX computers.

Vail, L.W.; Jenne, E.A.; Eary, L.E.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

H{sub 2}OTREAT: An acid for evaluating water treatment requirements for Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A public-domain software package is available to aid engineers in the design of water treatment systems for Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES). Geochemical phenomena that cause problems in ATES systems include formation of scale in heat exchangers, clogging of wells, corrosion in piping and heat exchangers, and degradation of aquifer materials. Preventing such problems frequently requires employing water treatment systems. Individual water treatment methods vary in cost. effectiveness, environmental impact, corrosion potential, and acceptability to regulatory bodies. Evaluating these water treatment options is generally required to determine the feasibility of ATFS systems. The H20TREAT software was developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for use by engineers with limited or no experience in geochemistry. At the feasibility analysis and design stages, the software utilizes a recently revised geochemical model,MINTEQ, to calculate the saturation indices of selected carbonate, oxide, and hydroxide minerals based on water chemistry and temperature data provided by the user. The saturation indices of key calcium, iron. silica, and manganese carbonates, oxides, and hydroxides (calcite, rhodochrosite, siderite, Fe(OH){sub 3}[a], birnessite, chalcedony, and SiO{sub 2}) are calculated. Currently, H20TREAT does not perform cost calculations; however, treatment capacity requirements are provided. Treatments considered include (1) Na and H ion exchangers and pellet reactors to avoid calcite precipitation, and (2) in situ nitrate addition and cascade precipitation. The H20TREAT software also provides the user with guidance on other geochemical problems that must be considered, such as SiO{sub 2} precipitation, corrosion, and environmental considerations. The sodium adsorption ratio and sodium hazard are calculated to evaluate the likelihood of clay swelling and dispersion caused by high Na concentrations. H20TREAT is available for DOS and UNIX computers.

Vail, L.W.; Jenne, E.A.; Eary, L.E.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Demand-Side and Supply-Side Load Management: Optimizing with Thermal Energy Storage (TES) for the Restructuring Energy Marketplace  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The current and future restructuring energy marketplace represents a number of challenges and opportunities to maximize value through the management of peak power. This is true both on the demand-side regarding peak power use and on the supply-side regarding power generation. Thermal Energy Storage (TES) can provide the flexibility essential to the economical management of power. In large industrial applications, the added value of TES has been demonstrated, not only in managing operating costs, but also in delivering a net saving in capital cost versus conventional, non-storage approaches. This capital cost saving is often realized in situations where investments in chiller plant capacity, or in on-site power generating capacity, are required. On the demand-side, TES has long been used to shift air-conditioning loads and process cooling loads from on-peak to off-peak periods. In today's and tomorrow's restructuring energy markets, price spikes are increasingly likely during periods of peak power demand. TES is performing an important role, especially when coupled with a proper understanding of modern TES technology options. The inherent advantages and limitations of the available TES technology options are briefly reviewed and discussed. Examples of existing large TES installations are presented, identifying the TES technology types they utilize. The applications include industrial facilities, as well as universities, hospitals, government, and District Cooling utility systems. The power management impact and the economic benefits of TES are illustrated through a review of several TES case studies. Combustion Turbines (CTs) are a common choice for modern on-site and utility power generation facilities. Inlet air cooling of CTs enhances their hot weather performance and has been successfully accomplished for many years, using a variety of technologies. In many instances, TES can and does provide a uniquely advantageous method of optimizing the economics of CT Inlet Cooling (CTIC) systems. TES systems can achieve low inlet air temperatures, with resulting high levels of power augmentation. The TES approach also minimizes the installed capacity (and capital cost) of cooling systems, as well as limiting the parasitic loads occurring during periods of peak power demand and peak power value. Chilled water, ice, and low temperature fluid TES systems are all applicable to CTIC. The inherent pros and cons of each TES type are discussed. Sensitivity analyses are presented to explore the impact of cooling hours per day on capital cost per kW of power enhancement. Case histories illustrate the beneficial impact of TES-based CTIC on both capital cost and operating cost of CT power plants. TES-based CTIC is advantageous as an economical, peaking power enhancement for either peaking or base-load plants. It is applied to both new and existing CTs. TES is projected to have even greater value in future restructuring energy markets.

Andrepont, J. S.

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Thermal treatment effects on charge storage performance of graphene-based materials for supercapacitors  

SciTech Connect

Graphene materials were synthesized by reduction of exfoliated graphene oxide sheets by hydrazine hydrate and then thermally treated in nitrogen to improve the surface area and their electrochemical performance as electrical double-layer capacitor electrodes. The structural and surface properties of the prepared reduced graphite oxide (RGO) were investigated using atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectra, X-ray diffraction, and nitrogen adsorption / desorption. RGO forms a continuous network of crumpled sheets, which consist of numerous few-layer and single-layer graphenes. Electrochemical studies were conducted by cyclic voltammetry, impedance spectroscopy, and galvanostatic charge-discharge measurements. The modified RGO materials showed enhanced electrochemical performance, with maximum specific capacitance of 96 F/g, energy density of 12.8 Wh/kg, and power density of 160 kW/kg. The results demonstrate that thermal treatment of RGO at selected conditions is a convenient and efficient method for improving specific capacitance, energy, and power density.

Zhang, Hongxin [ORNL; Bhat, Vinay V [ORNL; Gallego, Nidia C [ORNL; Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Final Environmental Impact Statement (Supplement to ERDA-1537, September 1977) Waste Management Operations Double-Shell Tanks for Defense High-Level Radioactive Waste Storage Savannah River Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Do Do E/EIS-0062 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT mATEIUIENT (Supplement to ERDA-1537, September 1977) Waste ~ Management Operations Savannah River Plant ! Aiken, South Carolina Double-Shell Tanks for Defense High-Level Radioactive Waste Storage April 1980 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WASHINGTON. D.C.20545 1980 WL 94273 (F.R.) NOTICES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Deputy Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Waste Management Double-Shell Tanks for Defense High-Level Radioactive Waste Storage, Savannah River Plant, Aiken, S.C. Wednesday, July 9, 1980 *46154 Record of Decision Decision. The decision has been made to complete the construction of the 14 double-shell tanks and use them to store defense high-level radioactive waste at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). Background. The SRP, located near Aiken, South Carolina, is a major installation of the

130

NETL: Carbon Storage - Reference Shelf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Storage > Reference Shelf Carbon Storage > Reference Shelf Carbon Storage Reference Shelf Below are links to Carbon Storage Program documents and reference materials. Each of the 10 categories has a variety of documents posted for easy access to current information - just click on the category link to view all related materials. RSS Icon Subscribe to the Carbon Storage RSS Feed. Carbon Storage Collage 2012 Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas IV Carbon Sequestration Project Portfolio DOE/NETL Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage RD&D Roadmap Public Outreach and Education for Carbon Storage Projects Carbon Storage Technology Program Plan Carbon Storage Newsletter Archive Impact of the Marcellus Shale Gas Play on Current and Future CCS Activities Site Screening, Selection, and Initial Characterization for Storage of CO2 in Deep Geologic Formations Carbon Storage Systems and Well Management Activities Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting of CO2 Stored in Deep Geologic Formations

131

The Tension between Fire Risk and Carbon Storage: Evaluating U.S. Carbon and Fire Management Strategies through Ecosystem Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fire risk and carbon storage are related environmental issues because fire reduction results in carbon storage through the buildup of woody vegetation, and stored carbon is a fuel for fires. The sustainability of the U.S. carbon sink and the ...

C. M. Girod; G. C. Hurtt; S. Frolking; J. D. Aber; A. W. King

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Thermal energy storage application areas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of thermal energy storage in the areas of building heating and cooling, recovery of industrial process and waste heat, solar power generation, and off-peak energy storage and load management in electric utilities is reviewed. (TFD)

Not Available

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Remote Handled Transuranic Sludge Retrieval Transfer And Storage System At Hanford  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the systems developed for processing and interim storage of the sludge managed as remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU). An experienced, integrated CH2M HILL/AFS team was formed to design and build systems to retrieve, interim store, and treat for disposal the K West Basin sludge, namely the Sludge Treatment Project (STP). A system has been designed and is being constructed for retrieval and interim storage, namely the Engineered Container Retrieval, Transfer and Storage System (ECRTS).

Raymond, Rick E. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States); Frederickson, James R. [AREVA, Avignon (France); Criddle, James [AREVA, Avignon (France); Hamilton, Dennis [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States); Johnson, Mike W. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States)

2012-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

134

Waste management system alternatives for treatment of wastes from spent fuel reprocessing  

SciTech Connect

This study was performed to help identify a preferred TRU waste treatment alternative for reprocessing wastes with respect to waste form performance in a geologic repository, near-term waste management system risks, and minimum waste management system costs. The results were intended for use in developing TRU waste acceptance requirements that may be needed to meet regulatory requirements for disposal of TRU wastes in a geologic repository. The waste management system components included in this analysis are waste treatment and packaging, transportation, and disposal. The major features of the TRU waste treatment alternatives examined here include: (1) packaging (as-produced) without treatment (PWOT); (2) compaction of hulls and other compactable wastes; (3) incineration of combustibles with cementation of the ash plus compaction of hulls and filters; (4) melting of hulls and failed equipment plus incineration of combustibles with vitrification of the ash along with the HLW; (5a) decontamination of hulls and failed equipment to produce LLW plus incineration and incorporation of ash and other inert wastes into HLW glass; and (5b) variation of this fifth treatment alternative in which the incineration ash is incorporated into a separate TRU waste glass. The six alternative processing system concepts provide progressively increasing levels of TRU waste consolidation and TRU waste form integrity. Vitrification of HLW and intermediate-level liquid wastes (ILLW) was assumed in all cases.

McKee, R.W.; Swanson, J.L.; Daling, P.M.; Clark, L.L.; Craig, R.A.; Nesbitt, J.F.; McCarthy, D.; Franklin, A.L.; Hazelton, R.F.; Lundgren, R.A.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Integrated Used Nuclear Fuel Storage, Transportation, and Disposal ...  

dry cask storage of used nuclear fuel at existing plant ... achievement of geologic disposal thermal management ... Senior Technology Commercialization Manager ...

136

RECENT IMPROVEMENTS IN INTERFACE MANAGEMENT FOR HANFORDS WASTE TREATMENT AND IMMOBILIZATION PLANT - 13263  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for management and completion of the River Protection Project (RPP) mission, which comprises both the Hanford Site tank farms operations and the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The RPP mission is to store, retrieve and treat Hanford's tank waste; store and dispose of treated wastes; and close the tank farm waste management areas and treatment facilities by 2047. The WTP is currently being designed and constructed by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) for DOE-ORP. BNI relies on a number oftechnical services from other Hanford contractors for WTP's construction and commissioning. These same services will be required of the future WTP operations contractor. The WTP interface management process has recently been improved through changes in organization and technical issue management documented in an Interface Management Plan. Ten of the thirteen active WTP Interface Control Documents (ICDs) have been revised in 2012 using the improved process with the remaining three in progress. The value of the process improvements is reflected by the ability to issue these documents on schedule.

ARM ST; PELL MJ; VAN MEIGHEM JS; DUNCAN GM; HARRINGTON C

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

137

Hydrogen Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 10, 2012 ... Energy Storage: Materials, Systems and Applications: Hydrogen Storage Program Organizers: Zhenguo "Gary" Yang, Pacific Northwest...

138

Alternatives for managing wastes from reactors and post-fission operations in the LWR fuel cycle. Volume 3. Alternatives for interim storage and transportation  

SciTech Connect

Volume III of the five-volume report contains information on alternatives for interim storage and transportation. Section titles are: interim storage of spent fuel elements; interim storage of chop-leach fuel bundle residues; tank storage of high-level liquid waste; interim storage of solid non-high-level wastes; interim storage of solidified high-level waste; and, transportation alternatives. (JGB)

1976-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Final environmental assessment for the U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations receipt and storage of uranium materials from the Fernald Environmental Management Project site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Through a series of material transfers and sales agreements over the past 6 to 8 years, the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) has reduced its nuclear material inventory from 14,500 to approximately 6,800 metric tons of uranium (MTU). This effort is part of the US Department of energy`s (DOE`s) decision to change the mission of the FEMP site; it is currently shut down and the site is being remediated. This EA focuses on the receipt and storage of uranium materials at various DOE-ORO sites. The packaging and transportation of FEMP uranium material has been evaluated in previous NEPA and other environmental evaluations. A summary of these evaluation efforts is included as Appendix A. The material would be packaged in US Department of Transportation-approved shipping containers and removed from the FEMP site and transported to another site for storage. The Ohio Field Office will assume responsibility for environmental analyses and documentation for packaging and transport of the material as part of the remediation of the site, and ORO is preparing this EA for receipt and storage at one or more sites.

NONE

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Review of private sector and Department of Energy treatment, storage, and disposal capabilities for low-level and mixed low-level waste  

SciTech Connect

Private sector capacity for treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) of various categories of radioactive waste has been researched and reviewed for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) by Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company, the primary contractor for the INEL. The purpose of this document is to provide assistance to the INEL and other US Department of Energy (DOE) sites in determining if private sector capabilities exist for those waste streams that currently cannot be handled either on site or within the DOE complex. The survey of private sector vendors was limited to vendors currently capable of, or expected within the next five years to be able to perform one or more of the following services: low-level waste (LLW) volume reduction, storage, or disposal; mixed LLW treatment, storage, or disposal; alpha-contaminated mixed LLW treatment; LLW decontamination for recycling, reclamation, or reuse; laundering of radioactively-contaminated laundry and/or respirators; mixed LLW treatability studies; mixed LLW treatment technology development. Section 2.0 of this report will identify the approach used to modify vendor information from previous revisions of this report. It will also illustrate the methodology used to identify any additional companies. Section 3.0 will identify, by service, specific vendor capabilities and capacities. Because this document will be used to identify private sector vendors that may be able to handle DOE LLW and mixed LLW streams, it was decided that current DOE capabilities should also be identified. This would encourage cooperation between DOE sites and the various states and, in some instances, may result in a more cost-effective alternative to privatization. The DOE complex has approximately 35 sites that generate the majority of both LLW and mixed LLW. Section 4.0 will identify these sites by Operations Office, and their associated LLW and mixed LLW TSD units.

Willson, R.A.; Ball, L.W.; Mousseau, J.D.; Piper, R.B.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "managing treatment storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

HEATS: Thermal Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect

HEATS Project: The 15 projects that make up ARPA-Es HEATS program, short for High Energy Advanced Thermal Storage, seek to develop revolutionary, cost-effective ways to store thermal energy. HEATS focuses on 3 specific areas: 1) developing high-temperature solar thermal energy storage capable of cost-effectively delivering electricity around the clock and thermal energy storage for nuclear power plants capable of cost-effectively meeting peak demand, 2) creating synthetic fuel efficiently from sunlight by converting sunlight into heat, and 3) using thermal energy storage to improve the driving range of electric vehicles (EVs) and also enable thermal management of internal combustion engine vehicles.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Hybrid electrical energy storage systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrical energy is a high quality form of energy that can be easily converted to other forms of energy with high efficiency and, even more importantly, it can be used to control lower grades of energy quality with ease. However, building a cost-effective ... Keywords: charge, electrical storage, energy, energy storage, hybrid storage, management

Massoud Pedram; Naehyuck Chang; Younghyun Kim; Yanzhi Wang

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

THEORETICAL STUDIES IN LONG-TERM THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mathematical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers.Proceedings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop,within the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage program managed

Tsang, C.F.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Bulk Energy Storage Impact and Value Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is intended for planners, R&D managers, and potential investors who manage or interpret results from value and impact analysis of energy storage. Due to performance improvements and cost reductions of battery technologies and the expectation that energy storage may help to manage potential operational challenges of incorporating variable, renewable energy resources, energy storage systems are under renewed investigation as a future electric system resource. Pumped hydro storage ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

145

Compressed Air Energy Storage: Proven US CAES Plant Cost Achievements and Potential Engineering, Design & Project Management Based C ost Reductions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) is a market ready technology that can play a valuable role in enhancing grid flexibility for variable generation integration. Relative to combustion turbines, CAES provides additional benefits and value streams, such as potential classification as a transmission asset, lower emissions, superior regulation service, reduction of wind spillage and in other ways improving wind plant economics. Although high cost estimates for CAES circulate in the industry, the first ...

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

146

Geological Carbon Storage: The Roles of Government  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geological Carbon Storage: The Roles of Government and Industry in Risk Management ROSE MURPHY Carbon Storage: The Roles of Government and Industry in Risk Management ro s e m ur phy an d m a r k jac c a rd Carbon dioxide capture and storage (ccs) offers the promise that humanity can continue

147

Wide-Area Energy Storage and Management system to Balance Intermittent Resources in the Bonneville Power Administration and California ISO Control Areas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The entire project addresses the issue of mitigating additional intermittency and fast ramps that occur at higher penetration of intermittent resources, including wind genera-tion, in the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the California Independent Sys-tem Operator (California ISO) control areas. The proposed Wide Area Energy Storage and Management System (WAEMS) will address the additional regulation requirement through the energy exchange between the participating control areas and through the use of energy storage and other generation resources. For the BPA and California ISO control centers, the new regulation service will look no different comparing with the traditional regulation resources. The proposed project will benefit the regulation service in these service areas, regardless of the actual degree of penetration of the intermittent resources in the regions. The project develops principles, algorithms, market integration rules, functional de-sign and technical specifications for the WAEMS system. The project is sponsored by BPA and supported in kind by California ISO, Beacon Power Corporation, and the Cali-fornia Energy Commission (CEC).

Makarov, Yuri V.; Yang, Bo; DeSteese, John G.; Lu, Shuai; Miller, Carl H.; Nyeng, Preben; Ma, Jian; Hammerstrom, Donald J.; Vishwanathan, Vilanyur V.

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

148

Key Technologies, Thermal Management, and Prototype Testing for Advanced Solid-State Hydrogen Storage Systems - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Joseph W. Reiter (Primary Contact), Alexander Raymond, Channing C. Ahn (Caltech), Bret Naylor, Otto Polanco, Rajeshuni Ramesham, and Erik Lopez Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Mail Stop 79-24 Pasadena, CA 91109-8099 Phone: (818) 354-4224; Email: Joseph.W.Reiter@jpl.nasa.gov DOE Managers HQ: Ned Stetson Phone: (202) 586-9995 Email: Ned.Stetson@ee.doe.gov GO: Jesse Adams Phone: (720) 356-1421 Email: Jesse.Adams@go.doe.gov Subcontractor: California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA Project Start Date: February, 2009 Project End Date: September, 2014 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Identify state-of-art concepts and designs for * cryosorbent-based hydrogen storage systems

149

Grid Applications for Energy Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Applications for Energy Storage Applications for Energy Storage Flow Cells for Energy Storage Workshop Washington DC 7-8 March 2012 Joe Eto jheto@lbl.gov (510) 486-7284 Referencing a Recent Sandia Study,* This Talk Will: Describe and illustrate selected grid applications for energy storage Time-of-use energy cost management Demand charge management Load following Area Regulation Renewables energy time shift Renewables capacity firming Compare Sandia's estimates of the economic value of these applications to the Electricity Storage Association's estimates of the capital costs of energy storage technologies *Eyer, J. and G. Corey. Energy Storage for the Electricity Grid: Benefits and Market Potential Assessment Guide. February 2010. SAND2010-0815 A Recent Sandia Study Estimates the Economic

150

H2O[underscore]TREAT users' manual: An aid for evaluating water treatment requirements for aquifer thermal energy storage systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This manual addresses the use of a public-domain software package developed to aid engineers in the desip of water treatment systems for aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES). The software, H20[underscore]TREAT, which runs in the DOS or UNIX Environment, was developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory and targeted to engineers possessing limited or no experience in geochemistry. To do this, the software provides guidance on geochemical phenomena that can cause problems in ATES systems (i.e., the formation of scale in heat exchangers, clogging of wells, corrosion in piping and heat exchangers, and degradation of aquifer materials causing a reduction in permeability). Preventing such problems frequently requires the use of water treatment systems. Because individual water treatment methods vary in cost, effectiveness, environmental impact, corrosion potential, and acceptability to regulators, proper evaluation of treatment options is required to determine the feasibility of ATES systems. The software is available for DOS- and UNIX-based computers. It uses a recently revised geochemical model, MINTEQ, to calculate the saturation indices of selected carbonate, oxide, and hydroxide minerals based on water chemistry and temperature data provided by the user. The saturation index of a specific mineral defines the point at which that mineral is oversaturated and hence may precipitate at the specified temperature. Cost calculations are not performed by the software; however, treatment capacity requirements are provided. Treatments include Na and H ion exchanger, fluidized-bed heat exchanger or pellet reactors, and CO[sub 2] injection. The H2O[underscore]TREAT software also provides the user with warning of geochemical problems that must be addressed, such as Fe and Mn oxide precipitation, SiO[sub 2] precipitation at high temperatures, corrosion, and clay swelling and dispersion.

Vail, L.W.; Jenne, E.A.; Zipperer, J.P.; McKinley, M.I.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

H2O{underscore}TREAT users` manual: An aid for evaluating water treatment requirements for aquifer thermal energy storage systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This manual addresses the use of a public-domain software package developed to aid engineers in the desip of water treatment systems for aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES). The software, H20{underscore}TREAT, which runs in the DOS or UNIX Environment, was developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory and targeted to engineers possessing limited or no experience in geochemistry. To do this, the software provides guidance on geochemical phenomena that can cause problems in ATES systems (i.e., the formation of scale in heat exchangers, clogging of wells, corrosion in piping and heat exchangers, and degradation of aquifer materials causing a reduction in permeability). Preventing such problems frequently requires the use of water treatment systems. Because individual water treatment methods vary in cost, effectiveness, environmental impact, corrosion potential, and acceptability to regulators, proper evaluation of treatment options is required to determine the feasibility of ATES systems. The software is available for DOS- and UNIX-based computers. It uses a recently revised geochemical model, MINTEQ, to calculate the saturation indices of selected carbonate, oxide, and hydroxide minerals based on water chemistry and temperature data provided by the user. The saturation index of a specific mineral defines the point at which that mineral is oversaturated and hence may precipitate at the specified temperature. Cost calculations are not performed by the software; however, treatment capacity requirements are provided. Treatments include Na and H ion exchanger, fluidized-bed heat exchanger or pellet reactors, and CO{sub 2} injection. The H2O{underscore}TREAT software also provides the user with warning of geochemical problems that must be addressed, such as Fe and Mn oxide precipitation, SiO{sub 2} precipitation at high temperatures, corrosion, and clay swelling and dispersion.

Vail, L.W.; Jenne, E.A.; Zipperer, J.P.; McKinley, M.I.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

An Integrated Water Treatment Technology Solution for Sustainable Water Resource Management in the Marcellus Shale  

SciTech Connect

This Final Scientific/ Technical Report submitted with respect to Project DE-FE0000833 titled 'An Integrated Water Treatment Technology Solution for Sustainable Water Resource Management in the Marcellus Shale' in support of final reporting requirements. This final report contains a compilation of previous reports with the most current data in order to produce one final complete document. The goal of this research was to provide an integrated approach aimed at addressing the increasing water resource challenges between natural gas production and other water stakeholders in shale gas basins. The objective was to demonstrate that the AltelaRain{reg_sign} technology could be successfully deployed in the Marcellus Shale Basin to treat frac flow-back water. That objective has been successfully met.

Matthew Bruff; Ned Godshall; Karen Evans

2011-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

153

Power Flow Management in a High Penetration Wind-Diesel Hybrid Power System with Short-Term Energy Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is intended as an introduction to some of the control challenges faced by developers of high penetration wind-diesel systems, with a focus on the management of power flows in order to achieve precise regulation of frequency and voltage in the face of rapidly varying wind power input and load conditions. The control algorithms presented herein are being implemented in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) high penetration wind-diesel system controller that will be installed in the village of Wales, Alaska, in early 2000.

Drouilhet, S. M.

1999-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

154

Hydrogen Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Applied Neutron Scattering in Engineering and Materials Science Research: Hydrogen Storage Sponsored by: Metallurgical Society of the Canadian Institute of...

155

Electricity Energy Storage Technology Options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A confluence of industry drivers8212including increased deployment of renewable generation, the high capital cost of managing grid peak demands, and large capital investments in grid infrastructure for reliability8212is creating new interest in electric energy storage systems. New EPRI research offers a current snapshot of the storage landscape and an analytical framework for estimating the benefits of applications and life-cycle costs of energy storage systems. This paper describes in detail 10 key appl...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

156

NETL: Carbon Storage - Geologic Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geologic Storage Geologic Storage Carbon Storage Geologic Storage Focus Area Geologiccarbon dioxide (CO2) storage involves the injection of supercritical CO2 into deep geologic formations (injection zones) overlain by competent sealing formations and geologic traps that will prevent the CO2 from escaping. Current research and field studies are focused on developing better understanding 11 major types of geologic storage reservoir classes, each having their own unique opportunities and challenges. Understanding these different storage classes provides insight into how the systems influence fluids flow within these systems today, and how CO2 in geologic storage would be anticipated to flow in the future. The different storage formation classes include: deltaic, coal/shale, fluvial, alluvial, strandplain, turbidite, eolian, lacustrine, clastic shelf, carbonate shallow shelf, and reef. Basaltic interflow zones are also being considered as potential reservoirs. These storage reservoirs contain fluids that may include natural gas, oil, or saline water; any of which may impact CO2 storage differently. The following summarizes the potential for storage and the challenges related to CO2 storage capability for fluids that may be present in more conventional clastic and carbonate reservoirs (saline water, and oil and gas), as well as unconventional reservoirs (unmineable coal seams, organic-rich shales, and basalts):

157

Hydrogen Storage- Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- - Overview George Thomas, Hydrogen Consultant to SNL * and Jay Keller, Hydrogen Program Manager Sandia National Laboratories H 2 Delivery and Infrastructure Workshop May 7-8, 2003 * Most of this presentation has been extracted from George Thomas' invited BES Hydrogen Workshop presentation (May 13-14, 2003) Sandia National Laboratories 4/14/03 2 Sandia National Laboratories From George Thomas, BES workshop 5/13/03 H 2 storage is a critical enabling technology for H 2 use as an energy carrier The low volumetric density of gaseous fuels requires a storage method which compacts the fuel. Hence, hydrogen storage systems are inherently more complex than liquid fuels. Storage technologies are needed in all aspects of hydrogen utilization. production distribution utilization

158

Device-transparent personal storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Users increasingly store data collections such as digital photographs on multiple personal devices, each of which typically presents the user with a storage management interface isolated from the contents of all other ...

Strauss, Jacob A. (Jacob Alo), 1979-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Storage Related News | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Storage Related News Storage Related News Storage Related News November 1, 2013 November 13 ESTAP Webinar: Duke Energy's Energy Storage Projects On Wednesday, November 13 from 1 - 2 p.m. ET, Clean Energy States Alliance will host a webinar on Duke Energy's battery energy storage systems. This webinar will be introduced by Dr. Imre Gyuk, Energy Storage Program Manager in the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability. August 30, 2013 September 16 ESTAP Webinar: Optimizing the Benefits of a PV with Battery Storage System On Monday, September 16 from 1 - 2 p.m. ET, Clean Energy States Alliance will host a webinar on optimizing the benefits of a photovoltaic (PV) storage system with a battery. This webinar will be introduced by Dr. Imre Gyuk, Energy Storage Program Manager in the Office of Electricity Delivery

160

Nevada test site underground storage tank number 12-13-1: Nevada division of emergency management case number H931130E corrective action unit 450. Closure report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project site was identified as an abandoned Underground Storage Tank (UST) to be closed under the Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) Environmental Restoration Division (ERD) Program during Fiscal Year 1993. The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requires that before permanent closure is completed an assessment of the site must take place. The Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) requires assessment and corrective actions for a petroleum substance in the soil which exceeds 100 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg). Subsequent to the tank removal, a hydrocarbon release was identified at the site. The release was reported to the NDEP by DOE/NV on November 30, 1993. Nevada Division of Environmental Management (NDEM) Case Number H931130E was assigned. This final closure report documents the assessment and corrective actions taken for the hydrocarbon release identified at the site. The Notification of Closure, EPA Form 7530-1 dated March 22, 1994, is provided in Appendix A. A 45-day report documenting the notification for a hydrocarbon release was submitted to NDEP on April 6, 1994.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "managing treatment storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2007 through June 30, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: (1) Organizing and hosting the 2007 GSTC Spring Meeting; (2) Identifying the 2007 GSTC projects, issuing award or declination letters, and begin drafting subcontracts; (3) 2007 project mentoring teams identified; (4) New NETL Project Manager; (5) Preliminary planning for the 2007 GSTC Fall Meeting; (6) Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC project final reports; and (7) Outreach and communications.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

162

Technical Safety Requirements for the Waste Storage Facilities  

SciTech Connect

This document contains Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) for the Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, which include Area 612 (A612) and the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) Storage Area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The TSRs constitute requirements regarding the safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. These TSRs are derived from the Documented Safety Analysis for the Waste Storage Facilities (DSA) (LLNL 2006). The analysis presented therein determined that the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are low-chemical hazard, Hazard Category 2 non-reactor nuclear facilities. The TSRs consist primarily of inventory limits and controls to preserve the underlying assumptions in the hazard and accident analyses. Further, appropriate commitments to safety programs are presented in the administrative controls sections of the TSRs. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are used by RHWM to handle and store hazardous waste, TRANSURANIC (TRU) WASTE, LOW-LEVEL WASTE (LLW), mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL as well as small amounts from other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, as described in the DSA. In addition, several minor treatments (e.g., drum crushing, size reduction, and decontamination) are carried out in these facilities. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are located in two portions of the LLNL main site. A612 is located in the southeast quadrant of LLNL. The A612 fenceline is approximately 220 m west of Greenville Road. The DWTF Storage Area, which includes Building 693 (B693), Building 696 Radioactive Waste Storage Area (B696R), and associated yard areas and storage areas within the yard, is located in the northeast quadrant of LLNL in the DWTF complex. The DWTF Storage Area fenceline is approximately 90 m west of Greenville Road. A612 and the DWTF Storage Area are subdivided into various facilities and storage areas, consisting of buildings, tents, other structures, and open areas as described in Chapter 2 of the DSA. Section 2.4 of the DSA provides an overview of the buildings, structures, and areas in the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, including construction details such as basic floor plans, equipment layout, construction materials, controlling dimensions, and dimensions significant to the hazard and accident analysis. Chapter 5 of the DSA documents the derivation of the TSRs and develops the operational limits that protect the safety envelope defined for the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. This TSR document is applicable to the handling, storage, and treatment of hazardous waste, TRU WASTE, LLW, mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste received or generated in the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. Section 5, Administrative Controls, contains those Administrative Controls necessary to ensure safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. Programmatic Administrative Controls are in Section 5.6. This Introduction to the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES TSRs is not part of the TSR limits or conditions and contains no requirements related to WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES operations or to the safety analyses of the DSA.

Larson, H L

2007-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

163

Solid Waste Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground Storage Act (Tennessee) Solid Waste Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground Storage Act (Tennessee) Eligibility...

164

Energy Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Laboratories September 27, 2007 San Francisco, CA PEER REVIEW 2007 DOE(SNL)CEC Energy Storage Program FYO7 Projects Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by...

165

Referenced-site environmental document for a Monitored Retrievable Storage facility: backup waste management option for handling 1800 MTU per year  

SciTech Connect

This environmental document includes a discussion of the purpose of a monitored retrievable storage facility, a description of two facility design concepts (sealed storage cask and field drywell), a description of three reference sites (arid, warm-wet, and cold-wet), and a discussion and comparison of the impacts associated with each of the six site/concept combinations. This analysis is based on a 15,000-MTU storage capacity and a throughput rate of up to 1800 MTU per year.

Silviera, D.J.; Aaberg, R.L.; Cushing, C.E.; Marshall, A.; Scott, M.J.; Sewart, G.H.; Strenge, D.L.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and is scheduled for completion on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project includes the creation of the GSTC structure, development of constitution (by-laws) for the consortium, and development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with the second 3-months of the project and encompasses the period December 31, 2003, through March 31, 2003. During this 3-month, the dialogue of individuals representing the storage industry, universities and the Department of energy was continued and resulted in a constitution for the operation of the consortium and a draft of the initial Request for Proposals (RFP).

Robert W. Watson

2004-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

167

Scalability of Dynamic Storage Allocation Algorithms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dynamic storage allocation has a significant impact on computer performance. A dynamic storage allocator manages space for objects whose lifetimes are not known by the system at the time of their creation. A good dynamic storage allocator should utilize storage efficiently and satisfy requests in as few instructions as possible. A dynamic storage allocator on a multiprocessor should have the ability to satisfy multiple requests concurrently. This paper examines parallel dynamic storage allocation algorithms and how performancescales with increasing numbers of processors. The highest throughputs and lowest instruction counts are achieved with multiple free list fit I. The best memory utilization is achieved using a best fit system.

Arun Iyengar

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama) Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama) Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Alabama Program Type Environmental Regulations Safety and Operational Guidelines This legislation gives regulatory authority to the Department of Environmental Management to monitor commercial sites for hazardous wastes; fees on waste received at such sites; hearings and investigations. The legislation also states responsibilities of generators and transporters of hazardous waste as well as responsibilities of hazardous waste storage and treatment facility and hazardous waste disposal site operators. There

169

Strategic Intelligence Update: Energy Storage & Distributed Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distributed generation and energy storage technologies add value to a wide range of applications within the electric utility enterprise. Energy storage at megawatt-hour scales can be used to enable generators to better follow load and stabilize transmission voltage and frequency. Both distributed generation and energy storage systems can help utilities shift and manage peak loads within the distribution system, improve reliability, and potentially help defer infrastructure upgrades. Bulk energy storage e...

2009-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

170

Strategic Intelligence Update: Distributed Generation & Energy Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distributed generation and energy storage technologies add value to a wide range of applications within the electric utility enterprise. Energy storage at megawatt-hour scales can be used to enable generators to better follow load and stabilize transmission voltage and frequency. Both distributed generation and energy storage systems can help utilities shift and manage peak loads within the distribution system, improve reliability, and potentially help defer infrastructure upgrades. Bulk energy storage e...

2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

171

Strategic Intelligence Update: Energy Storage & Distributed Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distributed generation and energy storage technologies add value to a wide range of applications within the electric utility enterprise. Energy storage at megawatt-hour scales can be used to enable generators to better follow load and stabilize transmission voltage and frequency. Both distributed generation and energy storage systems can help utilities shift and manage peak loads within the distribution system, improve reliability, and potentially help defer infrastructure upgrades. Bulk energy storage e...

2009-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

172

Strategic Intelligence Update: Distributed Generation & Energy Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distributed generation and energy storage technologies add value to a wide range of applications within the electric utility enterprise. Energy storage at megawatt-hour scales can be used to enable generators to better follow load and stabilize transmission voltage and frequency. Both distributed generation and energy storage systems can help utilities shift and manage peak loads within the distribution system, improve reliability, and potentially help defer infrastructure upgrades. Bulk energy storage e...

2009-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

173

Accident analysis for high-level waste management alternatives in the US Department of Energy Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect

A comparative generic accident analysis was performed for the programmatic alternatives for high-level waste (HLW) management in the US Department of Energy Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (EM PEIS). The key facilities and operations of the five major HLW management phases were considered: current storage, retrieval, pretreatment, treatment, and interim canister storage. A spectrum of accidents covering the risk-dominant accidents was analyzed. Preliminary results are presented for HLW management at the Hanford site. A comparison of these results with those previously advanced shows fair agreement.

Folga, S.; Mueller, C.; Roglans-Ribas, J.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Technical Safety Requirements for the Waste Storage Facilities  

SciTech Connect

This document contains Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) for the Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, which include Area 625 (A625) and the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) Storage Area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The TSRs constitute requirements regarding the safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. These TSRs are derived from the Documented Safety Analysis for the Waste Storage Facilities (DSA) (LLNL 2009). The analysis presented therein determined that the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are low-chemical hazard, Hazard Category 2 non-reactor nuclear facilities. The TSRs consist primarily of inventory limits and controls to preserve the underlying assumptions in the hazard and accident analyses. Further, appropriate commitments to safety programs are presented in the administrative controls sections of the TSRs. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are used by RHWM to handle and store hazardous waste, TRANSURANIC (TRU) WASTE, LOW-LEVEL WASTE (LLW), mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL as well as small amounts from other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, as described in the DSA. In addition, several minor treatments (e.g., size reduction and decontamination) are carried out in these facilities. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are located in two portions of the LLNL main site. A625 is located in the southeast quadrant of LLNL. The A625 fenceline is approximately 225 m west of Greenville Road. The DWTF Storage Area, which includes Building 693 (B693), Building 696 Radioactive Waste Storage Area (B696R), and associated yard areas and storage areas within the yard, is located in the northeast quadrant of LLNL in the DWTF complex. The DWTF Storage Area fenceline is approximately 90 m west of Greenville Road. A625 and the DWTF Storage Area are subdivided into various facilities and storage areas, consisting of buildings, tents, other structures, and open areas as described in Chapter 2 of the DSA. Section 2.4 of the DSA provides an overview of the buildings, structures, and areas in the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, including construction details such as basic floor plans, equipment layout, construction materials, controlling dimensions, and dimensions significant to the hazard and accident analysis. Chapter 5 of the DSA documents the derivation of the TSRs and develops the operational limits that protect the safety envelope defined for the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. This TSR document is applicable to the handling, storage, and treatment of hazardous waste, TRU WASTE, LLW, mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste received or generated in the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. Section 5, Administrative Controls, contains those Administrative Controls necessary to ensure safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. Programmatic Administrative Controls are in Section 5.4.

Laycak, D T

2010-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

175

Technical Safety Requirements for the Waste Storage Facilities  

SciTech Connect

This document contains Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) for the Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, which include Area 625 (A625) and the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) Storage Area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The TSRs constitute requirements regarding the safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. These TSRs are derived from the 'Documented Safety Analysis for the Waste Storage Facilities' (DSA) (LLNL 2008). The analysis presented therein determined that the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are low-chemical hazard, Hazard Category 2 non-reactor nuclear facilities. The TSRs consist primarily of inventory limits and controls to preserve the underlying assumptions in the hazard and accident analyses. Further, appropriate commitments to safety programs are presented in the administrative controls sections of the TSRs. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are used by RHWM to handle and store hazardous waste, TRANSURANIC (TRU) WASTE, LOW-LEVEL WASTE (LLW), mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL as well as small amounts from other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, as described in the DSA. In addition, several minor treatments (e.g., size reduction and decontamination) are carried out in these facilities. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are located in two portions of the LLNL main site. A625 is located in the southeast quadrant of LLNL. The A625 fenceline is approximately 225 m west of Greenville Road. The DWTF Storage Area, which includes Building 693 (B693), Building 696 Radioactive Waste Storage Area (B696R), and associated yard areas and storage areas within the yard, is located in the northeast quadrant of LLNL in the DWTF complex. The DWTF Storage Area fenceline is approximately 90 m west of Greenville Road. A625 and the DWTF Storage Area are subdivided into various facilities and storage areas, consisting of buildings, tents, other structures, and open areas as described in Chapter 2 of the DSA. Section 2.4 of the DSA provides an overview of the buildings, structures, and areas in the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, including construction details such as basic floor plans, equipment layout, construction materials, controlling dimensions, and dimensions significant to the hazard and accident analysis. Chapter 5 of the DSA documents the derivation of the TSRs and develops the operational limits that protect the safety envelope defined for the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. This TSR document is applicable to the handling, storage, and treatment of hazardous waste, TRU WASTE, LLW, mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste received or generated in the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. Section 5, Administrative Controls, contains those Administrative Controls necessary to ensure safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. Programmatic Administrative Controls are in Section 5.6.

Laycak, D T

2008-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

176

GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM  

SciTech Connect

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and was completed on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project included the creation of the GSTC structure, development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with Phase 1B and encompasses the period April 1, 2004, through June 30, 2004. During this 3-month period, a Request for Proposals (RFP) was made. A total of 17 proposals were submitted to the GSTC. A proposal selection meeting was held June 9-10, 2004 in Morgantown, West Virginia. Of the 17 proposals, 6 were selected for funding.

Robert W. Watson

2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

177

Radioactive waste storage issues  

SciTech Connect

In the United States we generate greater than 500 million tons of toxic waste per year which pose a threat to human health and the environment. Some of the most toxic of these wastes are those that are radioactively contaminated. This thesis explores the need for permanent disposal facilities to isolate radioactive waste materials that are being stored temporarily, and therefore potentially unsafely, at generating facilities. Because of current controversies involving the interstate transfer of toxic waste, more states are restricting the flow of wastes into - their borders with the resultant outcome of requiring the management (storage and disposal) of wastes generated solely within a state`s boundary to remain there. The purpose of this project is to study nuclear waste storage issues and public perceptions of this important matter. Temporary storage at generating facilities is a cause for safety concerns and underscores, the need for the opening of permanent disposal sites. Political controversies and public concern are forcing states to look within their own borders to find solutions to this difficult problem. Permanent disposal or retrievable storage for radioactive waste may become a necessity in the near future in Colorado. Suitable areas that could support - a nuclear storage/disposal site need to be explored to make certain the health, safety and environment of our citizens now, and that of future generations, will be protected.

Kunz, D.E.

1994-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

178

Hydrogen Storage  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen storage technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains the different ways in which hydrogen can be stored, as well a

179

Energy Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Development Concept Nitrogen-Air Battery F.M. Delnick, D. Ingersoll, K.Waldrip Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM presented to U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems...

180

Closure of Lagoons and Earthen Manure Storage Structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This publication explains the regulations, options and procedures for closing earthen storage and treatment structures for livestock or poultry manure.

Mukhtar, Saqib; Walker, Jerry

2002-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "managing treatment storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Programmatic Environmental Assessment for the U. S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations Implementation of a Comprehensive Management Program for the Storage, Transportation, and Disposition of Potentially Reusable Uranium Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

93 93 FINAL Programmatic Environmental Assessment for the U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations Implementation of a Comprehensive Management Program for the Storage, Transportation, and Disposition of Potentially Reusable Uranium Materials FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPMZT PROGR4MMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSME?X FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, OAK RIDGE OPER4TIOSS IMPLEMENTATION OF A COMPREHENSIVE MANAGEMEKT PROGK4hl FOR THE STORAGE, TRANSPORTATION, AND DISPOSITION OF POTENTIALLY REUSABLE URANJUh4 MATERIALS AGEhCY: U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE) ACTION: FINDI?iG OF NO SIGNIFICANT 1~IPAC-I SUMI\!L4RY: The U. S. DOE has completed a Programmatic Environmental Assessment (PE:,4) (DOE/E?,- 1393), which is incorporated herein by this reference. Tile purpose of the

182

DUF6 Storage Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Safety Depleted UF6 Storage line line How DUF6 is Stored Where DUF6 is Stored DUF6 Storage Safety Cylinder Leakage Depleted UF6 Storage Safety Continued cylinder storage is...

183

Supplemnental Volume - Independent Oversight Assessment of the Nuclear Safety Culture and Management of Nuclear Safety Concerns at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant, January 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Volume Volume Independent Oversight Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture and Management of Nuclear Safety Concerns at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant January 2012 Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Office of Health, Safety and Security HSS i Independent Oversight Assessment of Safety Culture and Management of Nuclear Safety Concerns at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Supplemental Volume Table of Contents Foreword ...................................................................................................................................................... iii Acronyms ...................................................................................................................................................... v

184

Device Transparency: a New Model for Mobile Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper proposes a new storage model, device transparency, in which users view and manage their entire data collection from any of their devices, even from disconnected storage-limited devices holding only a subset of ...

Strauss, Jacob A.

185

Assessment of sludge management options in a waste water treatment plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis is part of a larger project which began in response to a request by the Spanish water agengy, Cadagua, for advice on life cycle assessment (LCA) and environmental impacts of Cadagua operated wastewater treatment ...

Lim, Jong hyun, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Current Practices: Solid Waste Management from Zero Liquid Discharge (ZLD) Wastewater Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study was conducted to identify current practices used by power plants to manage their solid waste residuals from zero liquid discharge (ZLD) operations treating flue gas desulfurization (FGD) wastewater. Because there are such few FGD ZLD systems in operation not only in the United States but also worldwide, the study scope was expanded to include non-FGD ZLD operations, as well. Only two of the seven facilities interviewed in this study operate ZLDs on FGD water; therefore, much of the current ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

187

Hydrogen Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Objectives - Develop and verify: On-board hydrogen storage systems achieving: 1.5 kWhkg (4.5 wt%), 1.2 kWhL, and 6kWh by 2005 2 kWhkg (6 wt%), 1.5 kWhL, and 4kWh by...

188

SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scale Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Plant", IEEEfor SlIperconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Unit", inSuperconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Plant, Advances in

Hassenzahl, W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Superconducting 30-MJ Energy Storage Coil", Proc. 19 80 ASC,Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Plant", IEEE Trans.SlIperconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Unit", in Advances

Hassenzahl, W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlined aboveModeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers," Proceed-ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Storage | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Usage Storage Storage Energy storage isnt just for AA batteries. Thanks to investments from the Energy Department's Advanced Research...

192

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"Proceed- ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop,

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

FCT Hydrogen Storage: Contacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Storage: Contacts on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Storage: Contacts on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Storage: Contacts on...

194

The application of PHREEQCi, a geochemical computer program, to aid in the management of a wastewater treatment wetland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the past decade, constructed wetlands have become popular for treating coal-generated acid mine drainage and leachate from coal-ash disposal areas. The goal of the wetland manager is to design a system in which the pH is neutralized, toxic metals are removed, and wetland discharge meets or exceeds discharge standards for water quality. This is typically accomplished by using a combination of wetlands, ponds, and limestone drains. The treatment capability of a constructed wetland is based on relationships among dissolved oxygen (DO), pH, and metal speciation. The aim of this research was to determine if PHREEQCi, a geochemical computer program, could be used in wetland management and design. The wetland site chosen for this study was at a Texas Municipal Power Agency (TMPA) plant located in Grimes County, Texas and was created to treat leachate from a solid waste disposal area where coal ash and SO? scrubber sludge was deposited. The leachate contains significant concentrations of sulfate, chloride, total dissolved solids (TDS), arsenic, and selenium. Using PHREEQCi, geochemical speciation models were created to study the interrelationships between critical chemical components at the TMPA site in order to establish an optimum set of conditions to improve treatment capability and to avoid wetland failure. The results of the geochemical speciation modeling indicated a challenging situation for a wetland manager because different species precipitate under contrasting environments. In order to apply the geochemical speciation results to the design of the TMPA site, two conditions must be recognized. First, metal removal is best accomplished by generating alkaline and oxidative conditions to promote metal-oxide precipitation. Second, sulfate can be controlled under reducing environments where it is converted to sulfide and metal sulfides precipitate. Chlorides are very soluble and no viable conclusions as to the most appropriate removal method could be postulated. TDS has an ambiguous composition and could not be modeled using PHREEQCi.

Mitzman, Stephanie

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Solid Waste Management Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Solid Waste Management Program Plan (SWMPP) is to provide a summary level comprehensive approach for the storage, treatment, and disposal of current and future solid waste received at the Hanford Site (from onsite and offsite generators) in a manner compliant with current and evolving regulations and orders (federal, state, and Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford)). The Plan also presents activities required for disposal of selected wastes currently in retrievable storage. The SWMPP provides a central focus for the description and control of cost, scope, and schedule of Hanford Site solid waste activities, and provides a vehicle for ready communication of the scope of those activities to onsite and offsite organizations. This Plan represents the most complete description available of Hanford Site Solid Waste Management (SWM) activities and the interfaces between those activities. It will be updated annually to reflect changes in plans due to evolving regulatory requirements and/or the SWM mission. 8 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

Duncan, D.R.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Considerations in the Design of Treatment Best Management Practices (BMPs) to Improve Water Quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This document has been reviewed in accordance with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency=s peer and administrative review policies and approved for publiction. Mention of trade names, commercial products, or design procedures does not constitute endorsement or recommendation for use. ii Foreword The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is charged by Congress with protecting the Nations land, air, and water resources. Under a mandate of national environmental laws, the Agency strives to formulate and implement actions leading to a compatible balance between human activities and the ability of natural systems to support and nurture life. To meet this mandate, EPAs research program is providing data and technical support for solving environmental problems today and building a science knowledge base necessary to manage our ecological resources wisely, understand how pollutants affect our health, and prevent or reduce environmental risks in the future. The National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL) is the Agencys center for investigation of technological and management approaches for preventing and reducing risks from pollution that threaten human health and the environment. The focus of the Laboratorys research program is on methods and their cost-effectiveness for prevention and control of pollution to air, land, water, and subsurface resources; protection of water quality in public water systems; remediation of contaminated sites, sediments and ground water; prevention and control of indoor air pollution; and restoration of ecosystems. NRMRL collaborates with both public and private sector partners to foster technologies that reduce the cost of compliance and to anticipate emerging problems. NRMRLs research provides solutions to environmental problems by: developing and promoting technologies that protect and improve the environment; advancing

unknown authors

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Strategic Intelligence Update: Energy Storage & Distributed Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy Storage and distributed generation technologies add value to a wide range of applications within the electric utility enterprise. Both energy storage and distributed generation systems can help utilities shift and manage peak loads within the distribution system, improve reliability, and potentially help defer infrastructure upgrades. Bulk energy storage has the ability to improve the value of intermittent renewable resources and to provide multiple benefit streams through energy arbitrage and by ...

2012-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

198

Strategic Intelligence Update: Energy Storage & Distributed Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy Storage and distributed generation technologies add value to a wide range of applications within the electric utility enterprise. Both energy storage and distributed generation systems can help utilities shift and manage peak loads within the distribution system, improve reliability, and potentially help defer infrastructure upgrades. Bulk energy storage has the ability to improve the value of intermittent renewable resources and to provide multiple benefit streams through energy arbitrage and by ...

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

199

Strategic Intelligence Update: Energy Storage & Distributed Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy Storage and distributed generation technologies add value to a wide range of applications within the electric utility enterprise. Both energy storage and distributed generation systems can help utilities shift and manage peak loads within the distribution system, improve reliability, and potentially help defer infrastructure upgrades. Bulk energy storage has the ability to improve the value of intermittent renewable resources and to provide multiple benefit streams through energy arbitrage and by ...

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

200

Waste management facilities cost information for transuranic waste  

SciTech Connect

This report contains preconceptual designs and planning level life-cycle cost estimates for managing transuranic waste. The report`s information on treatment and storage modules can be integrated to develop total life-cycle costs for various waste management options. A procedure to guide the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractor personnel in the use of cost estimation data is also summarized in this report.

Shropshire, D.; Sherick, M.; Biagi, C.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "managing treatment storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Energy Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Daniel R. Borneo, PE Daniel R. Borneo, PE Sandia National Laboratories September 27, 2007 San Francisco, CA PEER REVIEW 2007 DOE(SNL)/CEC Energy Storage Program FYO7 Projects Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. 2 Presentation Outline * DOE(SNL)/CEC Collaboration - Background of DOE(SNL)/CEC Collaboration - FY07 Project Review * Zinc Bromine Battery (ZBB) Demonstration * Palmdale Super capacitor Demonstration * Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) Regional Transit (RT) Super capacitor demonstration * Beacon Flywheel Energy Storage System (FESS) 3 Background of DOE(SNL)/CEC Collaboration * Memorandum of Understanding Between CEC and DOE (SNL). - In Place since 2004

202

Energy Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Development Concept Development Concept Nitrogen-Air Battery F.M. Delnick, D. Ingersoll, K.Waldrip Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM presented to U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Research Program Washington, DC November 2-4, 2010 Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin company, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Funded by the Energy Storage Systems Program of the U.S. Department Of Energy through Sandia National Laboratories Full Air Breathing Battery Concept * Concept is to use O 2 and N 2 as the electrodes in a battery * Novel because N 2 is considered inert * Our group routinely reacts N 2 electrochemically

203

November 13 ESTAP Webinar: Duke Energy's Energy Storage Projects...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gyuk, Energy Storage Program Manager in the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability. The webinar will discuss Duke Energy's six deployed battery systems, which...

204

NREL: Energy Storage - Laboratory Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory Capabilities Laboratory Capabilities Photo of NREL's Energy Storage Laboratory. NREL's Energy Storage Laboratory. Welcome to our Energy Storage Laboratory at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado. Much of our testing is conducted at this state-of-the-art laboratory, where researchers use cutting-edge modeling and analysis tools to focus on thermal management systems-from the cell level to the battery pack or ultracapacitor stack-for electric, hybrid electric, and fuel cell vehicles (EVs, HEVs, and FCVs). In 2010, we received $2 million in funding from the U.S. Department of Energy under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) to enhance and upgrade the NREL Battery Thermal and Life Test Facility. The Energy Storage Laboratory houses two unique calorimeters, along with

205

Energy Storage | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Storage Energy Storage Energy Storage One of the distinctive characteristics of the electric power sector is that the amount of electricity that can be generated is relatively fixed over short periods of time, although demand for electricity fluctuates throughout the day. Developing technology to store electrical energy so it can be available to meet demand whenever needed would represent a major breakthrough in electricity distribution. Helping to try and meet this goal, electricity storage devices can manage the amount of power required to supply customers at times when need is greatest, which is during peak load. These devices can also help make renewable energy, whose power output cannot be controlled by grid operators, smooth and dispatchable. They can also balance microgrids to achieve a good match between generation

206

Frugal storage for cloud file systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Enterprises are moving their IT infrastructure to cloud service providers with the goal of saving costs and simplifying management overhead. One of the critical services for any enterprise is its file system, where users require real-time access to files. ... Keywords: caching, cloud computing, storage, storage cost

Krishna P.N. Puttaswamy; Thyaga Nandagopal; Murali Kodialam

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

SGDP Storage System Performance Supplement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Analysis for the ARRA SGDP Analysis for the ARRA SGDP Energy Storage Projects Update Conference - DOE 2010 Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) November 3, 2010 Presenter: Jacquelyn Bean Organization: DOE-National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Funded in part by the Energy Storage Systems Program of the U.S. Department Of Energy through National Energy Technology Laboratory 1 Background 2 Metrics and Benefits Data Flow 3 Contact Information Table of Contents 1 4 Appendix NETL's role in SGDP metrics and benefits reporting 2 NETL Energy Delivery Technologies Division SGDP Technical Project Officers (TPOs) SGDP Principal Investigators (PIs) Project Management and Performance Data Analysis NETL Project Management Center's Analysis & Support Team Data Analysis Team (DAT) Lead Contractors: Booz Allen

208

ZZ Mercury Storage Book.indb  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 Comment Response Document Environmental Impact Statement Final Final Environmental Impact Statement DOE/EIS-0423 January 2011 Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury For additional information on this Final Mercury Storage EIS, contact: AVAILABILITY OF THIS FINAL LONG-TERM MANAGEMENT AND STORAGE OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT David Levenstein, Document Manager Office of Environmental Compliance (EM-41) U.S. Department of Energy Post Office Box 2612 Germantown, MD 20874 Website: http://www.mercurystorageeis.com Fax: 877-274-5462 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Cover Sheet Lead Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperating Agencies: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

209

Stationary High-Pressure Hydrogen Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stationary High-Pressure Hydrogen Storage Zhili Feng Oak Ridge National Laboratory 2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Technology Gap Analysis for Bulk...

210

Development of Energy Management Strategies for Automated Real- Time Pricing: Control System Enhancements for Thermal Energy Storage (TES) and Modulating Building Loads  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many prominent electric utilities throughout the United States are currently investigating real-time pricing rate structures (RTP) as a means of giving their large customers an economic incentive to reduce their electricity usage during periods when the utility's cost of providing power is high. This report summarizes the results of an engineering study of the technical approach and potential benefits of optimizing thermal energy storage in response to real-time pricing of electricity. The program is com...

1996-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

211

NETL: Carbon Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (RCSP) Programmatic Points of Contact Carbon Storage Program Infrastructure Coordinator Carbon Storage...

212

Hazardous Waste Management Act (South Dakota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous Waste Management Act (South Dakota) Hazardous Waste Management Act (South Dakota) Hazardous Waste Management Act (South Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Fuel Distributor Program Info State South Dakota Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources It is the public policy of the state of South Dakota to regulate the control and generation, transportation, treatment, storage, and disposal of hazardous wastes. The state operates a comprehensive regulatory program of hazardous waste management, and the South Dakota Department of Environment

213

Application-storage discovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Discovering application dependency on data and storage is a key prerequisite for many storage optimization tasks such as data assignment to storage tiers, storage consolidation, virtualization, and handling unused data. However, in the real world these ... Keywords: enterprise storage, experimental evaluation, storage discovery

Nikolai Joukov; Birgit Pfitzmann; HariGovind V. Ramasamy; Murthy V. Devarakonda

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

TREATMENT OF HYDROCARBON, ORGANIC RESIDUE AND PRODUCTION CHEMICAL DAMAGE MECHANISMS THROUGH THE APPLICATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE IN NATURAL GAS STORAGE WELLS  

SciTech Connect

Two gas storage fields were studied for this project. Overisel field, operated by Consumer's Energy, is located near the town of Holland, Michigan. Huntsman Storage Unit, operated by Kinder Morgan, is located in Cheyenne County, Nebraska near the town of Sidney. Wells in both fields experienced declining performance over several years of their annual injection/production cycle. In both fields, the presence of hydrocarbons, organic materials or production chemicals was suspected as the cause of progressive formation damage leading to the performance decline. Core specimens and several material samples were collected from these two natural gas storage reservoirs. Laboratory studies were performed to characterize the samples that were believed to be representative of a reservoir damage mechanism previously identified as arising from the presence of hydrocarbons, organic residues or production chemicals. A series of laboratory experiments were performed to identify the sample materials, use these materials to damage the flow capacity of the core specimens and then attempt to remove or reduce the induced damage using either carbon dioxide or a mixture of carbon dioxide and other chemicals. Results of the experiments showed that pure carbon dioxide was effective in restoring flow capacity to the core specimens in several different settings. However, in settings involving asphaltines as the damage mechanism, both pure carbon dioxide and mixtures of carbon dioxide and other chemicals provided little effectiveness in damage removal.

Lawrence J. Pekot

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

215

Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research has indicated that, depending upon driver and passenger characteristics, passengers can have either a positive or negative influence upon driver behaviour. In conclusion to a recent study investigating the roles that passengers can play to influence, positively and negatively, driver behaviour, Regan and Mitsopoulos (2001) recommended, among other things, that the principles of Crew Resource Management (CRM) training may increase passengers ability to positively influence driver behaviour and also drivers ability to accept constructive feedback. The present study investigated the potential application of CRM training within young driver training in the Australian Capital Territory (ACT). This involved a literature review, an analysis of the differences between the driving and aviation domains, an analysis of the team-based activities and the knowledge, skills and attitudes required during driving to perform those activities, consultation with CRM experts from the aviation and medicine domains and the conduct of six focus groups involving young learner drivers, provisional licence drivers and course teachers. The findings indicate that CRM training as part of young driver training in the ACT is a viable concept to pursue. The application of CRM training within young driver training has potential to significantly enhance the positive and reduce the negative effects of passengers on young driver behaviour, and thus the safety of young drivers and passengers alike. The outcomes of this study formed the basis for a set of recommendations for the development of a young driver CRM training program in the ACT.

Young Drivers; Eve Mitsopoulos; Michael Regan; Janet Anderson; Paul Salmon; Jessica Edquist; Ii Report Documentation Page

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Mixed Waste Focus Area program management plan  

SciTech Connect

This plan describes the program management principles and functions to be implemented in the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA). The mission of the MWFA is to provide acceptable technologies that enable implementation of mixed waste treatment systems developed in partnership with end-users, stakeholders, tribal governments and regulators. The MWFA will develop, demonstrate and deliver implementable technologies for treatment of mixed waste within the DOE Complex. Treatment refers to all post waste-generation activities including sampling and analysis, characterization, storage, processing, packaging, transportation and disposal.

Beitel, G.A.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

218

Center for Electrical Energy Storage Home  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrical Energy Storage DOE Logo Electrical Energy Storage DOE Logo Focus Areas 3D Interface Architectures Dynamically Responsive Interfaces Control of Interfacial Processes Theory Search Argonne ... Search Argonne Home >Center for Electrical Energy Storage > Home Directorate & Principal Investigators Management Council Executive Committee Research Staff External Advisory Committee News Science Highlights Publications & Presentations CEES-Authored and Co-Authored Cover Stories Peer-Reviewed Publications Presentations Patents Frontiers in Energy Research Awards Jobs at CEES Energy Frontier Research Centers at Argonne Center for Electrical Energy Storage - an Energy Frontier Research Center Above: An artistic rendition showing a metal-fluoride stabilized surface structure at a lithium cobalt oxide

219

Using Alternative Energy Storage in UPS Applications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Data Management for Data Management for CEC/DOE Energy Storage Demonstration Project Work performed under contract with Sandia National Labs Garth Corey Project Manager Project funded by the US DOE ESS Program Dr. Imre Gyuk, Program Manager Presented by Doug Dorr ESI Project Manager ddorr@eprisolutions.com 2 Presentation Outline  Project Overview and Objectives  Data acquisition status for the demonstration projects  Updates to the Energy Storage Initiative Website  Examples of Website Data Analysis 3 Project Overview and Objectives  Promote New Energy Storage Technologies that can achieve California's long range energy goals:  Increased energy utilization efficiency  Reduced demand for out of state energy procurement  Reduced overall energy costs to consumers

220

Charge allocation for hybrid electrical energy storage systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hybrid electrical energy storage (HEES) systems, composed of multiple banks of heterogeneous electrical energy storage (EES) elements with their unique strengths and weaknesses, have been introduced to efficiently store and retrieve electrical energy ... Keywords: charge allocation, charge management, hybrid electrical energy storage system

Qing Xie; Yanzhi Wang; Younghyun Kim; Naehyuck Chang; Massoud Pedram

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "managing treatment storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Injection/withdrawal scheduling for natural gas storage facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Control decisions for gas storage facilities are made in the face of extreme uncertainty over future natural gas prices on world markets. We examine the problem faced by owners of storage contracts of how to manage the injection/withdrawal schedule of ... Keywords: natural gas storage, optimization, scheduling

Alan Holland

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Storage and Handling | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Storage and Handling Storage and Handling Storage and Handling Records Management Procedures for Storage, Transfer & Retrieval of Records from the Washington National Records Center (WNRC) or Legacy Management Business Center RETIREMENT OF RECORDS: 1. The Program Office is responsible for originating the Records Transmittal and Receipt Form SF-135 (PDF, 107KB), and sending it to IM-23 at doerha@hq.doe.gov for approval. 2. IM-23 reviews the SF-135 for completeness/correctness (Coordinates with the originating office by email if more information is required.). 3. IM-23 sends the SF-135 for approval to WNRC. PREPARING RECORDS FOR THE TRANSFER TO THE WNRC: 1. Use your organization's Records Information Disposition Schedule (RIDS) as a guide toward assessing records for storage. Refer to DOE O

223

Programmatic Environmental Assessment for the U. S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations Implementation of a Comprehensive Management Program for the Storage, Transportation, and Disposition of Potentially Reusable Uranium Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IMPMZT IMPMZT PROGR4MMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSME?X FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, OAK RIDGE OPER4TIOSS IMPLEMENTATION OF A COMPREHENSIVE MANAGEMEKT PROGK4hl FOR THE STORAGE, TRANSPORTATION, AND DISPOSITION OF POTENTIALLY REUSABLE URANJUh4 MATERIALS AGEhCY: U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE) ACTION: FINDI?iG OF NO SIGNIFICANT 1~IPAC-I SUMI\!L4RY: The U. S. DOE has completed a Programmatic Environmental Assessment (PE:,4) (DOE/E?,- 1393), which is incorporated herein by this reference. Tile purpose of the PEA is in assess potential enJ?ronmental impacts of the implementation of a comprehek-e management program for potentiaIly reusable ICW enriched uranium (LEU). norr,:al uranium (NU), and depleted uranium (DU). --l?prosimately 14,200 MTU (h?etric Tons of Uranium) of potentially reusable uranium is located at 15s

224

Integrating Total Quality Management (TQM) and hazardous waste management  

SciTech Connect

The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 and its subsequent amendments have had a dramatic impact on hazardous waste management for business and industry. The complexity of this law and the penalties for noncompliance have made it one of the most challenging regulatory programs undertaken by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The fundamentals of RCRA include ``cradle to grave`` management of hazardous waste, covering generators, transporters, and treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. The regulations also address extensive definitions and listing/identification mechanisms for hazardous waste along with a tracking system. Treatment is favored over disposal and emphasis is on ``front-end`` treatment such as waste minimization and pollution prevention. A study of large corporations such as Xerox, 3M, and Dow Chemical, as well as the public sector, has shown that well known and successful hazardous waste management programs emphasize pollution prevention and employment of techniques such as proactive environmental management, environmentally conscious manufacturing, and source reduction. Nearly all successful hazardous waste programs include some aspects of Total Quality Management, which begins with a strong commitment from top management. Hazardous waste management at the Rocky Flats Plant is further complicated by the dominance of ``mixed waste`` at the facility. The mixed waste stems from the original mission of the facility, which was production of nuclear weapons components for the Department of Energy (DOE). A Quality Assurance Program based on the criterion in DOE Order 5700.6C has been implemented at Rocky Flats. All of the elements of the Quality Assurance Program play a role in hazardous waste management. Perhaps one of the biggest waste management problems facing the Rocky Flats Plant is cleaning up contamination from a forty year mission which focused on production of nuclear weapon components.

Kirk, N. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Waste Management Project fiscal year 1998 multi-year work plan, WBS 1.2  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Management Project manages and integrates (non-TWRS) waste management activities at the site. Activities include management of Hanford wastes as well as waste transferred to Hanford from other DOE, Department of Defense, or other facilities. This work includes handling, treatment, storage, and disposal of radioactive, nonradioactive, hazardous, and mixed solid and liquid wastes. Major Waste Management Projects are the Solid Waste Project, Liquid Effluents Project, and Analytical Services. Existing facilities (e.g., grout vaults and canyons) shall be evaluated for reuse for these purposes to the maximum extent possible.

Jacobsen, P.H.

1997-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

226

Battery energy storage and superconducting magnetic energy storage for utility applications: A qualitative analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report was prepared at the request of the US Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Management for an objective comparison of the merits of battery energy storage with superconducting magnetic energy storage technology for utility applications. Conclusions are drawn regarding the best match of each technology with these utility application requirements. Staff from the Utility Battery Storage Systems Program and the superconductivity Programs at Sandia National contributed to this effort.

Akhil, A.A.; Butler, P.; Bickel, T.C.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

High-level waste storage tank farms/242-A evaporator standards/requirements identification document (S/RID), Vol. 6  

SciTech Connect

The scope of the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) Functional Area includes the programmatic controls associated with the management and operation of the Hanford Tank Farm Facility. The driving management organization implementing the programmatic controls is the Tank Farms Waste Management (WM)organization whose responsibilities are to ensure that performance objectives are established; and that measurable criteria for attaining objectives are defined and reflected in programs, policies and procedures. Objectives for the WM Program include waste minimization, establishment of effective waste segregation methods, waste treatment technology development, radioactive (low-level, high-level) hazardous and mixed waste transfer, treatment, and storage, applicability of a corrective action program, and management and applicability of a decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) program in future years.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

FCT Hydrogen Storage: The 'National Hydrogen Storage Project...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The 'National Hydrogen Storage Project' to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Storage: The 'National Hydrogen Storage Project' on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Storage: The...

229

DOE Issues Final Mercury Storage Environmental Impact Statement: Texas Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Issues Final Mercury Storage Environmental Impact Statement: DOE Issues Final Mercury Storage Environmental Impact Statement: Texas Site Is Preferred for Long-Term Mercury Storage DOE Issues Final Mercury Storage Environmental Impact Statement: Texas Site Is Preferred for Long-Term Mercury Storage January 19, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - The Department of Energy has prepared a Final Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Environmental Impact Statement to analyze the potential environmental, human health, and socioeconomic impacts of elemental mercury storage at seven locations. Based on these factors, DOE identified the Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas, as the preferred alternative for long-term management and storage of mercury. DOE will consider the environmental impact information presented in this

230

Storage and Aging Effects on Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin Ion Exchange Performance  

SciTech Connect

Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) is evaluating the alternate Cs ion exchanger, spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF), for use in the River Protection Project-Waste Treatment Plant (RPP-WTP).( ) Previous test activities with spherical RF indicate that it has adequate capacity, selectivity, and kinetics to perform in the plant according to the flowsheet needs. It appears to have better elution and hydraulic properties than the existing alternatives: ground-gel RF and SuperLig 644 (SL 644).( ) To date, the spherical RF performance testing has been conducted on freshly manufactured resin (within ~2 months of manufacture). The ion exchange resins will be manufactured and shipped to the WTP up to 1 year before being used in the plant. Changes in the resin properties during storage could reduce the capacity of the resin to remove Cs from low-activity waste solutions. Active sites on organic SL-644 resin have been shown to degrade during storage (Arm et al. 2004). Additional testing was needed to study the effects of storage conditions and aging on spherical RF ion exchange performance. Variables that could have a significant impact on ion exchange resins during storage include storage temperature, medium, and time. BattellePacific Northwest Division (PNWD) was contracted to test the effects of various storage conditions on spherical RF resin. Data obtained from the testing will be used by the WTP operations to provide direction for suitable storage conditions and manage the spherical RF resin stock. Storage test conditions included wet and dry resin configurations under nitrogen at three temperatures. Work was initially conducted under contract number 24590-101-TSA-W000-00004 satisfying the needs defined in Appendix C of the Research and Technology Plan( ) TSS A-219 to evaluate the impact of storage conditions on RF resin performance. In February 2007, the contract mechanism was switched to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Operating Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830.

Fiskum, Sandra K.; Arm, Stuart T.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Steele, Marilyn J.; Thomas, Kathie K.

2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

231

TREATMENT OF HYDROCARBON, ORGANIC RESIDUE AND PRODUCTION CHEMICAL DAMAGE MECHANISMS THROUGH THE APPLICATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE IN NATURAL GAS STORAGE WELLS  

SciTech Connect

Core specimens and several material samples were collected from two natural gas storage reservoirs. Laboratory studies were performed to characterize the samples that were believed to be representative of a reservoir damage mechanism previously identified as arising from the presence of hydrocarbons, organic residues or production chemicals. A series of laboratory experiments were performed to identify the sample materials, use these materials to damage the flow capacity of the core specimens and then attempt to remove or reduce the induced damage using either carbon dioxide or a mixture of carbon dioxide and other chemicals. Results of the experiments showed that pure carbon dioxide was effective in restoring flow capacity to the core specimens in several different settings. However, in settings involving asphaltines as the damage mechanism, both pure carbon dioxide and mixtures of carbon dioxide and other chemicals provided little effectiveness in damage removal.

Lawrence J. Pekot; Ron Himes

2004-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

232

Enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods for enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage are disclosed. One embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the hydrogen receptor to ultrasonification as doping occurs. Another embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the doped hydrogen receptor to a plasma treatment.

Yang, Ralph T. (Ann Arbor, MI); Li, Yingwel (Ann Arbor, MI); Lachawiec, Jr., Anthony J. (Ann Arbor, MI)

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

233

Enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods for enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage are disclosed. One embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the hydrogen receptor to ultrasonication as doping occurs. Another embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the doped hydrogen receptor to a plasma treatment.

Yang, Ralph T; Li, Yingwei; Lachawiec, Jr., Anthony J

2013-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

234

Strategic Intelligence Update: Distributed Generation & Energy Storage, 1st Newsletter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distributed generation and energy storage technologies add value to a wide range of applications within the electric utility enterprise. Energy storage at megawatt-hour scales can be used to enable generators to better follow load and stabilize transmission voltage and frequency. Both distributed generation and energy storage systems can help utilities shift and manage peak loads within the distribution system, improve reliability, and potentially help defer infrastructure upgrades. Bulk energy storage e...

2008-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

235

Strategic Intelligence Update - Energy Storage & Distributed Generation: December 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distributed generation and energy storage technologies add value to a wide range of applications within the electric utility enterprise. Both distributed generation and energy storage systems can help utilities shift and manage peak loads within the distribution system, improve reliability, and potentially help defer infrastructure upgrades. Bulk energy storage especially has the ability to improve the value of intermittent renewable resources. Smaller-scale distributed energy storage, on the order of a ...

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

236

Strategic Intelligence Update: Distributed Generation & Energy Storage, December 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distributed generation and energy storage technologies add value to a wide range of applications within the electric utility enterprise. Energy storage at megawatt-hour scales can be used to enable generators to better follow load and stabilize transmission voltage and frequency. Both distributed generation and energy storage systems can help utilities shift and manage peak loads within the distribution system, improve reliability, and potentially help defer infrastructure upgrades. Bulk energy storage e...

2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

237

Strategic Intelligence Update: Energy Storage and Distributed Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distributed generation and energy storage technologies add value to a wide range of applications within the electric utility enterprise. Both distributed generation and energy storage systems can help utilities shift and manage peak loads within the distribution system, improve reliability, and potentially help defer infrastructure upgrades. Bulk energy storage especially has the ability to improve the value of intermittent renewable resources. Smaller-scale distributed energy storage, on the order of a ...

2010-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

238

Strategic Intelligence Update: Energy Storage and Distributed Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distributed generation and energy storage technologies add value to a wide range of applications within the electric utility enterprise. Both distributed generation and energy storage systems can help utilities shift and manage peak loads within the distribution system, improve reliability, and potentially help defer infrastructure upgrades. Bulk energy storage especially has the ability to improve the value of intermittent renewable resources. Smaller-scale distributed energy storage, on the order of a ...

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

239

Strategic Intelligence Update: Energy Storage and Distributed Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distributed generation and energy storage technologies add value to a wide range of applications within the electric utility enterprise. Both distributed generation and energy storage systems can help utilities shift and manage peak loads within the distribution system, improve reliability, and potentially help defer infrastructure upgrades. Bulk energy storage especially has the ability to improve the value of intermittent renewable resources. Smaller scale distributed energy storage, on the order of a ...

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Occult Trucking and Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At least we used to. We are Occult Trucking and Storage andNOTHING. FLASHBACK -- OCCULT TRUCKING AND STORAGE DEPOT --I saw him. FLASHBACK - OCCULT TRUCKING AND STORAGE DEPOT -

Eyres, Jeffrey Paul

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "managing treatment storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Sorption Storage Technology Summary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Technology Summary DOE H2 Storage Workshop, Feb 14-15, 2011, Washington, DC 1 Compressed & Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage Workshop February 14 - 15, 2011, Washington, DC...

242

Seasonal thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the following: (1) the US Department of Energy Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program, (2) aquifer thermal energy storage technology, (3) alternative STES technology, (4) foreign studies in seasonal thermal energy storage, and (5) economic assessment.

Allen, R.D.; Kannberg, L.D.; Raymond, J.R.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adki ns, "Raccoon Mountain Pumped-Storage Plant- Ten Years2J O. D. Johnson, "Worldwide Pumped-Storage Projects", PowerUnderground Pumped Hydro Storage", Proc. 1976 Eng.

Hassenzahl, W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

FCT Hydrogen Storage: Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Storage: Basics on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Storage: Basics on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Storage: Basics on Google...

245

Record of Decision for the Department of Energy's Waste Management Program: Storage of High-Level Radioactive Waste (08/26/99)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

661 661 Federal Register / Vol. 64, No. 165 / Thursday, August 26, 1999 / Notices Installation State Function(s) Total au- thorizations Public an- nounce- ment date Solicitation issued or scheduled date SELFRIDGE ......................... MI FUELS MANAGEMENT ..................................................... 8 01-Jun-98 27-Apr-99. SELFRIDGE ......................... MI TRANSIENT AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE ......................... 8 04-Jun-98 28-Apr-99. SEYMOUR JOHNSON ......... NC TRANSIENT AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE ......................... 8 12-Nov-97 02-Jul-99. SHAW ................................... SC COMMUNICATION FUNCTIONS ....................................... 3 18-May-99 09-May-00. SHAW ................................... SC LIBRARY .............................................................................

246

AZ CO2 Storage Pilot  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2 Storage Pilot Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Initiative Review Meeting Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania October 7, 2008 John Henry Beyer, Ph.D. WESTCARB Program Manager, Geophysicist 510-486-7954, jhbeyer@lbl.gov Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Earth Sciences Division, MS 90-1116 Berkeley, CA 94720 2 WESTCARB region has major CO2 point sources 3 WESTCARB region has many deep saline formations - candidates for CO2 storage WESTCARB also created GIS layers for oil/gas fields and deep coal basins Source: DOE Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the United States and Canada 4 - Aspen Environmental - Bevilacqua-Knight, Inc. Arizona Utilities CO2 Storage Pilot Contracting and Funding Flow Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Lawrence Berkeley National

247

NASA Perspectives on Cryo H2 Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Perspectives on Cryo H2 Perspectives on Cryo H2 Storage DOE Hydrogen Storage Workshop Marriott Crystal Gateway Arlington, VA February 15, 2011 David J. Chato NASA Glenn Research Center Michael P. Doherty NASA Glenn Research Center 2 Objectives Purposes of this Presentation * To show the role of Cryogenics in NASA prior missions * To show recent NASA accomplishments in cryogenic fluid management technology * To highlight the importance of long term cryogenic storage to future NASA missions (especially Human Space flight) 3 What is Cryogenic Fluid Management? 3 The Cartoon Guide to Cryogenic Fluid Management Illustrating Key Concepts in Iconic Form 4 GRC Cryogenic Fluid Management Accomplishments Pioneering cryogenic propellant properties, behavior, and instrumentation studies 1960s-70s 1962-> Centaur

248

Subsea Pumped Hydro Storage.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A new technology for energy storage called Subsea Pumped Hydro Storage (SPHS) has been evaluated from a techno-economical point of view. Intermittent renewable energy sources (more)

Erik, Almen John

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Energy Storage Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Storage Testing The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity is tasked by the U.S. Department of Energys Vehicle Technology Program to conduct various types of energy storage...

250

NERSC HPSS Storage Statistics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Trends and Summaries Storage by Scientific Discipline Troubleshooting Optimizing IO performance on the Lustre file system IO Formats Sharing Data Transferring Data Unix...

251

Underground Natural Gas Storage  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Underground Natural Gas Storage. Measured By. Disseminated Through. Monthly Survey of Storage Field Operators -- asking injections, withdrawals, base gas, working gas.

252

DC Hazardous Waste Management (District of Columbia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DC Hazardous Waste Management (District of Columbia) DC Hazardous Waste Management (District of Columbia) DC Hazardous Waste Management (District of Columbia) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider District Department of the Environment This regulation regulates the generation, storage, transportation, treatment, and disposal of hazardous waste, and wherever feasible, reduces

253

Second thermal storage applications workshop  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On February 7 and 8, 1980, approximately 20 persons representing the management of both the Solar Thermal Power Systems Program (TPS) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Division of Central Solar Technology (CST) and the Thermal Energy Storage Program (TES) of the DOE Division of Energy Storage Systems (STOR) met in San Antonio, Texas, for the Second Thermal Storage Applications Workshop. The purpose of the workshop was to review the joint Thermal Energy Storage for Solar Thermal Applications (TESSTA) Program between CST and STOR and to discuss important issues in implementing it. The meeting began with summaries of the seven major elements of the joint program (six receiver-related, storage development elements, and one advanced technology element). Then, a brief description along with supporting data was given of several issues related to the recent joint multiyear program plan (MYPP). Following this session, the participants were divided into three smaller groups representing the program elements that mainly supported large power, small power, and advanced technology activities. During the afternoon of the first day, each group prioritized the program elements through program budgets and discussed the issues defined as well as others of concern. On the morning of the second day, representatives of each group presented the group's results to the other participants. Major conclusions arising from the workshop are presented regarding program and budget. (LEW)

Wyman, C.E.; Larson, R.W.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Superconducting energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the status of energy storage involving superconductors and assesses what impact the recently discovered ceramic superconductors may have on the design of these devices. Our description is intended for R&D managers in government, electric utilities, firms, and national laboratories who wish an overview of what has been done and what remains to be done. It is assumed that the reader is acquainted with superconductivity, but not an expert on the topics discussed here. Indeed, it is the author`s aim to enable the reader to better understand the experts who may ask for the reader`s attention, support, or funding. This report may also inform scientists and engineers who, though expert in related areas, wish to have an introduction to our topic.

Giese, R.F.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

BladeCenter chassis management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The IBM eServerTM BladeCenter system allows compute, network, and storage components to operate under a common chassis management scheme. It offers a new approach to solving many systems management issues surrounding the integration ...

T. Brey; B. E. Bigelow; J. E. Bolan; H. Cheselka; Z. Dayar; J. M. Franke; D. E. Johnson; R. N. Kantesaria; E. J. Klodnicki; S. Kochar; S. M. Lardinois; C. A. Morrell; M. S. Rollins; R. R. Wolford; D. R. Woodham

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Facility accident analysis for low-level waste management alternatives in the US Department of Energy Waste Management Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The risk to human health of potential radiological releases resulting from facility accidents constitutes an important consideration in the US Department of Energy (DOE) waste management program. The DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM) is currently preparing a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) that evaluates the risks associated with managing five types of radiological and chemical wastes in the DOE complex. Several alternatives for managing each of the five waste types are defined and compared in the EM PEIS. The alternatives cover a variety of options for storing, treating, and disposing of the wastes. Several treatment methods and operation locations are evaluated as part of the alternatives. The risk induced by potential facility accidents is evaluated for storage operations (current and projected waste storage and post-treatment storage) and for waste treatment facilities. For some of the five waste types considered, facility accidents cover both radiological and chemical releases. This paper summarizes the facility accident analysis that was performed for low-level (radioactive) waste (LLW). As defined in the EM PEIS, LLW includes all radioactive waste not classified as high-level, transuranic, or spent nuclear fuel. LLW that is also contaminated with chemically hazardous components is treated separately as low-level mixed waste (LLMW).

Roglans-Ribas, J.; Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Folga, S.; Tompkins, M.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Waste Management Facilities cost information for mixed low-level waste. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains preconceptual designs and planning level life-cycle cost estimates for managing mixed low-level waste. The report`s information on treatment, storage, and disposal modules can be integrated to develop total life-cycle costs for various waste management options. A procedure to guide the US Department of Energy and its contractor personnel in the use of cost estimation data is also summarized in this report.

Shropshire, D.; Sherick, M.; Biadgi, C.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Storage | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Storage Storage Storage Energy storage isn’t just for AA batteries. Thanks to investments from the Energy Department's Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), energy storage may soon play a bigger part in our electricity grid, making it possible to generate more renewable electricity. Learn more. Energy storage isn't just for AA batteries. Thanks to investments from the Energy Department's Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), energy storage may soon play a bigger part in our electricity grid, making it possible to generate more renewable electricity. Learn more.

259

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EMS Energy Institute at The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) has managed the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC) since its inception in 2003. The GSTC infrastructure provided a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. The GSTC received base funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Oil & Natural Gas Supply Program. The GSTC base funds were highly leveraged with industry funding for individual projects. Since its inception, the GSTC has engaged 67 members. The GSTC membership base was diverse, coming from 19 states, the District of Columbia, and Canada. The membership was comprised of natural gas storage field operators, service companies, industry consultants, industry trade organizations, and academia. The GSTC organized and hosted a total of 18 meetings since 2003. Of these, 8 meetings were held to review, discuss, and select proposals submitted for funding consideration. The GSTC reviewed a total of 75 proposals and committed co-funding to support 31 industry-driven projects. The GSTC committed co-funding to 41.3% of the proposals that it received and reviewed. The 31 projects had a total project value of $6,203,071 of which the GSTC committed $3,205,978 in co-funding. The committed GSTC project funding represented an average program cost share of 51.7%. Project applicants provided an average program cost share of 48.3%. In addition to the GSTC co-funding, the consortium provided the domestic natural gas storage industry with a technology transfer and outreach infrastructure. The technology transfer and outreach were conducted by having project mentoring teams and a GSTC website, and by working closely with the Pipeline Research Council International (PRCI) to jointly host technology transfer meetings and occasional field excursions. A total of 15 technology transfer/strategic planning workshops were held.

Joel Morrison; Elizabeth Wood; Barbara Robuck

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

260

NREL: Vehicles and Fuels Research - Energy Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Research Search More Search Options Site Map NREL's Energy Storage Project is leading the charge on battery thermal management, modeling, and systems solutions to enhance the performance of fuel cell, hybrid electric, and electric vehicles (FCVs, HEVs, and EVs) for a cleaner, more secure transportation future. NREL's experts work closely with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), industry, and automotive manufacturers to improve energy storage devices, such as battery modules and ultracapacitors, by enhancing their thermal performance and life-cycle cost. Activities also involve modeling and simulation to evaluate technical targets and energy storage parameters, and investigating combinations of energy storage systems to increase vehicle efficiency. Much of this research is conducted at our state-of-the-art energy storage

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "managing treatment storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Revision to the Record of Decision for the Department of Energy's Waste Management Program: Treatment and Storage of Transuranic Waste (DOE/EIS-0200) (6/30/04)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 Federal Register / Vol. 69, No. 125 / Wednesday, June 30, 2004 / Notices Washington, DC 20585-0350 (FAX 202- 287-5736). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Steven Mintz (Program Office) 202-586- 9506 or Michael Skinker (Program Attorney) 202-586-2793. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C. 824a(e)). On May 24, 2004, the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy (DOE) received an application from Coral to transmit electric energy from the United States to Mexico for a period of five years. Coral is owned by subsidiaries of Shell Oil Company and InterGen, N.V., with its principal place of business in Houston, Texas. Coral

262

Independent Oversight Assessment of the Nuclear Safety Culture and Management of Nuclear Safety Concerns at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant, January 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Safety and Security HSS Independent Oversight Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture and Management of Nuclear Safety Concerns at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant January 2012 Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Enforcement and Oversight Abbreviations Used in this Report i Executive Summary iii Recommendations xi 1.0 Introduction 1 1.1 Background 2 1.2 Scope and Methodology 6 2.0 Current Safety Culture 9 2.1 Background 9 2.2 Scope and Methods 10 2.3 ORP (including DOE-WTP) 11 2.4 BNI 11 2.5 WTP Project 12 3.0 ORP Management of Safety Concerns 15 3.1 Corrective Actions for the 2010 HSS Review 15 3.2 Processes for Managing Issues 16

263

Independent Oversight Assessment of the Nuclear Safety Culture and Management of Nuclear Safety Concerns at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant, January 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety and Security HSS Independent Oversight Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture and Management of Nuclear Safety Concerns at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant January 2012 Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Enforcement and Oversight Abbreviations Used in this Report i Executive Summary iii Recommendations xi 1.0 Introduction 1 1.1 Background 2 1.2 Scope and Methodology 6 2.0 Current Safety Culture 9 2.1 Background 9 2.2 Scope and Methods 10 2.3 ORP (including DOE-WTP) 11 2.4 BNI 11 2.5 WTP Project 12 3.0 ORP Management of Safety Concerns 15 3.1 Corrective Actions for the 2010 HSS Review 15 3.2 Processes for Managing Issues 16

264

Proceedings of the tenth annual DOE low-level waste management conference: Session 4: Waste treatment minimization  

SciTech Connect

This document contains eleven papers on various aspects of low-level radioactive waste management. Topics in this volume include: volume reduction plans; incentitives; and cost proposals; acid detoxification and reclamation; decontamination of lead; leach tests; West Valley demonstration project status report; and DOE's regional management strategies. Individual papers were processed separately for the data base. (TEM)

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Proceedings of the tenth annual DOE low-level waste management conference: Session 4: Waste treatment minimization  

SciTech Connect

This document contains eleven papers on various aspects of low-level radioactive waste management. Topics in this volume include: volume reduction plans; incentitives; and cost proposals; acid detoxification and reclamation; decontamination of lead; leach tests; West Valley demonstration project status report; and DOE's regional management strategies. Individual papers were processed separately for the data base. (TEM)

Not Available

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Energy Storage Research and Development 2006 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EnErgy StoragE rESEarch EnErgy StoragE rESEarch and dEvElopmEnt U.S. Department of Energy Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies 1000 Independence Avenue S.W. Washington, D.C. 20585-0121 FY 2006 Progress Report for Energy Storage Research and Development Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Approved by: David Howell Manager, Energy Storage R&D January 2007 Energy Storage Research and Development FY 2006 Annual Progress Report TABLE OF CONTENTS I. INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................... 1 I.A FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program Overview .................................. 1 I.B Energy Storage Research & Development Overview ............................................... 1

267

Innovative Energy Storage Technologies Enabling More Renewable Power |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Storage Technologies Enabling More Renewable Energy Storage Technologies Enabling More Renewable Power Innovative Energy Storage Technologies Enabling More Renewable Power November 15, 2011 - 3:45pm Addthis The PNM Prosperity Energy Storage Project is the nation’s first combined solar generation and storage facility to be fully integrated into a utility’s power grid. Pictured above are the facility's solar panels, including an aerial view in the upper left. | Image courtesy of PNM The PNM Prosperity Energy Storage Project is the nation's first combined solar generation and storage facility to be fully integrated into a utility's power grid. Pictured above are the facility's solar panels, including an aerial view in the upper left. | Image courtesy of PNM Dr. Imre Gyuk Dr. Imre Gyuk Energy Storage Program Manager, Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy

268

Y-12 uranium storage facility?a dream come true,? part 2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shirley to transfer to a new organization and build a program called the Nuclear Materials Management and Storage Program. She had to find safe, secure storage space for the...

269

Transportation Storage Interface | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Storage Interface Transportation Storage Interface Regulation of Future Extended Storage and Transportation. Transportation Storage Interface More Documents & Publications Status...

270

A Reduced-Order Model of a Chevron Plate Heat Exchanger for Rapid Thermal Management by Using Thermo-Chemical Energy Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The heat flux demands for electronics cooling applications are quickly approaching the limits of conventional thermal management systems. To meet the demand of next generation electronics, a means for rejecting high heat fluxes at low temperatures in a compact system is an urgent need. To answer this challenge, in this work a gasketed chevron plate heat exchanger in conjunction with a slurry consisting of highly endothermic solid ammonium carbamate and a heat transfer fluid. A reduced-order 1-dimensional model was developed and used to solve the coupled equations for heat, mass, and momentum transfer. The feasibility of this chosen design for satisfying the heat rejection load of 2kW was also explored in this study. Also, a decomposition reaction using acetic acid and sodium bicarbonate was conducted in a plate heat exchanger (to simulate a configuration similar to the ammonium carbamate reactions). This enabled the experimental validation of the numerical predictions for the momentum transfer correlations used in this study (which in turn, are closely tied to both the heat transfer correlations and chemical kinetics models). These experiments also reveal important parameters of interest that are required for the reactor design. A numerical model was developed in this study and applied for estimating the reactor size required for achieving a power rating of 2 kW. It was found that this goal could be achieved with a plate heat exchanger weighing less than 70 kg (~100 lbs) and occupying a volume of 29 L (which is roughly the size of a typical desktop printer). Investigation of the hydrodynamic phenomena using flow visualization studies showed that the flow patterns were similar to those described in previous studies. This justified the adaptation of empirical correlations involving two-phase multipliers that were developed for air-water two-phase flows. High-speed video confirmed the absence of heterogeneous flow patterns and the prevalence of bubbly flow with bubble sizes typically less than 0.5 mm, which justifies the use of homogenous flow based correlations for vigorous gas-producing reactions inside a plate heat exchanger. Absolute pressure measurements - performed for experimental validation studies - indicate a significant rise in back pressure that are observed to be several times greater than the theoretically estimated values of frictional and gravitational pressure losses. The predictions from the numerical model were found to be consistent with the experimental measurements, with an average absolute error of ~26%

Niedbalski, Nicholas

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

A Framework for the Treatment of External Events in Configuration Risk Management: 2004 Configuration of Risk Management Forum Resea rch Task  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To comply with paragraph (a)(4) of the Maintenance Rule (10 CFR 50.65), U.S. nuclear plants consider the potential impacts of external events as part of the overall requirement to assess configuration-specific risk. This report, one result of efforts to develop practical, cost-effective tools to support this process, presents an overall framework for consideration of external events in configuration risk management (CRM).

2005-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

272

Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Sludge Treatment Proiject, September 17-28, 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3-09-18 3-09-18 Site: DOE Richland Operations Office Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Sludge Treatment Project Dates of Activity : 09/17/2013 - 09/18/2013 Report Preparer: Jake Wechselberger Activity Description/Purpose: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), performed an operational awareness review of the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) Engineered Container Retrieval and Transfer System (ECRTS) during this site visit. An HSS representative attended the Hanford K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Independent Project Review (IPR). Result: The purpose of the IPR was to validate the adequacy of preparations to execute construction and provide recommendations

273

Management Alert - The 2020 Vision One System Proposal for Commissioning and Startup of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant, IG-0871  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The 2020 Vision One System Proposal The 2020 Vision One System Proposal for Commissioning and Startup of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant DOE/IG-0871 October 2012 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits and Inspections Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 October 3, 2012 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Management Alert on "The 2020 Vision One System Proposal for Commissioning and Startup of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant" IMMEDIATE CONCERN The Department of Energy is considering a proposal known at the 2020 Vision One System (2020 Vision) that would implement a phased approach to commissioning the $12.2 billion Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). As part of the phased approach, the Low-

274

Bases for extrapolating materials durability in fuel storage pools  

SciTech Connect

A major body of evidence indicates that zirconium alloys have the most consistent and reliable durability in wet storage, justifying projections of safe wet storage greater than 50 y. Aluminum alloys have the widest range of durabilities in wet storage; systematic control and monitoring of water chemistry have resulted in low corrosion rates for more than two decades on some fuels and components. However, cladding failures have occurred in a few months when important parameters were not controlled. Stainless steel is extremely durable when stress, metallurgical and water chemistry factors are controlled. LWR SS cladding has survived for 25 y in wet storage. However, sensitized, stressed SS fuels and components have seriously degraded in fuel storage pools (FSPs) at {approximately} 30 C. Satisfactory durability of fuel assembly and FSP component materials in extended wet storage requires investments in water quality management and surveillance, including chemical and biological factors. The key aspect of the study is to provide storage facility operators and other decision makers a basis to judge the durability of a given fuel type in wet storage as a prelude to basing other fuel management plans (e.g. dry storage) if wet storage will not be satisfactory through the expected period of interim storage.

Johnson, A.B. Jr.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Upcoming Natural Gas Storage Facilities.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Kentucky Energy Hub Project Orbit Gas Storage Inc KY Leader One Gas Storage Project Peregrine Midstream Partners WY Tricor Ten Section Storage Project

276

Vehicle Technologies Office: Energy Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Storage to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Energy Storage on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Energy Storage on Twitter Bookmark...

277

Solid Waste Management Act (Pennsylvania)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Act provides for the planning and regulation of solid waste storage, collection, transportation, processing, treatment, and disposal. It requires that municipalities submit plans for municipal...

278

Carbon Storage Review 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23,...

279

NREL: Energy Storage - News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Storage News Below are news stories related to NREL's energy storage research. August 28, 2013 NREL Battery Calorimeters Win R&D 100 Award The award-wining Isothermal...

280

NETL: Carbon Storage Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2013 Carbon Storage Newsletter PDF-571KB has been posted. 08.27.2013 Publications August 2013 Carbon Storage Newsletter PDF-1.1MB has been posted. 08.15.2013 News Ancient...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "managing treatment storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pumped hydro, compressed air, and battery energy storage areto other energy storage sys tem s suc h as pumped hydro andenergy would be $50/MJ whereas the cost of the pumped hydro

Hassenzahl, W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Energy Storage & Delivery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy Storage & Delivery. Summary: Schematic of Membrane Molecular Structure The goal of the project is to develop ...

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

283

Conventional Storage Water Heaters  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Conventional storage water heaters remain the most popular type of water heating system for homes and buildings.

284

Behavior of spent nuclear fuel and storage system components in dry interim storage. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

Irradiated nuclear fuel has been handled under dry conditions since the early days of nuclear reactor operation, and use of dry storage facilities for extended management of irradiated fuel began in 1964. Irradiated fuel is currently being stored dry in four types of facilities: dry wells, vaults, silos, and metal casks. Essentially all types of irradiated nuclear fuel are currently stored under dry conditions. Gas-cooled reactor (GCR) and liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) fuels are stored in vaults and dry wells. Certain types of fuel are being stored in licensed dry storage facilities: Magnox fuel in vaults in the United Kingdom; organic-cooled reactor (OCR) fuel (clad with a zirconium alloy) in silos in Canada; and boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel (clad with Zircaloy) in a metal storage cask in Germany. Dry storage demonstrations are under way for Zircaloy-clad fuel from BWRs, pressurized heavy-water reactors (PHWRs), and pressurized water reactors (PWRs) in all four types of dry storage facilities. The demonstrations and related hot cell and laboratory tests are directed toward expanding the data base and establishing a licensing basis for dry storage of water reactor fuel. This report reviews the scope of dry interim storage technology, the performance of fuel and facility materials, the status of programs in several countries to license dry storage of water reactor fuel, and the characteristics of water reactor fuel that relate to dry storage conditions. 110 refs., 22 figs., 28 tabs.

Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Gilbert, E.R.; Guenther, R.J.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Porous polymeric materials for hydrogen storage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A porous polymer, poly-9,9'-spirobifluorene and its derivatives for storage of H.sub.2 are prepared through a chemical synthesis method. The porous polymers have high specific surface area and narrow pore size distribution. Hydrogen uptake measurements conducted for these polymers determined a higher hydrogen storage capacity at the ambient temperature over that of the benchmark materials. The method of preparing such polymers, includes oxidatively activating solids by CO.sub.2/steam oxidation and supercritical water treatment.

Yu, Luping; Liu, Di-Jia; Yuan, Shengwen; Yang, Junbing

2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

286

Strategic Intelligence Update: Energy Storage & Distributed Generation, November 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy Storage and distributed generation technologies add value to a wide range of applications within the electric utility enterprise. Both energy storage and distributed generation systems can help utilities shift and manage peak loads within the distribution system, improve reliability, and potentially help defer infrastructure upgrades.Bulk energy storage has the ability to improve the value of intermittent renewable resources and to provide multiple benefit streams through energy ...

2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

287

Strategic Intelligence Update: Energy Storage and Distributed Generation, June 2013  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy Storage and distributed generation technologies add value to a wide range of applications within the electric utility enterprise. Both energy storage and distributed generation systems can help utilities shift and manage peak loads within the distribution system, improve reliability, and potentially help defer infrastructure upgrades. Bulk energy storage has the ability to improve the value of intermittent renewable resources and to provide multiple benefit streams through energy ...

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

288

Structural Integrity Program for INTEC Calcined Solids Storage Facilities  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the activities of the structural integrity program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center relevant to the high-level waste Calcined Solids Storage Facilities and associated equipment, as required by DOE M 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual'. Based on the evaluation documented in this report, the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities are not leaking and are structurally sound for continued service. Recommendations are provided for continued monitoring of the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities.

Jeffrey Bryant

2008-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

289

Structural Integrity Program for INTEC Calcined Solids Storage Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the activities of the structural integrity program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center relevant to the high-level waste Calcined Solids Storage Facilities and associated equipment, as required by DOE M 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. Based on the evaluation documented in this report, the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities are not leaking and are structurally sound for continued service. Recommendations are provided for continued monitoring of the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities.

Bryant, Jeffrey Whealdon; Nenni, Joseph A; Timothy S. Yoder

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Strategic Intelligence Update: Energy Storage & Distributed Generation, December 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy Storage and distributed generation technologies add value to a wide range of applications within the electric utility enterprise. Both energy storage and distributed generation systems can help utilities shift and manage peak loads within the distribution system, improve reliability, and potentially help defer infrastructure upgrades. Bulk energy storage has the ability to improve the value of intermittent renewable resources and to provide multiple benefit streams through energy arbitrage and by ...

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

291

Strategic Intelligence Update: Energy Storage & Distributed Generation March 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy Storage and Distributed Generation technologies add value to a wide range of applications within the electric utility enterprise. Both energy storage and distributed generation systems can help utilities shift and manage peak loads within the distribution system, improve reliability, and potentially help defer infrastructure upgrades. Bulk energy storage has the ability to improve the value of intermittent renewable resources and to provide multiple benefit streams through energy arbitrage and by ...

2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

292

Strategic Intelligence Update: Energy Storage & Distributed Generation May 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy Storage and Distributed Generation technologies add value to a wide range of applications within the electric utility enterprise. Both energy storage and distributed generation systems can help utilities shift and manage peak loads within the distribution system, improve reliability, and potentially help defer infrastructure upgrades. Bulk energy storage has the ability to improve the value of intermittent renewable resources and to provide multiple benefit streams through energy arbitrage and by ...

2011-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

293

Strategic Intelligence Update: Energy Storage & Distributed Generation, September 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy storage and distributed generation technologies add value to a wide range of applications within the electric utility enterprise. Both energy storage and distributed generation systems can help utilities shift and manage peak loads within the distribution system, improve reliability, and potentially help defer infrastructure upgrades. Bulk energy storage has the ability to improve the value of intermittent renewable resources and to provide multiple benefit streams through energy arbitrage and by ...

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

294

Strategic Intelligence Update: Energy Storage & Distributed Generation, September 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy Storage and distributed generation technologies add value to a wide range of applications within the electric utility enterprise. Both energy storage and distributed generation systems can help utilities shift and manage peak loads within the distribution system, improve reliability, and potentially help defer infrastructure upgrades. Bulk energy storage has the ability to improve the value of intermittent renewable resources and to provide multiple benefit streams through energy ...

2012-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

295

Distributed Energy Storage Systems Testing and Evaluation 2010 Interim Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distributed Energy Storage Systems (DESS) are fully integrated AC storage devices which can be located within the distribution system, at substation locations, off distribution feeders, near end-of-line pad mounted transformers, or on customer side of the meter locations. Many new and emerging storage systems are being developed for grid support, outage mitigation, power quality and peak load energy management. However there is limited operational data on performance, grid comparability, durability, reli...

2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

296

Strategic Intelligence Update: Energy Storage and Distributed Generation, September 2013  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy Storage and distributed generation technologies add value to a wide range of applications within the electric utility enterprise. Both energy storage and distributed generation systems can help utilities shift and manage peak loads within the distribution system, improve reliability, and potentially help defer infrastructure upgrades.Bulk energy storage has the ability to improve the value of intermittent renewable resources and to provide multiple benefit streams through energy ...

2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

297

Strategic Intelligence Update: Energy Storage and Distributed Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy Storage and distributed generation technologies add value to a wide range of applications within the electric utility enterprise. Both energy storage and distributed generation systems can help utilities shift and manage peak loads within the distribution system, improve reliability, and potentially help defer infrastructure upgrades. Bulk energy storage has the ability to improve the value of intermittent renewable resources and to provide multiple benefit streams through energy arbitrage and by ...

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

298

Strategic Intelligence Update: Energy Storage and Distributed Generation, November 2013  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy Storage and distributed generation technologies add value to a wide range of applications within the electric utility enterprise. Both energy storage and distributed generation systems can help utilities shift and manage peak loads within the distribution system, improve reliability, and potentially help defer infrastructure upgrades. Bulk energy storage has the ability to improve the value of intermittent renewable resources and to provide multiple benefit streams through energy arbitrage ...

2013-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

299

Idaho Waste Vitrification Facilities Project Vitrified Waste Interim Storage Facility  

SciTech Connect

This feasibility study report presents a draft design of the Vitrified Waste Interim Storage Facility (VWISF), which is one of three subprojects of the Idaho Waste Vitrification Facilities (IWVF) project. The primary goal of the IWVF project is to design and construct a treatment process system that will vitrify the sodium-bearing waste (SBW) to a final waste form. The project will consist of three subprojects that include the Waste Collection Tanks Facility, the Waste Vitrification Facility (WVF), and the VWISF. The Waste Collection Tanks Facility will provide for waste collection, feed mixing, and surge storage for SBW and newly generated liquid waste from ongoing operations at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. The WVF will contain the vitrification process that will mix the waste with glass-forming chemicals or frit and turn the waste into glass. The VWISF will provide a shielded storage facility for the glass until the waste can be disposed at either the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant as mixed transuranic waste or at the future national geological repository as high-level waste glass, pending the outcome of a Waste Incidental to Reprocessing determination, which is currently in progress. A secondary goal is to provide a facility that can be easily modified later to accommodate storage of the vitrified high-level waste calcine. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of the VWISF, which would be constructed in compliance with applicable federal, state, and local laws. This project supports the Department of Energys Environmental Management missions of safely storing and treating radioactive wastes as well as meeting Federal Facility Compliance commitments made to the State of Idaho.

Bonnema, Bruce Edward

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Towards Scalable Benchmarks for Mass Storage Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While mass storage systems have been used for several decades to store large quantities of scientific data, there has been little work on devising standard ways of measuring them. Each system is hand-tuned using parameters that seem to work best, but it is difficult to gauge the potential effect of similar changes on other systems. The proliferation of storage management software and policies has made it difficult for users to make the best choices for their own systems. The introduction of benchmarks will make it possible to gather standard performance measurements across disparate systems, allowing users to make intelligent choices of hardware, software, and algorithms for their mass storage system. This paper presents guidelines for the design of a mass storage system benchmark suite, along with preliminary suggestions for programs to be included. The benchmarks will measure both peak and sustained performance of the system as well as predicting both short-term and long-term behav...

Ethan L. Miller

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "managing treatment storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

NREL: Energy Storage - Working with Us  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Working with Us Working with Us Partnering with industry, government, and universities is key to developing affordable energy storage technology and moving it into the marketplace and the U.S. economy. In collaboration with our diverse partners, we use thermal management and modeling and analysis from a vehicle systems perspective to improve energy storage devices. Much of our research is conducted at the state-of-the-art energy storage laboratory, in Golden, Colorado. There are a variety of ways to become involved with NREL's Energy Storage activities: NREL's Partnering Agreements Work collaboratively with NREL through a variety of Technology Partnership Agreements. We can help you select the most appropriate agreement for your research project. Gain access to NREL's expertise and specialized research facilities through

302

Dependable and Secure Sensor Data Storage with Dynamic Integrity Assurance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, distributed data storage has gained increasing popularity for efficient and robust data management in wireless sensor networks (WSNs). The distributed architecture makes it challenging to build a highly secure and dependable yet lightweight ... Keywords: Wireless sensor networks, data storage, integrity check

Qian Wang; Kui Ren; Shucheng Yu; Wenjing Lou

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Design a cloud storage platform for pervasive computing environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An increasing number of personal electronic handheld devices (e.g., SmartPhone, netbook, MID and etc.), which make up the personal pervasive computing environments, are playing an important role in our daily lives. Data storage and sharing is difficult ... Keywords: Cloud storage, Data management, Pervasive computing

Weimin Zheng; Pengzhi Xu; Xiaomeng Huang; Nuo Wu

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Utility Battery Storage Systems Program report for FY93  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, conducts the Utility Battery Storage Systems Program, which is sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Management. In this capacity, Sandia is responsible for the engineering analyses, contract development, and testing of rechargeable batteries and systems for utility-energy-storage applications. This report details the technical achievements realized during fiscal year 1993.

Butler, P.C.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Bigtable: A Distributed Storage System for Structured Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bigtable is a distributed storage system for managing structured data that is designed to scale to a very large size: petabytes of data across thousands of commodity servers. Many projects at Google store data in Bigtable, including web indexing, Google ... Keywords: Large-Scale Distributed Storage

Fay Chang; Jeffrey Dean; Sanjay Ghemawat; Wilson C. Hsieh; Deborah A. Wallach; Mike Burrows; Tushar Chandra; Andrew Fikes; Robert E. Gruber

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

The Legal Rights and Liabilities of Underground CO2 Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report reviews the legal and regulatory landscape of CO2 storage through an analysis of current rules from state and federal agencies that have jurisdiction now, or may have jurisdiction in the future, and which will impact the planning, construction, management and operation of underground CO2 storage projects.

2009-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

307

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Underground Natural Gas Storage  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Storage Storage About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Underground Natural Gas Storage Overview | Regional Breakdowns Overview Underground natural gas storage provides pipelines, local distribution companies, producers, and pipeline shippers with an inventory management tool, seasonal supply backup, and access to natural gas needed to avoid imbalances between receipts and deliveries on a pipeline network. There are three principal types of underground storage sites used in the United States today. They are: · depleted natural gas or oil fields (326), · aquifers (43), or · salt caverns (31). In a few cases mine caverns have been used. Most underground storage facilities, 82 percent at the beginning of 2008, were created from reservoirs located in depleted natural gas production fields that were relatively easy to convert to storage service, and that were often close to consumption centers and existing natural gas pipeline systems.

308

November 13 ESTAP Webinar: Duke Energy's Energy Storage Projects |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 13 ESTAP Webinar: Duke Energy's Energy Storage Projects November 13 ESTAP Webinar: Duke Energy's Energy Storage Projects November 13 ESTAP Webinar: Duke Energy's Energy Storage Projects November 1, 2013 - 5:00pm Addthis On Wednesday, November 13 from 1 - 2 p.m. ET, Clean Energy States Alliance will host a webinar on Duke Energy's battery energy storage systems. This webinar will be introduced by Dr. Imre Gyuk, Energy Storage Program Manager in the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability. The webinar will discuss Duke Energy's six deployed battery systems, which cover a wide range of battery chemistries, sizes, locations on the grid, and applications. The deployments include the Notrees Wind Storage project, which OE supports under the Recovery Act-funded Smart Grid Energy Storage Demonstration Program. The other projects are the Rankin

309

Storage Sub-committee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Storage Sub-committee Storage Sub-committee 2012 Work Plan Confidential 1 2012 Storage Subcommittee Work Plan * Report to Congress. (legislative requirement) - Review existing and projected research and funding - Review existing DOE, Arpa-e projects and the OE 5 year plan - Identify gaps and recommend additional topics - Outline distributed (review as group) * Develop and analysis of the need for large scale storage deployment (outline distributed again) * Develop analysis on regulatory issues especially valuation and cost recovery Confidential 2 Large Scale Storage * Problem Statement * Situation Today * Benefits Analysis * Policy Issues * Technology Gaps * Recommendations * Renewables Variability - Reserves and capacity requirements - Financial impacts - IRC Response to FERC NOI and update

310

Enhanced Reliability of Photovoltaic Systems with Energy Storage and Controls  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes efforts to reconfigure loads during outages to allow individual customers the opportunity to enhance the reliability of their electric service through the management of their loads, photovoltaics, and energy storage devices.

Manz, D.; Schelenz, O.; Chandra, R.; Bose, S.; de Rooij, M.; Bebic, J.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Google Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Delicious Rank FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Digg Find More places to share FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on AddThis.com... Home Basics Current Technology DOE R&D Activities National Hydrogen Storage Compressed/Liquid Hydrogen Tanks Testing and Analysis Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards

312

Integration of Demand Side Management, Distributed Generation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Integration of Demand Side Management, Distributed Generation, Renewable Energy Sources, and Energy Storages:...

313

MEMS based storage architecture for relational databases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to recent advances in semiconductor manufacturing, the gap between main memory and disks is constantly increasing. This leads to a significant performance bottleneck for Relational Database Management Systems. Recent advances in nanotechnology have ... Keywords: Data placement, MEMS, Relational databases, Storage

Hailing Yu; Divyakant Agrawal; Amr El Abbadi

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Chemical Storage-Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage - Storage - Overview Ali T-Raissi, FSEC Hydrogen Storage Workshop Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois August 14-15, 2002 Hydrogen Fuel - Attributes * H 2 +½ O 2 → H 2 O (1.23 V) * High gravimetric energy density: 27.1 Ah/g, based on LHV of 119.93 kJ/g * 1 wt % = 189.6 Wh/kg (0.7 V; i.e. η FC = 57%) * Li ion cells: 130-150 Wh/kg Chemical Hydrides - Definition * They are considered secondary storage methods in which the storage medium is expended - primary storage methods include reversible systems (e.g. MHs & C-nanostructures), GH 2 & LH 2 storage Chemical Hydrides - Definition (cont.) * The usual chemical hydride system is reaction of a reactant containing H in the "-1" oxidation state (hydride) with a reactant containing H in the "+1" oxidation

315

NETL: Carbon Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Storage Technologies Carbon Storage (formerly referred to as the "Carbon Sequestration Program") Program Overview For quick navigation of NETL's Carbon Storage Program website, please click on the image. NETL's Carbon Storage Program Fossil fuels are considered the most dependable, cost-effective energy source in the world. The availability of these fuels to provide clean, affordable energy is essential for domestic and global prosperity and security well into the 21st century. However, a balance is needed between energy security and concerns over the impacts of concentrations of greenhouse gases (GHGs) in the atmosphere - particularly carbon dioxide (CO2). NETL's Carbon Storage Program is developing a technology portfolio of safe, cost-effective, commercial-scale CO2 capture, storage, and mitigation

316

Production, Storage, and FC Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Roxanne Danz Technology Development Manager DOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program Systems Analysis Workshop July 28-29, 2004 Washington, D.C. 2 HFCI Analysis * National Laboratory projects (including subcontracts to National Labs) - covered by presentations later today. * Cooperative Agreements - GTI - Sunita Satyapal - Battelle - Kathi Epping - TIAX - Roxanne Danz 3 GTI Project Development of Cost-Effective and Reliable Underground Off-Board Hydrogen Storage Technology * Gas Technology Institute (GTI) - Over 40 years RD&D in hydrogen technologies GTI Hydrogen Capabilities and Activities - Hydrogen Production (reformation, gasification, thermochemical, thermal decomposition, biological, and electrolysis)

317

Waste Management Facilities Cost Information Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Waste Management Facility Cost Information (WMFCI) Report, commissioned by the US Department of Energy (DOE), develops planning life-cycle cost (PLCC) estimates for treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. This report contains PLCC estimates versus capacity for 26 different facility cost modules. A procedure to guide DOE and its contractor personnel in the use of estimating data is also provided. Estimates in the report apply to five distinctive waste streams: low-level waste, low-level mixed waste, alpha contaminated low-level waste, alpha contaminated low-level mixed waste, and transuranic waste. The report addresses five different treatment types: incineration, metal/melting and recovery, shredder/compaction, solidification, and vitrification. Data in this report allows the user to develop PLCC estimates for various waste management options.

Feizollahi, F.; Shropshire, D.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Safety analysis report for the Waste Storage Facility. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

This safety analysis report outlines the safety concerns associated with the Waste Storage Facility located in the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The three main objectives of the report are: define and document a safety basis for the Waste Storage Facility activities; demonstrate how the activities will be carried out to adequately protect the workers, public, and environment; and provide a basis for review and acceptance of the identified risk that the managers, operators, and owners will assume.

Bengston, S.J.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) Waste Management Project  

SciTech Connect

This document is the Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) for Waste Management Federal Services of Hanford, Inc. (WMH), that implements the requirements of the Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC), HNF-MP-599, Project Hanford Quality Assurance Program Description (QAPD) document, and the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement with Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement), Sections 6.5 and 7.8. WHM is responsible for the treatment, storage, and disposal of liquid and solid wastes generated at the Hanford Site as well as those wastes received from other US Department of Energy (DOE) and non-DOE sites. WMH operations include the Low-Level Burial Grounds, Central Waste Complex (a mixed-waste storage complex), a nonradioactive dangerous waste storage facility, the Transuranic Storage Facility, T Plant, Waste Receiving and Processing Facility, 200 Area Liquid Effluent Facility, 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility, the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility, the 242-A Evaporator, 300 Area Treatment Effluent Disposal Facility, the 340 Facility (a radioactive liquid waste handling facility), 222-S Laboratory, the Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility, and the Hanford TRU Waste Program.

VOLKMAN, D.D.

1999-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

320

Systems and Components Development Expertise [Nuclear Waste Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Systems and Components Systems and Components Development Expertise Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management Technologies Overview Modeling and analysis Unit Process Modeling Mass Tracking System Software Waste Form Performance Modeling Safety Analysis, Hazard and Risk Evaluations Development, Design, Operation Overview Systems and Components Development Expertise System Engineering Design Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr Nuclear Waste Management using Electrometallurgical Technology Systems and Components Development Expertise Bookmark and Share Electrorefiner The electrorefiner: an apparatus used for electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel to facilitate storage and ultimate disposal. Click on

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "managing treatment storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Underground Storage Tank Management (District of Columbia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The installation, upgrade and operation of any petroleum UST (>110 gallons) or hazardous substance UST System, including heating oil tanks over 1,100 gallons capacity in the District requires a...

322

Managing Aging Effects on Dry Cask Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

... III.4-5 III.5 Time-Dependent Degradation of Radiation-Shielding Materials ... III.5-1 III.5.1 Description of the...

323

Storage Hierarchy Management for Scientific Computing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the design of com- puter systems. As a result, many advances in CPU architecture were first developed for high-speed supercomputer systems, keeping them among the fastest computers in the world. However system attached to a high-speed computer. The analysis finds that the number of files and average file

Miller, Ethan L.

324

Federal Facility Compliance Act, Proposed Site Treatment Plan: Background Volume. Executive Summary  

SciTech Connect

This Federal Facility Compliance Act Site Treatment Plan discusses the options of radioactive waste management for Ames Laboratory. This is the background volume which discusses: site history and mission; framework for developing site treatment plans; proposed plan organization and related activities; characterization of mixed waste and waste minimization; low level mixed waste streams and the proposed treatment approach; future generation of TRU and mixed wastes; the adequacy of mixed waste storage facilities; and a summary of the overall DOE activity in the area of disposal of mixed waste treatment residuals.

1995-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

325

Carbon Capture and Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) is the long-term isolation of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere through physical, chemical, biological, or engineered processes. This includes a range of approaches including soil carbon sequestration (e.g., through no-till farming), terrestrial biomass sequestration (e.g., through planting forests), direct ocean injection of CO{sub 2} either onto the deep seafloor or into the intermediate depths, injection into deep geological formations, or even direct conversion of CO{sub 2} to carbonate minerals. Some of these approaches are considered geoengineering (see the appropriate chapter herein). All are considered in the 2005 special report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC 2005). Of the range of options available, geological carbon sequestration (GCS) appears to be the most actionable and economic option for major greenhouse gas reduction in the next 10-30 years. The basis for this interest includes several factors: (1) The potential capacities are large based on initial estimates. Formal estimates for global storage potential vary substantially, but are likely to be between 800 and 3300 Gt of C (3000 and 10,000 Gt of CO{sub 2}), with significant capacity located reasonably near large point sources of the CO{sub 2}. (2) GCS can begin operations with demonstrated technology. Carbon dioxide has been separated from large point sources for nearly 100 years, and has been injected underground for over 30 years (below). (3) Testing of GCS at intermediate scale is feasible. In the US, Canada, and many industrial countries, large CO{sub 2} sources like power plants and refineries lie near prospective storage sites. These plants could be retrofit today and injection begun (while bearing in mind scientific uncertainties and unknowns). Indeed, some have, and three projects described here provide a great deal of information on the operational needs and field implementation of CCS. Part of this interest comes from several key documents written in the last three years that provide information on the status, economics, technology, and impact of CCS. These are cited throughout this text and identified as key references at the end of this manuscript. When coupled with improvements in energy efficiency, renewable energy supplies, and nuclear power, CCS help dramatically reduce current and future emissions (US CCTP 2005, MIT 2007). If CCS is not available as a carbon management option, it will be much more difficult and much more expensive to stabilize atmospheric CO{sub 2} emissions. Recent estimates put the cost of carbon abatement without CCS to be 30-80% higher that if CCS were to be available (Edmonds et al. 2004).

Friedmann, S

2007-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

326

Heat storage duration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Both the amount and duration of heat storage in massive elements of a passive building are investigated. Data taken for one full winter in the Balcomb solar home are analyzed with the aid of sub-system simulation models. Heat storage duration is tallied into one-day intervals. Heat storage location is discussed and related to overall energy flows. The results are interpreted and conclusions drawn.

Balcomb, J.D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

NETL: Carbon Storage - Infrastructure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrastructure Infrastructure Carbon Storage Infrastructure The Infrastructure Element of DOE's Carbon Storage Program is focused on research and development (R&D) initiatives to advance geologic CO2 storage toward commercialization. DOE determined early in the program's development that addressing CO2 mitigation on a regional level is the most effective way to address differences in geology, climate, population density, infrastructure, and socioeconomic development. This element includes the following efforts designed to support the development of regional infrastructure for carbon capture and storage (CCS). Click on Image to Navigate Infrastructure Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player. Get Adobe Flash player Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSP) - This

328

Other Innovative Storage Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High Efficiency Electrical Energy Storage Using Reversible Solid Oxide Cells: Scott Barnett1; Gareth Hughes1; Kyle Yakal-Kremski1; Zhan Gao1; 1 Northwestern...

329

NREL: Energy Storage - Webmaster  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to reply. Your name: Your email address: Your message: Send Message Printable Version Energy Storage Home About the Project Technology Basics Research & Development Awards &...

330

NREL: Energy Storage - Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resources The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) Energy Storage team and partners work within a variety of programs that have created test manuals to establish standard...

331

Advanced Energy Storage Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Energy Storage Publications Reports: Advanced Technology Development Program For Lithium-Ion Batteries: Gen 2 Performance Evaluation Final Report Advanced Technology...

332

Storage Sub-committee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gaps - Existing R&D and pilot programs - CAES - Controllable pumping - Off shore (energy island, etc) - Gravity systems - Thermal storage Confidential 3 Report to DOE ...

333

Carbon Storage Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fuel power plants as viable, clean sources of electric power. The program is focused on developing technologies that can achieve 99 percent of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) storage...

334

H 2 Storage Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 10. Titanium-decorated carbon nanotubes: a potential high-capacity hydrogen storage madium. ... 3. Exohydrogenated single-wall carbon nanotubes. ...

335

Natural Gas Storage Valuation .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this thesis, one methodology for natural gas storage valuation is developed and two methodologies are improved. Then all of the three methodologies are applied (more)

Li, Yun

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

NETL: Carbon Storage FAQs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Does CCS really make a difference for the environment? Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is one of several options, including the use of renewables, nuclear energy, alternative...

337

Nuclear Fuels Storage & Transportation Planning Project Documents |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Cycle Technologies » Nuclear Fuels Storage & Fuel Cycle Technologies » Nuclear Fuels Storage & Transportation Planning Project » Nuclear Fuels Storage & Transportation Planning Project Documents Nuclear Fuels Storage & Transportation Planning Project Documents September 30, 2013 Preliminary Evaluation of Removing Used Nuclear Fuel From Shutdown Sites In January 2013, the Department of Energy issued the Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste. Among the elements contained in this strategy is an initial focus on accepting used nuclear fuel from shutdown reactor sites. February 22, 2013 Public Preferences Related to Consent-Based Siting of Radioactive Waste Management Facilities for Storage and Disposal This report provides findings from a set of social science studies

338

Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - International Energy Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Energy International Energy Storage Program Presentations Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - International Energy Storage Program Presentations The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) held an annual peer review on September 27, 2007 in San Francisco, CA. Eighteen presentations were divided into categories; those related to international energy storage programs are below. Other presentation categories were: Economics - Benefit Studies and Environment Benefit Studies Utility & Commercial Applications of Advanced Energy Storage Systems Power Electronics Innovations in Energy Storage Systems ESS 2007 Peer Review - DOE-CEC Energy Storage Program FY07 Projects - Daniel Borneo, SNL.pdf ESS 2007 Peer Review - Joint NYSERDA-DOE Energy Storage Initiative Projects

339

Decision analysis for INEL hazardous waste storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In mid-November 1993, the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Waste Reduction Operations Complex (WROC) Manager requested that the INEL Hazardous Waste Type Manager perform a decision analysis to determine whether or not a new Hazardous Waste Storage Facility (HWSF) was needed to store INEL hazardous waste (HW). In response to this request, a team was formed to perform a decision analysis for recommending the best configuration for storage of INEL HW. Personnel who participated in the decision analysis are listed in Appendix B. The results of the analysis indicate that the existing HWSF is not the best configuration for storage of INEL HW. The analysis detailed in Appendix C concludes that the best HW storage configuration would be to modify and use a portion of the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) Waste Storage Building (WWSB), PBF-623 (Alternative 3). This facility was constructed in 1991 to serve as a waste staging facility for WERF incineration. The modifications include an extension of the current Room 105 across the south end of the WWSB and installing heating, ventilation, and bay curbing, which would provide approximately 1,600 ft{sup 2} of isolated HW storage area. Negotiations with the State to discuss aisle space requirements along with modifications to WWSB operating procedures are also necessary. The process to begin utilizing the WWSB for HW storage includes planned closure of the HWSF, modification to the WWSB, and relocation of the HW inventory. The cost to modify the WWSB can be funded by a reallocation of funding currently identified to correct HWSF deficiencies.

Page, L.A.; Roach, J.A.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;2 3 Managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy MSTD/CD-Apr-08 Energy Storage Energy conversion Energy Source Input Energy Carrier A Multiple Energy Conversions Losses: Storage Conversion Hydrogen Electricity Storage: Chemical Electrochemical #12;3 5 Managed by UT-Battelle for the Department

Pennycook, Steve

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "managing treatment storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs draft environmental impact statement. Summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document analyzes at a programmatic level the potential environmental consequences over the next 40 years of alternatives related to the transportation, receipt, processing, and storage of spent nuclear fuel under the responsibility of the US Department of Energy. It also analyzes the site-specific consequences of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory sitewide actions anticipated over the next 10 years for waste and spent nuclear fuel management and environmental restoration. For programmatic spent nuclear fuel management, this document analyzes alternatives of no action, decentralization, regionalization, centralization and the use of the plans that existed in 1992/1993 for the management of these materials. For the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, this document analyzes alternatives of no action, ten-year plan, minimum and maximum treatment, storage, and disposal of US Department of Energy wastes.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 2, Part A  

SciTech Connect

This document analyzes at a programmatic level the potential environmental consequences over the next 40 years of alternatives related to the transportation, receipt, processing, and storage of spent nuclear fuel under the responsibility of the US Department of Energy. It also analyzes the site-specific consequences of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory sitewide actions anticipated over the next 10 years for waste and spent nuclear fuel management and environmental restoration. For programmatic spent nuclear fuel management this document analyzes alternatives of no action, decentralization, regionalization, centralization and the use of the plans that existed in 1992/1993 for the management of these materials. For the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, this document analyzes alternatives of no action, ten-year plan, minimum and maximum and maximum treatment, storage, and disposal of US Department of Energy wastes.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document analyzes at a pregrammatic level the potential environmental consequences over the next 40 years of alternatives related to the transportation, receipt, processing, and storage of spent nuclear fuel under the responsibility of the US Department of Energy. It also analyzes the site-specific consequences of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory sitewide actions anticipated over the next 10 years for waste and spent nuclear fuel management and environmental restoration. For pregrammatic spent nuclear fuel management, this document analyzes alternatives of no action, decentralization, regionalization, centralization and the use of the plans that existed in 1992/1993 for the management of these materials. For the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, this document analyzes alternatives of no action, ten-year plan, minimum and maximum treatment, storage, and disposal of US Department of Energy wastes.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

DOE Order 435.1 Radioactive Waste Management Revision Status  

(generation, treatment, storage, disposal) under the Atomic Energy Act. ... October 2010 Salt Lake City, UT Identify cross-cutting issues

345

Optimization and Valuation of Natural Gas Storage: or How to Get More out of the Gas Piggy Bank  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Storage capacity can be extremely valuable in the natural gas industry. However, because gas prices are so volatile and storage is subject to multiple physical constraints, it can be difficult for managers to determine how much storage is worth and how to extract the greatest value. This report shows that natural gas storage can be viewed as a bundle of options, and it exploits this observation to develop a powerful new approach to valuation and management.

2001-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

346

Energy Department Announces New Investment in Nuclear Fuel Storage Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Announces New Investment in Nuclear Fuel Storage Announces New Investment in Nuclear Fuel Storage Research Energy Department Announces New Investment in Nuclear Fuel Storage Research April 16, 2013 - 12:19pm Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - As part of its commitment to developing an effective strategy for the safe and secure storage and management of used nuclear fuel, the Energy Department today announced a new dry storage research and development project led by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The project will design and demonstrate dry storage cask technology for high burn-up spent nuclear fuels that have been removed from commercial nuclear power plants. "The Energy Department is committed to advancing clean, reliable and safe nuclear power - which provides the largest source of low-carbon

347

Energy Department Announces New Investment in Nuclear Fuel Storage Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Investment in Nuclear Fuel Storage Investment in Nuclear Fuel Storage Research Energy Department Announces New Investment in Nuclear Fuel Storage Research April 16, 2013 - 12:19pm Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - As part of its commitment to developing an effective strategy for the safe and secure storage and management of used nuclear fuel, the Energy Department today announced a new dry storage research and development project led by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The project will design and demonstrate dry storage cask technology for high burn-up spent nuclear fuels that have been removed from commercial nuclear power plants. "The Energy Department is committed to advancing clean, reliable and safe nuclear power - which provides the largest source of low-carbon

348

Cool Storage Technology Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is a fact that avoiding load growth is cheaper than constructing new power plants. Cool storage technologies offer one method for strategically stemming the impact of future peak demand growth. This guide provides a comprehensive resource for understanding and evaluating cool storage technologies.

2000-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

349

Energy storage capacitors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The properties of capacitors are reviewed in general, including dielectrics, induced polarization, and permanent polarization. Then capacitance characteristics are discussed and modelled. These include temperature range, voltage, equivalent series resistance, capacitive reactance, impedance, dissipation factor, humidity and frequency effects, storage temperature and time, and lifetime. Applications of energy storage capacitors are then discussed. (LEW)

Sarjeant, W.J.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

A thermal energy storage system for adsorbent low-pressure natural gas storage  

SciTech Connect

Carbon-based adsorbents were determined to be the best enhanced storage media that would store more natural gas at low pressures than achieved with compression only. Thermal energy storage (TES) was previously demonstrated to be a potentially promising technique to mitigate heat effects associated with low-pressure carbon adsorption systems for natural gas storage. Further investigations were conducted to develop information for the design of an optimized adsorption system that incorporates TES heat management. The selection of appropriate phase-change materials and nucleating agents, encapsulant materials, and corrosion inhibitors for a TES heat management system are discussed and the results of extended thermal cyclic behavior are presented. Engineering analyses and finite element analyses are employed to calculate adsorption rates, heat generation, temperatures, and heat transfer within the adsorbent bed. The size, volume, and arrangement of components for an operational TES system designed to accommodate fast-fill within a defined time limit is presented.

Blazek, C.F.; Jasionowski, W.J.; Kountz, K.J.; Tiller, A.J. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Gauthier, S.W.; Takagishi, S.K. [Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

351

Warehouse and Storage Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Warehouse and Storage Warehouse and Storage Characteristics by Activity... Warehouse and Storage Warehouse and storage buildings are those used to store goods, manufactured products, merchandise, raw materials, or personal belongings. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Warehouse and Storage Buildings... While the idea of a warehouse may bring to mind a large building, in reality most warehouses were relatively small. Forty-four percent were between 1,001 and 5,000 square feet, and seventy percent were less than 10,000 square feet. Many warehouses were newer buildings. Twenty-five percent were built in the 1990s and almost fifty percent were constructed since 1980. Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics

352

Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory), Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Materials Storage Materials Laboratory may include: * CSP technology developers * Utilities * Certification laboratories * Government agencies * Universities * Other National laboratories Contact Us If you are interested in working with NREL's Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory, please contact: ESIF Manager Carolyn Elam Carolyn.Elam@nrel.gov 303-275-4311 Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory The Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) investigates materials that can be used as high-temperature heat transfer fluids or thermal energy storage media in concentrating solar power (CSP) plants. Research objectives include the discovery and evaluation of

353

,"Underground Natural Gas Storage by Storage Type"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sourcekey","N5030US2","N5010US2","N5020US2","N5070US2","N5050US2","N5060US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)","U.S. Total Natural Gas in Underground...

354

Underground Natural Gas Storage by Storage Type  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Feb-13 Mar-13 Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 View History All Operators Natural Gas in Storage 6,482,603 6,102,063 6,235,751 6,653,184 7,027,708 7,302,556 1973-2013 Base Gas 4,379,494...

355

Strategic Intelligence Update: Energy Storage & Distributed Generation, May-June 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distributed generation and energy storage technologies add value to a wide range of applications within the electric utility enterprise. Both distributed generation and energy storage systems can help utilities shift and manage peak loads within the distribution system, improve reliability, and potentially help defer infrastructure upgrades. Bulk energy storage especially has the ability to improve the value of intermittent renewable resources. Smaller-scale distributed energy storage, on the order of a ...

2010-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

356

Hydrogen-based electrochemical energy storage - Energy ...  

An energy storage device (100) providing high storage densities via hydrogen storage. The device (100) includes a counter electrode (110), a storage ...

357

Thermal Storage with Conventional Cooling Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The newly opened Pennsylvania Convention Center in Philadelphia, PA; Exxon's Computer Facility at Florham Park, NJ; The Center Square Building in Philadelphia, are success stories for demand shifting through thermal storage. These buildings employ a simple thermal energy storage system that already exists in almost every structure - concrete. Thermal storage calculations simulate sub-cooling of a building's structure during unoccupied times. During occupied times, the sub-cooled concrete reduces peak cooling demand, thereby lowering demand and saving money. In addition, significant savings are possible in the first cost of chilled water equipment, and the smaller chillers run at peak capacity and efficiency during a greater portion of their run time. The building, controlled by an Energy Management and Control System (EMCS), "learns" from past experience how to run the building efficiently. The result is an optimized balance between energy cost and comfort.

Kieninger, R. T.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Durability study of a vehicle-scale hydrogen storage system.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories has developed a vehicle-scale demonstration hydrogen storage system as part of a Work for Others project funded by General Motors. This Demonstration System was developed based on the properties and characteristics of sodium alanates which are complex metal hydrides. The technology resulting from this program was developed to enable heat and mass management during refueling and hydrogen delivery to an automotive system. During this program the Demonstration System was subjected to repeated hydriding and dehydriding cycles to enable comparison of the vehicle-scale system performance to small-scale sample data. This paper describes the experimental results of life-cycle studies of the Demonstration System. Two of the four hydrogen storage modules of the Demonstration System were used for this study. A well-controlled and repeatable sorption cycle was defined for the repeated cycling, which began after the system had already been cycled forty-one times. After the first nine repeated cycles, a significant hydrogen storage capacity loss was observed. It was suspected that the sodium alanates had been affected either morphologically or by contamination. The mechanisms leading to this initial degradation were investigated and results indicated that water and/or air contamination of the hydrogen supply may have lead to oxidation of the hydride and possibly kinetic deactivation. Subsequent cycles showed continued capacity loss indicating that the mechanism of degradation was gradual and transport or kinetically limited. A materials analysis was then conducted using established methods including treatment with carbon dioxide to react with sodium oxides that may have formed. The module tubes were sectioned to examine chemical composition and morphology as a function of axial position. The results will be discussed.

Johnson, Terry Alan; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Behrens, Richard, Jr.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Corrosion in ICPP fuel storage basins  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant currently stores irradiated nuclear fuel in fuel storage basins. Historically, fuel has been stored for over 30 years. During the 1970`s, an algae problem occurred which required higher levels of chemical treatment of the basin water to maintain visibility for fuel storage operations. This treatment led to higher levels of chlorides than seen previously which cause increased corrosion of aluminum and carbon steel, but has had little effect on the stainless steel in the basin. Corrosion measurements of select aluminum fuel storage cans, aluminum fuel storage buckets, and operational support equipment have been completed. Aluminum has exhibited good general corrosion rates, but has shown accelerated preferential attack in the form of pitting. Hot dipped zinc coated carbon steel, which has been in the basin for approximately 40 years, has shown a general corrosion rate of 4 mpy, and there is evidence of large shallow pits on the surface. A welded Type 304 stainless steel corrosion coupon has shown no attack after 13 years exposure. Galvanic couples between carbon steel welded to Type 304 stainless steel occur in fuel storage yokes exposed to the basin water. These welded couples have shown galvanic attack as well as hot weld cracking and intergranular cracking. The intergranular stress corrosion cracking is attributed to crevices formed during fabrication which allowed chlorides to concentrate.

Dirk, W.J.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Property Management | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Management Management Property Management Personal Property Management and Accountability for Headquarters Management Personal property management includes all functions necessary for the proper determination of need, source, acquisition, receipt, accountability, utilization, maintenance, rehabilitation, storage, distribution and disposal of property. Authorized Property Representatives Effective October 2, 2013: Authorized Property Pass Signers List and Accountable Property Representatives List Personal Property Guidance Personal property management requires a lifecycle approach to be effective. There are four major phases in the personal property lifecycle: acquisition, receipt, utilization, and disposal. Each phase has distinct processes and procedures associated with it to maintain proper stewardship

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "managing treatment storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Ultrafine hydrogen storage powders  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of making hydrogen storage powder resistant to fracture in service involves forming a melt having the appropriate composition for the hydrogen storage material, such, for example, LaNi.sub.5 and other AB.sub.5 type materials and AB.sub.5+x materials, where x is from about -2.5 to about +2.5, including x=0, and the melt is gas atomized under conditions of melt temperature and atomizing gas pressure to form generally spherical powder particles. The hydrogen storage powder exhibits improved chemcial homogeneity as a result of rapid solidfication from the melt and small particle size that is more resistant to microcracking during hydrogen absorption/desorption cycling. A hydrogen storage component, such as an electrode for a battery or electrochemical fuel cell, made from the gas atomized hydrogen storage material is resistant to hydrogen degradation upon hydrogen absorption/desorption that occurs for example, during charging/discharging of a battery. Such hydrogen storage components can be made by consolidating and optionally sintering the gas atomized hydrogen storage powder or alternately by shaping the gas atomized powder and a suitable binder to a desired configuration in a mold or die.

Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA); Ellis, Timothy W. (Doylestown, PA); Pecharsky, Vitalij K. (Ames, IA); Ting, Jason (Ames, IA); Terpstra, Robert (Ames, IA); Bowman, Robert C. (La Mesa, CA); Witham, Charles K. (Pasadena, CA); Fultz, Brent T. (Pasadena, CA); Bugga, Ratnakumar V. (Arcadia, CA)

2000-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

362

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January 1, 2006 through March 31, 2006. Activities during this time period were: (1) Organize and host the 2006 Spring Meeting in San Diego, CA on February 21-22, 2006; (2) Award 8 projects for co-funding by GSTC for 2006; (3) New members recruitment; and (4) Improving communications.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2006-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

363

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2005 through June 30, 2005. During this time period efforts were directed toward (1) GSTC administration changes, (2) participating in the American Gas Association Operations Conference and Biennial Exhibition, (3) issuing a Request for Proposals (RFP) for proposal solicitation for funding, and (4) organizing the proposal selection meeting.

Joel Morrison

2005-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

364

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created - the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January1, 2007 through March 31, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: {lg_bullet} Drafting and distributing the 2007 RFP; {lg_bullet} Identifying and securing a meeting site for the GSTC 2007 Spring Proposal Meeting; {lg_bullet} Scheduling and participating in two (2) project mentoring conference calls; {lg_bullet} Conducting elections for four Executive Council seats; {lg_bullet} Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC Final Project Reports; and {lg_bullet} Outreach and communications.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

365

SERI Solar Energy Storage Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The SERI Solar Energy Storage Program provides research on advanced technologies, system analyses, and assessments of thermal energy storage for solar applications in support of the Thermal and Chemical Energy Storage Program of the DOE Division of Energy Storage Systems. Currently, research is in progress on direct contact latent heat storage and thermochemical energy storage and transport. Systems analyses are being performed of thermal energy storage for solar thermal applications, and surveys and assessments are being prepared of thermal energy storage in solar applications.

Copeland, R. J.; Wright, J. D.; Wyman, C. E.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

NREL: Energy Storage - Industry Participants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industry Participants NREL's energy storage project is funded by the DOE's Vehicle Technologies Office. We work closely with automobile manufacturers, energy storage developers,...

367

Cooling thermal storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article gives some overall guidelines for successful operation of cooling thermal storage installations. Electric utilities use rates and other incentives to encourage thermal storage, which not only reduces their system peaks but also transfers a portion of their load from expensive daytime inefficient peaking plants to less expensive nighttime base load high efficiency coal and nuclear plants. There are hundreds of thermal storage installations around the country. Some of these are very successful; others have failed to achieve all of their predicted benefits because application considerations were not properly addressed.

Gatley, D.P.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Collector: storage wall systems  

SciTech Connect

Passive Trombe wall systems require massive masonry walls to minimize large temperature swings and movable night insulation to prevent excessive night heat losses. As a solar energy collection system, Trombe wall systems have low efficiencies because of the nature of the wall and, if auxiliary heat is needed, because of absorption of this heat. Separation of collector and storage functions markedly improves the efficiency. A simple fiberglass absorber can provide high efficiency while phase change storage provides a compact storage unit. The need for movable insulation is obviated.

Boardman, H.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Interim report: Waste management facilities cost information for mixed low-level waste  

SciTech Connect

This report contains preconceptual designs and planning level life-cycle cost estimates for treating alpha and nonalpha mixed low-level radioactive waste. This report contains information on twenty-seven treatment, storage, and disposal modules that can be integrated to develop total life cycle costs for various waste management options. A procedure to guide the US Department of Energy and its contractor personnel in the use of estimating data is also summarized in this report.

Feizollahi, F.; Shropshire, D.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Fifteenth annual U.S. Department of Energy low-level radioactive waste management conference: Agenda and abstracts  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the conference was to give the opportunity to identify and discuss low-level radioactive waste management issues, share lessons learned, and hear about some of the latest advances in technology. Abstracts of the presentations are arranged into the following topical sections: (1) Performance Management Track: Performance assessment perspectives; Site characterization; Modeling and performance assessment; and Remediation; (2) Technical Track: Strategic planning; Tools and options; Characterization and validation; Treatment updates; Technology development; and Storage; (3) Institutional Track: Orders and regulatory issues; Waste management options; Legal, economic, and social issues; Public involvement; Siting process; and Low-level radioactive waste policy amendment acts.

NONE

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

371

Mixed wastes management at Fernald: Making it happen quickly, economically and compliantly  

SciTech Connect

At the end of calender year 1992, the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) had approximately 12,500 drums of mixed low-level waste in storage and the Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corporation (FERMCO) had just begun to develop an aggressive project based program to treat and dispose of this mixed waste. By 1996 the FERMCO mixed waste management program had reduced the aforementioned 12,500 drums of waste once in inventory to approximately 5800 drums. Projects are currently in progress to completely eliminate the FEMP inventory of mixed waste. As a result of these initiatives and aggressive project management, the FEMP has become a model for mixed waste handling, treatment and disposal for DOE facilities. Mixed waste management has traditionally been viewed as a singular and complex environmental problem. FERMCO has adopted the viewpoint that treatment and disposal of mixed waste is an engineering project, to be executed in a disciplined fashion with timely and economic results. This approach allows the larger mixed waste management problem to be divided into manageable fractions and managed by project. Each project is managed by problem solving experts, project managers, in lieu of environmental experts. In the project approach, environmental regulations become project requirements for individual resolution, as opposed to what had formerly been viewed as technically unachievable environmental standards.

Witzeman, J.T. [Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States); Rast, D.M. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1996-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

372

The Role of Energy Storage in Commercial Building  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Motivation and Background of Study This project was motivated by the need to understand the full value of energy storage (thermal and electric energy storage) in commercial buildings, the opportunity of benefits for building operations and the potential interactions between a building and a smart grid infrastructure. On-site or local energy storage systems are not new to the commercial building sector; they have been in place in US buildings for decades. Most building-scale storage technologies are based on thermal or electrochemical storage mechanisms. Energy storage technologies are not designed to conserve energy, and losses associated with energy conversion are inevitable. Instead, storage provides flexibility to manage load in a building or to balance load and generation in the power grid. From the building owner's perspective, storage enables load shifting to optimize energy costs while maintaining comfort. From a grid operations perspective, building storage at scale could provide additional flexibility to grid operators in managing the generation variability from intermittent renewable energy resources (wind and solar). To characterize the set of benefits, technical opportunities and challenges, and potential economic values of storage in a commercial building from both the building operation's and the grid operation's view-points is the key point of this project. The research effort was initiated in early 2010 involving Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to quantify these opportunities from a commercial buildings perspective. This report summarizes the early discussions, literature reviews, stakeholder engagements, and initial results of analyses related to the overall role of energy storage in commercial buildings. Beyond the summary of roughly eight months of effort by the laboratories, the report attempts to substantiate the importance of active DOE/BTP R&D activities in this space.

Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Subbarao, Krishnappa; Prakash Kumar, Nirupama; Bandyopadhyay, Gopal K.; Finley, C.; Koritarov, V. S.; Molburg, J. C.; Wang, J.; Zhao, Fuli; Brackney, L.; Florita, A. R.

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

373

River Protection Project (RPP) Project Management Plan  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), in accordance with the Strom Thurmond National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1999, established the Office of River Protection (ORP) to successfully execute and manage the River Protection Project (RPP), formerly known as the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS). The mission of the RPP is to store, retrieve, treat, and dispose of the highly radioactive Hanford tank waste in an environmentally sound, safe, and cost-effective manner. The team shown in Figure 1-1 is accomplishing the project. The ORP is providing the management and integration of the project; the Tank Farm Contractor (TFC) is responsible for providing tank waste storage, retrieval, and disposal; and the Privatization Contractor (PC) is responsible for providing tank waste treatment.

SEEMAN, S.E.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Porous polymeric materials for hydrogen storage  

SciTech Connect

Porous polymers, tribenzohexazatriphenylene, poly-9,9'-spirobifluorene, poly-tetraphenyl methane and their derivatives for storage of H.sub.2 prepared through a chemical synthesis method. The porous polymers have high specific surface area and narrow pore size distribution. Hydrogen uptake measurements conducted for these polymers determined a higher hydrogen storage capacity at the ambient temperature over that of the benchmark materials. The method of preparing such polymers, includes oxidatively activating solids by CO.sub.2/steam oxidation and supercritical water treatment.

Yu, Luping (Hoffman Estates, IL); Liu, Di-Jia (Naperville, IL); Yuan, Shengwen (Chicago, IL); Yang, Junbing (Westmont, IL)

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

375

Porous polymeric materials for hydrogen storage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Porous polymers, tribenzohexazatriphenylene, poly-9,9'-spirobifluorene, poly-tetraphenyl methane and their derivatives for storage of H.sub.2 prepared through a chemical synthesis method. The porous polymers have high specific surface area and narrow pore size distribution. Hydrogen uptake measurements conducted for these polymers determined a higher hydrogen storage capacity at the ambient temperature over that of the benchmark materials. The method of preparing such polymers, includes oxidatively activating solids by CO.sub.2/steam oxidation and supercritical water treatment.

Yu, Luping (Hoffman Estates, IL); Liu, Di-Jia (Naperville, IL); Yuan, Shengwen (Chicago, IL); Yang, Junbing (Westmont, IL)

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

376

PUREX storage tunnels waste analysis plan  

SciTech Connect

Washington Administrative Code 173-303-300 requires that a facility develop and follow a written waste analysis plan which describes the procedures that will be followed to ensure that its dangerous waste is managed properly. This document covers the activities at the PUREX Storage Tunnels used to characterize and designate waste that is generated within the PUREX Plant, as well as waste received from other on-site sources.

Haas, C.R., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

377

DC Hazardous Waste Management (District of Columbia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This regulation regulates the generation, storage, transportation, treatment, and disposal of hazardous waste, and wherever feasible, reduces or eliminates waste at the source. It is the policy of...

378

Hazardous Waste Management (Oklahoma) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

treatment and storage of such waste. It also mentions the availability of tax credits for waste facilities. Energy recovery from the destruction of a hazardous waste may be...

379

Vermont Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (Vermont)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations are intended to protect public health and the environment by comprehensively regulating the generation, storage, collection, transport, treatment, disposal, use, reuse, and...

380

NETL: Carbon Storage FAQs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Where is CO2 storage happening today? Where is CO2 storage happening today? Sleipner Project (Norway) Sleipner Project (Norway) Carbon dioxide (CO2) storage is currently happening across the United States and around the world. Large, commercial-scale projects, like the Sleipner CO2 Storage Site in Norway, the Weyburn-Midale CO2 Project in Canada, and the In Salah project in Algeria, have been injecting CO2 for many years. Each of these projects stores more than 1 million tons of CO2 per year. Large-scale efforts are currently underway in Africa, China, Australia, and Europe, too. These commercial-scale projects are demonstrating that large volumes of CO2 can be safely and permanently stored. Additionally, a multitude of pilot efforts are underway in different parts of the world to determine suitable locations and technologies for future

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "managing treatment storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

storage technology barriers. The...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summit Power to build a 400-megawatt (MW) coal-fired power plant with carbon capture and storage (CCS) in Britain. The companies will submit the Caledonia Clean Energy Project to...

382

Flywheel Energy Storage Module  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

kWh100 kW Flywheel Energy Storage Module * 100KWh - 18 cost KWh vs. current State of the Art * Bonded Magnetic Bearings on Rim ID * No Shaft Hub (which limits surface speed)...

383

DUF6 Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of depleted UF6 is stored in steel cylinders at three sites in the U.S. Depleted UF6 Inventory and Storage Locations U.S. DOE's inventory of depleted UF6 consists of approximately...

384

Storage Ring Parameters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photon Source Parameters Storage Ring Parameters Print General Parameters Parameter Value Beam particle electron Beam energy 1.9 GeV (1.0-1.9 GeV possible) Injection energy 1.9 GeV...

385

Carbon Aerogels for Hydrogen Storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This effort is focused on the design of new nanostructured carbon-based materials that meet the DOE 2010 targets for on-board vehicle hydrogen storage. Carbon aerogels (CAs) are a unique class of porous materials that possess a number of desirable structural features for the storage of hydrogen, including high surface areas (over 3000 m{sup 2}/g), continuous and tunable porosities, and variable densities. In addition, the flexibility associated with CA synthesis allows for the incorporation of modifiers or catalysts into the carbon matrix in order to alter hydrogen sorption enthalpies in these materials. Since the properties of the doped CAs can be systematically modified (i.e. amount/type of dopant, surface area, porosity), novel materials can be fabricated that exhibit enhanced hydrogen storage properties. We are using this approach to design new H{sub 2} sorbent materials that can storage appreciable amounts of hydrogen at room temperature through a process known as hydrogen spillover. The spillover process involves the dissociative chemisorption of molecular hydrogen on a supported metal catalyst surface (e.g. platinum or nickel), followed by the diffusion of atomic hydrogen onto the surface of the support material. Due to the enhanced interaction between atomic hydrogen and the carbon support, hydrogen can be stored in the support material at more reasonable operating temperatures. While the spillover process has been shown to increase the reversible hydrogen storage capacities at room temperature in metal-loaded carbon nanostructures, a number of issues still exist with this approach, including slow kinetics of H{sub 2} uptake and capacities ({approx} 1.2 wt% on carbon) below the DOE targets. The ability to tailor different structural aspects of the spillover system (i.e. the size/shape of the catalyst particle, the catalyst-support interface and the support morphology) should provide valuable mechanistic information regarding the critical aspects of the spillover process (i.e. kinetics of hydrogen dissociation, diffusion and recombination) and allow for optimization of these materials to meet the DOE targets for hydrogen storage. In a parallel effort, we are also designing CA materials as nanoporous scaffolds for metal hydride systems. Recent work by others has demonstrated that nanostructured metal hydrides show enhanced kinetics for reversible hydrogen storage relative to the bulk materials. This effect is diminished, however, after several hydriding/dehydriding cycles, as the material structure coarsens. Incorporation of the metal hydride into a porous scaffolding material can potentially limit coarsening and, therefore, preserve the enhanced kinetics and improved cycling behavior of the nanostructured metal hydride. Success implementation of this approach, however, requires the design of nanoporous solids with large accessible pore volumes (> 4 cm{sup 3}/g) to minimize the gravimetric and volumetric capacity penalties associated with the use of the scaffold. In addition, these scaffold materials should be capable of managing thermal changes associated with the cycling of the incorporated metal hydride. CAs are promising candidates for the design of such porous scaffolds due to the large pore volumes and tunable porosity of aerogel framework. This research is a joint effort with HRL Laboratories, a member of the DOE Metal Hydride Center of Excellence. LLNL's efforts have focused on the design of new CA materials that can meet the scaffolding requirements, while metal hydride incorporation into the scaffold and evaluation of the kinetics and cycling performance of these composites is performed at HRL.

Baumann, T F; Worsley, M; Satcher, J H

2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

386

Thermal Energy Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ice Bear30 Hybrid Air Conditionerthermal energy storage system150uses smart integrated controls, ice storage, and a dedicated compressor for cooling. The system is designed to provide cooling to interior spaces by circulating refrigerant within an additional evaporator coil added to a standard unitary air conditioner. The Ice Bear 30 is a relatively small size (5 ton), intended for use in residential and light commercial applications. This report describes EPRI tests of the Ice Bear 30, which is manu...

2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

387

Analog storage integrated circuit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high speed data storage array is defined utilizing a unique cell design for high speed sampling of a rapidly changing signal. Each cell of the array includes two input gates between the signal input and a storage capacitor. The gates are controlled by a high speed row clock and low speed column clock so that the instantaneous analog value of the signal is only sampled and stored by each cell on coincidence of the two clocks.

Walker, J. T. (Palo Alto, CA); Larsen, R. S. (Menlo Park, CA); Shapiro, S. L. (Palo Alto, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Thermal Energy Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technology Brief provides an update on the current state of cool thermal energy storage systems (TES) for end-use applications. Because of its ability to shape energy use, TES is strategic technology that allows end-users to reduce their energy costs while simultaneously providing benefits for electric utilities through persistent peak demand reduction and peak shifting. In addition to discussing the concepts of thermal energy storage, the Brief discusses the current state of TES technologies and dr...

2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

389

Analog storage integrated circuit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high speed data storage array is defined utilizing a unique cell design for high speed sampling of a rapidly changing signal. Each cell of the array includes two input gates between the signal input and a storage capacitor. The gates are controlled by a high speed row clock and low speed column clock so that the instantaneous analog value of the signal is only sampled and stored by each cell on coincidence of the two clocks. 6 figs.

Walker, J.T.; Larsen, R.S.; Shapiro, S.L.

1989-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

390

NETL: Carbon Storage FAQs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

different options for CO2 storage? different options for CO2 storage? Oil and gas reservoirs, many containing carbon dioxide (CO2), as well as natural deposits of almost pure CO2, can be found in many places in the United States and around the world. These are examples of long-term storage of CO2 by nature, where "long term" means millions of years. Their existence demonstrates that naturally occurring geologic formations and structures of various kinds are capable of securely storing CO2 deep in the subsurface for very long periods of time. Because of the economic importance of oil and gas, scientists and engineers have studied these natural deposits for many decades in order to understand the physical and chemical processes which led to their formation. There are also many decades of engineering experience in subsurface operations similar to those needed for CO2 storage. The most directly applicable experience comes from the oil industry, which, for 40 years, has injected CO2 in depleted oil reservoirs for the recovery of additional product through enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Additional experience comes from natural gas storage operations, which have utilized depleted gas reservoirs, as well as reservoirs containing only water. Scientists and engineers are now combining the knowledge obtained from study of natural deposits with experience from analogous operations as a basis for studying the potential for large-scale storage of CO2 in the deep subsurface.

391

Energy Conversion, Storage, and Transport News  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Energy Conversion, Storage, and Transport News. Energy Conversion, Storage, and Transport News. (showing ...

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

392

Energy Conversion, Storage, and Transport Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Energy Conversion, Storage, and Transport Portal. Energy Conversion, Storage, and Transport Portal. Programs ...

2013-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

393

Comparison of cask and drywell storage concepts for a monitored retrievable storage/interim storage system  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy, through its Richland Operations Office is evaluating the feasibility, timing, and cost of providing a federal capability for storing the spent fuel, high-level wastes, and transuranic wastes that DOE may be obligated by law to manage until permanent waste disposal facilities are available. Three concepts utilizing a monitored retrievable storage/interim storage (MRS/IS) facility have been developed and analyzed. The first concept, co-location with a reprocessing plant, has been developed by staff of Allied General Nuclear Services. the second concept, a stand-alone facility, has been developed by staff of the General Atomic Company. The third concept, co-location with a deep geologic repository, has been developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory with the assistance of the Westinghouse Hanford Company and Kaiser Engineers. The objectives of this study are: to develop preconceptual designs for MRS/IS facilities: to examine various issues such as transportation of wastes, licensing of the facilities, and environmental concerns associated with operation of such facilities; and to estimate the life-cycle costs of the facilities when operated in response to a set of scenarios that define the quantities and types of waste requiring storage in specific time periods, generally spanning the years 1989 to 2037. Three scenarios are examined to develop estimates of life-cycle costs for the MRS/IS facilities. In the first scenario, the reprocessing plant is placed in service in 1989 and HLW canisters are stored until a repository is opened in the year 1998. Additional reprocessing plants and repositories are placed in service at intervals as needed to meet the demand. In the second scenario, the reprocessing plants are delayed in starting operations by 10 years, but the repositories open on schedule. In the third scenario, the repositories are delayed 10 years, but the reprocessing plants open on schedule.

Rasmussen, D.E.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Measurements for Hydrogen Storage Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements for Hydrogen Storage Materials. Summary: ... Hydrogen is promoted as petroleum replacement in the Hydrogen Economy. ...

2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

395

Dry Cask Storage Characterization Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear utilities have developed independent spent fuel storage installations (ISFSIs) as a means of expanding their spent-fuel storage capacity on an interim basis until a geologic repository is available to accept the fuel for permanent storage. This report provides a technical basis for demonstrating the feasibility of extended spent-fuel storage in ISFSIs.

2002-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

396

Management of HFIR spent fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been unable to ship its spent fuel off-site for reprocessing since 1985. The HFIR storage pools are expected to fill up by the end of 1994. If a management alternative to existing HFIR pool storage is not identified and implemented by that time, the HFIR will be forced to shut down. This study identified and investigated five alternatives to managing the HFIR spent fuel, to determine the feasibility of implementing each in time to prevent shutdown of the HFIR: (1) increasing HFIR pool storage capacity, (2) storing the spent fuel at another ORNL pool, (3) storing the spent fuel in one or more hot cells at ORNL, (4) shipping the spent fuel off-site for reprocessing or storage elsewhere, and (5) installing a dedicated dry storage facility at ORNL. Of the alternatives investigated, only two could prevent the shutdown of the HFIR in the near term: increasing HFIR pool storage capacity or shipping the spent fuel off-site. Both options have been vigorously pursued because neither is assured of success, and at least one of the options must be successfully implemented if the HFIR is to continue operation. In addition, a third option was selected for implementation as an intermediate-term storage solution: installing a dedicated dry storage facility for the HFIR. An intermediate-term storage solution is needed because neither of the short-term solutions could ensure long-term continued operation of the HFIR.

Green, V.M.; Begovich, J.M.; Flanagan, G.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Lotts, A.L.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created-the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of July 1, 2006 to September 30, 2006. Key activities during this time period include: {lg_bullet} Subaward contracts for all 2006 GSTC projects completed; {lg_bullet} Implement a formal project mentoring process by a mentor team; {lg_bullet} Upcoming Technology Transfer meetings: {sm_bullet} Finalize agenda for the American Gas Association Fall Underground Storage Committee/GSTC Technology Transfer Meeting in San Francisco, CA. on October 4, 2006; {sm_bullet} Identify projects and finalize agenda for the Fall GSTC Technology Transfer Meeting, Pittsburgh, PA on November 8, 2006; {lg_bullet} Draft and compile an electronic newsletter, the GSTC Insider; and {lg_bullet} New members update.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

398

Waste management project fiscal year 1998 multi-year work plan WBS 1.2  

SciTech Connect

The MYWP technical baseline describes the work to be accomplished by the Project and the technical standards which govern that work. The Waste Management Project manages and integrates (non-TWRS) waste management activities at the site. Activities include management of Hanford wastes as well as waste transferred to Hanford from other DOE, Department of Defense, or other facilities. This work includes handling, treatment, storage, and disposition of radioactive, nonradioactive, hazardous, and mixed solid and liquid wastes. Major Waste Management Projects are the Solid Waste Project (SW), Liquid Effluents Project (LEP), and Analytical Services. Existing facilities (e.g., grout vaults and canyons) shall be evaluated for reuse for these purposes to the maximum extent possible. The paper tabulates the major facilities that interface with this Project, identifying the major facilities that generate waste, materials, or infrastructure for this Project and the major facilities that will receive waste and materials from this Project.

Slaybaugh, R.R.

1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

399

Utility battery storage systems program report for FY 94  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, conducts the Utility Battery Storage Systems Program, which is sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Management. The goal of this program is to assist industry in developing cost-effective battery systems as a utility resource option by 2000. Sandia is responsible for the engineering analyses, contracted development, and testing of rechargeable batteries and systems for utility energy storage applications. This report details the technical achievements realized during fiscal year 1994.

Butler, P.C.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Specific systems studies of battery energy storage for electric utilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, conducts the Utility Battery Storage Systems Program, which is sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Management. As a part of this program, four utility-specific systems studies were conducted to identify potential battery energy storage applications within each utility network and estimate the related benefits. This report contains the results of these systems studies.

Akhil, A.A.; Lachenmeyer, L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jabbour, S.J. [Decision Focus, Inc., Mountain View, CA (United States); Clark, H.K. [Power Technologies, Inc., Roseville, CA (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "managing treatment storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise: Output  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise: Output Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise: Output Report Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise: Output Report Focus Area: Clean Fossil Energy Topics: Market Analysis Website: cdn.globalccsinstitute.com/sites/default/files/publications/7326/carbo Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/carbon-capture-transport-and-storage- Policies: Regulations Regulations: Emissions Mitigation Scheme The Scottish Government published this report to identify regulatory gaps or overlaps in the nation's framework for regulating carbon capture and storage (CCS). The report aims to streamline and better manage CCS regulation. It focuses on evaluating the risks, barriers, information gaps,

402

300kW Energy Storage Demonstration Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

kW Energy Storage Demonstration kW Energy Storage Demonstration Project Technical Overview Presented at: Annual Doe Peer Review Meeting ─ 2008 DOE Energy Storage & Power Electronics Research Programs By Ib I. Olsen September 29, 2008 116 John Street - Suite 2320 New York, New York 10038 (p) 1.212.732.5507 (f) 1.212.732.5597 www.gaiapowertech.com This project is part of the Joint Energy Storage Initiative between the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) and the Energy Storage Systems Program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE/ESS), and managed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Sandia is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration, under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000

403

FCT Hydrogen Storage: Current Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Current Technology to someone Current Technology to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Storage: Current Technology on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Storage: Current Technology on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Storage: Current Technology on Google Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Storage: Current Technology on Delicious Rank FCT Hydrogen Storage: Current Technology on Digg Find More places to share FCT Hydrogen Storage: Current Technology on AddThis.com... Home Basics Current Technology Gaseous and Liquid Hydrogen Storage Materials-Based Hydrogen Storage Hydrogen Storage Challenges Status of Hydrogen Storage Technologies DOE R&D Activities Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems Analysis Contacts Current Technology

404

Structural Integrity Program for INTEC Calcined Solids Storage Facilities  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the activities of the structural integrity program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center relevant to the high-level waste Calcined Solids Storage Facilities and associated equipment, as required by DOE M 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual'. Based on the evaluation documented in this report, the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities are not leaking and are structurally sound for continued service. Recommendations are provided for continued monitoring of the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities.

Jeffrey Bryant

2008-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

405

Solar Energy Collection and Management for Networked Infomechanical Systems (NIMS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Networked Sensing Solar Energy Collection and Management forProposed Solution: Solar Energy Harvesting Why is Solarbeing recharged Solar energy harvesting and storage allow

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Superconducting magnetic energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Long-time varying-daily, weekly, and seasonal-power demands require the electric utility industry to have installed generating capacity in excess of the average load. Energy storage can reduce the requirement for less efficient excess generating capacity used to meet peak load demands. Short-time fluctuations in electric power can occur as negatively damped oscillations in complex power systems with generators connected by long transmission lines. Superconducting inductors with their associated converter systems are under development for both load leveling and transmission line stabilization in electric utility systems. Superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) is based upon the phenomenon of the nearly lossless behavior of superconductors. Application is, in principal, efficient since the electromagnetic energy can be transferred to and from the storage coils without any intermediate conversion to other energy forms. Results from a reference design for a 10-GWh SMES unit for load leveling are presented. The conceptual engineering design of a 30-MJ, 10-MW energy storage coil is discussed with regard to system stabilization, and tests of a small scale, 100-KJ SMES system are presented. Some results of experiments are provided from a related technology based program which uses superconducting inductive energy storage to drive fusion plasmas.

Rogers, J.D.; Boenig, H.J.; Hassenzahl, W.V.; Schermer, R.I.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act (Oklahoma) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act (Oklahoma) Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act (Oklahoma) Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act (Oklahoma) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Construction Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Oklahoma Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality A hazardous waste facility permit from the Department of Environmental Quality is required to store, treat or dispose of hazardous waste materials, or to construct, own or operate any facility engaged in the operation of storing, treating or disposing of hazardous waste or storing recyclable materials. The Department shall not issue a permit for the treatment, disposal or temporary storage of any liquid hazardous waste in a

408

Underground Natural Gas Storage by Storage Type  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History All Operators Net Withdrawals 192,093 33,973 -348,719 -17,009 -347,562 -7,279 1967-2012 Injections 3,132,920 3,340,365 3,314,990 3,291,395 3,421,813 2,825,427 1935-2012 Withdrawals 3,325,013 3,374,338 2,966,180 3,274,385 3,074,251 2,818,148 1944-2012 Salt Cavern Storage Fields Net Withdrawals 20,001 -42,044 -56,010 -58,295 -92,413 -19,528 1994-2012 Injections 400,244 440,262 459,330 510,691 532,893 465,005 1994-2012 Withdrawals 420,245 398,217 403,321 452,396 440,480 445,477 1994-2012 Nonsalt Cavern Storage Net Withdrawals 172,092 76,017 -292,710 41,286 -255,148 12,249 1994-2012 Injections 2,732,676 2,900,103 2,855,667 2,780,703 2,888,920 2,360,422 1994-2012 Withdrawals

409

Underground Natural Gas Storage by Storage Type  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History All Operators Net Withdrawals 192,093 33,973 -348,719 -17,009 -347,562 -7,279 1967-2012 Injections 3,132,920 3,340,365 3,314,990 3,291,395 3,421,813 2,825,427 1935-2012 Withdrawals 3,325,013 3,374,338 2,966,180 3,274,385 3,074,251 2,818,148 1944-2012 Salt Cavern Storage Fields Net Withdrawals 20,001 -42,044 -56,010 -58,295 -92,413 -19,528 1994-2012 Injections 400,244 440,262 459,330 510,691 532,893 465,005 1994-2012 Withdrawals 420,245 398,217 403,321 452,396 440,480 445,477 1994-2012 Nonsalt Cavern Storage Net Withdrawals 172,092 76,017 -292,710 41,286 -255,148 12,249 1994-2012 Injections 2,732,676 2,900,103 2,855,667 2,780,703 2,888,920 2,360,422 1994-2012 Withdrawals

410

Calcined solids storage facility closure study  

SciTech Connect

The disposal of radioactive wastes now stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory is currently mandated under a {open_quotes}Settlement Agreement{close_quotes} (or {open_quotes}Batt Agreement{close_quotes}) between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. Under this agreement, all high-level waste must be treated as necessary to meet the disposal criteria and disposed of or made road ready to ship from the INEEL by 2035. In order to comply with this agreement, all calcined waste produced in the New Waste Calcining Facility and stored in the Calcined Solids Facility must be treated and disposed of by 2035. Several treatment options for the calcined waste have been studied in support of the High-Level Waste Environmental Impact Statement. Two treatment methods studied, referred to as the TRU Waste Separations Options, involve the separation of the high-level waste (calcine) into TRU waste and low-level waste (Class A or Class C). Following treatment, the TRU waste would be sent to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for final storage. It has been proposed that the low-level waste be disposed of in the Tank Farm Facility and/or the Calcined Solids Storage Facility following Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure. In order to use the seven Bin Sets making up the Calcined Solids Storage Facility as a low-level waste landfill, the facility must first be closed to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) standards. This study identifies and discusses two basic methods available to close the Calcined Solids Storage Facility under the RCRA - Risk-Based Clean Closure and Closure to Landfill Standards. In addition to the closure methods, the regulatory requirements and issues associated with turning the Calcined Solids Storage Facility into an NRC low-level waste landfill or filling the bin voids with clean grout are discussed.

Dahlmeir, M.M.; Tuott, L.C.; Spaulding, B.C. [and others

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

NREL: Learning - Hydrogen Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage Hydrogen Storage On the one hand, hydrogen's great asset as a renewable energy carrier is that it is storable and transportable. On the other hand, its very low natural density requires storage volumes that are impractical for vehicles and many other uses. Current practice is to compress the gas in pressurized tanks, but this still provides only limited driving range for vehicles and is bulkier than desirable for other uses as well. Liquefying the hydrogen more than doubles the fuel density, but uses up substantial amounts of energy to lower the temperature sufficiently (-253°C at atmospheric pressure), requires expensive insulated tanks to maintain that temperature, and still falls short of desired driving range. One possible way to store hydrogen at higher density is in the spaces within the crystalline

412

Storage Ring Operation Modes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Longitudinal bunch profile and Up: APS Storage Ring Parameters Longitudinal bunch profile and Up: APS Storage Ring Parameters Previous: Source Parameter Table Storage Ring Operation Modes Standard Operating Mode, top-up Fill pattern: 102 mA in 24 singlets (single bunches) with a nominal current of 4.25 mA and a spacing of 153 nanoseconds between singlets. Lattice configuration: Low emittance lattice with effective emittance of 3.1 nm-rad and coupling of 1%. Bunch length (rms): 33.5 ps. Refill schedule: Continuous top-up with single injection pulses occurring at a minimum of two minute intervals, or a multiple of two minute intervals. Special Operating Mode - 324 bunches, non top-up Fill pattern: 102 mA in 324 uniformly spaced singlets with a nominal single bunch current of 0.31 mA and a spacing of 11.37 nanoseconds between singlets.

413

Flywheel Energy Storage Module  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

kWh/100 kW kWh/100 kW Flywheel Energy Storage Module * 100KWh - 1/8 cost / KWh vs. current State of the Art * Bonded Magnetic Bearings on Rim ID * No Shaft / Hub (which limits surface speed) * Flexible Motor Magnets on Rim ID * Develop Touch-down System for Earthquake Flying Rim Eliminate Shaft and Hub Levitate on Passive Magnetic Bearings Increase Rim Tip Speed Larger Diameter Thinner Rim Stores More Energy 4 X increase in Stored Energy with only 60% Increase in Weight Development of a 100 kWh/100 kW Flywheel Energy Storage Module High Speed, Low Cost, Composite Ring with Bore-Mounted Magnetics Current State of the Art Flywheel Limitations of Existing Flywheel * 15 Minutes of storage * Limited to Frequency Regulation Application * Rim Speed (Stored Energy) Limited by Hub Strain and Shaft Dynamics

414

Inertial energy storage device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The inertial energy storage device of the present invention comprises a composite ring formed of circumferentially wound resin-impregnated filament material, a flanged hollow metal hub concentrically disposed in the ring, and a plurality of discrete filament bandsets coupling the hub to the ring. Each bandset is formed of a pair of parallel bands affixed to the hub in a spaced apart relationship with the axis of rotation of the hub being disposed between the bands and with each band being in the configuration of a hoop extending about the ring along a chordal plane thereof. The bandsets are disposed in an angular relationship with one another so as to encircle the ring at spaced-apart circumferential locations while being disposed in an overlapping relationship on the flanges of the hub. The energy storage device of the present invention has the capability of substantial energy storage due to the relationship of the filament bands to the ring and the flanged hub.

Knight, Jr., Charles E. (Knoxville, TN); Kelly, James J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Pollard, Roy E. (Powell, TN)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Nevada Energy Storage Study - Jim Ellison, SNL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NVEnergy Storage Study NVEnergy Storage Study Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND No. 2011-XXXXP Objectives To answer the following questions: * Is there a business case for energy storage in Nevada? * What value can energy storage provide to Nevada in the face of increasing renewables penetration? * What is the appropriate type, size, and location to maximize this value? * Does sub-hourly production cost modeling show improved value and performance for energy storage

416

Thermal energy storage material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal energy storage material which is stable at atmospheric temperature and pressure and has a melting point higher than 32.degree.F. is prepared by dissolving a specific class of clathrate forming compounds, such as tetra n-propyl or tetra n-butyl ammonium fluoride, in water to form a substantially solid clathrate. The resultant thermal energy storage material is capable of absorbing heat from or releasing heat to a given region as it transforms between solid and liquid states in response to temperature changes in the region above and below its melting point.

Leifer, Leslie (Hancock, MI)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Interim Storage of Used or Spent Nuclear Fuel Position Statement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The American Nuclear Society (ANS) supports the safe, controlled, licensed, and regulated interim storage of used nuclear fuel (UNF) (irradiated, spent fuel from a nuclear power reactor) until disposition can be determined and completed. ANS supports the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commissions (NRCs) determination that spent fuel generated in any reactor can be stored safely and without significant environmental impacts for at least 30 years beyond the licensed life for operation. 1 Current operational and decommissioned nuclear power plants in the United States were licensed with the expectation that the UNF would be stored at the nuclear power plant site until shipment to an interim storage facility, reprocessing plant, or permanent storage. Because of delays in Federal programs and policy issues, utilities have been forced to store UNF. Current means of interim storage of UNF at nuclear power plant sites include storage of discharged fuel in a water-filled pool or in a sealed dry cask, both under safe, controlled, and monitored conditions. This UNF interim storage is designed, managed, and controlled to minimize or preclude potential radiological hazards or material releases. At nuclear power plant sites in the United States and internationally, this interim storage is regulated under site license requirements and technical specifications imposed by the national or state regulator. In the United States, NRC is the licensing and regulatory authority. ANS believes that UNF interim storage

unknown authors

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Waste Management Assistance Act (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section promotes the proper and safe storage, treatment, and disposal of solid, hazardous, and low-level radioactive wastes in Iowa, and calls on Iowans to assume responsibility for waste...

419

Integrated Waste Treatment Facility Fact Sheet | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Management Tank Waste and Waste Processing Integrated Waste Treatment Facility Fact Sheet Integrated Waste Treatment Facility Fact Sheet Waste Management Nuclear...

420

Storage Business Model White Paper  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Storage Business Model White Paper Storage Business Model White Paper Summary June 11 2013 Storage Business Model White Paper - Purpose  Identify existing business models for investors/operators, utilities, end users  Discuss alignment of storage "value proposition" with existing market designs and regulatory paradigms  Difficulties in realizing wholesale market product revenue streams for distributed storage - the "bundled applications" problem  Discuss risks/barriers to storage adoption and where existing risk mitigation measures fall down  Recommendations for policy/research steps - Alternative business models - Accelerated research into life span and failure modes

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "managing treatment storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Spent-fuel-storage alternatives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Spent Fuel Storage Alternatives meeting was a technical forum in which 37 experts from 12 states discussed storage alternatives that are available or are under development. The subject matter was divided into the following five areas: techniques for increasing fuel storage density; dry storage of spent fuel; fuel characterization and conditioning; fuel storage operating experience; and storage and transport economics. Nineteen of the 21 papers which were presented at this meeting are included in this Proceedings. These have been abstracted and indexed. (ATT)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Records Management | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Records Management Services » Records Management Records Management In 2009, Legacy Management constructed a state-of-the-art facility known as the LM Business Center in Morgantown, West Virginia. The facility houses historical records from the nation's former nuclear production sites and serves as an information technology data center. Learn about how LM is meeting its goal to "Preserve, Protect, and Share Information." The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) has consolidated the business functions, including records management and records storage, information technology infrastructure, and other services at a new facility named the DOE LM Business Center (LMBC), located in Morgantown, West Virginia. The LMBC (formerly referred to as the LM Records Storage Facility), located

423

Waste management facilities cost information: System cost model product description. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

In May of 1994, Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company (LITCO) in Idaho Falls, Idaho and subcontractors developed the System Cost Model (SCM) application. The SCM estimates life-cycle costs of the entire US Department of Energy (DOE) complex for designing; constructing; operating; and decommissioning treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities for mixed low-level, low-level, transuranic, and mixed transuranic waste. The SCM uses parametric cost functions to estimate life-cycle costs for various treatment, storage, and disposal modules which reflect planned and existing facilities at DOE installations. In addition, SCM can model new facilities based on capacity needs over the program life cycle. The SCM also provides transportation costs for DOE wastes. Transportation costs are provided for truck and rail and include transport of contact-handled, remote-handled, and alpha (transuranic) wastes. The user can provide input data (default data is included in the SCM) including the volume and nature of waste to be managed, the time period over which the waste is to be managed, and the configuration of the waste management complex (i.e., where each installation`s generated waste will be treated, stored, and disposed). Then the SCM uses parametric cost equations to estimate the costs of pre-operations (designing), construction costs, operation management, and decommissioning these waste management facilities.

Lundeen, A.S.; Hsu, K.M.; Shropshire, D.E.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

A thermal energy storage system for adsorbent low-pressure natural gas storage  

SciTech Connect

Thermal energy storage (TES) was previously demonstrated to be a potentially promising technique to mitigate heat effects associated with low-pressure carbon adsorption systems for natural gas storage. Further investigations were conducted to develop information for the design of an optimized adsorption system that incorporates TES heat management. The selection of appropriate phase-change materials and nucleating agents, encapsulant materials, and corrosion inhibitors for a TES heat management system are discussed and the results of extended thermal cyclic behavior are presented. Engineering analyses and finite element analyses are employed to calculate adsorption rates, heat generation, temperatures, and heat transfer within the adsorbent bed. The size, volume, and arrangement of components for an operational TES system designed to accommodate fast-fill within a defined time limit is presented.

Jasionowski, W.J.; Kountz, K.J.; Blazek, C.F.; Tiller, A.J. (Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)); Gauthier, S.W.; Takagishi, S.K. (Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Electrical Energy Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electrochemical Flow Storage System Typical Cell Power Density (Wcm 2 ) 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1 UTRC Conventional Conventional flow battery cell UTRC flow battery...

426

Flash Storage Today  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Can flash memory become the foundation for a new tier in the storage hierarchy? The past few years have been an exciting time for flash memory. The cost has fallen dramatically as fabrication has become more efficient and the market has grown; the density ...

Adam Leventhal

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Alkaline storage battery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An alkaline storage battery having located in a battery container a battery element comprising a positive electrode, a negative electrode, a separator and a gas ionizing auxiliary electrode, in which the gas ionizing electrode is contained in a bag of microporous film, is described.

Suzuki, S.

1984-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

428

Flywheel Energy Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flywheels are under consideration as an alternative for electrochemical batteries in a variety of applications This summary report provides a discussion of the mechanics of flywheels and magnetic bearings, the general characteristics of inertial energy storage systems, design considerations for flywheel systems, materials for advanced flywheels, and cost considerations.

1997-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

429

Underground pumped hydroelectric storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Underground pumped hydroelectric energy storage was conceived as a modification of surface pumped storage to eliminate dependence upon fortuitous topography, provide higher hydraulic heads, and reduce environmental concerns. A UPHS plant offers substantial savings in investment cost over coal-fired cycling plants and savings in system production costs over gas turbines. Potential location near load centers lowers transmission costs and line losses. Environmental impact is less than that for a coal-fired cycling plant. The inherent benefits include those of all pumped storage (i.e., rapid load response, emergency capacity, improvement in efficiency as pumps improve, and capacity for voltage regulation). A UPHS plant would be powered by either a coal-fired or nuclear baseload plant. The economic capacity of a UPHS plant would be in the range of 1000 to 3000 MW. This storage level is compatible with the load-leveling requirements of a greater metropolitan area with population of 1 million or more. The technical feasibility of UPHS depends upon excavation of a subterranean powerhouse cavern and reservoir caverns within a competent, impervious rock formation, and upon selection of reliable and efficient turbomachinery - pump-turbines and motor-generators - all remotely operable.

Allen, R.D.; Doherty, T.J.; Kannberg, L.D.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Cryptographic cloud storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider the problem of building a secure cloud storage service on top of a public cloud infrastructure where the service provider is not completely trusted by the customer. We describe, at a high level, several architectures that combine recent and ...

Seny Kamara; Kristin Lauter

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Pneumatic energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An essential component to hybrid electric and electric vehicles is energy storage. A power assist device could also be important to many vehicle applications. This discussion focuses on the use of compressed gas as a system for energy storage and power in vehicle systems. Three possible vehicular applications for which these system could be used are discussed in this paper. These applications are pneumatically driven vehicles, series hybrid electric vehicles, and power boost for electric and conventional vehicles. One option for a compressed gas system is as a long duration power output device for purely pneumatic and hybrid cars. This system must provide enough power and energy to drive under normal conditions for a specified time or distance. The energy storage system for this use has the requirement that it will be highly efficient, compact, and have low mass. Use of a compressed gas energy storage as a short duration, high power output system for conventional motor vehicles could reduce engine size or reduce transient emissions. For electric vehicles this kind of system could lengthen battery life by providing battery load leveling during accelerations. The system requirements for this application are that it be compact and have low mass. The efficiency of the system is a secondary consideration in this application.

Flowers, D.

1995-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

432

NV Energy Electricity Storage Valuation  

SciTech Connect

This study examines how grid-level electricity storage may benet the operations of NV Energy in 2020, and assesses whether those benets justify the cost of the storage system. In order to determine how grid-level storage might impact NV Energy, an hourly production cost model of the Nevada Balancing Authority (\\BA") as projected for 2020 was built and used for the study. Storage facilities were found to add value primarily by providing reserve. Value provided by the provision of time-of-day shifting was found to be limited. If regulating reserve from storage is valued the same as that from slower ramp rate resources, then it appears that a reciprocating engine generator could provide additional capacity at a lower cost than a pumped storage hydro plant or large storage capacity battery system. In addition, a 25-MW battery storage facility would need to cost $650/kW or less in order to produce a positive Net Present Value (NPV). However, if regulating reserve provided by storage is considered to be more useful to the grid than that from slower ramp rate resources, then a grid-level storage facility may have a positive NPV even at today's storage system capital costs. The value of having storage provide services beyond reserve and time-of-day shifting was not assessed in this study, and was therefore not included in storage cost-benefit calculations.

Ellison, James F.; Bhatnagar, Dhruv; Samaan, Nader A.; Jin, Chunlian

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

433

Removal plan for Shippingport pressurized water reactor core 2 blanket fuel assemblies form T plant to the canister storage building  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents the current strategy and path forward for removal of the Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor Core 2 blanket fuel assemblies from their existing storage configuration (wet storage within the T Plant canyon) and transport to the Canister Storage Building (designed and managed by the Spent Nuclear Fuel. Division). The removal plan identifies all processes, equipment, facility interfaces, and documentation (safety, permitting, procedures, etc.) required to facilitate the PWR Core 2 assembly removal (from T Plant), transport (to the Canister storage Building), and storage to the Canister Storage Building. The plan also provides schedules, associated milestones, and cost estimates for all handling activities.

Lata

1996-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

434

Carbon-based Materials for Energy Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flexible, lightweight energy-storage devices are of greatstrategy to fabricate flexible energy-storage devices.Flexible, lightweight energy-storage devices (batteries and

Rice, Lynn Margaret

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High temperature underground thermal energy storage, inProceedings, Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Workshop:underground thermal energy storage, in ATES newsletter:

Tsang, Chin Fu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Nanostructured Materials for Energy Generation and Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Electrochemical Energy Storage Nanostructured Electrodesof Electrode Design for Energy Storage and Generation .batteries and their energy storage efficiency. vii Contents

Khan, Javed Miller

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Energy Storage Demonstration Project Locations | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Storage Demonstration Project Locations Energy Storage Demonstration Project Locations Map of the United States showing the location of Energy Storage Demonstration projects...

438

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Coupled withGeneration and Energy Storage," presented at Frontiers ofStudy of Underground Energy Storage Using High-Pressure,

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1978, High temperature underground thermal energy storage,in Proceedings, Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Workshop:High temperature underground thermal energy storage, in ATES

Tsang, Chin Fu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B. Quale. Seasonal storage of thermal energy in water in theand J. Schwarz, Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in AquifersSecond Annual Thermal Energy Storage Contractors'

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "managing treatment storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Nuclear Fuels Storage & Transportation Planning Project | Department...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Fuels Storage & Transportation Planning Project Nuclear Fuels Storage & Transportation Planning Project Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) at the shutdown...

442

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Storage  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

| Consumer Information Hydrogen Storage Search Search Help Hydrogen Storage EERE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Hydrogen Storage Printable Version Share this resource Send...

443

Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of electricity and natural gas DER No Heat Storage: therecovery and storage) utility electricity and natural gasbut no heat storage, a 200 kW natural gas reciprocating

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Summary)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Salt Caverns Storage Capacity Aquifers Storage Capacity Depleted Fields Storage Capacity Total Working Gas Capacity Working Gas Capacity of Salt Caverns Working Gas Capacity of...

445

Silo Storage Preconceptual Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has a need to develop and field a low-cost option for the long-term storage of a variety of radiological material. The storage options primary requirement is to provide both environmental and physical protection of the materials. Design criteria for this effort require a low initial cost and minimum maintenance over a 50-year design life. In 1999, Argonne National Laboratory-West was tasked with developing a dry silo storage option for the BN-350 Spent Fuel in Aktau Kazakhstan. Argons design consisted of a carbon steel cylinder approximately 16 ft long, 18 in. outside diameter and 0.375 in. wall thickness. The carbon steel silo was protected from corrosion by a duplex coating system consisting of zinc and epoxy. Although the study indicated that the duplex coating design would provide a design life well in excess of the required 50 years, the review board was concerned because of the novelty of the design and the lack of historical use. In 2012, NNSA tasked Idaho National Laboratory (INL) with reinvestigating the silo storage concept and development of alternative corrosion protection strategies. The 2012 study, Silo Storage Concepts, Cathodic Protection Options Study (INL/EST-12-26627), concludes that the option which best fits the design criterion is a passive cathotic protection scheme, consisting of a carbon steel tube coated with zinc or a zinc-aluminum alloy encapsulated in either concrete or a cement grout. The hot dipped zinc coating option was considered most efficient, but the flame-sprayed option could be used if a thicker zinc coating was determined to be necessary.

Stephanie L. Austad; Patrick W. Bragassa; Kevin M Croft; David S Ferguson; Scott C Gladson; Annette L Shafer; John H Weathersby

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Storage Ring | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Electron Storage Ring The 7-GeV electrons are injected into the 1104-m-circumference storage ring, a circle of more than 1,000 electromagnets and associated equipment, located...

447

Hydrogen Storage Technologies Hydrogen Delivery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogen Storage Technologies Roadmap Hydrogen Delivery Technical Team Roadmap June 2013 #12;This.................................................................................. 13 6. Hydrogen Storage and Innovation for Vehicle efficiency and Energy sustainability) is a voluntary, nonbinding, and nonlegal

448

081001 CA CO2 Storage Pilot  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

California California CO2 Storage Pilot Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Initiative Review Meeting Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania October 7, 2008 John Henry Beyer, Ph.D. WESTCARB Program Manager, Geophysicist 510-486-7954, jhbeyer@lbl.gov Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Earth Sciences Division, MS 90-1116 Berkeley, CA 94720 2 Industry Partner: Shell Oil Company Committed to reducing global CO2 emissions Extensive technical expertise in: - Geologic evaluation - Well log analysis - Porosity and permeability evaluation - Geophysics - Deep well drilling - CO2 injection A welcome industry partner 3 - Bevilacqua-Knight, Inc. (DOE/PIER) - Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (PIER) - Sandia Technologies, LLC (DOE/PIER) - Terralog (DOE) Northern California CO2 Storage Pilot Contracting and Funding Flow

449

Battery Chargers | Electrical Power Conversion and Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Battery Chargers | Electrical Power Conversion and Storage Battery Chargers | Electrical Power Conversion and Storage 625 West A Street | Lincoln, NE 68522-1794 | LesterElectrical.com P: 402.477.8988 | F: 402.441.3727, 402.474.1769 (Sales) MEMORANDUM TO: United States Department of Energy (DOE), Via Email, expartecommunications@hq.doe.gov FROM: Spencer Stock, Product Marketing Manager, Lester Electrical DATE: June 18, 2012 RE: Ex Parte Communications, Docket Number EERE-2008-BT-STD-0005, RIN 1904-AB57 On Monday, June 11, 2012, representatives from Lester Electrical and Ingersoll Rand met with DOE to discuss the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NOPR) for Energy Conservation Standards for Battery Chargers and External Power Supplies, Docket Number EERE-2008-BT-STD-0005, RIN 1904-AB57.

450

An integrated framework for warehouse management using wireless sensor networks and decision support systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Storage Warehouse managers face diverse challenges in operating and managing a warehouse. Problems range from capacity-planning and inventory management of stored goods, loss or damage of stored goods due to weather changes, pest infestation and improper ...

Punit Ahluwalia; Anand Ramachandran

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Part II Energy Storage Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

II. Energy Storage Technology Overview * Instructor - Haresh Kamath, EPRI PEAC * Short term - Flywheels, Cranking Batteries, Electrochemical Capacitors, SMES * Long term -...

452

Normal matter storage of antiprotons  

SciTech Connect

Various simple issues connected with the possible storage of anti p in relative proximity to normal matter are discussed. Although equilibrium storage looks to be impossible, condensed matter systems are sufficiently rich and controllable that nonequilibrium storage is well worth pursuing. Experiments to elucidate the anti p interactions with normal matter are suggested. 32 refs.

Campbell, L.J.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Transportable Energy Storage Systems Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project will define the requirements and specification for a transportable energy storage system and then screen various energy storage options and assess their capability to meet that specification. The application will be designed to meet peak electrical loads (3-4 hours of storage) on the electrical distribution system.

2009-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

454

COSBench: cloud object storage benchmark  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With object storage systems being increasingly recognized as a preferred way to expose one's storage infrastructure to the web, the past few years have witnessed an explosion in the acceptance of these systems. Unfortunately, the proliferation of available ... Keywords: benchmark tool, object storage

Qing Zheng; Haopeng Chen; Yaguang Wang; Jian Zhang; Jiangang Duan

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Electrolysis-based hydrogen storage systems. Annual report, January 1, 1978-December 31, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Contract management, technical monitoring and in-house research conducted by Brookhaven National Laboratory for the US Department of Energy, Division of Energy Storage as described. The status of each project within four major areas of investigation is summarize. Activities deal with: (1) Electrolytic Production of Hydrogen; (2) Hydrogen Storage Systems; (3) Hydrogen Storage Materials; and (4) Systems Studies/End-Use Applications. The BNL programmatic responsibilities encompass the direction of 17 contractors and a $3,200,000 budget.

Not Available

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Results of ultrasonic testing evaluations on UF{sub 6} storage cylinders  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The three site cylinder management program is responsible for the safe storage of the DOE owned UF{sub 6} storage cylinders at PORTS, PGDP and at the K-25 site. To ensure the safe storage of the UF{sub 6} in the cylinders, the structural integrity of the cylinders must be evaluated. This report represents the latest cylinder integrity investigation that utilized wall thickness evaluations to identify thinning due to atmospheric exposure.

Lykins, M.L.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Energy Storage Market Opportunities: Application Value Analysis and Technology Gap Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A confluence of industry drivers including increased deployment of renewable generation, high capital costs for managing grid peak demands, grid infrastructure for reliability, and smart grid initiatives are creating a new interest in electric energy storage systems. Electricity storage systems may play a pivotal role in addressing these industry drivers. Utilities and industry stakeholders need cost and value information to support the business case for energy storage system investments. However, tradit...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

458

Feasibility study: Assess the feasibility of siting a monitored retrievable storage facility. Phase 1  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of phase one of this study are: To understand the waste management system and a monitored retrievable storage facility; and to determine whether the applicant has real interest in pursuing the feasibility assessment process. Contents of this report are: Generating electric power; facts about exposure to radiation; handling storage, and transportation techniques; description of a proposed monitored retrievable storage facility; and benefits to be received by host jurisdiction.

King, J.W.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Energy Storage & Power Electronics 2008 Peer Review - Energy Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& Power Electronics 2008 Peer Review - Energy & Power Electronics 2008 Peer Review - Energy Storage Systems (ESS) Presentations Energy Storage & Power Electronics 2008 Peer Review - Energy Storage Systems (ESS) Presentations The 2008 Peer Review Meeting for the DOE Energy Storage and Power Electronics Program (ESPE) was held in Washington DC on Sept. 29-30, 2008. Current and completed program projects were presented and reviewed by a group of industry professionals. The 2008 agenda was composed of 28 projects that covered a broad range of new and ongoing, state-of-the-art, energy storage and power electronics technologies, including updates on the collaborations among DOE/ESPE, CEC in California, and NYSERDA in New York. Energy Storage Systems (ESS) presentations are available below. ESPE 2008 Peer Review - EAC Energy Storage Subcommittee - Brad Roberts, S&C