Sample records for managing carbon regulatory

  1. Reading the Tea Leaves: How Utilities in the West Are Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in their Resource Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Westernand Risk Management in the US Electricity Sector,” Energyof energy efficiency in mitigating carbon regulatory risk (

  2. Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning:Current Practices in the Western United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles

    2008-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Concerns about global climate change have substantially increased the likelihood that future policy will seek to minimize carbon dioxide emissions. Assuch, even today, electric utilities are making resource planning and investment decisions that consider the possible implications of these future carbon regulations. In this article, we examine the manner in which utilities assess the financial risks associated with future carbon regulations within their long-term resource plans. We base our analysis on a review of the most recent resource plans filed by fifteen electric utilities in the Western United States. Virtually all of these utilities made some effort to quantitatively evaluate the potential cost of future carbon regulations when analyzing alternate supply- and demand-side resource options for meeting customer load. Even without Federal climate regulation in the U.S., the prospect of that regulation is already having an impact on utility decision-making and resource choices. That said, the methods and assumptions used by utilities to analyze carbon regulatory risk, and the impact of that analysis on their choice of a particular resource strategy, vary considerably, revealing a number of opportunities for analytic improvement. Though our review focuses on a subset of U.S. electric utilities, this work holds implications for all electric utilities and energy policymakers who are seeking to minimize the compliance costs associated with future carbon regulations

  3. Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles

    2008-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Concerns about global climate change have substantially increased the likelihood that future policy will seek to minimize carbon dioxide emissions. As such, even today, electric utilities are making resource planning and investment decisions that consider the possible implications of these future carbon regulations. In this article, we examine the manner in which utilities assess the financial risks associated with future carbon regulations within their long-term resource plans. We base our analysis on a review of the most recent resource plans filed by fifteen electric utilities in the Western United States. Virtually all of these utilities made some effort to quantitatively evaluate the potential cost of future carbon regulations when analyzing alternate supply- and demand-side resource options for meeting customer load. Even without Federal climate regulation in the U.S., the prospect of that regulation is already having an impact on utility decision-making and resource choices. That said, the methods and assumptions used by utilities to analyze carbon regulatory risk, and the impact of that analysis on their choice of a particular resource strategy, vary considerably, revealing a number of opportunities for analytic improvement. Though our review focuses on a subset of U.S. electric utilities, this work holds implications for all electric utilities and energy policymakers who are seeking to minimize the compliance costs associated with future carbon regulations.

  4. Reading the Tea Leaves: How Utilities in the West Are Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in their Resource Plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles

    2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The long economic lifetime and development lead-time of many electric infrastructure investments requires that utility resource planning consider potential costs and risks over a lengthy time horizon. One long-term -- and potentially far-reaching -- risk currently facing the electricity industry is the uncertain cost of future carbon dioxide (CO2) regulations. Recognizing the importance of this issue, many utilities (sometimes spurred by state regulatory requirements) are beginning to actively assess carbon regulatory risk within their resource planning processes, and to evaluate options for mitigating that risk. However, given the relatively recent emergence of this issue and the rapidly changing political landscape, methods and assumptions used to analyze carbon regulatory risk, and the impact of this analysis on the selection of a preferred resource portfolio, vary considerably across utilities. In this study, we examine the treatment of carbon regulatory risk in utility resource planning, through a comparison of the most-recent resource plans filed by fifteen investor-owned and publicly-owned utilities in the Western U.S. Together, these utilities account for approximately 60percent of retail electricity sales in the West, and cover nine of eleven Western states. This report has two related elements. First, we compare and assess utilities' approaches to addressing key analytical issues that arise when considering the risk of future carbon regulations. Second, we summarize the composition and carbon intensity of the preferred resource portfolios selected by these fifteen utilities and compare them to potential CO2 emission benchmark levels.

  5. Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Westernand Risk Management in the US Electricity Sector,” Energyhow energy planners might better address and manage the risk

  6. Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Westernand Risk Management in the US Electricity Sector,” Energyhow energy planners might better address and manage the risk

  7. Reading the Tea Leaves: How Utilities in the West Are Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in their Resource Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We benchmark the carbon footprint of the new resourceand their associated carbon footprint, providing a bottom-updegrade a utility’s carbon footprint, as illustrated by

  8. Reading the Tea Leaves: How Utilities in the West Are Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in their Resource Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2 Carbon Emission Price Projections in Utilitycarbon emission price projection (approximately $24/ton,carbon emission price projections to their base-case.

  9. Carbon capture retrofits and the cost of regulatory uncertainty

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reinelt, P.S.; Keith, D.W. [SUNY College of Fredonia, Fredonia, NY (United States). Dept. of Economics

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Power generation firms confront impending replacement of an aging coal-fired fleet in a business environment characterized by volatile natural gas prices and uncertain carbon regulation. We develop a stochastic dynamic programming model of firm investment decisions that minimizes the expected present value of future power generation costs under uncertain natural gas and carbon prices. We explore the implications of regulatory uncertainty on generation technology choice and the optimal timing of investment, and assess the implications of these choices for regulators. We find that interaction of regulatory uncertainty with irreversible investment always raises the social cost of carbon abatement. Further, the social cost of regulatory uncertainty is strongly dependent on the relative competitiveness of IGCC plants, for which the cost of later carbon capture retrofits is comparatively small, and on the firm's ability to use investments in natural gas generation as a transitional strategy to manage carbon regulation uncertainty. Without highly competitive IGCC or low gas prices, regulatory uncertainty can increase the expected social cost of reducing emissions by 40 to 60%.

  10. Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise: Output Report Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage...

  11. DEVELOPING A SET OF REGULATORY ANALOGS FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DEVELOPING A SET OF REGULATORY ANALOGS FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION D.M. Reiner1 , H.J. Herzog2 1 Judge Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA, email: hjherzog@mit.edu ABSTRACT Carbon capture and sequestration variables critical for determining the success of carbon sequestration as a viable climate policy option

  12. A SEARCH FOR REGULATORY ANALOGS TO CARBON SEQUESTRATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A SEARCH FOR REGULATORY ANALOGS TO CARBON SEQUESTRATION D.M. Reiner and H.J. Herzog1 1 Laboratory for Energy and the Environment, M.I.T., Cambridge, MA. 02139, USA ABSTRACT Carbon capture and sequestration for determining the success of carbon sequestration as a viable climate policy option. INTRODUCTION To date

  13. University of Dundee Carbon Management Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidson, Fordyce A.

    Carbon Management Strategy 2.1 Our low carbon vision 6 2.2 Context and drivers for Carbon Management 6 2 and sources of funding 18 6 Actions to Embed Carbon Management in Your Organisation 19 6.1 Corporate Strategy Appendix A: Carbon Management Matrix - Embedding 23 Appendix B: Energy Prices 24 #12;3 FOREWORD FROM

  14. University of Aberdeen Carbon Management Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levi, Ran

    of Aberdeen is committed to reducing its carbon footprint and to playing its part in limiting the worstUniversity of Aberdeen Carbon Management Plan Higher Education Carbon Management Programme working with Page 1 The University of Aberdeen Carbon Management Programme Carbon Management Plan (CMP

  15. Carbon Management Plan 1. Executive summary 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haase, Markus

    Carbon Management Plan June 2011 #12;2 #12;3 CONTENTS 1. Executive summary 5 2. Introduction 15 3. Background and context 16 4. Carbon management strategy 18 5. Carbon emissions baseline and projections 22 6. Past actions and achievements 30 7. Carbon Management Plan implementation 33 8. Carbon Management Plan

  16. 2013 Carbon Management Research Symposium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . BACKGROUND · As a first step towards developing risk assessment strategies for carbon sequestration projects2013 Carbon Management Research Symposium Effects of Formation Heterogeneity on CO2 Gas Phase Attenuation in the Shallow Subsurface During Possible Leakage from Geologic Sequestration Sites Michael

  17. University of Glasgow Carbon Management Programme Carbon Management Plan working with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Nigel

    fully in the initiatives which will help us reduce our carbon footprint and combat climate changeUniversity of Glasgow Carbon Management Programme Carbon Management Plan working with Page 1 Carbon Management Programme Carbon Management Plan (CMP) Albert Young, 3 November 2009 #12;University of Glasgow

  18. Carbon Capture and Sequestration: A Regulatory Gap Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lincoln Davies; Kirsten Uchitel; John Ruple; Heather Tanana

    2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Though a potentially significant climate change mitigation strategy, carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) remains mired in demonstration and development rather than proceeding to full-scale commercialization. Prior studies have suggested numerous reasons for this stagnation. This Report seeks to empirically assess those claims. Using an anonymous opinion survey completed by over 200 individuals involved in CCS, it concludes that there are four primary barriers to CCS commercialization: (1) cost, (2) lack of a carbon price, (3) liability risks, and (4) lack of a comprehensive regulatory regime. These results largely confirm previous work. They also, however, expose a key barrier that prior studies have overlooked: the need for comprehensive, rather than piecemeal, CCS regulation. The survey data clearly show that the CCS community sees this as one of the most needed incentives for CCS deployment. The community also has a relatively clear idea of what that regulation should entail: a cooperative federalism approach that directly addresses liability concerns and that generally does not upset traditional lines of federal-state authority.

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: Carbon Management Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Management Systems Models Publications Questions WECSsim Model The Water, Energy and Carbon Sequestration Model (WECSsim): A Collaborative Systems Model The Water, Energy and...

  20. Biofuels and Regulatory Co-Production Critical Stakeholder Perceptions of Carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    Biofuels and Regulatory Co-Production Critical Stakeholder Perceptions of Carbon and Sustainability are the responsibility of the author(s) alone and not the Tyndall Centre. #12; BIOFUELS AND REGULATORY and, to a lesser extent, industry, stakeholder views on biofuels as of late

  1. Regional evaluation of brine management for geologic carbon sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breunig, H.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    be managed early on. Carbon capture technology is water-,we believe that carbon capture technology will improve over

  2. Royal College of Art Carbon Management Programme Carbon Management Plan working with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Sriram

    carbon emissions come from our consumption of gas and electricity. We can expect energy prices of carbon management. Richard Rugg Head of Public Sector, Carbon Trust #12;Royal College of Art Carbon and the College recognises that it has a responsibility to contribute to the commitments made by the HE sector

  3. University of Surrey Carbon Management Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doran, Simon J.

    and embed within all aspects of our business energy and carbon reduction behaviours and initiatives. 3) To reduce our costs of energy, reduce risks and prepare the University Managing Price Volatility and putting, Impact of CRC 2.4 Reduced Consumption, Emission & Cost 2.5 Reputational Drivers 3.0 University Carbon

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: Carbon Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (SO2), nitrous oxides (NOx), mercury, and fine particulate matter. Carbon dioxide (CO2) is always a byproduct of combustion. ... Geomechanics Laboratory On April 7, 2011,...

  5. Environmental Assessment/Regulatory Impact Review AMENDMENT 45 TO THE FISHERY MANAGEMENT PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environmental Assessment/Regulatory Impact Review FOR AMENDMENT 45 TO THE FISHERY MANAGEMENT PLAN it would conflict with the Bering Sea non-roe season. At its January 1996 meeting, the Council considered/C Regulatory Areas must be made. Amendment 19 to the FMP, implemented as a measure to prevent roe stripping

  6. Unintended Consequences of Regulatory Takings Reform on the SDCP and Arizona Water Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    a property owners to just compensation if the value of a person's property is reduced by the enactmentUnintended Consequences of Regulatory Takings Reform on the SDCP and Arizona Water Management Fellowship Program #12;Introduction: Regulatory laws are often passed with the best intentions

  7. Carbon Foam Thermal Management Materials for Electronic Packaging...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Foam Thermal Management Materials for Electronic Packaging Carbon Foam Thermal Management Materials for Electronic Packaging Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle...

  8. Managing carbon in a multiple use world: The implications of land-use decision context for carbon management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neff, Jason

    Managing carbon in a multiple use world: The implications of land-use decision context for carbon, Boulder, 80309-0488, United States 1. Introduction Carbon management through changes in land, 2010). Human land-use change is the second largest contributor of increasing carbon dioxide

  9. Development of a Carbon Management Geographic Information System (GIS) for the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard Herzog; Holly Javedan

    2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In this project a Carbon Management Geographical Information System (GIS) for the US was developed. The GIS stored, integrated, and manipulated information relating to the components of carbon management systems. Additionally, the GIS was used to interpret and analyze the effect of developing these systems. This report documents the key deliverables from the project: (1) Carbon Management Geographical Information System (GIS) Documentation; (2) Stationary CO{sub 2} Source Database; (3) Regulatory Data for CCS in United States; (4) CO{sub 2} Capture Cost Estimation; (5) CO{sub 2} Storage Capacity Tools; (6) CO{sub 2} Injection Cost Modeling; (7) CO{sub 2} Pipeline Transport Cost Estimation; (8) CO{sub 2} Source-Sink Matching Algorithm; and (9) CO{sub 2} Pipeline Transport and Cost Model.

  10. Carbon Foam Thermal Management Materials for Electronic Packaging...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Carbon Foam Thermal Management Materials for Electronic Packaging David P. Stinton Oak Ridge National Laboratory Project Team: Nidia C. Gallego, ORNL Brian Thompson, ThermalCentric...

  11. Better understanding of bacterial fate and transport in watersheds is necessary for improved regulatory management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perfect, Ed

    bacterial survival in hydro- environmental systems such as sunlight, temperature, soil moisture conditions1559 Better understanding of bacterial fate and transport in watersheds is necessary for improved regulatory management of impaired streams. Novel statistical time series analyses of coliform data can

  12. Managing Commercial Tree Species for Timber Production and Carbon Sequestration: Management Guidelines and Financial Returns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary D. Kronrad

    2006-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A carbon credit market is developing in the United States. Information is needed by buyers and sellers of carbon credits so that the market functions equitably and efficiently. Analyses have been conducted to determine the optimal forest management regime to employ for each of the major commercial tree species so that profitability of timber production only or the combination of timber production and carbon sequestration is maximized. Because the potential of a forest ecosystem to sequester carbon depends on the tree species, site quality and management regimes utilized, analyses have determined how to optimize carbon sequestration by determining how to optimally manage each species, given a range of site qualities, discount rates, prices of carbon credits and other economic variables. The effects of a carbon credit market on the method and profitability of forest management, the cost of sequestering carbon, the amount of carbon that can be sequestered, and the amount of timber products produced has been determined.

  13. Carbon Management Plan for the Exeter Campuses 2010-2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bearhop, Stuart

    Programme www.exeter.ac.uk/sustainability #12;Version 2010v1 dated 8/03/2011 Page 2 Owner ­ G Whitehouse ­ Energy Manager Carbon Management Plan 2010 - 2020 Contents 1 Forewords 1.1 Foreword from the Vice Drivers 3.4.2 National Drivers - Legislation 3.4.3 National Drivers ­ Government Strategy for Carbon

  14. Regulatory instrument review: Aging management of LWR cables, containment and basemat, reactor coolant pumps, and motor-operated valves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Werry, E.V.; Somasundaram, S.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of Stage 2 of the Regulatory Instrument Review are presented in this volume. Selected regulatory instruments, such as the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Regulatory Guides, and ASME Codes, were investigated to determine the extent to which these regulations apply aging management to selected safety-related components in nuclear power plants. The Regulatory Instrument Review was funded by the NRC under the Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) program. Stage 2 of the review focused on four safety-related structures and components; namely, cables, containment and basemat, reactor coolant pumps, and motor-operated valves. The review suggests that the primary-emphasis of the regulatory instruments was on the design, construction, start-up, and operation of a nuclear power plant, and that aging issues were primarily addressed after an aging-related problem was recognized. This Stage 2 review confirms the results of the prior review; (see Regulatory Instrument Review: Management of Aging of LWR Major Safety-Related Components NUREG/CR-5490. The observations indicate that the regulations generally address management of age-related degradation indirectly. Specific age-related degradation phenomena frequently are dealt with in bulletins and notices or through generic issues, letters, etc. The major recommendation of this report, therefore, is that the regulatory instruments should more directly and explicitly address the aging phenomenon and the management of the age-related degradation process.

  15. Independent Verification and Validation Of SAPHIRE 8 Risk Management Project Number: N6423 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kent Norris

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides an evaluation of the risk management. Risk management is intended to ensure a methodology for conducting risk management planning, identification, analysis, responses, and monitoring and control activities associated with the SAPHIRE project work, and to meet the contractual commitments prepared by the sponsor; the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

  16. Terrestrial Carbon Management Data from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    CDIAC products are indexed and searchable through a customized interface powered by ORNL's Mercury search engine. Products include numeric data packages, publications, trend data, atlases, and models and can be searched for by subject area, keywords, authors, product numbers, time periods, collection sites, spatial references, etc. Some of the collections may also be included in the CDIAC publication Trends Online: A Compendium of Global Change Data. Most data sets, many with numerous data files, are free to download from CDIAC's ftp area. Collections under the broad heading of Terrestrial Carbon Management are organized as Carbon Accumulation with Cropland Management, Carbon Accumulation with Grassland Management, Carbon Loss Following Cultivation, Carbon Accumulation Following Afforestation, and Carbon Sources and Sinks Associated with U.S. Cropland Production.

  17. University of Bath Carbon Management Plan working with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, Geoffrey R.

    at Stake 20 4 Carbon Management Projects 23 4.1 Existing projects 24 4.2 District heating projects 25 4 Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs DH District Heating DTI Department of Trade and Industry

  18. Knowledge Management Initiatives Used to Maintain Regulatory Expertise in Transportation and Storage of Radioactive Materials - 12177

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindsay, Haile; Garcia-Santos, Norma; Saverot, Pierre; Day, Neil; Gambone Rodriguez, Kimberly; Cruz, Luis; Sotomayor-Rivera, Alexis; Vechioli, Lucieann; Vera, John; Pstrak, David [United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Mail Stop EBB-03D-02M, 6003 Executive Boulevard, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) was established in 1974 with the mission to license and regulate the civilian use of nuclear materials for commercial, industrial, academic, and medical uses in order to protect public health and safety, and the environment, and promote the common defense and security. Currently, approximately half (?49%) of the workforce at the NRC has been with the Agency for less than six years. As part of the Agency's mission, the NRC has partial responsibility for the oversight of the transportation and storage of radioactive materials. The NRC has experienced a significant level of expertise leaving the Agency due to staff attrition. Factors that contribute to this attrition include retirement of the experienced nuclear workforce and mobility of staff within or outside the Agency. Several knowledge management (KM) initiatives have been implemented within the Agency, with one of them including the formation of a Division of Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation (SFST) KM team. The team, which was formed in the fall of 2008, facilitates capturing, transferring, and documenting regulatory knowledge for staff to effectively perform their safety oversight of transportation and storage of radioactive materials, regulated under Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR) Part 71 and Part 72. In terms of KM, the SFST goal is to share critical information among the staff to reduce the impact from staff's mobility and attrition. KM strategies in place to achieve this goal are: (1) development of communities of practice (CoP) (SFST Qualification Journal and the Packaging and Storing Radioactive Material) in the on-line NRC Knowledge Center (NKC); (2) implementation of a SFST seminar program where the seminars are recorded and placed in the Agency's repository, Agency-wide Documents Access and Management System (ADAMS); (3) meeting of technical discipline group programs to share knowledge within specialty areas; (4) development of written guidance to capture 'administrative and technical' knowledge (e.g., office instructions (OIs), generic communications (e.g., bulletins, generic letters, regulatory issue summary), standard review plans (SRPs), interim staff guidance (ISGs)); (5) use of mentoring strategies for experienced staff to train new staff members; (6) use of Microsoft SharePoint portals in capturing, transferring, and documenting knowledge for staff across the Division from Division management and administrative assistants to the project managers, inspectors, and technical reviewers; and (7) development and implementation of a Division KM Plan. A discussion and description of the successes and challenges of implementing these KM strategies at the NRC/SFST will be provided. (authors)

  19. The U.S. regulatory framework for long-term management of uranium mill tailings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smythe, C. [Dept. of Energy, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bierley, D.; Bradshaw, M. [Roy F. Weston, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US established the regulatory structure for the management, disposal, and long-term care of uranium mill tailings in 1978 with the passage of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) (Pub. L. 95-604). This legislation has governed the cleanup and disposal of uranium tailings at both inactive and active sites. The passage of the UMTRCA established a federal regulatory program for the cleanup and disposal of uranium mill tailings in the US. This program involves the DOE, the NRC, the EPA, various states and tribal governments, private licensees, and the general public. The DOE has completed surface remediation at 14 sites, with the remaining sites either under construction or in planning. The DOE`s UMTRA Project has been very successful in dealing with public and agency demands, particularly regarding disposal site selection and transportation issues. The active sites are also being cleaned up, but at a slower pace than the inactive sites, with the first site tentatively scheduled for completion in 1996.

  20. Virginia Environmentally Sustainable Technologies Laboratory Developing strategies for carbon management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarens, Andres

    the environmental implications of deploying carbon manage- ment at large scales. Efforts to mitigate the effects lubricants (GELs) are novel mixtures of CO2 and synthetic lubricants with tunable properties (e.g., viscosity- hanced oil recovery, and GCS. · Published an open-source meta-model of algae bio- fuel production

  1. Waste management activities and carbon emissions in Africa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Couth, R. [University of KwaZulu-Natal, CRECHE, School of Civil Engineering, Survey and Construction, Durban 4041 (South Africa); Trois, C., E-mail: troisc@ukzn.ac.za [University of KwaZulu-Natal, CRECHE, School of Civil Engineering, Survey and Construction, Durban 4041 (South Africa)

    2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes research into waste management activities and carbon emissions from territories in sub-Saharan Africa with the main objective of quantifying emission reductions (ERs) that can be gained through viable improvements to waste management in Africa. It demonstrates that data on waste and carbon emissions is poor and generally inadequate for prediction models. The paper shows that the amount of waste produced and its composition are linked to national Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Waste production per person is around half that in developed countries with a mean around 230 kg/hd/yr. Sub-Saharan territories produce waste with a biogenic carbon content of around 56% (+/-25%), which is approximately 40% greater than developed countries. This waste is disposed in uncontrolled dumps that produce large amounts of methane gas. Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from waste will rise with increasing urbanization and can only be controlled through funding mechanisms from developed countries.

  2. Interstate Technology & Regulatory Council (ITRC) Remediation...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Technology & Regulatory Council (ITRC) Remediation Management of Complex Sites: Case Studies and Guidance Interstate Technology & Regulatory Council (ITRC) Remediation...

  3. Management Opportunities for Enhancing Terrestrial Carbon Dioxide Sinks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Post, W. M.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; West, Tristram O.; Liebig, Mark A.; King, Anthony W.

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential for mitigating increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations through the use of terrestrial biological carbon (C) sequestration is substantial. Here, we estimate the amount of C being sequestered by natural processes at global, North American, and national US scales. We present and quantify, where possible, the potential for deliberate human actions – through forestry, agriculture, and use of biomass-based fuels – to augment these natural sinks. Carbon sequestration may potentially be achieved through some of these activities but at the expense of substantial changes in land-use management. Some practices (eg reduced tillage, improved silviculture, woody bioenergy crops) are already being implemented because of their economic benefits and associated ecosystem services. Given their cumulative greenhouse-gas impacts, other strategies (eg the use of biochar and cellulosic bioenergy crops) require further evaluation to determine whether widespread implementation is warranted.

  4. Assessment of Brine Management for Geologic Carbon Sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breunig, Hanna M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for  Geologic  Carbon  Sequestration. ”   International  of  Energy.  “Carbon  Sequestration  Atlas  of  the  Water  Extracted  from  Carbon  Sequestration  Projects."  

  5. Carbon Footprint and the Management of Supply Chains: Insights from Simple Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjaafar, Saifallah

    Carbon Footprint and the Management of Supply Chains: Insights from Simple Models Saif Benjaafar1, we illustrate how carbon emission concerns could be integrated into operational decision-making with regard to procurement, production, and inventory management. We show how, by associating carbon emission

  6. Developing a Social Cost of Carbon for US Regulatory Analysis: A Methodology and Interpretation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenstone, Michael

    The US government recently developed a range of values representing the monetized global damages associated with an incremental increase in carbon dioxide (CO[subscript 2]) emissions, commonly referred to as the social ...

  7. STRATEGIES AND TECHNOLOGY FOR MANAGING HIGH-CARBON ASH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Hurt; Eric Suuberg; John Veranth; Xu Chen

    2003-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of the present project is to identify and assess strategies and solutions for the management of industry problems related to carbon in ash. Specific research issues to be addressed include: (1) the effect of parent fuel selection on ash properties and adsorptivity, including a first ever examination of the air entrainment behavior of ashes from alternative (non-coal) fuels; (2) the effect of various low-NOx firing modes on ash properties and adsorptivity; and (3) the kinetics and mechanism of ash ozonation. This data will provide scientific and engineering support of the ongoing process development activities. During this fourth project period we completed the characterization of ozone-treated carbon surfaces and wrote a comprehensive report on the mechanism through which ozone suppresses the adsorption of concrete surfactants.

  8. STRATEGIES AND TECHNOLOGY FOR MANAGING HIGH-CARBON ASH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Hurt; Eric Suuberg; John Veranth; Xu Chen

    2002-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of the present project is to identify and assess strategies and solutions for the management of industry problems related to carbon in ash. Specific research issues to be addressed include: (1) the effect of parent fuel selection on ash properties and adsorptivity, including a first ever examination of the air entrainment behavior of ashes from alternative (non-coal) fuels; (2) the effect of various low-NOx firing modes on ash properties and adsorptivity; and (3) the kinetics and mechanism of ash ozonation. This data will provide scientific and engineering support of the ongoing process development activities. During this fourth project period we completed the characterization of ozone-treated carbon surfaces and wrote a comprehensive report on the mechanism through which ozone suppresses the adsorption of concrete surfactants.

  9. Carbon calculator tracks the climate benefits of managed private forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, William C; Sharma, Benktesh D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    forests provide more carbon sequestration benefits than let-the relative carbon sequestration benefits of let-growlife cycle carbon sequestration benefits, averaged over 120,

  10. Carbon and Water Resource Management for Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hendrickson, Thomas Peter

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Buckley, C. A. ; Carbon footprint analysis for increasingeffectively reduce their carbon footprint. To accomplish7 February 2013. (8) The Carbon Footprint of Water; River

  11. Management of water extracted from carbon sequestration projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harto, C. B.; Veil, J. A. (Environmental Science Division)

    2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Throughout the past decade, frequent discussions and debates have centered on the geological sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). For sequestration to have a reasonably positive impact on atmospheric carbon levels, the anticipated volume of CO{sub 2} that would need to be injected is very large (many millions of tons per year). Many stakeholders have expressed concern about elevated formation pressure following the extended injection of CO{sub 2}. The injected CO{sub 2} plume could potentially extend for many kilometers from the injection well. If not properly managed and monitored, the increased formation pressure could stimulate new fractures or enlarge existing natural cracks or faults, so the CO{sub 2} or the brine pushed ahead of the plume could migrate vertically. One possible tool for management of formation pressure would be to extract water already residing in the formation where CO{sub 2} is being stored. The concept is that by removing water from the receiving formations (referred to as 'extracted water' to distinguish it from 'oil and gas produced water'), the pressure gradients caused by injection could be reduced, and additional pore space could be freed up to sequester CO{sub 2}. Such water extraction would occur away from the CO{sub 2} plume to avoid extracting a portion of the sequestered CO{sub 2} along with the formation water. While water extraction would not be a mandatory component of large-scale carbon storage programs, it could provide many benefits, such as reduction of pressure, increased space for CO{sub 2} storage, and potentially, 'plume steering.' Argonne National Laboratory is developing information for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to evaluate management of extracted water. If water is extracted from geological formations designated to receive injected CO{sub 2} for sequestration, the project operator will need to identify methods for managing very large volumes of water most of which will contain large quantities of salt and other dissolved minerals. Produced water from oil and gas production also typically contains large quantities of dissolved solids. Therefore, many of the same practices that are established and used for managing produced water also may be applicable for extracted water. This report describes the probable composition of the extracted water that is removed from the formations, options for managing the extracted water, the pros and cons of those options, and some opportunities for beneficial use of the water. Following the introductory material in Chapter 1, the report is divided into chapters covering the following topics: (Chapter 2) examines the formations that are likely candidates for CO{sub 2} sequestration and provides a general evaluation of the geochemical characteristics of the formations; (Chapter 3) makes some preliminary estimates of the volume of water that could be extracted; (Chapter 4) provides a qualitative review of many potential technologies and practices for managing extracted water and for each technology or management practice, pros and cons are provided; (Chapter 5) explores the potential costs of water management; and (Chapter 6) presents the conclusions.

  12. STRATEGIES AND TECHNOLOGY FOR MANAGING HIGH-CARBON ASH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Hurt; Eric Suuberg; John Veranth

    2001-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of the present project is to identify and assess strategies and solutions for the management of industry problems related to carbon in ash. Specific research issues to be addressed include: the effect of parent fuel selection on ash properties and adsorptivity, including a first ever examination of the air entrainment behavior of ashes from alternative (non-coal) fuels; the effect of various low-NOx firing modes on ash properties and adsorptivity; and the kinetics and mechanism of ash ozonation. This data will provide scientific and engineering support of the ongoing process development activities. This first project period, experiments were carried out to better understand the fundamental nature of the ozonation effect on ash. Carbon surfaces were characterized by surfactant adsorption, and by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy before and after oxidation, both by air at 440 C and by ozone at room temperature. The results strongly suggest that the beneficial effect of ozonation is in large part due to chemical modification of the carbon surfaces.

  13. What is the optimal heather moorland management regime for carbon sequestration?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Zaoyang

    What is the optimal heather moorland management regime for carbon sequestration? Supervisors: Prof, the Muirburn Code has no evidence base with regard to carbon sequestration. Given the increased concern use moorland carbon sequestration to offset emissions, it is essential that the most appropriate land

  14. Managing the Cost, Energy Consumption, and Carbon Footprint of Internet Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martonosi, Margaret

    Managing the Cost, Energy Consumption, and Carbon Footprint of Internet Services Kien Le , Ozlem electricity consumptions translate into large carbon footprints, since most of the electricity in the US such as government imposed Kyoto- style carbon limits. Extensive simulations and real experiments show that our

  15. NTU Carbon Management Statement 2010 Nottingham Trent University fully supports government and HEFCE climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Paul

    NTU Carbon Management Statement 2010 Nottingham Trent University fully supports government the following absolute carbon reduction target aligned to higher education sector target: · At least a 48% reduction in scope 1 and 2 carbon emissions from 2005/6 to 2020/21 NTU is currently completing actions from

  16. STRATEGIES AND TECHNOLOGY FOR MANAGING HIGH-CARBON ASH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Hurt; Eric Suuberg; John Veranth; Xu Chen; Indrek Kulaots

    2004-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of the present project was to identify and assess strategies and solutions for the management of industry problems related to carbon in ash. Specific issues addressed included: (1) the effect of parent fuel selection on ash properties and adsorptivity, including a first ever examination of the air entrainment behavior of ashes from alternative (non-coal) fuels; (2) the effect of various low-NOx firing modes on ash properties and adsorptivity based on pilot-plant studies; and (3) the kinetics and mechanism of ash ozonation. This laboratory data has provided scientific and engineering support and underpinning for parallel process development activities. The development work on the ash ozonation process has now transitioned into a scale-up and commercialization project involving a multi-industry team and scheduled to begin in 2004. This report describes and documents the laboratory and pilot-scale work in the above three areas done at Brown University and the University of Utah during this three-year project.

  17. The private sector's capacity to manage climate risks and finance carbon neutral energy infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Craig A

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation examines the financial aspects of climate change relating to the private sector's capacity to manage climate risks and finance carbon neutral energy infrastructure. The dissertation examines (a) potential ...

  18. Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sub-critical pulverized coal generation, representing thecontaining new pulverized coal generation without CCS. Ofthe operating cost of coal-fired generation without CCS, and

  19. Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sub-critical pulverized coal generation, representing thecontaining new pulverized coal generation without CCS. Ofthe operating cost of coal-fired generation without CCS, and

  20. Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    planning. First, early retirement of a utility’s own coal-would justify the early retirement of their own coal-fired

  1. Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    planning. First, early retirement of a utility’s own coal-would justify the early retirement of their own coal-fired

  2. Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    alternative CO 2 price projections in terms of the levelizedof utilities’ price projections, as well as differences inand high-range CO 2 price projections developed by Synapse

  3. Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    alternative CO 2 price projections in terms of the levelizedof utilities’ price projections, as well as differences inand high-range CO 2 price projections developed by Synapse

  4. Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    translated into electricity price projections based on fuelused to develop electricity price projections for carbondeveloping electricity market price projections and modeling

  5. Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    translated into electricity price projections based on fuelused to develop electricity price projections for carbondeveloping electricity market price projections and modeling

  6. CARBON MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGY CONFERENCE OCTOBER 21-23, 2013 Hilton Alexandria Old Town Alexandria, Virginia Page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    CARBON MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGY CONFERENCE OCTOBER 21-23, 2013· Hilton Alexandria Old Town· Alexandria University Abstract Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) projects are subject to monitoring and verification) on Mt. Simon sandstone (USA) #12;CARBON MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGY CONFERENCE OCTOBER 21-23, 2013· Hilton

  7. Assessment of Brine Management for Geologic Carbon Sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breunig, Hanna M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    water  management  options,  including:  geothermal  energy   extraction,  desalination,  salt  and  mineral   harvesting,  

  8. Lifecycle Management of Relational Records for External Auditing and Regulatory Compliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tompa, Frank

    and implementing complex workflow based constraints, temporal access control constraints, and records retention authorities can demand access to a database system and conduct a thorough forensic analysis of corporate internal and external), who are responsible for verifying that corporate records management practices

  9. Regulatory Issues Affecting Management of Produced Water from Coal Bed Methane Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, John A.

    2003-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the existing national discharge regulations, the ways in which CBM produced water is currently being managed, the current CBM discharge permitting practices, and how these options might change as the volume of produced water increases because of the many new wells being developed.

  10. Impacts of Land Management on Agroecosystem Carbon Fluxes in the Upper Midwest, United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Impacts of Land Management on Agroecosystem Carbon Fluxes in the Upper Midwest, United States Investigators: T.J. Griffis and J.M. Baker Funding Source: United States Department of Energy, Office-soybean rotation systems located in the Upper Midwest. The management strategies will include: 1) Conventional corn

  11. Swansea University Carbon Management Plan 2010 -2020 SUMMARY Swansea University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant, P. W.

    measurement including the global warming potential (GWP) of each of the six greenhouses gases expressed in terms of the Global Warming Potential (GWP) of one unit of carbon dioxide. The six key emissions covered to this the emissions due to burning biologically sequestered carbon (e.g. biomass or biofuels) are also not included

  12. Driving down corporate carbon emissions through sustainable property management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    be more energy- and cost- efficient. These demands impact the property strategy and how it informs portfolios, with buildings being responsible for some 45% of the UK's overall greenhouse gas emissions. The Carbon Trust estimates that 20% energy savings (translating into both cost and carbon reductions

  13. Assistance to Oil and Gas State Agencies and Industry through Continuation of Environmental and Production Data Management and a Water Regulatory Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grunewald, Ben; Arthur, Dan; Langhus, Bruce; Gillespie, Tom; Binder, Ben; Warner, Don; Roberts, Jim; Cox, D.O.

    2002-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This grant project was a major step toward completion of the Risk Based Data Management System (RBDMS) project. Additionally the project addresses the needs identified during the projects initial phases. By implementing this project, the following outcomes were sought: (1) State regulatory agencies implemented more formalized environmental risk management practices as they pertain to the production of oil and gas, and injection via Class II wells. (2) Enhancement of oil and gas production by implementing a management system supporting the saving of abandoned or idle wells located in areas with a relatively low environmental risk of endangering underground sources of drinking water (USDWs) in a particular state. (3) Verification that protection of USDWs is adequate and additional restrictions of requirements are not necessary in areas with a relatively low environmental risk. (4) Standardization of data and information maintained by state regulatory agencies and decrease the regulatory cost burden on producers operating in multiple states, and (5) Development of a system for electronic data transfer among operators and state regulatory agencies and reduction of overall operator reporting burdens.

  14. Pursuing Energy Efficiency as a Hedge against Carbon Regulatory Risks: Current Resource Planning Practices in the West

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    electricity market price projections and modeling the costalthough their high gas price projections were not developeddevelop electricity price projections for carbon regulation

  15. Pursuing Energy Efficiency as a Hedge against Carbon Regulatory Risks: Current Resource Planning Practices in the West

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    developed future carbon price projections based specificallyalternative CO 2 price projections in terms of the levelizedtiming of utilities’ price projections. We benchmark these

  16. Carbon emissions reduction strategies in Africa from improved waste management: A review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Couth, R. [University of KwaZulu-Natal, CRECHE, School of Civil Engineering, Survey and Construction, Durban 4041 (South Africa); Trois, C., E-mail: troisc@ukzn.ac.z [University of KwaZulu-Natal, CRECHE, School of Civil Engineering, Survey and Construction, Durban 4041 (South Africa)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper summarises a literature review into waste management practices across Africa as part of a study to assess methods to reduce carbon emissions. Research shows that the average organic content for urban Municipal Solid Waste in Africa is around 56% and its degradation is a major contributor to greenhouse gas emissions. The paper concludes that the most practical and economic way to manage waste in the majority of urban communities in Africa and therefore reduce carbon emissions is to separate waste at collection points to remove dry recyclables by door to door collection, compost the remaining biogenic carbon waste in windrows, using the maturated compost as a substitute fertilizer and dispose the remaining fossil carbon waste in controlled landfills.

  17. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- National Carbon Co - NY 48

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp - CT 0-01 FUSRAPMonsantoMorseAcmeCarbon Co

  18. Carbon Foam Thermal Management Materials for Electronic Packaging |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof Energy Change RequestFirst Report to the PrimePilot PlantCarbon

  19. AN INTEGRATED MODELING FRAMEWORK FOR CARBON MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anand B. Rao; Edward S. Rubin; Michael B. Berkenpas

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CO{sub 2} capture and storage (CCS) is gaining widespread interest as a potential method to control greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel sources, especially electric power plants. Commercial applications of CO{sub 2} separation and capture technologies are found in a number of industrial process operations worldwide. Many of these capture technologies also are applicable to fossil fuel power plants, although applications to large-scale power generation remain to be demonstrated. This report describes the development of a generalized modeling framework to assess alternative CO{sub 2} capture and storage options in the context of multi-pollutant control requirements for fossil fuel power plants. The focus of the report is on post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture using amine-based absorption systems at pulverized coal-fired plants, which are the most prevalent technology used for power generation today. The modeling framework builds on the previously developed Integrated Environmental Control Model (IECM). The expanded version with carbon sequestration is designated as IECM-cs. The expanded modeling capability also includes natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power plants and integrated coal gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems as well as pulverized coal (PC) plants. This report presents details of the performance and cost models developed for an amine-based CO{sub 2} capture system, representing the baseline of current commercial technology. The key uncertainties and variability in process design, performance and cost parameters which influence the overall cost of carbon mitigation also are characterized. The new performance and cost models for CO{sub 2} capture systems have been integrated into the IECM-cs, along with models to estimate CO{sub 2} transport and storage costs. The CO{sub 2} control system also interacts with other emission control technologies such as flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems for SO{sub 2} control. The integrated model is applied to study the feasibility and cost of carbon capture and sequestration at both new and existing PC plants as well as new NGCC plants. The cost of CO{sub 2} avoidance using amine-based CO{sub 2} capture technology is found to be sensitive to assumptions about the reference plant design and operation, as well as assumptions about the CO{sub 2} capture system design. The case studies also reveal multi-pollutant interactions and potential tradeoffs in the capture of CO{sub 2}, SO{sub 2}, NO{sub 2} and NH{sub 3}. The potential for targeted R&D to reduce the cost of CO{sub 2} capture also is explored using the IECM-cs in conjunction with expert elicitations regarding potential improvements in key performance and cost parameters of amine-based systems. The results indicate that the performance of amine-based CO{sub 2} capture systems can be improved significantly, and the cost of CO{sub 2} capture reduced substantially over the next decade or two, via innovations such as new or improved sorbents with lower regeneration heat requirements, and improvements in power plant heat integration to reduce the (currently large) energy penalty of CO{sub 2} capture. Future work will explore in more detail a broader set of advanced technology options to lower the costs of CO{sub 2} capture and storage. Volume 2 of this report presents a detailed User's Manual for the IECM-cs computer model as a companion to the technical documentation in Volume 1.

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF A CARBON MANAGEMENT GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM (GIS) FOR THE UNITED STATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard J. Herzog

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lab for Energy and Environment (LFEE) at MIT is developing a Geographic Information System (GIS) for carbon management. The GIS will store, integrate, and manipulate information relating to the components of carbon management systems. Additionally, the GIS can be used to interpret and analyze the effect of developing these systems. In the first year of this three year project, we focused on two tasks: (1) specifying the system design--defining in detail the GIS data requirements, the types of analyses that can be conducted, and the forms of output we will produce, as well as designing the computer architecture of the GIS and (2) creating the ''core'' datasets--identifying data sources and converting them into a form accessible by the GIS.

  1. Proceedings of the tenth annual DOE low-level waste management conference: Session 1: Institutional and regulatory issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains eleven papers on various aspects of low-level radioactive waste regulation. Topics include: EPA environmental standards; international exemption principles; the concept of below regulatory concern; envirocare activities in Utah; mixed waste; FUSRAP and the Superfund; and a review of various incentive programs. Individual papers are processed separately for the data base. (TEM)

  2. Technical Report: Investigation of Carbon Cycle Processes within a Managed Landscape: An Ecosystem Manipulation and Isotope Tracer Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffis, Timothy J; Baker, John M; Billmark, Kaycie

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this research is to provide a better scientific understanding of carbon cycle processes within an agricultural landscape characteristic of the Upper Midwest. This project recognizes the need to study processes at multiple spatial and temporal scales to reduce uncertainty in ecosystem and landscape-scale carbon budgets to provide a sound basis for shaping future policy related to carbon management. Specifically, this project has attempted to answer the following questions: 1. Would the use of cover crops result in a shift from carbon neutral to significant carbon gain in corn-soybean rotation ecosystems of the Upper Midwest? 2. Can stable carbon isotope analyses be used to partition ecosystem respiration into its autotrophic and heterotrophic components? 3. Can this partitioning be used to better understand the fate of crop residues to project changes in the soil carbon reservoir? 4. Are agricultural ecosystems of the Upper Midwest carbon neutral, sinks, or sources? Can the proposed measurement and modeling framework help address landscape-scale carbon budget uncertainties and help guide future carbon management policy?

  3. Carbon-Optimal and Carbon-Neutral Supply Chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caro, F.; Corbett, C. J.; Tan, T.; Zuidwijk, R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Li, M. Daskin. 2009. Carbon Footprint and the Management ofThe Importance of Carbon Footprint Estimation Boundaries.Carbon accounting and carbon footprint - more than just

  4. Social marketing, financial, and regulatory mechanisms for adoption of water conservation and stormwater management practices by single-family households

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Youngerman, Zach (Zach Reuben)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the latter half of the nineteenth century, water delivery and stormwater removal have been managed largely by engineering staff at water utilities, municipal departments and multi-jurisdiction authorities. In recent ...

  5. Regulatory Project Manager for Salina and Permian Basins for the NWTS (National Waste Terminal Storage) Program: Final techical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The identification of candidate sites for nuclear waste repositories involves geological and environmental studies to characterize potential sites. These investigations include the collection and analysis of detailed geological and environmental data and comparison of the data against predetermined site performance criteria, i.e., geologic characteristics, environmental protection, and socioeconomic impacts. The work summarized in this final technical report encompasses mainly ''environmental characterization'' studies in the Permian Basin in the Texas Panhandle during the period of 1977-86; in the earlier phase of the contract, regional environmental work was also done in the Salina Basin (1977-79) and certain licensing support activities and safety analyses were conducted (1977-82). Considerable regulatory support work was also performed during 1986. 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Regulating carbon dioxide capture and storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Figueiredo, Mark A.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This essay examines several legal, regulatory and organizational issues that need to be addressed to create an effective regulatory regime for carbon dioxide capture and storage ("CCS"). Legal, regulatory, and organizational ...

  7. Regulatory and Permitting Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry Myer

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB), Terralog Technologies USA, Inc., reviewed current state and federal regulations related to carbon dioxide capture and storage within geologic formations and enhanced carbon uptake in terrestrial ecosystems. We have evaluated and summarized the current and possible future permitting requirements for the six states that comprise the West Coast Regional Partnership. Four options exist for CO{sub 2} injection into appropriate geologic formations, including storage in: (1) oil and gas reservoirs, (2) saline formations, (3) unmineable coal beds, and (4) salt caverns. Terrestrial CO{sub 2} sequestration involves improved carbon conservation management (e.g. reduction of deforestation), carbon substitution (e.g., substitution for fossil fuel-based products, energy conservation through urban forestry, biomass for energy generation), and improved carbon storage management (e.g., expanding the storage of carbon in forest ecosystems). The primary terrestrial options for the West Coast Region include: (1) reforestation of under-producing lands (including streamside forest restoration), (2) improved forest management, (3) forest protection and conservation, and (4) fuel treatments for the reduction of risk of uncharacteristically severe fires (potentially with associated biomass energy generation). The permits and/or contracts required for any land-use changes/disturbances and biomass energy generation that may occur as part of WESTCARB's activities have been summarized for each state.

  8. Reading the Tea Leaves: How Utilities in the West Are Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in their Resource Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    expiring geothermal, small hydro, and biomass contracts).Plan Needs Geothermal Small Hydro or Upgrade Biomass Windwith geothermal, and four with small hydro or upgrades to

  9. Reading the Tea Leaves: How Utilities in the West Are Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in their Resource Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    containing new pulverized coal generation without CCS. Ofwith any coal-fired generation. Of these utilities, four areor contracting with coal-fired generation lacking CCS.

  10. Reading the Tea Leaves: How Utilities in the West Are Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in their Resource Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2007 Electricity Outlook. EIA, 2003, Analysis of S. 139, theAdministration, SR/OIAF/2003-02. EIA, 2007a, Energy MarketAdministration, SR/OIAF/2007- EIA, 2007b, Energy Market and

  11. Reading the Tea Leaves: How Utilities in the West Are Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in their Resource Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with New Renewable Resources 18Portfolios with New Renewable Resources No. of Candidateportfolios with new renewable resources comprising, at most,

  12. Reading the Tea Leaves: How Utilities in the West Are Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in their Resource Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    study to develop natural gas price forecasts for each of itsits base-case natural gas price forecast. PSCo found that,develop separate natural gas price forecasts for each of its

  13. Reading the Tea Leaves: How Utilities in the West Are Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in their Resource Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of its Boardman coal plant above the cost of a new CCGT. PGEoperating cost of a super-critical coal-plant. Only threecost-effectiveness of retiring existing convention coal plants

  14. Reading the Tea Leaves: How Utilities in the West Are Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in their Resource Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    lacking CCS, clearly have the potential to significantlyperceived potential to retrofit IGCC plants with CCS at a

  15. Reading the Tea Leaves: How Utilities in the West Are Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in their Resource Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plan Needs Geothermal Small Hydro or Upgrade Biomass Windwith geothermal, and four with small hydro or upgrades toexpiring geothermal, small hydro, and biomass contracts).

  16. Reading the Tea Leaves: How Utilities in the West Are Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in their Resource Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    develops its electricity price projection. Among our sample,forecast. Unlike electricity price projections developedcalculating electricity market prices from projections of

  17. Regulatory facility guide for Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, S.S.; Bock, R.E.; Francis, M.W.; Gove, R.M.; Johnson, P.E.; Kovac, F.M.; Mynatt, J.O. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Rymer, A.C. [Transportation Consulting Services, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1994-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Regulatory Facility Guide (RFG) has been developed for the DOE and contractor facilities located in the state of Ohio. It provides detailed compilations of international, federal, and state transportation-related regulations applicable to shipments originating at destined to Ohio facilities. This RFG was developed as an additional resource tool for use both by traffic managers who must ensure that transportation operations are in full compliance with all applicable regulatory requirements and by oversight personnel who must verify compliance activities.

  18. COCA: Online Distributed Resource Management for Cost Minimization and Carbon Neutrality in Data Centers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ren, Shaolei

    concerns, data centers have been increasingly pressured to reduce long-term net carbon footprint to zero, i% (compared to state of the art) while resulting in a smaller carbon footprint. Keywords Carbon neutrality of which comes from coal or other carbon-intensive sources that produce huge carbon footprints [2, 29

  19. Regulatory Tools

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Technical s o Freiberg and SondershausenRegulatory

  20. Research Summary Carbon Additionality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the quality assurance of emissions reduction and carbon sequestration activities, but remains a source of muchResearch Summary Carbon Additionality Additionality is widely considered to be a core aspect controversy in national carbon accounting, international regulatory frameworks and carbon markets. A review

  1. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, August 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houlberg, L.M., Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Environmental Regulatory Update Table (August 1991) provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  2. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, September 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  3. Environmental regulatory update table, March 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houlberg, L.; Langston, M.E.; Nikbakht, A.; Salk, M.S.

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  4. Environmental regulatory update table, July 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Environmental Regulatory Update Table (July 1991) provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  5. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, December 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houlbert, L.M.; Langston, M.E. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA)); Nikbakht, A.; Salk, M.S. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  6. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, April 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houlberg, L.; Langston, M.E.; Nikbakht, A.; Salk, M.S.

    1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  7. Effects of afforestation and forest management on soil carbon dynamics and trace gas emissions in a Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis (Bong) Carr.) forest 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zerva, Argyro

    The establishment and intensive management of forests for the production of timber can have significant effects on the soil carbon dynamics. The establishment of forest on organic soils under grasslands may lead to ...

  8. activities international regulatory: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    through active, but not inactive, regulatory links1,2. Thus Dunlop, Mary 4 INTERNAL AUDIT ACTIVITY ANNUAL REPORT Engineering Websites Summary: management, control, and...

  9. Managing the cost of emissions for durable, carbon-containing products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirley, Kevin [Appalachian State University; Marland, Eric [Appalachian State University; Cantrell, Jenna [Appalachian State University; Marland, Gregg [ORNL

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We recognize that carbon-containing products do not decay and release CO2 to the atmosphere instantaneously, but release that carbon over extended periods of time. For an initial production of a stock of carbon-containing product, we can treat the release as a probability distribution covering the time over which that release occurs. The probability distribution that models the carbon release predicts the amount of carbon that is released as a function of time. The use of a probability distribution in accounting for the release of carbon to the atmosphere realizes a fundamental shift from the idea that all carbon-containing products contribute to a single pool that decays in proportion to the size of the stock. Viewing the release of carbon as a continuous probabilistic process introduces some theoretical opportunities not available in the former paradigm by taking advantage of other fields where the use of probability distributions has been prevalent for many decades. In particular, theories developed in the life insurance industry can guide the development of pricing and payment structures for dealing with the costs associated with the oxidation and release of carbon. These costs can arise from a number of proposed policies (cap and trade, carbon tax, social cost of carbon, etc), but in the end they all result in there being a cost to releasing carbon to the atmosphere. If there is a cost to the emitter for CO2 emissions, payment for that cost will depend on both when the emissions actually occur and how payment is made. Here we outline some of the pricing and payment structures that are possible which result from analogous theories in the life insurance industry. This development not only provides useful constructs for valuing sequestered carbon, but highlights additional motivations for employing a probability distribution approach to unify accounting methodologies for stocks of carbon containing products.

  10. CARBON MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES FOR U.S. ELECTRICITY GENERATION CAPACITY: A VINTAGE-BASED APPROACH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahowski, Robert T.; Dooley, James J.

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper examines the stock of fossil-fired power generation capacity in the United States within the context of climate change. At present, there are over 1,337 fossil-fired power generating units of at least 100 MW in capacity, that began operating between the early 1940s and today. Together these units provide some 453 GW of electric power. Launching a national program to accelerate the early retirement of this stock or tearing them down and undertaking near-term brownfield redevelopment with advanced power cycle technologies as a means of addressing their greenhouse gas emissions will not be a sensible option for all of these units. Considering a conservative 40-year operating life, there are over 667 existing fossil-fired power plants, representing a capacity of over 291 GW, that have at least a decades worth of productive life remaining. This paper draws upon specialized tools developed by Battelle to analyze the characteristics of this subset of U.S. power generation assets and explore the relationships between plant type, location, emissions, and vintage. It examines the use of retrofit carbon capture technologies, considering criteria such as the proximity of these power plants to geologic reservoirs, to assess the potential that geologic sequestration of CO2 offers these plants for managing their emissions. The average costs for retrofitting these plants and sequestering their CO2 into nearby geologic reservoirs are presented. A discussion of a set of planned U.S. fossil-fired power projects within this context is also included.

  11. Enhancing the Effectiveness of Carbon Dioxide Flooding by Managing Asphaltene Precipitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deo, Milind D.

    2002-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Objectives of this project was to understand asphaltene precipitation in General and carbon dioxide induced precipitation in particular. To this effect, thermodynamic and kinetic experiments with the Rangely crude oil were conducted and thermodynamic and reservoir models were developed.

  12. Carbon and Greenhouse Gas Dynamics in Annual Grasslands: Effects of Management and Potential for Climate Change Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryals, Rebecca

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    dynamics and potential carbon sequestration by rangelands.G. E. Schuman. 2007. Carbon sequestration and rangelands: ASilver, W.L. in review. Carbon sequestration potential and

  13. Scott M. Kaufman US Project Manager The Carbon Trust Brooklyn, NY January 2009 -present

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lenfest Center for Sustainable Energy, The Earth Institute at Columbia University New York, NY Dec 2007 and direction for research. Crafted strategy for data collection and analysis from waste management partners waste managers to determine efficient collections routing and outreach strategies. Searched for new

  14. Environment, safety, and health regulatory implementation plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    To identify, document, and maintain the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project`s environment, safety, and health (ES&H) regulatory requirements, the US Department of Energy (DOE) UMTRA Project Office tasked the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) to develop a regulatory operating envelope for the UMTRA Project. The system selected for managing the UMTRA regulatory operating envelope data bass is based on the Integrated Project Control/Regulatory Compliance System (IPC/RCS) developed by WASTREN, Inc. (WASTREN, 1993). The IPC/RCS is a tool used for identifying regulatory and institutional requirements and indexing them to hardware, personnel, and program systems on a project. The IPC/RCS will be customized for the UMTRA Project surface remedial action and groundwater restoration programs. The purpose of this plan is to establish the process for implementing and maintaining the UMTRA Project`s regulatory operating envelope, which involves identifying all applicable regulatory and institutional requirements and determining compliance status. The plan describes how the Project will identify ES&H regulatory requirements, analyze applicability to the UMTRA Project, and evaluate UMTRA Project compliance status.

  15. Plans, Updates, Regulatory Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stewardship Environmental Protection Obeying Environmental Laws Individual Permit Documents Individual Permit: Plans, Updates, Regulatory Documents1335769200000Plans...

  16. Enhancing the Effectiveness of Carbon Dioxide Flooding by Managing Asphaltene Precipitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deo, Milind D.

    2002-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was undertaken to understand fundamental aspects of carbon dioxide (CO2) induced asphaltene precipitation. Oil and asphaltene samples from the Rangely field in Colorado were used for most of the project. The project consisted of pure component and high-pressure, thermodynamic experiments, thermodynamic modeling, kinetic experiments and modeling, targeted corefloods and compositional modeling.

  17. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/ REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/ REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW/ FINAL REGULATORY FLEXIBILITY ANALYSIS Area and Regulatory Amendments for Bering Sea Habitat Conservation May 2008 Lead Agency: National Juneau, AK 99802 (907) 586-7228 Abstract: This Environmental Assessment/Regulatory Impact Review

  18. Enhancing the Effectiveness of Carbon Dioxide Flooding by Managing Asphaltene Precipitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deo, M.D.

    2001-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to identify conditions at which carbon dioxide induced precipitation occurred in crude oils. Establishing compositions of the relevant liquid and solid phases was planned. Other goals of the project were to determine if precipitation occurred in cores and to implement thermodynamic and compositional models to examine the phenomenon. Exploring kinetics of precipitation was also one of the project goals. Crude oil from the Rangely Field (eastern Colorado) was used as a prototype.

  19. Carbon Capital: The Political Ecology of Carbon Forestry and Development in Chiapas, Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osborne, Tracey Muttoo

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    B v + B d ) C T = Total carbon B v = biomass contained indevelopment through carbon sequestration: experiences in2000) Rural livelihoods and carbon management, IIED Natural

  20. Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation gives regulatory authority to the Department of Environmental Management to monitor commercial sites for hazardous wastes; fees on waste received at such sites; hearings and...

  1. Environmental regulatory update table, September--October 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Lewis, E.B.; Salk, M.S.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  2. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, January/February 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action. This table is for January/February 1992.

  3. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, January--February 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.; Danford, G.S.; Lewis, E.B.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  4. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, November--December 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Lewis, E.B.; Salk, M.S.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly wit information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  5. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, January--February 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.; Danford, G.S.; Lewis, E.B.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations ad contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  6. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, November--December 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.; Danford, G.S.; Lewis, E.B.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  7. Environmental regulatory update table, July/August 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Bock, R.E.; Salk, M.S.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  8. Environmental regulatory update table: September/October 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Bock, R.E.; Salk, M.S.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  9. Environmental regulatory update table, March--April 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Bock, R.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Health Sciences Research Div.; Salk, M.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  10. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, May--June 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Bock, R.E.; Salk, M.S.

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bimonthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  11. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, July--August 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Lewis, E.B.; Salk, M.S.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  12. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, March/April 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  13. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, September/October 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.; Danford, G.S.; Lewis, E.B.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operation and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  14. Environmental sciences division: Environmental regulatory update table July 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langston, M.E.; Nikbakht, A.; Salk, M.S.

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  15. Managing the Cost, Energy Consumption, and Carbon Footprint of Internet Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bianchini, Ricardo

    or "green" energy. This paper introduces a general, optimization-based framework for enabling multi-data-center services to manage their brown en- ergy consumption and leverage green energy, while respecting their SLAs. "green" or renewable energy.) We argue that placing caps on the brown energy consumption of data centers

  16. Carbon-Optimal and Carbon-Neutral Supply Chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caro, F.; Corbett, C. J.; Tan, T.; Zuidwijk, R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Y. Li, M. Daskin. 2009. Carbon Footprint and the ManagementJ. van Houtum. 2011. E?ect of carbon emission regulations onStreamlined Enterprise Carbon Footprinting. Environmental

  17. Regulatory issues controlling carbon capture and storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Adam (Adam M.), 1978-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate change is increasingly being recognized by governments, industry, the scientific community, and the public as an issue that must be dealt with. Parties are pursuing various strategies to reduce CO? emissions. ...

  18. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW/ FINAL REGULATORY FLEXIBILITY ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW/ FINAL REGULATORY FLEXIBILITY ANALYSIS.0 NEPA REQUIREMENTS: ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS OF THE ALTERNATIVES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 2.1 Environmental Impacts of the Alternatives

  19. Phenylpropanoid related regulatory protein-regulatory region associations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Apuya, Nestor (Culver City, CA); Bobzin, Steven Craig (Malibu, CA); Park, Joon-Hyun (Oak Park, CA); Doukhanina, Elena (Newbury Park, CA)

    2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Materials and methods for identifying lignin regulatory region-regulatory protein associations are disclosed. Materials and methods for modulating lignin accumulation are also disclosed.

  20. Regulatory Promotion of Emergent CCS Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davies, Lincoln; Uchitel, Kirsten; Johnson, David

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite the growing inevitability of climate change and the attendant need for mitigation strategies, carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) has yet to gain much traction in the United States. Recent regulatory proposals by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), limited in scope to new-build power plants, represent the only significant policy initiative intended to mandate diffusion of CCS technology. Phase I of this Project assessed barriers to CCS deployment as prioritized by the CCS community. That research concluded that there were four primary barriers: (1) cost, (2) lack of a carbon price, (3) liability, and (4) lack of a comprehensive regulatory regime. Phase II of this Project, as presented in this Report, assesses potential regulatory models for CCS and examines where those models address the hurdles to diffusing CCS technology identified in Phase I. It concludes (1) that a CCS-specific but flexible standard, such as a technology performance standard or a very particular type of market-based regulation, likely will promote CCS diffusion, and (2) that these policies cannot work alone, but rather, should be combined with other measures, such as liability limits and a comprehensive CCS regulatory regime.

  1. Basic refractory and slag management for petcoke carbon feedstock in gasifiers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwong, Kyei-Sing; Bennett, James P; Nakano, Jinichiro

    2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure provides methods of operating a slagging gasifier using a carbon feedstock having a relatively high V.sub.2O.sub.5 to SiO.sub.2 ratio, such as petcoke. The disclosure generates a combined chemical composition in the feed mixture having less than 25 wt. % SiO.sub.2, greater than 20 wt. % V.sub.2O.sub.5, and greater than 20 wt. % CaO. The method takes advantage of a novel recognition that increased levels of SiO.sub.2 tend to decrease dissolution of the V.sub.2O.sub.3 which forms under the reducing conditions of the gasifier, and utilizes the CaO additive to establish a chemical phase equilibria comprised of lower melting compounds. The method further provides for control based on the presence of Al.sub.2O.sub.3 and FeO, and provides for a total combined chemical composition of greater than about 5 wt. % MgO for use with refractory linings comprised of MgO based refractory brick.

  2. Research Report Forests and carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Report Forests and carbon: valuation, discounting and risk management #12;#12;Forests and carbon: valuation, discounting and risk management Gregory Valatin Forestry Commission: Edinburgh-0-85538-815-7 Valatin, G. (2010). Forests and carbon: valuation, discounting and risk management. Forestry Commission

  3. Proceedings of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission fifteenth water reactor safety information meeting: Volume 6, Decontamination and decommissioning, accident management, TMI-2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, A. J. [comp.

    1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This six-volume report contains 140 papers out of the 164 that were presented at the Fifteenth Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the National Bureau of Standards, Gaithersburg, Maryland, during the week of October 26-29, 1987. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. This report, Volume 6, discusses decontamination and decommissioning, accident management, and the Three Mile Island-2 reactor accident. Thirteen reports have been cataloged separately.

  4. Independent Verification and Validation Of SAPHIRE 8 Software Configuration Management Plan Project Number: N6423 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kent Norris

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) role in the evaluation of the SAPHIRE configuration management is to assess the activities that results in the process of identifying and defining the baselines associated with the SAPHIRE software product; controlling the changes to baselines and release of baselines throughout the life cycle; recording and reporting the status of baselines and the proposed and actual changes to the baselines; and verifying the correctness and completeness of baselines.. The IV&V team began this endeavor after the software engineering and software development of SAPHIRE had already been in production.

  5. Independent Verification and Validation Of SAPHIRE 8 Software Configuration Management Plan Project Number: N6423 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kent Norris

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) role in the evaluation of the SAPHIRE configuration management is to assess the activities that results in the process of identifying and defining the baselines associated with the SAPHIRE software product; controlling the changes to baselines and release of baselines throughout the life cycle; recording and reporting the status of baselines and the proposed and actual changes to the baselines; and verifying the correctness and completeness of baselines.. The IV&V team began this endeavor after the software engineering and software development of SAPHIRE had already been in production.

  6. atmospheric carbon dioxide: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the 21st century (IPCC 2001a). Management of vegetation and soils for terrestrial carbon sequestration or penalties associated with CO2 management. For terrestrial carbon...

  7. REGULATORY STATUS: AOC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    184 UNIT NAME: Concrete Rubble pile 129) REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Outside plant security south of C-611 Water Treatment Plant. Estimated to be less than 5 cubic feet....

  8. Best Environmental Management Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Best Environmental Management Practices Farm Animal Production Comprehensive Nutrient Management with regulatory guidelines by addressing items such as manure management, field crop nutrients, and storm water What is a CNMP? A Comprehensive Nutrient Management Plan (CNMP) is a total planning tool that details

  9. Essays in Regulatory Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guerrero, Santiago

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, 58(2) (Journal of Environmental Economics and Management (2009), inevidence. ” Eastern Economics Journal, 23 (3) (1997), 253-

  10. RMOTC - Testing - Carbon Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    several years of site characterization and baseline studies necessary to advance CO2 injection tests that could yield important EOR and storage findings. Numerous...

  11. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, May/June 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Lewis, E.B.; Salk, M.S.

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains a bi-monthly update of environmental regulatory activity that is of interest to the Department of Energy. It is provided to DOE operations and contractor staff to assist and support environmental management programs by tracking regulatory developments. Any proposed regulation that raises significant issues for any DOE operation should be reported to the Office of Environmental Guidance (EH-23) as soon as possible so that the Department can make its concerns known to the appropriate regulatory agency. Items of particular interest to EH-23 are indicated by a shading of the RU{number sign}.

  12. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, May/June 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Lewis, E.B.; Salk, M.S.

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains a bi-monthly update of environmental regulatory activity that is of interest to the Department of Energy. It is provided to DOE operations and contractor staff to assist and support environmental management programs by tracking regulatory developments. Any proposed regulation that raises significant issues for any DOE operation should be reported to the Office of Environmental Guidance (EH-23) as soon as possible so that the Department can make its concerns known to the appropriate regulatory agency. Items of particular interest to EH-23 are indicated by a shading of the RU{number_sign}.

  13. Carbon and Greenhouse Gas Dynamics in Annual Grasslands: Effects of Management and Potential for Climate Change Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryals, Rebecca

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2004. Carbon dioxide and water vapor exchange in a warmProgram. Land, Air, and Water Resources Paper 100028, Davis,effects. Journal of Soil and Water Conservation 62:77-85.

  14. 6 Monthly Report on MMU Carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monthly Report on MMU Carbon Management Plan #12;2009/10 Emissions MMU Carbon Footprint Trajectory Project Footprint MMU Actual Carbon Footprint Projects that Reduced the 2009/10 CO2 Footprint #12;2010/11 Emissions6 Monthly Report on MMU Carbon Management Plan June 2011 let's make a sustainable planet #12

  15. Regulatory strategies for remediation of contaminated sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zar, H. [Environmental Protection Agency, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of federal and state laws may be used to obtain remediation of contaminated sediments in the US. Until recently, the most prominent approaches at the federal level were the use of Superfund authorities for sites on the National priority List and navigational dredging activity by the Corps of Engineers. However, with the increasing concern about contaminated sediments, regional offices of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state agencies have begun to use a greater variety of regulatory approaches, both individually and in combination. These efforts have been particularly evident in the Great Lakes and are now being extended nationwide, as embodied in the EPA`s Contaminated Sediment Management Strategy. This paper will describe some of the regulatory approaches being applied, case examples in the Great Lakes area, and the expected directions of these efforts, as embodied in the national strategy.

  16. School of Animal, Rural and Environmental Sciences Management of carbon budgets for severely eroded upland blanket peat bogs impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Paul

    upland blanket peat bogs ­ impacts of restoration Blanket bog is an important carbon sink and an Annex 1 Habitat priority under the EU Habitats Directive, but in the Peak District National Park much suffers peat by Natural England as an important site for studies of vegetation history and peat erosion in the Pennines

  17. Carbon Sequestration Advisory Committee (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under this statute, the Director of Natural Resources will document and quantify carbon sequestration and greenhouse emissions reductions associated with agricultural practices, management systems,...

  18. MOWII Webinar: Wind Development Cultural Resource Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    During the planning stages, wind energy development can be affected by the regulatory process relative to cultural resource management issues. Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act ...

  19. CARBON-CARBON COMPOSITE ALLCOMP Carbon-Carbon Composite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    materials. MATERIALS AND DESIRED DATA Carbon-Carbon Composites(T300 & SWB): Crush Resistance, Bend StrengthCARBON-CARBON COMPOSITE ALLCOMP Carbon-Carbon Composite · C-C supplied in two forms · T300: C strength 4340 steel, carbon-carbon composite, and Carbon-Silicon Carbide composite were tested to examine

  20. MIDWEST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP (MRCSP) MANAGING CLIMATE CHANGE AND SECURING A FUTURE FOR THE MIDWEST'S INDUSTRIAL BASE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Ball; Robert Burns; Judith Bradbury; Bob Dahowski; Casie Davidson; James Dooley; Neeraj Gupta; Rattan Lal; Larry Wickstrom

    2005-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the third semiannual report for Phase I of the Midwest Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP). The project consists of nine tasks to be conducted over a two-year period that started in October 2003. The makeup of the MRCSP and objectives are described. Progress on each of the active Tasks is also described and where possible, for those Tasks at some point of completion, a summary of results is presented.

  1. Biomass Chronosequences of United States Forests: Implications for Carbon Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lichstein, Jeremy W.

    Management and Carbon Sequestration Forests account for a large fraction of the carbon stored in global soils for forest management aimed at carbon sequestration is controversial. On the one hand, logging diminishes of succession (Peet 1981, 1992; Shugart 1984). In the context of forest management aimed at carbon sequestration

  2. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW/ FINAL REGULATORY FLEXIBILITY ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW/ FINAL REGULATORY FLEXIBILITY ANALYSIS Amendment and Need The purpose of the non-AFA crab sideboard limits was to prevent vessels with crab QS from paper of all GOA sideboards for non-American Fisheries Act (AFA) crab vessels. In April 2007

  3. Essays on Environmental Regulatory Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobson, Sarah

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    R. S. (2008). The Social Cost of Carbon: Trends, Outliersestimates of the social cost of carbon in climate changehowever, put the mean social cost of carbon in 1995 dollars

  4. Carbon Capture Pilots (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Support for the Carbon Management Research Group (CMRG), a public/private partnership consisting of most of the Commonwealth’s utilities, the Electric Power Research Institute, the Center for...

  5. Air Quality: Air Pollutants, SLAC Emissions Sources, and Regulatory Reference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    Air Quality: Air Pollutants, SLAC Emissions Sources, and Regulatory Reference Department: Chemical and General Safety Program: Air Quality Owner: Program Manager Authority: ES&H Manual, Chapter 30, Air Quality1 SLAC's air emissions are regulated through a federally mandated site-wide permit as well

  6. Regulatory Streamlining and Improvement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark A. Carl

    2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) engaged in numerous projects outlined under the scope of work discussed in the United States Department of Energy (DOE) grant number DE-FC26-04NT15456 awarded to the IOGCC. Numerous projects were completed that were extremely valuable to state oil and gas agencies as a result of work performed utilizing resources provided by the grant. There are numerous areas in which state agencies still need assistance. This additional assistance will need to be addressed under future scopes of work submitted annually to DOE's Project Officer for this grant. This report discusses the progress of the projects outlined under the grant scope of work for the 2005-2006 areas of interest, which are as follows: Area of Interest No. 1--Regulatory Streamlining and Improvement: This area of interest continues to support IOGCC's regulatory streamlining efforts that include the identification and elimination of unnecessary duplications of efforts between and among state and federal programs dealing with exploration and production on public lands. Area of Interest No. 2--Technology: This area of interest seeks to improve efficiency in states through the identification of technologies that can reduce costs. Area of Interest No. 3--Training and Education: This area of interest is vital to upgrading the skills of regulators and industry alike. Within the National Energy Policy, there are many appropriate training and education opportunities. Education was strongly endorsed by the President's National Energy Policy Development group. Acting through the governors offices, states are very effective conduits for the dissemination of energy education information. While the IOGCC favors the development of a comprehensive, long-term energy education plan, states are also supportive of immediate action on important concerns, such as energy prices, availability and conservation. Area of Interest No. 4--Resource Assessment and Development: This area of interest relates directly to helping maximize production of domestic oil and natural gas resources, including areas that are under explored or have not been adequately defined.

  7. ash aqueous carbonation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    carbon content, specific surface area Aydilek, Ahmet 3 Issues with the Use of Fly Ash for Carbon Sequestration A.V. Palumbo1* Environmental Management and Restoration Websites...

  8. atmospheric carbon exchange: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    carbon, little research has examined the direct effects of forest management practices on carbon sequestration. At the Howland Forest in Maine, USA, we are using eddy 19 Analytical...

  9. 3, 409447, 2006 Modeling carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    BGD 3, 409­447, 2006 Modeling carbon dynamics in farmland of China F. Zhang et al. Title Page impacts of management alternatives on soil carbon storage of farmland in Northwest China F. Zhang1,3 , C-term losses of soil organic carbon (SOC) have been observed in many agricul- ture lands in Northwest China

  10. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON AUTOMATION SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING, VOL. 10, NO. 1, JANUARY 2013 99 Carbon Footprint and the Management of Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjaafar, Saifallah

    , traditional models can be modified to support decision-making that accounts for both cost and carbon footprint initiatives to reduce their carbon footprint. It is the conventional thinking that such initiatives.2203304 Index Terms--Carbon emissions, carbon footprint, climate con- trol, environmental policy, operations

  11. Analysis of transcriptional regulatory circuitry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rinaldi, Nicola J., 1974-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research in this thesis has focused on the analysis of data from two types of microarray technologies with the goal of improving understanding of transcriptional regulatory circuitry in yeast. These microarray technologies, ...

  12. Regulatory Requirements for Cogeneration Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curry, K. A., Jr.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for cogeneration, therefore, the discussion will be limited to those portions of each act that affect cogenerators. Since the original cogeneration legislation was passed in 1978 and implemented by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) in 1980... major pieces of legislation that impact cogeneration as well as an outline of the major provisions obtain ed in the Department of Energy Federal Energy Regulatory Commission final rule implementing Section 201 and Section 210 of PURPA. Public Uti...

  13. Regulatory Requirements | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Technical s o Freiberg and SondershausenRegulatory DriversRegulatory

  14. A carbon sensitive supply chain network problem with green procurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simchi-Levi, David

    Faced with growing concerns over the environmental impact of human activities and increasing regulatory pressure, companies are beginning to recognize the importance of greening their supply chains by minimizing carbon ...

  15. CDIAC -WHPO/CCHDO Data Management Plan for CTD/Hydrographic/CO2/Tracer Data for the Global Ocean Carbon and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbon and Repeat Hydrography Program Alex Kozyr Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Environmental://cdiac.esd.ornl.gov/oceans/home.html James H. Swift WOCE Hydrographic Program Office (CLIVAR and Carbon Hydrographic Data Office) UCSD oceanographic research depends on the availability and clarity of existing data. Two data offices in the US deal

  16. Agricultural Soil Carbon Sequestration Offset Programs: Strengths, Difficulties, and Suggestions for Their Potential Use in AB 32's Cap and Trade Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernadett, Lauren

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    harms involved in agricultural soil carbon sequestration.land-management/soil-carbon- sequestration/en/ (last visitedet al. , Soil Carbon Sequestration – Fundamentals , O HIO S

  17. SOUTHWEST REGIONAL PARTNERSHIP FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian McPherson

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Southwest Partnership Region includes five states (Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Utah) and contiguous areas from three adjacent states (west Texas, south Wyoming, and west Kansas). This energy-rich region exhibits some of the largest growth rates in the nation, and it contains two major CO{sub 2} pipeline networks that presently tap natural subsurface CO{sub 2} reservoirs for enhanced oil recovery at a rate of 30 million tons per year. The ten largest coal-fired power plants in the region produce 50% (140 million tons CO{sub 2}/y) of the total CO{sub 2} from power-plant fossil fuel combustion, with power plant emissions close to half the total CO{sub 2} emissions. The Southwest Regional Partnership comprises a large, diverse group of expert organizations and individuals specializing in carbon sequestration science and engineering, as well as public policy and outreach. These partners include 21 state government agencies and universities, the five major electric utility industries, seven oil, gas and coal companies, three federal agencies, the Navajo Nation, several NGOs including the Western Governors Association, and data sharing agreements with four other surrounding states. The Partnership is developing action plans for possible Phase II carbon sequestration pilot tests in the region, as well as the non-technical aspects necessary for developing and carrying out these pilot tests. The establishment of a website network to facilitate data storage and information sharing, decision-making, and future management of carbon sequestration in the region is a priority. The Southwest Partnership's approach includes (1) dissemination of existing regulatory/permitting requirements, (2) assessing and initiating public acceptance of possible sequestration approaches, and (3) evaluation and ranking of the most appropriate sequestration technologies for capture and storage of CO{sub 2} in the Southwest Region. The Partnership will also identify potential gaps in monitoring and verification approaches needed to validate long-term storage efforts.

  18. Threat Insight Quarterly Regulatory Compliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X-Force ® Threat Insight Quarterly Regulatory Compliance www.iss.netwww.iss.net October 2006 #12 Risk Index ..............................................11 Future X-Force Threat Insight Quarterly Internet Security Systems X-Force® Threat Insight Quarterly > October 2006 ©2006 Internet Security Systems

  19. UNITED STATES NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UNITED STATES NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION OFFICE OF NUCLEAR MATERIAL SAFETY AND SAFEGUARDS ON RADIATION THERAPY OVEREXPOSURES IN PANAMA Addressees All medical licensees. Purpose The U.S. Nuclear persons in your institution who are involved with radiation therapy should review this notice

  20. State Regulatory Oversight of Geothermal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    State Regulatory Oversight of Geothermal Heat Pump Installations: 2012 Kevin McCray Executive of this project was to update previous research accomplished by the Geothermal Heat Pump Consortium (GHPC of ground-source heat pump (GSHP) systems. The work was to provide insight into existing and anticipated

  1. State Regulatory Oversight of Geothermal Heat Pump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    State Regulatory Oversight of Geothermal Heat Pump Installa:ons: 2012 & 2009 Kevin McCray, Execu:ve Director #12;2009 #12;Sponsors ·The Geothermal Hea requested geothermal hea:ng and cooling regulatory data. · An email containing

  2. Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise: Output

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation inOpen EnergyCallawayCapara Energia S A

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: Carbon Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the rest of the world, that number approaches 70 percent. While we can accelerate a transition to cleaner, "greener" energy by curtailing the construction of new coal-fired...

  4. Identification and Characterization of Prokaryotic Regulatory Networks: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary D Stormo

    2012-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We have completed our characterization of both the transcriptional regulatory network and post-transcriptional regulatory motifs in Shewanella.

  5. Fact Sheet: DOE/National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissione...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DOENational Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners Natural Gas Infrastructure Modernization Partnership Fact Sheet: DOENational Association of Regulatory Utility...

  6. Comprehensive Irrigation Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, K.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ? Commoditized relationships ? Disconnect with conservation investments & sustainable water savings ? High turnover rates among property managers and landscape contractors ? Economic pressures on operating expense to maintain system integrity Result... for conserving water ? Irrigation manufactures disputed claims regarding documentable savings ? Irrigation professionals blamed for excessive application ? Regulatory agencies not accountable ? Water utilities imposing restrictions & blaming landscapes...

  7. Public resource allocation for programs aimed at managing woody plants on the Edwards Plateau: water yield, wildlife habitat, and carbon sequestration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Amber Marie

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Edwards Plateau is the drainage area for the Edwards Aquifer, which provides water to over 2.2 million people. The plateau also provides other ecosystem services, such as wildlife habitat and the sequestration of atmospheric carbon dioxide...

  8. Public resource allocation for programs aimed at managing woody plants on the Edwards Plateau: water yield, wildlife habitat, and carbon sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Amber Marie

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Edwards Plateau is the drainage area for the Edwards Aquifer, which provides water to over 2.2 million people. The plateau also provides other ecosystem services, such as wildlife habitat and the sequestration of atmospheric carbon dioxide...

  9. Regulating Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage 07-003 April 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Regulating Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage by 07-003 April 2007 M.A. de Figueiredo, H.J. Herzog, P.L. Joskow, K.A. Oye, and D.M. Reiner #12;#12;Regulating Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage M.A. de to be addressed to create an effective regulatory regime for carbon dioxide capture and storage ("CCS"). Legal

  10. WESTCARB Carbon Atlas

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (known as WESTCARB) was established in Fall 2003. It is one of seven research partnerships co-funded by DOE to characterize regional carbon sequestration opportunities and conduct pilot-scale validation tests. The California Energy Commission manages WESTCARB and is a major co-funder. WESTCARB is characterizing the extent and capacity of geologic formations capable of storing CO2, known as sinks. Results are entered into a geographic information system (GIS) database, along with the location of major CO2-emitting point sources in each of the six WESTCARB states, enabling researchers and the public to gauge the proximity of candidate CO2 storage sites to emission sources and the feasibility of linking them via pipelines. Specifically, the WESTCARB GIS database (also known as the carbon atlas) stores layers of geologic information about potential underground storage sites, such as porosity and nearby fault-lines and aquifers. Researchers use these data, along with interpreted geophysical data and available oil and gas well logs to estimate the region's potential geologic storage capacity. The database also depicts existing pipeline routes and rights-of-way and lands that could be off-limits, which can aid the development of a regional carbon management strategy. The WESTCARB Carbon Atlas, which is accessible to the public, provides a resource for public discourse on practical solutions for regional CO2 management. A key WESTCARB partner, the Utah Automated Geographic Reference Center, has developed data serving procedures to enable the WESTCARB Carbon Atlas to be integrated with those from other regional partnerships, thereby supporting the U.S. Department of Energy's national carbon atlas, NATCARB

  11. State financial and regulatory incentives: Return of the power?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, H.H. II; Shirley, L.E. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). North Carolina Solar Center

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Database of State Incentives for Renewable Energy (DSIRE) is an ongoing project of the Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC), and is managed by the North Carolina Solar Center with funding from the Office of Utility Technologies, US Department of Energy. This database serves as the nation`s one-stop source of information on the status of regulatory and financial incentives for renewable energy that are provided by state governments in the states and territories. Information on existing incentives is provided to industry, government officials, utilities, regulatory officials and the public through written reports, a world wide web site, and a database application on computer diskette. For additional information on DSIRE, contact the N.C. Solar Center: (919) 515-3480; fax: (919) 515-5778; email: ncsun{at}ncsu.edu; or http://www/ncsc.ncsu.edu/dsire.htm.

  12. Nuclear regulatory legislation, 104th Congress. Volume 2, No. 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the second of two volumes compiling statutes and material pertaining to nuclear regulatory legislation through the 104th Congress, 2nd Session. It is intended for use as a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) internal resource document. Legislative information reproduced in this document includes portions of the Paperwork Reduction Act, various acts pertaining to low-level radioactive waste, the Clean Air Act, the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, the National Environmental Policy Act, the Hazardous Materials Transportation Act, the West Valley Demonstration Project Act, Nuclear Non-Proliferation and Export Licensing Statutes, and selected treaties, agreements, and executive orders. Other information provided pertains to Commissioner tenure, NRC appropriations, the Chief Financial Officers Act, information technology management reform, and Federal civil penalties.

  13. Carbon Smackdown: Carbon Capture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Jeffrey Long

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this July 9, 2010 Berkeley Lab summer lecture, Lab scientists Jeff Long of the Materials Sciences and Nancy Brown of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division discuss their efforts to fight climate change by capturing carbon from the flue gas of power plants, as well as directly from the air

  14. Economic Viability of Dynamic Spectrum Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianwei

    providers, and government regulatory bodies. Providing proper economic incentives for everyone involved, proper economic incentives, and timely policy reforms. DSM is a promising solution to this issue. In DSMEconomic Viability of Dynamic Spectrum Management Jianwei Huang Network Communications

  15. Enhanced Performance Assessment System (EPAS) for carbon sequestration.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yifeng; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; McNeish, Jerry A. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Dewers, Thomas A.; Hadgu, Teklu; Jove-Colon, Carlos F.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) is an option to mitigate impacts of atmospheric carbon emission. Numerous factors are important in determining the overall effectiveness of long-term geologic storage of carbon, including leakage rates, volume of storage available, and system costs. Recent efforts have been made to apply an existing probabilistic performance assessment (PA) methodology developed for deep nuclear waste geologic repositories to evaluate the effectiveness of subsurface carbon storage (Viswanathan et al., 2008; Stauffer et al., 2009). However, to address the most pressing management, regulatory, and scientific concerns with subsurface carbon storage (CS), the existing PA methodology and tools must be enhanced and upgraded. For example, in the evaluation of a nuclear waste repository, a PA model is essentially a forward model that samples input parameters and runs multiple realizations to estimate future consequences and determine important parameters driving the system performance. In the CS evaluation, however, a PA model must be able to run both forward and inverse calculations to support optimization of CO{sub 2} injection and real-time site monitoring as an integral part of the system design and operation. The monitoring data must be continually fused into the PA model through model inversion and parameter estimation. Model calculations will in turn guide the design of optimal monitoring and carbon-injection strategies (e.g., in terms of monitoring techniques, locations, and time intervals). Under the support of Laboratory-Directed Research & Development (LDRD), a late-start LDRD project was initiated in June of Fiscal Year 2010 to explore the concept of an enhanced performance assessment system (EPAS) for carbon sequestration and storage. In spite of the tight time constraints, significant progress has been made on the project: (1) Following the general PA methodology, a preliminary Feature, Event, and Process (FEP) analysis was performed for a hypothetical CS system. Through this FEP analysis, relevant scenarios for CO{sub 2} release were defined. (2) A prototype of EPAS was developed by wrapping an existing multi-phase, multi-component reservoir simulator (TOUGH2) with an uncertainty quantification and optimization code (DAKOTA). (3) For demonstration, a probabilistic PA analysis was successfully performed for a hypothetical CS system based on an existing project in a brine-bearing sandstone. The work lays the foundation for the development of a new generation of PA tools for effective management of CS activities. At a top-level, the work supports energy security and climate change/adaptation by furthering the capability to effectively manage proposed carbon capture and sequestration activities (both research and development as well as operational), and it greatly enhances the technical capability to address this national problem. The next phase of the work will include (1) full capability demonstration of the EPAS, especially for data fusion, carbon storage system optimization, and process optimization of CO{sub 2} injection, and (2) application of the EPAS to actual carbon storage systems.

  16. Regulatory Processes | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR -Department of Energyas ofCheniereDepartment ofRegulatory

  17. Comprehensive carbon footprint analysis of the value chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , carbon sequestration) VTT: expertise in sustainability assessment (life cycle analysis, carbon footprint of wood supply 2.Carbon sequestration Managed stand Unmanaged stand photos: Erkki Oksanen/Metla #12;VTT of the results Quality - wood & biomass Biodiversity Carbon - sequestration - footprint Economics - cost

  18. Carbon Storage in Young Growth Coast Redwood Stands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    515 Carbon Storage in Young Growth Coast Redwood Stands Dryw A. Jones1 and Kevin L. O'Hara1 Abstract Carbon sequestration is an emerging forest management objective within California and around the dynamics of carbon sequestration and to accurately measure carbon storage is essential to insure successful

  19. Seamless Transport Policy: Institutional and Regulatory Aspects...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Seamless Transport Policy: Institutional and Regulatory Aspects of Inter-Modal Coordination Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Seamless Transport Policy:...

  20. Other Regulatory Efforts | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Efforts Other Regulatory Efforts In addition to regulating international electricity trade, the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability participates in other...

  1. Mineral Test Hole Regulatory Act (Tennessee)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Mineral Hole Regulatory Act is applicable to any person (individual, corporation, company, association, joint venture, partnership, receiver, trustee, guardian, executor, administrator,...

  2. Federal / State Legislative & Regulatory Changes Required for...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Issues Federal and State Blending Restrictions Action by ASTM NCWM to address higher ethanol blends Federal State Legislative & Regulatory Changes Required for Introduction of...

  3. EAC Recommendations Regarding Emerging and Alternative Regulatory...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Tools to Assist in Analysis (September 2014) EAC Recommendations Regarding Emerging and Alternative Regulatory Models and Modeling Tools to Assist in Analysis (September 2014)...

  4. REGULATORY COOPERATION COUNCIL - WORK PLANNING FORMAT: Natural...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    FORMAT: Natural Gas Use in Transportation REGULATORY COOPERATION COUNCIL - WORK PLANNING FORMAT: Natural Gas Use in Transportation RCC Workplan NGV.PDF More Documents &...

  5. Invitation to Present, Sponsor, and Attend Geologic Carbon Sequestration Site Integrity: Characterization and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniels, Jeffrey J.

    Invitation to Present, Sponsor, and Attend Geologic Carbon Sequestration Site Integrity and long-term sustainability of geologic carbon sequestration sites depends upon the ability on geologic carbon sequestration site monitoring. The management framework and costs will be similar

  6. Techniques of analyzing the impacts of certain electric-utility ratemaking and regulatory-policy concepts. Bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This bibliography provides documentation for use by state public utility commissions and major nonregulated utilities in evaluating the applicability of a wide range of electric utility rate design and regulatory concepts in light of certain regulatory objectives. Part I, Utility Regulatory Objectives, contains 2084 citations on conservation of energy and capital; efficient use of facilities and resources; and equitable rates to electricity consumers. Part II, Rate Design Concepts, contains 1238 citations on time-of-day rates; seasonally-varying rates; cost-of-service rates; interruptible rates (including the accompanying use of load management techniques); declining block rates; and lifeline rates. Part III, Regulatory Concepts, contains 1282 references on restrictions on master metering; procedures for review of automatic adjustment clauses; prohibitions of rate or regulatory discrimination against solar, wind, or other small energy systems; treatment of advertising expenses; and procedures to protect ratepayers from abrupt termination of service.

  7. The Confusing Allure of Combined Heat and Power: The Financial Attraction and Management Challenge of Reducing Energy Spend and Resulting Carbon Emissions Through Onsite Power Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, R.

    —from the perspective of reducing energy spending and energy-related carbon emissions—is combined heat and power ("CHP"), sometimes referred to as cogeneration. However, the results of CHP deployment to date have been mixed—largely because companies do not fully...

  8. Compendium of regulatory requirements governing underground injection of drilling waste.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puder, M. G.; Bryson, B.; Veil, J. A.

    2002-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Large quantities of waste are produced when oil and gas wells are drilled. The two primary types of drilling wastes include used drilling fluids (commonly referred to as muds), which serve a variety of functions when wells are drilled, and drill cuttings (rock particles ground up by the drill bit). Some oil-based and synthetic-based muds are recycled; other such muds, however, and nearly all water-based muds, are disposed of. Numerous methods are employed to manage drilling wastes, including burial of drilling pit contents, land spreading, thermal processes, bioremediation, treatment and reuse, and several types of injection processes. This report provides a comprehensive compendium of the regulatory requirements governing the injection processes used for disposing of drilling wastes; in particular, for a process referred to in this report as slurry injection. The report consists of a narrative discussion of the regulatory requirements and practices for each of the oil- and gas-producing states, a table summarizing the types of injection processes authorized in each state, and an appendix that contains the text of many of the relevant state regulations and policies. The material included in the report was derived primarily from a review of state regulations and from interviews with state oil and gas regulatory officials.

  9. Secure Transportation Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbs, P. W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Secure Transport Management Course (STMC) course provides managers with information related to procedures and equipment used to successfully transport special nuclear material. This workshop outlines these procedures and reinforces the information presented with the aid of numerous practical examples. The course focuses on understanding the regulatory framework for secure transportation of special nuclear materials, identifying the insider and outsider threat(s) to secure transportation, organization of a secure transportation unit, management and supervision of secure transportation units, equipment and facilities required, training and qualification needed.

  10. Treading Lightly Steps Toward Reducing Our Carbon Footprint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Pak Kin

    Treading Lightly Steps Toward Reducing Our Carbon Footprint This is one section of The University reducing the UA's carbon footprint. The Facilities Management recycling and waste department supports long

  11. Bitcoin: a regulatory nightmare to a libertarian dream Internet Policy Review, 3(2).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Bitcoin: a regulatory nightmare to a libertarian dream Internet Policy Review, 3(2). Author and current discussions on the regulation of bitcoin in Europe and beyond. After presenting the potential by a central server, bitcoin is a distributed, worldwide, decentralised cryptocurrency that is managed solely

  12. This section of the FEDERAL REGISTER contains regulatory documents having general

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, David J.

    This section of the FEDERAL REGISTER contains regulatory documents having general applicability by the Superintendent of Documents. Prices of new books are listed in the first FEDERAL REGISTER issue of each week OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET 2 CFR Part 176 Requirements for Implementing Sections 1512, 1605, and 1606

  13. Uranium Watch REGULATORY CONFUSION: FEDERALAND STATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uranium Watch Report REGULATORY CONFUSION: FEDERALAND STATE ENFORCEMENT OF 40 C.F.R. PART 61 SUBPART W INTRODUCTION 1. This Uranium Watch Report, Regulatory Confusion: Federal and State Enforcement at the White Mesa Uranium Mill, San Juan County, Utah. 2. The DAQ, a Division of the Utah Department

  14. Carbon Capture and Storage in the Permian Basin, a Regional Technology Transfer and Training Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rychel, Dwight

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Permian Basin Carbon Capture, Utilization and Storage (CCUS) Training Center was one of seven regional centers formed in 2009 under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 and managed by the Department of Energy. Based in the Permian Basin, it is focused on the utilization of CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) projects for the long term storage of CO2 while producing a domestic oil and revenue stream. It delivers training to students, oil and gas professionals, regulators, environmental and academia through a robust web site, newsletter, tech alerts, webinars, self-paced online courses, one day workshops, and two day high level forums. While course material prominently features all aspects of the capture, transportation and EOR utilization of CO2, the audience focus is represented by its high level forums where selected graduate students with an interest in CCUS interact with Industry experts and in-house workshops for the regulatory community.

  15. Regional Workshop on Opportunities and Priorities for Low Carbon...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in the Asia Pacific Region Inside the Low Carbon Green Growth: Innovations in Green Energy Supply Demand Side Energy Efficiency Solutions: A Low Hanging Fruit Managing the...

  16. availability modulates carbon: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 The Effect of Land Use and Its Management Practices on Plant Nutrient Availability and Carbon Sequestration Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: on soil...

  17. Low Cost Carbon Fiber Research in the ALM Materials Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Carbon Fiber Research in the ALM Materials Program 27 February 2008 C. David (Dave) Warren Field Technical Manager Transportation Composite Materials Research Oak Ridge National...

  18. actinidevi carbonate speciation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Soil Organic Carbon under Varying Landscape Topographic Positions at the Molecular Scale Environmental Management and Restoration Websites Summary: Distribution, Speciation, and...

  19. ammonium carbonate leaching: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PHYSICS Visualizing Preferential Flow Paths using Ammonium Carbonate and a pH Indicator Environmental Management and Restoration Websites Summary: wet-ers of water flow in soil....

  20. ammonium uranyl carbonate: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PHYSICS Visualizing Preferential Flow Paths using Ammonium Carbonate and a pH Indicator Environmental Management and Restoration Websites Summary: wet-ers of water flow in soil....

  1. ammonium uranyl carbonates: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PHYSICS Visualizing Preferential Flow Paths using Ammonium Carbonate and a pH Indicator Environmental Management and Restoration Websites Summary: wet-ers of water flow in soil....

  2. Energy Praises the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Approval of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Praises the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Approval of the First United States Nuclear Plant Site in Over 30 Years Energy Praises the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Approval...

  3. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Input to DOE Request for Information...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Input to DOE Request for Information Smart Grid Implementation Input US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Input to DOE Request for Information Smart...

  4. Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission Increase...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nuclear Regulatory Commission Increase Cooperation to Advance Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission Increase Cooperation to...

  5. Canada-United States Regulatory Cooperation Council Webinar:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Canada-United States Regulatory Cooperation Council Webinar: Proposed Approach for Energy Efficiency Standards Canada-United States Regulatory Cooperation Council Webinar: Proposed...

  6. Changes in Translational Efficiency is a Dominant Regulatory...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Translational Efficiency is a Dominant Regulatory Mechanism in the Environmental Response of Bacteria. Changes in Translational Efficiency is a Dominant Regulatory Mechanism in the...

  7. Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) | Department...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility...

  8. Regulatory analysis technical evaluation handbook. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Handbook is to provide guidance to the regulatory analyst to promote preparation of quality regulatory analysis documents and to implement the policies of the Regulatory Analysis Guidelines of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NUREG/BR-0058 Rev. 2). This Handbook expands upon policy concepts included in the NRC Guidelines and translates the six steps in preparing regulatory analyses into implementable methodologies for the analyst. It provides standardized methods of preparation and presentation of regulatory analyses, with the inclusion of input that will satisfy all backfit requirements and requirements of NRC`s Committee to Review Generic Requirements. Information on the objectives of the safety goal evaluation process and potential data sources for preparing a safety goal evaluation is also included. Consistent application of the methods provided here will result in more directly comparable analyses, thus aiding decision-makers in evaluating and comparing various regulatory actions. The handbook is being issued in loose-leaf format to facilitate revisions. NRC intends to periodically revise the handbook as new and improved guidance, data, and methods become available.

  9. Regulatory Reform to Promote Clean Energy: The Potential of Output-Based Emissions Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, Matthew [Georgia Institute of Technology] [Georgia Institute of Technology; Brown, Dr. Marilyn Ann [Georgia Institute of Technology] [Georgia Institute of Technology; Jackson, Roderick K [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Barriers to industrial energy-efficient technologies hinder their use. A number of EPA analyses and industrial experts have found that the utilization of input-based emissions standards (measured in parts-per-million or pounds/MMBtu) in the Clean Air Act creates a regulatory barrier to the installation and deployment of technologies that emit fewer criteria pollutants and use energy more efficiently. Changing emission management strategies to an output-based emissions standard (measured in tons of pollutant emitted) is a way to ameliorate some of these barriers. Combined heat and power (CHP) is one of the key technologies that would see increased industrial application if the emissions standards were modified. Many states have made this change since the EPA first approved it in 2000, although direction from the Federal government could speed implementation modifications. To analyze the national impact of accelerated state adoption of output-based standards on CHP technologies, this paper uses detailed National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) and spreadsheet analysis illustrating two phased-in adoption scenarios for output-based emissions standards in the industrial sector. Benefit/cost metrics are calculated from a private and public perspective, and also a social perspective that considers the criteria and carbon air pollution emissions. These scenarios are compared to the reference case of AEO 2010 and are quite favorable, with a social benefit-cost ratio of 16.0 for a five-year phase-in scenario. In addition, the appropriateness of the Federal role, applicability, technology readiness, and administrative feasibility are discussed.

  10. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Rocky Flats Regulatory Documents

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111A Lithologic andRECORDDPetition Rocky

  11. Washington Coastal Zone Management Regulatory Handbook | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwide Permit webpageWalthallFacilityVermont:WashakieOpenInformation

  12. Interstate Technology & Regulatory Council (ITRC) Remediation Management of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM Flash2011-12Approvedof Energy Interim ReportComplex Sites: Case

  13. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Integrated Strategy for Spent Fuel Management

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked QuestionsDepartment ofDepartment640 FederalDepartment ofNRC's Integrated Strategy

  14. HANFORD REGULATORY EXPERIENCE REGULATION AT HANFORD A CASE STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HAWKINS AR

    2007-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Hanford has played a pivotal role in the United States' defense for more than 60 years, beginning with the Manhattan Project in the 1940s. During its history, the Hanford Site has had nine reactors producing plutonium for the United States' nuclear weapons program. All the reactors were located next to the Columbia River and all had associated low-level radioactive and hazardous waste releases. Site cleanup, which formally began in 1989 with the signing of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement, involves more than 1,600 waste sites and burial grounds, and the demolition of more than 1,500buildings and structures, Cleanup is scheduled to be complete by 2035. Regulatory oversight of the cleanup is being performed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Washington State Department of Ecology(Ecology) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the Revised Code of Washington, 'Hazardous Waste Management.' Cleanup of the waste sites and demolition of the many buildings and structures generates large volumes of contaminated soil, equipment, demolition debris, and other wastes that must be disposed of in a secure manner to prevent further environmental degradation. From a risk perspective, it is essential the cleanup waste be moved to a disposal facility located well away from the Columbia River. The solution was to construct very large engineered landfill that meets all technical regulatory requirements, on the Hanford Site Central Plateau approximately 10kilometers from the river and 100metersabovegroundwater. This landfill, called the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility or ERDF is a series of cells, each 150x 300 meters wide at the bottom and 20 meters deep. This paper looks at the substantive environmental regulations applied to ERDF, and how the facility is designed to protect the environment and meet regulatory requirements. The paper describes how the U.S. Department of Energy(DOE),EPA, and Ecology interact in its regulation. In addition, the response to a recent $1 million regulatory fine is described to show actual interactions and options in this aspect of the regulatory process. The author acknowledges the significant contributions by Messrs. Clifford Clark and Owen Robertson. Ms. Nancy Williams provided graphics support and Ms. Laurie Kraemer edited the report.

  15. Regulatory Networks Controlling Plant Cold Acclimation or Low Temperature Regulatory Networks Controlling Cold Acclimation in Arabidopsis (2011 JGI User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomashow, Mike

    2011-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Mike Thomashow of Michigan State University gives a presentation on on "Low Temperature Regulatory Networks Controlling Cold Acclimation in Arabidopsis" at the 6th annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011. «

  16. Regulatory Networks Controlling Plant Cold Acclimation or Low Temperature Regulatory Networks Controlling Cold Acclimation in Arabidopsis (2011 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Thomashow, Mike

    2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Mike Thomashow of Michigan State University gives a presentation on on "Low Temperature Regulatory Networks Controlling Cold Acclimation in Arabidopsis" at the 6th annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011. «

  17. Management Plan Management Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plan, Management Plan Page MP­ 1 #12;Management Plan water quality standards, instream flows, privateManagement Plan Management Plan "Management and restoration programs for native salmonids have communities" J. Lichatowich et al. 1998. A Conceptual Foundation for the Management of Native Salmonids

  18. Discriminative Learning of Composite Transcriptional Regulatory Modules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedman, Nir

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 4.2 Methionine metabolism cis-Regulatory complex . . . . . . . . . . 28 4.3 Genome-wide Yeast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 6 Discussion 37 A Calculating the Likelihood's Gradient 39 B Genome-wide Yeast Location Analysis

  19. Reliability and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) Fall 2008 meeting—covers the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) strategic plan, the Federal Power Act (FPA), current energy security posture, and more.

  20. Evolution and statistics of biological regulatory networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandalia, Juhi Kiran, 1979-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, I study the process of evolution of the gene regulatory network in Escherichia coli. First, I characterize the portion of the network that has been documented, and then I simulate growth of the network. In ...

  1. Regulatory roles of endothelial cells in cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franses, Joseph W. (Joseph Wang)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes the biochemical regulatory impact of endothelial cells, the cells that line all blood vessels, in cancer. Our work draws from concepts in vascular repair and tissue engineering and extends the view ...

  2. Natural Gas Regulatory Policy: Current Issues 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watkins, G.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    developments in federal and state regulatory arenas and their impacts on purchasing options. Among the issues discussed will be: 1. Federal Regulation a. Self-implementing transportation b. Service obligation c. Pipeline capacity brokering d. Non...

  3. Regulatory status of transgrafted plants is unclear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haroldsen, Victor M; Paulino, Gabriel; Chi-ham, Cecilia; Bennett, Alan B

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3. Graff GD, Wright BD, Bennett AB, Zilberman D. 2004. Ac-PIPRA, Davis; and A.B. Bennett is Profes- sor, Department ofL. Chi-Ham and Alan B. Bennett T he regulatory implications

  4. Natural Gas Regulatory Policy: Current Issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watkins, G.

    NATURAL GAS REGULATORY roLICY: CURRENT ISSUES G. GAIL WATKINS Railroad Commission of Texas Austin, Texas ABSTRACT Many changes have occurred in recent months in both federal and state natural gas regulation. Those changes have increased... the options of industrial energy consumers for purchasing and moving natural gas. This panel viII discuss important developments in federal and state regulatory arenas and their impacts on purchasing options. Among the issues discussed viII be: 1...

  5. Modeling and control of genetic regulatory networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pal, Ranadip

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    MODELING AND CONTROL OF GENETIC REGULATORY NETWORKS A Dissertation by RANADIP PAL Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY August 2007 Major... Subject: Electrical Engineering MODELING AND CONTROL OF GENETIC REGULATORY NETWORKS A Dissertation by RANADIP PAL Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR...

  6. Human Capital Management Accountability Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order establishes requirements, roles and responsibilities for the Human Capital Management Accountability Program (HCMAP) for human resources programs and personnel and ensures that human capital activities are regulatory and procedurally compliant with Federal statutes and Departmental policies. Does not cancel other directives.

  7. * Milepost Federal Energy Regulatory Commission

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of Bad CholesteroliManage#AskEnergySaver:Energy

  8. Carbon sequestration research and development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reichle, Dave; Houghton, John; Kane, Bob; Ekmann, Jim; and others

    1999-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Predictions of global energy use in the next century suggest a continued increase in carbon emissions and rising concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in the atmosphere unless major changes are made in the way we produce and use energy--in particular, how we manage carbon. For example, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) predicts in its 1995 ''business as usual'' energy scenario that future global emissions of CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere will increase from 7.4 billion tonnes of carbon (GtC) per year in 1997 to approximately 26 GtC/year by 2100. IPCC also projects a doubling of atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration by the middle of next century and growing rates of increase beyond. Although the effects of increased CO{sub 2} levels on global climate are uncertain, many scientists agree that a doubling of atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations could have a variety of serious environmental consequences. The goal of this report is to identify key areas for research and development (R&D) that could lead to an understanding of the potential for future use of carbon sequestration as a major tool for managing carbon emissions. Under the leadership of DOE, researchers from universities, industry, other government agencies, and DOE national laboratories were brought together to develop the technical basis for conceiving a science and technology road map. That effort has resulted in this report, which develops much of the information needed for the road map.

  9. DIVISION S-6--SOIL & WATER MANAGEMENT & CONSERVATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DIVISION S-6--SOIL & WATER MANAGEMENT & CONSERVATION Soil Organic Carbon Sequestration Rates soil column within 20 yr following culti- Carbon sequestration rates, with a change from CT to NT, can in approximately 40 to and returning to the original land cover or other peren- 60 yr. Carbon sequestration rates

  10. Managing Tipping Point Dynamics in Complex Construction Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, David N.

    -9364 2008 134:6 421 CE Database subject headings: Project management; Dynamic models; Simulation models from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission NRC 1982 and the Energy In- formation Administration EIA 1988

  11. Hazardous waste management in the Texas construction industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sprinkle, Donald Lee

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This pilot study reports the statewide, regulatory compliance of general construction contractors in Texas who generated regulated amounts of hazardous waste during 1990, defined by existing state and federal hazardous-waste-management regulations...

  12. The Bureau of Land Management's Well Information System (WIS...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bureau of Land Management's Well Information System (WIS) How-To Guide Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - Guide...

  13. Hazardous waste management in the Texas construction industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sprinkle, Donald Lee

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This pilot study reports the statewide, regulatory compliance of general construction contractors in Texas who generated regulated amounts of hazardous waste during 1990, defined by existing state and federal hazardous-waste-management regulations...

  14. A Knowledge Management Platform for Documentation of Case Reports in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A Knowledge Management Platform for Documentation of Case Reports in Pharmacovigilance Florence systematic reviews are needed, there is little guidance on how systematic documentation of drug adverse documentation of pharmacovigilance case reports for the pharmaceutical industry and regulatory authorities

  15. Carbon Strategy for the Food Industry FAPC Food Process Engineer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    172-1 Carbon Strategy for the Food Industry Tim Bowser FAPC Food Process Engineer FAPC-172 Robert M and Natural Resources Introduction Carbon strategy is a term that refers to a systematic plan of action for managing carbon consumption and emissions related to food manufacturing and distribution activities

  16. Capturing Carbon Will it work to cool the world?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    Capturing Carbon Will it work to cool the world? Speakers: Dr. Malcolm Wilson Chief Executive in Exploration Geophysics Department of Geoscience, University of Calgary Theme Leader for Secure Carbon Storage, Carbon Management Canada Don Wharton Vice-President, Sustainable Development TransAlta Corporation

  17. Coated porous carbon cathodes for lithium ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kercher, Andrew K [ORNL; Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL; Kiggans, Jim [ORNL; Klett, James William [ORNL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coated porous carbon cathodes for automotive lithium batteries are being developed with the goal of overcoming the problems with capacity fade and poor thermal management in conventional polymer-bonded cathodes. The active cathode material (lithium iron phosphate nanoparticles) is carbon-bonded to the porous carbon support material. Cathodes have been developed with high specific energy and power and with good cycling behavior.

  18. ELEMENT C: Management Measures Necessary to Achieve Your Load Reductions,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , public education, ordinances, pet waste programs, erosion control plans. Regulatory Tools as Management · Identify new management opportunities · Identify critical areas in watershed where additional measures1 ELEMENT C: Management Measures Necessary to Achieve Your Load Reductions, Along with the Critical

  19. Environmental Assessment/Regulatory Impact Review/Final Regulatory Flexibility Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environmental Assessment/Regulatory Impact Review/Final Regulatory Flexibility Analysis (EA . . . . . . . . . . . 11 2.0 NEPA REQUIREMENTS: ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS OF THE ALTERNATIVES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 2.1 Environmental Impacts of the Alternatives . . . . . 15 2.2 Whale watching activity in Alaska

  20. Regulatory Endorsement Activities for ASME Nuclear Codes and Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, Raymond A. [Dominion Nuclear Connecticut, Inc. - Dominion Generation (United States)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ASME Board on Nuclear Codes and Standards (BNCS) has formed a Task Group on Regulatory Endorsement (TG-RE) that is currently in discussions with the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to look at suggestions and recommendations that can be used to help with the endorsement of new and revised ASME Nuclear Codes and Standards (NC and S). With the coming of new reactors in the USA in the very near future we need to look at both the regulations and all the ASME NC and S to determine where we need to make changes to support these new plants. At the same time it is important that we maintain our operating plants while addressing ageing management needs of our existing reactors. This is going to take new thinking, time, resources, and money. For all this to take place the regulations and requirements that we use must be clear concise and necessary for safety and to that end both the NRC and ASME are working together to make this happen. Because of the influence that the USA has in the world in dealing with these issues, this paper is written to inform the international nuclear engineering community about the issues and what actions are being addressed under this effort. (author)

  1. Sustainability Considerations forSustainability Considerations for Managing Nutrient Loads to theManaging Nutrient Loads to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Variability and Reliability of Wastewater Treatment Performance Typical Biological Nutrient Removal (BNR), mg and Limits of Wastewater Treatment TechnologyWastewater Treatment Technology 99 1 Ignoring Considerations Wastewater Treatment Water Environment Research Foundation (WERF) "Nutrient Management: Regulatory Approaches

  2. Carbon Fiber

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    McGetrick, Lee

    2014-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Lee McGetrick leads ORNL's effort to produce light, durable carbon fiber at lower cost -- a key to improvements in manufacturing that will produce more fuel-efficient vehicles and other advances.

  3. Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon Sequestration- the process of capturing the CO2 released by the burning of fossil fuels and storing it deep withing the Earth, trapped by a non-porous layer of rock.

  4. Carbon Fiber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGetrick, Lee

    2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Lee McGetrick leads ORNL's effort to produce light, durable carbon fiber at lower cost -- a key to improvements in manufacturing that will produce more fuel-efficient vehicles and other advances.

  5. The Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James J. Dooley; Robert Dahowski; Casie Davidson

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report summarizes the Phase I research conducted by the Midwest regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP). The Phase I effort began in October 2003 and the project period ended on September 31, 2005. The MRCSP is a public/private partnership led by Battelle with the mission of identifying the technical, economic, and social issues associated with implementation of carbon sequestration technologies in its seven state geographic region (Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia) and identifying viable pathways for their deployment. It is one of seven partnerships that together span most of the U.S. and parts of Canada that comprise the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Regional Carbon Sequestration Program led by DOE's national Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The MRCSP Phase I research was carried out under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41981. The total value of Phase I was $3,513,513 of which the DOE share was $2,410,967 or 68.62%. The remainder of the cost share was provided in varying amounts by the rest of the 38 members of MRCSP's Phase I project. The next largest cost sharing participant to DOE in Phase I was the Ohio Coal Development Office within the Ohio Air Quality Development Authority (OCDO). OCDO's contribution was $100,000 and was contributed under Grant Agreement No. CDO/D-02-17. In this report, the MRCSP's research shows that the seven state MRCSP region is a major contributor to the U. S. economy and also to total emissions of CO2, the most significant of the greenhouse gases thought to contribute to global climate change. But, the research has also shown that the region has substantial resources for sequestering carbon, both in deep geological reservoirs (geological sequestration) and through improved agricultural and land management practices (terrestrial sequestration). Geological reservoirs, especially deep saline reservoirs, offer the potential to permanently store CO2 for literally 100s of years even if all the CO2 emissions from the region's large point sources were stored there, an unlikely scenario under any set of national carbon emission mitigation strategies. The terrestrial sequestration opportunities in the region have the biophysical potential to sequester up to 20% of annual emissions from the region's large point sources of CO2. This report describes the assumptions made and methods employed to arrive at the results leading to these conclusions. It also describes the results of analyses of regulatory issues in the region affecting the potential for deployment of sequestration technologies. Finally, it describes the public outreach and education efforts carried out in Phase I including the creation of a web site dedicated to the MRCSP at www.mrcsp.org.

  6. October 2004 / Vol. 54 No. 10 BioScience 895 Rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Post, Wilfred M.

    of the 21st century (IPCC 2001a). Management of vegetation and soils for terrestrial carbon sequestration or penalties associated with CO2 management. For terrestrial carbon sequestration to be useful, it must for evalu- ating all aspects of a carbon sequestration practice. Here we outline a complete and integrated

  7. Low Carbon Fuel Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Dan; Yeh, Sonia

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gas, or even coal with carbon capture and sequestration. Afuels that facilitate carbon capture and sequestration. Forenergy and could capture and sequester carbon emissions.

  8. Capturing carbon | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    carbon Released: October 02, 2011 New technology enables molecular-level insight into carbon sequestration Carbon sequestration is a potential solution for reducing greenhouse...

  9. Carbon supercapacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delnick, F.M.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon supercapacitors are represented as distributed RC networks with transmission line equivalent circuits. At low charge/discharge rates and low frequencies these networks approximate a simple series R{sub ESR}C circuit. The energy efficiency of the supercapacitor is limited by the voltage drop across the ESR. The pore structure of the carbon electrode defines the electrochemically active surface area which in turn establishes the volume specific capacitance of the carbon material. To date, the highest volume specific capacitance reported for a supercapacitor electrode is 220F/cm{sup 3} in aqueous H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (10) and {approximately}60 F/cm{sup 3} in nonaqueous electrolyte (8).

  10. A Comparison of International Regulatory Organizations and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aickelin, Uwe

    the safety regulation and the licensing of new nuclear power plants. The paper considers both design safety great emphasis to safety issues during the licensing process of any new nuclear plant. FurthermoreA Comparison of International Regulatory Organizations and Licensing Procedures for New Nuclear

  11. Carbon microtubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peng, Huisheng (Shanghai, CN); Zhu, Yuntian Theodore (Cary, NC); Peterson, Dean E. (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM)

    2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A carbon microtube comprising a hollow, substantially tubular structure having a porous wall, wherein the microtube has a diameter of from about 10 .mu.m to about 150 .mu.m, and a density of less than 20 mg/cm.sup.3. Also described is a carbon microtube, having a diameter of at least 10 .mu.m and comprising a hollow, substantially tubular structure having a porous wall, wherein the porous wall comprises a plurality of voids, said voids substantially parallel to the length of the microtube, and defined by an inner surface, an outer surface, and a shared surface separating two adjacent voids.

  12. Regulatory Impacts for Renewable Energy Projects on Indian Lands...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Regulatory Impacts for Renewable Energy Projects on Indian Lands Webinar Regulatory Impacts for Renewable Energy Projects on Indian Lands Webinar June 24, 2015 11:00AM to 12:30PM...

  13. Integrative approaches for systematic reconstruction of regulatory circuits in mammals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos Botelho Oliveira Leite, Ana Paula

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The reconstruction of regulatory networks is one of the most challenging tasks in systems biology. Although some models for inferring regulatory networks can make useful predictions about the wiring and mechanisms of ...

  14. How Regulatory Policy Impacts Large Scale Cogeneration Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, A. J. Jr.

    Congress passed the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) in November 1978. It was about two years before the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) which was charged with promulgating rules implementing PURPA, completed this task...

  15. Underground storage tank management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Underground Storage Tank (UST) Management Program at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant was established to locate UST systems in operation at the facility, to ensure that all operating UST systems are free of leaks, and to establish a program for the removal of unnecessary UST systems and upgrade of UST systems that continue to be needed. The program implements an integrated approach to the management of UST systems, with each system evaluated against the same requirements and regulations. A common approach is employed, in accordance with Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) regulations and guidance, when corrective action is mandated. This Management Plan outlines the compliance issues that must be addressed by the UST Management Program, reviews the current UST inventory and compliance approach, and presents the status and planned activities associated with each UST system. The UST Management Plan provides guidance for implementing TDEC regulations and guidelines for petroleum UST systems. (There are no underground radioactive waste UST systems located at Y-12.) The plan is divided into four major sections: (1) regulatory requirements, (2) implementation requirements, (3) Y-12 Plant UST Program inventory sites, and (4) UST waste management practices. These sections describe in detail the applicable regulatory drivers, the UST sites addressed under the Management Program, and the procedures and guidance used for compliance with applicable regulations.

  16. Carbon Storage Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carbon Sequestration Partnership MSU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Montana State University MVA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitoring,...

  17. US Department of Energys Regulatory Negotiations Convening...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    on Commercial Certification for Heating, Ventilating, Air-Conditioning, and Refrigeration Equipment US Department of Energys Regulatory Negotiations Convening on...

  18. Fact Sheet: DOE/National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissione...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Fact Sheet: DOENational Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners Natural Gas Infrastructure Modernization Partnership Summary: Building on many years of productive...

  19. Low Carbon Fuel Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Dan; Yeh, Sonia

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gas, or even coal with carbon capture and sequestration. Afuels that facilitate carbon capture and sequestration. For

  20. Methanation of Carbon Dioxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Daniel Jacob

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cycle plants, possibly with carbon capture and storage (CCS)natural gas plant with carbon capture and storage technology

  1. Methanation of Carbon Dioxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Daniel Jacob

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gas plant with carbon capture and storage technology werewith carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology, to replace

  2. anagin Forests because Carbon Matters: In grating Energy, Products, and Land

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fried, Jeremy S.

    -have the potential 10 increase biomass supply. Unlike metals, concrete, and plastic, forest products store carbon sources. Expanding forest biomass use for biofuels and energy generation will competeanagin Forests because Carbon Matters: In grating Energy, Products, and Land Management Policy

  3. A UPF3-mediated regulatory switch that maintains RNA surveillance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkinson, Miles F.

    A UPF3-mediated regulatory switch that maintains RNA surveillance Wai-Kin Chan1, Angela D Bhalla1RNAs. The regulation of NMD is poorly understood. Here we identify a regulatory mechanism acting on two related UPF (up-frameshift) factors crucial for NMD: UPF3A and UPF3B. This regulatory mechanism, which reduces the level of UPF3A

  4. agricultural management practice: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    areas. Published by Elsevier B.V. Keywords: Carbon Lawrence, Rick L. 7 Best Environmental Management Practices Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Best...

  5. agricultural management practices: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    areas. Published by Elsevier B.V. Keywords: Carbon Lawrence, Rick L. 7 Best Environmental Management Practices Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Best...

  6. Carbon Additionality: Discussion Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbon Additionality: A review Discussion Paper Gregory Valatin November 2009 Forest Research. Voluntary Carbon Standards American Carbon Registry Forest Carbon Project Standard (ACRFCPS) 27 CarbonFix Standard (CFS) 28 Climate, Community and Biodiversity Standard (CCBS) 28 Forest Carbon Standard (FCS) 28

  7. Papers on the nuclear regulatory dilemma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barkenbus, J.N.; Freeman, S.D.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The four papers contained in this report are titled: (1) From Prescriptive to Performance-Based Regulation of Nuclear Power; (2) Nuclear Regulatory Reform: A Technology-Forcing Approach; (3) Improving the Regulation of Nuclear Power; and (4) Science and Its Limits: The Regulators' Dilemma. These four papers investigate issues relating to the long-term regulation of nuclear energy. They were prepared as part of the Institute for Energy Analysis' project on Nuclear Regulation funded by a grant from the Mellon Foundation and a smaller grant by the MacArthur Foundation. Originally this work was to be supplemented by contributions from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and from the Department of Energy. These contributions were not forthcoming, and as a result the scope of our investigations was more restricted than we had originally planned.

  8. Carbon Trading, Carbon Taxes and Social Discounting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiblen, George D

    Carbon Trading, Carbon Taxes and Social Discounting Elisa Belfiori belf0018@umn.edu University of Minnesota Abstract This paper considers the optimal design of policies to carbon emissions in an economy, such as price or quantity controls on the net emissions of carbon, are insufficient to achieve the social

  9. Plant nitrogen regulatory P-PII genes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coruzzi, Gloria M. (New York, NY); Lam, Hon-Ming (Hong Kong, HK); Hsieh, Ming-Hsiun (Woodside, NY)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention generally relates to plant nitrogen regulatory PII gene (hereinafter P-PII gene), a gene involved in regulating plant nitrogen metabolism. The invention provides P-PII nucleotide sequences, expression constructs comprising said nucleotide sequences, and host cells and plants having said constructs and, optionally expressing the P-PII gene from said constructs. The invention also provides substantially pure P-PII proteins. The P-PII nucleotide sequences and constructs of the

  10. Regulatory Framework at LANL.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Technical s o Freiberg and SondershausenRegulatory Drivers In July

  11. Early Regulatory Engagement for Successful Site Remediation: the UK Experience - 13173

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maitland, R.P.; Senior, D. [Office for Nuclear Regulation, Redgrave Court, Liverpool L20 7HS (United Kingdom)] [Office for Nuclear Regulation, Redgrave Court, Liverpool L20 7HS (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Office for Nuclear Regulation (ONR) is an independent safety, security and transport regulator of the UK nuclear industry. ONR regulates all civil nuclear reactor power stations, fuel manufacture, enrichment, spent fuel reprocessing, most defence sites and installations that store and process legacy spent fuel and radioactive waste. The responsibility for funding and strategic direction of decommissioning and radioactive waste management of state owned legacy sites has rested solely with the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) since 2005. A key component of NDA's mandate was to encourage new strategic approaches and innovation to dealing with the UK's waste legacy and which deliver value-for-money to the UK taxpayer. ONR, as an agency of the Health and Safety Executive, is entirely independent of NDA and regulates all prescribed activities on NDA's sites. NDA's competition of site management and closure contracts has attracted significant international interest and the formation of consortia comprised of major British, US, French and Swedish organizations bidding for those contracts. The prominence of US organizations in each of those consortia reflects the scale and breadth of existing waste management and D and D projects in the US. This paper will articulate, in broad terms, the challenges faced by international organizations seeking to employ 'off-the-shelf' technology and D and D techniques, successfully employed elsewhere, into the UK regulatory context. The predominantly 'goal-setting' regulatory framework in the UK does not generally prescribe a minimum standard to which a licensee must adhere. The legal onus on licensees in the UK is to demonstrate, whatever technology is selected, that in its applications, risks are reduced 'So Far As Is Reasonably Practicable' or 'SFAIRP'. By the nature of its role, ONR adopts a conservative approach to regulation; however ONR also recognises that in the decommissioning (and ultimately the site closure) domain, it is often necessary to consider and support novel approaches to achieve the nationally desired end-state. Crucial to successful and compliant operation in this regulatory environment is early and sustained engagement of the contractor with the regulator. There must be a 'no-surprises' culture to engender regulatory confidence early in a project. The paper considers some of the challenges facing international prime and lower tier contractors when undertaking D and D contracts in the UK, and emphasizes the importance of constructive and transparent dialogue with all regulators to sustain confidence at all stages of a major decommissioning project. The paper will also articulate ONR's strategy to increase collaboration with the US Department of Energy in light of increasing UK-US synergy in the area of waste management and to benchmark respective regulatory approaches. (authors)

  12. Plant nitrogen regulatory P-PII polypeptides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coruzzi, Gloria M.; Lam, Hon-Ming; Hsieh, Ming-Hsiun

    2004-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention generally relates to plant nitrogen regulatory PII gene (hereinafter P-PII gene), a gene involved in regulating plant nitrogen metabolism. The invention provides P-PII nucleotide sequences, expression constructs comprising said nucleotide sequences, and host cells and plants having said constructs and, optionally expressing the P-PII gene from said constructs. The invention also provides substantially pure P-PII proteins. The P-PII nucleotide sequences and constructs of the invention may be used to engineer organisms to overexpress wild-type or mutant P-PII regulatory protein. Engineered plants that overexpress or underexpress P-PII regulatory protein may have increased nitrogen assimilation capacity. Engineered organisms may be used to produce P-PII proteins which, in turn, can be used for a variety of purposes including in vitro screening of herbicides. P-PII nucleotide sequences have additional uses as probes for isolating additional genomic clones having the promoters of P-PII gene. P-PII promoters are light- and/or sucrose-inducible and may be advantageously used in genetic engineering of plants.

  13. Low-Cost Carbon-Fiber Integration / Users Facility and Commercializati...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Carbon-Fiber Integration Users Facility And Commercialization of Textile Precursors 27 February 2008 C. David (Dave) Warren Field Technical Manager Transportation Composite...

  14. Harvesting intensity influences the carbon distribution in a northern hardwood ecosystem. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strong, T.F.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies the effects of five cutting methods on soil and vegetative carbon after 40 years of management in a northern hardwood forest in Wisconsin.

  15. Public Review Draft: A Method for Assessing Carbon Stocks, Carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Public Review Draft: A Method for Assessing Carbon Stocks, Carbon Sequestration, and Greenhouse, and Zhu, Zhiliang, 2010, Public review draft; A method for assessing carbon stocks, carbon sequestration

  16. Data Quality Objectives for Regulatory Requirements for Hazardous and Radioactive Air Emissions Sampling and Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MULKEY, C.H.

    1999-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the results of the data quality objective (DQO) process undertaken to define data needs for state and federal requirements associated with toxic, hazardous, and/or radiological air emissions under the jurisdiction of the River Protection Project (RPP). Hereafter, this document is referred to as the Air DQO. The primary drivers for characterization under this DQO are the regulatory requirements pursuant to Washington State regulations, that may require sampling and analysis. The federal regulations concerning air emissions are incorporated into the Washington State regulations. Data needs exist for nonradioactive and radioactive waste constituents and characteristics as identified through the DQO process described in this document. The purpose is to identify current data needs for complying with regulatory drivers for the measurement of air emissions from RPP facilities in support of air permitting. These drivers include best management practices; similar analyses may have more than one regulatory driver. This document should not be used for determining overall compliance with regulations because the regulations are in constant change, and this document may not reflect the latest regulatory requirements. Regulatory requirements are also expected to change as various permits are issued. Data needs require samples for both radionuclides and nonradionuclide analytes of air emissions from tanks and stored waste containers. The collection of data is to support environmental permitting and compliance, not for health and safety issues. This document does not address health or safety regulations or requirements (those of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration or the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health) or continuous emission monitoring systems. This DQO is applicable to all equipment, facilities, and operations under the jurisdiction of RPP that emit or have the potential to emit regulated air pollutants.

  17. Radioactive Waste Management in Central Asia - 12034

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhunussova, Tamara; Sneve, Malgorzata; Liland, Astrid [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (Norway)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After the collapse of the Soviet Union the newly independent states in Central Asia (CA) whose regulatory bodies were set up recently are facing problems with the proper management of radioactive waste and so called 'nuclear legacy' inherited from the past activities. During the former Soviet Union (SU) period, various aspects of nuclear energy use took place in CA republics of Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan. Activities range from peaceful use of energy to nuclear testing for example at the former Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site (SNTS) in Kazakhstan, and uranium mining and milling industries in all four countries. Large amounts of radioactive waste (RW) have been accumulated in Central Asia and are waiting for its safe disposal. In 2008 the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (NRPA), with the support of the Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, has developed bilateral projects that aim to assist the regulatory bodies in Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan (from 2010) to identify and draft relevant regulatory requirements to ensure the protection of the personnel, population and environment during the planning and execution of remedial actions for past practices and radioactive waste management in the CA countries. The participating regulatory authorities included: Kazakhstan Atomic Energy Agency, Kyrgyzstan State Agency on Environmental Protection and Forestry, Nuclear Safety Agency of Tajikistan, and State Inspectorate on Safety in Industry and Mining of Uzbekistan. The scope of the projects is to ensure that activities related to radioactive waste management in both planned and existing exposure situations in CA will be carried out in accordance with the international guidance and recommendations, taking into account the relevant regulatory practice from other countries in this area. In order to understand the problems in the field of radioactive waste management we have analysed the existing regulations through the so called 'Threat assessment' in each CA country which revealed additional problems in the existing regulatory documents beyond those described at the start of our ongoing bilateral projects in Kazakhstan, Kirgizistan Tajikistan and Uzbekistan. (authors)

  18. Management of National Nuclear Power Programs for assured safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connolly, T.J. (ed.)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Topics discussed in this report include: nuclear utility organization; before the Florida Public Service Commission in re: St. Lucie Unit No. 2 cost recovery; nuclear reliability improvement and safety operations; nuclear utility management; training of nuclear facility personnel; US experience in key areas of nuclear safety; the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission - function and process; regulatory considerations of the risk of nuclear power plants; overview of the processes of reliability and risk management; management significance of risk analysis; international and domestic institutional issues for peaceful nuclear uses; the role of the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO); and nuclear safety activities of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

  19. Management effects on labile organic carbon pools 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolodziej, Scott Michael

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    It is well documented that increases in soil organic matter (SOM) improve soil physical properties and increase the overall fertility and sustainability of the soil. Research in SOM storage has recently amplified following ...

  20. Carbon Management and Implementation Plan 1. Background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chittka, Lars

    obligations on climate change the United Kingdom Government has sought to ensure that universities play equates to reducing energy consumption. This report considers the phasing of work on the basis://www.diag.org.uk/ 5 The Energy Consortium is projecting a 15% rise in electricity costs and a 50% rise in gas costs

  1. Management effects on labile organic carbon pools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolodziej, Scott Michael

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    It is well documented that increases in soil organic matter (SOM) improve soil physical properties and increase the overall fertility and sustainability of the soil. Research in SOM storage has recently amplified following the proposal...

  2. Greenstone Carbon Management Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG ContractingGreenOrder JumpIowa:Greenport, New York:Greenspire

  3. U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission accountability report, fiscal year 1995. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is one of six Federal agencies participating in a pilot project to streamline financial management reporting. The goal of this pilot is to consolidate performance-related reporting into a single accountability report. The project, which is being carried out under the guidance of the Chief Financial Officers Council, was undertaken in accordance with the Government Management Reform Act (GMRA) of 1994. The GMRA permits the streamlining of financial management reports in consultation with the appropriate Congressional Committees through a liaison in the US Office of Management and Budget (OMB). The results of the pilot project will determine the method to be used for reporting financial management information for fiscal year (FY) 1996. This report consolidates the information previously reported in the following documents: (1) the NRC`s annual financial statement required by the Chief Financial Officers Act of 1990; (2) the Chairman`s annual report to the President and the Congress, required by the Federal Managers` Financial Integrity Act of 1982; (3) the Chairman`s semiannual report to the Congress on management decisions and final actions on Office of Inspector General audit recommendations, required by the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended. This report also includes performance measures, as required by the Chief Financial Officers Act of 1990.

  4. BRITISH COLUMBIA'S `CARBON NEUTRAL GOVERNMENT' MANDATE INFLUENCE ON INFRASTRUCTURE DECISIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    BRITISH COLUMBIA'S `CARBON NEUTRAL GOVERNMENT' MANDATE ­ INFLUENCE was approved by the University of British Columbia Behavioural Research Ethics Board Management and Environmental Studies) THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA (Vancouver

  5. 2011 SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY carbon neutral action report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and 6 more buildings were recommissioned through the BC Hydro Continuous Optimization Program. SFU: IT Services Virtual Technology & Power Management 6.4 #12;CARBON NEUTRAL ACTION REPORT 2011 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY1

  6. Carbon impact of proposed hydroelectric dams in Chilean Patagonia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mar, Laura E. (Laura Elizabeth)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The concern for and awareness of climate change is growing, and the world needs to react quickly and efficiently to manage the carbon intensity of the global energy industry. Making smart decisions about energy technology ...

  7. Management of Disused Radioactive Sealed Sources in Egypt - 13512

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohamed, Y.T.; Hasan, M.A.; Lasheen, Y.F. [Hot Laboratories and Waste Management Center, Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority, 11787, Cairo (Egypt)] [Hot Laboratories and Waste Management Center, Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority, 11787, Cairo (Egypt)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The future safe development of nuclear energy and progressive increasing use of sealed sources in medicine, research, industry and other fields in Egypt depends on the safe and secure management of disused radioactive sealed sources. In the past years have determined the necessity to formulate and apply the integrated management program for radioactive sealed sources to assure harmless and ecological rational management of disused sealed sources in Egypt. The waste management system in Egypt comprises operational and regulatory capabilities. Both of these activities are performed under legislations. The Hot Laboratories and Waste Management Center HLWMC, is considered as a centralized radioactive waste management facility in Egypt by law 7/2010. (authors)

  8. New regulatory environment changing pipeline operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fields, J.H. (Northwest Pipeline Corp., Salt Lake City, UT (United States))

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews the effects of deregulation of the natural gas and pipeline industry as a result of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Orders 436, 500, and 636. It describes the changes as they affected Northwest Pipeline's structure and marketing strategies as the company had to move from a gas merchandiser to a gas transporter. It describes the capacity release options of the pipeline which allow the customers to buy, release, and renegotiate prices whenever they need to because of an increase or decrease in demand using current market prices. The paper discusses the natural gas distribution system which has evolved as a result of these regulations.

  9. Re: Regulatory Burden RFI | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR - TProcuring SolarNo.FrequencyEO-05-01:Regulatory Burden RFI

  10. Regulatory Burden RFI | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR -Department of Energyas ofCheniere Energy, Inc.Regulatory

  11. Regulatory Commission of Alaska | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ | Roadmap Jump to:bJumpRedSeismic(California andRegulatory

  12. NUCLEAR REGULATORY,.COMMISSION REGION I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 August 2008REGULATORY,.COMMISSION REGION I

  13. Career Map: Regulatory Expert | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof Energy Change RequestFirst Report toFrequentlyProfessorRegulatory Expert

  14. Regulatory Drivers | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Technical s o Freiberg and SondershausenRegulatory Drivers In July 7,

  15. CALIFORNIA CARBON SEQUESTRATION THROUGH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CARBON SEQUESTRATION THROUGH CHANGES IN LAND USE IN WASHINGTON. Carbon Sequestration Through Changes in Land Use in Washington: Costs and Opportunities. California for Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration in Oregon. Report to Winrock International. #12;ii #12;iii Preface

  16. Photophysics of carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samsonidze, Georgii G

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis reviews the recent advances made in optical studies of single-wall carbon nanotubes. Studying the electronic and vibrational properties of carbon nanotubes, we find that carbon nanotubes less than 1 nm in ...

  17. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 1, Technology Evaluation: Part C, Waste Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents activities at ORNL including waste management and remedial action at the site; also waste processing and disposal; robotics and automation of the laboratory; and regulatory compliance

  18. Network Management Network Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that pertain to the operation, administration, maintenance, and provisioning of networked systems · Operation deals with keeping the network up (and the service provided by the network) · Administration involvesNetwork Management Pag. 1 Network Management Andrea Bianco Telecommunication Network Group Network

  19. Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasayya, Vivek

    #12;Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward

  20. Carbon Code Requirements for voluntary carbon sequestration projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woodland Carbon Code Requirements for voluntary carbon sequestration projects ® Version 1.2 July trademark 10 3. Carbon sequestration 11 3.1 Units of carbon calculation 11 3.2 Carbon baseline 11 3.3 Carbon leakage 12 3.4 Project carbon sequestration 12 3.5 Net carbon sequestration 13 4. Environmental quality 14

  1. National Carbon Sequestration Database and Geographic Information System (NatCarb)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenneth Nelson; Timothy Carr

    2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual and final report describes the results of the multi-year project entitled 'NATional CARBon Sequestration Database and Geographic Information System (NatCarb)' (http://www.natcarb.org). The original project assembled a consortium of five states (Indiana, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky and Ohio) in the midcontinent of the United States (MIDCARB) to construct an online distributed Relational Database Management System (RDBMS) and Geographic Information System (GIS) covering aspects of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) geologic sequestration. The NatCarb system built on the technology developed in the initial MIDCARB effort. The NatCarb project linked the GIS information of the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs) into a coordinated regional database system consisting of datasets useful to industry, regulators and the public. The project includes access to national databases and GIS layers maintained by the NatCarb group (e.g., brine geochemistry) and publicly accessible servers (e.g., USGS, and Geography Network) into a single system where data are maintained and enhanced at the local level, but are accessed and assembled through a single Web portal to facilitate query, assembly, analysis and display. This project improves the flow of data across servers and increases the amount and quality of available digital data. The purpose of NatCarb is to provide a national view of the carbon capture and storage potential in the U.S. and Canada. The digital spatial database allows users to estimate the amount of CO{sub 2} emitted by sources (such as power plants, refineries and other fossil-fuel-consuming industries) in relation to geologic formations that can provide safe, secure storage sites over long periods of time. The NatCarb project worked to provide all stakeholders with improved online tools for the display and analysis of CO{sub 2} carbon capture and storage data through a single website portal (http://www.natcarb.org/). While the external project is ending, NatCarb will continue as an internal US Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) project with the continued cooperation of personnel at both West Virginia University and the Kansas Geological Survey. The successor project will continue to organize and enhance the information about CO{sub 2} sources and developing the technology needed to access, query, analyze, display, and distribute natural resource data critical to carbon management. Data are generated, maintained and enhanced locally at the RCSP level, or at the national level in specialized data warehouses, and assembled, accessed, and analyzed in real-time through a single geoportal. To address the broader needs of a spectrum of users form high-end technical queries to the general public, NatCarb will be moving to an improved and simplified display for the general public using readily available web tools such as Google Earth{trademark} and Google Maps{trademark}. The goal is for NatCarb to expand in terms of technology and areal coverage and remain the premier functional demonstration of distributed data-management systems that cross the boundaries between institutions and geographic areas, and forms the foundation of a functioning carbon cyber-infrastructure. NatCarb provides access to first-order information to evaluate the costs, economic potential and societal issues of CO{sub 2} capture and storage, including public perception and regulatory aspects.

  2. Information resources in state regulatory agencies-a California perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiZio, S.M. [California Environmental Protection Agency, Sacramento (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Various state regulatory agencies have expressed a need for networking with information gatherers/researchers to produce a concise compilation of primary information so that the basis for regulatory standards can be scientifically referenced. California has instituted several programs to retrieve primary information, generate primary information through research, and generate unique regulatory standards by integrating the primary literature and the products of research. This paper describes these programs.

  3. Tritium Management Control of tritium inventory is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    Tritium Management · Control of tritium inventory is fundamental to public acceptance of fusion. Tritium Inventory Buildup vs. retention rate 1% 3% 10% 20% 50% TFTR JET TS ITER Inventory limit 10 days Production Rates (best estimate) carbon beryllium tungsten carbon with flakes DustInventory(kg) Number

  4. Office of Facilities Planning and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, James

    approved areas) Carbon Fooprint Reminders Less Energy Less Paper Less Water Timer installation (Department #12;Office of Facilities Planning and Management Carbon Footprint Reminders to ourselves Reminders & Ziplock (rinsed) Bubble Wrap NO Paper with food Paper cups (coffee, soda) Napkins Chip bags #12;Office

  5. Method of making carbon-carbon composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Engle, Glen B. (16716 Martincoit Rd., Poway, CA 92064)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for making 2D and 3D carbon-carbon composites having a combined high crystallinity, high strength, high modulus and high thermal and electrical conductivity. High-modulus/high-strength mesophase derived carbon fibers are woven into a suitable cloth. Layers of this easily graphitizible woven cloth are infiltrated with carbon material to form green composites. The carbonized composite is then impregnated several times with pitch by covering the composite with hot pitch under pressure. The composites are given a heat treatment between each impregnant step to crack up the infiltrated carbon and allow additional pitch to enter the microstructure during the next impregnation cycle. The impregnated composites are then given a final heat treatment in the range 2500.degree. to 3100.degree. C. to fully graphitize the fibers and the matrix carbon. The composites are then infiltrated with pyrolytic carbon by chemical vapor deposition in the range 1000.degree. C. to 1300.degree. C. at a reduced. pressure.

  6. Carbon Fiber Technology Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The Carbon Fiber Technology Facility is relevant in proving the scale- up of low-cost carbon fiber precursor materials and advanced manufacturing technologies * Significant...

  7. Motivating carbon dioxide | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Motivating carbon dioxide Motivating carbon dioxide Released: April 17, 2013 Scientists show what it takes to get the potential fuel feedstock to a reactive spot on a model...

  8. Safety and Regulatory Structure for CNG, CNG-Hydrogen, Hydrogen...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen, Hydrogen Vehicles and Fuels in China Safety and Regulatory Structure for CNG, CNG-Hydrogen, Hydrogen Vehicles and Fuels in China Presentation given by Jinyang Zheng of...

  9. Effective Regulatory Institutions: The Regulator's Role in the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Institutions: The Regulator's Role in the Policy Process, Including Issues of Regulatory Independence Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Effective...

  10. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    UNITED STATES OF AMERICA FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION United States Department of Energy Docket No. EF13-5-000 Western Area Power Administration Washoe Project, Stampede...

  11. Mr. John Kinneman, Chief Nuclear Materfals Branch Nuclear Regulatory...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    111989 Mr. John Kinneman, Chief Nuclear Materfals Branch Nuclear Regulatory Commission Region I 475 Allendale Road King of Prussia. Pennsylvania 19406 Dear Mr. Kinneman: -;' .-. 'W...

  12. Public Utility Regulatory Act, Alternative Energy Providers (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Chapter 35 of the Public Utility Regulatory Act specifically addresses alternative energy providers, and contains provisions designed to aid such providers in selling power in Texas's competitive...

  13. Regulatory Roadmap Workshop for Federal Bulk Transmission Regulations...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for bulk transmission. Date: Tuesday, 29 July, 2014 - 09:30 - 15:30 Location: NREL Education Center Auditorium Golden, Colorado Groups: Federal Bulk Transmission Regulatory...

  14. adipor1 regulatory region: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    regulatory rich different transcription factors. We perform on all the factors a multivariate analysis in the framework Gerstein, Mark 15 Genome Regions Involved in Multiple...

  15. Regulatory and Permitting Information Desktop Toolkit (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, K.

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Overview of DOE's Regulatory and Permitting Information Desktop (RAPID) Toolkit project, providing information on where to go to view documents and who to contact to get involved.

  16. angiogenesis regulatory factors: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Earnhart, Dietrich H. 2006-03-13 6 Utility & Regulatory Factors Affecting Cogeneration & Independent Power Plant Design & Operation Texas A&M University - TxSpace...

  17. Comments on Request For Information regarding Reducing Regulatory...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Request For Information regarding Reducing Regulatory Reform issued February 3, 2011 (Federal Register Vol. 76, No. 23 Thursday, February 3, 2011 Notices). Comments on Request...

  18. Regulatory and Financial Reform of Federal Research Policy: Recommenda...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Financial Reform of Federal Research Policy: Recommendations to the NRC Committee on Research Universities Regulatory and Financial Reform of Federal Research Policy:...

  19. Arsenic in Drinking Water: Regulatory Developments and Issues

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Order Code RS20672 Updated May 1, 2007 Arsenic in Drinking Water: Regulatory Developments and Issues Mary Tiemann Specialist in Environmental Policy Resources, Science, and...

  20. Comments from The National Association of Regulatory Utility...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) appreciates the opportunity to provide comments to the Department of Energy (DOE) on this Request for...

  1. Carbon Capture (Carbon Cycle 2.0)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Smit, Berend

    2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Berend Smit speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 3, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  2. "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of Bad CholesteroliManage Presentation3|Regulatory Policies Act of

  3. Evaluation of TechnologiesEvaluation of Technologies and Regulatory Policies forand Regulatory Policies for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Annual Conference on Carbon Capture and Storage Pittsburgh, PA May 11, 2010 #12;E.S. Rubin, Carnegie technology affect the optimal strategy? · What financial incentive is needed for a CCS project if no carbon 2010)(version 6.2.4, May 2010) · New Technology Options Advanced amine system for CO2 capture

  4. Composite carbon foam electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayer, S.T.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

    1997-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granulated materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivity and power to system energy. 1 fig.

  5. Composite carbon foam electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayer, Steven T. (San Leandro, CA); Pekala, Richard W. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granularized materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivty and power to system energy.

  6. Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978. Annual report to Congress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None,

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Titles I and III of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) establish retail regulatory policies for electric and natural gas utilities, respectively, aimed at achieving three purposes: conservation of energy supplied by electric and gas utilities; efficiency in the use of facilities and resources by these utilities; equitable rates to electricity and natural gas consumers. PURPA also continues the pilot utility implementation program, authorized under Title II of the Energy Conservation and Production ACT (ECPA), to encourage adoption of cost-based rates and efficient energy-management practices. The purpose of this report is twofold: (1) to summarize and analyze the progress that state regulatory authorities and certain nonregulated utilities have made in their consideration of the PURPA standards; and (2) to summarize the Department of Energy (DOE) activities relating to PURPA and ECPA. The report provides a broad overview and assessment of the status of electric and gas regulation nationwide, and thus helps provide the basis for congressional and DOE actions targeted on the utility industry to address pressing national energy problems.

  7. Above-and Belowground Carbon Stocks in a Miombo Woodland Landscape of Mozambique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , fuel, medicine and construction materials to larger-scale carbon and water management services. More prompted increasing attention to the preservation of carbon stocks in tropical ecosystems. The development on knowledge of the magnitude of such carbon stocks. Indeed Houghton (2005) shows that knowledge of the car

  8. 19.1 Introduction Carbon sequestration programs on land and in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    Chapter 19 19.1 Introduction Carbon sequestration programs on land and in the oceans are gaining sequestration programs emphasize storing carbon in soil organic matter in agri- cultural fields,in woody sequestration and management include the feasibil- ity and permanence of the carbon sequestered, the scale

  9. Global Change Biology (2000) 6, 317328 Soil Carbon Sequestration and Land-Use Change: Processes and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Post, Wilfred M.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Global Change Biology (2000) 6, 317­328 Soil Carbon Sequestration and Land-Use Change: Processes in enhanced soil carbon sequestration with changes in land-use and soil management. We review literature, and indicates the relative importance of some factors that influence the rates of organic carbon sequestration

  10. Soil carbon sequestration and land-use change: processes and potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soil carbon sequestration and land-use change: processes and potential W . M . P O S T * and K . C that may result in enhanced soil carbon sequestration with changes in land-use and soil management. We carbon accumulation. This data summary provides a guide to approximate rates of SOC sequestration

  11. Aboveground carbon biomass of plantation-grown American chestnut (Castanea dentata) in absence of blight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ). Forested ecosystems may help contribute toward carbon sequestration by capturing and storing atmospheric CO forests for carbon sequestration. Forest Ecology and Management 258 (2009) 288­294 A R T I C L E I N F O Keywords: Afforestation Carbon sequestration Competition Forest restoration Plantation establishment A B

  12. Carbon Reduction Analysis and Action Using the CoolClimate Version date: 12/17/2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Carbon Reduction Analysis and Action Using the CoolClimate Calculator Version date: 12 of publication. Recommended citation: Cuitation: Jones, C.M. and Kammen, D.M. (2009.) Carbon Reduction Analysis research and development of advanced carbon footprint management tools for U.S. households, small

  13. Carbon Target Initial Concept for 20to2T5m

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Carbon Target Initial Concept for 20to2T5m (Updated) Van Graves January 30, 2014 #12;2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Carbon Target Initial Concept 30 Jan 2014 Geometry · From Ding's presentation Beam Dump for Carbon Target with IDS120h Configuration at 6.75 GeV (updated

  14. Climate Policy 3 (2003) 149157 The climatic impacts of land surface change and carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pielke, Roger A.

    recognize that carbon sequestration in the terrestrial biosphere can reduce the build-up of carbon dioxide of the surface energy budget can affect the local, regional, and global climate. Given the goal of mitigatingClimate Policy 3 (2003) 149­157 The climatic impacts of land surface change and carbon management

  15. Inventory of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judd, Kathleen S.; Kora, Angela R.; Shankle, Steve A.; Fowler, Kimberly M.

    2009-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Carbon Management Strategic Initiative (CMSI) is a lab-wide initiative to position the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) as a leader in science, technology and policy analysis required to understand, mitigate and adapt to global climate change as a nation. As part of an effort to walk the talk in the field of carbon management, PNNL conducted its first carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions inventory for the 2007 calendar year. The goal of this preliminary inventory is to provide PNNL staff and management with a sense for the relative impact different activities at PNNL have on the lab’s total carbon footprint.

  16. Autonomous observations of the ocean biological carbon pump

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bishop, James K.B.

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prediction of the substantial biologically mediated carbon flows in a rapidly changing and acidifying ocean requires model simulations informed by observations of key carbon cycle processes on the appropriate space and time scales. From 2000 to 2004, the National Oceanographic Partnership Program (NOPP) supported the development of the first low-cost fully-autonomous ocean profiling Carbon Explorers that demonstrated that year-round real-time observations of particulate organic carbon (POC) concentration and sedimentation could be achieved in the world's ocean. NOPP also initiated the development of a sensor for particulate inorganic carbon (PIC) suitable for operational deployment across all oceanographic platforms. As a result, PIC profile characterization that once required shipboard sample collection and shipboard or shore based laboratory analysis, is now possible to full ocean depth in real time using a 0.2W sensor operating at 24 Hz. NOPP developments further spawned US DOE support to develop the Carbon Flux Explorer, a free-vehicle capable of following hourly variations of particulate inorganic and organic carbon sedimentation from near surface to kilometer depths for seasons to years and capable of relaying contemporaneous observations via satellite. We have demonstrated the feasibility of real time - low cost carbon observations which are of fundamental value to carbon prediction and when further developed, will lead to a fully enhanced global carbon observatory capable of real time assessment of the ocean carbon sink, a needed constraint for assessment of carbon management policies on a global scale.

  17. Design and implementation of a CO{sub 2} flood utilizing advanced reservoir characterization and horizontal injection wells in a shallow shelf carbonate approaching waterflood depletion: Project management/evaluation plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hallenbeck, L.D.; Harpole, K.J.; Gerard, M.G.

    1995-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the Management/Evaluation Plan are: (1) clarify management structure, task responsibilities and schedules, and (2) to be used as a basis for judging the Project Evaluation Report submitted as a part of the continuation application. The components addressed in the report are: management structure; project staff organization; management procedure; quality assurance plan; ES and H plan and environmental compliance reporting; task WBS and logic flow diagram; list and schedule of planned deliverables; diagram of existing facilities; industry interaction; and evaluation of technical and economic feasibility.

  18. Acetylenic carbon allotrope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lagow, R.J.

    1998-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A fourth allotrope of carbon, an acetylenic carbon allotrope, is described. The acetylenic carbon allotropes of the present invention are more soluble than the other known carbon allotropes in many common organic solvents and possesses other desirable characteristics, e.g. high electron density, ability to burn cleanly, and electrical conductive properties. Many uses for this fourth allotrope are described herein. 17 figs.

  19. Carbon Monoxide Environmental Public

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The National Workgroup on Carbon Monoxide Surveillance Formed in April 2005 Membership: EPHT grantees Academic

  20. The Woodland Carbon Code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Woodland Carbon Code While society must continue to make every effort to reduce greenhouse gas a role by removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. The potential of woodlands to soak up carbon to help compensate for their carbon emissions. But before investing in such projects, people want to know

  1. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW PROPOSAL TO CREATE DISTRICTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW FOR THE PROPOSAL TO CREATE DISTRICTS WITHIN. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 1.2.1Environmental Assessment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 1.2.2Regulatory Impact Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2.0 ENVIRONMENTAL AND BIOLOGICAL IMPACTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2.1 Atka Mackerel Biology

  2. SECRETARIAL REVIEW DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SECRETARIAL REVIEW DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW/ INITIAL REGULATORY The purpose of the non-AFA crab sideboard limits was to prevent vessels with crab QS from disadvantaging non for non-American Fisheries Act (AFA) crab vessels. In April 2007, the Council began developing options

  3. Staff Report to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    affecting competitive pricing of electric energy or reliability of service and (b) report its findingsStaff Report to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on the Bulk Power Markets In the United of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, any individual Commissioner, or the Commission itself

  4. Mesoporous carbon materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dai, Sheng; Fulvio, Pasquale Fernando; Mayes, Richard T.; Wang, Xiqing; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Guo, Bingkun

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A conductive mesoporous carbon composite comprising conductive carbon nanoparticles contained within a mesoporous carbon matrix, wherein the conductive mesoporous carbon composite possesses at least a portion of mesopores having a pore size of at least 10 nm and up to 50 nm, and wherein the mesopores are either within the mesoporous carbon matrix, or are spacings delineated by surfaces of said conductive carbon nanoparticles when said conductive carbon nanoparticles are fused with each other, or both. Methods for producing the above-described composite, devices incorporating them (e.g., lithium batteries), and methods of using them, are also described.

  5. Approach of Czech regulatory body to LBB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tendera, P.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At present there are two NPPs equipped with PWR units in Czech Republic. The Dukovany, NPP is about ten years in operation (four units 440 MW - WWBFL model 213) and Tomelin NPP is under construction (two units 1000 MW - WWER model 320). Both NPPs were built to Soviet design and according to Soviet regulations and standards but most of equipment for primary circuits was supplied by home manufacturers. The objective of the Czech LBB program is to prove the LBB status of the primary piping systems of there NPPs and the LBB concept is a part of strategy to meet western style safety standards. The reason for the Czech LBB project is a lack of some standard safety Facilities too. For both Dukovany and Tomelin NPPs a full LBB analysis should be carried out. The application of LBB to the piping system should be also a cost effective means to avoid installations of pipe whip restraints and jet shields. The Czech regulatory body issued non-mandatory requirement, {open_quotes}Leak Before Break{close_quotes} which is in compliance with national legal documents and which is based on the US NRC Regulatory Procedures and US standards (ASMF CODE, ANSI). The requirement has been published in the document {open_quotes}Safety of Nuclear Facilities{close_quotes} No 1/1991 as {open_quotes}Requirements on the Content and Format of Safety Reports and their Supplements{close_quote} and consist of two parts (1) procedure for obtaining proof of evidence {open_quotes}Leak Before Break{close_quotes} (2) leak detection systems for the pressurized reactor primary circuit. At present some changes concerning both parts of the above document will be introduced. The reasons for this modifications will be presented.

  6. Approach for Czech regulatory body to LBB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tendera, P. [State Office for Nuclear Safety (SONS), Prague (Czech Republic)

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At present there are two NPPs equipped with PWR units in Czech Republic. The Dukovany NPP is about ten years in operation (four units 440 MW - WWER model 213) and Temelin NPP is under construction (two units 1000 MW-WWER model 320). Both NPPs were built to Soviet design and according to Soviet regulations and standards but most of equipment for primary circuits was supplied by home manufactures. The objective for the Czech LBB programme is to prove the LBB status of the primary piping systems of these NPPs and the LBB concept is a part of strategy to meet western style safety standards. The reason for the Czech LBB project is a lack of some standard safety facilities, too. For both Dukovany and Temolin NPPs a full LBB analysis should be carried out. The application of LBB to the piping system should be also a cost effective means to avoid installations of pipe whip restraints and jet shields. The Czech regulatory body issued non-mandatory requirement {open_quotes}Leak Before Break{close_quotes} which is in compliance with national legal documents and which is based on the US NRC Regulatory Procedures and US standards (ASME, CODE, ANSI). The requirement has been published in the document {open_quotes}Safety of Nuclear Facilities{close_quotes} No. 1/1991 as {open_quotes}Requirements on the Content and Format of Safety Reports and their Supplements{close_quotes} and consists of two parts (1) procedure for obtaining proof of evidence {open_quotes}Leak Before Break{close_quotes} (2) leak detection systems for the pressurized reactor primary circuit. At present some changes concerning both parts of the above document will be introduced. The reasons for this modifications will be presented.

  7. Codes and standards and other guidance cited in regulatory documents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nickolaus, J.R.; Bohlander, K.L.

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Standard Review Plan Update and Development Program (SRP-UDP), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory developed a listing of industry consensus codes and standards and other government and industry guidance referred to in regulatory documents. The SRP-UDP has been completed and the SRP-Maintenance Program (SRP-MP) is now maintaining this listing. Besides updating previous information, Revision 3 adds approximately 80 citations. This listing identifies the version of the code or standard cited in the regulatory document, the regulatory document, and the current version of the code or standard. It also provides a summary characterization of the nature of the citation. This listing was developed from electronic searches of the Code of Federal Regulations and the NRC`s Bulletins, Information Notices, Circulars, Enforcement Manual, Generic Letters, Inspection Manual, Policy Statements, Regulatory Guides, Standard Technical Specifications and the Standard Review Plan (NUREG-0800).

  8. November 2008 Carbon Sequestration in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    November 2008 Carbon Sequestration in British Columbia's Forests and Management Options T. Andrew of British Columbia through the BC Ministry of the Environment. #12;3Forestry ExECutIvE SuMMary OF FuturE rESEarCh BlAckaNd rAchhpAl S. JASSAlFaculty oF laNd aNd Food SyStemS, uNiverSity oF britiSh columbia ArThur l

  9. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Handling of Beyond Design Basis Events for Nuclear Power Reactors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presenter: Bill Reckley, Chief, Policy and Support Branch, Japan Lessons-Learned Project Directorate, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission US Nuclear Regulatory Commission

  10. SUBCONTRACT MANAGEMENT

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    0-1 CHAPTER 10 SUBCONTRACT MANAGEMENT (Revised October 19, 2011) WHAT ARE THE BASIC PRINCIPLES AND OBJECTIVES OF SUBCONTRACT MANAGEMENT? 1. To ensure contractors establish,...

  11. Soil metagenomics and carbon cycling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and carbon cycling Establishing a foundational understanding of the microbial and ecosystem factors that control carbon cycling to improve climate modeling and carbon...

  12. Carbon Nanostructure-Based Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarkar, Tapan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Control of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Functionalization.M. S. Characterizing carbon nanotube samples with resonancewith a Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Capacitor. Science

  13. Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces Print Wednesday, 31 August 2011 00:00 From organic matter to pencil lead, carbon is a versatile...

  14. The Australian terrestrial carbon budget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Australian terrestrial carbon budget Open Access 3 , G. P.The Australian terrestrial carbon budget Luo, C. , Mahowald,terrestrial carbon budget Richards, G. P. , Borough, C. ,

  15. Carbon fuel cells with carbon corrosion suppression

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA)

    2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrochemical cell apparatus that can operate as either a fuel cell or a battery includes a cathode compartment, an anode compartment operatively connected to the cathode compartment, and a carbon fuel cell section connected to the anode compartment and the cathode compartment. An effusion plate is operatively positioned adjacent the anode compartment or the cathode compartment. The effusion plate allows passage of carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide exhaust channels are operatively positioned in the electrochemical cell to direct the carbon dioxide from the electrochemical cell.

  16. Benefits and costs of load management: a technical assistance and resource material handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, Ronald; Ackerman, Gary; Lau, Ronald; Patmore, James; Ma, Fred; Sechan, Neil; Schoor, Alan; Simon, Lois; Bleiweis, Bruce; Lloyd, Kevin

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This handbook will assist state regulatory authorities and electric utilities in complying with the Load Management Standard of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978. The handbook has two major sections. The first discusses load-management techniques in terms of equipment, customer applications, combinations of techniques, etc. Key steps for evaluating the costs and benefits of load management options also are presented. These steps are intended to sequentially eliminate ineffective load-management options as the cost-benefit calculation becomes more detailed. The second section includes up-to-date information on available load-management technologies, models for utility costing, load-management data transfer, prescreening of load-management options, and the load-management literature.

  17. End of FY10 report - used fuel disposition technical bases and lessons learned : legal and regulatory framework for high-level waste disposition in the United States.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiner, Ruth F.; Blink, James A. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA); Rechard, Robert Paul; Perry, Frank (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Jenkins-Smith, Hank C. (University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK); Carter, Joe (Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Aiken, SC); Nutt, Mark (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Cotton, Tom (Complex Systems Group, Washington DC)

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines the current policy, legal, and regulatory framework pertaining to used nuclear fuel and high level waste management in the United States. The goal is to identify potential changes that if made could add flexibility and possibly improve the chances of successfully implementing technical aspects of a nuclear waste policy. Experience suggests that the regulatory framework should be established prior to initiating future repository development. Concerning specifics of the regulatory framework, reasonable expectation as the standard of proof was successfully implemented and could be retained in the future; yet, the current classification system for radioactive waste, including hazardous constituents, warrants reexamination. Whether or not consideration of multiple sites are considered simultaneously in the future, inclusion of mechanisms such as deliberate use of performance assessment to manage site characterization would be wise. Because of experience gained here and abroad, diversity of geologic media is not particularly necessary as a criterion in site selection guidelines for multiple sites. Stepwise development of the repository program that includes flexibility also warrants serious consideration. Furthermore, integration of the waste management system from storage, transportation, and disposition, should be examined and would be facilitated by integration of the legal and regulatory framework. Finally, in order to enhance acceptability of future repository development, the national policy should be cognizant of those policy and technical attributes that enhance initial acceptance, and those policy and technical attributes that maintain and broaden credibility.

  18. @ GW Regulatory Studies Center | www.RegulatoryStudies.gwu.edu | Follow us @RegStudies 1 Seeking Comment on the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmitt, William R.

    Comment on the Social Cost of Carbon Susan E. Dudley, Director November 26, 2013 The Obama Administration aimed at reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, is that the social cost of burning carbon is greater. In 2010, an Interagency Working Group on the Social Cost of Carbon issued a "technical support document

  19. The George Washington University Regulatory Studies Center www.RegulatoryStudies.gwu.edu 1 Public Interest Comment1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmitt, William R.

    's contribution toward reducing climate change, and incorporated estimates of the social cost of carbon ("SCC

  20. Encouraging low-impact-development stormwater-management practices / Assabet River Watershed sub-basin case study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, James E. (James Edward), 1969-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Regulatory codes and ordinances create a framework that guide stormwater management decision processes. These regulations are designed to protect the health and safety of the public and to preserve the natural integrity ...

  1. Hospitality Management Hospitality Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McConnell, Terry

    of the Department of Hospitality Management and to the recorder in the College of Human Ecology. Required HPM 114 Food Safety and Quality Assurance 2 AND HPM 115 Food Science I 3 AND HPM 216 Restaurant and Food Service Operations 4 OR NSD 225 Nutrition in Health 3 12 credits needed: HPM 300 Selected Topics: Advanced

  2. LEGACY MANAGEMENT REQUIRES INFORMATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CONNELL, C.W.; HILDEBRAND, R.D.

    2006-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    ''Legacy Management Requires Information'' describes the goal(s) of the US Department of Energy's Office of Legacy Management (LM) relative to maintaining critical records and the way those goals are being addressed at Hanford. The paper discusses the current practices for document control, as well as the use of modern databases for both storing and accessing the data to support cleanup decisions. In addition to the information goals of LM, the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, known as the ''Tri-Party Agreement'' (TPA) is one of the main drivers in documentation and data management. The TPA, which specifies discrete milestones for cleaning up the Hanford Site, is a legally binding agreement among the US Department of Energy (DOE), the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The TPA requires that DOE provide the lead regulatory agency with the results of analytical laboratory and non-laboratory tests/readings to help guide them in making decisions. The Agreement also calls for each signatory to preserve--for at least ten years after the Agreement has ended--all of the records in its or its contractors, possession related to sampling, analysis, investigations, and monitoring conducted. The tools used at Hanford to meet TPA requirements are also the tools that can satisfy the needs of LM.

  3. Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenneth J. Nemeth

    2006-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership's (SECARB) Phase I program focused on promoting the development of a framework and infrastructure necessary for the validation and commercial deployment of carbon sequestration technologies. The SECARB program, and its subsequent phases, directly support the Global Climate Change Initiative's goal of reducing greenhouse gas intensity by 18 percent by the year 2012. Work during the project's two-year period was conducted within a ''Task Responsibility Matrix''. The SECARB team was successful in accomplishing its tasks to define the geographic boundaries of the region; characterize the region; identify and address issues for technology deployment; develop public involvement and education mechanisms; identify the most promising capture, sequestration, and transport options; and prepare action plans for implementation and technology validation activity. Milestones accomplished during Phase I of the project are listed below: (1) Completed preliminary identification of geographic boundaries for the study (FY04, Quarter 1); (2) Completed initial inventory of major sources and sinks for the region (FY04, Quarter 2); (3) Completed initial development of plans for GIS (FY04, Quarter 3); (4) Completed preliminary action plan and assessment for overcoming public perception issues (FY04, Quarter 4); (5) Assessed safety, regulatory and permitting issues (FY05, Quarter 1); (6) Finalized inventory of major sources/sinks and refined GIS algorithms (FY05, Quarter 2); (7) Refined public involvement and education mechanisms in support of technology development options (FY05, Quarter 3); and (8) Identified the most promising capture, sequestration and transport options and prepared action plans (FY05, Quarter 4).

  4. Conference Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish requirements and responsibilities with respect to managing conferences sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) or by DOE management and operating contractors and other contractors who perform work at DOE-owned or -leased facilities, including management and integration contractors and environmental restoration management contractors (when using funds that will be reimbursed by DOE). Cancels DOE N 110.3.

  5. Carbon Monoxide Safety Tips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Bryan W.; Garcia, Monica L.

    1999-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Protect yourself and your family from the deadly effects of carbon monoxide--a colorless, odorless poisonous gas. This publication describes the warning signs of carbon monoxide exposure and includes a home safety checklist....

  6. SCALE-UP OF CARBON /CARBON BIPOLAR PLATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scale-up of Carbon/Carbon Bipolar Plates · Project Objectives ­ Build and demonstrate a pilot facility#12;SCALE-UP OF CARBON /CARBON BIPOLAR PLATES Quarterly Report to the Department of Energy, May 19 #12;DOE PROGRAM OBJECTIVES Scale-up of Carbon/Carbon Bipolar Plates · Phase I ­ Technology Development

  7. ESM 271 Carbon Footprints and Carbon Accounting Instructor: Sangwon Suh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    1 ESM 271 Carbon Footprints and Carbon Accounting Instructor: Sangwon Suh Bren hall 3422, suh: Homework (1 for each week @10%): 40% Personal carbon account (report): 30% Final exam: 30% Course schedule Week 1: Introduction to carbon footprint and carbon account - Background: carbon awareness, major

  8. COST EFFECTIVE REGULATORY APPROACHES TO ENHANCE DOMESTIC OIL & GAS PRODUCTION AND ENSURE THE PROTECTION OF THE ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ben Grunewald; Paul Jehn; Tom Gillespie; Ben Binder

    2004-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Information Management Suite/Risk Based Data Management System (EIMS/RBDMS) and Cost Effective Regulatory Approach (CERA) programs continue to be successful. All oil and gas state regulatory programs participate in these efforts. Significant accomplishments include: streamline regulatory approaches, enhancing environmental protection, and making oil and gas data available via the Internet. Oil and gas companies worldwide now have access to data on state web sites. This reduces the cost of exploration and enables companies to develop properties in areas that would have been cost prohibited for exploration. Early in project, GWPC and State Oil and Gas agencies developed the EIMS and CERA strategic plan to prioritize long term development and implementation. The planning process identifies electronic commerce and coal bed methane as high priorities. The group has involved strategic partners in industry and government to develop a common data exchange process. Technical assistance to Alaska continues to improve their program management capabilities. New initiatives in Alaska include the development of an electronic permit tracking system. This system allows managers to expedite the permitting process. Nationwide, the RBDMS system is largely completed with 22 states and one Indian Nation now using this nationally accepted data management system. Additional remaining tasks include routine maintenance and the installation of the program upon request for the remaining oil and gas states. The GWPC in working with the BLM and MMS to develop an XML schema to facilitate electronic permitting and reporting (Appendix A, B, and C). This is a significant effort and, in years to come, will increase access to federal lands by reducing regulatory barriers. The new initiatives are coal bed methane and e-commerce. The e-commerce program will provide industry and BLM/MMS access to the millions of data points housed in the RBDMS system. E-commerce will streamline regulatory approaches and allow small operators to produce energy from areas that have become sub-economic for the major producers. The GWPC is working with states to develop a coal bed methane program, which will both manage the data and develop a public education program on the benefits of produced water. The CERA program benefits all oil and gas states by reducing the cost of regulatory compliance, increasing environmental protection, and providing industry and regulatory agencies a discussion forum. Activities included many small and large group forum settings for discussions of technical and policy issues as well as the ongoing State Class II UIC peer review effort. The accomplishments detailed in this report will be the basis for the next initiative which is RBDMS On-Line. RBDMS On-Line will combine data mining, electronic permitting and electronic reporting with .net technology. Industry, BLM, GWPC and all Oil and Gas states are partnering this effort.

  9. Managing Carbon in WisconsinManaging Carbon in Wisconsin Dick WolkowskiDick Wolkowski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balser, Teri C.

    both the hardest and one of the softestForms both the hardest and one of the softest minerals Interacts with environmental contaminantsInteracts with environmental contaminants #12;What is soil organic

  10. allosteric regulatory cavity: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    viII discuss important developments in federal and state regulatory arenas and their impacts on purchasing options. Among the issues discussed viII be: 1... Watkins, G. 468...

  11. Cross-regulation and interaction between eukaryotic gene regulatory processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spies, Noah (Noah Walter Benjamin)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Regulation of genes is fundamental to all living processes and can be exerted at many sequential steps. We studied several eukaryotic gene regulatory mechanisms with an emphasis on understanding the interplay between ...

  12. alters fyn regulatory: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    human genome where many TFsRegulatory Analysis for Exploring Human Disease Progression Dustin T. Holloway1 , Mark Kon2 have been built and tested for 153 human TFs. These...

  13. Lisa C. Tracy Acting Director Division of Natural Gas Regulatory...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    November 17, 2014 Lisa C. Tracy Acting Director Division of Natural Gas Regulatory Activities U.S. Department of Energy (FE-34) Office of Oil and Gas Global Security Office of...

  14. SEC Confidential Treatment Orders: Balancing Competing Regulatory Objectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Anne Margaret

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examines how the Securities and Exchange Commission balances competing regulatory objectives in its decisions to approve requests to withhold proprietary information from firms' financial reports. The confidential treatment process...

  15. Inferring regulatory networks from multiple sources of genomic data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeang, Chen-Hsiang, 1969-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (cont.) algorithm to identify the regulatory models from protein-DNA binding and gene expression data. These models to a large extent agree with the knowledge of gene regulation pertaining to the corresponding regulators. ...

  16. NGNP Project Regulatory Gap Analysis for Modular HTGRs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wayne Moe

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project Regulatory Gap Analysis (RGA) for High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTGR) was conducted to evaluate existing regulatory requirements and guidance against the design characteristics specific to a generic modular HTGR. This final report presents results and identifies regulatory gaps concerning current Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensing requirements that apply to the modular HTGR design concept. This report contains appendices that highlight important HTGR licensing issues that were found during the RGA study. The information contained in this report will be used to further efforts in reconciling HTGR-related gaps in the NRC licensing structure, which has to date largely focused on light water reactor technology.

  17. CUTTING EDGE Cutting Edge: Treatment of Complement Regulatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponder, Katherine P.

    CUTTING EDGE IMMUNOLOGY THE OF JOURNAL Cutting Edge: Treatment of Complement Regulatory Protein attachment of C regulators such as the decay-accelerating factor (DAF) (11) and C receptor 1-related gene

  18. Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) as Applicable...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Under Title I of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is required to publish a list identifying each electric utility...

  19. Bacterial regulatory networks are extremely flexible in evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babu, M. Madan

    are well conserved in evolution. From our comparative analysis, it is possible to infer evolves as it would enable us to study the molecular evolutionary ecology of regulatory diversifica- tion sequence data and complete genomes are a

  20. Big Sky Carbon Atlas

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    (Acknowledgment to the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership (BSCSP); see home page at http://www.bigskyco2.org/)

  1. Intro to Carbon Sequestration

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    NETL's Carbon Sequestration Program is helping to develop technologies to capture, purify, and store carbon dioxide (CO2) in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions without adversely influencing energy use or hindering economic growth. Carbon sequestration technologies capture and store CO2 that would otherwise reside in the atmosphere for long periods of time.

  2. Intro to Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    NETL's Carbon Sequestration Program is helping to develop technologies to capture, purify, and store carbon dioxide (CO2) in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions without adversely influencing energy use or hindering economic growth. Carbon sequestration technologies capture and store CO2 that would otherwise reside in the atmosphere for long periods of time.

  3. Carbon Footprint Towson University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fath, Brian D.

    Carbon Footprint Towson University GHG Inventory for Educational Institutes Getting Starting.TM The Carbon Footprint 8 The Constellation Experience A Broad Inventory 1. Scope I-Direct Emissions works.TM The Carbon Footprint 10 The Constellation Experience A Broad Inventory 3. Scope III

  4. Utility & Regulatory Factors Affecting Cogeneration & Independent Power Plant Design & Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felak, R. P.

    UTILITY & REGULATORY FACTORS AFFECTiNG COGENERATION & INDEPENDENT POWER PLANT DESIGN & OPERATION Richard P. Felak General Electric Company Schenectady, New York ABSTRACT In specifying a cogeneration or independent power plant, the owner... should be especially aware of the influences which electric utilities and regulatory bodies will have on key parameters such as size, efficiency, design. reliability/ availabilitY, operating capabilities and modes, etc. This paper will note examples...

  5. Panel Data Analysis of Regulatory Factors Shaping Environmental Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Earnhart, Dietrich H.

    2006-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    and the influence of regulatory factors in general, this paper examines a specific demonstration of environmental perfor- mance: biological oxygen demand (BOD) wastewater dis- charges by large (“major”) municipal wastewater treatment plants in Kansas during... example, limit levels). To analyze the effects of these regulatory factors on envi- ronmental performance, this particular empirical analysis examines the wastewater discharges by large municipal wastewater treatment facilities in the state of Kansas...

  6. Regulatory Assistance, Stakeholder Outreach, and Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning Activities in Support of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geerlofs, Simon H.; Copping, Andrea E.; Van Cleve, Frances B.; Blake, Kara M.; Hanna, Luke A.

    2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This fiscal year 2011 progress report summarizes activities carried out under DOE Water Power Task 2.1.7, Permitting and Planning. Activities under Task 2.1.7 address the concerns of a wide range of stakeholders with an interest in the development of the marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy industry, including regulatory and resource management agencies, tribes, nongovernmental organizations, and industry. Objectives for Task 2.1.7 are the following: • to work with stakeholders to streamline the MHK regulatory permitting process • to work with stakeholders to gather information on needs and priorities for environmental assessment of MHK development • to communicate research findings and directions to the MHK industry and stakeholders • to engage in spatial planning processes in order to further the development of the MHK industry. These objectives are met through three subtasks, each of which is described in this report: • 2.1.7.1—Regulatory Assistance • 2.1.7.2—Stakeholder Outreach • 2.1.7.3—Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning. As MHK industry partners work with the regulatory community and stakeholders to plan, site, permit, and license MHK technologies, they have an interest in a predictable, efficient, and transparent process. Stakeholders and regulators have an interest in processes that result in sustainable use of ocean space with minimal effects to existing ocean users. Both stakeholders and regulators have an interest in avoiding legal challenges by meeting the intent of federal, state, and local laws that govern siting and operation of MHK technologies. The intention of work under Task 2.1.7 is to understand and work to address these varied interests, reduce conflict, identify efficiencies, and ultimately reduce the regulatory costs, time, and potential environmental impacts associated with developing, siting, permitting, and deploying MHK systems.

  7. Regulatory and Permitting Information Desktop (RAPID) Toolkit (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, K. R.; Levine, A.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Regulatory and Permitting Information Desktop (RAPID) Toolkit combines the former Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap, National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Database, and other resources into a Web-based tool that gives the regulatory and utility-scale geothermal developer communities rapid and easy access to permitting information. RAPID currently comprises five tools - Permitting Atlas, Regulatory Roadmap, Resource Library, NEPA Database, and Best Practices. A beta release of an additional tool, the Permitting Wizard, is scheduled for late 2014. Because of the huge amount of information involved, RAPID was developed in a wiki platform to allow industry and regulatory agencies to maintain the content in the future so that it continues to provide relevant and accurate information to users. In 2014, the content was expanded to include regulatory requirements for utility-scale solar and bulk transmission development projects. Going forward, development of the RAPID Toolkit will focus on expanding the capabilities of current tools, developing additional tools, including additional technologies, and continuing to increase stakeholder involvement.

  8. Manufacture of finely divided carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, D.G.

    1980-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Finely divided carbon is manufactured by a process producing a gaseous stream containing carbon monoxide by reacting coal and air in a slagging ash gasifier, separating carbon monoxide from the gaseous mixture, and disproportionating the carbon monoxide to produce finely divided carbon and carbon dioxide, the latter of which is recycled to the gasifier.

  9. SmallholderSmallholder CarbonCarbon AgroforestryAgroforestry && Carbon for Poverty ReductionCarbon for Poverty Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SmallholderSmallholder CarbonCarbon AgroforestryAgroforestry && Carbon for Poverty ReductionCarbon for Poverty Reduction Roundtable (CAPR)Roundtable (CAPR) GEO Forest Monitoring SymposiumGEO Forest Monitoring)Amazon Initiative Consortium (IA) #12;Carbon for Poverty Reduction Roundtable (CAPR)Carbon for Poverty Reduction

  10. Regulatory and extra-regulatory testing to demonstrate radioactive material packaging safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammerman, D.J.

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Packages for the transportation of radioactive material must meet performance criteria to assure safety and environmental protection. The stringency of the performance criteria is based on the degree of hazard of the material being transported. Type B packages are used for transporting large quantities of radioisotopes (in terms of A{sub 2} quantities). These packages have the most stringent performance criteria. Material with less than an A{sub 2} quantity are transported in Type A packages. These packages have less stringent performance criteria. Transportation of LSA and SCO materials must be in {open_quotes}strong-tight{close_quotes} packages. The performance requirements for the latter packages are even less stringent. All of these package types provide a high level of safety for the material being transported. In this paper, regulatory tests that are used to demonstrate this safety will be described. The responses of various packages to these tests will be shown. In addition, the response of packages to extra-regulatory tests will be discussed. The results of these tests will be used to demonstrate the high level of safety provided to workers, the public, and the environment by packages used for the transportation of radioactive material.

  11. Regulatory Science: Principles & Practices in Food Systems SCSC 634 | Fall 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    will possess a practical knowledge of how to apply risk analysis to hazards in regulated products. The course: · Emerging Field of Regulatory Science · Regulatory Policy · Role of Risk Analysis in Regulatory Science - Perform a Quantitative Risk Assessment #12;Regulatory Science: Principles & Practices in Food Systems SCSC

  12. Impact of carbon emission regulatory policies on the electricity market : a simulation study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tiwari, Sandeep, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With ever rising concerns regarding global warming and other dangerous effects of CO2 , there had been efforts to reduce CO2 emissions all around the world by adopting more efficient technologies and alternate green or ...

  13. Regulatory Issues Controlling Carbon Capture and Storage B.S. Environmental Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Science in Technology and Policy at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology June 2004 2004 Massachusetts Institute of Technology. All rights reserved. Signature of Author environmental regulation and political action to curb climate change will affect CCS have not been thoroughly

  14. NON-DESTRUCTIVE SOIL CARBON ANALYZER.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WIELOPOLSKI,L.MITRA,S.HENDREY,G.ORION,I.ROGERS,H.TORBERT,A.PRIOR,S.RUNION,B.

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the feasibility, calibration, and safety considerations of a non-destructive, in situ, quantitative, volumetric soil carbon analytical method based on inelastic neutron scattering (INS). The method can quantify values as low as 0.018 gC/cc, or about 1.2% carbon by weight with high precision under the instrument's configuration and operating conditions reported here. INS is safe and easy to use, residual soil activation declines to background values in under an hour, and no radiological requirements are needed for transporting the instrument. The labor required to obtain soil-carbon data is about 10-fold less than with other methods, and the instrument offers a nearly instantaneous rate of output of carbon-content values. Furthermore, it has the potential to quantify other elements, particularly nitrogen. New instrumentation was developed in response to a research solicitation from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE LAB 00-09 Carbon Sequestration Research Program) supporting the Terrestrial Carbon Processes (TCP) program of the Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research (BER). The solicitation called for developing and demonstrating novel techniques for quantitatively measuring changes in soil carbon. The report includes raw data and analyses of a set of proof-of-concept, double-blind studies to evaluate the INS approach in the first phase of developing the instrument. Managing soils so that they sequester massive amounts of carbon was suggested as a means to mitigate the atmospheric buildup of anthropogenic CO{sub 2}. Quantifying changes in the soils' carbon stocks will be essential to evaluating such schemes and documenting their performance. Current methods for quantifying carbon in soil by excavation and core sampling are invasive, slow, labor-intensive and locally destroy the system being observed. Newly emerging technologies, such as Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and Near-Infrared Spectroscopy, offer soil-carbon analysis; however, these also are invasive and destructive techniques. The INS approach permits quantification in a relatively large volume of soil without disrupting the measurement site. The technique is very fast and provides nearly instantaneous results thereby reducing the cost, and speeding up the rate of analysis. It also has the potential to cover large areas in a mobile scanning mode. These capabilities will significantly advance the tracking carbon sequestration and offer a tool for research in agronomy, forestry, soil ecology and biogeochemistry.

  15. Radioactive Waste Management in Non-Nuclear Countries - 13070

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kubelka, Dragan; Trifunovic, Dejan [SORNS, Frankopanska 11, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia)] [SORNS, Frankopanska 11, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper challenges internationally accepted concepts of dissemination of responsibilities between all stakeholders involved in national radioactive waste management infrastructure in the countries without nuclear power program. Mainly it concerns countries classified as class A and potentially B countries according to International Atomic Energy Agency. It will be shown that in such countries long term sustainability of national radioactive waste management infrastructure is very sensitive issue that can be addressed by involving regulatory body in more active way in the infrastructure. In that way countries can mitigate possible consequences on the very sensitive open market of radioactive waste management services, comprised mainly of radioactive waste generators, operators of end-life management facilities and regulatory body. (authors)

  16. Formation of Carbon Dwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles L. Steinhardt; Dimitar D. Sasselov

    2012-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the formation of dwarf carbon stars via accretion from a carbon AGB companion in light of the new 107 object sample of Downes et al. (2004). This sample is now large enough to allow good mass determination via comparison of a composite spectrum to theoretical atmospheric models. Carbon dwarfs of spectral type M are indeed main sequence M dwarfs with enhanced metallicity and carbon abundance. We also calculate the predicted abundance of both M and of F/G carbon dwarfs, and show that the latter should be falsifiable in the near future.

  17. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Waste Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Waste Management Program is the protection of workers, the public, and the environment. A vital aspect of this goal is to comply with all applicable state, federal, and DOE requirements. Waste management requirements for DOE radioactive wastes are detailed in DOE Order 5820.2A, and the ORNL Waste Management Program encompasses all elements of this order. The requirements of this DOE order and other appropriate DOE orders, along with applicable Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) and US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) rules and regulations, provide the principal source of regulatory guidance for waste management operations at ORNL. The objective of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Waste Management Plan is to compile and to consolidate information annually on how the ORNL Waste Management is to compile and to consolidate information annually on how the ORNL Waste Management Program is conducted, which waste management facilities are being used to manage wastes, what forces are acting to change current waste management systems, what activities are planned for the forthcoming fiscal year (FY), and how all of the activities are documented.

  18. California Carbon Capture and Storage Panel Members Carl Bauer was appointed NETL Director in August

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Environmental Systems, and Director of NETL's Office of Product Management for Environmental Management. Under of Acquisition Management; and director of the Office of Technology Systems. Prior to joining the Department technologies and energy systems for a low- carbon future, groundwater quality and remediation, biogeochemistry

  19. Study of fire retardant behavior of carbon nanotube membranes and carbon nanofiber paper in carbon fiber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Suman

    Study of fire retardant behavior of carbon nanotube membranes and carbon nanofiber paper in carbon Accepted 14 January 2010 Available online 20 January 2010 A B S T R A C T Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) and multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) membranes (buckypaper) and carbon nanofiber (CNF) paper

  20. Load Management - An Industrial Perspective on This Developing Technology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delgado, R. M.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Load Management is a rapidly developing technology which can have a significant impact on all electric users, especially large users. It is mandated by P.U.R.P.A. (Public Utility Regulatory Policy Act) and is akin to energy conservation but its...

  1. Proceedings of the 1987 international waste management conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oyen, L.C.; Platt, A.M.; Tosetti, R.J.; Feizollahi, F.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book contains 70 selections. Some of the titles are: Development of regulatory policies on high-level waste disposal; Considerations in reviewing the waste volume reduction program in a large utility; The assurance of acceptable respository performance; Economics of defense high-level waste management in the United States; and future directions of defense programs high-level waste technology programs.

  2. The Return on Investment (ROI) for Forefront Identity Manager

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasayya, Vivek

    The Return on Investment (ROI) for Forefront Identity Manager July 2009 2009 Edgile, Inc ­ All of services and systems grow · Complexity of systems and applications increase · Regulatory demands increase (e.g., breach disclosures laws, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act [HIPAA

  3. Other Regulatory Efforts | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagementOPAM PolicyOfEnergy Online1ofGeothermal and

  4. Paducah Site Regulatory Documents | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagementOPAM5 Accretion-of-DutiesPROPERTY3-0127

  5. Policy and Regulatory Environment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOilNEWResponse(Expired)ofandProperty Management |Policy

  6. Legal and Regulatory | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOil & Gas »of EnergyLearning &Legacy ManagementLegacyLegal

  7. Improving the Assessment and Valuation of Climate Change Impacts for Policy and Regulatory Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marten, Alex; Kopp, Robert E.; Shouse, Kate C.; Griffiths, Charles; Hodson, Elke L.; Kopits, Elizabeth; Mignone, Bryan K.; Moore, Chris; Newbold, Steve; Waldhoff, Stephanie T.; Wolverton, Ann

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The social cost of carbon (SCC) is a monetized metric for evaluating the benefits associated with marginal reductions in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. It represents the expected welfare loss from the future damages caused by the release of one tonne of CO2 in a given year, expressed in consumption equivalent terms. It is intended to be a comprehensive measure, taking into account changes in agricultural productivity, human health risks, loss of ecosystem services and biodiversity, and the frequency and severity of flooding and storms, among other possible impacts. Estimating the SCC requires long-term modeling of global economic activity, the climate system, and the linkages between the two through anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and the effects of changing climatic conditions on economic activity and human well-being. The United States government currently uses the SCC in regulatory benefit-cost analyses to assess the welfare effects of changes in CO2 emissions. Consistent application of the SCC to federal rulemaking analyses began in 2009-2010 with the development of a set of global SCC estimates that employed three prominent integrated assessment models (IAMs) -- DICE, FUND, and PAGE. The U.S. government report identified a number of limitations associated with SCC estimates in general and its own assumptions in particular: an incomplete treatment of damages, including potential “catastrophic” impacts; uncertainty regarding the extrapolation of damage functions to high temperatures; incomplete treatment of adaptation and technological change; and the evaluation of uncertain outcomes in a risk-neutral fashion. External experts have identified other potential issues, including how best to model long-term socio-economic and emissions pathways, oversimplified physical climate and carbon cycle modeling within the IAMs, and an inconsistency between non-constant economic growth scenarios and constant discount rates. The U.S. government has committed to updating the estimates regularly as modeling capabilities and scientific and economic knowledge improves. To help foster further improvements in estimating the SCC, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy hosted a pair of workshops on “Improving the Assessment and Valuation of Climate Change Impacts for Policy and Regulatory Analysis.” The first focused on conceptual and methodological issues related to integrated assessment modeling and the second brought together natural and social scientists to explore methods for improving damage assessment for multiple sectors. These two workshops provide the basis for the 13 papers in this special issue.

  8. Hanford cultural resources management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatters, J.C. (ed.)

    1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a federal agency, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has been directed by Congress and the President to provide leadership in the preservation of prehistoric, historical, and cultural resources on lands it administers, to manage these in a spirit of stewardship for future generations, and to protect and preserve the rights of Native Americans to religious freedom. The purpose of this document is to describe how the DOE-Richland Operations (DOE-RL) will meet those responsibilities on the Hanford Site, pursuant to guidelines for Agency Responsibilities under the Historic Preservation Act (FR 53:31, February 17, 1988). This document is intended for multiple uses. Among other things, the text is designed as a manual for cultural resource managers to follow and as an explanation of the process of cultural resource regulatory compliance for the DOE-RL and Site contractors. 10 refs., 17 figs., 11 tabs.

  9. Project Management Plan Resident Management System (RMS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    1 Project Management Plan Resident Management System (RMS) And Quality Control System (QCS Resident Management System.........................................................................................................3 Project Management Plan - Purpose

  10. Survey of state regulatory activities on least cost planning for gas utilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, C.A. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States) National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners, Washington, DC (United States)); Hopkins, M.E. (Fleming Group, Washington, DC (United States))

    1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrated resource planning involves the creation of a process in which supply-side and demand-side options are integrated to create a resource mix that reliably satisfies customers' short-term and long-term energy service needs at the lowest cost. Incorporating the concept of meeting customer energy service needs entails a recognition that customers' costs must be considered along with the utility's costs in the economic analysis of energy options. As applied to gas utilities, an integrated resource plan seeks to balance cost and reliability, and should not be interpreted simply as the search for lowest commodity costs. All state commissions were surveyed to assess the current status of gas planning and demand-side management and to identify significant regulatory issues faced by commissions during the next several years. The survey was to determine the extent to which they have undertaken least-cost planning for gas utilities. The survey included the following topics: (1) status of state PUC least-cost planning regulations and practices for gas utilities; (2) type and scope ofnatural gas DSM programs in effect, includeing fuel substitution; (3) economic tests and analysis methods used to evaluate DSM programs; (4) relationship between prudence reviews of gas utility purchasing practices and integrated resource planning; and (5) key regulatory issues facing gas utilities during the next five years. 34 refs., 6 figs., 10 tabs.

  11. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2004-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Big Sky Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts during the first performance period fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first Partnership meeting the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Complementary to the efforts on evaluation of sources and sinks is the development of the Big Sky Partnership Carbon Cyberinfrastructure (BSP-CC) and a GIS Road Map for the Partnership. These efforts will put in place a map-based integrated information management system for our Partnership, with transferability to the national carbon sequestration effort. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but other policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long term viability. A series of meetings held in November and December, 2003, have laid the foundations for assessing the issues surrounding the implementation of a market-based setting for soil C credits. These include the impact of existing local, state, and federal permitting issues for terrestrial based carbon sequestration projects, consistency of final protocols and planning standards with national requirements, and alignments of carbon sequestration projects with existing federal and state cost-share programs. Finally, the education and outreach efforts during this performance period have resulted in a comprehensive plan which serves as a guide for implementing the outreach activities under Phase I. The primary goal of this plan is to increase awareness, understanding, and public acceptance of sequestration efforts and build support for a constituent based network which includes the initial Big Sky Partnership and other local and regional businesses and entities.

  12. Carbon dioxide sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dutta, Prabir K. (Worthington, OH); Lee, Inhee (Columbus, OH); Akbar, Sheikh A. (Hilliard, OH)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention generally relates to carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors. In one embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor that incorporates lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3). In another embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor has a reduced sensitivity to humidity due to a sensing electrode with a layered structure of lithium carbonate and barium carbonate. In still another embodiment, the present invention relates to a method of producing carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors having lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3).

  13. Regulatory Framework for Salt Waste Disposal and Tank Closure at the Savannah River Site - 13663

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, Steve; Dickert, Ginger [Savannah River Remediation LLC, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Remediation LLC, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The end of the Cold War has left a legacy of approximately 37 million gallons of radioactive waste in the aging waste tanks at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS). A robust program is in place to remove waste from these tanks, treat the waste to separate into a relatively small volume of high-level waste and a large volume of low-level waste, and to actively dispose of the low-level waste on-site and close the waste tanks and associated ancillary structures. To support performance-based, risk-informed decision making and to ensure compliance with all regulatory requirements, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its current and past contractors have worked closely with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to develop and implement a framework for on-site low-level waste disposal and closure of the SRS waste tanks. The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, provides DOE the authority to manage defense-related radioactive waste. DOE Order 435.1 and its associated manual and guidance documents detail this radioactive waste management process. The DOE also has a requirement to consult with the NRC in determining that waste that formerly was classified as high-level waste can be safely managed as either low-level waste or transuranic waste. Once DOE makes a determination, NRC then has a responsibility to monitor DOE's actions in coordination with SCDHEC to ensure compliance with the Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 61 (10CFR61), Subpart C performance objectives. The management of hazardous waste substances or components at SRS is regulated by SCDHEC and the EPA. The foundation for the interactions between DOE, SCDHEC and EPA is the SRS Federal Facility Agreement (FFA). Managing this array of requirements and successfully interacting with regulators, consultants and stakeholders is a challenging task but ensures thorough and thoughtful processes for disposing of the SRS low-level waste and the closure of the tank farm facilities. (authors)

  14. Linear Dynamic Programs for Resource Management Marek Petrik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    a river reservoir to produce hydroelectric power. Among renewable sources, hydroelectricity has the lowest management can therefore significantly reduce carbon emissions. Hydroelectric power is usually produced dynamic programming, a method used to optimize hydroelectric systems. 1 Introduction Sequential decision

  15. Multiphase Sequestration Geochemistry: Model for Mineral Carbonation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Multiphase Sequestration Geochemistry: Model for Mineral Carbonation. Multiphase Sequestration Geochemistry: Model for Mineral Carbonation. Abstract: Carbonation of formation...

  16. Evolutionary conservation of regulatory elements in vertebrate HOX gene clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santini, Simona; Boore, Jeffrey L.; Meyer, Axel

    2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to their high degree of conservation, comparisons of DNA sequences among evolutionarily distantly-related genomes permit to identify functional regions in noncoding DNA. Hox genes are optimal candidate sequences for comparative genome analyses, because they are extremely conserved in vertebrates and occur in clusters. We aligned (Pipmaker) the nucleotide sequences of HoxA clusters of tilapia, pufferfish, striped bass, zebrafish, horn shark, human and mouse (over 500 million years of evolutionary distance). We identified several highly conserved intergenic sequences, likely to be important in gene regulation. Only a few of these putative regulatory elements have been previously described as being involved in the regulation of Hox genes, while several others are new elements that might have regulatory functions. The majority of these newly identified putative regulatory elements contain short fragments that are almost completely conserved and are identical to known binding sites for regulatory proteins (Transfac). The conserved intergenic regions located between the most rostrally expressed genes in the developing embryo are longer and better retained through evolution. We document that presumed regulatory sequences are retained differentially in either A or A clusters resulting from a genome duplication in the fish lineage. This observation supports both the hypothesis that the conserved elements are involved in gene regulation and the Duplication-Deletion-Complementation model.

  17. Regulatory cross-cutting topics for fuel cycle facilities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denman, Matthew R.; Brown, Jason; Goldmann, Andrew Scott; Louie, David

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report overviews crosscutting regulatory topics for nuclear fuel cycle facilities for use in the Fuel Cycle Research&Development Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation and Screening study. In particular, the regulatory infrastructure and analysis capability is assessed for the following topical areas:Fire Regulations (i.e., how applicable are current Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and/or International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) fire regulations to advance fuel cycle facilities)Consequence Assessment (i.e., how applicable are current radionuclide transportation tools to support risk-informed regulations and Level 2 and/or 3 PRA) While not addressed in detail, the following regulatory topic is also discussed:Integrated Security, Safeguard and Safety Requirement (i.e., how applicable are current Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations to future fuel cycle facilities which will likely be required to balance the sometimes conflicting Material Accountability, Security, and Safety requirements.)

  18. Carbon Sequestration via Mineral Carbonation: Overview and Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Carbon Sequestration via Mineral Carbonation: Overview and Assessment 14 March 2002 Howard Herzog overview and assessment of carbon sequestration by mineral carbonation (referred to as "mineral sequestration R&D. The first is that carbonates have a lower energy state than CO2. Therefore, at least

  19. Would Border Carbon Adjustments prevent carbon leakage and heavy industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    No 52-2013 Would Border Carbon Adjustments prevent carbon leakage and heavy industry halshs-00870689,version1-7Oct2013 #12;Would Border Carbon Adjustments prevent carbon leakage and heavy The efficiency of unilateral climate policies may be hampered by carbon leakage and competitiveness losses

  20. Carbon RRLs Carbon RRLs towards Ultra-compact HII Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balser, Dana S.

    Carbon RRLs Carbon RRLs towards Ultra-compact HII Regions Dana S. Balser D. Anish Roshi (Raman (Agnes Scott College) #12;Carbon RRLs Carbon Radio Recombination Lines (RRLs) NGC 2024 (Orion B) IC 1795 (W3) Palmer et al. (1967) #12;Carbon RRLs Photodissociation Regions (PDRs) Hollenbach & Tielens (1997

  1. Cumulative Carbon and Just Allocation of the Global Carbon Commons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierrehumbert, Raymond

    Cumulative Carbon and Just Allocation of the Global Carbon Commons R.T. Pierrehumbert1 on climate can be characterized by a single statistic, called Cumulative Carbon. This is the aggregate amount of carbon emitted in the form of carbon dioxide by activities such as fossil fuel burning and deforestation

  2. Pyrolytic carbon electrodes Lithographically Defined Porous Carbon Electrodes**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    Pyrolytic carbon electrodes Lithographically Defined Porous Carbon Electrodes** D. Bruce Burckel Polsky* The special nature of the CÀC bond can lead to various polymorphic forms of carbon such as graphite, glassy-carbon, fullerenes (such as buckyballs), carbon nanotubes, and diamond. Electrodes made

  3. The Expanding Dairy Industry: Impact on Ground Water Quality and Quantity with Emphasis on Waste Management System Evaluation for Open Lot Dairies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sweeten, John M.; Wolfe, Mary Leigh

    of dairy waste management practices. The results of these studies will aid producers, engineers, planners, and regulatory officials in the refinement and adoption of appropriate practices for water quality protection....

  4. Cooperative management and its effects on shade tree diversity, soil properties and ecosystem services of coffee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    ), carbon (C) sequestration (Segura et al. 2006), and soil and water conservation (Babbar and Zak 1995 management approaches affected shade tree diversity, soil properties, and provi- sioning and carbon sequestration ecosystem services in three shade coffee cooperatives. Collectively managed cooperatives utilized

  5. Mesoporous carbon materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dai, Sheng; Wang, Xiqing

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is directed to a method for fabricating a mesoporous carbon material, the method comprising subjecting a precursor composition to a curing step followed by a carbonization step, the precursor composition comprising: (i) a templating component comprised of a block copolymer, (ii) a phenolic compound or material, (iii) a crosslinkable aldehyde component, and (iv) at least 0.5 M concentration of a strong acid having a pKa of or less than -2, wherein said carbonization step comprises heating the precursor composition at a carbonizing temperature for sufficient time to convert the precursor composition to a mesoporous carbon material. The invention is also directed to a mesoporous carbon material having an improved thermal stability, preferably produced according to the above method.

  6. Mesoporous carbon materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dai, Sheng (Knoxville, TN); Wang, Xiqing (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is directed to a method for fabricating a mesoporous carbon material, the method comprising subjecting a precursor composition to a curing step followed by a carbonization step, the precursor composition comprising: (i) a templating component comprised of a block copolymer, (ii) a phenolic compound or material, (iii) a crosslinkable aldehyde component, and (iv) at least 0.5 M concentration of a strong acid having a pKa of or less than -2, wherein said carbonization step comprises heating the precursor composition at a carbonizing temperature for sufficient time to convert the precursor composition to a mesoporous carbon material. The invention is also directed to a mesoporous carbon material having an improved thermal stability, preferably produced according to the above method.

  7. Mitigating Climate Change with Managed Forests: Balancing Expectations,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    with anticipation regarding how managed forests will be able to par- ticipate in emerging markets for carbon offsets. Carbon markets may in the future offer some potential for com- pensating forest landowners for actions (Bell 2008). Forestry projects can influence CO2 sequestration in essentially three ways: (i

  8. Update on the aquifer/wetlands restoration project at Utica, Nebraska, with recommendations for remapping of the carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2010-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1992-1993, Argonne National Laboratory investigated potential carbon tetrachloride contamination that might be linked to the former grain storage facility operated by the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) at Utica, Nebraska. These initial studies identified carbon tetrachloride in a plume of contaminated groundwater, extending approximately 3,500 ft southeastward from the former CCC/USDA facility, within a shallow upper aquifer that had been used previously as a municipal water source by the town (Figure 1.1). A deeper aquifer used as the current municipal water source was found to be free of carbon tetrachloride contamination. Although the shallow aquifer was no longer being used as a source of drinking water at Utica, additional studies indicated that the carbon tetrachloride could pose an unacceptable health threat to potential future residents who might install private wells along the expected downgradient migration pathway of the plume. On the basis of these findings, corrective action was recommended to decrease the carbon tetrachloride concentrations in the upper aquifer to acceptable levels (Argonne 1993a,b, 1995). Initial discussions with the Utica village board indicated that any restoration strategies involving nonbeneficial discharge of treated groundwater in the immediate vicinity of Utica would be unacceptable to the town. To address this concern, the CCC/USDA and Argonne, in cooperation with multiple federal and state regulatory and environmental agencies (Table 1.1) proposed a treatment strategy for the Utica groundwater employing groundwater extraction coupled with the seasonal use of agricultural spray irrigation equipment to simultaneously (1) remove carbon tetrachloride from the groundwater (by volatilization to the atmosphere) and (2) discharge the treated groundwater to enhance the development of wetlands in the North Lake Basin Wildlife Management Area, just north of the town (Argonne 2000). To develop this treatment approach, additional groundwater sampling was conducted to update the distribution of carbon tetrachloride in groundwater identified in the preliminary studies in 1992-1993. In March 1998, detailed mapping of the carbon tetrachloride plume was performed by using the Argonne cone penetrometer (CPT) vehicle to collect groundwater samples for analyses for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at 13 locations (PS01-PS09, PS12, PS16, PS17, PS19; Figure 1.2). The samples were collected in vertical profiles through the aquifer, at 10-ft intervals. The results of this 1998 study (Table 1.2) demonstrated that the three-dimensional distribution of carbon tetrachloride in the aquifer is complex, with multiple 'hot spots' occurring in the plume at various depths and distances along its length (Argonne 2000). In October 2002, the CCC/USDA requested that Argonne perform targeted groundwater sampling at Utica to document the migration of the carbon tetrachloride plume since the 1998 sampling event. In February 2003, vertical-profile groundwater sampling for VOCs analyses was conducted at 8 selected locations (PS01, PS04-PS07, PS12, PS19, PS20; Figure 1.2 and Table 1.3). The lateral and vertical configuration of the carbon tetrachloride plume, as identified in the 2003 study (Argonne 2003), is illustrated in Figures 1.3-1.7. On the basis of the 2003 groundwater sampling results, a remedial system employing four extraction wells (GWEX 1-GWEX 4), with groundwater treatment by spray irrigation and conventional air stripping, was implemented at Utica, with the concurrence of the CCC/USDA and the agencies identified in Table 1.1. The principal components of the Utica system (shown in Figure 1.8) are described briefly in Section 1.2. Operation of well GWEX4 and the associated air stripper began on October 29, 2004, and routine operation of wells GWEX1-GWEX3 and the spray irrigation treatment units began on November 22, 2004.

  9. Regulatory requirements affecting disposal of asbestos-containing waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities are undergoing decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities. The performance of these activities may generate asbestos-containing waste because asbestos was formerly used in many building materials, including floor tile, sealants, plastics, cement pipe, cement sheets, insulating boards, and insulating cements. The regulatory requirements governing the disposal of these wastes depend on: (1) the percentage of asbestos in the waste and whether the waste is friable (easily crumbled or pulverized); (2) other physical and chemical characteristics of the waste; and (3) the State in which the waste is generated. This Information Brief provides an overview of the environment regulatory requirements affecting disposal of asbestos-containing waste. It does not address regulatory requirements applicable to worker protection promulgated under the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHAct), the Mining Safety and Health Act (MSHA), or the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA).

  10. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Information Digest 1992 edition. Volume 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olive, K [ed.] [ed.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission Information Digest provides a summary of information about the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), NRC's regulatory responsibilities, the activities NRC licenses, and general information on domestic and worldwide nuclear energy. This digest is a compilation of nuclear- and NRC-related data and is designed to provide a quick reference to major facts about the agency and industry it regulates. In general, the data cover 1975 through 1991, with exceptions noted. Information on generating capacity and average capacity factor for operating US commercial nuclear power reactors is obtained from monthly operating reports that are submitted directly to the NRC by the licensee. This information is reviewed by the NRC for consistency only and no independent validation and/or verification is performed.

  11. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Information Digest 1994 edition. Volume 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stadler, L.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission Information Digest (digest) provides a summary of information about the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), NRCs regulatory responsibility the activities NRC licenses, and general information on domestic and worldwide nuclear energy. The digest, published annually, is a compilation of nuclear-and NRC-related data and is designed to provide a quick reference to major facts about the agency and the industry it regulates. In general, the data cover 1975 through 1993, with exceptions noted. Information on generating capacity and average capacity factor for operating US commercial nuclear power reactors is obtained from monthly operating reports that are submitted directly to the NRC by the information is reviewed by the NRC for consistency only and no independent validation and/or verification is performed.

  12. Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies and assessment frameworks; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. The groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO2 utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other DOE regional partnerships. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Deliverables for the 7th Quarter reporting period include (1) for the geological efforts: Reports on Technology Needs and Action Plan on the Evaluation of Geological Sinks and Pilot Project Deployment (Deliverables 2 and 3), and Report on the Feasibility of Mineralization Trapping in the Snake River Plain Basin (Deliverable 14); (2) for the terrestrial efforts: Report on the Evaluation of Terrestrial Sinks and a Report of the Best Production Practices for Soil C Sequestration (Deliverables 8 and 15). In addition, the 7th Quarter activities for the Partnership included further development of the proposed activities for the deployment and demonstration phase of the carbon sequestration pilots including geological and terrestrial pilots, expansion of the Partnership to encompass regions and institutions that are complimentary to the steps we have identified, building greater collaborations with industry and stakeholders in the region, contributed to outreach efforts that spanned all partnerships, co-authorship on the Carbon Capture and Separation report, and developed a regional basis to address future energy opportunities in the region. The deliverables and activities are discussed in the following sections and appended to this report. The education and outreach efforts have resulted in a comprehensive plan which serves as a guide for implementing the outreach activities under Phase I. The public website has been expanded and integrated with the GIS carbon atlas. We have made presentations to stakeholders and policy makers including two tribal sequestration workshops, and made connections to other federal and state agencies concerned with GHG emissions, climate change, and efficient and environmental

  13. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2004-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first two Partnership meetings the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. During the third quarter, planning efforts are underway for the next Partnership meeting which will showcase the architecture of the GIS framework and initial results for sources and sinks, discuss the methods and analysis underway for assessing geological and terrestrial sequestration potentials. The meeting will conclude with an ASME workshop. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. Efforts are also being made to find funding to include Wyoming in the coverage areas for both geological and terrestrial sinks and sources. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound information on MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Two key deliverables were completed in the second quarter--a literature review/database to assess the soil carbon on rangelands, and the draft protocols, contracting options for soil carbon trading. The protocols developed for soil carbon trading are unique and provide a key component of the mechanisms that might be used to efficiently sequester GHG and reduce CO{sub 2} concentrations. While no key deliverables were due during the third quarter, progress on other deliverables is noted in the PowerPoint presentations and in this report. A series of meetings held during the second and third quarters have laid the foundations for assessing the issues surrounding carbon sequestration in this region, the need for a holistic approach to meeting energy demands and economic development potential, and the implementation of government programs or a market-based setting for soil C credits. These meetings provide a connection to stakeholders in the region and a basis on which to draw for the DOE PEIS hearings. In the fourth quarter, three deliverables have been completed, some in draft form to be revised and updated to include Wyoming. This is due primarily to some delays in funding to LANL and INEEL and the approval of a supplemental proposal to include Wyoming in much of the GIS data sets, analysis, and related materials. The de

  14. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first two Partnership meetings the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. During the third quarter, planning efforts are underway for the next Partnership meeting which will showcase the architecture of the GIS framework and initial results for sources and sinks, discuss the methods and analysis underway for assessing geological and terrestrial sequestration potentials. The meeting will conclude with an ASME workshop (see attached agenda). The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. Efforts are also being made to find funding to include Wyoming in the coverage areas for both geological and terrestrial sinks and sources. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound information on MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Two key deliverables were completed in the second quarter--a literature review/database to assess the soil carbon on rangelands, and the draft protocols, contracting options for soil carbon trading. The protocols developed for soil carbon trading are unique and provide a key component of the mechanisms that might be used to efficiently sequester GHG and reduce CO2 concentrations. While no key deliverables were due during the third quarter, progress on other deliverables is noted in the PowerPoint presentations and in this report. A series of meetings held during the second and third quarters have laid the foundations for assessing the issues surrounding carbon sequestration in this region, the need for a holistic approach to meeting energy demands and economic development potential, and the implementation of government programs or a market-based setting for soil C credits. These meetings provide a connection to stakeholders in the region and a basis on which to draw for the DOE PEIS hearings. A third Partnership meeting has been planned for August 04 in Idaho Falls; a preliminary agenda is attached.

  15. Activated Carbon Injection

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    History of the Clean Air Act and how the injection of carbon into a coal power plant's flu smoke can reduce the amount of mercury in the smoke.

  16. Carbon Fiber SMC

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    confidential, or otherwise restricted information. ACC932 Materials and Processes Technology Development Carbon Fiber SMC 5-20-09 Charles Knakal USCAR C. S. Wang General Motors...

  17. Activated Carbon Injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2014-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    History of the Clean Air Act and how the injection of carbon into a coal power plant's flu smoke can reduce the amount of mercury in the smoke.

  18. Reinforced Carbon Nanotubes.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ren, Zhifen (Newton, MA); Wen, Jian Guo (Newton, MA); Lao, Jing Y. (Chestnut Hill, MA); Li, Wenzhi (Brookline, MA)

    2005-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates generally to reinforced carbon nanotubes, and more particularly to reinforced carbon nanotubes having a plurality of microparticulate carbide or oxide materials formed substantially on the surface of such reinforced carbon nanotubes composite materials. In particular, the present invention provides reinforced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) having a plurality of boron carbide nanolumps formed substantially on a surface of the reinforced CNTs that provide a reinforcing effect on CNTs, enabling their use as effective reinforcing fillers for matrix materials to give high-strength composites. The present invention also provides methods for producing such carbide reinforced CNTs.

  19. Carbon Fiber Technology Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    conventional and alternative precursors to carbon fiber Advance high-volume composite design and manufacturing capabilities Transition technology to industry partners...

  20. EMBODIED CARBON TARIFFS Christoph Bhringer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EMBODIED CARBON TARIFFS Christoph Böhringer Jared C. Carbone Thomas F. Rutherford Revised: August 2013 Abstract Embodied carbon tariffs tax the direct and indirect carbon emissions embodied in trade -- an idea popularized by countries seeking to extend the reach of domestic carbon regu- lations. We

  1. Compendium of Regulatory Requirements Governing Underground Injection of Drilling Wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puder, Markus G.; Bryson, Bill; Veil, John A.

    2003-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a comprehensive compendium of the regulatory requirements governing the injection processes used for disposing of drilling wastes; in particular, for a process referred to in this report as slurry injection. The report consists of a narrative discussion of the regulatory requirements and practices for each of the oil- and gas-producing states, a table summarizing the types of injection processes authorized in each state, and an appendix that contains the text of many of the relevant state regulations and policies.

  2. Nuclear regulatory legislation, 104th Congress, Volume 1, No. 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the first of two volumes compiling statutes and material pertaining to nuclear regulatory legislation through the 104th Congress, 2nd Session. It is intended for use as a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) internal resource document. Legislative information reproduced in this document includes portions of the Atomic Energy Act, Energy Reorganization Act, Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act, and Nuclear Waste Policy Act. Other information included in this volume pertains to NRC user fees, NRC authorizations, the Inspector General Act, and the Administrative Procedure Act.

  3. Legal and regulatory issues affecting aquifer thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendrickson, P.L.

    1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document updates and expands the report with a similar title issued in October 1980. This document examines a number of legal and regulatory issues that potentially can affect implementation of the aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) concept. This concept involves the storage of thermal energy in an underground aquifer until a later date when it can be effectively utilized. Either heat energy or chill can be stored. Potential end uses of the energy include district space heating and cooling, industrial process applications, and use in agriculture or aquaculture. Issues are examined in four categories: regulatory requirements, property rights, potential liability, and issues related to heat or chill delivery.

  4. Regulatory practices in India for establishing nuclear power stations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De, A.K. [Atomic Energy Regulatory Board, Calcutta (India); Singh, S.P. [Atomic Energy Regulatory Board, Bombay (India)

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB) of India was established as an independent regulatory authority charged with regulating radiation protection and nuclear safety. This article reviews the current state of India`s nuclear power reactor program and discusses the makeup of functions of the AERB, including the preparation of issuance of safety codes, guides, and other standards, with special recent emphasis on pressurized-heavy-water reactors (PHWRs). The AERB`s relationship to nuclear plant owners is discussed, as are the inspection and control functions the AERB performs, both for the construction and operation of nuclear plants and the licensing of operating personnel. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  5. An Assessment of the Commercial Availability of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Technologies as of June 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dooley, James J.; Davidson, Casie L.; Dahowski, Robert T.

    2009-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, there is considerable confusion within parts of the carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technical and regulatory communities regarding the maturity and commercial readiness of the technologies needed to capture, transport, inject, monitor and verify the efficacy of carbon dioxide (CO2) storage in deep, geologic formations. The purpose of this technical report is to address this confusion by discussing the state of CCS technological readiness in terms of existing commercial deployments of CO2 capture systems, CO2 transportation pipelines, CO2 injection systems and measurement, monitoring and verification (MMV) systems for CO2 injected into deep geologic structures. To date, CO2 has been captured from both natural gas and coal fired commercial power generating facilities, gasification facilities and other industrial processes. Transportation via pipelines and injection of CO2 into the deep subsurface are well established commercial practices with more than 35 years of industrial experience. There are also a wide variety of MMV technologies that have been employed to understand the fate of CO2 injected into the deep subsurface. The four existing end-to-end commercial CCS projects – Sleipner, Snøhvit, In Salah and Weyburn – are using a broad range of these technologies, and prove that, at a high level, geologic CO2 storage technologies are mature and capable of deploying at commercial scales. Whether wide scale deployment of CCS is currently or will soon be a cost-effective means of reducing greenhouse gas emissions is largely a function of climate policies which have yet to be enacted and the public’s willingness to incur costs to avoid dangerous anthropogenic interference with the Earth’s climate. There are significant benefits to be had by continuing to improve through research, development, and demonstration suite of existing CCS technologies. Nonetheless, it is clear that most of the core technologies required to address capture, transport, injection, monitoring, management and verification for most large CO2 source types and in most CO2 storage formation types, exist.

  6. Carbon-Optimal and Carbon-Neutral Supply Chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caro, F.; Corbett, C. J.; Tan, T.; Zuidwijk, R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pearce, D. 2003. The Social Cost Of Carbon And Its PolicyR.S.J. 2008. The Social Cost of Carbon: Trends, Outliers and

  7. Carbon Park Environmental Impact Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of offsetting the University's carbon footprint, promoting biodiversity and establishing easily maintained Carbon Park Environmental Impact Assessment A B.E.S.T. Project By, Adam Bond 2011 #12; Bishop's University Carbon Park

  8. First Proof of Ferromagnetic Carbon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Proof of Ferromagnetic Carbon First Proof of Ferromagnetic Carbon Print Wednesday, 25 July 2007 00:00 Although it has long been suspected that carbon belongs on the short list of...

  9. Lead carbonate scintillator materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Derenzo, Stephen E. (Pinole, CA); Moses, William W. (Berkeley, CA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Improved radiation detectors containing lead carbonate or basic lead carbonate as the scintillator element are disclosed. Both of these scintillators have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to other known scintillator materials. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in medical uses.

  10. Fly ash carbon passivation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    La Count, Robert B; Baltrus, John P; Kern, Douglas G

    2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal method to passivate the carbon and/or other components in fly ash significantly decreases adsorption. The passivated carbon remains in the fly ash. Heating the fly ash to about 500 and 800 degrees C. under inert gas conditions sharply decreases the amount of surfactant adsorbed by the fly ash recovered after thermal treatment despite the fact that the carbon content remains in the fly ash. Using oxygen and inert gas mixtures, the present invention shows that a thermal treatment to about 500 degrees C. also sharply decreases the surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash even though most of the carbon remains intact. Also, thermal treatment to about 800 degrees C. under these same oxidative conditions shows a sharp decrease in surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash due to the fact that the carbon has been removed. This experiment simulates the various "carbon burnout" methods and is not a claim in this method. The present invention provides a thermal method of deactivating high carbon fly ash toward adsorption of AEAs while retaining the fly ash carbon. The fly ash can be used, for example, as a partial Portland cement replacement in air-entrained concrete, in conductive and other concretes, and for other applications.

  11. Independent Verification and Validation Of SAPHIRE 8 Software Quality Assurance Plan Project Number: N6423 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kent Norris

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides an evaluation of the Software Quality Assurance Plan. The Software Quality Assurance Plan is intended to ensure all actions necessary for the software life cycle; verification and validation activities; documentation and deliverables; project management; configuration management, nonconformance reporting and corrective action; and quality assessment and improvement have been planned and a systematic pattern of all actions necessary to provide adequate confidence that a software product conforms to established technical requirements; and to meet the contractual commitments prepared by the sponsor; the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

  12. Independent Verification and Validation Of SAPHIRE 8 Software Quality Assurance Plan Project Number: N6423 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kent Norris

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides an evaluation of the Software Quality Assurance Plan. The Software Quality Assurance Plan is intended to ensure all actions necessary for the software life cycle; verification and validation activities; documentation and deliverables; project management; configuration management, nonconformance reporting and corrective action; and quality assessment and improvement have been planned and a systematic pattern of all actions necessary to provide adequate confidence that a software product conforms to established technical requirements; and to meet the contractual commitments prepared by the sponsor; the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

  13. Position Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1992-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The order prescribes the policies, responsibilities, and procedures for position management within (DOE). Canceled by DOE N 1321.140. Cancels DOE 3510.1

  14. Management Analyst

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Wind and Water Power Technologies Office (WWPTO) manages efforts to improve performance, lower costs, and accelerate deployment of wind and water power technologies, which can play a...

  15. Quality Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Quality Management, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security develops policies and procedures to ensure the classification and control of information is effective and...

  16. ORIGINAL PAPER Carbon in heartwood, sapwood and bark along the stem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ORIGINAL PAPER Carbon in heartwood, sapwood and bark along the stem profile in three Mediterranean to orientate ecosystem management towards potential C sequestration. To achieve this, information is required in forest ecosystems. Keywords Pinus nigra . Pinus pinaster. Pinus sylvestris . Radial and axial . Carbon

  17. Determination of the Effect of Geological Reservoir Variability on Carbon Dioxide Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Determination of the Effect of Geological Reservoir Variability on Carbon Dioxide Storage Using'expériences -- Dans le contexte de l'étude du stockage géologique du dioxyde de carbone dans les réservoirs al. (2007) Energy Convers. Manage. 48, 1782-1797; Gunter et al. (1999) Appl. Geochem. 4, 1

  18. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Big Sky Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts during the second performance period fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first two Partnership meetings the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. Efforts are also being made to find funding to include Wyoming in the coverage areas for both geological and terrestrial sinks and sources. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long term viability. Scientifically sound information on MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Two key deliverables were completed this quarter--a literature review/database to assess the soil carbon on rangelands, and the draft protocols, contracting options for soil carbon trading. To date, there has been little research on soil carbon on rangelands, and since rangeland constitutes a major land use in the Big Sky region, this is important in achieving a better understanding of terrestrial sinks. The protocols developed for soil carbon trading are unique and provide a key component of the mechanisms that might be used to efficiently sequester GHG and reduce CO{sub 2} concentrations. Progress on other deliverables is noted in the PowerPoint presentations. A series of meetings held during the second quarter have laid the foundations for assessing the issues surrounding the implementation of a market-based setting for soil C credits. These meetings provide a connection to stakeholders in the region and a basis on which to draw for the DOE PEIS hearings. Finally, the education and outreach efforts have resulted in a comprehensive plan and process which serves as a guide for implementing the outreach activities under Phase I. While we are still working on the public website, we have made many presentations to stakeholders and policy makers, connections to other federal and state agencies concerned with GHG emissions, climate change, and efficient and environmentally-friendly energy production. In addition, we have laid plans for integration of our outreach efforts with the students, especially at the tribal colleges and at the universities involved in our partnership. This includes collaboration with the film and media arts departments at MSU, with outreach effort

  19. CARBON SEQUESTRATION STRATEGIES FOR CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GEOLOGIC CARBON SEQUESTRATION STRATEGIES FOR CALIFORNIA: REPORT TO THE LEGISLATURE Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB) studies that we used, including Cameron Downey

  20. Global Coastal Carbon Program Data from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    CDIAC provides data management support for the Global Coastal Carbon Data Project. The coastal regions data are very important for the understanding of carbon cycle on the continental margins. The Coastal Project data include the bottle (discrete) and surface (underway) carbon-related measurements from coastal research cruises, the data from time series cruises, and coastal moorings. The data from US East Coast, US West Coast, and European Coastal areas are available. CDIAC provides a map interface with vessel or platform names. Clicking on the name brings up information about the vessel or the scientific platform, the kinds of measurements collected and the timeframe, links to project pages, when available, and the links to the data files themselves.

  1. BIOINFORMATICS Inferring Gene Regulatory Networks from Time Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babu, M. Madan

    model regulatory relations in terms of Boolean relationships and combinatorial logic circuits (Kauffman the model (Shmulevich et al., 2002), the immediate extension of PBNs to any finite quantization (also. As opposed to PBNs, where gene interactions are modeled explicitly in terms of binary or multi-valued logical

  2. Report on the Workshop on Regulatory Approaches to Smart

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Report on the Workshop on Regulatory Approaches to Smart Grid Investment and Deployment May APEC Secretariat APEC#212-CT-04.2 #12;SCSC Smart Grid Workshop 2012 Page 1 Grid Investment and Deployment May 16-17, 2012 Quebec City, Canada #12;SCSC Smart Grid Workshop 2012

  3. Leptin and regulatory T lymphocytes in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Leptin and regulatory T lymphocytes in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension Alice Huertas1 Centre National de Référence de l'Hypertension Pulmonaire Sévère, Service de Pneumologie et Réanimation Respiratoire, Hôpital Antoine Béclère, AP-HP, Clamart, F- 92140; 3 INSERM U999 Hypertension Artérielle

  4. nature genetics advance online publication 1 Identifying regulatory networks by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Church, George M.

    for modeling transcriptional regulatory networks in more complex eukaryotes. 1Department of Genetics and Lipper of multiple tran- scription factors. Examples of this combinatorial transcriptional control have been, including the control of gene expression in response to a variety of signals from the environment

  5. Hazard Communication -Regulatory Compliance 1/17/2013 a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    Hazard Communication - Regulatory Compliance 1/17/2013 a OSHA has updated their Hazard Communication Standard (29 CFR 1910.1200) and requires that all employees that work with Hazardous Chemicals this standard applies are required to receive an updated training as new chemical hazards are introduced

  6. argentine nuclear regulatory: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    argentine nuclear regulatory First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 UNITED STATES NUCLEAR...

  7. The underappreciated role of regulatory enforcement in natural resource conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nie, Martin

    are analyzed. Keywords Natural resource policy Á Environmental policy Á Governance Á Conservation Á RegulationThe underappreciated role of regulatory enforcement in natural resource conservation Martin Nie resource conservation in the USA. It first briefly explains why the judiciary is so involved in resource

  8. Metabolism and proliferation share common regulatory pathways in cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Metabolism and proliferation share common regulatory pathways in cancer cells. Vanessa Fritz, proliferation, and cancer inserm-00491405,version1-11Jun2010 Author manuscript, published in "Oncogene 2010;29(31):4369-77" DOI : 10.1038/onc.2010.182 #12;Metabolism, proliferation and cancer Fritz and Fajas 2 Abstract Cancer

  9. Natural Gas: Major Legislative and Regulatory Actions (1935 - 2008)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This special report Web-based product presents a chronology of some of the key federal legislative and regulatory actions that have helped shape the natural gas market, with particular emphasis on policy directives from 1978 to October 2008. Separate reports provide brief descriptions of specific legislation, regulations, or policies, and their impacts on the natural gas market.

  10. Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan Capalbo

    2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I are organized into four areas: (1) Evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; (2) Development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; (3) Design of an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies, market-based opportunities for carbon management, and an economic/risk assessment framework; (referred to below as the Advanced Concepts component of the Phase I efforts) and (4) Initiation of a comprehensive education and outreach program. As a result of the Phase I activities, the groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that complements the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The geology of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region is favorable for the potential sequestration of enormous volume of CO{sub 2}. The United States Geological Survey (USGS 1995) identified 10 geologic provinces and 111 plays in the region. These provinces and plays include both sedimentary rock types characteristic of oil, gas, and coal productions as well as large areas of mafic volcanic rocks. Of the 10 provinces and 111 plays, 1 province and 4 plays are located within Idaho. The remaining 9 provinces and 107 plays are dominated by sedimentary rocks and located in the states of Montana and Wyoming. The potential sequestration capacity of the 9 sedimentary provinces within the region ranges from 25,000 to almost 900,000 million metric tons of CO{sub 2}. Overall every sedimentary formation investigated has significant potential to sequester large amounts of CO{sub 2}. Simulations conducted to evaluate mineral trapping potential of mafic volcanic rock formations located in the Idaho province suggest that supercritical CO{sub 2} is converted to solid carbonate mineral within a few hundred years and permanently entombs the carbon. Although MMV for this rock type may be challenging, a carefully chosen combination of geophysical and geochemical techniques should allow assessment of the fate of CO{sub 2} in deep basalt hosted aquifers. Terrestrial carbon sequestration relies on land management practices and technologies to remove atmospheric CO{sub 2} where it is stored in trees, plants, and soil. This indirect sequestration can be implemented today and is on the front line of voluntary, market-based approaches to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. Initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil Carbon (C) on rangelands, and forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Rangelands can store up to an additional 0.05 mt C/ha/yr, while the croplands are on average four times that amount. Estimates of technical potential for soil sequestration within the region in cropland are in the range of 2.0 M mt C/yr over 20 year time horizon. This is equivalent to approximately 7.0 M mt CO{sub 2}e/yr. The forestry sinks are well documented, and the potential in the Big Sky region ranges from 9-15 M mt CO{sub 2} equivalent per year. Value-added benefits include enhanced yields, reduced erosion, and increased wildlife habitat. Thus the terrestrial sinks provide a viable, environmentally beneficial, and relatively low cost sink that is available to sequester C in the current time frame. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological and terrestrial sequestration re

  11. The role of reactive oxygen species and calcium in the interferon regulatory factor 3 mediated toll like receptor 4 signaling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Zhiyuan

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cutting edge: anthrax lethal toxin inhibits activation of IFN-regulatory factorCutting edge: anthrax lethal toxin inhibits activation of IFN-regulatory factorCutting edge: anthrax lethal toxin inhibits activation of IFN-regulatory factor

  12. Possible Regulatory Role for the Histidine-Rich Loop in the Zinc...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regulatory Role for the Histidine-Rich Loop in the Zinc Transport Protein, ZnuA. Possible Regulatory Role for the Histidine-Rich Loop in the Zinc Transport Protein, ZnuA. Abstract:...

  13. Regulatory and technical reports (abstract index journal). Second quarter 1996, April--June

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheehan, M.A.

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains bibliographic data and abstracts for the formal regulatory and technical reports issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC) staff and it`s contractors.

  14. Systematic dissection of regulatory motifs in 2000 predicted human enhancers using a massively parallel reporter assay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kheradpour, Pouya

    Genome-wide chromatin annotations have permitted the mapping of putative regulatory elements across multiple human cell types. However, their experimental dissection by directed regulatory motif disruption has remained ...

  15. Environmental Policy Factors in the Maritime Industry and Anticipated Regulatory Trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayes, Richard D.

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Increased environmental regulatory policy has been put in place by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) in response to waterborne oil pollution events. We examine the IMO regulatory response to these incidences. This paper covers literature...

  16. Regulatory and technical reports (abstract index journal): Annual compilation for 1996, Volume 21, No. 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheehan, M.A.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This compilation is the annual cumulation of bibliographic data and abstracts for the formal regulatory and technical reports issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Staff and its contractors.

  17. Computational inference of transcriptional regulatory networks from expression proling and transcription

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babu, M. Madan

    Bioinformatics Program, 2 Department of Biology and 3 Biomedical Engineering Department, Boston University, 44Computational inference of transcriptional regulatory networks from expression pro ABSTRACT We have developed a computational method for transcriptional regulatory network inference, CARRIE

  18. Enterprise Risk Management Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    Enterprise Risk Management Program DRAFT Introduction to Enterprise Risk Management at UVM 1 #12;Enterprise Risk Management Program DRAFT What is Enterprise Risk Management? Enterprise risk management governance, and accountability · Facilitates effective management of the uncertainty and associated risks

  19. Basin-Scale Hydrologic Impacts of CO2 Storage: Regulatory and Capacity Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birkholzer, J.T.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessment of Geological Carbon Sequestration Options in the2009. Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships –from geologic carbon sequestration: area-of-review

  20. advanced carbon-carbon composites: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 CARBON-CARBON COMPOSITE ALLCOMP Carbon-Carbon Composite Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: CARBON-CARBON...