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1

Total Light Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Light Management Light Management Why is saving Energy Important World Electricity Consumption (2007) Top 20 Countries 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500 4000 4500 U n i t e d S t a t e s C h i n a J a p a n R u s s i a I n d i a G e r m a n y C a n a d a A f r i c a F r a n c e B r a z i l K o r e a , S o u t h U n i t e d K i n g d o m I t a l y S p a i n A u s t r a l i a T a i w a n S o u t h A f r i c a M e x i c o S a u d i A r a b i a I r a n Billion kWh Source: US DOE Energy Information Administration Lighting Control Strategies 4 5 6 Occupancy/Vacancy Sensing * The greatest energy savings achieved with any lighting fixture is when the lights are shut off * Minimize wasted light by providing occupancy sensing or vacancy sensing 7 8 Daylight Harvesting * Most commercial space has enough natural light flowing into it, and the amount of artificial light being generated can be unnecessary * Cut back on the production of artificial lighting by

2

Total quality management implementation guidelines  

SciTech Connect

These Guidelines were designed by the Energy Quality Council to help managers and supervisors in the Department of Energy Complex bring Total Quality Management to their organizations. Because the Department is composed of a rich mixture of diverse organizations, each with its own distinctive culture and quality history, these Guidelines are intended to be adapted by users to meet the particular needs of their organizations. For example, for organizations that are well along on their quality journeys and may already have achieved quality results, these Guidelines will provide a consistent methodology and terminology reference to foster their alignment with the overall Energy quality initiative. For organizations that are just beginning their quality journeys, these Guidelines will serve as a startup manual on quality principles applied in the Energy context.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Integrating Total Quality Management (TQM) and hazardous waste management  

SciTech Connect

The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 and its subsequent amendments have had a dramatic impact on hazardous waste management for business and industry. The complexity of this law and the penalties for noncompliance have made it one of the most challenging regulatory programs undertaken by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The fundamentals of RCRA include ``cradle to grave`` management of hazardous waste, covering generators, transporters, and treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. The regulations also address extensive definitions and listing/identification mechanisms for hazardous waste along with a tracking system. Treatment is favored over disposal and emphasis is on ``front-end`` treatment such as waste minimization and pollution prevention. A study of large corporations such as Xerox, 3M, and Dow Chemical, as well as the public sector, has shown that well known and successful hazardous waste management programs emphasize pollution prevention and employment of techniques such as proactive environmental management, environmentally conscious manufacturing, and source reduction. Nearly all successful hazardous waste programs include some aspects of Total Quality Management, which begins with a strong commitment from top management. Hazardous waste management at the Rocky Flats Plant is further complicated by the dominance of ``mixed waste`` at the facility. The mixed waste stems from the original mission of the facility, which was production of nuclear weapons components for the Department of Energy (DOE). A Quality Assurance Program based on the criterion in DOE Order 5700.6C has been implemented at Rocky Flats. All of the elements of the Quality Assurance Program play a role in hazardous waste management. Perhaps one of the biggest waste management problems facing the Rocky Flats Plant is cleaning up contamination from a forty year mission which focused on production of nuclear weapon components.

Kirk, N. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Rangeland Resource Management for Texans: Total Resource Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Total Resource Management approach helps ranchers make strategic, tactical and operational decisions for the best, most cost-effective use of resources. This publication offers step-by-step directions for implementing TRM for a profitable...

Hanselka, C. Wayne; Fox, William E.; White, Larry D.

2004-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

5

Total Building Air Management: When Dehumidification Counts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MANAGEMENT ASHRAE 62-89, and the much discussed amendments to this document, is changing the way that the commercial building industry conducts business. As Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) becomes a major theme of regulators, it also becomes a major concern... within the building industry, particularly in the commercial building industry. Failure to comply with industry standards can result in law suits and st. penalties. Every design build contractor, commercial architect, design engineer and commercial...

Chilton, R. L.; White, C. L.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Managing Total Corporate Electricity/Energy Market Risks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper starts with a short history of the use of value-at-risk techniques in financial risk management. The specific and often unique risk management challenges faced by electricity companies are then desc...

Alex Henney; Greg Keers

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

The Office of Environmental Management Celebrates 20 years (1989...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Office of Environmental Management Celebrates 20 years (1989-2009) Work progresses rapidly on the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU). Click on image to enlarge With the...

8

Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Total .............. 16,164,874 5,967,376 22,132,249 2,972,552 280,370 167,519 18,711,808 1993 Total .............. 16,691,139 6,034,504 22,725,642 3,103,014 413,971 226,743 18,981,915 1994 Total .............. 17,351,060 6,229,645 23,580,706 3,230,667 412,178 228,336 19,709,525 1995 Total .............. 17,282,032 6,461,596 23,743,628 3,565,023 388,392 283,739 19,506,474 1996 Total .............. 17,680,777 6,370,888 24,051,665 3,510,330 518,425 272,117 19,750,793 Alabama Total......... 570,907 11,394 582,301 22,601 27,006 1,853 530,841 Onshore ................ 209,839 11,394 221,233 22,601 16,762 1,593 180,277 State Offshore....... 209,013 0 209,013 0 10,244 260 198,509 Federal Offshore... 152,055 0 152,055 0 0 0 152,055 Alaska Total ............ 183,747 3,189,837 3,373,584 2,885,686 0 7,070 480,828 Onshore ................ 64,751 3,182,782

9

Total Quality Management and nuclear weapons: A historian`s perspective  

SciTech Connect

Total Quality Management (TQM) has become a significant management theme at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This paper discusses the historical roots of TQM at Los Alamos and how TQM has been used in the development of nuclear weapons.

Meade, R.A.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Total............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total................................................................... Total................................................................... 111.1 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546

11

Relationship of the HACCP system to Total Quality Management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Websters Dictionary (1989) defines quality as a degree of excellence or superiority in kind. The American Society for Quality Control (ASQC, 1987) specifies that quality is the totality of feat...

N. B. Webb; J. L. Marsden

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Total...................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4,690,065 52,331,397 2,802,751 4,409,699 7,526,898 209,616 1993 Total................... 4,956,445 52,535,411 2,861,569 4,464,906 7,981,433 209,666 1994 Total................... 4,847,702 53,392,557 2,895,013 4,533,905 8,167,033 202,940 1995 Total................... 4,850,318 54,322,179 3,031,077 4,636,500 8,579,585 209,398 1996 Total................... 5,241,414 55,263,673 3,158,244 4,720,227 8,870,422 206,049 Alabama ...................... 56,522 766,322 29,000 62,064 201,414 2,512 Alaska.......................... 16,179 81,348 27,315 12,732 75,616 202 Arizona ........................ 27,709 689,597 28,987 49,693 26,979 534 Arkansas ..................... 46,289 539,952 31,006 67,293 141,300 1,488 California ..................... 473,310 8,969,308 235,068 408,294 693,539 36,613 Colorado...................... 110,924 1,147,743

13

A total system approach to sustainable pest?management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...therapeutics. Thus, the classic treadmill effect in pursuit of remediation of the symptoms persists (2) while tolls due to pests grow...management. In fact, many seem to view biotechnology as an innovative means for providing safe and effective tools that will essentially...

W. J. Lewis; J. C. van Lenteren; Sharad C. Phatak; J. H. Tumlinson III

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 2.1 0.6 Q 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 13.6 3.7 3.2 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 9.5 3.7 3.4 4.2 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.6 2.7 2.5 3.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 5.0 2.1 2.8 2.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.7 1.8 2.8 2.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.0 1.4 1.7 1.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.6 0.8 1.5 1.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

15

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.6 Q Q 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 9.0 4.2 1.5 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 8.6 4.7 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.0 2.9 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 4.1 2.1 0.7 1.3 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.0 1.8 0.5 0.7 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.1 1.2 0.5 0.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.5 0.8 0.3 0.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

16

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.9 1.0 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.9 9.0 6.3 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 4.4 8.6 5.0 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 3.5 6.0 4.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 3.2 4.1 2.6 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 2.7 3.0 2.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 2.1 2.1 0.9 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 1.7 1.5 0.9 4,000 or More.....................................................

17

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 1.0 0.2 0.8 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 6.3 1.4 4.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 5.0 1.6 3.4 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 4.0 1.4 2.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.6 0.9 1.7 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.4 0.9 1.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.9 0.3 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 0.9 0.4 0.5 4,000 or More.....................................................

18

Total.........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Floorspace (Square Feet) Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 2 Fewer than 500.................................................. 3.2 Q 0.8 0.9 0.8 0.5 500 to 999.......................................................... 23.8 1.5 5.4 5.5 6.1 5.3 1,000 to 1,499.................................................... 20.8 1.4 4.0 5.2 5.0 5.2 1,500 to 1,999.................................................... 15.4 1.4 3.1 3.5 3.6 3.8 2,000 to 2,499.................................................... 12.2 1.4 3.2 3.0 2.3 2.3 2,500 to 2,999.................................................... 10.3 1.5 2.3 2.7 2.1 1.7 3,000 to 3,499.................................................... 6.7 1.0 2.0 1.7 1.0 1.0 3,500 to 3,999.................................................... 5.2 0.8 1.5 1.5 0.7 0.7 4,000 or More.....................................................

19

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.6 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 2.2 0.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 1.4 0.5 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 1.7 0.5 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 1.7 0.6 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 1.0 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 0.9 0.3 4,000 or More.....................................................

20

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.4 Q Q 0.5 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 2.5 1.5 2.1 3.7 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 1.1 2.0 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 0.5 1.2 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 0.7 0.5 0.8 1.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 0.5 0.5 0.4 1.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.3 Q 0.4 0.3 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 Q Q Q Q 4,000 or More.....................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "management total year" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500...................................... 3.1 2.3 403 360 165 366 348 93 500 to 999.............................................. 22.2 14.4 763 660 277 730 646 303 1,000 to 1,499........................................ 19.1 5.8 1,223 1,130 496 1,187 1,086 696 1,500 to 1,999........................................ 14.4 1.0 1,700 1,422 412 1,698 1,544 1,348 2,000 to 2,499........................................ 12.7 0.4 2,139 1,598 Q Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999........................................ 10.1 Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 3,000 or More......................................... 29.6 0.3 Q Q Q Q Q Q Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None...................................................... 3.6 1.8 1,048 0 Q 827 0 407 Fewer than 500......................................

22

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2,033 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546 3,500 to 3,999................................................. 5.2 3,549 2,509 1,508

23

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................... 3.2 1.9 0.9 Q Q Q 1.3 2.3 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 10.5 7.3 3.3 1.4 1.2 6.6 12.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 5.8 7.0 3.8 2.2 2.0 3.9 8.9 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 3.1 4.2 3.4 2.0 2.7 1.9 5.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.7 2.7 2.9 1.8 3.2 1.1 2.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.2 2.2 2.3 1.7 2.9 0.6 2.0 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 0.9 1.4 1.5 1.0 1.9 0.4 1.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 0.8 1.2 1.0 0.8 1.5 0.4 1.3 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3 0.9 1.9 2.2 2.0 6.4 0.6 1.9 Heated Floorspace

24

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.7 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500.................................... 3.2 0.7 Q 0.3 0.3 0.7 0.6 0.3 Q 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 2.7 1.4 2.2 2.8 5.5 5.1 3.0 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 2.3 1.4 2.4 2.5 3.5 3.5 3.6 1.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.0 2.4 2.4 2.1 1.2 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.4 0.9 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.1 1.6 0.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.6 0.9 1.1 1.1 1.5 1.5 1.7 0.8 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 1.0 0.5 0.8 0.8 1.2 0.8 0.9 0.8 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 1.1 0.3 0.7 0.7 0.4 0.5 1.0 0.5 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3

25

Total................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 86.6 2,522 1,970 1,310 1,812 1,475 821 1,055 944 554 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................. 3.2 0.9 261 336 162 Q Q Q 334 260 Q 500 to 999.................................... 23.8 9.4 670 683 320 705 666 274 811 721 363 1,000 to 1,499.............................. 20.8 15.0 1,121 1,083 622 1,129 1,052 535 1,228 1,090 676 1,500 to 1,999.............................. 15.4 14.4 1,574 1,450 945 1,628 1,327 629 1,712 1,489 808 2,000 to 2,499.............................. 12.2 11.9 2,039 1,731 1,055 2,143 1,813 1,152 Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999.............................. 10.3 10.1 2,519 2,004 1,357 2,492 2,103 1,096 Q Q Q 3,000 or 3,499.............................. 6.7 6.6 3,014 2,175 1,438 3,047 2,079 1,108 N N N 3,500 to 3,999.............................. 5.2 5.1 3,549 2,505 1,518 Q Q Q N N N 4,000 or More...............................

26

SUGGESTED THREE-YEAR GRADUATION PLAN Roadmap: Recreation, Park and Tourism Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SUGGESTED THREE-YEAR GRADUATION PLAN Roadmap: Recreation, Park and Tourism Management ­ Park-YEAR GRADUATION PLAN Roadmap: Recreation, Park and Tourism Management ­ Park Management ­ Bachelor of Science [EH

Sheridan, Scott

27

SUGGESTED THREE-YEAR GRADUATION PLAN Roadmap: Recreation, Park and Tourism Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SUGGESTED THREE-YEAR GRADUATION PLAN Roadmap: Recreation, Park and Tourism Management ­ Recreation-YEAR GRADUATION PLAN Roadmap: Recreation, Park and Tourism Management ­ Recreation Management ­ Bachelor

Sheridan, Scott

28

Waste Information Management System: One Year After Web Deployment  

SciTech Connect

The implementation of the Department of Energy (DOE) mandated accelerated cleanup program created significant potential technical impediments. The schedule compression required close coordination and a comprehensive review and prioritization of the barriers that impeded treatment and disposition of the waste streams at each site. Many issues related to site waste treatment and disposal were potential critical path issues under the accelerated schedules. In order to facilitate accelerated cleanup initiatives, waste managers at DOE field sites and at DOE Headquarters in Washington, D.C., needed timely waste forecast information regarding the volumes and types of waste that would be generated by DOE sites over the next 30 years. Each local DOE site has historically collected, organized, and displayed site waste forecast information in separate and unique systems. However, waste information from all sites needed a common application to allow interested parties to understand and view the complete complex-wide picture. A common application allows identification of total waste volumes, material classes, disposition sites, choke points, and technological or regulatory barriers to treatment and disposal. The Applied Research Center (ARC) at Florida International University (FIU) in Miami, Florida, has completed the deployment of this fully operational, web-based forecast system. New functional modules and annual waste forecast data updates have been added to ensure the long-term viability and value of this system. In conclusion: WIMS continues to successfully accomplish the goals and objectives set forth by DOE for this project. WIMS has replaced the historic process of each DOE site gathering, organizing, and reporting their waste forecast information utilizing different database and display technologies. In addition, WIMS meets DOE's objective to have the complex-wide waste forecast information available to all stakeholders and the public in one easy-to-navigate system. The enhancements to WIMS made over the year since its web deployment include the addition of new DOE sites, an updated data set, and the ability to easily print the forecast data tables, the disposition maps, and the GIS maps. Future enhancements will include a high-level waste summary, a display of waste forecast by mode of transportation, and a user help module. The waste summary display module will provide a high-level summary view of the waste forecast data based on the selection of sites, facilities, material types, and forecast years. The waste summary report module will allow users to build custom filtered reports in a variety of formats, such as MS Excel, MS Word, and PDF. The user help module will provide a step-by-step explanation of various modules, using screen shots and general tutorials. The help module will also provide instructions for printing and margin/layout settings to assist users in using their local printers to print maps and reports. (authors)

Shoffner, P.A.; Geisler, T.J.; Upadhyay, H.; Quintero, W. [Applied Research Center, Florida International University, Miami, FL (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Groningen temporomandibular total joint prosthesis: An 8-year longitudinal follow-up on function and pain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Total temporomandibular joint replacement is a surgical procedure for patients with severe temporomandibular joint afflictions affecting quality of life, which have not responded beneficially to previous conventional surgery. The aim of this study was to assess the long-term outcome of the Groningen temporomandibular joint (TMJ) prosthesis in patients with chronic pain and mutilated temporomandibular joints following multiple surgical procedures, with respect to prosthesis failure, the patient's postoperative level of satisfaction and longitudinal changes in maximum mouth opening, functional mandibular impairment and pain. Eight female patients were studied in whom Groningen TMJ prostheses were inserted, two unilaterally and six bilaterally. The Groningen TMJ prosthesis was mechanically successful during 8years of follow-up in seven out of eight patients with a disc dislocation being seen in one patient (7%). Patients were satisfied, despite the limited improvement of the maximum mouth opening, and pain scores. Although the decline of MFIQ scores during 8years of follow-up was significant compared to baseline (p=0.027), the effects of the prosthesis on maximum mouth opening, function and pain were limited. This may be due to persistent chronic pain and the adverse effects of multiple previous surgical procedures.

Jennifer M. Schuurhuis; Pieter U. Dijkstra; Boudewijn Stegenga; Lambert G.M. de Bont; Fred K.L. Spijkervet

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

1 1 YEAR 2011 Males 18 Females 23 YEAR 2011 SES 2 EJ/EK 2 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 35 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 2 YEAR 2011 American Indian Male 1 American Indian Female 2 African American Male 3 African American Female 9 Asian Male 0 Asian Female 0 Hispanic Male 2 Hispanic Female 6 White Male 12 White Female 6 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Associate Administrator for Information Management & Chief Information Officer, NA-IM As of Sep 24, 2011 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER 18 43.9% 23 56.1% Gender Males Females 4.9% 4.9% 85.4% 4.9% Pay Plan SES EJ/EK NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) NU (Tech/Admin Support) 2.4% 4.9% 7.3% 22.0% 0.0% 0.0% 4.9% 14.6% 29.3% 14.6% Race and Gender American Indian Male American Indian Female African American Male African American Female Asian Male Asian Female Hispanic Male

31

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

40 40 YEAR 2011 Males 68 Females 72 YEAR 2011 SES 5 EJ/EK 1 NN (Engineering) 16 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 115 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 3 YEAR 2011 American Indian Male 1 American Indian Female 2 African American Male 3 African American Female 7 Asian Male 4 Asian Female 0 Hispanic Male 25 Hispanic Female 26 White Male 35 White Female 37 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Associate Administrator for Acquistion & Project Management, NA-APM As of Sep 24, 2011 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER 68 48.6% 72 51.4% Gender Males Females 3.6% 0.7% 11.4% 82.1% 2.1% Pay Plan SES EJ/EK NN (Engineering) NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) NU (Tech/Admin Support) 0.7% 1.4% 2.1% 5.0% 2.9% 0.0% 17.9% 18.6% 25.0% 26.4% Race and Gender American Indian Male American Indian Female African American Male African American Female Asian Male

32

state","Jan","Feb","Mar","Q1 Total","Apr","May","Jun","Q2 Total","Year total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year total" Year total" "Alabama",1562473,1400113,1447708,4410294,1592661,1584520,1474279,4651460,9061754 "Alaska",102639,95553,102206,300398,151343,155955,134279,441577,741975 "Arizona",626131,579206,619554,1824891,748419,751109,684147,2183675,4008566 "Arkansas",1344,1241,1331,3916,572,572,538,1682,5598 "Colorado",2049961,1815249,1916126,5781336,1708460,1651160,1937762,5297382,11078718 "Illinois",4897036,4449010,4664902,14010948,4596761,4692289,4224673,13513723,27524671 "Indiana",3304230,2985013,3132637,9421880,3242977,3260643,3012840,9516460,18938340 "Kansas",1589,1462,1564,4615,1627,1605,1527,4759,9374 "Kentucky Total",7194068,6511926,6926423,20632417,7065146,7169716,6488303,20723165,41355582

33

25 Years of MCDA in nuclear emergency management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Paraskevas, A. (2006) Crisis management or crisis response system?: A complexity science approach to organizational crises. Manage...A. (2010) The development of management sciences/operational research discourses......

K. Nadia Papamichail; Simon French

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Management Challenges at the Department of Energy ? Fiscal Year...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Our testing revealed various weaknesses related to security reporting, access controls, patch management, system integrity, configuration management, segregation of duties and...

35

Fixed-flowrate total water network synthesis under uncertainty with risk management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This work addresses the problem of integrated water network synthesis under uncertainty with risk management. We consider a superstructure consisting of water sources, regenerators, and sinks that leads to a mixed-integer quadratically-constrained quadratic program (MIQCQP) for a fixed-flowrate total water network synthesis problem. Uncertainty in the problem is accounted for via a recourse-based two-stage stochastic programming formulation with discrete scenarios that gives rise to a multiscenario MIQCQP comprising network design in the first stage and its operation in the second stage acting as recourse. In addition, we extend the model to address risk management using the Conditional Value-at-Risk (CVaR) metric. Because a large number of scenarios is often required to capture the underlying uncertainty of the problem, causing the model to suffer from the curse of dimensionality, we propose a stepwise solution strategy to reduce the computational load. We illustrate this methodology on a case study inspired from the water network of a petroleum refinery in Malaysia. The presence of nonconvex bilinear terms necessitates the use of global optimization techniques for which we employ a new global MIQCQP solver, GAMS/GloMIQO and verify the solutions with BARON. Our computational results show that total water network synthesis under uncertainty with risk management problems can be solved to global optimality in reasonable time.

Cheng Seong Khor; Benoit Chachuat; Nilay Shah

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

temperature that Earth will experience to the year 2100 depends most reliably on the total  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-traditional fossil-fuel sources of tar shales, oil sands or methane hydrates. Last year, we probably emitted more the amount of carbon contained in proven reserves of gas, oil and coal, let alone reserves of non

37

SUGGESTED THREE-YEAR GRADUATION PLAN Human Development and Family Studies Case Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development 3 See note 1 on page 2 HDFS 25512 Management of Family Resources 3 HDFS 34031 Cultural DiversitySUGGESTED THREE-YEAR GRADUATION PLAN Human Development and Family Studies ­Case Management THREE-YEAR GRADUATION PLAN Human Development and Family Studies ­Case Management for Individuals

Sheridan, Scott

38

Waste Management Project fiscal year 1998 multi-year work plan, WBS 1.2  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Management Project manages and integrates (non-TWRS) waste management activities at the site. Activities include management of Hanford wastes as well as waste transferred to Hanford from other DOE, Department of Defense, or other facilities. This work includes handling, treatment, storage, and disposal of radioactive, nonradioactive, hazardous, and mixed solid and liquid wastes. Major Waste Management Projects are the Solid Waste Project, Liquid Effluents Project, and Analytical Services. Existing facilities (e.g., grout vaults and canyons) shall be evaluated for reuse for these purposes to the maximum extent possible.

Jacobsen, P.H.

1997-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

39

Toward the Development of Multi-Year Total and Special Solar Radiation Budgets at the Three ARM Locales  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Development of Multi-Year Total and Special the Development of Multi-Year Total and Special Solar Radiation Budgets at the Three ARM Locales Z. Li and M. C. Cribb Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center University of Maryland College Park, Maryland A. P. Trishchenko Canada Centre for Remote Sensing Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Introduction Over the past decade, an unprecedented amount of high-quality observational data pertaining to atmospheric and surface parameters has been collected at Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) locales around the globe. These data have been critical in the development and validation of models used to study the complex interaction of cloud, aerosols, and the surface on the solar radiative budget (SRB), the primary force driving atmospheric circulation. As the next step forward, the challenge of

40

85Kr management trade-offs: a perspective to total radiation dose commitment  

SciTech Connect

Radiological consequences arising from the trade-offs for /sup 85/Kr waste management from possible nuclear fuel resource recovery activities have been investigated. The reference management technique is to release all the waste gas to the atmosphere where it is diluted and dispersed. A potential alternative is to collect, concentrate, package and submit the gas to long-term storage. This study compares the radiation dose commitment to the public and to the occupationally exposed work force from these alternatives. The results indicate that it makes little difference to the magnitude of the world population dose whether /sup 85/Kr is captured and stored or chronically released to the environment. Further, comparisons of radiation exposures (for the purpose of estimating health effects) at very low dose rates to very large populations with exposures to a small number of occupationally exposed workers who each receive much higher dose rates may be misleading. Finally, cost studies (EPA 1976 and DOE 1979a) show that inordinate amounts of money will be required to lower this already extremely small 80-year cumulative world population dose of 0.05 mrem/person (<0.001% of natural background radiation for the same time period).

Mellinger, P.J.; Hoenes, G.R.; Brackenbush, L.W.; Greenborg, J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "management total year" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Waste management project fiscal year 1998 multi-year work plan WBS 1.2  

SciTech Connect

The MYWP technical baseline describes the work to be accomplished by the Project and the technical standards which govern that work. The Waste Management Project manages and integrates (non-TWRS) waste management activities at the site. Activities include management of Hanford wastes as well as waste transferred to Hanford from other DOE, Department of Defense, or other facilities. This work includes handling, treatment, storage, and disposition of radioactive, nonradioactive, hazardous, and mixed solid and liquid wastes. Major Waste Management Projects are the Solid Waste Project (SW), Liquid Effluents Project (LEP), and Analytical Services. Existing facilities (e.g., grout vaults and canyons) shall be evaluated for reuse for these purposes to the maximum extent possible. The paper tabulates the major facilities that interface with this Project, identifying the major facilities that generate waste, materials, or infrastructure for this Project and the major facilities that will receive waste and materials from this Project.

Slaybaugh, R.R.

1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

42

Table ET1. Primary Energy, Electricity, and Total Energy Price and Expenditure Estimates, Selected Years, 1970-2011, United States  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

ET1. Primary Energy, Electricity, and Total Energy Price and Expenditure Estimates, Selected Years, 1970-2011, United States ET1. Primary Energy, Electricity, and Total Energy Price and Expenditure Estimates, Selected Years, 1970-2011, United States Year Primary Energy Electric Power Sector h,j Retail Electricity Total Energy g,h,i Coal Coal Coke Natural Gas a Petroleum Nuclear Fuel Biomass Total g,h,i,j Coking Coal Steam Coal Total Exports Imports Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel b LPG c Motor Gasoline d Residual Fuel Oil Other e Total Wood and Waste f,g Prices in Dollars per Million Btu 1970 0.45 0.36 0.38 1.27 0.93 0.59 1.16 0.73 1.43 2.85 0.42 1.38 1.71 0.18 1.29 1.08 0.32 4.98 1.65 1975 1.65 0.90 1.03 2.37 3.47 1.18 2.60 2.05 2.96 4.65 1.93 2.94 3.35 0.24 1.50 2.19 0.97 8.61 3.33 1980 2.10 1.38 1.46 2.54 3.19 2.86 6.70 6.36 5.64 9.84 3.88 7.04 7.40 0.43 2.26 4.57 1.77 13.95 6.89 1985 2.03 1.67 1.69 2.76 2.99 4.61 7.22 5.91 6.63 9.01 4.30 R 7.62 R 7.64 0.71 2.47 4.93 1.91 19.05

43

25 Years of MCDA in nuclear emergency management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......with high chemical/nuclear accident risk perceptions...involved, public policy deliberative processes...analysis to guide public policy deliberations. Decis...public debate on nuclear power. Eur. J...multi-criteria analysis in nuclear emergency management...Intelligent Decision and Policy Making Support Systems......

K. Nadia Papamichail; Simon French

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Managerial information behaviour: Relationships among Total Quality Management orientation, information use environments, and managerial roles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

production process and customer information Low Total Quality Learning: continuous innovation and learning: exploration

Simard, C; Rice, Ronald E

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

A Total Quality Management (TQM) Approach for Energy Savings Through Employee Awareness and Building Upgrades to Improve Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A TOTAL QUALIn' MANAGEMENT (TQM) APPROACH FOR ENERGY SAVINGS THROUGH EMPLOYEE AWARENESS AND BUILDING UPGRADES TO IMPROVE ENERGY EFFICIENCY Daniel H. Stewart, Principal Engineer, Facilities Department, Rh6oe-Poulenc. Inc., Cranbury, NJ...) approach depends on the input from the end-users, clients, employees, power companies, various consultants and site operation management. This paper discusses the energy efficiency projects that are currently in progress at Rhone Poulenc's Corporate...

Stewart, D. H.

46

ORAU Wins DOE Facility Management Contractor Small Business Achievement of the Year  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) won the Facility Management Contractor Small Business Achievement of the Year Award for FY 2013 at the Small Business Forum & Expo, June 12, 2014, Tampa, FL.

47

Energy Management: A Corporate Objective in the Five-Year Business Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents the Energy Management Program developed by the Western Electric Company. The program includes managerial accountabilities; administrative and technical activities; and a most recently implemented comprehensive five-year energy...

Mulhern, T. A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Purchasing and Materials Management Organization, Sandia National Laboratories annual report, fiscal year 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the purchasing and transportation activities of the Purchasing and Materials Management Organization for Fiscal Year 1993. Activities for both the New Mexico and California locations are included.

Martin, D.R.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

After years of research on captive elephant management in Nepal, UC anthropologist Dr  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

After years of research on captive elephant management in Nepal, UC anthropologist Dr Piers Locke-elephant relations, biodiversity conservation and nature tourism in the Chitwan National Park, in Nepal. During

Hickman, Mark

50

SUGGESTED THREE-YEAR GRADUATION PLAN Roadmap: Recreation, Park and Tourism Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SUGGESTED THREE-YEAR GRADUATION PLAN Roadmap: Recreation, Park and Tourism Management ­ Tourism Introduction to Global Tourism 3 Offered in fall only HM 13024 Introduction to Hospitality Management 2 US; offered in fall only RPTM 36060 Commercial Recreation and Tourism 3 Offered in fall only RPTM 36075

Sheridan, Scott

51

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

4 4 YEAR 2011 Males 21 Females 23 YEAR 2011 SES 3 EJ/EK 1 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 3 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 31 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 5 YEAR 2011 American Indian Male 0 American Indian Female 0 African American Male 1 African American Female 2 Asian Male 1 Asian Female 1 Hispanic Male 6 Hispanic Female 10 White Male 13 White Female 10 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Office of General Counsel, NA-GC As of Sep 24, 2011 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER 21 47.7% 23 52.3% Gender Males Females 6.8% 2.3% 2.3% 6.8% 70.5% 11.4% Pay Plan SES EJ/EK EN 03 NN (Engineering) NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) NU (Tech/Admin Support) 0.0% 0.0% 2.3% 4.5% 2.3% 2.3% 13.6% 22.7% 29.5% 22.7% Race and Gender American Indian Male American Indian Female African American Male African American Female Asian Male Asian Female Hispanic Male

52

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

6 6 YEAR 2011 Males 7 Females 9 YEAR 2011 SES 1 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 9 GS 15 2 GS 13 2 GS 12 1 GS 11 1 YEAR 2011 American Indian Male 0 American Indian Female 0 African American Male 1 African American Female 3 Asian Male 1 Asian Female 0 Hispanic Male 1 Hispanic Female 0 White Male 4 White Female 6 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Associate Administrator of External Affairs, NA-EA As of Sep 24, 2011 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER 7 43.8% 9 56.3% Gender Males Females 6.3% 56.3% 12.5% 12.5% 6.3% 6.3% Pay Plan SES NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) GS 15 GS 13 GS 12 GS 11 0.0% 0.0% 6.3% 18.8% 6.3% 0.0% 6.3% 0.0% 25.0% 37.5% Race and Gender American Indian Male American Indian Female African American Male African American Female Asian Male Asian Female Hispanic Male Hispanic Female White Male White Female FY11 Workforce Diversity

53

40 Years Of Dogger Aquifer Management In Ile-De-France, Paris Basin, France  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Years Of Dogger Aquifer Management In Ile-De-France, Paris Basin, France Years Of Dogger Aquifer Management In Ile-De-France, Paris Basin, France Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: 40 Years Of Dogger Aquifer Management In Ile-De-France, Paris Basin, France Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Geothermal energy has been supplying heat to district networks in the Paris Basin for more than 40 years. The most serious difficulties have been corrosion and scaling related problems that occurred in many geothermal loops in the mid-1980s. The main target of all exploration and exploitation projects has been the Dogger aquifer. Most of the operating facilities use the "doublet" technology which consists of a closed loop with one production well and one injection well. Injection of the cooled

54

Mycorrhizae and phosphorus fertilization effects on survival, growth, total biomass and leaf nutrient levels of two-year old Leucaena leucocephala  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MYCORRHIZAE AND PHOSPHORUS FERTILIZATION EFFECTS ON SURVIVAL, GRONTH& TOTAL BIOMASS AND LEAF NUTRIENT LEVELS OF TWO-YEAR CLD LEUCAENA LEUCOCEPHALA A Thesis by DAVID KAHURIA MBUGUA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1985 Major Subject: Forestry MYCORRHIZAE AND PHOSPHORUS FERTILIZATION EFFECTS ON SURVIVAL, GROWTH& TOTAL BIOMASS AND LEAF NUTRIENT LEVELS OF TWO-YEAR OLD LEUCAENA...

Mbugua, David Kahuria

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

55

Comparison of approaches to Total Quality Management. Including an examination of the Department of Energy`s position on quality management  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a comparison of several qualitatively different approaches to Total Quality Management (TQM). The continuum ranges from management approaches that are primarily standards -- with specific guidelines, but few theoretical concepts -- to approaches that are primarily philosophical, with few specific guidelines. The approaches to TQM discussed in this paper include the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 9000 Standard, the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award, Senge`s the Learning Organization, Watkins and Marsick`s approach to organizational learning, Covey`s Seven Habits of Highly Successful People, and Deming`s Fourteen Points for Management. Some of these approaches (Deming and ISO 9000) are then compared to the DOE`s official position on quality management and conduct of operations (DOE Orders 5700.6C and 5480.19). Using a tabular format, it is shown that while 5700.6C (Quality Assurance) maps well to many of the current approaches to TQM, DOE`s principle guide to management Order 5419.80 (Conduct of Operations) has many significant conflicts with some of the modern approaches to continuous quality improvement.

Bennett, C.T.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Office of Legacy Management: The First Five Years FY 2004¬タモ2008  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

S S . D E PA R T M E NT O F U. S . D E PA R T M E NT O F ENERGY ENERGY Managing Today's Change, Protecting Tomorrow's Future Managing Today's Change, Protecting Tomorrow's Future DOE/LM-1461 Office of Legacy Management FY 2004-2008 The First Five Years Front cover photos top to bottom: Rocky Flats, Colorado, site and the Fernald Preserve Visitors Center in Ohio. Back cover photos top to bottom: Pinellas, Florida, site and the Rifle, Colorado, site. This report covers the time period from December 2003 (FY 2004) through September 2008 (FY 2008). DOE/LM-1461 December 2008 www.LM.doe.gov Office of Legacy Management The First Five Years FY 2004-2008 ENERGY Office of Legacy Management U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Letter From the Director The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) established the Office of Legacy Management (LM) on December 15, 2003, to provide a long-term, sustainable solution

57

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 0 Hispanic Male (H M) 2 Hispanic Female (H F) 0 White Male (W M) 154 White Female (W F) 71 * Total numbers are combined. NA-30 total numbers...

58

SUGGESTED THREE-YEAR GRADUATION PLAN Roadmap: Recreation, Park and Tourism Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SUGGESTED THREE-YEAR GRADUATION PLAN Roadmap: Recreation, Park and Tourism Management ­ Tourism Recreation Group Leadership 3 RPTM 26060 Introduction to Global Tourism 3 Offered in fall only HM 13024 Fulfills domestic diversity requirement; offered in fall only RPTM 36060 Commercial Recreation and Tourism

Sheridan, Scott

59

Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management's Fiscal Year 2010 Financial Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

15, 2010 15, 2010 REPLY TO ATTN TO: IG-34 (A10FN009) SUBJECT: Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management's Fiscal Year 2010 Financial Statement Audit Report No.: OAS-FS-11-03 TO: Director, Office of Standard Contract Management The attached report presents the results of the independent certified public accountants' audit of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management's (OCRWM) Fiscal Year 2010 balance sheet and the related statements of net cost, changes in net position, and budgetary resources. To fulfill the Office of Inspector General's audit responsibilities, we contracted with the independent public accounting firm of KPMG LLP (KPMG) to conduct the audit, subject to our review. KPMG is responsible for expressing an opinion on OCRWM's

60

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

96 YEAR 2013 Males 69 Females 27 YEAR 2013 SES 1 EJEK 9 EN 04 27 NN (Engineering) 26 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 30 NU (TechAdmin Support) 3 YEAR 2013 American Indian Alaska Native Male...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "management total year" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Management plan for fiscal year 1981: Environmental Control Technology Project, geothermal development  

SciTech Connect

The management of the following four assessment tasks are discussed: current progress in H/sub 2/S abatement technology; solid wastes from geothermal power production operations: characterization, handling, and disposal; problems associated with the use of agricultural drainage water for geothermal power plant cooling in the Imperial Valley; and liquid dominated, low total dissolved solids geothermal resources: characterization and evaluation of potential problems due to composition. (MHR)

Morris, W.F.; Stephens, F.B.

1980-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

62

Management Challenges at the Department of Energy … Fiscal Year 2012, IG-0858  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management Challenges at the Management Challenges at the Department of Energy DOE/IG-0858 November 2011 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 November 10, 2011 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: "Management Challenges at the Department of Energy - Fiscal Year 2012" INTRODUCTION Responsible for executing some of the Nation's most complex and technologically advanced missions, the Department of Energy faces an array of challenges that are as wide-ranging and complex as at any time in its history. While the Department's origins can be traced to the Manhattan Project and the 1973-1974 oil embargo, it has evolved into a multi-faceted agency that encompasses a broad range of national security, scientific, energy and environmental activities

63

No Time Wasted. 25 years COVRA: Radioactive Waste Management in the Netherlands  

SciTech Connect

Time will render radioactive waste harmless. How can we manage the time radioactive substances remain harmful? Just 'wait and see' or 'marking time' is not an option. We need to isolate the waste from our living environment and control it as long as necessary. December 2007 was a time to commemorate, as the national waste management organisation of the Netherlands, COVRA, celebrated its 12. anniversary. During this period of 25 years a stable policy has been formulated and implemented. For the situation in the Netherlands, it was obvious that a period of long term storage was needed. Both the small volume of waste and the limited financial possibilities are determining factors. Time is needed to let the volume of waste grow and to let the money, needed for disposal, grow in a capital growth fund. A historical overview of the activities of COVRA is presented and lessons learned over a period of 25 years are given. (authors)

Codee, H.D.K.; Verhoef, E.V. [COVRA N.V., Vlissingen (Netherlands)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 0 Hispanic Male (H M) 0 Hispanic Female (H F) 0 White Male (W M) 10 White Female (W F) 2 DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Associate...

65

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 0 Hispanic Male (H M) 0 Hispanic Female (H F) 0 White Male (W M) 4 White Female (W F) 5 DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Associate...

66

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 25 Hispanic Male (H M) 202 Hispanic Female (H F) 177 White Male (W M) 1244 White Female (W F) 453 Total includes 2425 permanent and 21 temporary...

67

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Pacific Islander Female (AAPI, F) 1 Hispanic Male (H, M) 5 Hispanic Female (H, F) 6 White Male (W, M) 75 White Female (W, F) 32 TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER NNSA Production Office...

68

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 0 Hispanic Male (H M) 5 Hispanic Female (H F) 3 White Male (W M) 30 White Female (W F) 3 DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Associate...

69

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 3 Hispanic Male (H M) 15 Hispanic Female (H F) 33 White Male (W M) 44 White Female (W F) 68 DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Associate...

70

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 2 Hispanic Male (H M) 5 Hispanic Female (H F) 3 White Male (W M) 26 White Female (W F) 16 DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Livermore Field...

71

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 1 Hispanic Male (H M) 4 Hispanic Female (H F) 7 White Male (W M) 13 White Female (W F) 11 DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Office of General...

72

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Pacific Islander Female (AAPI, F) 2 Hispanic Male (H, M) 74 Hispanic Female (H, F) 22 White Male (W, M) 393 White Female (W, F) 19 PAY PLAN DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER...

73

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Pacific Islander Female (AAPI, F) 0 Hispanic Male (H, M) 12 Hispanic Female (H, F) 11 White Male (W, M) 34 White Female (W, F) 16 PAY PLAN DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Sandia...

74

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 0 Hispanic Male (H M) 0 Hispanic Female (H F) 0 White Male (W M) 13 White Female (W F) 5 DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Savannah River...

75

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 2 Hispanic Male (H M) 76 Hispanic Female (H F) 21 White Male (W M) 401 White Female (W F) 20 DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Assistant Deputy...

76

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 1 Hispanic Male (H M) 3 Hispanic Female (H F) 5 White Male (W M) 43 White Female (W F) 10 DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Associate...

77

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 0 Hispanic Male (H M) 12 Hispanic Female (H F) 12 White Male (W M) 34 White Female (W F) 16 DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Sandia Field...

78

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 0 Hispanic Male (H M) 25 Hispanic Female (H F) 25 White Male (W M) 61 White Female (W F) 41 DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Associate...

79

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 0 Hispanic Male (H M) 2 Hispanic Female (H F) 6 White Male (W M) 10 White Female (W F) 3 DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Associate...

80

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Pacific Islander Female (AAPI, F) 0 Hispanic Male (H, M) 1 Hispanic Female (H, F) 0 White Male (W, M) 25 White Female (W, F) 6 TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Kansas City Field Office...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "management total year" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 7 Hispanic Male (H M) 7 Hispanic Female (H F) 10 White Male (W M) 82 White Female (W F) 60 DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Deputy...

82

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 2 Hispanic Male (H M) 12 Hispanic Female (H F) 7 White Male (W M) 66 White Female (W F) 22 PAY PLAN DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Deputy...

83

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Pacific Islander Female (AAPI, F) 2 Hispanic Male (H, M) 5 Hispanic Female (H, F) 4 White Male (W, M) 25 White Female (W, F) 17 PAY PLAN DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER...

84

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Pacific Islander Female (AAPI, F) 2 Hispanic Male (H, M) 6 Hispanic Female (H, F) 6 White Male (W, M) 51 White Female (W, F) 14 PAY PLAN DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Nevada...

85

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 0 Hispanic Male (H M) 6 Hispanic Female (H F) 14 White Male (W M) 39 White Female (W F) 21 DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Associate...

86

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Pacific Islander Female (AAPI, F) 0 Hispanic Male (H, M) 0 Hispanic Female (H, F) 0 White Male (W, M) 15 White Female (W, F) 7 TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Savannah River Field...

87

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 0 Hispanic Male (H M) 0 Hispanic Female (H F) 0 White Male (W M) 24 White Female (W F) 6 TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Kansas City Field Office As...

88

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 0 Hispanic Male (H M) 0 Hispanic Female (H F) 3 White Male (W M) 7 White Female (W F) 1 PAY PLAN DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER National...

89

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 4 Hispanic Male (H M) 3 Hispanic Female (H F) 6 White Male (W M) 26 White Female (W F) 18 TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Associate Administrator for...

90

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 1 Hispanic Male (H M) 6 Hispanic Female (H F) 6 White Male (W M) 68 White Female (W F) 30 DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER NNSA Production...

91

Annual report to Congress on Federal Government energy management and conservation programs, Fiscal year 1994  

SciTech Connect

This report provides sinformation on energy consumption in Federal buildings and operations and documents activities conducted by Federal agencies to meet statutory requirements of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act. It also describes energy conservation and management activities of the Federal Government under section 381 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act. Implementation activities undertaken during FY94 by the Federal agencies under the Energy Policy Act of 1992 and Executive Orders 12759 and 12902 are also described. During FY94, total (gross) energy consumption of the US Government, including energy consued to produce, process, and transport energy, was 1.72 quadrillion Btu. This represents {similar_to}2.0% of the total 85.34 quads used in US.

NONE

1995-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

92

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

2540 YEAR 2013 Males 1677 Females 863 YEAR 2013 SES 102 EX 3 SL 1 EJEK 89 EN 05 41 EN 04 170 EN 03 18 NN (Engineering) 448 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 1249 NU (TechAdmin Support) 76 NV...

93

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Hispanic Male (H,M) 217 207 -4.61% Hispanic Female (H,F) 196 182 -7.14% White Male (W,M) 1318 1271 -3.57% White Female (W,F) 511 463 -9.39% Total includes...

94

Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management fiscal year 1996 annual report to Congress  

SciTech Connect

In Fiscal Year 1996 a revised program strategy was developed that reflects Administration policy and responds to sharply reduced funding and congressional guidance while maintaining progress toward long-term objectives. The program is on track, working toward an early, comprehensive assessment of the viability of the Yucca Mountain site; more closely determining what will be required to incorporate defense waste into the waste management system; pursuing a market-driven strategy for waste acceptance, storage, and transportation; and preserving the core capability to respond to an interim storage contingency. Overall, the elements of an integrated system for managing the Nation`s spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste are emerging, more soundly conceived, and more modestly designed, as the OCRWM works toward the physical reality of waste shipments to Federal facilities.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Department of Energy's second-year implementation of the Federal Managers' Financial Integrity Act  

SciTech Connect

GAO reviewed the implementation of the Federal Managers' Financial Integrity Act of 1982 by 23 federal departments and agencies. The act was intended to help reduce fraud, waste, and abuse in federal government operations by requiring agencies to assess and report annually to the President and the Congress on the adequacy of their internal controls and accounting systems. This report highlights the progress made and problems encountered by the Department of Energy (DOE) during its second year under the act. GAO evaluated DOE's efforts to correct internal control weaknesses and improve its accounting systems. GAO discusses ways in which DOE can strengthen its internal control and accounting system evaluations.

Not Available

1985-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

96

Management Challenges at the Department of Energy … Fiscal Year 2014  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 DOE/IG-0899 November 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits & Inspections Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 November 26, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Special Report on "Management Challenges at the Department of Energy - Fiscal Year 2014" BACKGROUND The Department of Energy executes some of the Nation's most complex and technologically advanced missions. Since the passage of the Department of Energy Organization Act in 1977, the Department has shifted its emphasis and priorities over time as the Nation's energy and security needs have evolved. In recent years, the Department has focused on issues such as clean

97

Annual report: Purchasing and Materials Management Organization, Sandia National Laboratories, fiscal year 1992  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the purchasing and transportation activities of the Purchasing and Materials Management Organization for Fiscal Year 1992. Activities for both the New Mexico and California locations are included. Topics covered in this report include highlights for fiscal year 1992, personnel, procurements (small business procurements, disadvantaged business procurements, woman-owned business procurements, New Mexico commercial business procurements, Bay area commercial business procurements), commitments by states and foreign countries, and transportation activities. Also listed are the twenty-five commercial contractors receiving the largest dollar commitments, commercial contractors receiving commitments of $1,000 or more, integrated contractor and federal agency commitments of $1,000 or more from Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico and California, and transportation commitments of $1,000 or more from Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico and California.

Zaeh, R.A.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Years  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Technology in and Technology in the National Interest 60 Years of Excellence Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory FY 2012 Annual Report About the Cover: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) engineers Chris Spadaccini (left) and Eric Duoss are shown experimenting with direct ink-writing to create micro- to macroscale structures with extreme precision. The Laboratory is advancing this process and other additive manufacturing technologies to develop new materials with extraordinary properties for use in a wide range of national-security and other applications. About the Laboratory: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was founded in 1952 to enhance the security of the United States by advancing nuclear weapons science and technology. With a talented and dedicated workforce and

99

Effects of Forest Management on Total Biomass Production and CO2 Emissions from use of Energy Biomass of Norway Spruce and Scots Pine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of forest management on the total biomass production (t ha-1a-1) and CO2 emissions (kg CO2 MWh-1) from use of energy biomass of Norway spruce and Scots pine grown ...

Johanna Routa; Seppo Kellomki; Harri Strandman

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

National Low-Level Waste Management Program final summary report of key activities and accomplishments for fiscal year 1995  

SciTech Connect

To assist the Department of Energy (DOE) in fulfilling its responsibilities under the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985, the National Low-Level Waste Management Program (NLLWMP) outlines the key activities that the NLLWMP will accomplish in the following fiscal year. Additional activities are added during the fiscal year as necessary to accomplish programmatic goals. This report summarizes the activities and accomplishments of the NLLWMP during fiscal year 1995.

Forman, S.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "management total year" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

National Low-Level Waste Management Program final summary report of key activities and accomplishments for fiscal year 1996  

SciTech Connect

To assist the Department of Energy (DOE) in fulfilling its responsibilities under the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985, the National Low-Level Waste Management Program (NLLWMP) outlines the key activities tat the NLLWMP will accomplish in the following fiscal year. Additional activities are added during the fiscal year as necessary to accomplish programmatic goals. This report summarizes the activities and accomplishments of the NLLWMP during Fiscal Year 1996.

Garcia, R.S.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan- Section 6.0 Program Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Program Management section of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan; updated August 2012. This plan includes goals, objectives, technical targets, tasks, and schedules for the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's contribution to the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program.

103

Riparian plant composition, abundance, and structure responses to different harvesting approaches in riparian management zones nine years after treatment in Northern Minnesota, U.S.A.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??I compared riparian plant responses to different harvesting approaches over nine years in Riparian Management Zones (RMZ) in Northern Minnesota. In Chapter 1, I found (more)

Martin, Michelle Amber

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Fiscal Year 2007 Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Fee Adequacy Assessment Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

U.S. Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Fee Adequacy Assessment Report is to present an analysis of the adequacy of the fee being paid by nuclear power utilities...

105

Flood risk management in the Thames Estuary looking ahead 100 years  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...by the Thames Gateway for innovative, sustainable and cost effective...defence is lower and the site remediation and other associated infrastructure...development policies which include innovative and cost effective approaches...and put in place at site remediation stage), the flood management...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Information management fiscal year 1996 site support program plan, WBS 6.4. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

In the recent past, information resource management (IRM) was a neatly separable component of the overall DOE mission, concerned primarily with procuring and implementing automatic data processing (ADP) systems. As the DOE missions have shifted from producing product to managing processes, those clear lines have blurred. Today, IRM is firmly embedded in all aspects of the DOE mission. BCS Richland, Inc., (BCSR) provides IRM for the Hanford Site. The main focus in executing this mission is to meet customer goals by providing high-quality, timely, and cost-effective electronic communication, computing, and information services. Information resources provide the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) and the Hanford Site contractors the ability to generate, store, access, and communicate information quickly, reliably, and cost effectively. BCSR plans, implements, and operates electronic communication, computing and information management systems that enable effective operation of the Hanford Site. Five strategic initiatives to encompass the vision provide guidance and focus to the information technology (IT) direction for developing the BCSR program plan. These strategic initiatives are the program vision and are as follows: primary focus; fast response; accessible information; world class information management infrastructure; powerful desktop. The business directions that guide the development of the BCSR Program Plan are: (1) emphasize providing cost-effective and value-added communication, computing, and information systems products and services to the Site missions; (2) strengthen the alignment of products and services with Site projects and programs and eliminate duplications Sitewide; (3) focus on the effective resolution of critical Site information management (IM) issues.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Colorado Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

108

Connecticut Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Connecticut Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

109

National Low-Level Waste Management Program final summary report of key activities and accomplishments for fiscal year 1997  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has responsibilities under the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 to assist states and compacts in their siting and licensing efforts for low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. The National Low-Level Waste Management Program (NLLWMP) is the element of the DOE that performs the key support activities under the Act. The NLLWMP`s activities are driven by the needs of the states and compacts as they prepare to manage their low-level waste under the Act. Other work is added during the fiscal year as necessary to accommodate new requests brought on by status changes in states` and compacts` siting and licensing efforts. This report summarizes the activities and accomplishments of the NLLWMP during FY 1997.

Rittenberg, R.B.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Fiscal Year 1994 annual report to Congress  

SciTech Connect

The events of Fiscal Year 1994 made it a notable year in OCRWN`s history. Highlights include formulation of a new program approach; intensive consultation with other parties to build confidence in that approach; the delivery, assembly, and initial testing of the tunnel boring machine that is now digging into Yucca Mountain; steps toward acquisition of a standardized multipurpose canister system and planning for the accompanying environmental impact statement; and solicitation, through a Federal Register notice, of utilities` and other interested parties` recommendations toward resolving key waste-acceptance issues.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Waste Management at the Nevada Test Site Year 2002: Current Status  

SciTech Connect

The performance attributes of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Low-level Radioactive Waste (LLW) disposal facilities located at the Nevada Test Site transcend those of any other LLW disposal site in the United States. Situated at the southern end of the Great Basin, 244 meters (800 feet) above the water table, the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) has utilized a combination of engineered shallow land disposal cells and deep augured shafts to dispose a variety of waste streams. These include high volume low-activity waste, classified material, and high-specific activity special case waste. Fifteen miles north of Area 5 is the Area 3 RWMS. Here bulk LLW disposal takes place in subsidence craters formed from underground testing of nuclear weapons. Earliest records indicate that documented LLW disposal activities have occurred at the Area 5 and Area 3 RWMSs since 1961 and 1968, respectively. However, these activities have only been managed under a formal program since 1978. This paper describes the technical attributes of the facilities, present and future capacities and capabilities, and provides a description of the process from waste approval to final disposition. The paper also summarizes the current status of the waste disposal operations.

Becker, Bruce, D.; Gertz, Carl, P.; Clayton, Wendy, A.; Carilli, Jhon, T.; Crowe, Bruce M.

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

112

Waste Management at the Nevada Test Site Fiscal Year 2001 Current Status  

SciTech Connect

The performance objectives of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV) Low-level Radioactive Waste (LLW) disposal facilities located at the Nevada Test Site transcend those of any other radioactive waste disposal site in the United States. Situated at the southern end of the Great Basin, 244 meters (800 feet) above the water table, the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) has utilized a combination of engineered shallow land disposal cells and deep augured shafts to dispose a variety of waste streams. These include high volume low-activity waste, classified radioactive material, and high-specific-activity special case waste. Fifteen miles north of Area 5 is the Area 3 RWMS. Here bulk LLW disposal takes place in subsidence craters formed from underground testing of nuclear weapons. Earliest records indicate that documented LLW disposal activities have occurred at the Area 5 and Area 3 RWMSs since 1961 and 1 968, respectively. However, these activities have only been managed under a formal program since 1978. This paper describes the technical attributes of the facilities, present and future capacities and capabilities, and provides a description of the process from waste approval to final disposition. The paper also summarizes the current status of the waste disposal operations.

B. D. Becker; W. A. Clayton; B. M. Crowe

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Environmental Management at the Nevada Test Site Year 2001 Current Status  

SciTech Connect

The performance objectives of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office Low-level Radioactive Waste (LLW) disposal facilities located at the Nevada Test Site transcend those of any other radioactive waste disposal site in the United States. Situated at the southern end of the Great Basin, 244 meters (800 feet) above the water table, the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) has utilized a combination of engineered shallow land disposal cells and deep augured shafts to dispose a variety of waste streams. These include high volume low-activity waste, classified material, and high-specific-activity special case waste. Fifteen miles north of Area 5 is the Area 3 RWMS. Here bulk LLW disposal takes place in subsidence craters formed from underground testing of nuclear weapons. Earliest records indicate that documented LLW disposal activities have occurred at the Area 5 and Area 3 RWMSs since 1961 and 1968, respectively. However, these activities have only been managed under a formal program since 1978. This paper describes the technical attributes of the facilities, present and future capacities and capabilities, and provides a description of the process from waste approval to final disposition. The paper also summarizes the current status of the waste disposal operations. Additionally, the Nevada Operations Office Environmental Restoration Division is responsible for identifying the nature and extent of contamination; determining its potential risk to the public and the environment; and performing the necessary corrective actions in compliance with guidelines and requirements. This paper summarizes just a few of the successes of the Nevada Operations Office projects.

Becker, B. D.; Gertz, C. P.; Clayton, W. A.; Carilli, J. T.; DiSanza, E. F.; Wycoff, R. C.; Crowe, B. M.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

114

Colorado Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

% of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Colorado Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

115

Connecticut Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

% of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Connecticut Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

116

TOTAL Full-TOTAL Full-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conducting - Orchestral 6 . . 6 5 1 . 6 5 . . 5 Conducting - Wind Ensemble 3 . . 3 2 . . 2 . 1 . 1 Early- X TOTAL Full- Part- X TOTAL Alternative Energy 6 . . 6 11 . . 11 13 2 . 15 Biomedical Engineering 52 English 71 . 4 75 70 . 4 74 72 . 3 75 Geosciences 9 . 1 10 15 . . 15 19 . . 19 History 37 1 2 40 28 3 3 34

Portman, Douglas

117

California Onshore Natural Gas Total Liquids Extracted in California...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Liquids Extracted in California (Thousand Barrels) California Onshore Natural Gas Total Liquids Extracted in California (Thousand Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

118

Total Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Imports - Total Imports - Crude Oil Imports - Crude Oil, Commercial Imports - by SPR Imports - into SPR by Others Imports - Total Products Imports - Total Motor Gasoline Imports - Finished Motor Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Other Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Conventional Gasoline Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 & Ed55 Imports - Other Conventional Gasoline Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Ether Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Alcohol Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, CBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, GTAB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, Other Imports - Fuel Ethanol Imports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Imports - Distillate Fuel Oil Imports - Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and Under Imports - Distillate F.O., > 15 ppm to 500 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 500 ppm to 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Residual Fuel Oil Imports - Propane/Propylene Imports - Other Other Oils Imports - Kerosene Imports - NGPLs/LRGs (Excluding Propane/Propylene) Exports - Total Crude Oil and Products Exports - Crude Oil Exports - Products Exports - Finished Motor Gasoline Exports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Exports - Distillate Fuel Oil Exports - Residual Fuel Oil Exports - Propane/Propylene Exports - Other Oils Net Imports - Total Crude Oil and Products Net Imports - Crude Oil Net Imports - Petroleum Products Period: Weekly 4-Week Avg.

119

Total Sustainability Humber College  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Total Sustainability Management Humber College November, 2012 SUSTAINABILITY SYMPOSIUM Green An Impending Global Disaster #12;3 Sustainability is NOT Climate Remediation #12;Our Premises "We cannot, you cannot improve it" (Lord Kelvin) "First rule of sustainability is to align with natural forces

Thompson, Michael

120

California Natural Gas Total Liquids Extracted (Thousand Barrels...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Extracted (Thousand Barrels) California Natural Gas Total Liquids Extracted (Thousand Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "management total year" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

California Natural Gas % of Total Electric Utility Deliveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electric Utility Deliveries (Percent) California Natural Gas % of Total Electric Utility Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

122

21 briefing pages total  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

briefing pages total p. 1 briefing pages total p. 1 Reservist Differential Briefing U.S. Office of Personnel Management December 11, 2009 p. 2 Agenda - Introduction of Speakers - Background - References/Tools - Overview of Reservist Differential Authority - Qualifying Active Duty Service and Military Orders - Understanding Military Leave and Earnings Statements p. 3 Background 5 U.S.C. 5538 (Section 751 of the Omnibus Appropriations Act, 2009, March 11, 2009) (Public Law 111-8) Law requires OPM to consult with DOD Law effective first day of first pay period on or after March 11, 2009 (March 15 for most executive branch employees) Number of affected employees unclear p. 4 Next Steps

123

Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

124

The Bachelor of Management degree in Management Information Systems is a minimum of 40 courses in length. Admission to the Faculty may occur at the end of Year One. Students are required to have the following courses for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Bachelor of Management degree in Management Information Systems is a minimum of 40 courses-language university. BachelorofManagement ManagementInformationSystems Name Technology Management 4090 - Management Policy and Strategy Management 4840 - Systems Analysis Management

Seldin, Jonathan P.

125

Total Precipitable Water  

SciTech Connect

The simulation was performed on 64K cores of Intrepid, running at 0.25 simulated-years-per-day and taking 25 million core-hours. This is the first simulation using both the CAM5 physics and the highly scalable spectral element dynamical core. The animation of Total Precipitable Water clearly shows hurricanes developing in the Atlantic and Pacific.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

management  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

5%2A en Management and Budget http:nnsa.energy.govaboutusouroperationsmanagementandbudget

P...

127

LRRB Pavement Management Systems Pavement Management Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LRRB Pavement Management Systems Pavement Management Systems Presented by: Michael Marti SRF for implementing and monitoring research results (RIC) #12;LRRB Pavement Management Systems LRRB Structure LRRB Current Pavement Management System Used ICON (Goodpointe) Year of Pavement Management System

Minnesota, University of

128

Barge Truck Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Barge Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Year (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) 2008 $6.26 $5.77 $36.50 15.8% 42.3% $6.12 $5.64 $36.36 15.5% 22.2% 2009 $6.23 $5.67 $52.71 10.8% 94.8% $4.90 $4.46 $33.18 13.5% 25.1% 2010 $6.41 $5.77 $50.83 11.4% 96.8% $6.20 $5.59 $36.26 15.4% 38.9% Annual Percent Change First to Last Year 1.2% 0.0% 18.0% - - 0.7% -0.4% -0.1% - - Latest 2 Years 2.9% 1.7% -3.6% - - 26.6% 25.2% 9.3% - - - = No data reported or value not applicable STB Data Source: The Surface Transportation Board's 900-Byte Carload Waybill Sample EIA Data Source: Form EIA-923 Power Plant Operations Report

129

RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT IN THE CHERNOBYL EXCLUSION ZONE - 25 YEARS SINCE THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT ACCIDENT  

SciTech Connect

Radioactive waste management is an important component of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident mitigation and remediation activities of the so-called Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. This article describes the localization and characteristics of the radioactive waste present in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone and summarizes the pathways and strategy for handling the radioactive waste related problems in Ukraine and the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone, and in particular, the pathways and strategies stipulated by the National Radioactive Waste Management Program. The brief overview of the radioactive waste issues in the ChEZ presented in this article demonstrates that management of radioactive waste resulting from a beyond-designbasis accident at a nuclear power plant becomes the most challenging and the costliest effort during the mitigation and remediation activities. The costs of these activities are so high that the provision of radioactive waste final disposal facilities compliant with existing radiation safety requirements becomes an intolerable burden for the current generation of a single country, Ukraine. The nuclear accident at the Fukushima-1 NPP strongly indicates that accidents at nuclear sites may occur in any, even in a most technologically advanced country, and the Chernobyl experience shows that the scope of the radioactive waste management activities associated with the mitigation of such accidents may exceed the capabilities of a single country. Development of a special international program for broad international cooperation in accident related radioactive waste management activities is required to handle these issues. It would also be reasonable to consider establishment of a dedicated international fund for mitigation of accidents at nuclear sites, specifically, for handling radioactive waste problems in the ChEZ. The experience of handling Chernobyl radioactive waste management issues, including large volumes of radioactive soils and complex structures of fuel containing materials can be fairly useful for the entire world's nuclear community and can help make nuclear energy safer.

Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Alaska (with Total Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Alaska (with Total Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

131

Alaska (with Total Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Alaska (with Total Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

132

Performance Assurance for Multi-Year Contracts Under the Utility Incentive Program; Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) Fact Sheet  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Leading by example, Leading by example, saving energy and taxpayer dollars in federal facilities Fact Sheet Section 152(f) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT) Public Law 102-486 autho- rized and encouraged Federal agencies to participate in programs to increase energy efficiency and for water conservation or the management of electricity demand conducted by gas, water, or electric utili- ties. Additionally Title 10 Section 2913 and 10 USC 2866 (a) authorizes and encourages Defense facilities to participate in utility programs for the management of electricity demand, and energy and water conservation. Since these contracts are for utility services under section 201 of the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949, the only financial requirement on Federal

133

Performance Assurance for Multi-Year Contracts Under the Utility Incentive Program; Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) Fact Sheet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Leading by example, Leading by example, saving energy and taxpayer dollars in federal facilities Fact Sheet Section 152(f) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT) Public Law 102-486 autho- rized and encouraged Federal agencies to participate in programs to increase energy efficiency and for water conservation or the management of electricity demand conducted by gas, water, or electric utili- ties. Additionally Title 10 Section 2913 and 10 USC 2866 (a) authorizes and encourages Defense facilities to participate in utility programs for the management of electricity demand, and energy and water conservation. Since these contracts are for utility services under section 201 of the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949, the only financial requirement on Federal

134

Wanaket Wildlife Area Management Plan : Five-Year Plan for Protecting, Enhancing, and Mitigating Wildlife Habitat Losses for the McNary Hydroelectric Facility.  

SciTech Connect

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) propose to continue to protect, enhance, and mitigate wildlife and wildlife habitat at the Wanaket Wildlife Area. The Wanaket Wildlife Area was approved as a Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) in 1993. This management plan will provide an update of the original management plan approved by BPA in 1995. Wanaket will contribute towards meeting BPA's obligation to compensate for wildlife habitat losses resulting from the construction of the McNary Hydroelectric facility on the Columbia River. By funding the enhancement and operation and maintenance of the Wanaket Wildlife Area, BPA will receive credit towards their mitigation debt. The purpose of the Wanaket Wildlife Area management plan update is to provide programmatic and site-specific standards and guidelines on how the Wanaket Wildlife Area will be managed over the next five years. This plan provides overall guidance on both short and long term activities that will move the area towards the goals, objectives, and desired future conditions for the planning area. The plan will incorporate managed and protected wildlife and wildlife habitat, including operations and maintenance, enhancements, and access and travel management. Specific project objectives are related to protection and enhancement of wildlife habitats and are expressed in terms of habitat units (HU's). Habitat units were developed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service's Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP), and are designed to track habitat gains and/or losses associated with mitigation and/or development projects. Habitat Units for a given species are a product of habitat quantity (expressed in acres) and habitat quality estimates. Habitat quality estimates are developed using Habitat Suitability Indices (HSI). These indices are based on quantifiable habitat features such as vegetation height, shrub cover, or other parameters, which are known to provide life history requisites for mitigation species. Habitat Suitability Indices range from 0 to 1, with an HSI of 1 providing optimum habitat conditions for the selected species. One acre of optimum habitat provides one Habitat Unit. The objective of continued management of the Wanaket Wildlife Mitigation Area, including protection and enhancement of upland and wetland/wetland associated cover types, is to provide and maintain 2,334 HU's of protection credit and generate 2,495 HU's of enhancement credit by the year 2004.

Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation Wildlife Program

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Iskuulpa Watershed Management Plan : A Five-Year Plan for Protecting and Enhancing Fish and Wildlife Habitats in the Iskuulpa Watershed.  

SciTech Connect

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) propose to protect, enhance, and mitigate wildlife and wildlife habitat and watershed resources in the Iskuulpa Watershed. The Iskuulpa Watershed Project was approved as a Columbia River Basin Wildlife Fish and Mitigation Project by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) in 1998. Iskuulpa will contribute towards meeting BPA's obligation to compensate for wildlife habitat losses resulting from the construction of the John Day and McNary Hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. By funding the enhancement and operation and maintenance of the Iskuulpa Watershed, BPA will receive credit towards their mitigation debt. The purpose of the Iskuulpa Watershed management plan update is to provide programmatic and site-specific standards and guidelines on how the Iskuulpa Watershed will be managed over the next three years. This plan provides overall guidance on both short and long term activities that will move the area towards the goals, objectives, and desired future conditions for the planning area. The plan will incorporate managed and protected wildlife and wildlife habitat, including operations and maintenance, enhancements, and access and travel management.

Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation Wildlife Program

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Federal Offshore -- Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Total Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

-- Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore -- Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

137

The Bachelor of Management degree in Management Information Systems is a minimum of 40 courses in length. Admission to the Faculty may occur at the end of Year One. Students are required to have the following courses for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Bachelor of Management degree in Management Information Systems is a minimum of 40 courses ManagementInformationSystems Name: __________________________________________________________ ID 4840 - Systems Analysis Management 4841 - Systems Design One of: Management 3380 - Technological Change

Seldin, Jonathan P.

138

Induction of labour versus expectant management for nulliparous women over 35 years of age: a multi-centre prospective, randomised controlled trial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.walker@nuh.nhs.ukExpectant management i.e. awaiting spontaneous onse35 years of age: a multi-centre prospective, randomised controlled trial Kate F Walker1*, George Bugg1, Marion Macpherson1, Carol McCormick1, Chris Wildsmith2, Gordon Smith3 and Jim Thornton4 Abstract Background... admission required first fetal pH obtained Birth trauma Subdural haematoma Intracerebral or intraventricular haemorrhage Spinal-cord injury Basal skull fracture Peripheral-nerve injury present at discharge from hospitalLong bone fracture Seizures...

Walker, Kate F; Bugg, George; Macpherson, Marion; McCormick, Carol; Wildsmith, Chris; Smith, Gordon; Thornton, Jim

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

139

Technical and management support for the development of Small Wind Systems. Fiscal year 1980 annual report, October 1, 1979-September 30, 1980  

SciTech Connect

The status and achievements of a program for the development, testing, and commercialization of wind energy systems rated under 100 kilowatts are described. The organization structure and task definition used to promote the production, marketing, and acceptance of small systems are described, and the Work Breakdown Structure under which the program is organized is detailed. Reports are given which describe the status of contracts funded by the Federal Wind Energy Program and managed by the Rocky Flats Wind Systems Program. These project reports, sequenced according to the Department of Energy Work Breakdown Structure, name the principal investigators involved, and discuss achievements and progress made during Fiscal Year 1980. Of fourty-four projects, seven were completed during the Fiscal Year. The Work Breakdown Structure Index details the organization sequence.

Not Available

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Audit Report - Management Letter on the Audit of the Department of Energy's Consolidated Financial Statements for Fiscal Year 2012, OAS-FS-13-08  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Audit of Audit of the Department of Energy's Consolidated Financial Statements for Fiscal Year 2012 OAS-FS-13-08 January 2013 i MANAGEMENT LETTER December 17, 2012 Mr. Gregory Friedman Inspector General U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W., Room 5D-039 Washington, DC 20585 Dear Mr. Friedman: We have audited the consolidated financial statements and special-purpose financial statements of the United States Department of Energy (Department or DOE) as of and for the year ended September 30, 2012, and have issued our reports thereon dated November 14, 2012. In planning and performing our audit of the consolidated financial statements and special-purpose financial statements, in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of America; the standards applicable to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "management total year" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

A Retrospective Management Perspective on Nearly 20 Years of the Savannah River Site Citizen Advisory Board - 13078  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management (DOE EM) program has invested in site specific advisory boards since 1994. These boards have served as a portal to the communities surrounding the DOE sites, provided a key avenue for public involvement, and have actively engaged in providing input and feedback that has informed clean up and priority decisions made by EM. Although the EM program has made considerable progress in completing its mission, work will continue for decades, including work at the Savannah River Site (SRS). It is reasonable to assume the advisory boards will continue in their role providing input and feedback to EM. The SRS Citizen Advisory Board (CAB) formed in 1994 and has issued 298 recommendations through September 2012. Although the effectiveness of the board is not measured by the number of recommendations issued, the recommendations themselves serve to illustrate the areas in which the CAB is particularly interested, and offer insight to the overall effectiveness of the CAB as a means for public participation in the EM decision making process. (authors)

Belencan, Helen L.; Guevara, Karen C.; Spears, Terrel J. [DOE Savannah River Site, Aiken SC (United States)] [DOE Savannah River Site, Aiken SC (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Barge Truck Total  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over...

143

California Natural Gas % of Total Commercial Delivered for the...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Commercial Delivered for the Account of Others (Percent) California Natural Gas % of Total Commercial Delivered for the Account of Others (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

144

TOTAL ORE PROCESSING INTEGRATION AND MANAGEMENT  

SciTech Connect

The lessons learned from ore segregation test No.3 were presented to Minntac Mine personnel during the reporting period. Ore was segregated by A-Factor, with low values going to Step 1/2 and high values going to Step 3. During the test, the mine maintained the best split possible for the given production and location constraints. During the test, Step 1&2 A-Factor was lowered more than Step 3 was raised. All other ore quality changes were not manipulated, but the segregation by A-Factor affected most of the other qualities. Magnetic iron, coarse tails, fine tails, silica, and grind changed in response to the split. Segregation was achieved by adding ore from HIS to the Step 3 blend and lowering the amount of LC 1&2 and somewhat lowering the amount of LC 3&4. Conversely, Step 1&2 received less HIS with a corresponding increase in LC 1&2. The amount of IBC was increased to both Steps about one-third of the way into the test. For about the center half of the test, LC 3&4 was reduced to both Steps. The most noticeable layer changes were, then: an increase in the HIS split; a decrease in the LC 1&2 split; adding IBC to both Steps; and lowering LC 3&4 to both Steps. Statistical analysis of the dataset collected during ordinary, non-segregated operation of the mine and mill is continuing. Graphical analysis of blast patterns according to drill monitor data was slowed by student classwork. It is expected to resume after the semester ends in May.

Leslie Gertsch; Richard Gertsch

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

145

Contract/Project Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

First Quarter First Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Improvement Performance Metrics and Targets 1 Contract/Project Management Performance Metric FY 2012 Target FY 2012 Forecast FY 2012 Pre- & Post-CAP Forecast Comment Capital Asset Project Success: Complete 90% of capital asset projects at original scope and within 110% of CD-2 TPC. 90%* 84% Construction 83% Cleanup 85% 77% Pre-CAP 86% Post- CAP This is based on a 3- year rolling average (FY10 to FY12). TPC is Total Project Cost. Contract/Project Management Performance Metrics FY 2012 Target FY 2012 1st Qtr Actual Comment Certified EVM Systems: Post CD-3, (greater than $20 million). 95%* 94% EVM represents Earned Value Management. Certified FPD's at CD-1: Projects

146

Contract/Project Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Second Quarter Second Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Improvement Performance Metrics and Targets 1 Contract/Project Management Performance Metric FY 2012 Target FY 2012 Forecast FY 2012 Pre- & Post-CAP Forecast Comment Capital Asset Project Success: Complete 90% of capital asset projects at original scope and within 110% of CD-2 TPC. 90%* 88% Construction 87% Cleanup 89% 77% Pre-CAP 92% Post- CAP This is based on a 3- year rolling average (FY10 to FY12). TPC is Total Project Cost. Contract/Project Management Performance Metrics FY 2012 Target FY 2012 2nd Qtr Actual Comment Certified EVM Systems: Post CD-3, (greater than $20 million). 95%* 96% EVM represents Earned Value Management. Certified FPD's at CD-1: Projects

147

Contract/Project Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fourth Quarter Fourth Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Improvement Performance Metrics and Targets 1 Contract/Project Management Performance Metric FY 2012 Target FY 2012 Final FY 2012 Pre- & Post-CAP Final Comment Capital Asset Project Success: Complete 90% of capital asset projects at original scope and within 110% of CD-2 TPC. 90%* 86% Construction 87% Cleanup 84% 77% Pre-CAP 89% Post-CAP This is based on a 3- year rolling average (FY10 to FY12). TPC is Total Project Cost. Contract/Project Management Performance Metrics FY 2012 Target FY 2012 4th Qtr Actual Comment Certified EVM Systems: Post CD-3, (greater than $20 million). 95%* 100% EVM represents Earned Value Management. Certified FPD's at CD-1: Projects

148

Contract/Project Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Third Quarter Third Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Improvement Performance Metrics and Targets 1 Contract/Project Management Performance Metric FY 2012 Target FY 2012 Forecast FY 2012 Pre- & Post-CAP Forecast Comment Capital Asset Project Success: Complete 90% of capital asset projects at original scope and within 110% of CD-2 TPC. 90%* 87% Construction 87% Cleanup 87% 77% Pre-CAP 90% Post- CAP This is based on a 3- year rolling average (FY10 to FY12). TPC is Total Project Cost. Contract/Project Management Performance Metrics FY 2012 Target FY 2012 3rd Qtr Actual Comment Certified EVM Systems: Post CD-3, (greater than $20 million). 95%* 98% EVM represents Earned Value Management. Certified FPD's at CD-1: Projects

149

Fiscal Year 2005 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Performance Assessment (PA) maintenance plan requires an annual review to determine if current operations and conditions at the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) remain consistent with PA and composite analysis (CA) assumptions and models. This report summarizes the fiscal year (FY) 2005 annual review findings for the Area 3 RWMS PA only. The PA Maintenance Plan states that no annual review or summary reporting will be carried out in years that a PA or CA revision is undertaken (Bechtel Nevada [BN], 2002). Updated PA results for the Area 5 RWMS were published in an addendum to the Area 5 RWMS PA report in September 2005. A federal review of the draft addendum report took place in early FY 2006 (October November 2005). The review team found the addendum acceptable without conditions. The review team's recommendation will be presented to the Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group in early 2006. The addendum was revised in January 2006 and incorporated comments from the review team (BN, 2006). Table 1 summarizes the updated Area 5 RWMS PA results presented in the addendum.

Vefa Yucel

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

total energy | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

total energy total energy Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 1, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion BTUs, and quantifies the energy prices using U.S. dollars. The data is broken down into total production, imports, exports, consumption, and prices for energy types. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO consumption EIA export import production reference case total energy Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary - Reference Case (xls, 112.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

151

Price of Lake Charles, LA Liquefied Natural Gas Total Imports...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquefied Natural Gas Total Imports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price of Lake Charles, LA Liquefied Natural Gas Total Imports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0...

152

ALLIANCE MANAGEMENT  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the last two decades, production and manufacturing management has rapidly adopted a range of new concepts: manufacturing strategy, focused factory, just-in-time manufacturing, concurrent engineering, total ...

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Rangeland Resource Management for Texans: Total Resource Management (Spanish)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

animales (ganado, fauna silvestre) ? recursos financieros ? recursos humanos ? recursos f?sicos (edificios, corrales, pozos de agua) Entonces prepare inventarios m?s espec?ficos de los recursos que apoyar?an a las empresas individuales. Paso 3. Escoja...

Hanselka, C. Wayne; Fox, William E.; White, Larry D.

2004-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

154

Variations of Total Domination  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The study of locatingdominating sets in graphs was pioneered by Slater[186, 187...], and this concept was later extended to total domination in graphs. A locatingtotal dominating set, abbreviated LTD-set, in G

Michael A. Henning; Anders Yeo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Total Crude by Pipeline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View

156

Waste Management | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 27, 2011 July 27, 2011 End of Year 2010 SNF & HLW Inventories Map of the United States of America that shows the location of approximately 64,000 MTHM of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) & 275 High-Level Radioactive Waste (HLW) Canisters. July 27, 2011 FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 The Analysis of the Total System Life Cycle Cost (TSLCC) of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program presents the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management's (OCRWM) May 2007 total system cost estimate for the disposal of the Nation's spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). The TSLCC analysis provides a basis for assessing the adequacy of the Nuclear Waste Fund (NWF) Fee as required by Section 302 of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), as amended.

157

Total Space Heat-  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration...

158

Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

6.0 Program Management Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan - Section 6.0 Program Management Program Management section of the...

159

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

38 38 Nevada - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S30. Summary statistics for natural gas - Nevada, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 4 4 4 3 4 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 4 4 4 3 4

160

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Idaho - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S14. Summary statistics for natural gas - Idaho, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "management total year" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Washington - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S49. Summary statistics for natural gas - Washington, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

162

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Maine - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S21. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maine, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0

163

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Minnesota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S25. Summary statistics for natural gas - Minnesota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

164

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 South Carolina - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S42. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Carolina, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

165

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 North Carolina - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S35. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Carolina, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

166

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Iowa - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S17. Summary statistics for natural gas - Iowa, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0

167

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Massachusetts - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S23. Summary statistics for natural gas - Massachusetts, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

168

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Minnesota - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S25. Summary statistics for natural gas - Minnesota, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

169

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 New Jersey - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S32. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Jersey, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

170

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Vermont - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S47. Summary statistics for natural gas - Vermont, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

171

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Wisconsin - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S51. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wisconsin, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

172

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 North Carolina - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S35. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Carolina, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

173

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 New Jersey - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S32. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Jersey, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

174

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Maryland - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S22. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maryland, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 35 28 43 43 34 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 35

175

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 New Hampshire - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S31. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Hampshire, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

176

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Maryland - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S22. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maryland, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7 7 7 8 9 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 28 43 43 34 44 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 28

177

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Missouri - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S27. Summary statistics for natural gas - Missouri, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 53 100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

178

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Massachusetts - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S23. Summary statistics for natural gas - Massachusetts, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

179

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 South Carolina - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S42. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Carolina, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

180

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Rhode Island - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S41. Summary statistics for natural gas - Rhode Island, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "management total year" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Towards Total Traffic Awareness  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A combination of factors render the transportation sector a highly desirable area for data management research. The transportation sector receives substantial investments and is of high societal interest across the globe. Since there is limited room ...

Chenjuan Guo, Christian S. Jensen, Bin Yang

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Strategisches Management und Strategiegenese  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Im vorhergenden Kapitel wurden die theoretischen Grundlagen von Total Quality Management erlutert und differenzierte Untersuchungen zu Umsetzungsversuchen im betrachteten Unternehmen angestellt. Ergebnis dies...

Martin Boehme

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Contract/Project Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Second Quarter Second Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Improvement Performance Metrics and Targets 1 Contract/Project Management Primary Performance Metrics FY 2011 Target FY 2011 Forecast FY 2011 Pre- & Post-CAP Forecast Comment 1a. Capital Asset Line Item Projects: (Pre-RCA/CAP) Projects completed within 110% of CD-2 TPC. 1b. Capital Asset Line Item Projects: (Post-RCA/CAP) 90% Line Item 84% Line Item 78% Pre-CAP 100% Post-CAP This is based on a 3-year rolling average (FY09 to FY11). TPC is Total Project Cost. 2a. EM Cleanup (Soil and Groundwater Remediation, D&D, and Waste Treatment and Disposal) Projects: (Pre- RAC/CAP) 90% of Projects completed within 110% of CD-2 TPC by FY12. 2b. EM Cleanup (Soil and Groundwater Remediation,

184

Contract/Project Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Third Quarter Third Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Performance Metrics and Targets 1 Contract/Project Management Primary Performance Metrics FY 2010 Target FY 2010 Forecast FY 2010 Pre- & Post-CAP Comment 1a. Capital Asset Line Item Projects: (Pre-RCA/CAP) 90% of projects completed within 110% of CD-2 TPC by FY11. 1b. Capital Asset Line Item Projects: (Post-RCA/CAP) 85% Line Item 71% Line Item 70% Pre-CAP 100% Post-CAP This is a projection based on a 3-year rolling average (FY08 to FY10). TPC is Total Project Cost. 2a. EM Cleanup (Soil and Groundwater Remediation, D&D, and Waste Treatment and Disposal) Projects: (Pre- RAC/CAP) 90% of projects completed within 110% of CD-2 TPC by FY11. 2b. EM Cleanup (Soil and Groundwater Remediation,

185

Contract/Project Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

First Quarter First Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Performance Metrics and Targets 1 Contract/Project Management Primary Performance Metrics FY 2011 Target FY 2011 Actual & Forecast FY 2011 Pre- & Post-CAP Comment 1a. Capital Asset Line Item Projects: (Pre-RCA/CAP) Projects completed within 110% of CD-2 TPC. 1b. Capital Asset Line Item Projects: (Post-RCA/CAP) 90% Line Item 79% Line Item 71% Pre-CAP 100% Post-CAP This is based on a 3-year rolling average (FY09 to FY11). TPC is Total Project Cost. 2a. EM Cleanup (Soil and Groundwater Remediation, D&D, and Waste Treatment and Disposal) Projects: (Pre- RAC/CAP) 90% of Projects completed within 110% of CD-2 TPC by FY12. 2b. EM Cleanup (Soil and Groundwater Remediation,

186

Contract/Project Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Third Quarter Third Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Improvement Performance Metrics and Targets 1 Contract/Project Management Primary Performance Metrics FY 2011 Target FY 2011 Forecast FY 2011 Pre- & Post-CAP Forecast Comment 1a. Capital Asset Line Item Projects: (Pre-RCA/CAP) Projects completed within 110% of CD-2 TPC. 1b. Capital Asset Line Item Projects: (Post-RCA/CAP) 90% Line Item 84% Line Item 78% Pre-CAP 100% Post-CAP This is based on a 3-year rolling average (FY09 to FY11). TPC is Total Project Cost. 2a. EM Cleanup (Soil and Groundwater Remediation, D&D, and Waste Treatment and Disposal) Projects: (Pre- RAC/CAP) 90% of Projects completed within 110% of CD-2 TPC by FY12. 2b. EM Cleanup (Soil and Groundwater Remediation,

187

Contract/Project Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fourth Quarter Fourth Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Improvement Performance Metrics and Targets 1 Contract/Project Management Primary Performance Metrics FY 2011 Target FY 2011 Actual FY 2011 Pre- & Post-CAP Actual Comment 1a. Capital Asset Line Item Projects: (Pre-RCA/CAP) Projects completed within 110% of CD-2 TPC. 1b. Capital Asset Line Item Projects: (Post-RCA/CAP) 90% Line Item 84% Line Item 77% Pre-CAP 100% Post-CAP This is based on a 3-year rolling average (FY09 to FY11). TPC is Total Project Cost. 2a. EM Cleanup (Soil and Groundwater Remediation, D&D, and Waste Treatment and Disposal) Projects: (Pre- RAC/CAP) 90% of Projects completed within 110% of CD-2 TPC by FY12. 2b. EM Cleanup (Soil and Groundwater Remediation,

188

Contract/Project Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fourth Quarter Fourth Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Performance Metrics and Targets 1 Contract/Project Management Primary Performance Metrics FY 2010 Target FY 2010 Actual FY 2010 Pre- & Post-CAP Comment 1a. Capital Asset Line Item Projects: (Pre-RCA/CAP) 90% of projects completed within 110% of CD-2 TPC by FY11. 1b. Capital Asset Line Item Projects: (Post-RCA/CAP) 85% Line Item 69% Line Item 67% Pre-CAP 100% Post-CAP This is based on a 3-year rolling average (FY08 to FY10). TPC is Total Project Cost. 2a. EM Cleanup (Soil and Groundwater Remediation, D&D, and Waste Treatment and Disposal) Projects: (Pre- RAC/CAP) 90% of projects completed within 110% of CD-2 TPC by FY11. 2b. EM Cleanup (Soil and Groundwater Remediation,

189

Contract/Project Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 st Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Performance Metrics and Targets 1 Contract/Project Management Primary Performance Metrics FY 2010 Target 1st Qtr FY 2010 Actual FY 2010 Pre- & Post-CAP Comment 1a. Capital Asset Line Item Projects: (Pre-RCA/CAP) 90% of projects completed within 110% of CD-2 TPC by FY11. 1b. Capital Asset Line Item Projects: (Post-RCA/CAP) 85% Line Item 73% Line Item 70% Pre-CAP 100% Post-CAP This is a projection based on a 3-year rolling average (FY08 to FY10). TPC is Total Project Cost. 2a. EM Cleanup (Soil and Groundwater Remediation, D&D, and Waste Treatment and Disposal) Projects: (Pre- RAC/CAP) 90% of projects completed within 110% of CD-2 TPC by FY11. 2b. EM Cleanup (Soil and Groundwater Remediation,

190

Executive Branch Management Scorecard | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Executive Branch Management Scorecard Executive Branch Management Scorecard More Documents & Publications Executive Branch Management Scorecard Slide 1 Three Year Rolling Timeline...

191

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Tennessee - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S44. Summary statistics for natural gas - Tennessee, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 285 310 230 210 212 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 4,700 5,478 5,144 4,851 5,825 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

192

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Connecticut - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S7. Summary statistics for natural gas - Connecticut, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

193

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Oregon - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S39. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oregon, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 18 21 24 26 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 409 778 821 1,407 1,344 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

194

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 District of Columbia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S9. Summary statistics for natural gas - District of Columbia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

195

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Oregon - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S39. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oregon, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 21 24 26 24 27 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 778 821 1,407 1,344 770 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

196

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Georgia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S11. Summary statistics for natural gas - Georgia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

197

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Delaware - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S8. Summary statistics for natural gas - Delaware, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

198

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 District of Columbia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S9. Summary statistics for natural gas - District of Columbia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

199

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Tennessee - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S44. Summary statistics for natural gas - Tennessee, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 305 285 310 230 210 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells NA 4,700 5,478 5,144 4,851 From Oil Wells 3,942 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

200

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Nebraska - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S29. Summary statistics for natural gas - Nebraska, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 186 322 285 276 322 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,331 2,862 2,734 2,092 1,854 From Oil Wells 228 221 182 163 126 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "management total year" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Georgia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S11. Summary statistics for natural gas - Georgia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

202

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Connecticut - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S7. Summary statistics for natural gas - Connecticut, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

203

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Florida - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S10. Summary statistics for natural gas - Florida, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 2,000 2,742 290 13,938 17,129 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

204

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Delaware - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S8. Summary statistics for natural gas - Delaware, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

205

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Indiana - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S16. Summary statistics for natural gas - Indiana, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 525 563 620 914 819 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 4,701 4,927 6,802 9,075 8,814 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

206

The Bachelor of Management degree in Information Systems is a minimum of 40 courses in length. Admission to the Faculty may occur at the end of Year One. Students are required to have completed the following courses, with a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Bachelor of Management degree in Information Systems is a minimum of 40 courses in length to admission. BachelorofManagement InformationSystems Name Systems Management Management 3080 - Managerial Skill Development Management 3821 - Visual Programming

Seldin, Jonathan P.

207

Summary Max Total Units  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Max Total Units Max Total Units *If All Splits, No Rack Units **If Only FW, AC Splits 1000 52 28 28 2000 87 59 35 3000 61 33 15 4000 61 33 15 Totals 261 153 93 ***Costs $1,957,500.00 $1,147,500.00 $697,500.00 Notes: added several refrigerants removed bins from analysis removed R-22 from list 1000lb, no Glycol, CO2 or ammonia Seawater R-404A only * includes seawater units ** no seawater units included *** Costs = (total units) X (estimate of $7500 per unit) 1000lb, air cooled split systems, fresh water Refrig Voltage Cond Unit IF-CU Combos 2 4 5 28 References Refrig Voltage C-U type Compressor HP R-404A 208/1/60 Hermetic SA 2.5 R-507 230/1/60 Hermetic MA 2.5 208/3/60 SemiHerm SA 1.5 230/3/60 SemiHerm MA 1.5 SemiHerm HA 1.5 1000lb, remote rack systems, fresh water Refrig/system Voltage Combos 12 2 24 References Refrig/system Voltage IF only

208

Karen Nunez, Procedures Center Manager  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Karen Nunez, Procedures Center Manager Print Procedures Center Manager Karen Nunez has been working somewhat "behind the scenes" at the ALS for the past seven years, ensuring that...

209

Total isomerization gains flexibility  

SciTech Connect

Isomerization extends refinery flexibility to meet changing markets. TIP (Total Isomerization Process) allows conversion of paraffin fractions in the gasoline boiling region including straight run naptha, light reformate, aromatic unit raffinate, and hydrocrackate. The hysomer isomerization is compared to catalytic reforming. Isomerization routes are graphed. Cost estimates and suggestions on the use of other feedstocks are given. TIP can maximize gas production, reduce crude runs, and complement cat reforming. In four examples, TIP reduces reformer severity and increases reformer yield.

Symoniak, M.F.; Holcombe, T.C.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Total Pollution Effect and Total Energy Cost per Output of Different Products for Polish Industrial System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For many years a broad use has been made of the indices of total energy requirements in the whole large production system corresponding to unit output of particular goods (Boustead I., Hancock G.F., 1979). The...

Henryk W. Balandynowicz

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Shifts in fisheries management: adapting to regime shifts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...into fisheries management. regime shifts|precautionary approach|fisheries management|management strategy...years, fisheries science and management...The current approach in fisheries science and management couples risk management...

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Effects of Cultural and Management Practices on Sudangrass Performance.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Harvest Frequen cy....-- 5 Harvest Practice ............................................ 5 Height and Frequency ................................ 5 Method of Harvest .................................... 6 Frequency of Harvest... sorghum and a sudangrass variety, have been used widely in recent years. The hybrids generally grow faster, produce more total dry matter and recover more rapidly following harvest than the sudan varieties. General culture and management practices ire...

Holt, Ethan C.

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Referenced-site environmental document for a Monitored Retrievable Storage facility: backup waste management option for handling 1800 MTU per year  

SciTech Connect

This environmental document includes a discussion of the purpose of a monitored retrievable storage facility, a description of two facility design concepts (sealed storage cask and field drywell), a description of three reference sites (arid, warm-wet, and cold-wet), and a discussion and comparison of the impacts associated with each of the six site/concept combinations. This analysis is based on a 15,000-MTU storage capacity and a throughput rate of up to 1800 MTU per year.

Silviera, D.J.; Aaberg, R.L.; Cushing, C.E.; Marshall, A.; Scott, M.J.; Sewart, G.H.; Strenge, D.L.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

U.S. Total Consumption of Heat Content of Natural Gas (BTU per...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption of Heat Content of Natural Gas (BTU per Cubic Foot) U.S. Total Consumption of Heat Content of Natural Gas (BTU per Cubic Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

215

Management Letter on the Department of Energy's Isotope Development and Production for Research and Applications Program's Fiscal Year 2009 Balance Sheet Audit, OAS-FS-12-09  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

09 Balance 09 Balance Sheet Audit OAS-FS-12-09 June 2012 January 30, 2012 Mr. Gregory Friedman, Inspector General Dr. Jehanne Gillo, Director, Facilities and Project Management Division, Office of Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Dear Mr. Friedman and Dr. Gillo: We have audited the balance sheet of the United States Department of Energy's (Department or DOE) Isotope Development and Production for Research and Applications Program (the Program) (a component of the Department) as of September 30, 2009, and have issued our report thereon dated January 30, 2012. In planning and performing our audit of the balance sheet, in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of America, we considered the Program's internal control over financial

216

Total Sales of Kerosene  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 492,702 218,736 269,010 305,508 187,656 81,102 1984-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 353,765 159,323 198,762 237,397 142,189 63,075 1984-2012 New England (PADD 1A) 94,635 42,570 56,661 53,363 38,448 15,983 1984-2012 Connecticut 13,006 6,710 8,800 7,437 7,087 2,143 1984-2012 Maine 46,431 19,923 25,158 24,281 17,396 7,394 1984-2012 Massachusetts 7,913 3,510 5,332 6,300 2,866 1,291 1984-2012 New Hampshire 14,454 6,675 8,353 7,435 5,472 1,977 1984-2012

217

Determination of Total Solids in Biomass and Total Dissolved...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Total Solids in Biomass and Total Dissolved Solids in Liquid Process Samples Laboratory Analytical Procedure (LAP) Issue Date: 3312008 A. Sluiter, B. Hames, D. Hyman, C. Payne,...

218

Grantee Total Number of Homes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Grantee Grantee Total Number of Homes Weatherized through November 2011 [Recovery Act] Total Number of Homes Weatherized through November 2011 (Calendar Year 2009 - November 2011) [Recovery Act + Annual Program Funding] Alabama 6,704 7,867 1 Alaska 443 2,363 American Samoa 304 410 Arizona 6,354 7,518 Arkansas 5,231 6,949 California 41,649 50,002 Colorado 12,782 19,210 Connecticut 8,940 10,009 2 Delaware** 54 54 District of Columbia 962 1,399 Florida 18,953 20,075 Georgia 13,449 14,739 Guam 574 589 Hawaii 604 1,083 Idaho** 4,470 6,614 Illinois 35,530 44,493 Indiana** 18,768 21,689 Iowa 8,794 10,202 Kansas 6,339 7,638 Kentucky 7,639 10,902 Louisiana 4,698 6,946 Maine 5,130 6,664 Maryland 8,108 9,015 Massachusetts 17,687 21,645 Michigan 29,293 37,137 Minnesota 18,224 22,711 Mississippi 5,937 6,888 Missouri 17,334 20,319 Montana 3,310 6,860 Navajo Nation

219

Total Marketed Production ..............  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

billion cubic feet per day) billion cubic feet per day) Total Marketed Production .............. 68.95 69.77 70.45 71.64 71.91 71.70 71.46 71.57 72.61 72.68 72.41 72.62 70.21 71.66 72.58 Alaska ......................................... 1.04 0.91 0.79 0.96 1.00 0.85 0.77 0.93 0.97 0.83 0.75 0.91 0.93 0.88 0.87 Federal GOM (a) ......................... 3.93 3.64 3.44 3.82 3.83 3.77 3.73 3.50 3.71 3.67 3.63 3.46 3.71 3.70 3.62 Lower 48 States (excl GOM) ...... 63.97 65.21 66.21 66.86 67.08 67.08 66.96 67.14 67.92 68.18 68.02 68.24 65.58 67.07 68.09 Total Dry Gas Production .............. 65.46 66.21 66.69 67.79 68.03 67.83 67.61 67.71 68.69 68.76 68.50 68.70 66.55 67.79 68.66 Gross Imports ................................ 8.48 7.60 7.80 7.95 8.27 7.59 7.96 7.91 7.89 7.17 7.61 7.73 7.96 7.93 7.60 Pipeline ........................................

220

Management Plan Management Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; and 5) consistency with the Endangered Species Act and Clean Water Act. In addition, the management plan Plan, Management Plan Page MP­ 1 #12;Management Plan water quality standards, instream flows, privateManagement Plan Management Plan "Management and restoration programs for native salmonids have

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "management total year" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Nuclear Waste Fund Activities Management Team | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste Fund Activities Management Team Waste Fund Activities Management Team Nuclear Waste Fund Activities Management Team The Nuclear Waste Fund Activities Management Team has responsibility to: Manage the investments and expenditures of the Nuclear Waste Fund; Support correspondence regarding Nuclear Waste Policy Act issues raised by congressional, Inspector General, Government Accounting Office and Freedom of Information Act inquiries; and, Manage the annual fee adequacy assessment process. Applicable Documents Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 Standard Contract for Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and/or High-Level Radioactive Waste Standard Contract Amendment for New Reactors FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 FY 2007 Fee Adequacy, Pub 2008 2009 Letter to Congress OCRWM Financial Statements for Annual Report for Years Ended

222

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings* ........................... 3,037 115 397 384 52 1,143 22 354 64 148 357 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 386 19 43 18 11 93 7 137 8 12 38 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 262 12 35 17 5 83 4 56 6 9 35 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 407 20 46 44 8 151 3 53 9 19 54 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 350 15 55 50 9 121 2 34 7 16 42 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 405 16 57 65 7 158 2 29 6 18 45 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 483 16 62 80 5 195 1 24 Q 31 56 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 361 8 51 54 5 162 1 9 8 19 43 Over 500,000 ............................. 383 8 47 56 3 181 2 12 8 23 43 Principal Building Activity

223

Total OECD Oil Stocks*  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: The most recent data show OECD inventories remaining at very low levels. EIA expects inventories to remain low through the coming year. This increases the potential for price volatility through the rest of the winter, and into the next gasoline season. Inventories are a good measure of the supply/demand balance that affects prices. A large over-supply (production greater than demand) will put downward pressure on prices, while under-supply will push prices upward. As global oil production changed relative to demand, the world moved from a period of over-supply in 1998 to one of under-supply in 1999 and 2000. OECD inventories illustrate the changes in the world petroleum balance. OECD inventories rose to high levels during 1997 and 1998 when production exceeded demand and prices dropped to around $10 per barrel in

224

Total OECD Oil Stocks*  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The most recent data show OECD inventories remaining at very low The most recent data show OECD inventories remaining at very low levels. EIA expects inventories to remain low through the coming year. This increases the potential for price volatility through the winter, and even extending to the next gasoline season. Inventories are a good measure of the supply/demand balance that effects prices. A large over-supply (production greater than demand) will put downward pressure on prices, while under-supply will push prices upward. As global oil production changed relative to demand, the world moved from a period of over-supply in 1998 to one of under-supply in 1999 and 2000. OECD inventories illustrate the changes in the world petroleum balance. OECD inventories rose to high levels during 1997 and 1998 when production exceeded demand and prices dropped to around $10 per barrel in

225

Total OECD Oil Stocks*  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Notes: The most recent data show OECD inventories remaining at very low levels. EIA expects inventories to remain low through the coming year. This increases the potential for price volatility through the winter, and even extending to the next gasoline season. Inventories are a good measure of the supply/demand balance that effects prices. A large over-supply (production greater than demand) will put downward pressure on prices, while under-supply will push prices upward. As global oil production changed relative to demand, the world moved from a period of over-supply in 1998 to one of under-supply in 1999 and 2000. OECD inventories illustrate the changes in the world petroleum balance. OECD inventories rose to high levels during 1997 and 1998 when production exceeded demand and prices dropped to around $10 per barrel in

226

Accountability report - fiscal year 1997  

SciTech Connect

This document contains the US NRC`s accountability report for fiscal year 1997. Topics include uses of funds, financial condition, program performance, management accountability, and the audited financial statement.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Determination of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) Using Total Carbon Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Several methods have been proposed to replace the Freon(TM)-extraction method to determine total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content. For reasons of cost, sensitivity, precision, or simplicity, none of the replacement methods are feasible for analysis of radioactive samples at our facility. We have developed a method to measure total petroleum hydrocarbon content in aqueous sample matrixes using total organic carbon (total carbon) determination. The total carbon content (TC1) of the sample is measured using a total organic carbon analyzer. The sample is then contacted with a small volume of non-pokar solvent to extract the total petroleum hydrocarbons. The total carbon content of the resultant aqueous phase of the extracted sample (TC2) is measured. Total petroleum hydrocarbon content is calculated (TPH = TC1-TC2). The resultant data are consistent with results obtained using Freon(TM) extraction followed by infrared absorbance.

Ekechukwu, A.A.

2002-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

228

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings ............................. 91.0 33.0 7.2 6.1 7.0 18.7 2.7 5.3 1.0 2.2 7.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 99.0 30.7 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.9 7.1 19.9 1.1 1.7 8.2 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 80.0 30.1 5.5 2.6 6.1 13.6 5.2 8.2 0.8 1.4 6.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 71.0 28.2 4.5 4.1 4.1 14.5 2.3 4.5 0.8 1.6 6.5 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 79.0 29.9 6.8 5.9 6.3 14.9 1.7 3.9 0.8 1.8 7.1 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 88.7 31.6 7.6 7.6 6.5 19.6 1.7 3.4 0.7 2.0 8.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 104.2 39.1 8.2 8.9 7.9 22.9 1.1 2.9 Q 3.2 8.7 200,001 to 500,000 ....................

229

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings ............................. 91.0 33.0 7.2 6.1 7.0 18.7 2.7 5.3 1.0 2.2 7.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 99.0 30.7 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.9 7.1 19.9 1.1 1.7 8.2 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 80.0 30.1 5.5 2.6 6.1 13.6 5.2 8.2 0.8 1.4 6.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 71.0 28.2 4.5 4.1 4.1 14.5 2.3 4.5 0.8 1.6 6.5 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 79.0 29.9 6.8 5.9 6.3 14.9 1.7 3.9 0.8 1.8 7.1 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 88.7 31.6 7.6 7.6 6.5 19.6 1.7 3.4 0.7 2.0 8.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 104.2 39.1 8.2 8.9 7.9 22.9 1.1 2.9 Q 3.2 8.7 200,001 to 500,000 ....................

230

U.S. Total Exports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Morgan, MT Pittsburg, NH Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Sweetgrass, MT Total to Chile Sabine Pass, LA Total to China Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to India Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Japan Cameron, LA Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to Mexico Douglas, AZ Nogales, AZ Calexico, CA Ogilby Mesa, CA Otay Mesa, CA Alamo, TX Clint, TX Del Rio, TX Eagle Pass, TX El Paso, TX Hidalgo, TX McAllen, TX Penitas, TX Rio Bravo, TX Roma, TX Total to Portugal Sabine Pass, LA Total to Russia Total to South Korea Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Spain Cameron, LA Sabine Pass, LA Total to United Kingdom Sabine Pass, LA Period: Monthly Annual

231

PHMC Year 2000: Status reporting for mission essential Year 2000 projects. Volume 3  

SciTech Connect

The PHMC (Project Hanford Management Contract) Year 2000 status reporting process is designed to encompass the reporting requirements of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), DOE HQ, RL and the PHMC team for mission essential Year 2000 projects. Status reporting is required for all mission essential Year 2000 projects until each Year 2000 project has completed the compliance assurance process.

Layfield, K.A.

1998-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

232

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Illinois - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S15. Summary statistics for natural gas - Illinois, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 45 51 50 40 40 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells E 1,188 E 1,438 E 1,697 2,114 2,125 From Oil Wells E 5 E 5 E 5 7 0 From Coalbed Wells E 0 E 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

233

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

50 50 North Dakota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S36. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Dakota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 194 196 188 239 211 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 13,738 11,263 10,501 14,287 22,261 From Oil Wells 54,896 45,776 38,306 27,739 17,434 From Coalbed Wells 0

234

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Mississippi - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S26. Summary statistics for natural gas - Mississippi, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,343 2,320 1,979 5,732 1,669 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 331,673 337,168 387,026 429,829 404,457 From Oil Wells 7,542 8,934 8,714 8,159 43,421 From Coalbed Wells 7,250

235

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Virginia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S48. Summary statistics for natural gas - Virginia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,735 6,426 7,303 7,470 7,903 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 6,681 R 7,419 R 16,046 R 23,086 20,375 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells R 86,275 R 101,567

236

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Michigan - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S24. Summary statistics for natural gas - Michigan, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 9,712 9,995 10,600 10,100 11,100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 80,090 R 16,959 R 20,867 R 7,345 18,470 From Oil Wells 54,114 10,716 12,919 9,453 11,620 From Coalbed Wells 0

237

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Montana - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S28. Summary statistics for natural gas - Montana, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,925 7,095 7,031 6,059 6,477 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 69,741 R 67,399 R 57,396 R 51,117 37,937 From Oil Wells 23,092 22,995 21,522 19,292 21,777 From Coalbed Wells

238

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Mississippi - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S26. Summary statistics for natural gas - Mississippi, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,315 2,343 2,320 1,979 5,732 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 259,001 R 331,673 R 337,168 R 387,026 429,829 From Oil Wells 6,203 7,542 8,934 8,714 8,159 From Coalbed Wells

239

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Indiana - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S16. Summary statistics for natural gas - Indiana, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,350 525 563 620 914 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 3,606 4,701 4,927 6,802 9,075 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

240

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 New York - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S34. Summary statistics for natural gas - New York, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,680 6,675 6,628 6,736 6,157 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 54,232 49,607 44,273 35,163 30,495 From Oil Wells 710 714 576 650 629 From Coalbed Wells 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "management total year" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Texas - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S45. Summary statistics for natural gas - Texas, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 76,436 87,556 93,507 95,014 100,966 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 4,992,042 R 5,285,458 R 4,860,377 R 4,441,188 3,794,952 From Oil Wells 704,092 745,587 774,821 849,560 1,073,301

242

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Ohio - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S37. Summary statistics for natural gas - Ohio, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 34,416 34,963 34,931 46,717 35,104 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 79,769 83,511 73,459 30,655 65,025 From Oil Wells 5,072 5,301 4,651 45,663 6,684 From Coalbed Wells 0

243

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Colorado - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S6. Summary statistics for natural gas - Colorado, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 25,716 27,021 28,813 30,101 32,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 496,374 459,509 526,077 563,750 1,036,572 From Oil Wells 199,725 327,619 338,565

244

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 South Dakota - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S43. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Dakota, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 71 71 89 102 100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 422 R 1,098 R 1,561 1,300 933 From Oil Wells 11,458 10,909 11,366 11,240 11,516 From Coalbed Wells 0 0

245

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Illinois - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S15. Summary statistics for natural gas - Illinois, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 43 45 51 50 40 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells RE 1,389 RE 1,188 RE 1,438 RE 1,697 2,114 From Oil Wells E 5 E 5 E 5 E 5 7 From Coalbed Wells RE 0 RE

246

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Colorado - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S6. Summary statistics for natural gas - Colorado, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 22,949 25,716 27,021 28,813 30,101 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 436,330 R 496,374 R 459,509 R 526,077 563,750 From Oil Wells 160,833 199,725 327,619

247

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Alaska - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S2. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alaska, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 239 261 261 269 277 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 165,624 150,483 137,639 127,417 112,268 From Oil Wells 3,313,666 3,265,401 3,174,747 3,069,683 3,050,654

248

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Ohio - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S37. Summary statistics for natural gas - Ohio, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 34,416 34,416 34,963 34,931 46,717 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 82,812 R 79,769 R 83,511 R 73,459 30,655 From Oil Wells 5,268 5,072 5,301 4,651 45,663 From Coalbed Wells

249

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Kentucky - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S19. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kentucky, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 16,563 16,290 17,152 17,670 14,632 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 95,437 R 112,587 R 111,782 133,521 122,578 From Oil Wells 0 1,529 1,518 1,809 1,665 From Coalbed Wells 0

250

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Utah - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S46. Summary statistics for natural gas - Utah, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,197 5,578 5,774 6,075 6,469 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 271,890 R 331,143 R 340,224 R 328,135 351,168 From Oil Wells 35,104 36,056 36,795 42,526 49,947 From Coalbed Wells

251

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 California - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S5. Summary statistics for natural gas - California, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 1,540 1,645 1,643 1,580 1,308 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 93,249 91,460 82,288 73,017 63,902 From Oil Wells R 116,652 R 122,345 R 121,949 R 151,369 120,880

252

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Utah - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S46. Summary statistics for natural gas - Utah, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,578 5,774 6,075 6,469 6,900 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 331,143 340,224 328,135 351,168 402,899 From Oil Wells 36,056 36,795 42,526 49,947 31,440 From Coalbed Wells 74,399

253

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Louisiana - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S20. Summary statistics for natural gas - Louisiana, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 18,145 19,213 18,860 19,137 21,235 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 1,261,539 R 1,288,559 R 1,100,007 R 911,967 883,712 From Oil Wells 106,303 61,663 58,037 63,638 68,505

254

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Oklahoma - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S38. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oklahoma, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 38,364 41,921 43,600 44,000 41,238 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 1,583,356 R 1,452,148 R 1,413,759 R 1,140,111 1,281,794 From Oil Wells 35,186 153,227 92,467 210,492 104,703

255

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 New Mexico - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S33. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Mexico, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 42,644 44,241 44,784 44,748 32,302 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 657,593 R 732,483 R 682,334 R 616,134 556,024 From Oil Wells 227,352 211,496 223,493 238,580 252,326

256

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 West Virginia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S50. Summary statistics for natural gas - West Virginia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 48,215 49,364 50,602 52,498 56,813 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 189,968 R 191,444 R 192,896 R 151,401 167,113 From Oil Wells 701 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells

257

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Michigan - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S24. Summary statistics for natural gas - Michigan, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 9,995 10,600 10,100 11,100 10,900 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 16,959 20,867 7,345 18,470 17,041 From Oil Wells 10,716 12,919 9,453 11,620 4,470 From Coalbed Wells 0

258

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 West Virginia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S50. Summary statistics for natural gas - West Virginia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 49,364 50,602 52,498 56,813 50,700 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 191,444 192,896 151,401 167,113 397,313 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 1,477 From Coalbed Wells 0

259

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

80 80 Wyoming - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S52. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wyoming, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 27,350 28,969 25,710 26,124 26,180 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 1,649,284 R 1,764,084 R 1,806,807 R 1,787,599 1,709,218 From Oil Wells 159,039 156,133 135,269 151,871 152,589

260

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 New York - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S34. Summary statistics for natural gas - New York, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,675 6,628 6,736 6,157 7,176 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 49,607 44,273 35,163 30,495 25,985 From Oil Wells 714 576 650 629 439 From Coalbed Wells 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "management total year" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Wyoming - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S52. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wyoming, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 28,969 25,710 26,124 26,180 22,171 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,764,084 1,806,807 1,787,599 1,709,218 1,762,095 From Oil Wells 156,133 135,269 151,871 152,589 24,544

262

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Virginia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S48. Summary statistics for natural gas - Virginia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,426 7,303 7,470 7,903 7,843 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 7,419 16,046 23,086 20,375 21,802 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 9 From Coalbed Wells 101,567 106,408

263

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Kentucky - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S19. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kentucky, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 16,290 17,152 17,670 14,632 17,936 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 112,587 111,782 133,521 122,578 106,122 From Oil Wells 1,529 1,518 1,809 1,665 0 From Coalbed Wells 0

264

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Pennsylvania - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S40. Summary statistics for natural gas - Pennsylvania, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 52,700 55,631 57,356 44,500 54,347 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 182,277 R 188,538 R 184,795 R 173,450 242,305 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0

265

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Texas - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S45. Summary statistics for natural gas - Texas, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 87,556 93,507 95,014 100,966 96,617 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 5,285,458 4,860,377 4,441,188 3,794,952 3,619,901 From Oil Wells 745,587 774,821 849,560 1,073,301 860,675

266

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Alabama - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S1. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alabama, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,860 6,913 7,026 7,063 6,327 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 158,964 142,509 131,448 116,872 114,407 From Oil Wells 6,368 5,758 6,195 5,975 10,978

267

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Louisiana - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S20. Summary statistics for natural gas - Louisiana, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 19,213 18,860 19,137 21,235 19,792 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,288,559 1,100,007 911,967 883,712 775,506 From Oil Wells 61,663 58,037 63,638 68,505 49,380

268

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 South Dakota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S43. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Dakota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 71 89 102 100 95 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,098 1,561 1,300 933 14,396 From Oil Wells 10,909 11,366 11,240 11,516 689 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0

269

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Kansas - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S18. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kansas, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 17,862 21,243 22,145 25,758 24,697 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 286,210 269,086 247,651 236,834 264,610 From Oil Wells 45,038 42,647 39,071 37,194 0 From Coalbed Wells 44,066

270

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Arkansas - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S4. Summary statistics for natural gas - Arkansas, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,592 6,314 7,397 8,388 8,538 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 173,975 164,316 152,108 132,230 121,684 From Oil Wells 7,378 5,743 5,691 9,291 3,000

271

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 California - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S5. Summary statistics for natural gas - California, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 1,645 1,643 1,580 1,308 1,423 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 91,460 82,288 73,017 63,902 120,579 From Oil Wells 122,345 121,949 151,369 120,880 70,900

272

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Oklahoma - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S38. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oklahoma, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 41,921 43,600 44,000 41,238 40,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,452,148 1,413,759 1,140,111 1,281,794 1,394,859 From Oil Wells 153,227 92,467 210,492 104,703 53,720

273

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Alaska - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S2. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alaska, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 261 261 269 277 185 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 150,483 137,639 127,417 112,268 107,873 From Oil Wells 3,265,401 3,174,747 3,069,683 3,050,654 3,056,918

274

BS in RECREATION MANAGEMENT: Experience Industry Management Emphasis (664521) MAP Sheet Department of Recreation Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BS in RECREATION MANAGEMENT: Experience Industry Management Emphasis (664521) MAP Sheet Department of Recreation Management For students entering the degree program during the 2013­2014 curricular year Recreation Management Core courses: RecM 404 Principles of Recreation Management RecM 420 Event

Olsen Jr., Dan R.

275

Y YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

5 79 -7.06% YEAR 2013 2014 Males 59 57 -3.39% Females 26 22 -15.38% YEAR 2013 2014 SES 1 0 -100% EJEK 4 3 -25.00% EN 05 3 2 -33.33% EN 04 22 22 0% EN 03...

276

Y YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

2 40 -4.76% YEAR 2013 2014 Males 37 35 -5.41% Females 5 5 0% YEAR 2013 2014 SES 2 2 0% EJEK 5 4 -20.00% EN 05 5 7 40.00% EN 04 6 6 0% EN 03 1 1 0% NN...

277

Y YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

91 81 -10.99% YEAR 2013 2014 Males 67 56 -16.42% Females 24 25 4.17% YEAR 2013 2014 SES 1 2 100% EJEK 9 8 -11.11% EN 04 25 22 -12.00% NN (Engineering) 24...

278

Relation between total quanta and total energy for aquatic ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Jan 22, 1974 ... havior of the ratio of total quanta to total energy (Q : W) within the spectral region of photosynthetic ..... For blue-green waters, where hRmax lies.

2000-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

279

Contract Management | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Contract Contract Management Berkeley Site Office (BSO) BSO Home About Current Projects Contract Management Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Resources Contact Information Berkeley Site Office U.S. Department of Energy One Cyclotron Road Berkeley, CA 94720 P: (510) 486-5784 E: bsowebinfo@bso.science.doe.gov Contract Management Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Contract Summary LBNL is managed and operated by the Regents of the University of California under prime contract number DE-AC02-05CH11231. This is a cost-reimbursement M&O performance-based contract with special performance fee and award term provisions. As of 2012, the Contractor has earned a total of 5 years towards the possible additional 15 years of the current contract term. The contract period of performance is April 19, 2005 - May 31, 2015, for each

280

Y YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Hispanic Male (H,M) 207 195 -5.80% Hispanic Female (H,F) 182 171 -6.04% White Male (W,M) 1271 1217 -4.25% White Female (W,F) 463 435 -6.05% Total includes...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "management total year" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Total assessment audits (TAA) in Iowa  

SciTech Connect

Traditionally, energy, waste reduction and productivity audits are performed for a manufacturing facility independent of one another. Auditors generally deliver recommendations for improvement based on their specialized expertise (energy, waste reduction, productivity, etc.) without regard to how those recommendations may impact other, sometimes less obvious, subsystems or processes within the facility. The audits are typically performed in isolation from the plant upper management and commonly without adequate knowledge of how inherent interrelated operational constraints may directly or indirectly influence the success of audit recommendations. The Total Assessment Audit (TAA) concept originated from the belief that a manufacturing facility is better served using a holistic approach to problem solving rather than the more conventional isolated approach. The total assessment audit methodology partners the upper management team of a company with a multi-disciplined team of industry-specific specialists to collectively ascertain the core opportunities for improvement in the company and then to formulate a company oriented continuous improvement plan. Productivity, waste reduction, and energy efficiency objectives are seamlessly integrated into a single service delivery with the TAA approach. Nontraditional audit objectives that influence profitability and competitiveness such as business management practices, employee training, human resource issues, etc. are also subject to evaluation in a TAA. The underlying premise of this approach is that the objectives are interrelated and that simultaneous evaluation will province synergistic results. Ultimately, it is believed that the TAA approach can motivate a manufacturer to implement improvements it might not otherwise pursue if it were focused only on singular objectives.

Haman, W.G.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Wildland fire management and air quality in the southern Sierra Nevada: Using the Lion Fire as a case study with a multi-year perspective on PM2.5 impacts and fire policy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Management of fire is an important and controversial policy issue. Active fire suppression has led to a backlog of fuels, limited the ecological benefits of fire, and reduced short-term smoke impacts likely delaying these emissions to future generations over a larger spatial extent. Smoke impacts can be expected to increase as fire size and intensity increase and the fuel backlog is consumed; whether through reintroduction of fire under desirable conditions or through stand replacing fire. Land Management Agencies would like to increase the use of naturally ignited fires to burn during favorable conditions as a way to reduce catastrophic fires. This study provides information about the levels of air quality impacts expected from these types of fires and discusses some of the policy controversies of managed fire that propagate inconsistencies between agencies and enter the public discourse. The Lion Fire, a primarily low intensity 8,370ha fire that was extensively monitored for Particulate Matter less than 2.5 microns (PM2.5), is used to quantify impacts to air quality. PM2.5 monitoring sites are used to assess exposure, public health impacts, and subsequently quantify annual air quality during a year with a fire that is within the historic normal fire size and intensity for this area. Ground level PM2.5 impacts were found to be localized with 99% of the hourly Air Quality Index readings in the moderate or good category for the sites impacted by the fire. PM2.5 concentrations at sites nearest the fire were below annual federal air quality standards for PM2.5 with annual 98th percentile at the most impacted sites (Johnsondale, Kernville, and Camp Nelson) of 35.0, 34.0, and 28.0?gm3 respectively. Smoke impacts to PM2.5 concentrations were not found to reach the populated Central Valley. The findings suggest that this type of fire can be implemented with minimal public health impacts thus allowing an opportunity for air and fire managers to alter policy to allow additional burning in an area with severe anthropogenic air pollution and where frequent widespread fire is both beneficial and inevitable. The more extensive air quality impacts documented with large high intensity fire may be averted by embracing the use of fire to prevent unwanted high intensity burns. A widespread increase in the use of fire for ecological benefit may provide the resiliency needed in Sierra Nevada forests as well as be the most beneficial to public health through the reduction of single dose exposure to smoke and limiting impacts spatially.

Don Schweizer; Ricardo Cisneros

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

EQUUS Total Return Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EQUUS Total Return Inc EQUUS Total Return Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name EQUUS Total Return Inc Place Houston, Texas Product A business development company and VC investor that trades as a closed-end fund. EQUUS is managed by MCC Global NV, a Frankfurt stock exchange listed management and merchant banking group. Coordinates 29.76045°, -95.369784° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.76045,"lon":-95.369784,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

284

Energy Department Awards Small Business Contract for Legacy Management Work  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Small Business Contract for Legacy Small Business Contract for Legacy Management Work to S.M. Stoller Corporation Energy Department Awards Small Business Contract for Legacy Management Work to S.M. Stoller Corporation July 2, 2007 - 2:54pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced the award of a prime contract for the Department's Office of Legacy Management (LM) Support Services work to S.M. Stoller Corporation for surveillance and maintenance and technical support at more than 100 of DOE's legacy sites. The three-year contract, with one two-year extension option for a total of five years, is valued at approximately $170 million over the life of the contract and is one of the largest 100% small business contracts within DOE. The contract includes responsibility for legacy sites that have been

285

Previous Year Awards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Awards Awards Previous Year Awards 2013 Allocation Awards This page lists the allocation awards for NERSC for the 2013 allocation year (Jan 8, 2013 through Jan 13, 2014). Read More » NERSC Initiative for Scientific Exploration (NISE) 2013 Awards NISE is a mechanism used for allocating the NERSC reserve (10% of the total allocation). In 2013 we made the second year of the two-year awards made in 2012, supplemented by projects selected by the NERSC director. Read More » Data Intensive Computing Pilot Program 2012/2013 Awards NERSC's new data-intensive science pilot program is aimed at helping scientists capture, analyze and store the increasing stream of scientific data coming out of experiments, simulations and instruments. Read More » 2012 Allocation Awards This page lists the allocation awards for NERSC for the 2012 allocation

286

Is Demand-Side Management Economically Justified?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 Is Demand-Side Management Economically Justified? With billions of dollars being spent on demand-side management programs in the U.S. every year, the rationale for and performance of these programs are coming under increasing scrutiny. Three projects in the Energy Analysis Program are making significant contributions to the DSM debate. *Total Resource Cost Test Ratio = ratio of utility avoided costs (i.e., benefits) divided by total cost of program (i.e., Administrative Cost + Incentive Cost + Consumer Cost) In May, Joe Eto, Ed Vine, Leslie Shown, Chris Payne, and I released the first in a series of reports we authored from the Database on Energy Efficiency Programs (DEEP) project. The objective of DEEP is to document the measured cost and performance of utility-sponsored energy-efficiency

287

Hospitality Management Hospitality Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the global hospitality industry. Academic Offerings HOSPITALITY AND FOOD SERVICE MANAGEMENT MINOR HOSPITALITY AND FOOD SERVICE MANAGEMENT MINOR Students pursuing programs in other areas of study may choose a minor Lodging Management 3 HPM 309 Sports Arena Management 3 HPM 312* Cost Control in Food Services (Prereq

McConnell, Terry

288

Report to Congress on the U.S. Department of Energy`s Environmental Management Science Program: Research funded and its linkages to environmental cleanup problems, and high out-year cost environmental management project descriptions. Volume 3 of 3 -- Appendix C  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy`s Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) serves as a catalyst for the application of scientific discoveries to the development and deployment of technologies that will lead to reduction of the costs and risks associated with cleaning up the nation`s nuclear complex. Appendix C provides details about each of the Department`s 82 high cost projects and lists the EMSP research awards with potential to impact each of these projects. The high cost projects listed are those having costs greater than $50 million in constant 1998 dollars from the year 2007 and beyond, based on the March 1998 Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure Draft data, and having costs of quantities of material associated with an environmental management problem area. The high cost project information is grouped by operations office and organized by site and project code. Each operations office section begins with a list of research needs associated with that operations office. Potentially related research awards are listed by problem area in the Index of Research Awards by Environmental Management Problem Area, which can be found at the end of appendices B and C. For projects that address high risks to the public, workers, or the environment, refer also the Health/Ecology/Risk problem area awards. Research needs are programmatic or technical challenges that may benefit from knowledge gained through basic research.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Commercial Algae Management | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Commercial Algae Management Jump to: navigation, search Name: Commercial Algae Management Address: 320 Arbor Lane Place: Franklin, NC Zip: 28734 Year Founded: 2002 Phone Number:...

290

Mujeres Hombres Total Hombres Total 16 5 21 0 10  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Julio de 2011 Tipo de Discapacidad Sexo CENTRO 5-Distribución del estudiantado con discapacidad por centro, tipo de discapacidad, sexo y totales. #12;

Autonoma de Madrid, Universidad

291

Relation between total quanta and total energy for aquatic ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Jan 22, 1974 ... ment of the total energy and vice versa. From a measurement of spectral irradi- ance ... unit energy (for the wavelength region specified).

2000-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

292

Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type: Total Estimated  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Number: Number: Contract Type: Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Earned FY2008 $2,550,203 FY2009 $39,646,446 FY2010 $64,874,187 FY2011 $66,253,207 FY2012 $41,492,503 FY2013 $0 FY2014 FY2015 FY2016 FY2017 FY2018 Cumulative Fee Earned $214,816,546 Fee Available $2,550,203 Minimum Fee $77,931,569 $69,660,249 Savannah River Nuclear Solutions LLC $458,687,779 $0 Maximum Fee Fee Information $88,851,963 EM Contractor Fee Site: Savannah River Site Office, Aiken, SC Contract Name: Management & Operating Contract September 2013 DE-AC09-08SR22470

293

Total.................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

49.2 49.2 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................... 93.3 31.3 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Use Cooling Equipment................................ 91.4 30.4 14.6 15.4 11.1 6.9 5.2 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............... 1.9 1.0 0.5 Q Q Q Q Q Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................... 17.8 17.8 N N N N N N Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................. 65.9 3.9 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Without a Heat Pump................................ 53.5 3.5 12.9 12.7 8.6 5.5 4.2 6.2 With a Heat Pump..................................... 12.3 0.4 2.2 2.9 2.5 1.5 1.0 1.8 Window/Wall Units........................................ 28.9 27.5 0.5 Q 0.3 Q Q Q 1 Unit......................................................... 14.5 13.5 0.3 Q Q Q N Q 2 Units.......................................................

294

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.2 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 7.1 6.8 7.9 11.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 7.1 6.6 7.9 11.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N Q N 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 3.8 0.4 3.8 8.4 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 1.8 Q 3.1 6.0 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 1.5 Q 3.1 6.0 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 Q N Q Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 1.9 Q Q 0.2 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 0.8 Q N Q For Two Housing Units.................................

295

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.6 5.6 17.7 7.9 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q N Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 25.6 17.7 7.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 25.6 17.7 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 18.4 13.1 5.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 16.2 11.6 4.7 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 15.5 11.0 4.5 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.7 0.6 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 1.6 1.2 0.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 1.1 0.9 Q For Two Housing Units.................................

296

Total...........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat Pump........................................... 53.5 8.7 3.2 5.5 With a Heat Pump............................................... 12.3 1.7 0.7 1.0 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 3.6 0.6 3.0 1 Unit................................................................... 14.5 2.9 0.5 2.4 2 Units.................................................................

297

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q Q Million U.S. Housing Units Renter- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit U.S. Housing Units (millions Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing Units Renter- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit U.S. Housing Units (millions Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005

298

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Personal Computers Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 14.2 7.2 2.8 4.2 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 26.6 14.5 4.1 7.9 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 20.5 11.0 3.4 6.1 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 6.1 3.5 0.7 1.9 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 5.0 2.6 1.0 1.3 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 10.3 5.9 1.6 2.9 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 4.1 2.3 0.6 1.2 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

299

Total..............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,171 ,171 1,618 1,031 845 630 401 Census Region and Division Northeast................................................... 20.6 2,334 1,664 562 911 649 220 New England.......................................... 5.5 2,472 1,680 265 1,057 719 113 Middle Atlantic........................................ 15.1 2,284 1,658 670 864 627 254 Midwest...................................................... 25.6 2,421 1,927 1,360 981 781 551 East North Central.................................. 17.7 2,483 1,926 1,269 999 775 510 West North Central................................. 7.9 2,281 1,930 1,566 940 796 646 South.......................................................... 40.7 2,161 1,551 1,295 856 615 513 South Atlantic......................................... 21.7 2,243 1,607 1,359 896 642 543 East South Central.................................

300

Total.........................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

..... ..... 111.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer...................................... 35.5 3.0 2.0 2.7 3.1 Use a Personal Computer.................................................. 75.6 4.2 5.0 5.3 9.0 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model............................................................. 58.6 3.2 3.9 4.0 6.7 Laptop Model................................................................. 16.9 1.0 1.1 1.3 2.4 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours......................................................... 13.6 0.7 0.9 0.9 1.4 2 to 15 Hours................................................................. 29.1 1.7 2.1 1.9 3.4 16 to 40 Hours............................................................... 13.5 0.9 0.9 0.9 1.8 41 to 167 Hours.............................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "management total year" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 2.6 0.7 1.9 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 6.6 2.0 4.6 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 8.8 2.9 5.8 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 4.7 1.5 3.1 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.7 Q 0.6 Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 0.7 0.3 0.4 No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 0.2 Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 23.7 7.5 16.2 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.7 0.4 1.3 Once a Day.......................................................

302

Total..............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 23.2 10.9 3.8 8.4 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 9.0 6.7 1.4 0.9 Window/Wall Units..................................................... 28.9 8.0 3.4 1.7 2.9 1 Unit......................................................................

303

Total....................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.7 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Household Size 1 Person.......................................................... 30.0 4.6 2.5 3.7 3.2 5.4 5.5 3.7 1.6 2 Persons......................................................... 34.8 4.3 1.9 4.4 4.1 5.9 5.3 5.5 3.4 3 Persons......................................................... 18.4 2.5 1.3 1.7 1.9 2.9 3.5 2.8 1.6 4 Persons......................................................... 15.9 1.9 0.8 1.5 1.6 3.0 2.5 3.1 1.4 5 Persons......................................................... 7.9 0.8 0.4 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.1 1.5 0.9 6 or More Persons........................................... 4.1 0.5 0.3 0.3 0.6 0.5 0.7 0.8 0.4 2005 Annual Household Income Category Less than $9,999............................................. 9.9 1.9 1.1 1.3 0.9 1.7 1.3 1.1 0.5 $10,000 to $14,999..........................................

304

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 6.9 8.1 14.2 6.4 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 13.7 17.5 26.6 17.8 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 10.4 14.1 20.5 13.7 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 3.3 3.4 6.1 4.1 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 2.4 3.4 5.0 2.9 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 5.2 7.0 10.3 6.6 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 3.1 2.8 4.1 3.4 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

305

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 6.4 2.2 4.2 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 17.8 5.3 12.5 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 13.7 4.2 9.5 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 4.1 1.1 3.0 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 2.9 0.9 2.0 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 6.6 2.0 4.6 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 3.4 0.9 2.5 41 to 167 Hours......................................................... 6.3

306

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

33.0 33.0 8.0 3.4 5.9 14.4 1.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 6.5 1.6 0.9 1.3 2.4 0.2 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 26.5 6.5 2.5 4.6 12.0 1.0 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 25.7 6.3 2.5 4.4 11.7 0.8 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 0.8 Q Q 0.2 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 14.1 3.6 1.5 2.1 6.4 0.6 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 12.4 3.1 1.3 1.8 5.7 0.6 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 1.7 0.6 Q 0.3 0.6 Q Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 12.4 2.9 1.0 2.5 5.6 0.4 1 Unit.......................................................... 14.5 7.3 1.2 0.5 1.4 3.9 0.2 2 Units.........................................................

307

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day................................................. 8.2 3.7 1.6 1.4 1.5 2 Times A Day.............................................................. 24.6 10.8 4.1 4.3 5.5 Once a Day................................................................... 42.3 17.0 7.2 8.7 9.3 A Few Times Each Week............................................. 27.2 11.4 4.7 6.4 4.8 About Once a Week..................................................... 3.9 1.7 0.6 0.9 0.8 Less Than Once a Week.............................................. 4.1 2.2 0.6 0.8 0.5 No Hot Meals Cooked................................................... 0.9 0.4 Q Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven................................................................. 109.6 46.2 18.8

308

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Single-Family Units Single-Family Units Detached Type of Housing Unit Table HC2.7 Air Conditioning Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Single-Family Units Detached Type of Housing Unit Table HC2.7 Air Conditioning Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) At Home Behavior Home Used for Business

309

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 2.1 1.8 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 23.5 16.0 7.5 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 23.4 15.9 7.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 17.3 11.3 6.0 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 16.2 10.6 5.6 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 1.1 0.8 0.4 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 6.6 4.9 1.7 1 Unit..................................................................... 14.5 4.1 2.9 1.2 2 Units...................................................................

310

Total..............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20.6 20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 4.0 2.1 1.4 10.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 16.5 23.5 39.3 13.9 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 16.3 23.4 38.9 12.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.3 Q 0.5 1.0 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 6.0 17.3 32.1 10.5 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 5.5 16.2 23.2 8.7 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 0.5 1.1 9.0 1.7 Window/Wall Units..................................................... 28.9 10.7 6.6 8.0 3.6 1 Unit......................................................................

311

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.6 5.6 17.7 7.9 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 8.1 5.6 2.5 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 17.5 12.1 5.4 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 14.1 10.0 4.0 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 3.4 2.1 1.3 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 3.4 2.5 0.9 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 7.0 4.8 2.3 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 2.8 2.1 0.7 41 to 167 Hours......................................................... 6.3

312

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.2 15.2 7.8 1.0 1.2 3.3 1.9 For Two Housing Units............................. 0.9 Q N Q 0.6 N Heat Pump.................................................. 9.2 7.4 0.3 Q 0.7 0.5 Portable Electric Heater............................... 1.6 0.8 Q Q Q 0.3 Other Equipment......................................... 1.9 0.7 Q Q 0.7 Q Fuel Oil........................................................... 7.7 5.5 0.4 0.8 0.9 0.2 Steam or Hot Water System........................ 4.7 2.9 Q 0.7 0.8 N For One Housing Unit.............................. 3.3 2.9 Q Q Q N For Two Housing Units............................. 1.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 N Central Warm-Air Furnace........................... 2.8 2.4 Q Q Q 0.2 Other Equipment......................................... 0.3 0.2 Q N Q N Wood..............................................................

313

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................. Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................. 17.8 5.3 4.7 2.8 1.9 3.1 3.6 7.5 Have Cooling Equipment.............................. 93.3 21.5 24.1 17.8 11.2 18.8 13.0 31.1 Use Cooling Equipment............................... 91.4 21.0 23.5 17.4 11.0 18.6 12.6 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............. 1.9 0.5 0.6 0.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................ 65.9 11.0 16.5 13.5 8.7 16.1 6.4 17.2 Without a Heat Pump.............................. 53.5 9.4 13.6 10.7 7.1 12.7 5.4 14.5 With a Heat Pump................................... 12.3 1.7 2.8 2.8 1.6 3.4 1.0 2.7 Window/Wall Units...................................... 28.9 10.5 8.1 4.5 2.7 3.1 6.7 14.1 1 Unit....................................................... 14.5 5.8 4.3 2.0 1.1 1.3 3.4 7.4 2 Units.....................................................

314

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 1.4 1.0 0.4 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 5.8 3.5 2.3 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 10.7 7.8 2.9 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 5.6 4.0 1.6 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.9 0.6 0.3 Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 1.1 0.7 0.4 No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 Q Q N Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 25.3 17.6 7.7 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.3 0.8 0.5 Once a Day.......................................................

315

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 17.1 10.8 4.2 1.8 1.6 10.3 20.6 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 9.6 18.0 16.4 11.3 20.3 6.4 17.9 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 8.3 14.2 11.4 7.2 9.2 5.3 14.2 2.......................................................... 16.2 0.9 2.6 3.7 2.9 6.2 0.8 2.6 3 or More............................................. 9.0 0.4 1.2 1.3 1.2 5.0 0.3 1.1 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 2.2 4.6 4.5 2.9 8.3 1.4 4.0 2.......................................................... 4.0 Q 0.4 0.6 0.4 2.4 Q 0.5 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q Q 0.4 Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top

316

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20.6 20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 6.9 8.1 14.2 6.4 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 13.7 17.5 26.6 17.8 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 9.3 11.9 18.2 11.0 2.......................................................... 16.2 2.9 3.5 5.5 4.4 3 or More............................................. 9.0 1.5 2.1 2.9 2.5 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 4.7 4.6 7.7 5.4 2.......................................................... 4.0 0.6 0.9 1.5 1.1 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q 0.3 Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 7.9 11.4 15.4 10.2 Flat-panel LCD.................................

317

Total................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment....... 1.2 0.5 0.3 0.2 Q 0.2 0.3 0.6 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.......... 109.8 26.2 28.5 20.4 13.0 21.8 16.3 37.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment............ 109.1 25.9 28.1 20.3 12.9 21.8 16.0 37.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It.............. 0.8 0.3 0.3 Q Q N 0.4 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.................................................. 58.2 12.2 14.4 11.3 7.1 13.2 7.6 18.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace........................ 44.7 7.5 10.8 9.3 5.6 11.4 4.6 12.0 For One Housing Unit........................... 42.9 6.9 10.3 9.1 5.4 11.3 4.1 11.0 For Two Housing Units......................... 1.8 0.6 0.6 Q Q Q 0.4 0.9 Steam or Hot Water System..................... 8.2 2.4 2.5 1.0 1.0 1.3 1.5 3.6 For One Housing Unit...........................

318

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q Q Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Owner- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Owner- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Housing Units (millions)

319

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 25.6 40.3 23.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 25.6 40.1 22.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N Q 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 18.4 13.6 14.7 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1 16.2 11.0 11.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 5.6 15.5 10.7 11.1 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.5 0.7 Q 0.3 Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.9 1.6 1.0 0.6 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 3.2 1.1 0.4

320

Total...........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.6 0.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 0.3 Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat Pump........................................... 53.5 5.5 4.8 0.7 With a Heat Pump............................................... 12.3 0.5 0.4 Q Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 10.7 7.6 3.1 1 Unit................................................................... 14.5 4.3 2.9 1.4 2 Units.................................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "management total year" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Total.......................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ................... 35.5 6.4 2.2 4.2 Use a Personal Computer................................ 75.6 17.8 5.3 12.5 Number of Desktop PCs 1.................................................................. 50.3 11.0 3.4 7.6 2.................................................................. 16.2 4.4 1.3 3.1 3 or More..................................................... 9.0 2.5 0.7 1.8 Number of Laptop PCs 1.................................................................. 22.5 5.4 1.5 3.9 2.................................................................. 4.0 1.1 0.3 0.8 3 or More..................................................... 0.7 0.3 Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)...........................

322

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 47.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 16.9 6.5 4.6 7.6 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 30.3 12.5 18.1 14.7 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 22.9 9.8 14.1 11.9 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 7.4 2.7 4.0 2.9 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 5.7 1.8 2.9 3.2 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 11.9 5.1 6.5 5.7 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 5.5 2.5 3.3 2.2 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

323

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.2 Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 46.3 18.9 22.5 22.1 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 45.6 18.8 22.5 22.1 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.7 Q N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 27.0 11.9 14.9 4.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 19.8 8.6 12.8 3.6 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 18.8 8.3 12.3 3.5 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 1.0 0.3 0.4 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.4 2.1 1.4 0.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 2.1 1.6 1.0

324

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.1 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 15.1 5.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 15.1 5.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 9.1 2.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1 5.3 0.8 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 5.6 4.9 0.7 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.5 0.4 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.9 3.6 1.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 3.2 2.2 1.0 For Two Housing Units.................................

325

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 2.8 0.7 0.5 0.2 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC12.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region,...

326

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 1.8 1.2 0.5 Table HC11.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Appliances...

327

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

... 2.8 1.1 0.7 Q 0.4 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC13.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by South Census Region,...

328

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 3.1 1.0 2.2 Table HC14.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by West Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Appliances...

329

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

States New York Florida Texas California Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC15.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated...

330

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 2.7 3.5 2.2 1.3 3.5 1.3 3.8 Table HC7.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005 Below Poverty Line Eligible for Federal...

331

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

... 13.2 3.4 2.0 1.4 Table HC12.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Appliances...

332

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Census Region Northeast Midwest South West Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC10.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005...

333

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(as Self-Reported) City Town Suburbs Rural Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC8.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by UrbanRural Location,...

334

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 4.4 2.5 3.0 3.4 Table HC8.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by UrbanRural Location, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units UrbanRural...

335

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 2.8 0.6 Q 0.5 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC14.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by West Census Region, 2005...

336

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

... 13.2 4.9 2.3 1.1 1.5 Table HC13.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by South Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units South Census Region...

337

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 51.9 7.0 4.8 2.2 Not Asked (Mobile Homes or Apartment in Buildings with 5 or More Units)... 23.7...

338

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Housing Units Living Space Characteristics Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units Detached...

339

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment... 1.2 Q Q N Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment... 109.8 40.3 21.4 6.9 12.0 Use Main Space Heating...

340

Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Normal ButaneButylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Gasoline Blending...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "management total year" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Normal ButaneButylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Gasoline Blending...

342

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 1.2 1.0 0.2 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 4.0 2.7 1.2 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 7.9 5.4 2.5 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 6.0 4.8 1.2 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.6 0.5 Q Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 0.6 0.4 Q No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 0.3 Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 20.3 14.9 5.4 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.4 1.2 0.3 Once a Day.......................................................

343

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

47.1 47.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 16.9 6.5 4.6 7.6 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 30.3 12.5 18.1 14.7 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 21.1 8.3 10.7 10.1 2.......................................................... 16.2 6.2 2.8 4.1 3.0 3 or More............................................. 9.0 2.9 1.4 3.2 1.6 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 9.1 3.6 6.0 3.8 2.......................................................... 4.0 1.5 0.6 1.3 0.7 3 or More............................................. 0.7 0.3 Q Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 17.7 7.5 10.2 9.6 Flat-panel LCD.................................

344

Total........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Census Region and Division Northeast............................................. 20.6 6.7 1,247 1,032 Q 811 788 147 New England.................................... 5.5 1.9 1,365 1,127 Q 814 748 107 Middle Atlantic.................................. 15.1 4.8 1,182 978 Q 810 800 159 Midwest................................................ 25.6 4.6 1,349 1,133 506 895 810 346 East North Central............................ 17.7 3.2 1,483 1,239 560 968 842 351 West North Central........................... 7.9 1.4 913 789 329 751 745 337 South................................................... 40.7 7.8 881 752 572 942 873 797 South Atlantic................................... 21.7 4.9 875 707 522 1,035 934 926 East South Central........................... 6.9 0.7 Q Q Q 852 826 432 West South Central..........................

345

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 14.2 7.2 2.8 4.2 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 26.6 14.5 4.1 7.9 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 18.2 10.0 2.9 5.3 2.......................................................... 16.2 5.5 3.0 0.7 1.8 3 or More............................................. 9.0 2.9 1.5 0.5 0.8 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 7.7 4.3 1.1 2.4 2.......................................................... 4.0 1.5 0.9 Q 0.4 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 15.4 7.9 2.8 4.8 Flat-panel LCD.................................

346

Total.................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day.............................. 8.2 2.9 2.5 1.3 0.5 1.0 2.4 4.6 2 Times A Day........................................... 24.6 6.5 7.0 4.3 3.2 3.6 4.8 10.3 Once a Day................................................ 42.3 8.8 9.8 8.7 5.1 10.0 5.0 12.9 A Few Times Each Week........................... 27.2 5.6 7.2 4.7 3.3 6.3 3.2 7.5 About Once a Week................................... 3.9 1.1 1.1 0.6 0.5 0.6 0.4 1.4 Less Than Once a Week............................ 4.1 1.3 1.0 0.9 0.5 0.4 0.7 1.4 No Hot Meals Cooked................................ 0.9 0.5 Q Q Q Q 0.2 0.5 Conventional Oven Use an Oven.............................................. 109.6 26.1 28.5 20.2 12.9 21.8 16.3 37.8 More Than Once a Day..........................

347

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 3.9 1.8 2.2 2.1 3.1 2.6 1.7 0.4 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 10.8 5.6 10.3 10.4 15.8 16.0 15.6 8.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 10.6 5.5 10.3 10.3 15.3 15.7 15.3 8.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 Q Q Q Q 0.6 0.4 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 3.7 2.6 6.1 6.8 11.2 13.2 13.9 8.2 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 3.6 2.3 5.5 5.8 9.5 10.1 10.3 6.4 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 Q 0.3 0.6 1.0 1.7 3.1 3.6 1.7 Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 7.3 3.2 4.5 3.7 4.8 3.0 1.9 0.7 1 Unit..........................................................

348

Total..............................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 86.6 2,720 1,970 1,310 1,941 1,475 821 1,059 944 554 Census Region and Division Northeast.................................... 20.6 13.9 3,224 2,173 836 2,219 1,619 583 903 830 Q New England.......................... 5.5 3.6 3,365 2,154 313 2,634 1,826 Q 951 940 Q Middle Atlantic........................ 15.1 10.3 3,167 2,181 1,049 2,188 1,603 582 Q Q Q Midwest...................................... 25.6 21.0 2,823 2,239 1,624 2,356 1,669 1,336 1,081 961 778 East North Central.................. 17.7 14.5 2,864 2,217 1,490 2,514 1,715 1,408 907 839 553 West North Central................. 7.9 6.4 2,729 2,289 1,924 1,806 1,510 1,085 1,299 1,113 1,059 South.......................................... 40.7 33.0 2,707 1,849 1,563 1,605 1,350 954 1,064 970 685 South Atlantic......................... 21.7 16.8 2,945 1,996 1,695 1,573 1,359 909 1,044 955

349

Total.................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

... ... 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.3 Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.......................................................... 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 5.5 4.8 0.7 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 0.5 0.4 Q Window/Wall Units.................................................... 28.9 10.7 7.6 3.1 1 Unit.......................................................................

350

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 8.5 2.7 2.6 4.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 38.6 16.2 20.1 18.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 37.8 15.9 19.8 18.0 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.9 0.3 0.3 0.4 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 25.8 10.9 16.6 12.5 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 21.2 9.7 13.7 8.9 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 4.6 1.2 2.8 3.6 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 13.4 5.6 3.9 6.1 1 Unit.....................................................................

351

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 8.7 3.2 5.5 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 1.7 0.7 1.0 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 3.6 0.6 3.0 1 Unit..................................................................... 14.5 2.9 0.5 2.4 2 Units...................................................................

352

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

78.1 78.1 64.1 4.2 1.8 2.3 5.7 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 11.3 9.3 0.6 Q 0.4 0.9 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 66.8 54.7 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 65.8 54.0 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 1.1 0.8 Q N Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 51.7 43.9 2.5 0.7 1.6 3.1 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 41.1 34.8 2.1 0.5 1.2 2.6 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 10.6 9.1 0.4 Q 0.3 0.6 Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 16.5 12.0 1.3 1.0 0.4 1.7 1 Unit.......................................................... 14.5 7.2 5.4 0.5 0.2 Q 0.9 2 Units.........................................................

353

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 23.2 10.9 3.8 8.4 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 9.0 6.7 1.4 0.9 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 8.0 3.4 1.7 2.9 1 Unit.....................................................................

354

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 23.4 7.5 16.0 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 22.9 7.4 15.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.6 Q 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 14.7 4.6 10.1 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 11.4 4.0 7.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 11.1 3.8 7.3 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.3 Q Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 0.6 0.3 0.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 0.4 0.2 0.1 For Two Housing Units.................................

355

Total..............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................ Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................ 17.8 5.3 4.7 2.8 1.9 3.1 3.6 7.5 Have Cooling Equipment............................. 93.3 21.5 24.1 17.8 11.2 18.8 13.0 31.1 Use Cooling Equipment.............................. 91.4 21.0 23.5 17.4 11.0 18.6 12.6 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............. 1.9 0.5 0.6 0.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.......................................... 65.9 11.0 16.5 13.5 8.7 16.1 6.4 17.2 Without a Heat Pump.............................. 53.5 9.4 13.6 10.7 7.1 12.7 5.4 14.5 With a Heat Pump................................... 12.3 1.7 2.8 2.8 1.6 3.4 1.0 2.7 Window/Wall Units................................... 28.9 10.5 8.1 4.5 2.7 3.1 6.7 14.1 1 Unit...................................................... 14.5 5.8 4.3 2.0 1.1 1.3 3.4 7.4 2 Units....................................................

356

Idle Operating Total Stream Day  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Idle Operating Total Stream Day Barrels per Idle Operating Total Calendar Day Barrels per Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity Idle Operating Total Operable Refineries Number of State and PAD District a b b 11 10 1 1,293,200 1,265,200 28,000 1,361,700 1,329,700 32,000 ............................................................................................................................................... PAD District I 1 1 0 182,200 182,200 0 190,200 190,200 0 ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ Delaware......................................

357

Residential Commercial Industrial Year  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Residential Commercial Industrial Year and State Volume (million cubic feet) Consumers Volume (million cubic feet) Consumers Volume (million cubic feet) Consumers 2000 Total ................... 4,996,179 59,252,728 3,182,469 5,010,817 8,142,240 220,251 2001 Total ................... 4,771,340 60,286,364 3,022,712 4,996,446 7,344,219 217,026 2002 Total ................... 4,888,816 61,107,254 3,144,169 5,064,384 7,507,180 205,915 2003 Total ................... R 5,079,351 R 61,871,450 R 3,179,493 R 5,152,177 R 7,150,396 R 205,514 2004 Total ................... 4,884,521 62,469,142 3,141,653 5,135,985 7,250,634 212,191 Alabama ...................... 43,842 806,175 26,418 65,040 169,135 2,800 Alaska.......................... 18,200 104,360 18,373 13,999 46,580 10 Arizona ........................

358

BS in RECREATION MANAGEMENT: Experience Industry Management Emphasis (664521) MAP Sheet Department of Recreation Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BS in RECREATION MANAGEMENT: Experience Industry Management Emphasis (664521) MAP Sheet Department of Recreation Management For students entering the degree program during the 2014­2015 curricular year accepted to the program. 3. Complete the following Recreation Management Core courses: RecM 404 Principles

Olsen Jr., Dan R.

359

Steve Criss Marketing & Communications Manager  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steve Criss Marketing & Communications Manager Steve Criss communications initiatives, including electronic and print media, direct marketing than 15 years of hands-on marketing and public relations management experience

Alpay, S. Pamir

360

DOE Office of Environmental Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Management Environmental Management Project and Contract Management Improvement Timeline Improving DOE contract and project management is a top priority of the Department's senior management and entire organization. The DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM) has put in place a "Roadmap" for Journey to Excellence that sets specific performance expectations for continuous improvements in contract and project management. Following are some highlights of EM's improvement actions over the past five years. In 2006, the National Academy of Public Administration (NAPA) began a study of EM, which included acquisition and project management among its key focus areas. The resultant report from the study,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "management total year" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

HIGHER EDUCATION FACILITIES MANAGEMENT: READY FOR INTERNATIONALIZATION?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The last ten years has seen dramatic growth in Facilities Management (FM) activities worldwide, including Malaysia. Facilities Management is responsible for coordinating all efforts related to planning, designing and managing physical structure...

Aizuddin, N.; Yahya, M.

362

Total solar irradiance during the Holocene F. Steinhilber,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Total solar irradiance during the Holocene F. Steinhilber,1 J. Beer,1 and C. Fro¨hlich2 Received 20 solar irradiance covering 9300 years is presented, which covers almost the entire Holocene. This reconstruction is based on a recently observationally derived relationship between total solar irradiance

Wehrli, Bernhard

363

Total Sky Imager (TSI) Handbook  

SciTech Connect

The total sky imager (TSI) provides time series of hemispheric sky images during daylight hours and retrievals of fractional sky cover for periods when the solar elevation is greater than 10 degrees.

Morris, VR

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Water Utility Demand Management and the Financial, Social and Environmental  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Utility Demand Management and the Financial, Social and Environmental Water Utility Demand Management and the Financial, Social and Environmental Drivers Speaker(s): Allan J. Dietemann Date: February 19, 2004 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Camilla Whitehead At Seattle Public Utilities, Al Dietemann leads a team of 11 persons with a budget of $5 million a year implementing cost-effective resource conservation measures. In 2003, the Seattle area used less water than was used in 1950 on an annual basis. Seattle's demand management programs have been successful in holding total regional water use constant in our service area, despite an annual growth in population served. During this seminar he will speak to the following issues: 1) Water utility demand management and the financial, social and environmental drivers. 2)

365

Total solar house description and performance  

SciTech Connect

The initial attempt to apply the Total Solar concept to a residence in the Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, area is described. A very large storage capacity has made it possible to use only solar energy for meeting the heating, cooling and hot water needs for the entire year, with a parasitic power penalty of about 3500 kWh. Winter temperatures were maintained at 68/sup 0/F with 60/sup 0/F night setback, summer at 76/sup 0/F. Occupant intervention was negligible and passive overheat was minimized. The extra cost for the system, approximately $30,000 is readily amortized by the savings in purchased energy.

Starobin, L. (Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia); Starobin, J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet) Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 0 9 13 1990's 19,861 32,603 191,605 218,023 349,380 356,598 361,068 409,091 392,320 376,435 2000's 361,289 200,862 202,002 194,339 165,630 152,902 145,762 134,451 125,502 109,214 2010's 101,487 84,270 87,398 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross Withdrawals of Natural Gas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Alabama Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

367

California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 5,417 19,929 20,394 1980's 19,980 26,692 31,904 38,084 60,207 84,062 77,355 67,835 60,308 59,889 1990's 58,055 59,465 62,473 58,635 60,765 60,694 73,092 80,516 81,868 84,547 2000's 83,882 78,209 74,884 64,961 61,622 60,773 47,217 52,805 51,931 47,281 2010's 46,755 41,742 32,313 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross Withdrawals of Natural Gas

368

Alaska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 72,813 71,946 1980's 63,355 71,477 66,852 68,776 68,315 62,454 63,007 69,656 101,440 122,595 1990's 144,064 171,665 216,377 233,198 224,301 113,552 126,051 123,854 133,111 125,841 2000's 263,958 262,937 293,580 322,010 334,125 380,568 354,816 374,204 388,188 357,490 2010's 370,148 364,702 307,306 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross Withdrawals of Natural Gas

369

Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 88,258 418,474 760,566 1980's 949,177 1,010,772 1,120,830 992,041 1,021,260 942,413 1,169,038 1,330,604 1,376,093 1,457,841 1990's 1,555,568 1,494,494 1,411,147 1,355,333 1,392,727 1,346,674 1,401,753 1,351,067 1,241,264 1,206,045 2000's 1,177,257 53,649 57,063 53,569 44,946 36,932 24,785 29,229 46,786 37,811 2010's 28,574 23,791 16,506 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014

370

Tank waste remediation system multi-year work plan  

SciTech Connect

The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Multi-Year Work Plan (MYWP) documents the detailed total Program baseline and was constructed to guide Program execution. The TWRS MYWP is one of two elements that comprise the TWRS Program Management Plan. The TWRS MYWP fulfills the Hanford Site Management System requirement for a Multi-Year Program Plan and a Fiscal-Year Work Plan. The MYWP addresses program vision, mission, objectives, strategy, functions and requirements, risks, decisions, assumptions, constraints, structure, logic, schedule, resource requirements, and waste generation and disposition. Sections 1 through 6, Section 8, and the appendixes provide program-wide information. Section 7 includes a subsection for each of the nine program elements that comprise the TWRS Program. The foundation of any program baseline is base planning data (e.g., defendable product definition, logic, schedules, cost estimates, and bases of estimates). The TWRS Program continues to improve base data. As data improve, so will program element planning, integration between program elements, integration outside of the TWRS Program, and the overall quality of the TWRS MYWP. The MYWP establishes the TWRS baseline objectives to store, treat, and immobilize highly radioactive Hanford waste in an environmentally sound, safe, and cost-effective manner. The TWRS Program will complete the baseline mission in 2040 and will incur costs totalling approximately 40 billion dollars. The summary strategy is to meet the above objectives by using a robust systems engineering effort, placing the highest possible priority on safety and environmental protection; encouraging {open_quotes}out sourcing{close_quotes} of the work to the extent practical; and managing significant but limited resources to move toward final disposition of tank wastes, while openly communicating with all interested stakeholders.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

LANL Data Profile 20122013 Total: 10,407  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration. Community Programs Office (505) 665% Environmental management 6% Safeguards and security 5% DOE Office of Science 4% Energy and related programs.......................$534,756,599 New Mexico total procurement..........$338,725,405 Los Alamos County

372

Main Principles of the Perspective System of SNF Management in Russia - 13333  

SciTech Connect

For the last several years the System of the Spent Nuclear Fuel management in Russia was seriously changed. The paper describes the main principles of the changes and the bases of the Perspective System of SNF Management in Russia. Among such the bases there are the theses with the interesting names like 'total knowledge', 'pollutant pays' and 'pay and forget'. There is also a brief description of the modern Russian SNF Management Infrastructure. And an outline of the whole System. The System which is - in case of Russia - is quite necessary to adjust SNF accumulation and to utilize the nuclear heritage. (authors)

Baryshnikov, Mikhail [Project Office for SNF Management, Russian State Atomic Energy Corporation 'ROSATOM', Bolshaya Ordynka str., 24, Moscow, 119017 (Russian Federation)] [Project Office for SNF Management, Russian State Atomic Energy Corporation 'ROSATOM', Bolshaya Ordynka str., 24, Moscow, 119017 (Russian Federation)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Student ID Advisor 1st Year Fall __________ (year) 1st Year Spr. __________ (year) 1st Year Sum. __________ (year)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Name Major Student ID Advisor 1st Year Fall __________ (year) 1st Year Spr. __________ (year) 1st) Projected Graduation Date SUBJECT SUBJECT CR. HRS. SUBJECT COURSE # CR. HRS. Advisor Signature Date Student

Barrash, Warren

374

Property:Geothermal/TotalProjectCost | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TotalProjectCost TotalProjectCost Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Geothermal/TotalProjectCost Property Type Number Description Total Project Cost Pages using the property "Geothermal/TotalProjectCost" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A A 3D-3C Reflection Seismic Survey and Data Integration to Identify the Seismic Response of Fractures and Permeable Zones Over a Known Geothermal Resource at Soda Lake, Churchill Co., NV Geothermal Project + 14,571,873 + A Demonstration System for Capturing Geothermal Energy from Mine Waters beneath Butte, MT Geothermal Project + 2,155,497 + A Geothermal District-Heating System and Alternative Energy Research Park on the NM Tech Campus Geothermal Project + 6,135,381 + A new analytic-adaptive model for EGS assessment, development and management support Geothermal Project + 1,629,670 +

375

Facility Representative of the Year Award  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REPRESENTATIVE OF THE YEAR AWARD PROGRAM REPRESENTATIVE OF THE YEAR AWARD PROGRAM OBJECTIVE The Facility Representative Award Program is a special award designed to recognize superior or exemplary service by a Facility Representative over a period of one year. This special award program has been established in accordance with the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 331.1C, Employee Performance Management and Recognition Program. FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE OF THE YEAR AWARD The Facility Representative of the Year Award is determined by a panel representing the Chief Health, Safety and Security Officer and managers from the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), the Office of Environmental Management (EM), the Office of Science (SC), and the Office of Nuclear Energy (NE). The Facility Representative Program Manager in

376

Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Guidance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guidance Guidance The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides guidance on Federal laws and regulations related to energy management. General Guidance for Facilities Overview of Federal Energy Management Policy and Mandates: Guidance document outlining Federal energy management goals and requirements for Federal energy managers. Sustainability Requirement Crosswalk: Crosswalk of sustainability and energy goals and targets within executive orders and other statutes. Guidelines Establishing Criteria for Excluding Buildings from the Energy Performance Requirements of Section 543 of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act as Amended by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005): Guidelines that established criteria for exclusions from the energy performance requirement for a fiscal year or any Federal building or collection of Federal buildings within the statutory framework provided by the law.

378

Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Period Period Total Fee Paid 4/29/2012 - 9/30/2012 $418,348 10/1/2012 - 9/30/2013 $0 10/1/2013 - 9/30/2014 $0 10/1/2014 - 9/30/2015 $0 10/1/2015 - 9/30/2016 $0 Cumulative Fee Paid $418,348 Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee Contract Period: $116,769,139 November 2011 - September 2016 $475,395 $0 Fee Information Total Estimated Contract Cost $1,141,623 $1,140,948 $1,140,948 $5,039,862 $1,140,948 Maximum Fee $5,039,862 Minimum Fee Fee Available Portage, Inc. DE-DT0002936 EM Contractor Fee Site: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings - MOAB, UT Contract Name: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Contract September 2013 Contractor: Contract Number:

379

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L1. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type for Non-Mall Buildings, 1995" L1. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type for Non-Mall Buildings, 1995" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings*",54068,51570,45773,6746,34910,1161,3725,779 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000",6272,5718,4824,986,3767,50,22,54 "5,001 to 10,000",7299,6667,5728,1240,4341,61,169,45 "10,001 to 25,000",10829,10350,8544,1495,6442,154,553,"Q"

380

ARM - Measurement - Total cloud water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cloud water cloud water ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Total cloud water The total concentration (mass/vol) of ice and liquid water particles in a cloud; this includes condensed water content (CWC). Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. External Instruments NCEPGFS : National Centers for Environment Prediction Global Forecast System Field Campaign Instruments CSI : Cloud Spectrometer and Impactor PDI : Phase Doppler Interferometer

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "management total year" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L2. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Types (Non-Mall Buildings), 1999" L2. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Types (Non-Mall Buildings), 1999" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings* ...............",61707,58693,49779,6496,37150,3058,5343,1913 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6750,5836,4878,757,3838,231,109,162 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",7940,7166,5369,1044,4073,288,160,109 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",10534,9773,7783,1312,5712,358,633,232

382

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L3. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type (Non-Mall Buildings), 2003" L3. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type (Non-Mall Buildings), 2003" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings* ...............",64783,62060,51342,5556,37918,4004,4950,2403 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6789,6038,4826,678,3932,206,76,124 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",6585,6090,4974,739,3829,192,238,248 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11535,11229,8618,1197,6525,454,506,289

383

Total isomerization process -- the flexible approach for upgrading light straight run gasoline  

SciTech Connect

The EPA's recent decision to reduce the maximum lead level in gasoline to 0.1 gram per gallon by January 1, 1986, will leave the U.S. refining industry in an octane ''crunch.'' This government action comes at a critical time as refined product margins are slim or non-existent and funds for capital expenditure are scarce. One of the most economical means of adding back the lost octane is to isomerize light straight run (LSR), but many refiners will not have the time or the capital to install a new unit. The Total Isomerization Process (TIP) offers a highly flexible approach to coping with the octane problem. During the past 15 years, refiners around the world have adapted TIP to their particular needs and managed to implement isomerization capacity both quickly and inexpensively.

Mackler, S.E.; Holcombe, T.C.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Federal Energy and Water Management Awards | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy and Water Management Awards Federal Energy and Water Management Awards Each year, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), in conjunction with the Federal Interagency Energy...

385

Fuel cell gas management system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell gas management system including a cathode humidification system for transferring latent and sensible heat from an exhaust stream to the cathode inlet stream of the fuel cell; an anode humidity retention system for maintaining the total enthalpy of the anode stream exiting the fuel cell equal to the total enthalpy of the anode inlet stream; and a cooling water management system having segregated deionized water and cooling water loops interconnected by means of a brazed plate heat exchanger.

DuBose, Ronald Arthur (Marietta, GA)

2000-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

386

Total Adjusted Sales of Kerosene  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 492,702 218,736 269,010 305,508 187,656 81,102 1984-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 353,765 159,323 198,762 237,397 142,189 63,075 1984-2012 New England (PADD 1A) 94,635 42,570 56,661 53,363 38,448 15,983 1984-2012 Connecticut 13,006 6,710 8,800 7,437 7,087 2,143 1984-2012 Maine 46,431 19,923 25,158 24,281 17,396 7,394 1984-2012 Massachusetts 7,913 3,510 5,332 6,300 2,866 1,291 1984-2012 New Hampshire 14,454 6,675 8,353 7,435 5,472 1,977 1984-2012

387

Solar total energy project Shenandoah  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the description of the final design for the Solar Total Energy System (STES) to be installed at the Shenandoah, Georgia, site for utilization by the Bleyle knitwear plant. The system is a fully cascaded total energy system design featuring high temperature paraboloidal dish solar collectors with a 235 concentration ratio, a steam Rankine cycle power conversion system capable of supplying 100 to 400 kW(e) output with an intermediate process steam take-off point, and a back pressure condenser for heating and cooling. The design also includes an integrated control system employing the supervisory control concept to allow maximum experimental flexibility. The system design criteria and requirements are presented including the performance criteria and operating requirements, environmental conditions of operation; interface requirements with the Bleyle plant and the Georgia Power Company lines; maintenance, reliability, and testing requirements; health and safety requirements; and other applicable ordinances and codes. The major subsystems of the STES are described including the Solar Collection Subysystem (SCS), the Power Conversion Subsystem (PCS), the Thermal Utilization Subsystem (TUS), the Control and Instrumentation Subsystem (CAIS), and the Electrical Subsystem (ES). Each of these sections include design criteria and operational requirements specific to the subsystem, including interface requirements with the other subsystems, maintenance and reliability requirements, and testing and acceptance criteria. (WHK)

None

1980-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

388

Properties of solar gravity mode signals in total irradiance observations  

SciTech Connect

Further evidence has been found that a significant fraction of the gravity mode power density in the total irradiance observations appears in sidebands of classified eigenfrequencies. These sidebands whose amplitudes vary from year to year are interpreted as harmonics of the rotational frequencies of the nonuniform solar surface. These findings are for non axisymmetric modes and corroborate the findings of Kroll, Hill and Chen for axisymmetric modes. It is demonstrated the the generation of the sidebands lifts the usual restriction on the parity of the eigenfunctions for modes detectable in total irradiance observations. 14 refs.

Kroll, R.J.; Chen, J.; Hill, H.A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Nuclear Materials Focus Area Fiscal Year 2002 Mid Year Review  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Materials Focus Area (NMFA) held its annual mid-year review on February 12 and 14, 2002, in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The purpose of this review was to examine both the technical aspects and the programmatic aspects of its technology development program. The focus area activities were reviewed by a panel consisting of personnel representing the end users of the technologies, and technical experts in nuclear materials. This year's review was somewhat different than in the past, as the stress was on how well the various projects being managed through the NMFA aligned with the two thrust areas and nine key goals and priorities recently issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM).

Thiel, E.C.; Fuhrman, P.W.

2002-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

390

Nuclear Materials Focus Area Fiscal Year 2002 Mid Year Review  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Materials Focus Area (NMFA) held its annual mid-year review on February 12 and 14, 2002, in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The purpose of this review was to examine both the technical aspects and the programmatic aspects of its technology development program. The focus area activities were reviewed by a panel consisting of personnel representing the end users of the technologies, and technical experts in nuclear materials. This year's review was somewhat different than in the past, as the stress was on how well the various projects being managed through the NMFA aligned with the two thrust areas and nine key goals and priorities recently issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM).

Thiel, Elizabeth Chilcote

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Proposal Budget Form for(Project Number), Year 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

,,,"Year 1",,,"Year 2","Cummulative" "Budget Category (add categories if needed)",,,"Total",,,"Total","Total" "Labor (# hrs/hourly rate required) by job category","# hrs","$ / hr",,"# hrs","$ / hr" " Faculty" " Name" " Name" " Name " " Post Doc " " Grad Student " " Undergrad" " Other Professional " "Fringe Benefit Cost and %" " PI/Faculty, %" " Post Docs, %" " Graduate Students, %" " Undergraduate Students, %" " Other Professional, %" "Travel (designate if travel to INL)"

392

Year STB EIA STB EIA  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Release Date: November 16, 2012 Release Date: November 16, 2012 Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Year (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) 2008 $6.26 $5.77 $36.50 15.8% 42.3% $6.12 $5.64 $36.36 15.5% 22.2% 2009 $6.23 $5.67 $52.71 10.8% 94.8% $4.90 $4.46 $33.18 13.5% 25.1% 2010 $6.41 $5.77 $50.83 11.4% 96.8% $6.20 $5.59 $36.26 15.4% 38.9% Annual Percent Change First to Last Year 1.2% 0.0% 18.0% - - 0.7% -0.4% -0.1% - - Latest 2 Years 2.9% 1.7% -3.6% - - 26.6% 25.2% 9.3% - - - = No data reported or value not applicable STB Data Source: The Surface Transportation Board's 900-Byte Carload Waybill Sample

393

Total Number of Operable Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Total Number of Operable Refineries Number of Operating Refineries Number of Idle Refineries Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/SD) Vacuum Distillation Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Delayed Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD Thermal Cracking Fluid Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Visbreaking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Other/Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Recycle Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Low Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming High Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating/Desulfurization Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Naphtha/Reformer Feed Charge Cap (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Gasoline Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Heavy Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Kerosene/Jet Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Diesel Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual/Other Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Oils Charge Capacity (B/SD) Fuels Solvent Deasphalting Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Period:

394

NNSA Celebrates 10 Years of Cooperation with Russia in Securing...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

10 Years of Cooperation with Russia in Securing Nuclear Material | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the...

395

State Energy Program Formula Grant Guidance Program Year 2007  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STATE ENERGY PROGRAM FORMULA GRANT GUIDANCE PROGRAM YEAR 2007 STATE ENERGY PROGRAM NOTICE 07-01 EFFECTIVE DATE: April 3, 2007 PURPOSE To establish grant guidance and management...

396

An evaluation of total body electrical conductivity to estimate body composition of largemouth bass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Information about body composition of fish is important for the assessment and management of fish stocks. Measurement of total body electrical conductivity (TOBEC) recently has been used to estimate the body composition of several fish species in a...

Barziza, Daniel Eugene

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

397

Program Managers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Managers Program Managers Enabling remarkable discoveries and tools that transform our understanding of energy and matter and advance national, economic, and energy...

398

Total Heart Transplant: A Modern Overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

use of the total artificial heart. New England Journal ofJ. (1997). Artificial heart transplants. British medicala total artificial heart as a bridge to transplantation. New

Lingampalli, Nithya

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Tank Waste Remediation System fiscal year 1996 multi-year program plan WBS 1.1. Revision 1, Appendix A  

SciTech Connect

This document is a compilation of data relating to the Tank Waste Remediation System Multi-Year Program. Topics discussed include: management systems; waste volume, transfer and evaporation management; transition of 200 East and West areas; ferricyanide, volatile organic vapor, and flammable gas management; waste characterization; retrieval from SSTs and DSTs; heat management; interim storage; low-level and high-level radioactive waste management; and tank farm closure.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

A comparative application of the Repository Integration Program (RIP) to Total System Performance Assessment, 1991  

SciTech Connect

During Fiscal Year (FY) 1991 and FY 1992, Sandia National Laboratory and Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory were assigned the responsibility to generate initial Total System Performance Assessments (TSPAs) of the Yucca Mountain site. The analyses performed by these organizations (called TSPA-1991) are reported in Barnard et al(1992) and Eslinger et al. (1993). During this same time period, Golder Associates Inc. was assigned the task of generating a model capable of analyzing the total system performance of a high-level radioactive waste repository. The developed model, called Repository Integration Program (RIP), is documented in Kossik and Hachey (1993), Miller et al. (1993), and Golder Associates Inc. (1993). In FY 1993, the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Contractor was assigned the responsibility to plan, coordinate, and contribute to the second iteration of TSPA-2. Prior to initiating the next TSPA iteration, it was decided that it would be valuable to evaluate the applicability of RIP for use in this iteration. Therefore, analyses were conducted to compare the results generated by RIP to those reported in TSPA-1991. In particular, the aim was to generate a RIP input data set as equivalent as possible to that documented in Barnard et al. (1992) and to analyze the total system performance (as well as the performance of the individual subsystem components of the waste package/Engineered Barrier System (EBS), unsaturated gaseous flow and transport, unsaturated aqueous flow and transport, saturated flow and transport, and disruptive processes/events). The performance measure for comparison with the results of TSPA-1991 is the cumulative release of radionuclides to the accessible environment over a 10,000-year period following closure normalized to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) release limits specified in 40 CFR 191.

NONE

1993-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "management total year" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 The Analysis of the Total System Life Cycle Cost (TSLCC) of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program presents the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management's (OCRWM) May 2007 total system cost estimate for the disposal of the Nation's spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). The TSLCC analysis provides a basis for assessing the adequacy of the Nuclear Waste Fund (NWF) Fee as required by Section 302 of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), as amended. In addition, the TSLCC analysis provides a basis for the calculation of the Government's share of disposal costs for government-owned and managed SNF and HLW. The TSLCC estimate includes both historical costs and

402

125 total creditsMar. 15, 2013 (offered Fall/Spring)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

125 total creditsMar. 15, 2013 CH 101 General Chemistry 4 cr ECE 121 or ENGR 111 1 cr (offered Fall/Spring) Freshman Year Sophomore Year Junior Year Senior Year Fall - 15 cr Spring - 16 cr Fall - 15 cr Spring - 16 cr Fall - 16 cr Spring - 16 cr Fall - 16 cr Spring - 15 cr Department of Electrical and Computer

Carver, Jeffrey C.

403

Total Imports of Residual Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History U.S. Total 5,752 5,180 7,707 9,056 6,880 6,008 1936-2013 PAD District 1 1,677 1,689 2,008 3,074 2,135 2,814 1981-2013 Connecticut 1995-2009 Delaware 1995-2012 Florida 359 410 439 392 704 824 1995-2013 Georgia 324 354 434 364 298 391 1995-2013 Maine 65 1995-2013 Maryland 1995-2013 Massachusetts 1995-2012 New Hampshire 1995-2010 New Jersey 903 756 948 1,148 1,008 1,206 1995-2013 New York 21 15 14 771 8 180 1995-2013 North Carolina 1995-2011 Pennsylvania 1995-2013 Rhode Island 1995-2013 South Carolina 150 137 194 209 1995-2013 Vermont 5 4 4 5 4 4 1995-2013 Virginia 32 200 113 1995-2013 PAD District 2 217 183 235 207 247 179 1981-2013 Illinois 1995-2013

404

U.S. Total Exports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Noyes, MN Warroad, MN Babb, MT Port of Del Bonita, MT Port of Morgan, MT Sweetgrass, MT Whitlash, MT Portal, ND Sherwood, ND Pittsburg, NH Champlain, NY Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Highgate Springs, VT U.S. Pipeline Total from Mexico Ogilby, CA Otay Mesa, CA Galvan Ranch, TX LNG Imports from Algeria LNG Imports from Australia LNG Imports from Brunei LNG Imports from Canada Highgate Springs, VT LNG Imports from Egypt Cameron, LA Elba Island, GA Freeport, TX Gulf LNG, MS LNG Imports from Equatorial Guinea LNG Imports from Indonesia LNG Imports from Malaysia LNG Imports from Nigeria Cove Point, MD LNG Imports from Norway Cove Point, MD Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Oman LNG Imports from Peru Cameron, LA Freeport, TX LNG Imports from Qatar Elba Island, GA Golden Pass, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Trinidad/Tobago Cameron, LA Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Everett, MA Freeport, TX Gulf LNG, MS Lake Charles, LA Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from United Arab Emirates LNG Imports from Yemen Everett, MA Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Other Countries Period: Monthly Annual

405

Natural Gas Total Liquids Extracted  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Thousand Barrels) Thousand Barrels) Data Series: Natural Gas Processed Total Liquids Extracted NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 658,291 673,677 720,612 749,095 792,481 873,563 1983-2012 Alabama 13,381 11,753 11,667 13,065 1983-2010 Alaska 22,419 20,779 19,542 17,798 18,314 18,339 1983-2012 Arkansas 126 103 125 160 212 336 1983-2012 California 11,388 11,179 11,042 10,400 9,831 9,923 1983-2012 Colorado 27,447 37,804 47,705 57,924 1983-2010 Florida 103 16 1983-2008 Illinois 38 33 24 231 705 0 1983-2012

406

Establishing and Maintaining Effective Energy Management Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SAIC has developed, and has delivered over the past 4 years, training and tools to industry for them to implement energy management practices. Practical Energy Management (PEM) has been delivered to over 1000 industry professionals, arming them...

Giffin, T. M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Total Petroleum Systems and Assessment Units (AU)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Total Petroleum Systems (TPS) and Assessment Units (AU) Field type Surface water Groundwater X X X X X X X X AU 00000003 Oil/ Gas X X X X X X X X Total X X X X X X X Total Petroleum Systems (TPS) and Assessment Units (AU) Field type Total undiscovered petroleum (MMBO or BCFG) Water per oil

Torgersen, Christian

408

Locating and total dominating sets in trees  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A set S of vertices in a graph G = ( V , E ) is a total dominating set of G if every vertex of V is adjacent to a vertex in S. We consider total dominating sets of minimum cardinality which have the additional property that distinct vertices of V are totally dominated by distinct subsets of the total dominating set.

Teresa W. Haynes; Michael A. Henning; Jamie Howard

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Conference Management  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To establish requirements and responsibilities with respect to managing conferences sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) or by DOE management and operating contractors and other contractors who perform work at DOE-owned or -leased facilities, including management and integration contractors and environmental restoration management contractors (when using funds that will be reimbursed by DOE). Cancels DOE N 110.3.

1999-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

410

Locating-total domination in graphs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we continue the study of locating-total domination in graphs. A set S of vertices in a graph G is a total dominating set in G if every vertex of G is adjacent to a vertex in S . We consider total dominating sets S which have the additional property that distinct vertices in V ( G ) ? S are totally dominated by distinct subsets of the total dominating set. Such a set S is called a locating-total dominating set in G , and the locating-total domination number of G is the minimum cardinality of a locating-total dominating set in G . We obtain new lower and upper bounds on the locating-total domination number of a graph. Interpolation results are established, and the locating-total domination number in special families of graphs, including cubic graphs and grid graphs, is investigated.

Michael A. Henning; Nader Jafari Rad

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

PHMC Year 2000 handbook: Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The PHMC [Project Hanford Management Contract] Year 2000 Project involves the effective cooperation and participation of the Year 2000 Project Office, FDH Project Direction, FDH Chief Information Officer, major subcontractors and DynCorp. The primary responsibilities of the Year 2000 Project Office is to develop and facilitate a Year 2000 approach, provide an awareness program, report status, and perform compliance assurance reviews. The primary responsibility of the FDH Project Directors is to direct the major subcontractors, and DynCorp toward the successful completion of Year 2000 activities.

Layfield, K.A.

1998-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

412

Total China Investment Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Total China Investment Co Ltd Total China Investment Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Total (China) Investment Co. Ltd. Place Beijing, China Zip 100004 Product Total has been present in China for about 30 years through its activities of Exploration & Production, Gas & Power, Refining & Marketing, and Chemicals. Coordinates 39.90601°, 116.387909° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.90601,"lon":116.387909,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

413

Total Energy - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Energy Total Energy Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Monthly Annual Analysis & Projections All Reports Most Requested Annual Monthly Projections U.S. States Annual Energy Review September 2012 PDF | previous editions Release Date: September 27, 2012 Important notes about the data Note: The emphasis of the Annual Energy Review (AER) is on long-term trends. Analysts may wish to use the data in this report in conjunction with EIA's monthly releases that offer updates to the most recent years' data. In particular, see the Monthly Energy Review for statistics that include updates to many of the annual series in this report. Data Years Displayed: For tables beginning in 1949, some early years (usually 1951-1954, 1956-1959, 1961-1964, 1966-1969, and 1971-1974) are not

414

U.S. Total Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

International Falls, MN Noyes, MN Warroad, MN Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Del Bonita, MT Port of Morgan, MT Sweetgrass, MT Whitlash, MT Portal, ND Sherwood, ND Pittsburg, NH Champlain, NY Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Highgate Springs, VT North Troy, VT LNG Imports into Cameron, LA LNG Imports into Cove Point, MD LNG Imports into Elba Island, GA LNG Imports into Everett, MA LNG Imports into Freeport, TX LNG Imports into Golden Pass, TX LNG Imports into Gulf Gateway, LA LNG Imports into Gulf LNG, MS LNG Imports into Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports into Neptune Deepwater Port LNG Imports into Northeast Gateway LNG Imports into Sabine Pass, LA U.S. Pipeline Total from Mexico Ogilby, CA Otay Mesa, CA Alamo, TX El Paso, TX Galvan Ranch, TX Hidalgo, TX McAllen, TX Penitas, TX LNG Imports from Algeria Cove Point, MD Everett, MA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Australia Everett, MA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Brunei Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Canada Highgate Springs, VT LNG Imports from Egypt Cameron, LA Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Everett, MA Freeport, TX Gulf LNG, MS Lake Charles, LA Northeast Gateway Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Equatorial Guinea Elba Island, GA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Indonesia Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Malaysia Gulf Gateway, LA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Nigeria Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Freeport, TX Gulf Gateway, LA Lake Charles, LA Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Norway Cove Point, MD Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Oman Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Peru Cameron, LA Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Qatar Cameron, LA Elba Island, GA Golden Pass, TX Gulf Gateway, LA Lake Charles, LA Northeast Gateway Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Trinidad/Tobago Cameron, LA Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Everett, MA Freeport, TX Gulf Gateway, LA Gulf LNG, MS Lake Charles, LA Neptune Deepwater Port Northeast Gateway Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from United Arab Emirates Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Yemen Everett, MA Freeport, TX Neptune Deepwater Port Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Other Countries Lake Charles, LA Period: Monthly Annual

415

Oak Ridge Reflects on 30 Years of Cleanup | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reflects on 30 Years of Cleanup Reflects on 30 Years of Cleanup Oak Ridge Reflects on 30 Years of Cleanup May 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Oak Ridge Office (ORO) of EM Deputy Manager Sue Cange, left to right, former ORO Manager Jim Hall, former ORO Manager Joe LaGrone, former ORO Manager Gerald Boyd, EM Senior Advisor Dave Huizenga and ORO EM Manager Mark Whitney take the stage after the showing of “30 Years in 30 Minutes.” Oak Ridge Office (ORO) of EM Deputy Manager Sue Cange, left to right, former ORO Manager Jim Hall, former ORO Manager Joe LaGrone, former ORO Manager Gerald Boyd, EM Senior Advisor Dave Huizenga and ORO EM Manager Mark Whitney take the stage after the showing of "30 Years in 30 Minutes." Displays at the event provide timelines and accomplishments of Oak Ridge’s EM program.

416

For the year ended 31 July 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on investments and servicing of finance 41 Capital expenditure and financial investment 41 Management of liquid and Expenditure Account 30 Statement of Total Recognised Gains and Losses 31 Balance Sheet 32 Cash Flow Statement/Higher paid staff emoluments 35 Other operating expenses 35 Interest payable 35 Analysis of expenditure

Martin, Ralph R.

417

Welcome, Prospective Manager, to the ASH: Is Management For Me...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

answered in a timely manner. "Through my research, teaching, and consulting over the past ten years, I have come to understand more deeply than ever that the best managers are...

418

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE BUSINESS, COMPUTER AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION (Suggested 4 Year Plan)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Science with Lab 4 Total Credits Per Term 16 Total Credits Per Term 16 Total Credits Per Academic Year 32 GE: Arts & Letters 3 PEDC 1 Total Credits Per Term 17 Total Credits Per Term 16 Total Credits Per: History 3 GE: Cultures (Global) or Philosophical Inquiry 3 GE: Arts & Letters 3 GE: History, Cultures

Benos, Panayiotis "Takis"

419

PROGRAMMATIC AGREEMENT OPERATION AND MANAGEMENT OF THE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

9. Main Stem Reservoirs Cultural Resources Management Plans ........................................ 7 10. Five-Year Cultural Resources Implementation Plan ........................................................................................ 11 15. Cultural Resource Education Program

US Army Corps of Engineers

420

Environmental Management Performance Reports - Hanford Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Official Documents > Environmental Management Performance Reports Official Documents DOE - RL ContractsProcurements DOE-ORP ContractsProcurements AR-PIR CERCLA Five-Year Review...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "management total year" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

State Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

schedules 4A-D, EIA-861S and EIA-861U) State Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total 2012 Total Electric Industry- Average Retail Price (centskWh) (Data from...

422

Total cost model for making sourcing decisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis develops a total cost model based on the work done during a six month internship with ABB. In order to help ABB better focus on low cost country sourcing, a total cost model was developed for sourcing decisions. ...

Morita, Mark, M.B.A. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

FALL SPRING FALL SPRING FALL SPRINGFALL SPRING YEAR 1 YEAR 2 YEAR 3 YEAR 4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B FALL SPRING FALL SPRING FALL SPRINGFALL SPRING YEAR 1 YEAR 2 YEAR 3 YEAR 4 ECHM 100 (CHBE 100) 2). There is a pre- requisite of M-273Q (MATH 224). CHMY-373 (CHEM 324) could be taken Spring of year 3. Also, CHMY Math Placement ExamB M-172-Q (MATH 182) 4 cr Chemical Engineering Prerequisite Flowchart Catalog: 2010

Lawrence, Rick L.

424

FALL SPRING FALL SPRING FALL SPRINGFALL SPRING YEAR 1 YEAR 2 YEAR 3 YEAR 4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B FALL SPRING FALL SPRING FALL SPRINGFALL SPRING YEAR 1 YEAR 2 YEAR 3 YEAR 4 CHBE 100 2 cr CHMY-141 324) could be taken Spring of year 3. Also, CHMY-371 (CHEM 323) may be substituted for CHMY-373 (CHEM Engineering Prerequisite Flowchart Catalog: 2008-2010 updated 2009 rev. 06/29/10, rwl ­ new course numbers E

Lawrence, Rick L.

425

First & Second Years Third Year (Junior) Forth Year (Senior) Fifth Year Fall Spring Fall  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Social World Elective2 (3) Technical Elective5 CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Curriculum for Spring SemesterFirst & Second Years Third Year (Junior) Forth Year (Senior) Fifth Year Fall1 Spring1 Fall Spring Fall For your Freshman and Sophomore years, students should follow

Mountziaris, T. J.

426

Team Total Points Beta Theta Pi 2271  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bubbles 40 Upset City 30 Team Success 30 #12;Team Total Points Sly Tye 16 Barringer 15 Fire Stinespring 15

Buehrer, R. Michael

427

Power management system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of managing power resources for an electrical system of a vehicle may include identifying enabled power sources from among a plurality of power sources in electrical communication with the electrical system and calculating a threshold power value for the enabled power sources. A total power load placed on the electrical system by one or more power consumers may be measured. If the total power load exceeds the threshold power value, then a determination may be made as to whether one or more additional power sources is available from among the plurality of power sources. At least one of the one or more additional power sources may be enabled, if available.

Algrain, Marcelo C. (Peoria, IL); Johnson, Kris W. (Washington, IL); Akasam, Sivaprasad (Peoria, IL); Hoff, Brian D. (East Peoria, IL)

2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

428

Management Responsibilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Management Responsibilities Management Responsibilities Depleted UF6 Management Responsibilities DOE has responsibility for safe and efficient management of approximately 700,000 metric tons of depleted UF6. Organizational Responsibilities In the United States, the U.S. Department of Energy is responsible for managing all the depleted uranium that has been generated by the government and has been declared surplus to national defense needs. In addition, as a result of two memoranda of agreement that have been signed between the DOE and USEC, the DOE has assumed management responsibility for approximately 145,000 metric tons of depleted UF6 that has been or will be generated by USEC. Any additional depleted UF6 that USEC generates will be USEC's responsibility to manage. DOE Management Responsibility

429

Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Guidance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Management Energy Management Guidance to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Guidance on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Guidance on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Guidance on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Guidance on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Guidance on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Guidance on AddThis.com... Requirements by Subject Requirements by Regulation Notices & Rules Guidance Facility Reporting Fleet Reporting Energy Management Guidance The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides guidance on Federal

430

Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) at...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) at Oak Ridge Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) at Oak Ridge Full Document and Summary Versions...

431

BS in RECREATION MANAGEMENT: Therapeutic Recreation Emphasis (664523) MAP Sheet Department of Recreation Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BS in RECREATION MANAGEMENT: Therapeutic Recreation Emphasis (664523) MAP Sheet Department of Recreation Management For students entering the degree program during the 2013­2014 curricular year require therapeutic recreation specialists to be certified through the National Council on Therapeutic

Olsen Jr., Dan R.

432

Microsoft Word - Management Challenges Final.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audit Services Special Report Management Challenges at the Department of Energy DOE/IG-0712 December 2005 SPECIAL REPORT ON MANAGEMENT CHALLENGES AT THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY TABLE OF CONTENTS Analysis of Management Challenges Background 1 Department Successes in Meeting the President's Management Agenda 1 Management Challenges 2 Appendices 1. Watch List 16 2. Comparison of Management Challenges Reported by Various Groups 19 3. Related Reports Issued in Fiscal Year 2005 20 Analysis of Management Challenges ______________________________________________________________________

433

EERE Program Management Guide - Appendix A  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE Multi-Year Program Plan Template Foreword Multi-Year Program Plans (MYPP) are intended primarily to serve as operational guides for programs to manage their activities and as...

434

Compare All CBECS Activities: Total Energy Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Use Total Energy Use Compare Activities by ... Total Energy Use Total Major Fuel Consumption by Building Type Commercial buildings in the U.S. used a total of approximately 5.7 quadrillion Btu of all major fuels (electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district steam or hot water) in 1999. Office buildings used the most total energy of all the building types, which was not a surprise since they were the most common commercial building type and had an above average energy intensity. Figure showing total major fuel consumption by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800. Major Fuel Consumption per Building by Building Type Because there were relatively few inpatient health care buildings and they tend to be large, energy intensive buildings, their energy consumption per building was far above that of any other building type.

435

TotalView Parallel Debugger at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Totalview Totalview Totalview Description TotalView from Rogue Wave Software is a parallel debugging tool that can be run with up to 512 processors. It provides both X Windows-based Graphical User Interface (GUI) and command line interface (CLI) environments for debugging. The performance of the GUI can be greatly improved if used in conjunction with free NX software. The TotalView documentation web page is a good resource for learning more about some of the advanced TotalView features. Accessing Totalview at NERSC To use TotalView at NERSC, first load the TotalView modulefile to set the correct environment settings with the following command: % module load totalview Compiling Code to Run with TotalView In order to use TotalView, code must be compiled with the -g option. We

436

INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT OFFICE MANAGEMENT OFFICE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT OFFICE INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT OFFICE THE UNIVERSITY OF UTAH University of Utah | Investment Management Office Quarterly Summary The Endowment Pool had a positive first quarter (ending March gain from investments of $7.8 million. The Endowment Pool unit value of $100 has grown to $175 in 10

437

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Fernald Environmental Management  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Fernald Environmental Management Fernald Environmental Management Project - 027 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Fernald Environmental Management Project (027) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: The Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), formerly known as the Feed Materials Production Center, is located about 18 miles northwest of Cincinnati, Ohio. The facility produced uranium metal products between 1953 and 1989 for use in production reactors to make plutonium and tritium at other Department of Energy (DOE) sites in support of United States defense programs. Uranium metal production ended in July 1989 and resources shifted

438

Total System Performance Assessment - License Application Methods and Approach  

SciTech Connect

''Total System Performance Assessment-License Application (TSPA-LA) Methods and Approach'' provides the top-level method and approach for conducting the TSPA-LA model development and analyses. The method and approach is responsive to the criteria set forth in Total System Performance Assessment Integration (TSPAI) Key Technical Issues (KTIs) identified in agreements with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the ''Yucca Mountain Review Plan'' (YMRP), ''Final Report'' (NRC 2003 [163274]), and the NRC final rule 10 CFR Part 63 (NRC 2002 [156605]). This introductory section provides an overview of the TSPA-LA, the projected TSPA-LA documentation structure, and the goals of the document. It also provides a brief discussion of the regulatory framework, the approach to risk management of the development and analysis of the model, and the overall organization of the document. The section closes with some important conventions that are used in this document.

J. McNeish

2003-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

439

Foundation Year Aguideforinternationalstudents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Foundation Year Aguideforinternationalstudents #12;2 Contents TheFoundationYears 5 Engineering/Physics/Geophysics FoundationYear 6 ScienceFoundationYear 7 EntryRequirements 8 Moneymatters 10 Universitylife 10 The-termcommitmentandabig investmentinyourfuture.OurFoundationYearsare designedtoprepareyouforundergraduatestudyandto

Molinari, Marc

440

Foundation Year Aguideforstudents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Foundation Year Aguideforstudents #12;2 Contents TheFoundationYears 5 Engineering/Physics/Geophysics FoundationYear 6 ScienceFoundationYear 7 EntryRequirements 8 Moneymatters 10 Universitylife 10 TheUniversity 10 Thecity 10 Accommodation 10 Studentaccommodation MontefioreHouse4.. #12;3 OurFoundation

Anderson, Jim

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "management total year" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Children's Hospital of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 July General Pediatric Children's Hospital of Michigan High Risk Obstetrics Hutzel Women's Hospital Biochemical Genetics Lab/Metabolic Clinic Harper Hospital/ Children's Hospital of Michigan Reproductive Genetics Hutzel Women's Hospital August General Pediatric Children

Finley Jr., Russell L.

442

FALL SPRING FALL SPRING FALL SPRING FALL SPRING FALL Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FALL SPRING FALL SPRING FALL SPRING FALL SPRING FALL Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 CORE W to meet BioE Engineering Elective Reqt. (c) ­ course used to meet ChE Techical Elective Reqt Revised 11

Lawrence, Rick L.

443

Academic Year 2010/11 Students total (WS) 11,681  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Business Economics 11 - 92 Mechanical Engineering 38 - 620 Mechanical Engineering and Business Economics 67 Mechanical Engineering and Business Economics 7 210 799 Electrical Engineering 31 176 620 Electrical Mechanical Engineering - 17 22 Mechanical Engineering and Business Economics - 5 9 Production Science

444

Office of the Registrar 2011-2012 Academic Year DEGREE DIVISION MEN WOMEN TOTAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Computer Engineering WSE 0 0 0 Bachelor of Science in Compuer Science WSE 0 0 0 Bachelor of Science

Weaver, Harold A. "Hal"

445

Office of the Registrar 2011-2012 Academic Year DEGREE DIVISION MEN WOMEN TOTAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engineering WSE 2 0 2 Bachelor of Science in Compuer Science WSE 4 0 4 Bachelor of Science in Electrical

Weaver, Harold A. "Hal"

446

Office of the Registrar 2011-2012 Academic Year DEGREE DIVISION MEN WOMEN TOTAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Compuer Science WSE 19 2 21 Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering WSE 7 3 10 Bachelor of Science

Weaver, Harold A. "Hal"

447

Office of the Registrar 2010-2011 Academic Year DEGREE DIVISION MEN WOMEN TOTAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Computer Engineering WSE 1 0 1 Bachelor of Science in Compuer Science WSE 2 0 2 Bachelor of Science

Weaver, Harold A. "Hal"

448

A commodity approach to aging management review of supports for license renewal  

SciTech Connect

10CFR Part 54 requires that nuclear power plant licensees who seek renewal of their operating licenses for an additional 20 years of operation (i.e., for a total operating life of 60 years) perform an Integrated Plant Assessment (IPA) on all systems, structures and components (SSCs) within the scope of license renewal. Baltimore Gas and Electric (BGE) and MPR Associates, Inc., have recently completed an aging management review of component supports for Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant (CCNPP). A commodity approach was used on the basis that component supports perform essentially the same function regardless of the system with which they are associated. This approach, i.e., treating component supports as commodities as opposed to performing the aging management review for each individual component support, resulted in a cost-effective approach for this portion of the IPA. An important feature of the aging management review of component support at CCNPP is the evaluation of the adequacy of existing programs to manage component support aging. Two major programs were included in the evaluation: the ASME Section 11 In-Service Inspection (ISI) Program, and CCNPP`s Seismic Verification Project to resolve USI A-46. The key role that these programs play in the overall aging management strategy for component supports, as well as the evaluation of other on-going activities which complete the aging management approach for component supports, are discussed.

Schlaseman, C.S. [MPR Associates, Inc., Washington, DC (United States); Tilden, B.M. [Baltimore Gas and Electric Co., MD (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Bruce Brodie, Managing Director Bruce Brodie  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1PwC Bruce Brodie, Managing Director Bruce Brodie Managing Director, Insurance Advisory Telephone: 203.864.5204 E-mail: bruce.brodie@us.pwc.com Bruce is a Managing Director in PwC's Financial Services companies. · He has more than 30 years of experience in the insurance industry and has held a number

Sadeh, Norman M.

450

ARM - Measurement - Shortwave spectral total downwelling irradiance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shadowband Spectroradiometer SPEC-TOTDN : Shortwave Total Downwelling Spectrometer UAV-EGRETT : UAV-Egrett Value-Added Products VISST : Minnis Cloud Products Using Visst...

451

,"New York Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2013 ,"Release Date:","12312014"...

452

Total Supplemental Supply of Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Product: Total Supplemental Supply Synthetic Propane-Air Refinery Gas Biomass Other Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources &...

453

Total Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Summary)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Additions LNG Storage Withdrawals LNG Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Lease Fuel Plant Fuel Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to...

454

Federal Energy Management Program: Computerized Maintenance Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computerized Computerized Maintenance Management Systems to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Computerized Maintenance Management Systems on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Computerized Maintenance Management Systems on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Computerized Maintenance Management Systems on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Computerized Maintenance Management Systems on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Computerized Maintenance Management Systems on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Computerized Maintenance Management Systems on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance Federal Requirements Program Management

455

SUBCONTRACT MANAGEMENT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

-1 -1 CHAPTER 10 SUBCONTRACT MANAGEMENT (Revised October 19, 2011) WHAT ARE THE BASIC PRINCIPLES AND OBJECTIVES OF SUBCONTRACT MANAGEMENT? 1. To ensure contractors establish, document, and maintain adequate purchasing systems. 2. To ensure contractors flow down contract requirements to subcontractors. WHY IS SUBCONTRACT MANAGEMENT IMPORTANT? In many Department prime contracts a significant portion of the obligated dollars is spent on subcontract work. Due to the absence of a direct contractual relationship with the subcontractor, the Department must rely on the prime contractor to manage subcontract work. Subcontractors perform significant work efforts at sites and are an integral part of the site's success. Prime

456

Program Manager  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A successful candidate in this position will participate in a wide spectrum of program and project management activities involving systems engineering and integration support for Defense Programs...

457

Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Management This department applies multi-disciplinary science and technology-based modeling to assess complex environmental systems. It integrates ecology, anthropology, and...

458

Position Management  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The order prescribes the policies, responsibilities, and procedures for position management within (DOE). Canceled by DOE N 1321.140. Cancels DOE 3510.1

1992-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

459

MANAGEMENT (MNG)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and recommendations is adequately implemented. (DOE Order 414.1A, Criterion 3; 10 CFR 830, Subpart A) Approach Record Review * Review the SWS issues management systems and...

460

Fiscal Year 2008 Budget-in-Brief  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Fiscal Year 2008 Budget-in-Brief www.eere.energy.gov TABLE OF CONTENTS Page Preface...................................................................................................................................................... 3 Biomass and Biorefinery Systems R&D Program.................................................................................. 6 Building Technologies Program ............................................................................................................. 9 Federal Energy Management Program ................................................................................................ 13 Geothermal Technology Program.........................................................................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "management total year" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Year STB EIA STB EIA  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Release Date: November 16, 2012 Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments...

462

Calendar Year 2012 | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 Calendar Year 2012 RSS December 21, 2012 Audit Report: OAS-L-13-03 The Management of the Plateau Remediation Contract December 21, 2012 Audit Report: IG-0879 Naval Reactors Information Technology System Development Efforts December 17, 2012 Audit Report: OAS-FS-13-08 Management Letter on the Audit of the Department of Energy's Consolidated Financial Statements for Fiscal Year 2012 December 11, 2012 Audit Report: IG-0878 Follow-up Audit of the Department's Cyber Security Incident Management Program December 3, 2012 Audit Report: OAS-RA-L-13-02 The Department's Implementation of Financial Incentive Programs under the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program November 30, 2012 Inspection Report: INS-O-13-02 Tactical Response Force Pursuit Operations at Idaho National Laboratory

463

Total Synthesis of Irciniastatin A (Psymberin)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Total Synthesis of Irciniastatin A (Psymberin) Michael T. Crimmins,* Jason M. Stevens, and Gregory, North Carolina 27599 crimmins@email.unc.edu Received July 21, 2009 ABSTRACT The total synthesis of a hemiaminal and acid chloride to complete the synthesis. In 2004, Pettit and Crews independently reported

464

TOTAL REFLUX OPERATION OF MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TOTAL REFLUX OPERATION OF MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION BERND WITTGENS, RAJAB LITTO, EVA S RENSEN a generalization of previously proposed batch distillation schemes. A simple feedback control strategy for total re verify the simulations. INTRODUCTION Although batch distillation generally is less energy e cient than

Skogestad, Sigurd

465

Carlsbad Field Office Manager Selected  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carlsbad Field Office Manager Selected CARLSBAD, N.M., November 10, 2011 - The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Richland Operations Office (RL) Assistant Manager for the River Corridor Joe Franco was selected as Manager for the Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO), which oversees the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). CBFO Deputy Manager Ed Ziemianski has been acting in the CBFO Manager's position for the past year and will continue to serve as Deputy Manager. In operation since 1999, WIPP is a DOE facility designed to safely isolate defense-related transuranic (TRU) waste from people and the environment. Since 2006, Franco was responsible for cleanup and restoration of the 220 square miles of the

466

Predictive Factors and Management of Rectal Bleeding Side Effects Following Prostate Cancer Brachytherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To report on the incidence, nature, and management of rectal toxicities following individual or combination brachytherapy following treatment for prostate cancer over a 17-year period. We also report the patient and treatment factors predisposing to acute ?grade 2 proctitis. Methods and Materials: A total of 2752 patients were treated for prostate cancer between October 1990 and April 2007 with either low-dose-rate brachytherapy alone or in combination with androgen depletion therapy (ADT) or external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and were followed for a median of 5.86 years (minimum 1.0 years; maximum 19.19 years). We investigated the 10-year incidence, nature, and treatment of acute and chronic rectal toxicities following BT. Using univariate, and multivariate analyses, we determined the treatment and comorbidity factors predisposing to rectal toxicities. We also outline the most common and effective management for these toxicities. Results: Actuarial risk of ?grade 2 rectal bleeding was 6.4%, though notably only 0.9% of all patients required medical intervention to manage this toxicity. The majority of rectal bleeding episodes (72%) occurred within the first 3 years following placement of BT seeds. Of the 27 patients requiring management for their rectal bleeding, 18 underwent formalin treatment and nine underwent cauterization. Post-hoc univariate statistical analysis revealed that coronary artery disease (CAD), biologically effective dose, rectal volume receiving 100% of the prescription dose (RV100), and treatment modality predict the likelihood of grade ?2 rectal bleeding. Only CAD, treatment type, and RV100 fit a Cox regression multivariate model. Conclusions: Low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy is very well tolerated and rectal bleeding toxicities are either self-resolving or effectively managed by medical intervention. Treatment planning incorporating adjuvant ADT while minimizing RV100 has yielded the best toxicity-free survival following BT.

Price, Jeremy G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York (United States); Stone, Nelson N. [Department of Urology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York (United States); Stock, Richard G., E-mail: Richard.Stock@mountsinai.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York (United States)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Calendar Year 2005 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 Calendar Year 2005 RSS December 30, 2005 Audit Report: OAS-M-06-03 Management Controls over the University of California's Contributions to the Los Alamos National Laboratory Foundation December 21, 2005 Audit Report: IG-0713 Status of the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility December 20, 2005 Audit Report: OAS-L-06-04 Federal Managers' Financial Integrity Act December 20, 2005 Audit Report: OAS-L-06-03 Defense Waste Processing Facility Operations at the Savannah River Site December 14, 2005 Special Report: IG-0712 Management Challenges at the Department of Energy December 5, 2005 Audit Report: IG-0711 Demolition and Replacement of Hanford's Radiological Calibration Laboratory November 25, 2005 Audit Report: OAS-M-06-02 Management Controls over Assessing Natural Resource Damage at Rocky Flats

468

Calendar Year 2012 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 26, 2012 October 26, 2012 Special Report: IG-0875 Review of the Compromise of Security Test Materials at the Y-12 National Security Complex October 22, 2012 Audit Report: IG-0873 Management of Western Area Power Administration's Cyber Security Program October 19, 2012 Special Report: IG-0874 Management Challenges at the Department of Energy - Fiscal Year 2013 October 17, 2012 Examination Report: OAS-RA-13-03 Community Action Partnership of Orange County - Weatherization Assistance Program Funds Provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 October 16, 2012 Management Alert: IG-0872 The Department of Energy's Management of Foreign Travel October 9, 2012 Examination Report: OAS-RA-13-02 County of Los Angeles - Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant

469

Secretary Moniz's First Year  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Check out our new interactive timeline to recap top moments from Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz's first year in office.

470

Secretary Moniz's First Year  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

We're looking back at some of the biggest moments from Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz's first year in office.

471

RMOTC - Testing - Carbon Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Management Carbon Management Ten Sleep Time Structure, 2nd Wall Creek Formation at RMOTC Notice: As of July 15th 2013, the Department of Energy announced the intent to sell Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 3 (NPR3). The sale of NPR-3 will also include the sale of all equipment and materials onsite. A decision has been made by the Department of Energy to complete testing at RMOTC by July 1st, 2014. RMOTC will complete testing in the coming year with the currently scheduled testing partners. For more information on the sale of NPR-3 and sale of RMOTC equipment and materials please join our mailing list here. RMOTC has the field setting, infrastructure, and expertise to play an important role in carbon management testing, demonstration, and research. The unique combination of a publicly-owned and DOE-operated oil field,

472

DEACTIVATION MANAGEMENT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MANAGEMENT MANAGEMENT The purpose here is to provide information for specific aspects of project management that apply to deactivation. Overall management of deactivation projects should use a traditional project management approach, and as such is not addressed. The following specific topics are based on lessons learned during deactivation of DOE facilities.  The Deactivation Mission  The Stabilization/Deactivation "Customer"  Project Approach for a Complex Facility  Establishing the Overall End-State  Viewing Deactivation in Two Phases  Early Decisions  Early Deactivation Tasks  Facility-Specific Commitments  Hazard Reduction  Detailed End-Points  Set Up Method and Criteria  Post-Deactivation S&M Plan

473

BachelorofManagement InternationalManagement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the official transcript (see Part 11 - Faculty of Management in the 2007/2008 Calendar). Program Planning Guide Management 3050/Political Science 3420 - Human Resource Management Management 3061 - Information Systems Environment Management 3640 - Cross-Cultural Management Practices Management 3660/Geography 3225 - Industrial

Seldin, Jonathan P.

474

Year 1 Year 2 Anne 3 Anne 4 Year 5 Year 6 Year 7Year 3 Year 4 INGENIEUR POLYTECHNICIENINGENIEUR POLYTECHNICIEN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Biology / Chemistry / Computer Science / Economics / Energy / Mechanics and Environmental Sciences / Mathematics and Applied Mathematics / Physics / Science, Technology & Society / Software Systems / Innovation Duration: 2 years - Possibility to be directly admitted to Year 2 Master of ScienceMaster of Science #12

Cengarle, María Victoria

475

Depleted uranium management alternatives  

SciTech Connect

This report evaluates two management alternatives for Department of Energy depleted uranium: continued storage as uranium hexafluoride, and conversion to uranium metal and fabrication to shielding for spent nuclear fuel containers. The results will be used to compare the costs with other alternatives, such as disposal. Cost estimates for the continued storage alternative are based on a life-cycle of 27 years through the year 2020. Cost estimates for the recycle alternative are based on existing conversion process costs and Capital costs for fabricating the containers. Additionally, the recycle alternative accounts for costs associated with intermediate product resale and secondary waste disposal for materials generated during the conversion process.

Hertzler, T.J.; Nishimoto, D.D.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Lynn C. Simpson Director, Total Fleet Force Manpower &  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

responsibilities include strategic workforce planning and management, program management and execution, policy Directorate in planning, implementation, and management of major programmatic and organization initiatives

477

Module title Human Resource Management Module code INT3604  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

working and the positive management of conflict and cultural difference Syllabus plan Syllabus planModule title Human Resource Management Module code INT3604 Academic year(s) 2013/4 Credits 15 Basic in the context of human resource management principles and practice as currently applied within organisations

Mumby, Peter J.

478

Total synthesis and study of myrmicarin alkaloids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I. Enantioselective Total Synthesis of Tricyclic Myrmicarin Alkaloids An enantioselective gram-scale synthesis of a key dihydroindolizine intermediate for the preparation of myrmicarin alkaloids is described. Key transformations ...

Ondrus, Alison Evelynn, 1981-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Total synthesis of cyclotryptamine and diketopiperazine alkaloids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I. Total Synthesis of the (+)-12,12'-Dideoxyverticillin A The fungal metabolite (+)-12,12'-dideoxyverticillin A, a cytotoxic alkaloid isolated from a marine Penicillium sp., belongs to a fascinating family of densely ...

Kim, Justin, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Provides Total Tuition Charge to Source Contribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,262 1,938 TGR 4-20 0-3 2,871 2,871 - % of time appointed Hours of Work/Week Units TAL Provides Total

Kay, Mark A.

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481

Enantioselective Total Synthesis of (?)-Acylfulvene and (?)- Irofulven  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report our full account of the enantioselective total synthesis of (?)-acylfulvene (1) and (?)-irofulven (2), which features metathesis reactions for the rapid assembly of the molecular framework of these antitumor ...

Movassaghi, Mohammad

482

A GENUINELY HIGH ORDER TOTAL VARIATION DIMINISHING ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(TVD) schemes solving one-dimensional scalar conservation laws degenerate to first order .... where the total variation is measured by the standard bounded variation ..... interval Ij and into the jump discontinuities at cell interfaces, see [12].

483

AB IN STUDIO ART Suggested 4 Year Curriculum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Total 16 THIRD YEAR First semester Area Hours Second semester Area Hours ARST 3000/4000 M 3 ARST 3000 FOURTH YEAR First semester Area Hours Must Second semester Area Hours ARST 3000/4000 M 3 Submit ARST 3000AB IN STUDIO ART Suggested 4 Year Curriculum revised 09/11 First semester Area Hours Must Second

Arnold, Jonathan

484

New Years Revolutions | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Years Revolutions New Years Revolutions New Years Revolutions January 3, 2012 - 9:42am Addthis Drew Bittner Web Manager, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Happy New Year to all you Energy Savers out there! Now that 2012 calendars are up and we (hopefully) remember to use '12 instead of '11 where necessary (does anyone write checks anymore?), it's time to think about the New Year's resolutions we made and are (hopefully again) still keeping. For instance... if you've been putting off getting an energy assessment of your home, why wait? Now is a good time to find out if you have cracks, leaks or other places where heat is escaping; you can start making your home more energy efficient today. Have you put off replacing your traditional light bulbs with energy efficient ones? Well, check out our page on lighting and get started! There

485

New Years Revolutions | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Years Revolutions Years Revolutions New Years Revolutions January 3, 2012 - 9:42am Addthis Drew Bittner Web Manager, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Happy New Year to all you Energy Savers out there! Now that 2012 calendars are up and we (hopefully) remember to use '12 instead of '11 where necessary (does anyone write checks anymore?), it's time to think about the New Year's resolutions we made and are (hopefully again) still keeping. For instance... if you've been putting off getting an energy assessment of your home, why wait? Now is a good time to find out if you have cracks, leaks or other places where heat is escaping; you can start making your home more energy efficient today. Have you put off replacing your traditional light bulbs with energy efficient ones? Well, check out our page on lighting and get started! There

486

Inspection of Westinghouse Savannah River Company Fees for Managing and Operating the Savannah River Site, IG-0377  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IG-1 IG-1 INFORMATION: Report on "Inspection of Westinghouse Savannah River Company Fees for Managing and Operating the Savannah River Site" The Secretary BACKGROUND: During the first five years of its contract with the Department of Energy, Westinghouse Savannah River Company was paid over $130 million in fees to manage and operate the Savannah River Site. Fees paid to Westinghouse steadily increased over the five year period. For example, fees paid for the last six months of this five year period were over three times as large as fees paid for the first six months. The purpose of this inspection was to review the Department's annual negotiation of total available fees with Westinghouse, and to examine the reasons for the growth

487

Management Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Immobilization Research Immobilization Research Kurt Gerdes U.S. DOE, Office of Engineering and Technology John Vienna Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Environmental Management May 19, 2009 2009 Hanford - Idaho - Savannah River Technical Exchange 2 Objectives Perform research and development to advance the waste stabilization technology options by through closely- coupled theory, experimentation, and modeling Develop solutions for Hanford, Idaho, Savannah River, and Oak Ridge wastes challenges (along with facilitating management of future wastes) Environmental Management General Approach Balance between near-term incremental technology improvements and long-term transformational solutions Address the requirements for high risk waste streams - high-level tank waste (RPP, SRS)

488

The effects of forest management on plant species diversity in a Sierran conifer forest  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We used a large data set collected as part of a wildlife habitat study at the Blodgett Forest Research Station in the Sierra Nevada of California to assess the influence of management practices on vascular plant diversity in the mixed conifer forest. In addition to the existing data, we conducted botanical inventories in 32 plots (0.28ha in size) from five different silvicultural regimes in 1997. Based on these inventories, understory species richness normalized to a total area sampled of 1.13ha was significantly greater in plots under plantation (80 species) and shelterwood (77 species) management compared to plots in reserve sites (i.e., approximately 80 year with no active management, 48 species). This pattern in species richness was consistent in the larger data set. Based on 372 plots sampled between 1977 and 1996, plantations and shelterwoods routinely had the highest species richness and the reserve units routinely were the least rich. Stands under single-tree selection had species richness values closer to those of the reserve stands. The relative diversity observed in group selection plots varied from year to year. Based on the 1997 data, canopy closure and seedbed were significantly correlated to understory plant diversity. Plots that were more open and had more bare ground tended to have higher species richness. This result supports the suggestion that in addition to the total amount of biomass removed, post-harvest practices also affect plant diversity. There were considerable differences in the composition of the understory communities among silvicultural treatments. Plots under a group selection, single tree selection or reserve management regime had a greater proportion of late-seral vs. early-seral species and a lower proportion of introduced exotic species compared to plantations and shelterwoods. In this forest, more intensive management maximized species richness, but the lower intensity practices better conserved understory plants typical of late-seral stands.

John J Battles; Ayn J Shlisky; Reginald H Barrett; Robert C Heald; Barbara H Allen-Diaz

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Residential Energy Consumption Survey Results: Total Energy Consumption,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Survey Results: Total Energy Consumption, Survey Results: Total Energy Consumption, Expenditures, and Intensities (2005) Dataset Summary Description The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) is a national survey that collects residential energy-related data. The 2005 survey collected data from 4,381 households in housing units statistically selected to represent the 111.1 million housing units in the U.S. Data were obtained from residential energy suppliers for each unit in the sample to produce the Consumption & Expenditures data. The Consumption & Expenditures and Intensities data is divided into two parts: Part 1 provides energy consumption and expenditures by census region, population density, climate zone, type of housing unit, year of construction and ownership status; Part 2 provides the same data according to household size, income category, race and age. The next update to the RECS survey (2009 data) will be available in 2011.

490

Kyoto-Related Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emission Totals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kyoto-Related Emissions Kyoto-Related Emissions Kyoto-Related Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emission Totals DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/ffe.007_V2012 world map Kyoto-Related Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emission Totals Year Annex B Countries Non Annex B Countries Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions (million metric tonnes C) Bunkers (million metric tonnes C) Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions (million metric tonnes C) Bunkers (million metric tonnes C) 1990 3894 90 2111 46 1991 3801 94 2299 38 1992 3750 109 2263 44 1993 3685 107 2339 48 1994 3656 107 2469 54 1995 3681 110 2570 59 1996 3704 111 2657 72 1997 3727 114 2737 74 1998 3746 118 2698 82 1999 3678 124 2718 90 2000 3725 130 2821 90 2001 3781 120 2936 92 2002 3764 128 3013 94 2003 3853 123 3347 98 2004 3888 135 3683 107 2005 3933 142 3926 106

491

| Los Alamos National Laboratory | Total Scattering Developments forTotal Scattering Developments for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratory | Total Scattering at the Lujan Center Neutron Powder Diffractometer (NPDF) High-Intensity Powder. Shoemaker, et al., Reverse Monte Carlo neutron scattering study of disordered crystalline materials neutron| Los Alamos National Laboratory | Total Scattering Developments forTotal Scattering Developments

Magee, Joseph W.

492

Allocation Year Rollover  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Allocation Year Rollover Allocation Year Rollover Allocation Year Rollover: 2013 to 2014 Note: Allocation Year 2013 (AY13) ends at 23:59:59 on Monday, January 13, 2014. AY14 runs from Tuesday, January 14, 2014 through Monday, January 12, 2015. Below are major changes that will go into effect with the beginning of AY14 on Tuesday, January 14, 2014. All times listed are PST. Scheduled System Downtimes There will be no service disruption during the allocation year rollover this year. Interactive and batch use will continue uninterrupted (except for "premium" jobs on Hopper; see below). Charging Across AY Boundary All batch jobs will continue running during the rollover. Time accrued before midnight will be charged to AY13 repos; time accrued after midnight will be charged to AY14 repos. Running batch jobs that are associated with

493

Administrator D'Agostino's Remarks at NNSA's 10-Year Anniversary  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

NNSA's 10-Year Anniversary NNSA's 10-Year Anniversary Celebration | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Speeches > Administrator D'Agostino's Remarks at NNSA's 10-Year Anniversary Celebration Speech Administrator D'Agostino's Remarks at NNSA's 10-Year Anniversary Celebration Apr 28, 2010

494

2013 Year of Important Accomplishments, Improvements for NNSA | National  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Year of Important Accomplishments, Improvements for NNSA | National Year of Important Accomplishments, Improvements for NNSA | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Press Releases > 2013 Year of Important Accomplishments, Improvements for NNSA Press Release 2013 Year of Important Accomplishments, Improvements for NNSA

495

Stormwater Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

management program must be developed that would meet the standard of reducing pollutants to the maximum extent practicable. Stormwater management programs for medium and large MS4s include measures to: ? Identify major outfalls and pollutant loadings... seeding: The vegetation used will be part of final landscaping, but during construction it prevents soil erosion. ? Mulching: Materials such as hay, grass, woodchips, gravel, or straw are placed on top of the soil to keep it from eroding. Structural...

Jaber, Fouad

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

496

2008 Data Report: Groundwater Monitoring Program Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site  

SciTech Connect

This report is a compilation of the groundwater sampling results from the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) including calendar year 2008 results. Each of the three Pilot Wells was sampled on March 11, 2008, and September 10, 2008. These wells were sampled for the following indicators of contamination: pH, specific conductance, total organic carbon, total organic halides, and tritium. Indicators of general water chemistry (cations and anions) were also monitored. Results from all samples collected in 2008 were within the limits established by agreement with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for each analyte. These data indicate that there has been no measurable impact to the uppermost aquifer from the Area 5 RWMS. There were no significant changes in measured groundwater parameters compared to previous years. Other information in the report includes an updated Cumulative Chronology for the Area 5 RWMS Groundwater Monitoring Program and a brief description of the site hydrogeology.

NSTec Environmental Management

2009-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

497

2006 Data Report: Groundwater Monitoring Program Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site  

SciTech Connect

This report is a compilation of the groundwater sampling results from the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) for calendar year 2006. Pilot wells UE5PW-1, UE5PW-2, and UE5PW-3 were sampled in April and October 2006 for the following indicators of contamination: pH, specific conductance, total organic carbon, total organic halides, and tritium. Indicators of general water chemistry (cations and anions) were also monitored. Results from all samples collected in 2006 were within the limits established by agreement with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for each analyte. These data indicate that there has been no measurable impact to the uppermost aquifer from the Area 5 RWMS. There were no significant changes in measured groundwater parameters compared to previous years. Other information in the report includes an updated Cumulative Chronology for the Area 5 RWMS Groundwater Monitoring Program and a brief description of the site hydrogeology.

David B. Hudson

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Table A50. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generatio  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A50. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" A50. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Census Region, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Type of" " Energy-Management Program, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,," Census Region",,,"RSE" "SIC",,,,,,,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total","Northeast","Midwest","South","West","Factors" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.7,1.2,1.1,0.9,1.2 "20-39","ALL INDUSTRY GROUPS" ,"Participation in One or More of the Following Types of Programs",12605,1209,3303,6386,1706,2.9

499

Table A41. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A41. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity" A41. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity" " Generation by Census Region, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Type of" " Energy Management Program, 1991" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,," Census Region",,,,"RSE" "SIC","Industry Groups",," -------------------------------------------",,,,"Row" "Code(a)","and Industry","Total","Northeast","Midwest","South","West","Factors" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.7,1.3,1,0.9,1.2 "20-39","ALL INDUSTRY GROUPS" ,"Participation in One or More of the Following Types of Programs",10743,1150,2819,5309,1464,2.6,,,"/WIR{D}~"

500

Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2008 Year...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

8 Year-End Summary Report Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2008 Year-End Summary Report Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2008 Year-End...