Sample records for management practices improvements

  1. Alternative Chemicals and Improved Disposal-End Management Practices for CCA-treated Wood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Alternative Chemicals and Improved Disposal-End Management Practices for CCA-treated Wood (FINAL Importation Associated with CCA-Treated Wood Use APPENDIX B: MSDS Sheets for Alternative Chemicals APPENDIX C Members A-1 B-1 C-1 D-1 E-1 F-1 G-1 ATTACHMENT: Treated Wood Resource Book #12;ii This page left

  2. Range Con: a management evaluation system for assessing sucess of selected range improvement practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ekblad, Steven Linn

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    strategic resource management plans. Individual management skills and managerial environment have not been considered when predicting biological and economic response of range management practices. Risk for individual managers adopting unsuited... APPENDIX Prototype Range Management Skills Survey. Range Management Skills Survey Survey Data Tables. Validation Figures. VITA 64 65 74 92 104 106 1X LIST OP FIGURES FIGURE Page 1. The Range Con expert system in relation to the Resource...

  3. Environmental Best Management Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Environmental Best Management Practices for Virginia's Golf Courses Prepared by Virginia Golf Course Superintendents Association #12;#12;EnvironmEntal BEst managEmEnt PracticEs for virginia's golf III I am pleased to endorse the Environmental Best Management Practices for Virginia's Golf Courses

  4. Best Environmental Management Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Best Environmental Management Practices Farm Animal Production Comprehensive Nutrient Management with regulatory guidelines by addressing items such as manure management, field crop nutrients, and storm water What is a CNMP? A Comprehensive Nutrient Management Plan (CNMP) is a total planning tool that details

  5. Development of a mult-objective strategic management approach to improve decisions for pavement management practices in local agencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang Albitres, Carlos Martin

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Multiple objectives are often used by agencies trying to manage pavement networks. Often alternative investment strategies can accomplish the agencies’ target objectives. If the goal is to achieve the target objectives at the minimum cost...

  6. Managing Critical Management Improvement Initiatives

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Provides requirements and responsibilities for planning, executing and assessing critical management improvement initiatives within DOE. DOE N 251.59, dated 9/27/2004, extends this Notice until 10/01/2005. Archived 11-8-10. Does not cancel other directives.

  7. Colorado Forestry Best Management Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    Colorado Forestry Best Management Practices Forest Stewardship Guidelines for Water Quality Management Practices (BMPs) for forestry activities. BMPs are a set of water-quality protection measures-harvest sites in southwest Colorado to assess Colorado forestry BMP application and effectiveness. Sites were

  8. COMPARING FOREST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES UNDER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COMPARING FOREST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES UNDER COMMUNITY-BASED AND CONVENTIONAL TENURES IN BRITISH OF MASTER OF RESOURCE MANAGEMENT In the School of Resource and Environmental Management © David Mealiea 2011 of Canada, this work may be reproduced, without authorization, under the conditions for Fair Dealing

  9. Project Management Practices

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and applies it as the foundational, best case probability of occurrence. 2. 2. As applied to forecasting, planning, estimating in management: anchoring is a starting point,...

  10. Best Environmental Management Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    protection 3. Aesthetics Acceptable ways for managing mortality include: 1. Rendering 2. Composting 3, and composting methods recycle the nutrients. The other methods, in essence, waste the nutrients. Rendering by rendering plant vehicles and personnel. Composting Composting is the controlled aerobic biological

  11. A Seminal Case Study on Application of Last Planner System with Cash Flow Data for Improvements in Construction Management Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lagoo, Nishi

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A major challenge faced by project managers is balancing the variables of scope, cost, and schedule. Changes in scope usually result in cost/schedule overruns. Variance in either or both of them creates disorder (typically increases...

  12. Kitchen Appliance Upgrades Improve Water Efficiency at DOD Exchange Facilities: Best Management Practice Case Study #11: Commercial Kitchen Equipment (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Exchange, formerly the Army and Air Force Exchange Service (AAFES), is a joint military activity and the U.S. Department of Defense?s (DOD) oldest and largest retailer. The Exchange is taking a leadership role in water efficiency improvements in their commercial kitchens by integrating water efficiency concepts into the organization?s overall sustainability plan and objectives.

  13. ESSENCE Good practice document series to improving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    ESSENCE Good practice document series 2012 Five keys to improving research costing in low ESSENCE Good practice document series Five keys to improving research costing in low- and middle- income countries 2012 ESSENCE Good practice document series Contents About ESSENCE and this 2 good practise

  14. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Improves Cooling System Performance: Best Management Practice Case Study #10: Cooling Towers (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has a longstanding sustainability program that revolves around energy and water efficiency as well as environmental protection. MSFC identified a problematic cooling loop with six separate compressor heat exchangers and a history of poor efficiency. The facility engineering team at MSFC partnered with Flozone Services, Incorporated to implement a comprehensive water treatment platform to improve the overall efficiency of the system.

  15. Establishing and Maintaining Effective Energy Management Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giffin, T. M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SAIC has developed, and has delivered over the past 4 years, training and tools to industry for them to implement energy management practices. Practical Energy Management (PEM) has been delivered to over 1000 industry professionals, arming them...

  16. Best Management Practices for Bedding and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrara, Katherine W.

    1 Best Management Practices for Bedding and Container Color Plant Production in California #12 in California Bedding and Container Color Plant Production 5 Best Management Practices for Disease Prevention 16 Best Management Practices For Insect And Mite Prevention 19 Impact of Common Bedding And Container

  17. BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES & GUIDANCE MANUAL: DESERT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES & GUIDANCE MANUAL: DESERT RENEWABLE ENERGY SOUTHWEST REGION #12;Draft BMPs and Guidance October 5, 2009 DISCLAIMER Best Management Practices & Guidance Eugenia Laychak Mignon Marks James W. Reede, Jr., Ed. D. Paul Richins Authors Roger Johnson Manager

  18. Desktop Management Energy Practices OOC Report Submission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Desktop Management Energy Practices OOC Report Submission Project: Review energy desktop King, George McCabe, Purpose: To determine if Purdue can establish more effective energy management school. Figures include Discovery Park and CERIAS. #12;Desktop Management Energy Practices OOC Report

  19. Managing Energy Efficiency Improvement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almaguer, J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    results has been the utilization of Six Sigma methodology to identify and seize opportunities to improve our performance and to better meet customer needs. Since its implementation in 1999, Six Sigma has proven to be a breakthrough process that can... take Dow to the next level of performance for all our key stakeholders. The Six Sigma methodology has been especially successful in improving energy efficiency and reducing energy costs and is the primary methodology used by technology center...

  20. Problem and Preferred Management Practices Identification Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patchen, Douglas G.

    2003-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The goals for this workshop were: to introduce key players in the Appalachian basin oil industry to DOE's new Preferred Upstream Management Practices (PUMP) program; to explain the various elements of our two-year project in detail; to transfer technology through a series of short, invited talks; to identify technical problems and best management practices; and to recruit members for our Preferred Management Practices (PMP) Council.

  1. JLab Property Management Best Practices | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Property Management Best Practices Nearly every employee at JLab is a property custodian. A property custodian is responsible for the proper use, control, physical protection and...

  2. Some practical aspects of reservoir management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, M.L.; Young, M.A.; Cole, E.L.; Madden, M.P. [BDM-Oklahoma, Bartlesville, OK (United States)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The practical essence of reservoir management is the optimal application of available resources-people, equipment, technology, and money to maximize profitability and recovery. Success must include knowledge and consideration of (1) the reservoir system, (2) the technologies available, and (3) the reservoir management business environment. Two Reservoir Management Demonstration projects (one in a small, newly-discovered field and one in a large, mature water-flood) implemented by the Department of Energy through BDM-Oklahoma illustrate the diversity of situations suited for reservoir management efforts. Project teams made up of experienced engineers, geoscientists, and other professionals arrived at an overall reservoir management strategy for each field. in 1993, Belden & Blake Corporation discovered a regionally significant oil reservoir (East Randolph Field) in the Cambrian Rose Run formation in Portage County, Ohio. Project objectives are to improve field operational economics and optimize oil recovery. The team focused on characterizing the reservoir geology and analyzing primary production and reservoir data to develop simulation models. Historical performance was simulated and predictions were made to assess infill drilling, water flooding, and gas repressurization. The Citronelle Field, discovered in 1955 in Mobile County, Alabama, has produced 160 million barrels from fluvial sandstones of the Cretaceous Rodessa formation. Project objectives are to address improving recovery through waterflood optimization and problems related to drilling, recompletions, production operations, and regulatory and environmental issues. Initial efforts focused on defining specific problems and on defining a geographic area within the field where solutions might best be pursued. Geologic and reservoir models were used to evaluate past performance and to investigate improved recovery operations.

  3. Best Practices for Managing Organizational Diversity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreitz, Patricia; /SLAC

    2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Organizations with increasingly diverse workforces and customer populations face challenges in reaping diversity's benefits while managing its potentially disruptive effects. This article defines workplace diversity and identifies best practices supporting planned and positive diversity management. It explores how academic libraries can apply diversity management best practices and provides a reading list for leaders and human resource managers wishing to optimize their organization's approach to diversity.

  4. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for Cement Making. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technology and Energy Management” Zement-Kalk-Gips 47 : 630-and Bezant, K.W. , 1990. “Energy Management in the UK Cementpotential for improved energy management practices exists.

  5. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Pharmaceutical Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2005). Guidelines for Energy Management. Washington, D.C.Caffal, C. (1995). Energy Management in Industry. Centre forfor improving your energy management practices. Resources

  6. Best Management Practice #1: Water Management Planning

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A successful water management program starts with developing a comprehensive water management plan. This plan should be included within existing facility operating plans.

  7. Implementing Nutrient Management Practices in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balser, Teri C.

    /Implementation Efforts Nutrient and Pest Management Program (NPM) Certified Crop Adviser (CCA) Training Local Nutrient Assurance Team #12;Nutrient & Pest Management (NPM) Program What we do · Promote agricultural management conservation staff. · Over 400 participants to date Presented by: UWEX, NPM, DATCP, NRCS Financial support

  8. Best Management Practice #2: Information and Education Programs...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Water Use Reduction Best Management Practice 2: Information and Education Programs Best Management Practice 2: Information and Education Programs Educating users about water...

  9. Best Management Practices for Water Efficiency | Department of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Practices for Water Efficiency Best Management Practices for Water Efficiency The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) worked with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency...

  10. Agricultural Management Practices And Soil Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Agricultural Management Practices And Soil Quality: Measuring, assessing, and comparing laboratory and field test kit indicators of soil quality attributes. Publication 452-400 #12;Agricultural Management Associate, respectively, Crop and Soil Environmental Sciences, Virginia Tech #12;1 Introduction What makes

  11. Best Practices Implementation for Hydropower Efficiency and Utilization Improvement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Brennan T [ORNL] [ORNL; Zhang, Qin Fen [ORNL] [ORNL; March, Patrick [Hydro Performance Processes, Inc.] [Hydro Performance Processes, Inc.; Cones, Marvin [Mesa Associates, Inc.] [Mesa Associates, Inc.; Dham, Rajesh [U.S. Department of Energy] [U.S. Department of Energy; Spray, Michael [New West Technologies, LLC.] [New West Technologies, LLC.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    By using best practices to manage unit and plant efficiency, hydro owner/operators can achieve significant improvements in overall plant performance, resulting in increased generation and profitability and, frequently, reduced maintenance costs. The Hydropower Advancement Project (HAP) was initiated by the Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy to develop and implement a systematic process with standard methodology, based on the best practices of operations, maintenance and upgrades; to identify the improvement opportunities at existing hydropower facilities; and to predict and trend the overall condition and improvement opportunity within the U.S. hydropower fleet. The HAP facility assessment includes both quantitative condition ratings and data-based performance analyses. However, this paper, as an overview document for the HAP, addresses the general concepts, project scope and objectives, best practices for unit and plant efficiency, and process and methodology for best practices implementation for hydropower efficiency and utilization improvement.

  12. Best Practices in Managed Document Review February 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oard, Doug

    best practices for managing document review ­ a basic best practice guide ­ having as its goalsBest Practices in Managed Document Review February 2011 #12;Best Practices in Managed Document and minimizes risk. Accordingly, counsel should guard against undervaluing discovery as a process. Best practice

  13. Best Management Practices for Aquatic Vegetation Management Principal Investigator: Joseph E. Morris

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koford, Rolf R.

    . Develop educational materials related to aquatic plant identification and their specific managementBest Management Practices for Aquatic Vegetation Management Principal Investigator: Joseph E vegetation management with the ultimate goal of producing the best management practices protocol in Iowa

  14. Best Practices for Managing Organizational Diversity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreitz, Patricia A.; /SLAC

    2007-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In the twentieth century, ecologists and agriculturists developed an increasingly sophisticated understanding of the value of biological diversity, specifically the resilience and adaptability it brings to ecosystems. In the twenty-first century, the ecosystem model has been applied to human systems, particularly to understanding how organizations are structured and how they operate. Twenty-first century organizations are challenged by diversity in many arenas. Demographic changes in workforce composition and customer populations, combined with globalized markets and international competition are increasing the amount of diversity organizations must manage, both internally and externally. Many diversity specialists and business leaders argue that businesses and organizations interested in surviving and thriving in the twenty-first century need to take competitive advantage of a diverse workplace (Soutar, 2004; Yang, 2005). But to do so successfully, leaders and human resources (HR) managers must redefine management and leadership (Jones, 1989). Just as mono-cropping destroys biological diversity, and, in extreme cases, such as the Irish potato famine--human as well as natural ecosystems (Keohane, n.d.), so does mono-managing similarly destroy diversity within organizations. Leaders wanting to build strong, diverse organizations will not be successful if they rely on one approach or solution. Single-threaded diversity solutions, such as focusing only on recruitment or single-approach management techniques, such as requiring every employee to take diversity training, do not create lasting change (Kossek & Lobel, 1996; McMahon, 2006; Thomas, 1990). Bringing about the changes needed to build and sustain diversity requires commitment, strategy, communication, and concrete changes in organizational structure and processes. How, then, can managers and leaders develop diverse organizations and ensure that they are managed to take optimum advantage of diversity? What role should human resource specialists play in creating and managing diverse organizations? What are the best practices they should apply? The purpose of this review is to define workplace diversity, to identify best practices, and to identify how diversity management best practices can be applied in academic libraries. Finally, this review will provide a resource list for HR managers and leaders to learn more about those best practices with the goal of optimizing their organization's approach to diversity.

  15. Certifying Industrial Energy Efficiency Performance: Aligning Management, Measurement, and Practice to Create Market Value

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKane, Aimee; Scheihing, Paul; Williams, Robert

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    knowledge concerning energy management best practices andapplying and validating energy management best practices inan international industrial energy management standard that

  16. Weed Management Costs, Weed Best Management Practices, and The Roundup Ready Weed Management Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, Paul D.

    substantially increase weed management costs and so discourage adoption. This paper uses survey results: glyphosate, resistance management, BMP adoption, telephone survey, herbicide #12;2 INTRODUCTION Roundup ReadyWeed Management Costs, Weed Best Management Practices, and The Roundup Ready® Weed Management

  17. Transforming commercial aerospace supply chain management practices by utilizing Toyota production system principles, practices, and methodologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patneaude, Steven M

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis examines The Toyota Motor Corporation's core precepts, management principles, supply chain architecture, product development methods, leveraged practice of supplier partnerships and procurement practices, all ...

  18. How are Practices Made to Vary? Managing Practice Adaptation in a Multinational Corporation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ansari, Shaz; Reinecke, Juliane; Spaan, Amy

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    & Alvarez, 2000). After two failed initial adoptions of generic versions, Q+ and Kaizen, in 1991, UTC’s former Chairman and CEO George David invited the Japanese quality advisor Yuzuro Ito to join UTC in the quest to develop a specialized quality... by the consultancy Shingijutsu. ACE also incorporated methodologies from existing quality management practices; Kaizen (continuous improvement) and 3P (Production Preparation Process). A pilot version was introduced at UTC division, Pratt & Whitney, at the end...

  19. New Course Teaches Best Practices for Water Management for Federal...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    New Course Teaches Best Practices for Water Management for Federal Facilities New Course Teaches Best Practices for Water Management for Federal Facilities May 8, 2014 - 11:13am...

  20. Challenges for Water Quality Best Management Practices Andrew Sharpley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Challenges for Water Quality Best Management Practices Andrew Sharpley Department of Crop, Soil and Environmental Sciences, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR Agricultural Best Management Practices (BMPs, basing fertilizer applications on soil test recommendations, and transportation from surplus to deficit

  1. Survey Questionnaire on Environmental Management Practices: Summary of Results by Industry and practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delmas, Magali A; Toffel, Michael W.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    results of a survey on Environmental Management Practices (SURVEY QUESTIONNAIRE ON ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT PRACTICESmanagement consultants to complete the draft survey, and

  2. Optimal Location of Infiltration-Based Best Management Practices for Storm Water Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vogel, Richard M.

    Optimal Location of Infiltration-Based Best Management Practices for Storm Water Management and water quality impacts. The concept of best manage- ment practices BMPs encompasses a wide variety with a genetic algorithm to determine the optimal location of infiltration-based best management practices BMPs

  3. Managing Warm-season Improved Pastures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stichler, Charles; Prostko, Eric P.; Livingston, Stephen

    1998-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    M anaging Warm-season Improved Pastures Charles Stichler, Eric Prostko, Steve Livingston* he quality and quantity of forage in pastures can vary greatly and are constantly changing throughout the year. The goal of forage management is to provide...

  4. Energy Management Practices at Dalls/Fort Worth International Airport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dennis, J. R.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Airport?s energy conservation building codes and standards. Proposed Street Light for Southgate Fanwall AHU (TRIP) Energy Management Practices at DFW Airport, October 9, 2013 Demand-Side Management (cont.) ? Continuous Commissioning? ? Optimizes... Management Section ? Structure & Mission ? Supply-Side Management ? Reliability ? Cost (Risk) mitigation ? Environmental stewardship ? Demand-Side Management ? Energy monitoring ? Energy audits ? Energy standards ? Continuous Commissioning...

  5. Florida School IPM Best Management Practices Aug 17, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jawitz, James W.

    the implementation of inte- grated pest management practices in Florida schools. In 2004, the Florida School IPM Work in pest management pro- grams implemented in Florida schools. The Work Group also identified what IPMFlorida School IPM Best Management Practices Aug 17, 2012 FINAL DRAFT OPEN FOR COMMENT UNTIL SEPT

  6. Slag pit practices to improve slag quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mertdogan, A. [Metal Enterprises, Research and Technology, Inc., Homewood, IL (United States); Gambol, F.C.; Spaeth, J.R.; Zbos, J.; Batka, R. [Acme Steel Co., Chicago, IL (United States); Tolliver, D. [Heckett MultiServ, Whiting, IN (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Slag quality had deteriorated recently. Without the explicit approval for slag quality by the Illinois Department of Transportation, the slag would not be saleable. Disposal of slag to landfills was going to be an expensive solution and rife with environmental concerns. A slag quality control program embarked on in mid-1994 restored slag quality to desired specifications. This paper describes the changes in slag pit practice adopted following extensive tests performed on cooling slag under controlled conditions.

  7. Waste Heat Management Options for Improving Industrial Process...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heat Management Options for Improving Industrial Process Heating Systems Waste Heat Management Options for Improving Industrial Process Heating Systems This presentation covers...

  8. agricultural management practice: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    areas. Published by Elsevier B.V. Keywords: Carbon Lawrence, Rick L. 7 Best Environmental Management Practices Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Best...

  9. agricultural management practices: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    areas. Published by Elsevier B.V. Keywords: Carbon Lawrence, Rick L. 7 Best Environmental Management Practices Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Best...

  10. Impact of demographics on supply chain risk management practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanyagui, Kenneth (Kenneth K.)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Do demographic factors play a role in the choice of supply chain risk management practices by supply chain professionals? Are there stronger relationships between certain demographic factors and supply chain risk management ...

  11. Snow and Ice Control Best Management Practices Parking Lots, Sidewalks, Roads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Snow and Ice Control Best Management Practices Parking Lots, Sidewalks, Roads Minnesota Circuit opportunity to improve the way we manage snow and ice in Minnesota. By using snow and ice control best safer--while saving money and protecting water quality. Current Situation The snow and ice maintenance

  12. INTEGRATED SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM SAFETY CULTURE IMPROVEMENT INITIATIVE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MCDONALD JA JR

    2009-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) identified safety culture as one of their top Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) related priorities. A team was formed to address this issue. The team identified a consensus set of safety culture principles, along with implementation practices that could be used by DOE, NNSA, and their contractors. Documented improvement tools were identified and communicated to contractors participating in a year long pilot project. After a year, lessons learned will be collected and a path forward determined. The goal of this effort was to achieve improved safety and mission performance through ISMS continuous improvement. The focus of ISMS improvement was safety culture improvement building on operating experience from similar industries such as the domestic and international commercial nuclear and chemical industry.

  13. Best Management Practices for Forestry: Protecting New Hampshire's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Best Management Practices for Forestry: Protecting New Hampshire's Water Quality #12;#12;i of Conservation's Maine Forest Service publication, "Best Management Practices for Forestry: Protecting Maine). Members of FORAT's BMP Manual Sub-Group include: · Morten Moesswilde, Maine Forest Service · Roger Ryder

  14. Renovation Practices to Improve Rainfall Effectiveness on Rangeland and Pastures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanselka, C. Wayne; Livingston, Stephen

    2001-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    . Taylor Jr., ?Improving Rainfall Effectiveness on Range- Iand.? L-5029, Texas Agricultural Extension Service, Welch, Tommy G., Robert W. Knight, Dan Caudle, Andy Garza and John M. Sweeten. ?Impact of Grazing Management on Nonpoint Source Pollution,? L-5002...

  15. REFERRED WATERFLOOD MANAGEMENT PRACTICES FOR THE SPRABERRY TREND AREA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. M. Sizemore; David S. Schechter

    2004-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the work performed during the first semi-annual third year of the project, ''Preferred Waterflood Management Practices for the Spraberry Trend Area''. The objective of this project is to significantly increase field-wide production in the Spraberry Trend in a short time frame through the application of preferred practices for managing and optimizing water injection. Our goal is to dispel negative attitudes and lack of confidence in water injection and to document the methodology and results for public dissemination to motivate waterflood expansion in the Spraberry Trend. To achieve this objective, in this period we concentrated our effort on analyzing production and injection data to optimize the reservoir management strategies for Germania Spraberry Unit. This study address the reservoir characterization and monitoring of the waterflooding project and propose alternatives of development of the current and future conditions of the reservoir to improve field performance. This research should serve as a guide for future work in reservoir simulation and can be used to evaluate various scenarios for additional development as well as to optimize the operating practices in the field. The results indicate that under the current conditions, a total of 1.410 million barrels of oil can be produced in the next 20 years through the 64 active wells and suggest that the unit can be successfully flooded with the current injection rate of 1600 BWPD and the pattern consisting of 6 injection wells aligned about 36 degrees respect to the major fracture orientation. In addition, a progress report on GSU waterflood pilot is reported for this period.

  16. Project Hanford management contract quality improvement project management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ADAMS, D.E.

    1999-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    On July 13, 1998, the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) Manager transmitted a letter to Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. (FDH) describing several DOE-RL identified failed opportunities for FDH to improve the Quality Assurance (QA) Program and its implementation. In addition, DOE-RL identified specific Quality Program performance deficiencies. FDH was requested to establish a periodic reporting mechanism for the corrective action program. In a July 17, 1998 response to DOE-RL, FDH agreed with the DOE concerns and committed to perform a comprehensive review of the Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) QA Program during July and August, 1998. As a result, the Project Hanford Management Contract Quality Improvement Plan (QIP) (FDH-3508) was issued on October 21, 1998. The plan identified corrective actions based upon the results of an in-depth Quality Program Assessment. Immediately following the scheduled October 22, 1998, DOE Office of Enforcement and Investigation (EH-10) Enforcement Conference, FDH initiated efforts to effectively implement the QIP corrective actions. A Quality Improvement Project (QI Project) leadership team was assembled to prepare a Project Management Plan for this project. The management plan was specifically designed to engage a core team and the support of representatives from FDH and the major subcontractors (MSCs) to implement the QIP initiatives; identify, correct, and provide feedback as to the root cause for deficiency; and close out the corrective actions. The QI Project will manage and communicate progress of the process.

  17. Thinking Globally: How ISO 50001 - Energy Management can make industrial energy efficiency standard practice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKane, Aimee

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with management systems, for example - quality, safety, andother management systems, such as ISO 90001 (quality) andquality management practices (ISO 9001) and environmental management systems (

  18. Storm-water management for construction activities. Developing pollution prevention plans and best management practices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The manual provides industrial facilities with comprehensive guidance on the development of storm water pollution prevention plans and identification of appropriate Best Management Practices (BMPs). It provides technical assistance and support to all facilities subject to pollution prevention requirements established under National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits for storm water point source discharges. EPA's storm water program significantly expands the scope and application of the existing NPDES permit system for municipal and industrial process wastewater discharges. It emphasizes pollution prevention and reflects a heavy reliance on BMPs to reduce pollutant loadings and improve water quality. The manual provides essential guidance in both of these areas.

  19. Storm-water management for industrial activities. Developing pollution prevention plans and best management practices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The manual provides industrial facilities with comprehensive guidance on the development of storm water pollution prevention plans and identification of appropriate Best Management Practices (BMPs). It provides technical assistance and support to all facilities subject to pollution prevention requirements established under National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits for storm water point source discharges. EPA's storm water program significantly expands the scope and application of the existing NPDES permit system for municipal and industrial process wastewater discharges. It emphasizes pollution prevention and reflects a heavy reliance on BMPs to reduce pollutant loadings and improve water quality. The manual provides essential guidance in both of these areas.

  20. Ways of Knowing and Inclusive Management Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feldman, Martha S; Khademian, Anne M; Ingram, Helen; Schneider, Anne S

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    plant diversi? cation and composting. Certi? cation stance,farmers’ practice of composting, which the regulationsbuilding blocks, research composting processes, such as

  1. A comparative analysis of supply chain management practices by Boeing and Airbus : long-term strategic implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horng, Tzu-Ching

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this research is to develop an improved understanding of supply chain management strategies and practices being pursued by Boeing and Airbus in the 787 Dreamliner and the A380 Navigator programs, respectively, ...

  2. COMPARATIVE HEALTH IMPACT ASSESSMENTS ON FECAL SLUDGE MANAGEMENT PRACTICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    i COMPARATIVE HEALTH IMPACT ASSESSMENTS ON FECAL SLUDGE MANAGEMENT PRACTICES: A CASE STUDY OF KLONG Fecal sludge (FS) is widely acknowledged as a major source of infectious pathogens. However, the proper

  3. Land management practices to become important as biofuels use...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Land management practices to become important as biofuels use grows By Angela Hardin * May 21, 2015 Tweet EmailPrint The handling of agricultural crop residues appears to have a...

  4. CHAPTER 11: CONTROLLING MANAGERS' `BECOMING': THE PRACTICE OF IDENTITY REGULATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 CHAPTER 11: CONTROLLING MANAGERS' `BECOMING': THE PRACTICE OF IDENTITY REGULATION Stéphan Pezé regulation. My focus is on how identity regulation is performed through individuals' concrete actions regulation discourses are performed through micro- practices showing that identity regulation is far from

  5. Effects of Cultural and Management Practices on Sudangrass Performance.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holt, Ethan C.

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Harvest Frequen cy....-- 5 Harvest Practice ............................................ 5 Height and Frequency ................................ 5 Method of Harvest .................................... 6 Frequency of Harvest... sorghum and a sudangrass variety, have been used widely in recent years. The hybrids generally grow faster, produce more total dry matter and recover more rapidly following harvest than the sudan varieties. General culture and management practices ire...

  6. IT PROJECT MANAGEMENT PROGRAM A ten-week program covering best practices in IT project management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaefer, Marcus

    with managing and working with people such as team composition and leadership, conflict resolution and politics Management Program are expected to do a considerable amount of work outside of class. StudentsIT PROJECT MANAGEMENT PROGRAM A ten-week program covering best practices in IT project management

  7. Review and Status of Solid Waste Management Practices in Multan, Pakistan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoaib, Muhammad; Mirza, Umar Karim; Sarwar, Muhammad Avais

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Resource Center. (2004). Solid waste management study,in management of liquid and solid waste, Multan City, JuneReview and Status of Solid Waste Management Practices in

  8. Development and Demonstration of Advanced Forecasting, Power and Environmental Planning and Management Tools and Best Practices

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Development and Demonstration of Advanced Forecasting, Power and Environmental Planning and Management Tools and Best Practices

  9. Best Practices in Industrial Data Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S. Department ofJune 2, 2015Energyon23264 PreparedEnergyofBest Practices

  10. La Jolla Children's Pool Beach Management and Water Quality Improvement Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elwany, Hany; Flick, Reinhard; Nichols, Jean; Lindquist, Anne-Lise

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    POOL BEACH MANAGEMENT AND WATER QUALITY IMPROVEMENT PROJECTPool Beach Management and Water Quality Improvements ProjectPool Beach Management and Water Quality Improvements Project

  11. Demonstration Sites of Best Management Practices: A Manual for the Upper Etowah River Alliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosemond, Amy Daum

    Demonstration Sites of Best Management Practices: A Manual for the Upper Etowah River Alliance and the Institute of Ecology #12;UERA BMPs Demonstation Sites Manual 2 of 2 Demonstration Sites of Best Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 iii. Best Management Practices

  12. Evaluating the DSM Potential for Industrial Electrotechnologies and Management Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrell, P. J.; Pavone, A.

    -side management (DSM) program. This paper outlines the procedures used to evaluate technologies that may impact oil refining, pulp & paper production, and 26 major chemical processes of industrial customers within HL&P's service area. Each technology... practices (technologies) for possible inclusion in an industrial demand-side management (DSM) program. This paper outlines the procedures used to evaluate technologies that may impact oil refining, pulp & paper production, and 26 major chemical processes...

  13. Bachelor of Science in Construction Management Management Option Prepares the student for professional practice as a construction manager. Provides a well rounded

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemmers, Oliver

    Bachelor of Science in Construction Management ­ Management Option Prepares the student for professional practice as a construction manager. Provides a well rounded educational back ground in business, construction management and science, liberal arts, management, mathematics, and college physics. The program

  14. Business Process Management Systems enabling continuous improvement in industrial services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Business Process Management Systems ­ enabling continuous improvement in industrial services Heikki that modern business process management systems (BPMS) provide in improving industrial service processes. A case study identifies improvement opportunities in the order-to- cash process in two service lines

  15. Guidance manual for developing best management practices (BMP). Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ;Table of Contents: Introduction to Best Management Practices (BMP); BMP Plan Development; Industry-Specific BMP (Metal Finishing; Organic Chemicals, Plastics, and Synthetic Fibers Manufacturing; Textiles Manufacturing; Pulp and Paper Manufacturing; Pesticides Formulation; Pharmaceuticals Manufacturing; Primary Metals Manufacturing; Petroleum Refining; and Inorganic Chemicals Manufacturing); Resources Available for Determining BMP; BMP Plan Development Checklists; and Theoretical Decision-Making Process for BMP Plan Development.

  16. IT Capital Planning Corporate Management Improvement Program (CMIP)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Corporate Management Improvement Program (CMIP) was initiated by the Department in recognition of the fact that corporate legacy systems that support administrative functions were nearing the...

  17. Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide: Practical Ways to Improve Energy Performance, K-12 Schools (Book)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed the K-12 Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide to provide specific methodologies, information, and guidance to help energy managers and other stakeholders plan and execute energy efficiency improvements. We emphasize actionable information, practical methodologies, diverse case studies, and unbiased evaluation of the most promising retrofit measure for each building type. K-12 schools were selected as one of the highest priority building sectors, because schools affect the lives of most Americans. They also represent approximately 8% of the energy use and 10% of the floor area in commercial buildings.

  18. Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide: Practical Ways to Improve Energy Performance; Grocery Stores (Revised) (Book)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendron, B.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed the Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides (AERGs) to provide specific methodologies, information, and guidance to help energy managers and other stakeholders successfully plan and execute energy efficiency improvements. Detailed technical discussion is fairly limited in these guides. Instead, we emphasize actionable information, practical methodologies, diverse case studies, and unbiased evaluations of the most promising retrofit measures for each building type. A series of AERGs is under development, addressing key segments of the commercial building stock. Grocery stores were selected as one of the highest priority sectors, because they represent one of the most energy-intensive market segments.

  19. Watershed Management: An Evaluation of the Mullen Slough Capital Improvement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watershed Management: An Evaluation of the Mullen Slough Capital Improvement Project Study MANAGEMENT in the School of Resource and Environmental Management Report No. 321 © Fiona Murray McNair 2003 SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY July 2003 All rights reserved. This work may not be reproduced in whole

  20. Recent improvements in casthouse practices at the Kwangyang blast furnaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jang, Y.S.; Han, K.W.; Kim, K.Y.; Cho, B.R.; Hur, N.S.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    POSCO`s Kwangyang blast furnaces have continuously carried out high production and low fuel operation under a high pulverized coal injection rate without complications since the Kwangyang No. 1 blast furnace was blown-in in 1987. The Kwangyang blast furnaces have focused on improving the work environment for the increase of competitive power in terms of increased production, cost savings, and management of optimum manpower through use of low cost fuel and raw material. At this time, the casthouse work lags behind most work in the blast furnace. Therefore, the Kwangyang blast furnaces have adopted a remote control system for the casthouse equipment to solve complications in the casthouse work due to high temperature and fumes. As the result, the casthouse workers can work in clean air and the number of workers has been reduced to 9.5 personnel per shift by reduction of the workload.

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: improve MHK device management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MHK device management Sandia Funded to Model Power Pods for Utility-Scale Wave-Energy Converter On September 16, 2014, in Computational Modeling & Simulation, Energy, News, News &...

  2. ITIL frameworks to ITD Company for improving capabilities in service management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Phuc V

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IT operates in dynamic environments with the need always to change and adapt. There is a need to improve performance. Many gaps were found when we conduct the IT audit and we tried to seek to close gaps in capabilities. One way to the close these gaps is the adoption of good practices in wide industry use. There are several sources for good practices including public frameworks and standards such as ITIL, COBIT, CMMI, eSCM-SP, PRINCE2, ISO 9000, ISO/IEC 20000 and ISO/IEC 27001, etc. The paper propose ITIL frameworks to ITD Company for improving capabilities in service management.

  3. Recommended Practice for Patch Management of Control Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven Tom; Dale Christiansen; Dan Berrett

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A key component in protecting a nation’s critical infrastructure and key resources is the security of control systems. The term industrial control system refers to supervisory control and data acquisition, process control, distributed control, and any other systems that control, monitor, and manage the nation’s critical infrastructure. Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources (CIKR) consists of electric power generators, transmission systems, transportation systems, dam and water systems, communication systems, chemical and petroleum systems, and other critical systems that cannot tolerate sudden interruptions in service. Simply stated, a control system gathers information and then performs a function based on its established parameters and the information it receives. The patch management of industrial control systems software used in CIKR is inconsistent at best and nonexistent at worst. Patches are important to resolve security vulnerabilities and functional issues. This report recommends patch management practices for consideration and deployment by industrial control systems owners.

  4. Fifty years of federal radioactive waste management: Policies and practices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, R.G.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a chronological history of policies and practices relating to the management of radioactive waste for which the US Atomic Energy Commission and its successor agencies, the Energy Research and Development Administration and the Department of Energy, have been responsible since the enactment of the Atomic Energy Act in 1946. The defense programs and capabilities that the Commission inherited in 1947 are briefly described. The Commission undertook a dramatic expansion nationwide of its physical facilities and program capabilities over the five years beginning in 1947. While the nuclear defense activities continued to be a major portion of the Atomic Energy Commission`s program, there was added in 1955 the Atoms for Peace program that spawned a multiplicity of peaceful use applications for nuclear energy, e.g., the civilian nuclear power program and its associated nuclear fuel cycle; a variety of industrial applications; and medical research, diagnostic, and therapeutic applications. All of these nuclear programs and activities generated large volumes of radioactive waste that had to be managed in a manner that was safe for the workers, the public, and the environment. The management of these materials, which varied significantly in their physical, chemical, and radiological characteristics, involved to varying degrees the following phases of the waste management system life cycle: waste characterization, storage, treatment, and disposal, with appropriate transportation linkages. One of the benefits of reviewing the history of the waste management program policies and practices if the opportunity it provides for identifying the lessons learned over the years. Examples are summarized at the end of the report and are listed in no particular order of importance.

  5. Production system improvement : floor area reduction and visual management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Zhuling, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis suggests on the development process of a new layout design and visual management tools to improve the efficiency of a production line in a medical device company. Lean production philosophy and common lean ...

  6. Municipal solid waste management in Nepal: practices and challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pokhrel, D. [Faculty of Engineering, University of Regina, 3737 Wascana Parkway, Regina, SK, S4S 0A2 (Canada); Viraraghavan, T. [Faculty of Engineering, University of Regina, 3737 Wascana Parkway, Regina, SK, S4S 0A2 (Canada)]. E-mail: t.viraraghavan@uregina.ca

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid waste management in Kathmandu valley of Nepal, especially concerning the siting of landfills, has been a challenge for over a decade. The current practice of the illegal dumping of solid waste on the river banks has created a serious environmental and public health problem. The focus of this study was to carry out an evaluation of solid waste management in Nepal based on published information. The data showed that 70% of the solid wastes generated in Nepal are of organic origin. As such, composting of the solid waste and using it on the land is the best way of solid waste disposal. This will reduce the waste volume transported to the landfill and will increase its life.

  7. improve your position Master of Science Programme Information Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Twente, Universiteit

    improve your position Master of Science Programme Information Management and Technology Information Technology and Management Information technology has become a common and indispensable tool for modern this question you need a thorough understanding of the possible role of information technology in organizations

  8. IMPROVING CALIFORNIA WATER MANAGEMENT: OPTIMIZING VALUE AND FLEXIBILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    are: 1) "Shortage" is an imprecise and outmoded concept for water management in California. Economicv IMPROVING CALIFORNIA WATER MANAGEMENT: OPTIMIZING VALUE AND FLEXIBILITY EXECUTIVE SUMMARY October of California http://cee.engr.ucdavis.edu/faculty/lund/CALVIN/ "When the well's dry, we know the worth of water

  9. Improving Reservoir Management from an Ecological Perspective JOHN TERANCE HICKEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lund, Jay R.

    i Improving Reservoir Management from an Ecological Perspective By JOHN TERANCE HICKEY B.S. (SUNY and future water resource challenges. Water managers are asked that reservoir operations provide additional opportunities. These and other interests share reservoir reoperation as a common solution often integrated

  10. Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide: Practical Ways to Improve Energy Performance, K-12 Schools (Book)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed the Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides (AERGs) to provide specific methodologies, information, and guidance to help energy managers and other stakeholders plan and execute energy efficiency improvements. Detailed technical discussion is fairly limited. Instead, we emphasize actionable information, practical methodologies, diverse case studies, and unbiased evaluations of the most promising retrofit energy efficiency measures for each building type. A series of AERGs is under development, addressing key segments of the commercial building stock. K-12 schools were selected as one of the highest priority building sectors, because schools affect the lives of most Americans. They also represent approximately 8% of the energy use and 10% of the floor area in commercial buildings nationwide. U.S. K-12 school districts spend more than $8 billion each year on energy - more than they spend on computers and textbooks combined. Most occupy older buildings that often have poor operational performance - more than 30% of schools were built before 1960. The average age of a school is about 42 years - which is nearly the expected serviceable lifespan of the building. K-12 schools offer unique opportunities for deep, cost-effective energy efficiency improvements, and this guide provides convenient and practical guidance for exploiting these opportunities in the context of public, private, and parochial schools.

  11. Recommendations for improvements to program and project management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has operated with a balanced matrix organization for over sixteen years. Much of the work at the Laboratory is accomplished with good customer satisfaction through programs, projects, and matrix management. During the past several years concerns about program and project management at ORNL have been expressed by both the Department of Energy and ORNL staff. In May 1993 the ORNL Division/Program/Office Directors Caucus chartered a ``fox team`` to identity and to recommend improvements to matrix management that would lead to resolution of these concerns. Nine experienced ORNL staff members served on this Matrix Management Upgrade Solutions Team (MMUST). The MMUST adopted a four-phase approach in which they first gathered information and then developed and proposed recommended actions. In the fourth phase the team was available to support implementation of the recommendations. They began work in June 1993, gathering and evaluating information in biweekly meetings for six months. Recommendations developed in October and November 1993 were presented to ORNL management in December. The MMUST issued three principal recommendations based on their evaluation of the information gathered. They are: Renew and enhance the ORNL management commitment to matrix management, program managers, and project managers; Implement actions to ensure career path parity between the program/project manager family of positions and the technical line manager family of positions across all directorates and divisions; and Clarify and document program/project manager roles, responsibilities, and authorities.

  12. PREFERRED WATERFLOOD MANAGEMENT PRACTICES FOR THE SPRABERRY TREND AREA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David S. Schechter

    2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area is one of the largest reservoirs in the domestic U.S. and is the largest reservoir in area extent in the world. Production from Spraberry sands is found over a 2,500 sq. mile area and Spraberry reservoirs can be found in an eight county area in west Texas. Over 150 operators produce 65,000 barrels of oil per day (bopd) from the Spraberry Trend Area from more than 9,000 production wells. Recovery is poor, on the order of 7-10% due to the profoundly complicated nature of the reservoir, yet billions of barrels of hydrocarbons remain. We estimate over 15% of remaining reserves in domestic Class III reservoirs are in Spraberry Trend Area reservoirs. This tremendous domestic asset is a prime example of an endangered hydrocarbon resource in need of immediate technological advancements before thousands of wells are permanently abandoned. This report describes the final work of the project, ''Preferred Waterflood Management Practices for the Spraberry Trend Area.'' The objective of this project is to significantly increase field-wide production in the Spraberry Trend in a short time frame through the application of preferred practices for managing and optimizing water injection. Our goal is to dispel negative attitudes and lack of confidence in water injection and to document the methodology and results for public dissemination to motivate waterflood expansion in the Spraberry Trend. This objective has been accomplished through research in three areas: (1) detail historical review and extensive reservoir characterization, (2) production data management, and (3) field demonstration. This provides results of the final year of the three-year project for each of the three areas.

  13. Thinking Globally: How ISO 50001 - Energy Management can make industrial energy efficiency standard practice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKane, Aimee; Desai, Deann; Matteini, Marco; Meffert, William; Williams, Robert; Risser, Roland

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Industry utilizes very complex systems, consisting of equipment and their human interface, which are organized to meet the production needs of the business. Effective and sustainable energy efficiency programs in an industrial setting require a systems approach to optimize the integrated whole while meeting primary business requirements. Companies that treat energy as a manageable resource and integrate their energy program into their management practices have an organizational context to continually seek opportunities for optimizing their energy use. The purpose of an energy management system standard is to provide guidance for industrial and commercial facilities to integrate energy efficiency into their management practices, including fine-tuning production processes and improving the energy efficiency of industrial systems. The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) has identified energy management as one of its top five priorities for standards development. The new ISO 50001 will establish an international framework for industrial, commercial, or institutional facilities, or entire companies, to manage their energy, including procurement and use. This standard is expected to achieve major, long-term increases in energy efficiency (20percent or more) in industrial, commercial, and institutional facilities and to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions worldwide.This paper describes the impetus for the international standard, its purpose, scope and significance, and development progress to date. A comparative overview of existing energy management standards is provided, as well as a discussion of capacity-building needs for skilled individuals to assist organizations in adopting the standard. Finally, opportunities and challenges are presented for implementing ISO 50001 in emerging economies and developing countries.

  14. PUBLIC ACCEPTABILITY OF FOREST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES AT MORGAN-MONROE STATE FOREST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    providing brief explanations of alternative management practices. An on-site survey of recreationists to forest management on public land, the present study used survey methodologies to examine stakeholder254 PUBLIC ACCEPTABILITY OF FOREST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES AT MORGAN-MONROE STATE FOREST Shannon C

  15. Improving Project Management | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking of BlytheDepartment of Energy IRSJuly 2012|| DepartmentImproving Project

  16. Recovery and recycling practices in municipal solid waste management in Lagos, Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kofoworola, O.F. [Environment Division, Joint Graduate School of Energy and Environment, King Mongkuts University of Technology Thonburi, 91 Prachauthit Road, Bangmod, Tungkru, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand)], E-mail: sholafemi28@yahoo.com

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The population of Lagos, the largest city in Nigeria, increased seven times from 1950 to 1980 with a current population of over 10 million inhabitants. The majority of the city's residents are poor. The residents make a heavy demand on resources and, at the same time, generate large quantities of solid waste. Approximately 4 million tonnes of municipal solid waste (MSW) is generated annually in the city, including approximately 0.5 million of untreated industrial waste. This is approximately 1.1 kg/cap/day. Efforts by the various waste management agencies set up by the state government to keep its streets and neighborhoods clean have achieved only minimal success. This is because more than half of these wastes are left uncollected from the streets and the various locations due to the inadequacy and inefficiency of the waste management system. Whilst the benefits of proper solid waste management (SWM), such as increased revenues for municipal bodies, higher productivity rate, improved sanitation standards and better health conditions, cannot be overemphasized, it is important that there is a reduction in the quantity of recoverable materials in residential and commercial waste streams to minimize the problem of MSW disposal. This paper examines the status of recovery and recycling in current waste management practice in Lagos, Nigeria. Existing recovery and recycling patterns, recovery and recycling technologies, approaches to materials recycling, and the types of materials recovered from MSW are reviewed. Based on these, strategies for improving recovery and recycling practices in the management of MSW in Lagos, Nigeria are suggested.

  17. PREFERRED WATERFLOOD MANAGEMENT PRACTICES FOR THE SPRABERRY TREND AREA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. M. Sizemore; David S. Schechter

    2003-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the work performed during the second year of the project, ''Preferred Waterflood Management Practices for the Spraberry Trend Area''. The objective of this project is to significantly increase field-wide production in the Spraberry Trend in a short time frame through the application of preferred practices for managing and optimizing water injection. Our goal is to dispel negative attitudes and lack of confidence in water injection and to document the methodology and results for public dissemination to motivate waterflood expansion in the Spraberry Trend. To achieve this objective, in this period we concentrated our effort on characterization of Germania Unit using an analog field ET ODaniel unit and old cased hole neutron. Petrophysical Characterization of the Germania Spraberry units requires a unique approach for a number of reasons--limited core data, lack of modern log data and absence of directed studies within the unit. The need for characterization of the Germania unit has emerged as a first step in the review, understanding and enhancement of the production practices applicable within the unit and the trend area in general. In the absence or lack of the afore mentioned resources, an approach that will rely heavily on previous petrophysical work carried out in the neighboring ET O'Daniel unit (6.2 miles away), and normalization of the old log data prior to conventional interpretation techniques will be used. A log-based rock model has been able to guide successfully the prediction of pay and non-pay intervals within the ET O'Daniel unit, and will be useful if found applicable within the Germania unit. A novel multiple regression technique utilizing non-parametric transformations to achieve better correlations in predicting a dependent variable (permeability) from multiple independent variables (rock type, shale volume and porosity) will also be investigated in this study. A log data base includes digitized formats of Gamma Ray, Cased Hole Neutron, limited Resistivity and Neutron/Density/Sonic porosity logs over a considerable wide area. In addition, a progress report on GSU waterflood pilot is reported for this period. We have seen positive response of water injection on new wells. We believe by proper data acquisition and precise reservoir engineering techniques, any lack of confidence in waterflooding can be overcome. Therefore, we develop field management software to control a vast data from the pilot and to perform precise reservoir engineering techniques such as decline curve analysis, gas and oil material balances, bubble map plot and PVT analysis. The manual for this software is listed in the Appendix-A.

  18. An exploration of supply chain management practices in the aerospace industry and in Rolls-Royce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tiwari, Mohit

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis is a part of the Supply Chain 2020 research project which seeks to study best practices in supply chain management in multiple industries in order to develop a deeper understanding of key principles and practices ...

  19. Thinking Globally: How ISO 50001 - Energy Management can make industrial energy efficiency standard practice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKane, Aimee

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    integration of energy management into business practices. ItIndustrial Energy Efficiency The principal business of anIn addition, business metrics such as energy performance

  20. Thinking Globally: How ISO 50001 - Energy Management can make industrial energy efficiency standard practice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKane, Aimee

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with the ISO quality (ISO 9001:2008) and environmental (ISOsystem standards such as ISO 9001 and ISO 14001 have somemanagement practices (ISO 9001) and environmental management

  1. A Framework for Classification of Traffic Management Practices as Reasonable or Unreasonable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jordan, Scott

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a frame- work that classi?es a traf?c management practice onrequires work by transit nodes, but the traf?c managementwork appeared in the 2009 IFIP/IEEE International Symposium on Integrated Network Management

  2. Practical methods to improve the development of computational software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osborne, A. G.; Harding, D. W.; Deinert, M. R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas, Austin (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of computation has become ubiquitous in science and engineering. As the complexity of computer codes has increased, so has the need for robust methods to minimize errors. Past work has show that the number of functional errors is related the number of commands that a code executes. Since the late 1960's, major participants in the field of computation have encouraged the development of best practices for programming to help reduce coder induced error, and this has lead to the emergence of 'software engineering' as a field of study. Best practices for coding and software production have now evolved and become common in the development of commercial software. These same techniques, however, are largely absent from the development of computational codes by research groups. Many of the best practice techniques from the professional software community would be easy for research groups in nuclear science and engineering to adopt. This paper outlines the history of software engineering, as well as issues in modern scientific computation, and recommends practices that should be adopted by individual scientific programmers and university research groups. (authors)

  3. Planting improvement : the rhetoric and practice of scientific agriculture in northern British America, 1670-1820

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zilberstein, Anya

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    "Planting Improvement: The Rhetoric and Practice of Scientific Agriculture in Northern British America, 1670-1820," explores the history and cultural politics of environmental change in the British empire through a focus ...

  4. Household Segmentation in Food Insecurity and Soil Improving Practices in Ghana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nata, Jifar T

    2013-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    , and lessen food insecurity problems. There, however, is a missing link between food insecurity and adoption of soil improving practices in the literature. The missing link is addressed by investigation whether the food insecurity group differs in adopting...

  5. Fort Huachuca Water Awareness Program: Best Management Practice Case Study #2: Information and Education Programs, Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Case study overview of the U.S. Army Fort Huachuca water awareness practice as part of FEMP's water efficiency best management practice series.

  6. Certifying Industrial Energy Efficiency Performance: AligningManagement, Measurement, and Practice to Create Market Value

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKane, Aimee; Scheihing, Paul; Williams, Robert

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    More than fifteen years after the launch of programs in theU.K. and U.S., industry still offers one of the largest opportunities forenergy savings worldwide. The International Energy Agency (IEA) estimatesthe savings potential from cost-optimization of industrial motor-drivensystems alone at 7 percent of global electricity use. The U.S. Departmentof Energy (USDOE) Industrial Technologies Program estimates 7 percentsavings potential in total US industrial energy use through theapplication of proven best practice. Simple paybacks for these types ofprojects are frequently two years or less. The technology required toachieve these savings is widely available; the technical skills requiredto identify energy saving opportunities are known and transferable.Although programs like USDOE's Best Practices have been highlysuccessful, most plants, as supported by 2002 MECS data, remain eitherunaware or unmotivated to improve their energy efficiency--as evidencedby the 98 percent of US industrial facilities reporting to MECS say thatthey lack a full-time energy manager. With the renewed interest in energyefficiency worldwide and the emergence of carbon trading and newfinancial instruments such as white certificates1, there is a need tointroduce greater transparency into the way that industrial facilitiesidentify, develop, and document energy efficiency projects. Historically,industrial energy efficiency projects have been developed by plantengineers, frequently with assistance from consultants and/or supplierswith highly specialized technical skills. Under this scenario,implementation of energy efficiency improvements is dependent onindividuals. These individuals typically include "champions" within anindustrial facility or corporation, working in cooperation withconsultants or suppliers who have substantial knowledge based on years ofexperience. This approach is not easily understood by others without thisspecialized technical knowledge, penetrates the market fairly slowly, andhas no assurance of persistence, since champions may leave the company orbe reassigned after project completion.This paper presents an alternatescenario that builds on the body of expert knowledge concerning energymanagement best practices and the experience of industrial champions toengage industry in continuous energy efficiency improvement at thefacility rather than the individual level. Under this scenario,standardized methodologies for applying and validating energy managementbest practices in industrial facilities will be developed through aconsensus process involving both plant personnel and specializedconsultants and suppliers. The resulting protocols will describe aprocess or framework for conducting an energy savings assessment andverifying the results that will be transparent to policymakers, managers,and the financial community, and validated by a third-party organization.Additionally, a global dialogue is being initiated by the United NationsIndustrial Development Organization (UNIDO) concerning the development ofan international industrial energy management standard that would be ISOcompatible. The proposed scenario will combine the resulting standardwith the best practice protocols for specific energy systems (i.e.,steam, process heating, compressed air, pumping systems, etc.) to formthe foundation of a third party, performance-based certification programfor the overall industrial facility that is compatible with existingmanagement systems, including ISO 9001:2000, 14001:2004 and 6 Sigma. Thelong term goal of this voluntary, industry designed certification programis to develop a transparent, globally accepted system for validatingenergy efficiency projects and management practices. This system wouldcreate a verified record of energy savings with potential market valuethat could be recognized among sectors and countries.

  7. 1 ISERN-96-05 Practical Guidelines for Measurement-Based Process Improvement1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Briand, Lionel C.

    1 ISERN-96-05 Practical Guidelines for Measurement-Based Process Improvement1 Lionel C. Briand guidelines for efficient and useful software measurement aimed at process improvement in industry. Issues the consistency and completeness of measurement plans. More precisely, our guidelines will be defined

  8. Direct and Indirect Impacts of Weed Management Practices on Soil Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    : although effective weed management and enhancement of soil quality are necessary components of sustainable275 18 Direct and Indirect Impacts of Weed Management Practices on Soil Quality Richard G. Smith, crop yield, and agricultural sustainability (Kar- len et al., 2001), the impact that weed management

  9. Updates for your practice March, 2013. Vol 2, Issue 14 Managing Complicated Diabetes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bushman, Frederic

    Updates for your practice March, 2013. Vol 2, Issue 14 TLALELETSO Managing Complicated Diabetes Diabetes is increasingly common Managing diabetes and working as part of a multi- disciplinary team is essential for the effective management of diabetes mellitus. Notes from the Editor.... DID YOU KNOW? Eating

  10. IT Project Management Practices Guide Page 1 of 83 ASU, HSC, TTU, TTUS IT Project Management Practices Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    . Application of Project Management ­ distinguishes what types of work should and should not be categorized of Project Management Types of Work The Guide should be used for the management of Information Technology management methodologies outlined within the Guide. Upcoming/potential work should be analyzed to determine

  11. Survey Questionnaire on Environmental Management Practices: Summary of Results by Industry and practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delmas, Magali A; Toffel, Michael W.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental Policyadoption of an environmental policy and its communication,Practices 2.1. Environmental Policy 95% of the respondents

  12. Born to be Wild: Using Communities of Practice as a Tool for Knowledge Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chanal, Valérie

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper looks at what happens when Communities of Practice are used as a tool for Knowledge Management. The original concept of a Community of Practice appears to have very little in common with the knowledge sharing communities found in Knowledge Management, which are based on a revised view of 'cultivated' communities. We examine the risks and benefits of cultivating Communities of Practice rather than leaving them 'in the wild'. The paper presents the findings from two years of research in a small microelectronics firm to provide some insights into the wild vs domesticated dichotomy and discusses the implications of attempting to tame Communities of Practice in this way.

  13. Water Efficiency Improvements at Various Environmental Protection...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Water Efficiency Improvements at Various Environmental Protection Agency Sites: Best Management Practices Case Study 12-LaboratoryMedical Equipment Water Efficiency Improvements...

  14. Mapping The Best Practices of XP and Project Management: Well defined approach for Project Manager

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Javed, Muhammad; Hussain, Shahid; Ahmad, Shakeel

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Software engineering is one of the most recent additions in various disciplines of system engineering. It has emerged as a key obedience of system engineering in a quick succession of time. Various Software Engineering approaches are followed in order to produce comprehensive software solutions of affordable cost with reasonable delivery timeframe with less uncertainty. All these objectives are only satisfied when project's status is properly monitored and controlled; eXtreme Programming (XP) uses the best practices of AGILE methodology and helps in development of small size software very sharply. In this paper, authors proposed that via XP, high quality software with less uncertainty and under estimated cost can be developed due to proper monitoring and controlling of project. Moreover, authors give guidelines that how activities of project management can be embedded into development life cycle of XP to enhance the quality of software products and reduce the uncertainty.

  15. An examination of Boeing's supply chain management practices within the context of the global aerospace industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Çizmeci, DaÄŸ lar

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis examines the supply chain management practices of the Boeing Commercial Airplane Company within the context of the global aerospace industry. The methodology used for this study includes a study of emerging ...

  16. MCA 77-5-303 - Standards for Forest Practices in Streamside Management...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    3 - Standards for Forest Practices in Streamside Management Zones Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: MCA 77-5-303 -...

  17. On farm yield and water use response of pearl millet to different management practices in Niger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manyame, Comfort

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    . The management practices tested were: 1) Five manure treatments (no manure, transported manure, current corralling, a year after corralling, and two years after corralling); 2) The microdose technology (20 kg di-ammonium phosphate ha-1, and 20 kg di...

  18. Best Management Practice #5: Water-Efficient Irrigation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Water efficiency must be considered from the initial irrigation system design phase through installation to ensure optimal performance. Consistent management and maintenance is also essential.

  19. Qtier-Rapor: Managing Spreadsheet Systems & Improving Corporate Performance, Compliance and Governance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bishop, Keith

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Much of what EuSpRIG discusses is concerned with the integrity of individual spreadsheets. In businesses, interlocking spreadsheets are regularly used to fill functional gaps in core administrative systems. The growth and deployment of such integrated spreadsheet SYSTEMS raises the scale of issues to a whole new level. The correct management of spreadsheet systems is necessary to ensure that the business achieves its goals of improved performance and good corporate governance, within the constraints of legislative compliance - poor management will deliver the opposite. This paper is an anatomy of the real-life issues of the commercial use of spreadsheets in business, and demonstrates how Qtier-Rapor has been used to instil best practice in the use of integrated commercial spreadsheet systems.

  20. Knowledge management practices in automotive safety attribute development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnaswami, Ram N. (Ram Narian)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Organizations strive continuously to become efficient. Over the years many of them have tried to attain this through streamlining or reengineering their product development practices. 'While some of them succeed others are ...

  1. Born to be Wild: Using Communities of Practice as a Tool for Knowledge Management 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Born to be Wild: Using Communities of Practice as a Tool for Knowledge Management 1 By Valérie of Practice rather than leaving them 'in the wild'. The paper presents the findings from two years of research in a small microelectronics firm to provide some insights into the wild vs domesticated dichotomy

  2. A mandatory best management practices (BMP) program was implemented in the Everglades Agricultural Area (EAA) farms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grunwald, Sabine

    trends. The insignificant trends are probably related to management practices of mixed crop systems as it is comprised of organic soils (Histosols) that have been artificially drained, totaling approximately 280 lift, pumps. Excess water is pumped off farms into South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD

  3. UrbanSolutionsCenter Evaluation of Best Management Practices (BMPs) for Reducing Non-Point

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    water bodies. · Reduced erosion from agricultural and urban lands will help sustain soil fertilityUrbanSolutionsCenter Evaluation of Best Management Practices (BMPs) for Reducing Non-Point Source of the reservoir cannot be achieved without identifying, testing and implementing appropriate best management

  4. 13. Sustainability in Practice: Exploring Innovations in Domestic Solid Waste Management in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    13. Sustainability in Practice: Exploring Innovations in Domestic Solid Waste Management in India environmental conditions, particularly through solid waste management. Solid waste is defined as the organic and inorganic waste materials generated by household, commercial and institutional establishments. A solid waste

  5. Sustainable Best Management Practices for Wetland Seasonal Drainage in Response to San Joaquin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinn, Nigel

    wetland sites ­ treatment drawdown is delayed to coincide with VAMP period (April 15-May 15) HighSustainable Best Management Practices for Wetland Seasonal Drainage in Response to San Joaquin wetlands in the Grasslands Ecological Area within the San Joaquin Basin #12;WATER MANAGEMENT FOR MOIST SOIL

  6. ADAPTIVE SWITCHING IN PRACTICE: IMPROVING MYOELECTRIC PROSTHESIS PERFORMANCE THROUGH REINFORCEMENT LEARNING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutton, Richard S.

    ADAPTIVE SWITCHING IN PRACTICE: IMPROVING MYOELECTRIC PROSTHESIS PERFORMANCE THROUGH REINFORCEMENT, each muscle site directly controls one motion of the prosthesis, and various methods of switching can be used as needed to control additional motions of the prosthesis [1] [2] [3]. Some state

  7. Designing a Practical Data Filter Cache to Improve Both Energy Efficiency and Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whalley, David

    A Designing a Practical Data Filter Cache to Improve Both Energy Efficiency and Performance Alen Bardizbanyan, Chalmers University of Technology Magnus Sj¨alander, Florida State University David Whalley, Florida State University Per Larsson-Edefors, Chalmers University of Technology Conventional data filter

  8. Sustainable Water Practices at Pomona's Parks: Improving Irrigation Use and Stormwater Runoff Retention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Terence

    utilized as irrigation for these locations, it is critical to retrofit existing systems and implement newSustainable Water Practices at Pomona's Parks: Improving Irrigation Use and Stormwater Runoff be leading the way towards a sustainable future. However, this is not the case. Landscape irrigation

  9. Changing Soil Fertility Management in Bhutan: Effects on Practices, Nutrient Status and Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norbu, Chencho; Floyd, Christopher

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    49 Changing Soil Fertility Management in Bhutan: Effects on Practices, Nutrient Status and Sustainability? Chencho Norbu+ and Christopher Floyd Abstract This paper is the results of a Soil Fertility Management (SFM) survey conducted in 1999... . Lack of sustainability is a concern on both wetland and dryland soils and among households identified as being less able to manage soil fertility. This paper has identified implications for policy, research and extension...

  10. Best Management Practice #2: Information and Education Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Educating users about water conservation is essential to sustain the savings of water-efficient technologies and practices. It is not enough to install water-saving technology in a facility. New operation procedures, retrofits, and replacements are most effective when employees, contractors, and the public know what the new technologies or methods are and how to use them properly.

  11. Survey Questionnaire on Environmental Management Practices: Summary of Results by Industry and practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delmas, Magali A; Toffel, Michael W.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Engineering-Design Departments Management Utilities Refining Industry Paper Metals Machinery Electronics/Electrical ChemicalsEngineering - Design Department Utilities Refining Industry Paper Metals Machinery Electronics/Electrical Chemicals

  12. Storm water quantity control has long been a challenge for highway designers. Traditionally, centralized best management practice designs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiedler, Fritz R.

    on centralized detention-based best man- agement practices (BMPs) that reduce the amount of storm water released and environmentally sound storm water management practice (1, 6). Numerous studies and other research efforts have, centralized best management practice designs are often cost prohibitive and inefficient in many rural highway

  13. Practical approaches for healthcare: Indoor air quality management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turk, A.R.; Poulakos, E.M.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The management of indoor air quality (IAQ) is of interest to building occupants, managers, owners, and regulators alike. Whether by poor design, improper attention, inadequate maintenance or the intent to save energy, many buildings today have significantly degraded IAQ levels. Considering the increase of facilities and occupants in the non-industrial sector of the nation`s workforce, the consequences of inadequate IAQ, as related to productivity, human wellness and healthcare costs in the commercial (healthcare) environment, have become increasingly urgent issues to design professionals, building owners and managers, safety and health professionals, interior product manufacturers, and HVAC control vendors. The first step of proper IAQ management is to fully understand the issue of IAQ and to a certain elemental degree, the extent of the problem(s), causes and possible solution applications. The second step is to conduct a performance review of the HVAC systems based on equipment design specifications and guidelines for acceptable IAQ. And the third step is to identify potential chemical, physical and biological sources that are known to contribute to adverse air quality.

  14. Lone Star Healthy Streams: Teaching best managment practices statewide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Leslie

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    bacterial loading, was developed through the project Copano Bay Water Quality Education. That program was developed and implemented in response to bacterial water quality issues in Copano Bay that impaired oyster harvest in the bay and contact... practices statewide Institute (TWRI). ?It will provide a one-stop shop for the livestock industry and natural resource agencies to access information regarding bacterial water quality issues related to livestock, as well as measures that can...

  15. The Environmental Management Project Manager`s Handbook for improved project definition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is committed to providing high quality products that satisfy customer needs and are the associated with this goal, DOE personnel must possess the knowledge, skills, and abilities to ensure successful job performance. In addition, there must be recognition that the greatest obstacle to proper project performance is inadequate project definition. Without strong project definition, DOE environmental management efforts are vulnerable to fragmented solutions, duplication of effort, and wastes resources. The primary means of ensuring environmental management projects meet cost and schedule milestones is through a structured and graded approach to project definition, which is the focus of this handbook.

  16. Huntington Veterans Affairs Medical Center - Faucet and Showerhead Replacement Project: Best Management Practice Case Study #7: Faucets and Showerheads, Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Case study overview of the Huntington Veterans Affairs Medical Center water efficiency program as part of FEMP's water efficiency best management practice series.

  17. Business Improvements Records Management Introduction V1 Page 1 of 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brierley, Andrew

    and standards · Reduced costs · Reduced duplication and less waste Does Records Management mean extra work for me? No. Records Management is a part of the way people work, not another job on top of it. DoesBusiness Improvements Records Management Introduction V1 Page 1 of 1 RECORDS MANAGEMENT What

  18. Investigating Rainwater Harvesting as a Stormwater Best Management Practice and as a Function of Irrigation Water Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shannak, Sa'D Abdel-Halim

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    INVESTIGATING RAINWATER HARVESTING AS A STORMWATER BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICE AND AS A FUNCTION OF IRRIGATION WATER USE A Thesis by SA?D ABDEL-HALIM SHANNAK Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University... Management Practice and as a Function of Irrigation Water Use Copyright 2010 Sa?d Abdel-Halim Shannak INVESTIGATING RAINWATER HARVESTING AS A STORMWATER BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICE AND AS A FUNCTION OF IRRIGATION WATER USE A Thesis by SA?D ABDEL...

  19. Water management practices used by Fayetteville shale gas producers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J. A. (Environmental Science Division)

    2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Water issues continue to play an important role in producing natural gas from shale formations. This report examines water issues relating to shale gas production in the Fayetteville Shale. In particular, the report focuses on how gas producers obtain water supplies used for drilling and hydraulically fracturing wells, how that water is transported to the well sites and stored, and how the wastewater from the wells (flowback and produced water) is managed. Last year, Argonne National Laboratory made a similar evaluation of water issues in the Marcellus Shale (Veil 2010). Gas production in the Marcellus Shale involves at least three states, many oil and gas operators, and multiple wastewater management options. Consequently, Veil (2010) provided extensive information on water. This current study is less complicated for several reasons: (1) gas production in the Fayetteville Shale is somewhat more mature and stable than production in the Marcellus Shale; (2) the Fayetteville Shale underlies a single state (Arkansas); (3) there are only a few gas producers that operate the large majority of the wells in the Fayetteville Shale; (4) much of the water management information relating to the Marcellus Shale also applies to the Fayetteville Shale, therefore, it can be referenced from Veil (2010) rather than being recreated here; and (5) the author has previously published a report on the Fayetteville Shale (Veil 2007) and has helped to develop an informational website on the Fayetteville Shale (Argonne and University of Arkansas 2008), both of these sources, which are relevant to the subject of this report, are cited as references.

  20. Improving Distribution System Reliability Through Risk-base Doptimization of Fault Management and Improved Computer-based Fault Location

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Yimai

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    )’s regulation on power quality. Optimization in fault management tasks has the potential of improving system reliability by reducing the duration and scale of outages caused by faults through fast fault isolation and service restoration. The research reported...

  1. Using a Practical Approach to Energy Management to Get it Done

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicol, J.; Dantoin, T.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Wisconsin Focus on Energy program saw a need in 2002 to develop a template for energy management so that companies could easily implement a systematic and continual improvement approach to manage their energy. To meet this need the Focus program...

  2. Water Reclamation and Reuse at Fort Carson: Best Management Practice Case Study #14 - Alternate Water Sources (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FEMP Water Efficiency Best Management Practice #14 Case Study: Overview of the water reclamation and reuse program at the U.S. Army's Fort Carson.

  3. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Grounds Maintenance: Best Management Practice Case Studies #4 and #5 - Water Efficient Landscape and Irrigation (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FEMP Water Efficiency Best Management Practices #4 and #5 Case Study: Overview of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory grounds maintenance program and results.

  4. Bachelor of Science in Construction Management Engineering Science Option Prepares the student for professional practice as a construction manager. Provides a well rounded

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemmers, Oliver

    Bachelor of Science in Construction Management ­ Engineering Science Option Prepares the student for professional practice as a construction manager. Provides a well rounded educational back ground in business, construction management and science, liberal arts, management, mathematics, and college physics. The program

  5. Best management practices plan for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan was prepared in support of the Phase II Remedial Design Report (DOE/OR/01-1449&D1) and in accordance with requirements under CERCLA to present the plan for best management practices to be followed during the remediation. This document provides the Environmental Restoration Program with information about spill prevention and control, water quality monitoring, good housekeeping practices, sediment and erosion control measures, and inspections and environmental compliance practices to be used during Phase II of the remediation project for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit.

  6. Improving Mission Execution by Integrating our Management Systems

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Request for analysis and preliminary set of alternatives for the integration of management systems within DOE.

  7. Preliminary Results from a State-of-the-Practice Survey on Risk Management in Off-The-Shelf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Preliminary Results from a State-of-the-Practice Survey on Risk Management in Off in software development. Previous studies have identified typical risks and related risk management strategies-proven guidelines to help project managers to identify and manage these risks. We are performing an international

  8. A Tale of Two Rivers: Implications of Water Management Practices for Mussel Biodiversity Outcomes During Droughts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Daniel C.

    REPORT A Tale of Two Rivers: Implications of Water Management Practices for Mussel Biodiversity Outcomes During Droughts Daniel C. Allen, Heather S. Galbraith, Caryn C. Vaughn, Daniel E. Spooner Received Abstract Droughts often pose situations where stream water levels are lowest while human demand for water

  9. Proper pond management practices should always start with an assessment and inspection of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    1 Proper pond management practices should always start with an assessment and inspection that collects surface runoff from the surrounding land. College of Agricultural Sciences · Cooperative Extension source, it is a good idea to establish a buffer strip of vegetation around the pond to trap sediment

  10. Best Management Practices for Hybrid Striped Bass Culture Principal Investigator: Joseph E. Morris

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koford, Rolf R.

    in from Kansas on May 15 while sunshine bass were shipped in from Keo-Fish Farms, AR two days later. FryBest Management Practices for Hybrid Striped Bass Culture Principal Investigator: Joseph E. Morris Goals and Objectives: o Perform literature search on extensively-reared hybrid striped bass (HSB

  11. Impacts of two best management practices on Pb weathering and leachability in shooting range soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    . 2007), which influences the environmental fate and transport of Pb in shooting range soils (Heier et alImpacts of two best management practices on Pb weathering and leachability in shooting range soils Environmental Protection Agency on Pb weather- ing and leachability in shooting range soils. The two BMPs

  12. QUANTITATIVE MICROBIAL RISK ASSESSMENT OF ORGANIC WASTE MANAGEMENT PRACTICES IN A PERI-URBAN COMMUNITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    i QUANTITATIVE MICROBIAL RISK ASSESSMENT OF ORGANIC WASTE MANAGEMENT PRACTICES IN A PERI transfer station and the households who helped me in getting food waste samples. It should thing in my life with this little effort. #12;iii Abstract The growth of municipal solid waste

  13. BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES FOR POTATOES seec ing Potato Voriet-es

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douches, David S.

    BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES FOR POTATOES seec ing Potato Voriet-es for Mic -gon 45¢ Richard Chase bal to a high quality potato crop for commer- inche in rows 34 inches apart. Based on a soil test cial outlet. Extensive potato Ibs K20/A. variety performance trials are conducted each year Harvests were made

  14. Survey Report: Improving Integration of Program Management and Systems Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conforto, Edivandro

    For many years, a cultural barrier has existed between practitioners of systems engineering and of program management.  Some systems engineers and program managers have developed the mindset that their work activities ar ...

  15. Toward A Practical Multi-agent System for Integrated Control and Asset Management of Petroleum Production Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, James H.

    Toward A Practical Multi-agent System for Integrated Control and Asset Management of Petroleum Production Facilities Atalla F. Sayda and James H. Taylor Abstract-- This paper addresses a practical intelligent multi- agent system for asset management for the petroleum industry, which is crucial

  16. THE EFFECT OF WATER MANAGEMENT AND LAND USE PRACTICES ON THE RESTORATION OF LEE VINING AND RUSH CREEKS1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    . The implications of existing and potential management practices for the restoration of the stream habitat the condition of stream habitat and should be considered in any restoration plan. The in-stream studies can thusTHE EFFECT OF WATER MANAGEMENT AND LAND USE PRACTICES ON THE RESTORATION OF LEE VINING AND RUSH

  17. 2nd Plant Managers Forum Achieving best practices in plant management under financial crisis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jayaram, Bhyravabotla

    market conditions Achieving optimum energy management goals by creating and implementing a strategic and managing health and safety hazards within your business Effectively assessing and handling the potential assess and handle the potential risks in your supply chain As corporate environment is quickly changing

  18. The New Energy Management Frontier: The Critical Role of a Systematic Management Approach in Making Technology Improvements Successful

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feldman, J.

    The New Energy Management Frontier: The Critical Role of a Systematic Management Approach in Making Technology Improvements Successful Jon Feldman Senior Consultant Hatch Consulting Mississauga, Ontario, Canada ABSTRACT Improvements... in technology certainly playa pivotal role in the quest for increased energy efficiency. However, sophisticated industrial energy users are increasingly learning that technology alone cannot drive long-tenn, sustainable reductions in energy cost. The role...

  19. ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Environmental Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haase, Markus

    ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Environmental Policy February 2013 The University of Leeds is responsible to reflect best environmental practice, implement an environmental management system to pursue sustainability and continuous improvement and seek innovative ways of meeting environmental objectives. These include: To meet

  20. Energy Management of Chiller Plant for Improved Efficiency and Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander, D. P.; Rice, L. S.

    while meeting the operational requirements of plant chillers. The chiller energy management is an integrated part of total energy management system including the boilers. A uniform display is used for boilers, chillers, compressors, etc. Specific... displayed and organized so that the plant is easily manageable. With the outdated equipment, a major control system failure could generate discomfort. Furthermore, more manual observation and adjustments were required to provide a trouble-free operation...

  1. Slaughter and carcass characteristics of Santa Gertrudis steers produced by different management practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reddish, Robert Lee

    1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    T V v r- t?B ?. M ?'i?> SLAUGHTER AND CARCASS CHARACTERISTICS OF SANTA GERTRUDIS STEERS PRODUCED BY DIFFERENT MANAGEMENT PRACTICES A Dissertation By ROBERT LEE REDDISH"i Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical... theexperimental cattle, Mr. Harold Franke and Mr* H*. V. Reyes for feeding and caring for the experimental cattle, and Dr. M. J* Garber and Mr. R* L . Smith for their help with the statistical analyses. The work of Dr* Sylvia Cover in collection...

  2. A comparison of alternative tillage practices and machinery management strategies in the Texas Rolling Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maddox, Jim Dalton

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1987 Major Subject: Agricultural Economics A COMPARISON OF CONVENTIONAL AND ALTERNATIVE TILLAGE PRACTICES AND MACHINERY MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES IN THE TEXAS ROLLING PLAINS A Thesis by Jim Dalton Maddox... for reduced till/diking was $51. 83 higher for cotton, $ 21. 65 higher for sorghum, and only $0. 60 lower for wheat. The initial machinery investment in reduced till/diking was $18, 000 to $23, 000 lower than conventional till. When analyzed by enterprise...

  3. The Capital Structure and Financial Management Practices of the Texas Cattle Feeding Industry.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dietrich, Raymond A.; Martin, J. R.; Ljungdahl, P. W.

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    examines the capital structure and financial management practices of feedlots in the Panhandle-Plains area of Texas. More specif- ically, the study considers the characteristics of the Panhandle-Plains cattle feeding industry, the asset-debt structure... high proportion of the larger lots and a majority of all feedlots are incorporated. These incorporated feedlots account for about 80 percent of the cattle fed in the Texas Panhandle-Plains area. Approximately 50 percent of the total assets...

  4. Slaughter and carcass characteristics of Santa Gertrudis steers produced by different management practices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reddish, Robert Lee

    1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    T V v r- t?B ?. M ?'i?> SLAUGHTER AND CARCASS CHARACTERISTICS OF SANTA GERTRUDIS STEERS PRODUCED BY DIFFERENT MANAGEMENT PRACTICES A Dissertation By ROBERT LEE REDDISH"i Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical... theexperimental cattle, Mr. Harold Franke and Mr* H*. V. Reyes for feeding and caring for the experimental cattle, and Dr. M. J* Garber and Mr. R* L . Smith for their help with the statistical analyses. The work of Dr* Sylvia Cover in collection...

  5. Factors Influencing the Adoption of Water Quality Best Management Practices by Texas Beef Cattle Producers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Jennifer

    2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis of variance ATTAINS Assessment, TMDL Tracking and Implementation System BMP Best management practice CWA Clean Water Act DOI Diffusion of innovations EPA Environmental Protection Agency EQIP Environmental Quality Incentives Program GCSP... quality. According to the US Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Assessment, TMDL Tracking and Implementation System (ATTAINS) database (2013), Texas has approximately 191,000 miles of streams and rivers; nearly 2 million acres of lakes...

  6. Improving web site security with data flow management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yip, Alexander Siumann, 1979-

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation describes two systems, RESIN and BFLow, whose goal is to help Web developers build more secure Web sites. RESIN and BFLOW use data flow management to help reduce the security risks of using buggy or ...

  7. TREATMENT OF GASEOUS EFFLUENTS ISSUED FROM RECYCLING – A REVIEW OF THE CURRENT PRACTICES AND PROSPECTIVE IMPROVEMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patricia Paviet-Hartmann; William Kerlin; Steven Bakhtiar

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of gaseous waste management for the recycling of nuclear used fuel is to reduce by best practical means (ALARA) and below regulatory limits, the quantity of activity discharged to the environment. The industrial PUREX process recovers the fissile material U(VI) and Pu(IV) to re-use them for the fabrication of new fuel elements e.g. recycling plutonium as a Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel or recycling uranium for new enrichment for Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). Meanwhile the separation of the waste (activation and fission product) is performed as a function of their pollution in order to store and avoid any potential danger and release towards the biosphere. Raffinate, that remains after the extraction step and which contains mostly all fission products and minor actinides is vitrified, the glass package being stored temporarily at the recycling plant site. Hulls and end pieces coming from PWR recycled fuel are compacted by means of a press leading to a volume reduced to 1/5th of initial volume. An organic waste treatment step will recycle the solvent, mainly tri-butyl phosphate (TBP) and some of its hydrolysis and radiolytic degradation products such as dibutyl phosphate (HDPB) and monobutyl phosphate (H2MBP). Although most scientific and technological development work focused on high level waste streams, a considerable effort is still under way in the area of intermediate and low level waste management. Current industrial practices for the treatment of gaseous effluents focusing essentially on Iodine-129 and Krypton-85 will be reviewed along with the development of novel technologies to extract, condition, and store these fission products. As an example, the current industrial practice is to discharge Kr-85, a radioactive gas, entirely to the atmosphere after dilution, but for the large recycling facilities envisioned in the near future, several techniques such as 1) cryogenic distillation and selective absorption in solvents, 2) adsorption on activated charcoal, 3) selective sorption on chemical modified zeolites, or 4) diffusion through membranes with selective permeability are potential technologies to retain the gas.

  8. Improved Decision Making through the Integration of Program and Project Management with National Environmental Policy Act Compliance

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Recommendations from the DOE Field Management Council (FMC), NEPA Improvement Team, and the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) for improving NEPA compliance through the integration of Program ad Project Management

  9. Quality Improvement Practices in Academic Emergency Medicine: Perspectives from the Chairs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DelliFraine, Jami L; Langabeer, James; King, Brent

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sigma PDCA Total Quality Management Not sure Other, pleaseManag, Kelly D. Applying quality management in healthcare: aAct (PDCA), total quality management (TQM), Six Sigma and

  10. F L O R I D A G R E E N I N D U S T R I E S Best Management Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    and implementation of this best management practices manual developed jointly by the Department of Environmental written our best management practices manual in partnership with the Department of EnvironmentalF L O R I D A G R E E N I N D U S T R I E S Best Management Practices for Protection of Water

  11. Identification, Verification, and Compilation of Produced Water Management Practices for Conventional Oil and Gas Production Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rachel Henderson

    2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The project is titled 'Identification, Verification, and Compilation of Produced Water Management Practices for Conventional Oil and Gas Production Operations'. The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC), headquartered in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, is the principal investigator and the IOGCC has partnered with ALL Consulting, Inc., headquartered in Tulsa, Oklahoma, in this project. State agencies that also have partnered in the project are the Wyoming Oil and Gas Conservation Commission, the Montana Board of Oil and Gas Conservation, the Kansas Oil and Gas Conservation Division, the Oklahoma Oil and Gas Conservation Division and the Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission. The objective is to characterize produced water quality and management practices for the handling, treating, and disposing of produced water from conventional oil and gas operations throughout the industry nationwide. Water produced from these operations varies greatly in quality and quantity and is often the single largest barrier to the economic viability of wells. The lack of data, coupled with renewed emphasis on domestic oil and gas development, has prompted many experts to speculate that the number of wells drilled over the next 20 years will approach 3 million, or near the number of current wells. This level of exploration and development undoubtedly will draw the attention of environmental communities, focusing their concerns on produced water management based on perceived potential impacts to fresh water resources. Therefore, it is imperative that produced water management practices be performed in a manner that best minimizes environmental impacts. This is being accomplished by compiling current best management practices for produced water from conventional oil and gas operations and to develop an analysis tool based on a geographic information system (GIS) to assist in the understanding of watershed-issued permits. That would allow management costs to be kept in line with the specific projects and regions, which increases the productive life of wells and increases the ultimate recoverable reserves in the ground. A case study was conducted in Wyoming to validate the applicability of the GIS analysis tool for watershed evaluations under real world conditions. Results of the partnered research will continue to be shared utilizing proven methods, such as on the IGOCC Web site, preparing hard copies of the results, distribution of documented case studies, and development of reference and handbook components to accompany the interactive internet-based GIS watershed analysis tool. Additionally, there have been several technology transfer seminars and presentations. The goal is to maximize the recovery of our nation's energy reserves and to promote water conservation.

  12. Investigation of Project Management Planning Practices for Renovation of Historical Buildings in Urban Contexts Located in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escamilla, Edelmiro

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    of these questions, the study incorporated three major bodies of knowledge. The first body of literature focused on project management practices associated with project success. The second concentrated on historic preservation with a focus on historic significance...

  13. The Influence of Hotel Managers’ Intentions for Green Marketing Practices: An Application of the Theory of Planned Behavior in Turkey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yilmaz, Nese

    2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    What drives hotel managers to adapt green practices in their hotel especially in developing countries with less policy and control of environmental impacts? In seeking to answer this question, the developing country of Turkey was selected...

  14. The effects of management practices on the growth characteristics and animal performance of different varieties of bermudagrasses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nickel, Larry Gene

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EFFECTS OF MANAGEMENT PRACTICES ON THE GROWTH CHARACTERISTICS AND ANIMAL PERFORMANCE OF DIFFERENT VARIETIES OF BERMUDAGRASSES A Thesis LARRY GENE NICKEL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August l983 Major Subject: Agronomy THE EFFECTS OF MANAGEMENT PRACTICES ON THE GROWTH CHARACTERISTICS AND ANIMAL PERFORMANCE OF DIFFERENT VARIETIES OF BERMUDAGRASSES A Thesis by LARRY GENE NICKEL...

  15. INCREASING WATERFLOOD RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH IMPROVED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND RESERVOIR MANAGEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Walker; Chris Phillips; Roy Koerner; Don Clarke; Dan Moos; Kwasi Tagbor

    2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This project increased recoverable waterflood reserves in slope and basin reservoirs through improved reservoir characterization and reservoir management. The particular application of this project is in portions of Fault Blocks IV and V of the Wilmington Oil Field, in Long Beach, California, but the approach is widely applicable in slope and basin reservoirs. Transferring technology so that it can be applied in other sections of the Wilmington Field and by operators in other slope and basin reservoirs is a primary component of the project. This project used advanced reservoir characterization tools, including the pulsed acoustic cased-hole logging tool, geologic three-dimensional (3-D) modeling software, and commercially available reservoir management software to identify sands with remaining high oil saturation following waterflood. Production from the identified high oil saturated sands was stimulated by recompleting existing production and injection wells in these sands using conventional means as well as a short radius redrill candidate. Although these reservoirs have been waterflooded over 40 years, researchers have found areas of remaining oil saturation. Areas such as the top sand in the Upper Terminal Zone Fault Block V, the western fault slivers of Upper Terminal Zone Fault Block V, the bottom sands of the Tar Zone Fault Block V, and the eastern edge of Fault Block IV in both the Upper Terminal and Lower Terminal Zones all show significant remaining oil saturation. Each area of interest was uncovered emphasizing a different type of reservoir characterization technique or practice. This was not the original strategy but was necessitated by the different levels of progress in each of the project activities.

  16. Communities of Practice: A Tool for Creating Institutional Change in Support of the Mission of the Federal Energy Management Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Report discusses “communities of practice,” which are professionals working on common problems to exchange information and ideas that allow them to innovate and better manage the pace and direction of change in their organization. These communities can be a a tool to stimulate organizational, social, and cultural change to support energy efficiency, renewable energy, and water conservation efforts. This report also describes the behavior and organizational principles that underlie communities of practices, provides examples of different types of communities of practice.

  17. Efficiency improvement of a ground coupled heat pump system from energy management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernández de Córdoba, Pedro

    Efficiency improvement of a ground coupled heat pump system from energy management N. Pardo a,*, Á coupled heat pump Energy efficiency Numerical simulation a b s t r a c t The installed capacity of an air to improve the efficiency of a ground coupled heat pump air conditioning system by adapting its produced

  18. Turf in Texas: still sustainable, Researchers test management practices and tout landscapes' benefits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Leslie

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    always said is ?turf is a resource,?? Wherley said, of Dr. David Chalmers, professor emeritus in the soil and crop sciences department. ?And just like any other resource, it?s not simply there for people to look at and say ?wow, that looks beautiful...;? it actually serves very important functions.? TURF IN TEXAS: still sustainable Researchers test management practices and tout landscapes? bene#31;ts ] 22 txH2O Fall 2013 Turf in Texas continued One station at the Texas A&M AgriLife Research turfgrass...

  19. Substation based data interpretation techniques for improved power system management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booth, C.; McDonald, J.R. [Univ. of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom). Centre for Electrical Power Engineering] [Univ. of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom). Centre for Electrical Power Engineering; Laycock, W.J.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is now considerable pressure on electric utilities to operate their systems in the most efficient manner possible and to provide increased quality of service to customers. This pressure, coupled with the decreasing availability of reserve margins dictates that there is a requirement for comprehensive system operation support through, among other things, the provision of quality information relating to the behavior of the primary and secondary systems. This paper will show how the data available within modern substation control and management systems can be exploited in a cost-effective manner, through the implementation of advanced substation functions in an open systems environment. Certain functions which are presently carried out at the control center could be distributed (or partially distributed) to the substation. These functions may provide the utility staff with quality information, which can in turn be used to satisfy the objectives of increasing quality and security of supply, in addition to optimizing the utility`s information, maintenance and asset management functions.

  20. Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide (AERG): Practical Ways to Improve Energy Performance; Healthcare Facilities (Book)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendron, R.; Leach, M.; Bonnema, E.; Shekhar, D.; Pless, S.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide for Healthcare Facilities is part of a series of retrofit guides commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy. By presenting general project planning guidance as well as detailed descriptions and financial payback metrics for the most important and relevant energy efficiency measures (EEMs), the guides provide a practical roadmap for effectively planning and implementing performance improvements in existing buildings. The Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides (AERGs) are intended to address key segments of the U.S. commercial building stock: retail stores, office buildings, K-12 schools, grocery stores, and healthcare facilities. The guides' general project planning considerations are applicable nationwide; the energy and cost savings estimates for recommended EEMs were developed based on energy simulations and cost estimates for an example hospital tailored to five distinct climate regions. These results can be extrapolated to other U.S. climate zones. Analysis is presented for individual EEMs, and for packages of recommended EEMs for two project types: existing building commissioning projects that apply low-cost and no-cost measures, and whole-building retrofits involving more capital-intensive measures.

  1. Trends in Energy Management Technology - Part 3: State of Practice of Energy Management, Control, and Information Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yee, Gaymond; Webster, Tom

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    November 2000. Trends in Energy Management TechnologyTrends in Energy Management Technology FEMP/NTDP TechnicalT. L. , "Trends in Energy Management Technology - Enabling

  2. Waste Management Improvement Initiatives at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited - 13091

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, Nicholas; Adams, Lynne; Wong, Pierre [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada)] [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's (AECL) Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) has been in operation for over 60 years. Radioactive, mixed, hazardous and non-hazardous wastes have been and continue to be generated at CRL as a result of research and development, radioisotope production, reactor operation and facility decommissioning activities. AECL has implemented several improvement initiatives at CRL to simplify the interface between waste generators and waste receivers: - Introduction of trained Waste Officers representing their facilities or activities at CRL; - Establishment of a Waste Management Customer Support Service as a Single-Point of Contact to provide guidance to waste generators for all waste management processes; and - Implementation of a streamlined approach for waste identification with emphasis on early identification of waste types and potential disposition paths. As a result of implementing these improvement initiatives, improvements in waste management and waste transfer efficiencies have been realized at CRL. These included: 1) waste generators contacting the Customer Support Service for information or guidance instead of various waste receivers; 2) more clear and consistent guidance provided to waste generators for waste management through the Customer Support Service; 3) more consistent and correct waste information provided to waste receivers through Waste Officers, resulting in reduced time and resources required for waste management (i.e., overall cost); 4) improved waste minimization and segregation approaches, as identified by in-house Waste Officers; and 5) enhanced communication between waste generators and waste management groups. (authors)

  3. Electronic waste (e-waste): Material flows and management practices in Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nnorom, Innocent Chidi [Department of Industrial Chemistry, Abia State University, Uturu, Abia State (Nigeria)], E-mail: chidiabsu@yahoo.co.uk; Osibanjo, Oladele [Basel Convention Regional Coordinating Center for Africa for Training and Technology Transfer, Department of Chemistry, University of Ibadan (Nigeria)], E-mail: osibanjo@baselnigeria.com

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The growth in electrical and electronic equipment (EEE) production and consumption has been exponential in the last two decades. This has been as a result of the rapid changes in equipment features and capabilities, decrease in prices, and the growth in internet use. This creates a large volume of waste stream of obsolete electrical and electronic devices (e-waste) in developed countries. There is high level of trans-boundary movement of these devices as secondhand electronic equipment into developing countries in an attempt to bridge the 'digital divide'. The past decade has witnessed a phenomenal advancement in information and communication technology (ICT) in Nigeria, most of which rely on imported secondhand devices. This paper attempts to review the material flow of secondhand/scrap electronic devices into Nigeria, the current management practices for e-waste and the environmental and health implications of such low-end management practices. Establishment of formal recycling facilities, introduction of legislation dealing specifically with e-waste and the confirmation of the functionality of secondhand EEE prior to importation are some of the options available to the government in dealing with this difficult issue.

  4. Quality Improvement Practices in Academic Emergency Medicine: Perspectives from the Chairs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DelliFraine, Jami L; Langabeer, James; King, Brent

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Emergency Medicine Quality Improvement Table 1. Surveydepartment adopted a formal quality improvement program forHow long ago was the quality program first implemented? ____

  5. Recent Improvements in Interface Management for Hanford's Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - 13263

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arm, Stuart T.; Van Meighem, Jeffery S. [Washington River Protection Solutions, P.O. Box 850, Richland, Washington, 99352 (United States)] [Washington River Protection Solutions, P.O. Box 850, Richland, Washington, 99352 (United States); Duncan, Garth M.; Pell, Michael J. [Bechtel National Inc., 2435 Stevens Center Place, Richland, Washington, 99352 (United States)] [Bechtel National Inc., 2435 Stevens Center Place, Richland, Washington, 99352 (United States); Harrington, Christopher C. [Department of Energy - Office of River Protection, 2440 Stevens Center Place, Richland, Washington, 99352 (United States)] [Department of Energy - Office of River Protection, 2440 Stevens Center Place, Richland, Washington, 99352 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for management and completion of the River Protection Project (RPP) mission, which includes the Hanford Site tank farms operations and the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The RPP mission is to store, retrieve and treat Hanford's tank waste; store and dispose of treated wastes; and close the tank farm waste management areas and treatment facilities by 2047. The WTP is currently being designed and constructed by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) for DOE-ORP. BNI relies on a number of technical services from other Hanford contractors for WTP's construction and commissioning. These same services will be required of the future WTP operations contractor. Partly in response to a DNFSB recommendation, the WTP interface management process managing these technical services has recently been improved through changes in organization and issue management. The changes are documented in an Interface Management Plan. The organizational improvement is embodied in the One System Integrated Project Team that was formed by integrating WTP and tank farms staff representing interfacing functional areas into a single organization. A number of improvements were made to the issue management process but most notable was the formal appointment of technical, regulatory and safety subject matter experts to ensure accurate identification of issues and open items. Ten of the thirteen active WTP Interface Control Documents have been revised in 2012 using the improved process with the remaining three in progress. The value of the process improvements is reflected by the ability to issue these documents on schedule and accurately identify technical, regulatory and safety issues and open items. (authors)

  6. On September 28, 2012 twenty-nine people participated in a bus tour of seven sites where stormwater management practices had been installed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Robert M.

    - timately the Passaic River. A Regional Storm- water Manage- ment Plan for the Troy Brook was developed of Environmental Protection. It is through that Plan that the Troy Troy Brook Stormwater Best Management Practices Management Practices (BMPs) is the best way to under- stand them,'" confirm the desire to continue

  7. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for Cement Making. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cost of energy as part of the total production costs in the cement industry is significant, warranting attention for energy efficiency to improve the bottom line. Historically, energy intensity has declined, although more recently energy intensity seems to have stabilized with the gains. Coal and coke are currently the primary fuels for the sector, supplanting the dominance of natural gas in the 1970s. Most recently, there is a slight increase in the use of waste fuels, including tires. Between 1970 and 1999, primary physical energy intensity for cement production dropped 1 percent/year from 7.3 MBtu/short ton to 5.3 MBtu/short ton. Carbon dioxide intensity due to fuel consumption and raw material calcination dropped 16 percent, from 609 lb. C/ton of cement (0.31 tC/tonne) to 510 lb. C/ton cement (0.26 tC/tonne). Despite the historic progress, there is ample room for energy efficiency improvement. The relatively high share of wet-process plants (25 percent of clinker production in 1999 in the U.S.) suggests the existence of a considerable potential, when compared to other industrialized countries. We examined over 40 energy efficient technologies and measures and estimated energy savings, carbon dioxide savings, investment costs, and operation and maintenance costs for each of the measures. The report describes the measures and experiences of cement plants around the wold with these practices and technologies. Substantial potential for energy efficiency improvement exists in the cement industry and in individual plants. A portion of this potential will be achieved as part of (natural) modernization and expansion of existing facilities, as well as construction of new plants in particular regions. Still, a relatively large potential for improved energy management practices exists.

  8. Science as Knowledge, Practice, and Map Making: The Challenge of Defining Metrics for Evaluating and Improving DOE-Funded Basic Experimental Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bodnarczuk, M.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Industrial R&D laboratories have been surprisingly successful in developing performance objectives and metrics that convincingly show that planning, management, and improvement techniques can be value-added to the actual output of R&D organizations. In this paper, I will discuss the more difficult case of developing analogous constructs for DOE-funded non-nuclear, non-weapons basic research, or as I will refer to it - basic experimental science. Unlike most industrial R&D or the bulk of applied science performed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the purpose of basic experimental science is producing new knowledge (usually published in professional journals) that has no immediate application to the first link (the R) of a planned R&D chain. Consequently, performance objectives and metrics are far more difficult to define. My claim is that if one can successfully define metrics for evaluating and improving DOE-funded basic experimental science (which is the most difficult case), then defining such constructs for DOE-funded applied science should be much less problematic. With the publication of the DOE Standard - Implementation Guide for Quality Assurance Programs for Basic and Applied Research (DOE-ER-STD-6001-92) and the development of a conceptual framework for integrating all the DOE orders, we need to move aggressively toward the threefold next phase: (1) focusing the management elements found in DOE-ER-STD-6001-92 on the main output of national laboratories - the experimental science itself; (2) developing clearer definitions of basic experimental science as practice not just knowledge; and (3) understanding the relationship between the metrics that scientists use for evaluating the performance of DOE-funded basic experimental science, the management elements of DOE-ER-STD-6001-92, and the notion of continuous improvement.

  9. Carbon emissions reduction strategies in Africa from improved waste management: A review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Couth, R. [University of KwaZulu-Natal, CRECHE, School of Civil Engineering, Survey and Construction, Durban 4041 (South Africa); Trois, C., E-mail: troisc@ukzn.ac.z [University of KwaZulu-Natal, CRECHE, School of Civil Engineering, Survey and Construction, Durban 4041 (South Africa)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper summarises a literature review into waste management practices across Africa as part of a study to assess methods to reduce carbon emissions. Research shows that the average organic content for urban Municipal Solid Waste in Africa is around 56% and its degradation is a major contributor to greenhouse gas emissions. The paper concludes that the most practical and economic way to manage waste in the majority of urban communities in Africa and therefore reduce carbon emissions is to separate waste at collection points to remove dry recyclables by door to door collection, compost the remaining biogenic carbon waste in windrows, using the maturated compost as a substitute fertilizer and dispose the remaining fossil carbon waste in controlled landfills.

  10. A discussion of best management practices for the South Esk Catchment: mitigation of a diminished aquatic habitat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Shiloh

    2011-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    agriculture in order to be placed into conservation programmes. These relationships can be vital to the success of a management plan. The establishment of buffer zones was established an appropriate mitigation measure for the improvement of the aquatic...

  11. Improving fisheries co-management through ecosystem-based spatial management: The Galapagos Marine Reserve

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles, Anthony

    Febrero, Santa Cruz, Galapagos, Ecuador c Management Science/Environmental Science, Saint Mary's University, Halifax, NS, Canada B3H 3C3 a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 2 May 2012 Received for ocean space, to mitigate the impact of human activities on sensitive ecological areas, and to contribute

  12. Recent Improvements In Interface Management For Hanfords Waste Treatment And Immobilization Plant - 13263

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arm, Stuart T. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, WA (United States); Pell, Michael J. [Bechtel National, Inc., Richland, WA (United States); Van Meighem, Jeffery S. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, WA (United States); Duncan, Garth M. [Bechtel National, Inc., Richland, WA (United States); Harrington, Christopher C. [Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Richland, Washington (United States)

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for management and completion of the River Protection Project (RPP) mission, which comprises both the Hanford Site tank farms operations and the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The RPP mission is to store, retrieve and treat Hanford's tank waste; store and dispose of treated wastes; and close the tank farm waste management areas and treatment facilities by 2047. The WTP is currently being designed and constructed by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) for DOE-ORP. BNI relies on a number oftechnical services from other Hanford contractors for WTP's construction and commissioning. These same services will be required of the future WTP operations contractor. The WTP interface management process has recently been improved through changes in organization and technical issue management documented in an Interface Management Plan. Ten of the thirteen active WTP Interface Control Documents (ICDs) have been revised in 2012 using the improved process with the remaining three in progress. The value of the process improvements is reflected by the ability to issue these documents on schedule.

  13. Air Handler Condensate Recovery at the Environmental Protection Agency's Science and Ecosystem Support Division: Best Management Practice Case Study #14; Alternate Water Sources (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FEMP Water Efficiency Best Management Practice #14 Case Study: Overview of the air handler condensate recovery program at the Environmental Protection Agency's Science and Ecosystem Support Division.

  14. Thinking Globally: How ISO 50001 - Energy Management can make industrial energy efficiency standard practice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKane, Aimee

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Comparison of National Energy Management Standards, prepared2007, Industrial Energy Management: Issues Paper, preparedMeeting: Using Energy Management Standards to stimulate

  15. Household Segmentation in Food Insecurity and Soil Improving Practices in Ghana 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nata, Jifar T

    2013-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    improved chickpea varieties, smallholder farmers in Ethiopia and Tanzania farmers are able to produce more and create a market surplus in their locality (Asfaw and Shiferaw 2010). Food security for these farmers improved after adoption. Further, Asfaw...

  16. CROPS AND SOILS RESEARCH PAPER Improved weather-based late blight risk management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douches, David S.

    CROPS AND SOILS RESEARCH PAPER Improved weather-based late blight risk management: comparing models infestans) risk at 26 locations in the Great Lakes region. Accuracies of predictions made using an early number of early warning systems for crop disease risk that integrate with crop- specific decision support

  17. A Supply-Demand Model Based Scalable Energy Management System for Improved Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhunia, Swarup

    energy generation and consumption parameters. The system uses economics inspired supply-demand modelA Supply-Demand Model Based Scalable Energy Management System for Improved Energy Utilization Western Reserve University, *Cleveland State University, +Rockwell Automation, Cleveland, OR, USA Email

  18. Reactive power management of distribution networks with wind generation for improving voltage stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    -loadability Reactive power margin Wind turbine a b s t r a c t This paper proposes static and dynamic VAR planningReactive power management of distribution networks with wind generation for improving voltage February 2013 Available online Keywords: Composite load Distributed generation D-STATCOM Q

  19. Better understanding of bacterial fate and transport in watersheds is necessary for improved regulatory management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perfect, Ed

    bacterial survival in hydro- environmental systems such as sunlight, temperature, soil moisture conditions1559 Better understanding of bacterial fate and transport in watersheds is necessary for improved regulatory management of impaired streams. Novel statistical time series analyses of coliform data can

  20. Keep Pesticides Out of Texas Water Supplies: Best Management Practices to Prevent Pesticide Contamination of Water Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Porter, Dana

    2008-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Keep Pesticides Out of Texas Water Supplies Best Management Practices to Prevent Pesticide Contamination Dana Porter Associate Professor and Extension Agricultural Engineering Specialist?Water Management The Texas A&M University System Demands... are increasing for Texas? limited water supplies, so it is critical that we protect them from contamination. Pesticides offer many benefi ts and are important tools in ensuring a dependable and pest-free food supply and fi ber for clothing. They help us...

  1. An engineering approach to improving hospital supply chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Scott Hsiang-Jen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis explores supply chain management practices that have been implemented, and have improved supply chains in industries outside of healthcare. The presented supply chain practices have been selected because they ...

  2. FRESH THINKING FOR MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Eui-Hyeok

    FOR TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT Technology Acceptance in Organizations: What Can We Do to Improve it? by Patricia in organizations is thus an important topic in both management research and management practice. Technology choice of a mobile phone. In organizations, there are two steps in technology adoption. First

  3. UNBC Hazardous Waste Guide Proper waste management practices are essential for the safety of all students, staff, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    chemical waste, hazardous solid chemical waste (i.e. items that have been contaminated with hazardous are preferred for all hazardous liquid chemical waste. - Plastic bags are preferred for all hazardous solidUNBC Hazardous Waste Guide Proper waste management practices are essential for the safety of all

  4. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Pharmaceutical Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitsky, Christina; Galitsky, Christina; Chang, Sheng-chieh; Worrell, Ernst; Masanet, Eric

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. pharmaceutical industry consumes almost $1 billion in energy annually. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. pharmaceutical industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, system, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. pharmaceutical industry is provided along with a description of the major process steps in the pharmaceutical manufacturing process. Expected savings in energy and energy-related costs are given for many energy efficiency measures, based on case study data from real-world applications in pharmaceutical and related facilities worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner while meeting regulatory requirements and maintaining the quality of products manufactured. At individual plants, further research on the economics of the measures?as well as their applicability to different production practices?is needed to assess potential implementation of selected technologies.

  5. A Measurement Management Technology for Improving Energy Efficiency in Data Centers and Telecommunication Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendrik Hamann, Levente Klein

    2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Data center (DC) electricity use is increasing at an annual rate of over 20% and presents a concern for the Information Technology (IT) industry, governments, and the society. A large fraction of the energy use is consumed by the compressor cooling to maintain the recommended operating conditions for IT equipment. The most common way to improve the DC efficiency is achieved by optimally provisioning the cooling power to match the global heat dissipation in the DC. However, at a more granular level, the large range of heat densities of today's IT equipment makes the task of provisioning cooling power optimized to the level of individual computer room air conditioning (CRAC) units much more challenging. Distributed sensing within a DC enables the development of new strategies to improve energy efficiency, such as hot spot elimination through targeted cooling, matching power consumption at rack level with workload schedule, and minimizing power losses. The scope of Measurement and Management Technologies (MMT) is to develop a software tool and the underlying sensing technology to provide critical decision support and control for DC and telecommunication facilities (TF) operations. A key aspect of MMT technology is integration of modeling tools to understand how changes in one operational parameter affect the overall DC response. It is demonstrated that reduced ordered models for DC can generate, in less than 2 seconds computational time, a three dimensional thermal model in a 50 kft{sup 2} DC. This rapid modeling enables real time visualization of the DC conditions and enables 'what if' scenarios simulations to characterize response to 'disturbances'. One such example is thermal zone modeling that matches the cooling power to the heat generated at a local level by identifying DC zones cooled by a specific CRAC. Turning off a CRAC unit can be simulated to understand how the other CRAC utilization changes and how server temperature responds. Several new sensing technologies were added to the existing MMT platform: (1) air contamination (corrosion) sensors, (2) power monitoring, and (3) a wireless environmental sensing network. All three technologies are built on cost effective sensing solutions that increase the density of sensing points and enable high resolution mapping of DCs. The wireless sensing solution enables Air Conditioning Unit (ACU) control while the corrosion sensor enables air side economization and can quantify the risk of IT equipment failure due to air contamination. Validation data for six test sites demonstrate that leveraging MMT energy efficiency solutions combined with industry best practices results in an average of 20% reduction in cooling energy, without major infrastructure upgrades. As an illustration of the unique MMT capabilities, a data center infrastructure efficiency (DCIE) of 87% (industry best operation) was achieved. The technology is commercialized through IBM System and Technology Lab Services that offers MMT as a solution to improve DC energy efficiency. Estimation indicates that deploying MMT in existing DCs can results in an 8 billion kWh savings and projection indicates that constant adoption of MMT can results in obtainable savings of 44 billion kWh in 2035. Negotiations are under way with business partners to commercialize/license the ACU control technology and the new sensor solutions (corrosion and power sensing) to enable third party vendors and developers to leverage the energy efficiency solutions.

  6. Improving Automation in Developer Testing: State of the Practice Department of Computer Science, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, R. Michael

    of techniques implemented in industrial developer testing tools to address challenges in improving automation. We provide in- sights to major industrial tools' key features in improving automation in developerImproving Automation in Developer Testing: State of the Practice Tao Xie Department of Computer

  7. Collaborative adaptive management in practice : case studies from Arizona and New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Jenna (Jenna Leidy)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Collaborative adaptive management (CAM) is a natural resource management approach in which a diverse group of stakeholders iteratively plan, implement, monitor, evaluate and adjust management actions to reduce uncertainty ...

  8. Review and Status of Solid Waste Management Practices in Multan, Pakistan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoaib, Muhammad; Mirza, Umar Karim; Sarwar, Muhammad Avais

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in management of liquid and solid waste, Multan City, JuneResource Center. (2004). Solid waste management study,The secondary data on solid waste and its management aspects

  9. A Total Quality Management (TQM) Approach for Energy Savings Through Employee Awareness and Building Upgrades to Improve Energy Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, D. H.

    . The partnership between the employees and management is critical for an energy-efficient program to succeed. The informed team of"Energy Partners" can track energy use and develop programs which will reduce energy waste, improve the environment and improve...A TOTAL QUALIn' MANAGEMENT (TQM) APPROACH FOR ENERGY SAVINGS THROUGH EMPLOYEE AWARENESS AND BUILDING UPGRADES TO IMPROVE ENERGY EFFICIENCY Daniel H. Stewart, Principal Engineer, Facilities Department, Rh6oe-Poulenc. Inc., Cranbury, NJ...

  10. Quality Improvement Practices in Academic Emergency Medicine: Perspectives from the Chairs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DelliFraine, Jami L; Langabeer, James; King, Brent

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Journal of Emergency Medicine Volume XI, no . 5 : DecemberJournal of Emergency Medicine Quality Improvement Table 1.in your prac- tice of medicine based on the quality training

  11. A Framework for Classification of Traffic Management Practices as Reasonable or Unreasonable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jordan, Scott

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a survey of traf?c management techniques andsection presents a survey of traf?c management techniques to

  12. Thinking Globally: How ISO 50001 - Energy Management can make industrial energy efficiency standard practice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKane, Aimee

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    regarding energy efficiency; • Limited awareness of theof awareness and the corresponding failure to manage energyawareness within the corporate management culture of the potential for energy

  13. Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Westernand Risk Management in the US Electricity Sector,” Energyhow energy planners might better address and manage the risk

  14. Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Westernand Risk Management in the US Electricity Sector,” Energyhow energy planners might better address and manage the risk

  15. Thinking Globally: How ISO 50001 - Energy Management can make industrial energy efficiency standard practice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKane, Aimee

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thinking Globally: How ISO 50001 – Energy Management canThinking Globally: How ISO 50001 – Energy Management canOrganization for Standardization (ISO) has identified energy

  16. Social, Economic and Environmental Evaluation of Agri-Environmental Beneficial Management Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Systems to Manage Livestock, Riparian Buffer Establishment, Irrigation Management, and Wildlife Damage and environmental factors whereas adopters of the Irrigation Management and Wildlife Damage Prevention BMPs to be cost; however, barriers are overall lower for both the Irrigation Management and Wildlife Damage

  17. Facilitating the improved management of waste in South Africa through a national waste information system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Godfrey, Linda [CSIR, Natural Resources and the Environment, P.O. Box 395, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa)], E-mail: lgodfrey@csir.co.za

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Developing a waste information system (WIS) for a country is more than just about collecting routine data on waste; it is about facilitating the improved management of waste by providing timely, reliable information to the relevant role-players. It is a means of supporting the waste governance challenges facing South Africa - challenges ranging from strategic waste management issues at national government to basic operational challenges at local government. The paper addresses two hypotheses. The first is that the identified needs of government can provide a platform from which to design a national WIS framework for a developing country such as South Africa, and the second is that the needs for waste information reflect greater, currently unfulfilled challenges in the sustainable management of waste. Through a participatory needs analysis process, it is shown that waste information is needed by the three spheres of government, to support amongst others, informed planning and decision-making, compliance monitoring and enforcement, community participation through public access to information, human, infrastructure and financial resource management and policy development. These needs for waste information correspond closely with key waste management challenges currently facing the country. A shift in governments approach to waste, in line with national and international policy, is evident from identified current and future waste information needs. However, the need for information on landfilling remains entrenched within government, possibly due to the poor compliance of landfill sites in South Africa and the problems around the illegal disposal of both general and hazardous waste.

  18. Designing Building Systems to Save Energy and Improve Indoor Environments: A Practical Demonstration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Commission through the Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) program as Element 6 consumption from switch to gas heating; 50,931 MBtu source energy reduction; and a combined school district and the building sector continue to seek improvement in energy efficiency. Designs achieving good IEQ can

  19. Practice Energy Conservation, and Explore for Improving Technical Standards of Energy Efficiency Management

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Information about the energy conservation and environmental protection investment group CECEP and its various services.

  20. Influence of result demonstrations on the adoption of improved practices in cotton production in a six-county area in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shamsuzzoha, A. N. M

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INFLUENCE OF RESULT DEMONSTRATIONS ON THE ADOPTION OF IMPROVED PRACTICES IN COTTON PRODUCTION IN A SIX ? COUNTY AREA IN TEXAS A Thesis by A. N. M. SHAMSUZZOHA Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1967 Major Subject: Agricultural Education INFLUENCE OF RESULT DEMONSTRATIONS ON THE ADOPTION OF IMPROVED PRACTICES IN COTTON PRODUCTION IN A SIX-COUNTY AREA IN TEXAS A Thesis...

  1. A proposal to improve ecological compensation practice in road and railway projects in Spain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villarroya, Ana, E-mail: avillarroya@alumni.unav.es; Puig, Jordi, E-mail: jpbaguer@unav.es

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To reduce ecological impacts caused by development projects, avoidance, minimization and compensation techniques have to be taken together into consideration along Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) procedures. This paper explores the particular role that ecological compensation has had in recent road and railway EIA procedures in Spain, as seen through the review of a set of recent EIA Records of Decision (RODs) that confirms precedent findings. Noticing that residual impacts are not paid much attention, and that there is no evidence of a solid public participation in ecological impact evaluation, it proposes to increase the awareness on residual impacts, as a way to make easier public access to the allegedly most sensitive moment of EIA implementation: (residual) impact evaluation. -- Highlights: ? Ecological compensation practice in Spain is much lower than avoidance or mitigation. ? Residual impacts are overlooked in EIA processes and public participation is low. ? An increased awareness of residual impacts may also promote public participation. ? Current context needs these small steps to move towards better compensation practice.

  2. Review of LCA studies of solid waste management systems – Part II: Methodological guidance for a better practice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laurent, Alexis, E-mail: alau@dtu.dk [Division for Quantitative Sustainability Assessment, Department of Management Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Clavreul, Julie [Residual Resources Engineering, Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Bernstad, Anna [Water and Environmental Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, Lund University, 221 00 Lund (Sweden); Bakas, Ioannis [Division for Quantitative Sustainability Assessment, Department of Management Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Niero, Monia [Division for Quantitative Sustainability Assessment, Department of Management Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); ECO – Ecosystems and Environmental Sustainability, Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, 4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Gentil, Emmanuel [Copenhagen Resource Institute, 1215 Copenhagen K (Denmark); Christensen, Thomas H. [Residual Resources Engineering, Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Hauschild, Michael Z. [Division for Quantitative Sustainability Assessment, Department of Management Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • We perform a critical review of 222 LCA studies of solid waste management systems. • We analyse the past LCA practice against the ISO standard and ILCD Handbook guidance. • Malpractices exist in many methodological aspects with large variations among studies. • Many of these aspects are important for the reliability of the results. • We provide detailed recommendations to practitioners of waste management LCAs. - Abstract: Life cycle assessment (LCA) is increasingly used in waste management to identify strategies that prevent or minimise negative impacts on ecosystems, human health or natural resources. However, the quality of the provided support to decision- and policy-makers is strongly dependent on a proper conduct of the LCA. How has LCA been applied until now? Are there any inconsistencies in the past practice? To answer these questions, we draw on a critical review of 222 published LCA studies of solid waste management systems. We analyse the past practice against the ISO standard requirements and the ILCD Handbook guidelines for each major step within the goal definition, scope definition, inventory analysis, impact assessment, and interpretation phases of the methodology. Results show that malpractices exist in several aspects of the LCA with large differences across studies. Examples are a frequent neglect of the goal definition, a frequent lack of transparency and precision in the definition of the scope of the study, e.g. an unclear delimitation of the system boundaries, a truncated impact coverage, difficulties in capturing influential local specificities such as representative waste compositions into the inventory, and a frequent lack of essential sensitivity and uncertainty analyses. Many of these aspects are important for the reliability of the results. For each of them, we therefore provide detailed recommendations to practitioners of waste management LCAs.

  3. Implementation of a Project Management System for Improvement to City, State's Design and Construction Capital Project Delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Chad C.

    2007-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    than 400 projects with budgets of over a half billion dollars. It has shifted the capital improvement project delivery from a “multi-departmental” style of delivery to a “project management” style of delivery through the infusion of private consultants...

  4. DepSec_Memo_Improving_Project_Management_10Aug2005.pdf | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you0andEnergy Improving_Project_Management_10Aug2005.pdf

  5. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Glass Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina; Masanet, Eric; Graus, Wina

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. glass industry is comprised of four primary industry segments--flat glass, container glass, specialty glass, and fiberglass--which together consume $1.6 billion in energy annually. On average, energy costs in the U.S. glass industry account for around 14 percent of total glass production costs. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There is a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. glass industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, system, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. glass industry is provided along with a description of the major process steps in glass manufacturing. Expected savings in energy and energy-related costs are given for many energy efficiency measures, based on case study data from real-world applications in glass production facilities and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. glass industry reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of the measures--as well on as their applicability to different production practices--is needed to assess potential implementation of selected technologies at individual plants.

  6. Surgeons' Knowledge and Practices Regarding the Role of Radiation Therapy in Breast Cancer Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Jessica [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Griffith, Kent A. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Hawley, Sarah T.; Zikmund-Fisher, Brian J. [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Janz, Nancy K. [Department of Health Behavior and Health Education, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Sabel, Michael S. [Department of Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Katz, Steven J. [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Jagsi, Reshma, E-mail: rjagsi@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Population-based studies suggest underuse of radiation therapy, especially after mastectomy. Because radiation oncology is a referral-based specialty, knowledge and attitudes of upstream providers, specifically surgeons, may influence patients' decisions regarding radiation, including whether it is even considered. Therefore, we sought to evaluate surgeons' knowledge of pertinent risk information, their patterns of referral, and the correlates of surgeon knowledge and referral in specific breast cancer scenarios. Methods and Materials: We surveyed a national sample of 750 surgeons, with a 67% response rate. We analyzed responses from those who had seen at least 1 breast cancer patient in the past year (n=403), using logistic regression models to identify correlates of knowledge and appropriate referral. Results: Overall, 87% of respondents were general surgeons, and 64% saw >10 breast cancer patients in the previous year. In a scenario involving a 45-year-old undergoing lumpectomy, only 45% correctly estimated the risk of locoregional recurrence without radiation therapy, but 97% would refer to radiation oncology. In a patient with 2 of 20 nodes involved after mastectomy, 30% would neither refer to radiation oncology nor provide accurate information to make radiation decisions. In a patient with 4 of 20 nodes involved after mastectomy, 9% would not refer to radiation oncology. Fewer than half knew that the Oxford meta-analysis revealed a survival benefit from radiation therapy after lumpectomy (45%) or mastectomy (32%). Only 16% passed a 7-item knowledge test; female and more-experienced surgeons were more likely to pass. Factors significantly associated with appropriate referral to radiation oncology included breast cancer volume, tumor board participation, and knowledge. Conclusions: Many surgeons have inadequate knowledge regarding the role of radiation in breast cancer management, especially after mastectomy. Targeted educational interventions may improve the quality of care.

  7. Economic Analysis of Selected Bush Management Practices for Eastern South Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McBryde, G.L.; Conner, J.R.; Scifres C.J.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    process the first step is to deter mine yearly cash flows over the life of an investment. This is done by considering all costs of the new manage ment and then the additional benefits the new manage ment generates and the years in which the costs... System I College Station, Texas 4 Summary Brush management research has generated data concerning treat ment efficacy, application technology, and environmental implica tions. Economic evaluations, however, have lagged behind develop ment...

  8. Certifying Industrial Energy Efficiency Performance: Aligning Management, Measurement, and Practice to Create Market Value

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKane, Aimee; Scheihing, Paul; Williams, Robert

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    management systems, including ISO 9001:2000, 14001:2004 andmanagement systems, such as ISO 9001:2000, 14001:2004, and

  9. Energy Efficiency Best Practice Guide©

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rouse, S.

    ENERGY EFFICIENCY BEST PRACTICE GUIDE@ Scott Rouse Manager Energy Efficiency Department Ontario Power Generation Inc. Toronto, Ontario, Canada (416) 592-8044 srouse@ontariopowergeneration.com ABSTRACT 'Setting the bar above mere... mediocrity!' The goal of the Energy Efficiency (EE) Best Practice Guide is to help business units meet and exceed their energy efficiency targets through continuous improvement using seven key criteria. The objectives are threefold: - to provide an easy...

  10. Official Doctor of Nursing Practice Program of Study Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheon, James M.

    Clinical Immersion Project 2: Implementation NURS 9923 Clinical Immersion Project 3: Outcomes NURS 9131 Biometrics for Advanced Practice Nursing NURS 9133 Clinical Scholarship and Policy Development NURS 9135 Outcomes Management Strategies for Improved Health Care Outcomes

  11. Certifying Industrial Energy Efficiency Performance: Aligning Management, Measurement, and Practice to Create Market Value

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKane, Aimee; Scheihing, Paul; Williams, Robert

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Certifying Industrial Energy Efficiency Performance:to improve their energy efficiency- as evidenced by the 98%the renewed interest in energy efficiency worldwide and the

  12. Use of information technology in facility management practices: a case study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dayal, Richa

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study deals with the use and effects of Information Technology (IT) in the field of Facilities Management (FM). The positives and negatives related to the use of IT were identified, and the reasons for using IT in ...

  13. Rethinking Internet Traffic Management: From Multiple Decompositions to a Practical Protocol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Jaswinder Pal

    management spans congestion control (at end hosts), routing protocols (on routers), and traffic engineering (by network operators). Historically, this division of functionality evolved organically- tures of the algorithms, we construct TRUMP: a traffic man- agement protocol that is distributed

  14. Appropriate Technologies and Systems to respond to Climate Change, Improved Water Resources Management, Waste Management and Sanitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthelat, Francois

    Resources Management, Waste Management and Sanitation A Review of Water Information Systems in the English availability, quality, use and demand. In this regard, Water Information Systems play a key role in the management of the resource. This paper examines the water information systems of St. Lucia, Jamaica

  15. Improved oil recovery in mature fields through reservoir characterization and management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leetaru, H.E. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Illinois basin is mature with respect to hydrocarbon exploitation in the Pennsylvanian and Mississippian strata. Available subsurface data for the basin commonly are 30 to 50 yr old and of lower quality than today's state-of-the-art data. Recent evaluation of two geologically similar Illinois oil fields shows how the application of new concepts and technologies to the old data can be used to improve oil recovery. Boyd and King fields, located in Jefferson County, Illinois, produce from the Mississippian Aux Vases formation, a unit that was deposited in nearshore mixed siliciclastic-carbonate environments. Prospective areas for further development were delineated by conventional reservoir-characterization methods. Three-dimensional modeling was used to enhance visualization of the lateral and vertical heterogeneity of these reservoirs. At King field, mixing of intercalated siliciclastic-carbonate facies causes significant reservoir heterogeneity; numerous compartments have been bypassed by the existing waterflood. Targeted infill drilling of additional producing and injector wells should recover 1-2 million bbl of additional hydrocarbons. At Boyd field, delineation of areas that contain bypassed oil is more difficult because many of the wells have not penetrated the entire reservoir. An additional problem is that almost all of the production from the original Aux Vases wells was severely inhibited by backflow from a higher pressured, shallower reservoir with which it is commingled. In this type of field, reservoir management must focus on isolating the Aux Vases, producing intervals and deepening individual wells through the entire reservoir. The study of these two fields suggests that detailed geologic characterization of the internal reservoir architecture is not enough. Effective reservoir characterization for improved oil recovery must include both reservoir geology and an understanding of previous reservoir management techniques.

  16. Improved methodology to assess modification and completion of landfill gas management in the aftercare period

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, Jeremy W.F., E-mail: jmorris@geosyntec.com [Geosyntec Consultants, 10220 Old Columbia Road, Suite A, Columbia, MD 21046 (United States); Crest, Marion, E-mail: marion.crest@suez-env.com [Suez Environnement, 38 rue du President Wilson, 78230 Le Pecq (France); Barlaz, Morton A., E-mail: barlaz@ncsu.edu [Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, Campus Box 7908, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7908 (United States); Spokas, Kurt A., E-mail: kurt.spokas@ars.usda.gov [United States Department of Agriculture - Agricultural Research Service, 1991 Upper Buford Circle, 439 Borlaug Hall, St. Paul, MN 55108 (United States); Akerman, Anna, E-mail: anna.akerman@sita.fr [SITA France, Tour CB 21, 16 Place de l'Iris, 92040 Paris La Defense Cedex (France); Yuan, Lei, E-mail: lyuan@geosyntec.com [Geosyntec Consultants, 10220 Old Columbia Road, Suite A, Columbia, MD 21046 (United States)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Performance-based evaluation of landfill gas control system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analytical framework to evaluate transition from active to passive gas control. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Focus on cover oxidation as an alternative means of passive gas control. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Integrates research on long-term landfill behavior with practical guidance. - Abstract: Municipal solid waste landfills represent the dominant option for waste disposal in many parts of the world. While some countries have greatly reduced their reliance on landfills, there remain thousands of landfills that require aftercare. The development of cost-effective strategies for landfill aftercare is in society's interest to protect human health and the environment and to prevent the emergence of landfills with exhausted aftercare funding. The Evaluation of Post-Closure Care (EPCC) methodology is a performance-based approach in which landfill performance is assessed in four modules including leachate, gas, groundwater, and final cover. In the methodology, the objective is to evaluate landfill performance to determine when aftercare monitoring and maintenance can be reduced or possibly eliminated. This study presents an improved gas module for the methodology. While the original version of the module focused narrowly on regulatory requirements for control of methane migration, the improved gas module also considers best available control technology for landfill gas in terms of greenhouse gas emissions, air quality, and emissions of odoriferous compounds. The improved module emphasizes the reduction or elimination of fugitive methane by considering the methane oxidation capacity of the cover system. The module also allows for the installation of biologically active covers or other features designed to enhance methane oxidation. A methane emissions model, CALMIM, was used to assist with an assessment of the methane oxidation capacity of landfill covers.

  17. Using a contingent valuation approach for improved solid waste management facility: Evidence from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Afroz, Rafia, E-mail: rafia_afroz@yahoo.com [Department of Economics, Faculty of Economics and Management Science, International Islamic University Malaysia (Malaysia); Masud, Muhammad Mehedi [Department of Economics, Faculty of Economics and Management Science, International Islamic University Malaysia (Malaysia)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This study employed contingent valuation method to estimate the willingness to pay (WTP) of the households to improve the waste collection system in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The objective of this study is to evaluate how household WTP changes when recycling and waste separation at source is made mandatory. The methodology consisted of asking people directly about their WTP for an additional waste collection service charge to cover the costs of a new waste management project. The new waste management project consisted of two versions: version A (recycling and waste separation is mandatory) and version B (recycling and waste separation is not mandatory). The households declined their WTP for version A when they were asked to separate the waste at source although all the facilities would be given to them for waste separation. The result of this study indicates that the households were not conscious about the benefits of recycling and waste separation. Concerted efforts should be taken to raise environmental consciousness of the households through education and more publicity regarding waste separation, reducing and recycling.

  18. Use of information technology in facility management practices: a case study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dayal, Richa

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    as practical evidence, provided an opportunity to test the hypotheses of this study. Being a part of the culture of an organization allowed the researcher exposure to many more concerns related with the use of technology. These have been discussed as areas...

  19. Current waste-management practices and operations at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eisenhower, B.M.; Oakes, T.W.; Coobs, J.H.; Weeter, D.W.

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The need for efficient management of industrial chemical wastes, especially those considered hazardous or radioactive, is receiving increased attention in the United States. During the past five years, several federal laws have addressed the establishment of stronger programs for the control of hazardous and residual wastes. At a facility such as Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), an efficient waste management program is an absolute necessity to ensure protection of human health and compliance with regulatory requirements addressing the treatment and disposal of hazardous, nonhazardous, and radioactive wastes. This report highlights the major regulatory requirements under which the Laboratory must operate and their impact on ORNL facilities. Individual waste streams, estimates of quantities of waste, and current waste management operations are discussed.

  20. Corporate Energy Management Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geiger, T.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . May 21-24, 2013 Corporate Energy Management Process 2 ?Brief introduction to BASF ? BASF Corporate Energy Management ? Management Support ? Goals ? Continuous Improvement ? Best Practices ? Recognition ?Summary ESL-IE-13-05-25 Proceedings...-value products ? Intelligent, sustainable system solutions ? 2012 Sales: ?72.1 Billion ? Employees: 110,000 Company overview BASF ? The Chemical Company ESL-IE-13-05-25 Proceedings of the Thrity-Fifth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA...

  1. Management of high sulfur coal combustion residues, issues and practices: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chugh, Y.P.; Beasley, G.A. [eds.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Papers presented at the following sessions are included in this proceedings: (1) overview topic; (2) characterization of coal combustion residues; (3) environmental impacts of residues management; (4) materials handling and utilization, Part I; and (5) materials handling and utilization, Part II. Selected paper have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  2. modifications in the river, in climate and in nitrogen-management practice. Continued

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stone, J. V.

    of riverine nitrogen and NANI will refine our understanding of nitrogen dynamics in river basins and will facilitate adaptive management of conservation poli- cies and programmes. Gregory F. McIsaac*, Mark B. David://usda.mannlib.cornell.edu/reports/nassr/other/pcu-bb 13.Taylor, H. H. Stat. Bull. 893 (Econ. Res. Service, US Dept Agric., Washington DC, 1994). 14

  3. Interaction of Water Management and Riparian Ecosystems: Attitudes, Practices, and Effects1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of waters for the reclamation of arid and semiarid lands in 17 Western States. The basic objectives, developing, and managing water and related land resource projects which sup ply water for agriculture, domestic, and industrial use in the 17 western states, the Bureau of Reclamation also ful fills the mission

  4. Leadership Theory and Practice in Sport Management: What Constitutes Ethical Leadership According to Student-Interns?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clack, Justin Tyler

    2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Assistant to the Football Director Cadence F 22 Caucasian LMF Marketing Intern Eva F 21 Caucasian AC Intern James M 22 Caucasian ESJC Assistant to the Athletic Director Alberto M 22 Hispanic YSEMO Area Sales Manager Kacey F 22 Caucasian SPSO...

  5. DOE Handbook: Guide to good practices for training of technical staff and managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Training programs at DOE facilities should prepare personnel to safely and efficiently operate the facilities in accordance with DOE requirements. This guide contains information that can be used to develop or validate training programs for technical staff and managers at DOE nuclear facilities. Training programs based on the content of this guide should provide assurance that these personnel perform their jobs safely and competently.

  6. Integrating Customer Relationship Management and Project Lifecycle Management using Information Technology Infrastructure Library Techniques to Improve Service Delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millet, Sabbas

    2008-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    -facing staff, and a platform for measuring product performance. ITIL (Information Technology Infrastructure Library) is a set of best practices, or body of knowledge, which describes all aspects of delivering IT services. ITIL Version 3 is used by the ISO...

  7. Best care practices in anesthesiology : development and evaluation of an electronic feedback system to improve physician compliance with evidence-based practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarin, Pankaj, M.D. University of Rochester

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, hospitals, regulatory agencies, and insurers have renewed their focus on improving patient care and safety. Outcomes based measures are being utilized and hospitals are being asked to report on whether patients ...

  8. Improvement actions in waste management systems at the provincial scale based on a life cycle assessment evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rigamonti, L., E-mail: lucia.rigamonti@polimi.it; Falbo, A.; Grosso, M.

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • LCA was used for evaluating the performance of four provincial waste management systems. • Milano, Bergamo, Pavia and Mantova (Italy) are the provinces selected for the analysis. • Most of the data used to model the systems are primary. • Significant differences were found among the provinces located in the same Region. • LCA was used as a decision-supporting tool by Regione Lombardia. - Abstract: This paper reports some of the findings of the ‘GERLA’ project: GEstione Rifiuti in Lombardia – Analisi del ciclo di vita (Waste management in Lombardia – Life cycle assessment). The project was devoted to support Lombardia Region in the drafting of the new waste management plan by applying a life cycle thinking perspective. The present paper mainly focuses on four Provinces in the Region, which were selected based on their peculiarities. Life cycle assessment (LCA) was adopted as the methodology to assess the current performance of the integrated waste management systems, to discuss strengths and weaknesses of each of them and to design their perspective evolution as of year 2020. Results show that despite a usual business approach that is beneficial to all the provinces, the introduction of technological and management improvements to the system provides in general additional energy and environmental benefits for all four provinces. The same improvements can be easily extended to the whole Region, leading to increased environmental benefits from the waste management sector, in line with the targets set by the European Union for 2020.

  9. Operational Characteristics and Herd Health Management Practices Associated With Brucellosis Quarantined Cattle Herds, U.S., 1980-82.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dietrich, Raymond A.; Amosson, Stephen H.; Crawford, Richard P.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    concerning herd health management practices and associated epidemiologi? cal information of newly quarantined beef and dairy brucel? losis herds in the contiguous 48 states during 1980?82. De? tailed information was obtained from Veterinary Medical...-19 28.2 35.7 17.2 31.5 20-49 38.5 42.8 41.4 36.4 50-99 26.9 16.2 29.3 20.7 100-199 3.8 3.5 9.4 6.5 200-499 2.6 1.6 2.7 4.6 500-999 NR NR NR .3 1,000 or more NR. .2 NR NR Total 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 Dairy: 1-19 NR 11.1 31.6 10 20-49 33.3 34...

  10. A model for performance management in real properties using statistical techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deolalikar, Jyoti

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Within Real Property Portfolio Management. there is a conscious search for new methodologies to improve building management practice, particularly for facilities in use. An approach in this direction is realized by the ...

  11. UK and Italian EIA systems: A comparative study on management practice and performance in the construction industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bassi, Andrea, E-mail: ab395@bath.co.uk [University of Bath, Faculty of Engineering and Design, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); Howard, Robert, E-mail: robhoward@constcom.demon.co.uk [Construction Communications, 8 Cotton& #x27; s Field, Dry Drayton, Cambridge CB23 8DG (United Kingdom); Geneletti, Davide, E-mail: davide.geneletti@ing.unitn.it [Sustainability Science Program, Harvard University, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Trento, Via Mesiano, 77 38123 Trento (Italy); Ferrari, Simone, E-mail: simone.ferrari@polimi.it [Dept. BEST, Building Environment Science and Technology, Politecnico di Milano, Via Bonardi, 3 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This study evaluates and contrasts the management practice and the performance that characterise Environmental Impact Assessments (EIA) in Italy and in the UK. The methodology relies on the investigation of six carefully selected case studies, critically reviewed by referring to EIA and project design information, as well as collecting the opinion of key project participants. The study focuses on the construction industry and on specific key sectors like infrastructure for transport and renewable energy and commercial and tourism development. A main term of reference for the analyses has been established by critically reviewing international literature so as to outline common good practice, requirements for the enhancement of sustainability principles and typically incurred drawbacks. The proposed approach enhances transfer of knowledge and of experiences between the analyzed contexts and allows the provision of guidelines for practitioners. Distinctive differences between the UK and the Italian EIA systems have been detected for pivotal phases and elements of EIA, like screening, scoping, analysis of alternatives and of potential impacts, definition of mitigation strategies, review, decision making, public participation and follow up. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Italian and the UK Environmental Impact Assessment systems are compared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The research is centred on the construction industry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Issues and shortcomings are analysed by investigating six case studies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Integration of EIA with sustainability principles is appraised. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer General guidelines are provided to assist practitioners in the two national contexts.

  12. Supplier selection and supplier management improvements at an analytical instrument manufacturing company

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Yan, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis addresses the challenges of improving the quality of parts received from suppliers at Waters, an analytical instrument manufacturing company. Preliminary analysis identified improvement opportunities at evaluation ...

  13. IGCC and PFBC By-Products: Generation, Characteristics, and Management Practices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pflughoeft-Hassett, D.F.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following report is a compilation of data on by-products/wastes from clean coal technologies, specifically integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC). DOE had two objectives in providing this information to EPA: (1) to familiarize EPA with the DOE CCT program, CCT by-products, and the associated efforts by DOE contractors in the area of CCT by-product management and (2) to provide information that will facilitate EPA's effort by complementing similar reports from industry groups, including CIBO (Council of Industrial Boiler Owners) and EEI USWAG (Edison Electric Institute Utility Solid Waste Activities Group). The EERC cooperated and coordinated with DOE CCT contractors and industry groups to provide the most accurate and complete data on IGCC and PFBC by-products, although these technologies are only now being demonstrated on the commercial scale through the DOE CCT program.

  14. Recommended management practices for operation and closure of shallow injection wells at DOE facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Safe Drinking Water Act established the Underground Injection Control (UIC) program to ensure that underground injection of wastes does not endanger an underground source of drinking water. Under UIC regulations, an injection well is a hole in the ground, deeper than it is wide, that receives wastes or other fluid substances. Types of injection wells range from deep cased wells to shallow sumps, drywells, and drainfields. The report describes the five classes of UIC wells and summarizes relevant regulations for each class of wells and for the UIC program. The main focus of the report is Class IV and V shallow injection wells. Class IV wells are prohibited and should be closed when they are identified. Class V wells are generally authorized by rule, but EPA or a delegated state may require a permit for a Class V well. This report provides recommendations on sound operating and closure practices for shallow injection wells. In addition the report contains copies of several relevant EPA documents that provide additional information on well operation and closure. Another appendix contains information on the UIC programs in 21 states in which there are DOE facilities discharging to injection wells. The appendix includes the name of the responsible regulatory agency and contact person, a summary of differences between the state`s regulations and Federal regulations, and any closure guidelines for Class IV and V wells.

  15. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worrell, Ernst; Blinde, Paul; Neelis, Maarten; Blomen, Eliane; Masanet, Eric

    2010-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy is an important cost factor in the U.S iron and steel industry. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. iron and steel industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, facility, and organizational levels. A discussion of the structure, production trends, energy consumption, and greenhouse gas emissions of the iron and steel industry is provided along with a description of the major process technologies used within the industry. Next, a wide variety of energy efficiency measures are described. Many measure descriptions include expected savings in energy and energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-world applications in the steel and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. iron and steel industry reduce energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of all measures?and on their applicability to different production practices?is needed to assess their cost effectiveness at individual plants.

  16. Comparison of selected foreign plans and practices for spent fuel and high-level waste management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, K.J.; Mitchell, S.J.; Lakey, L.T.; Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Hazelton, R.F.; Bradley, D.J.

    1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the major parameters for management of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive wastes in selected foreign countries as of December 1989 and compares them with those in the United States. The foreign countries included in this study are Belgium, Canada, France, the Federal Republic of Germany, Japan, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. All the countries are planning for disposal of spent fuel and/or high-level wastes in deep geologic repositories. Most countries (except Canada and Sweden) plan to reprocess their spent fuel and vitrify the resultant high-level liquid wastes; in comparison, the US plans direct disposal of spent fuel. The US is planning to use a container for spent fuel as the primary engineered barrier. The US has the most developed repository concept and has one of the earliest scheduled repository startup dates. The repository environment presently being considered in the US is unique, being located in tuff above the water table. The US also has the most prescriptive regulations and performance requirements for the repository system and its components. 135 refs., 8 tabs.

  17. Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning:Current Practices in the Western United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles

    2008-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Concerns about global climate change have substantially increased the likelihood that future policy will seek to minimize carbon dioxide emissions. Assuch, even today, electric utilities are making resource planning and investment decisions that consider the possible implications of these future carbon regulations. In this article, we examine the manner in which utilities assess the financial risks associated with future carbon regulations within their long-term resource plans. We base our analysis on a review of the most recent resource plans filed by fifteen electric utilities in the Western United States. Virtually all of these utilities made some effort to quantitatively evaluate the potential cost of future carbon regulations when analyzing alternate supply- and demand-side resource options for meeting customer load. Even without Federal climate regulation in the U.S., the prospect of that regulation is already having an impact on utility decision-making and resource choices. That said, the methods and assumptions used by utilities to analyze carbon regulatory risk, and the impact of that analysis on their choice of a particular resource strategy, vary considerably, revealing a number of opportunities for analytic improvement. Though our review focuses on a subset of U.S. electric utilities, this work holds implications for all electric utilities and energy policymakers who are seeking to minimize the compliance costs associated with future carbon regulations

  18. Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles

    2008-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Concerns about global climate change have substantially increased the likelihood that future policy will seek to minimize carbon dioxide emissions. As such, even today, electric utilities are making resource planning and investment decisions that consider the possible implications of these future carbon regulations. In this article, we examine the manner in which utilities assess the financial risks associated with future carbon regulations within their long-term resource plans. We base our analysis on a review of the most recent resource plans filed by fifteen electric utilities in the Western United States. Virtually all of these utilities made some effort to quantitatively evaluate the potential cost of future carbon regulations when analyzing alternate supply- and demand-side resource options for meeting customer load. Even without Federal climate regulation in the U.S., the prospect of that regulation is already having an impact on utility decision-making and resource choices. That said, the methods and assumptions used by utilities to analyze carbon regulatory risk, and the impact of that analysis on their choice of a particular resource strategy, vary considerably, revealing a number of opportunities for analytic improvement. Though our review focuses on a subset of U.S. electric utilities, this work holds implications for all electric utilities and energy policymakers who are seeking to minimize the compliance costs associated with future carbon regulations.

  19. Toward improving the effectiveness of wolf management approaches in Michigan: insights from a 2010 statewide survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Michael P.

    changes (e.g., federal delisting, regulated hunting seasons); public responses management. Current events in Michigan (e.g., delisting) provide an ideal time

  20. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Glass Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Manufacturing Industries. Good Practice Guide 131. Unitedand their Controls. Good Practice Guide 252. United Kingdom.

  1. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masanet, Eric; Masanet, Eric; Worrell, Ernst; Graus, Wina; Galitsky, Christina

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry--defined in this Energy Guide as facilities engaged in the canning, freezing, and drying or dehydrating of fruits and vegetables--consumes over $800 million worth of purchased fuels and electricity per year. Energy efficiency improvement isan important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, facility, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry is provided along with a description of the major process technologies used within the industry. Next, a wide variety of energy efficiency measures applicable to fruit and vegetable processing plants are described. Many measure descriptions include expected savings in energy and energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-world applications in fruit and vegetable processing facilities and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. Given the importance of water in fruit and vegetable processing, a summary of basic, proven measures for improving plant-level water efficiency are also provided. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry reduce energy and water consumption in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of all measures--as well as on their applicability to different production practices--is needed to assess their cost effectiveness at individual plants.

  2. Building America Best Practices Series: Volume 3; Builders and Buyers Handbook for Improving New Home Efficiency, Comfort, and Durability in Cold and Very Cold Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This best practices guide is part of a series produced by Building America. The guide book is a resource to help builders large and small build high-quality, energy-efficient homes that achieve 30% energy savings in space conditioning and water heating in the cold and very cold climates. The savings are in comparison with the 1993 Model Energy Code. The guide contains chapters for every member of the builder's team-from the manager to the site planner to the designers, site supervisors, the trades, and marketers. There is also a chapter for homeowners on how to use the book to provide help in selecting a new home or builder.

  3. Building America Best Practices Series: Volume 5; Builders and Buyers Handbook for Improving New Home Efficiency, Comfort, and Durability in the Marine Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baechler, M. C.; Taylor, Z. T.; Bartlett, R.; Gilbride, T.; Hefty, M.; Steward, H.; Love, P. M.; Palmer, J. A.

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This best practices guide is part of a series produced by Building America. The guide book is a resource to help builders large and small build high-quality, energy-efficient homes that achieve 30% energy savings in space conditioning and water heating in the Marine climate region. The savings are in comparison with the 1993 Model Energy Code. The guide contains chapters for every member of the builder's team--from the manager to the site planner to the designers, site supervisors, the trades, and marketers. There is also a chapter for homeowners on how to use the book to provide help in selecting a new home or builder.

  4. An approach to improving the power management system in electronic devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Jui Min

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The current power management technology baseline does not address the increasing gap between system charge performance and functionality needs in a smartphone. This gap can eventually inhibit further increases in functionality ...

  5. Coupling of ecological and water quality models for improved water resource and fish management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tillman, Dorothy Hamlin

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years new ideas for nutrient management to control eutrophication in estuarine environments have been under consideration. One popular approach being considered in the Chesapeake Bay Program is called the “top down” approach based...

  6. GUIDELINES FOR IMPLEMENTATION OF AN ADVANCED OUTAGE CONTROL CENTER TO IMPROVE OUTAGE COORDINATION, PROBLEM RESOLUTION, AND OUTAGE RISK MANAGEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Germain, Shawn St; Farris, Ronald; Whaley, April M; Medema, Heather; Gertman, David

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research effort is a part of the Light-Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, which is a research and development (R&D) program sponsored by Department of Energy (DOE) and performed in close collaboration with industry R&D programs that provide the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of current nuclear power plants. The LWRS program serves to help the U.S. nuclear industry adopt new technologies and engineering solutions that facilitate the continued safe operation of the plants and extension of the current operating licenses. Managing NPP outages is a complex and difficult task due to the large number of maintenance and repair activities that are accomplished in a short period of time. During an outage, the outage control center (OCC) is the temporary command center for outage managers and provides several critical functions for the successful execution of the outage schedule. Essentially, the OCC functions to facilitate information inflow, assist outage management in processing information, and to facilitate the dissemination of information to stakeholders. Currently, outage management activities primarily rely on telephone communication, face to face reports of status, and periodic briefings in the OCC. It is a difficult task to maintain current the information related to outage progress and discovered conditions. Several advanced communication and collaboration technologies have shown promise for facilitating the information flow into, across, and out of the OCC. The use of these technologies will allow information to be shared electronically, providing greater amounts of real-time information to the decision makers and allowing OCC coordinators to meet with supporting staff remotely. Passively monitoring status electronically through advances in the areas of mobile worker technologies, computer-based procedures, and automated work packages will reduce the current reliance on manually reporting progress. The use of these technologies will also improve the knowledge capture and management capabilities of the organization. The purpose of this research is to improve management of NPP outages through the development of an advanced outage control center (AOCC) that is specifically designed to maximize the usefulness of communication and collaboration technologies for outage coordination and problem resolution activities. This technical report for industry implementation outlines methods and considerations for the establishment of an AOCC. This report provides a process for implementation of a change management plan, evaluation of current outage processes, the selection of technology, and guidance for the implementation of the selected technology. Methods are presented for both adoption of technologies within an existing OCC and for a complete OCC replacement, including human factors considerations for OCC design and setup.

  7. Developing a Maturity Matrix for Software Product Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    management (SPM) is a crucial area within many software companies. Good product management has a high impact, as it improves product quality and prevents release delays. To improve the SPM practice, we propose the maturity has to solve by getting experienced in the area. Hence, lifting the quality of the product

  8. Breeding management practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Laura Lea

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Pemstein, D. O'Canna, and R. H. Douglas. 19BO. Control of ovulation in cycling mares with ovarian steriods and prostaglandin. Therio. 15: 191. Miller, P. 4. , J. W. Lauderdale and S. Geng. 1976. Effects of various doses of prostin F2 alpha on estrous...

  9. Best Environmental Management Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    other medical wastes back to the farm. Containers should be visibly labeled identifying down a drain or on the ground. Disinfectant should be added to unused portions of live or modified

  10. Best Environmental Management Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to produce feed nutrients that can be fed to animals for meat, milk or egg production. Excess accumulation of the NH4 - N is lost when manure is applied during cool weather. Generally, most manure is applied

  11. Best Environmental Management Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Sampling Don Jones and Alan Sutton, Purdue University and Bruce MacKellar, Michigan State University Proper ice. Samples to be stored for more than two days should be refrigerated. Poultry cake litter samples,000 gallons if liquid, or per acre-inch if irrigated. In Michigan, ammonia levels will also be neded

  12. Best Environmental Management Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of circulation fans in pits of high-rise laying houses, ventilation systems that promote proper dunging patterns

  13. Water Management Best Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Energy Star Programs ? www.epa.gov/watersense www.energystar.gov ? Conserve Florida Water Clearinghouse ? http://www.conservefloridawater.org/ ? Arizona Department of Water Resources ? www.azwater.gov/conservation The True Cost of Water... Future Demands Municipal Manufacturing Mining Steam Electric Agriculture New Codes & Standards Green Certification& Labeling Programs ? Green Restaurants, Hotels, etc. ? Green Guide for Health Care ? LEED ? GBI ? EPA Water Sense ? EPA...

  14. Project Management Practices

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR - TProcuring Solar forProject DevelopsDepartmentACQUISITION

  15. The Role of Benchmarking in Promoting Strong Energy Management Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tunnessen, W.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The significance of formalized energy management practices and programs in driving and sustaining energy efficiency improvements within the industrial sector has become more widely recognized over the past several years. The release of the ISO 50001...

  16. The Role of Benchmarking in Promoting Strong Energy Management Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tunnessen, W.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The significance of formalized energy management practices and programs in driving and sustaining energy efficiency improvements within the industrial sector has become more widely recognized over the past several years. ...

  17. Improvement of Radwaste Management System at Bilibinskaya NPP in the Far North Conditions - 13456

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedorov, Denis; Adamovich, Dmitry; Savkin, Alexander [SUE SIA Radon, 2/14, 7th Rostovsky lane, Moscow, 119121 (Russian Federation)] [SUE SIA Radon, 2/14, 7th Rostovsky lane, Moscow, 119121 (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 2009 Bilibinskaya NPP is getting started to prepare to the decommissioning in the Far North conditions. Bilibinskaya NPP is located in the Far North of Russian Federation in Chukotka region. Since 1974 it operates 4 units EGP-6 with the capacity of 48 MW each. According to the contract, SIA Radon has performed the following works: - LLRW disposal safety analysis, - The technology of spent ion-exchanger and salt residue solidification is proposed, - Expected radwaste (till 2027) management economical analysis, - Technical proposals for LLRW and IRW management. (authors)

  18. Managing variability to improve quality, capacity and cost in the perioperative process at Massachusetts General Hospital

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Devon J. (Devon Jameson)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The widely held assumption is that to improve access and quality of health care, we need to spend more. In fact, that is not necessarily true. The results of this project, performed at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), ...

  19. Analyzing capital allocation for energy efficiency improvements by commercial real estate investment managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Kristian A

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerous studies have shown that retrofitting an office building with energy efficiency improvements can significantly reduce operating costs, yet many existing office buildings have not been retrofitted. The objective of ...

  20. This document is produced by the University Print Management Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yi

    University Print Management Team. A Guide To Best Practice Printing #12;This document is produced by the University Print Management Team (UPMT) to raise awareness of printing on campus, and to demonstrate how we managing the print process to reduce cost, waste and to improve the functionality and availability of print

  1. An analysis of the teaching methods and sources of information used in adopting improved practices in rice production in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kibria, A. K. M. Anwarul

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Size of Farms on the Use of Teaching Methods for Adoption of Rice Production Practices 22 25 27 30 34 38 42 TABLE OF CON TEN TS (continued) Chapter Page Influence of Parents' Vocation on the Use of Teaching Methods for Adoption of Rice... with Different Tenure Levels Expressed in Percentage 41 10 Chi-Square Test for Tenure Levels-Teaching Methods Independence 42 Average Use of Major Categories of Teaching Methods for Rice Production by Farmers with Different Size of Farms Expressed...

  2. Improvement of the Road Traffic Management by an Ant-Hierarchical Fuzzy System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casillas Barranquero, Jorge

    of an adaptive vehicle guidance system. The proposed method is implemented as a deliberative module of a vehicle quality in terms of time, fluidity, and adaptability. Index Terms--transportation, adaptive vehicle of ITS are the vehicle guidance [1], the optimization of the road traffic flow [2], the manage- ment

  3. Increasing Waterflooding Reservoirs in the Wilmington Oil Field through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management, Class III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koerner, Roy; Clarke, Don; Walker, Scott; Phillips, Chris; Nguyen, John; Moos, Dan; Tagbor, Kwasi

    2001-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was intended to increase recoverable waterflood reserves in slope and basin reservoirs through improved reservoir characterization and reservoir management. The particular application of this project is in portions of Fault Blocks IV and V of the Wilmington Oil Field, in Long Beach, California, but the approach is widely applicable in slope and basin reservoirs, transferring technology so that it can be applied in other sections of the Wilmington field and by operators in other slope and basin reservoirs is a primary component of the project.

  4. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neelis, Maarten; Worrell, Ernst; Masanet, Eric

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy is the most important cost factor in the U.S petrochemical industry, defined in this guide as the chemical industry sectors producing large volume basic and intermediate organic chemicals as well as large volume plastics. The sector spent about $10 billion on fuels and electricity in 2004. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. petrochemical industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, facility, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the petrochemical industry is provided along with a description of the major process technologies used within the industry. Next, a wide variety of energy efficiency measures are described. Many measure descriptions include expected savings in energy and energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-world applications in the petrochemical and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. petrochemical industry reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of all measures--and on their applicability to different production practices--is needed to assess their cost effectiveness at individual plants.

  5. Collaboration between Rutgers Business School, private companies and public entities leading to improved efficiencies in end-to-end supply chain management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Xiaodong

    Michael R. Cooper, PhD. "The new Supply Chain Management and Marketing Sciences department playsCollaboration between Rutgers Business School, private companies and public entities leading to improved efficiencies in end-to-end supply chain management The newly established Department of Supply

  6. Improving the Usability of Integrated Assessment for Adaptation Practice: Insights from the U.S. Southeast Energy Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Bremond, Ariane; Preston, Benjamin; Rice, Jennie S.

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy systems comprise a key sector of the U.S. economy, and one that has been identified as potentially vulnerable to the effects of climate variability and change. However, understanding of adaptation processes in energy companies and private entities more broadly is limited. It is unclear, for example, the extent to which energy companies are well-served by existing knowledge and tools emerging from the impacts, adaptation and vulnerability (IAV) and integrated assessment modeling (IAM) communities and/or what experiments, analyses, and model results have practical utility for informing adaptation in the energy sector. As part of a regional IAM development project, we investigated available evidence of adaptation processes in the energy sector, with a particular emphasis on the U.S. Southeast and Gulf Coast region. A mixed methods approach of literature review and semi-structured interviews with key informants from energy utilities was used to compare existing knowledge from the IAV community with that of regional stakeholders. That comparison revealed that much of the IAV literature on the energy sector is climate-centric and therefore disconnected from the more integrated decision-making processes and institutional perspectives of energy utilities. Increasing the relevance of research and assessment for the energy sector will necessitate a greater investment in integrated assessment and modeling efforts that respond to practical decision-making needs as well as greater collaboration between energy utilities and researchers in the design, execution, and communication of those efforts.

  7. Increasing Waterflood Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clarke, D.; Koerner, R.; Moos D.; Nguyen, J.; Phillips, C.; Tagbor, K.; Walker, S.

    1999-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This project used advanced reservoir characterization tools, including the pulsed acoustic cased-hole logging tool, geologic three-dimensional (3-D) modeling software, and commercially available reservoir management software to identify sands with remaining high oil saturation following waterflood. Production from the identified high oil saturated sands was stimulated by recompleting existing production and injection wells in these sands using conventional means as well as a short radius redrill candidate.

  8. Water Efficiency Improvements at Various Environmental Protection Agency Sites: Best Management Practice Case Study #12 - Laboratory/Medical Equipment (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blakley, H.

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) built a successful water conservation program and reduced potable water use through a series of initiatives at EPA laboratories. The projects highlighted in this case study demonstrate EPA's ability to reduce water use in laboratory and medical equipment by implementing vacuum pump and steam sterilizer replacements and retrofits. Due to the success of the initial vacuum pump and steam sterilizer projects described here, EPA is implementing similar projects at several laboratories throughout the nation.

  9. Microelectronics Plant Water Efficiency Improvements at Sandia National Laboratories: Best Management Practice, Case Study #13 - Other Water Use (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Overview of alternative financing mechanisms avaiable to Federal agencies to fund renewable energy and energy efficiency projects.

  10. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Glass Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    actions, develop an energy management plan for business; andinternal support for a business energy management program ishowever, support for business energy management programs can

  11. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Glass Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    actions, develop an energy management plan for business; and38. Caffal, C. (1995). Energy Management in Industry. Centre2005a). Guidelines for Energy Management. United States

  12. Theorizing Practice and Practicing Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feldman, Martha S; Orlikowski, Wanda J

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Practice and Practicing Theory Organization Science 22(5),Practice and Practicing Theory Organization Science 22(5),Practice and Practicing Theory Organization Science 22(5),

  13. Building America Best Practices Series: Volume 4; Builders and Buyers Handbook for Improving New Home Efficiency, Comfort, and Durability in the Mixed-Humid Climate Climate Regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baechler, M. C.; Love, P. M.

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This best practices guide is part of a series produced by Building America. The guide book is a resource to help builders large and small build high-quality, energy-efficient homes that achieve 30% energy savings in space conditioning and water heating in the mixed-humid climate region. The savings are in comparison with the 1993 Model Energy Code. The guide contains chapters for every member of the builder?s team?from the manager to the site planner to the designers, site supervisors, the trades, and marketers. There is also a chapter for homeowners on how to use the book to provide help in selecting a new home or builder.

  14. Software engineering practices for control system reliability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. K. Schaffner; K. S White

    1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper will discuss software engineering practices used to improve Control System reliability. The authors begin with a brief discussion of the Software Engineering Institute's Capability Maturity Model (CMM) which is a framework for evaluating and improving key practices used to enhance software development and maintenance capabilities. The software engineering processes developed and used by the Controls Group at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab), using the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) for accelerator control, are described. Examples are given of how their procedures have been used to minimized control system downtime and improve reliability. While their examples are primarily drawn from their experience with EPICS, these practices are equally applicable to any control system. Specific issues addressed include resource allocation, developing reliable software lifecycle processes and risk management.

  15. Review of comparative LCAs of food waste management systems - Current status and potential improvements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernstad, A., E-mail: anna.bernstad@chemeng.lth.se [Water and Environmental Engineering at the Department of Chemical Engineering, Lund University, Chemical Centre, 221 00 Lund (Sweden); Cour Jansen, J. la [Water and Environmental Engineering at the Department of Chemical Engineering, Lund University, Chemical Centre, 221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GHG-emissions from different treatment alternatives vary largely in 25 reviewed comparative LCAs of bio-waste management. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer System-boundary settings often vary largely in reviewed studies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Existing LCA guidelines give varying recommendations in relation to several key issues. - Abstract: Twenty-five comparative cycle assessments (LCAs) addressing food waste treatment were reviewed, including the treatment alternatives landfill, thermal treatment, compost (small and large scale) and anaerobic digestion. The global warming potential related to these treatment alternatives varies largely amongst the studies. Large differences in relation to setting of system boundaries, methodological choices and variations in used input data were seen between the studies. Also, a number of internal contradictions were identified, many times resulting in biased comparisons between alternatives. Thus, noticed differences in global warming potential are not found to be a result of actual differences in the environmental impacts from studied systems, but rather to differences in the performance of the study. A number of key issues with high impact on the overall global warming potential from different treatment alternatives for food waste were identified through the use of one-way sensitivity analyses in relation to a previously performed LCA of food waste management. Assumptions related to characteristics in treated waste, losses and emissions of carbon, nutrients and other compounds during the collection, storage and pretreatment, potential energy recovery through combustion, emissions from composting, emissions from storage and land use of bio-fertilizers and chemical fertilizers and eco-profiles of substituted goods were all identified as highly relevant for the outcomes of this type of comparisons. As the use of LCA in this area is likely to increase in coming years, it is highly relevant to establish more detailed guidelines within this field in order to increase both the general quality in assessments as well as the potentials for cross-study comparisons.

  16. Water Management Strategies for Improved Coalbed Methane Production in the Black Warrior Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pashin, Jack; McIntyre-Redden, Marcella; Mann, Steven; Merkel, David

    2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The modern coalbed methane industry was born in the Black Warrior Basin of Alabama and has to date produced more than 2.6 trillion cubic feet of gas and 1.6 billion barrels of water. The coalbed gas industry in this area is dependent on instream disposal of co-produced water, which ranges from nearly potable sodium-bicarbonate water to hypersaline sodium-chloride water. This study employed diverse analytical methods to characterize water chemistry in light of the regional geologic framework and to evaluate the full range of water management options for the Black Warrior coalbed methane industry. Results reveal strong interrelationships among regional geology, water chemistry, and gas chemistry. Coalbed methane is produced from multiple coal seams in Pennsylvanian-age strata of the Pottsville Coal Interval, in which water chemistry is influenced by a structurally controlled meteoric recharge area along the southeastern margin of the basin. The most important constituents of concern in the produced water include chlorides, ammonia compounds, and organic substances. Regional mapping and statistical analysis indicate that the concentrations of most ionic compounds, metallic substances, and nonmetallic substances correlate with total dissolved solids and chlorides. Gas is effectively produced at pipeline quality, and the only significant impurity is N{sub 2}. Geochemical analysis indicates that the gas is of mixed thermogenic-biogenic origin. Stable isotopic analysis of produced gas and calcite vein fills indicates that widespread late-stage microbial methanogenesis occurred primarily along a CO{sub 2} reduction metabolic pathway. Organic compounds in the produced water appear to have helped sustain microbial communities. Ammonia and ammonium levels increase with total dissolved solids content and appear to have played a role in late-stage microbial methanogenesis and the generation of N{sub 2}. Gas production tends to decline exponentially, whereas water production tends to decline hyperbolically. Hyperbolic decline indicates that water volume is of greatest concern early in the life of a coalbed methane project. Regional mapping indicates that gas production is controlled primarily by the ability to depressurize permeable coal seams that are natively within the steep part of the adsorption isotherm. Water production is greatest within the freshwater intrusion and below thick Cretaceous cover strata and is least in areas of underpressure. Water management strategies include instream disposal, which can be applied effectively in most parts of the basin. Deep disposal may be applicable locally, particularly where high salinity limits the ability to dispose into streams. Artificial wetlands show promise for the management of saline water, especially where the reservoir yield is limited. Beneficial use options include municipal water supply, agricultural use, and industrial use. The water may be of use to an inland shrimp farming industry, which is active around the southwestern coalbed methane fields. The best opportunities for beneficial use are reuse of water by the coalbed methane industry for drilling and hydraulic fracturing. This research has further highlighted opportunities for additional research on treatment efficiency, the origin of nitrogen compounds, organic geochemistry, biogenic gas generation, flow modeling, and computer simulation. Results of this study are being disseminated through a vigorous technology transfer program that includes web resources, numerous presentations to stakeholders, and a variety of technical publications.

  17. An assessment of potential for benefit from integrating geographic information systems technology into life-cycle management of infrastructures a focus for infrastructure management practice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millegan, Harold Lynn

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    : Dr. Robert L. Lytton Infrastructure life-cycle management phases with the greatest potential for benefit from Geographic Information Systems (GIS), is the subject of this thesis. The planning, design, construction, operations, maintenance... then focuses on analysis of data collected by a questionnaire sent to in&astructure managers in Texas. The survey was made to assess how important and frequently they deal with issues associated with the planning, design, construction, operation, maintenance...

  18. Improved Radiation Dosimetry/Risk Estimates to Facilitate Environmental Management of Plutonium-Contaminated Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, Bobby R.; Tokarskaya, Zoya B.; Zhuntova, Galina V.; Osovets, Sergey V.; Syrchikov, Victor A., Belyaeva, Zinaida D.

    2007-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes 4 years of research achievements in this Office of Science (BER), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) project. The research described was conducted by scientists and supporting staff at Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute (LRRI)/Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Institute (LBERI) and the Southern Urals Biophysics Institute (SUBI). All project objectives and goals were achieved. A major focus was on obtaining improved cancer risk estimates for exposure via inhalation to plutonium (Pu) isotopes in the workplace (DOE radiation workers) and environment (public exposures to Pu-contaminated soil). A major finding was that low doses and dose rates of gamma rays can significantly suppress cancer induction by alpha radiation from inhaled Pu isotopes. The suppression relates to stimulation of the body's natural defenses, including immunity against cancer cells and selective apoptosis which removes precancerous and other aberrant cells.

  19. Management of lignite fly ash for improving soil fertility and crop productivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ram, L.C.; Srivastava, N.K.; Jha, S.K.; Sinha, A.K.; Masto, R.E.; Selvi, V.A. [Central Fuel Research Institute, Dhanbad (India)

    2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Lignite fly ash (LFA), being alkaline and endowed with excellent pozzolanic properties, a silt loam texture, and plant nutrients, has the potential to improve soil quality and productivity. Long-term field trials with groundnut, maize, and sun hemp were carried out to study the effect of LFA on growth and yield. Before crop I was sown, LFA was applied at various doses with and without press mud (an organic waste from the sugar industry, used as an amendment and source of nutrients). LFA with and without press mud was also applied before crops III and V were cultivated. Chemical fertilizer, along with gypsum, humic acid, and bioferfertilizer, was applied in all treatments, including the control. With one-time and repeat applications of LFA (with and without press mud), yield increased significantly (7.0-89.0%) in relation to the control crop. The press mud enhanced the yield (3.0-15.0%) with different LFA applications. One-time and repeat application of LFA (alone and in combination with press mud) improved soil quality and the nutrient content of the produce. The highest dose of LFA (200 t/ha) with and without press mud showed the best residual effects (eco-friendly increases in the yield of succeeding crops). Some increase in trace- and heavy metal contents and in the level of gamma-emitters in soil and crop produce, but well within permissible limits, was observed. Thus, LFA can be used on a large scale to boost soil fertility and productivity with no adverse effects on the soil or crops, which may solve the problem of bulk disposal of fly ash in an eco-friendly manner.

  20. Improved fodder tree management in the agroforestry systems of central and western Nepal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karki, M.B.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ten, three year old, fodder tree species were evaluated at four on-station and three on-farm sites in Nepal. Ficus semicordata (Buchattam. ex Sm.) growth was found to be significantly higher than the rest in diameter and dry foliage weight values. Species were significantly different in height, diameter, and foliage and wood growth. Sites were significantly different in total height growth only. On-farm species evaluation indicated that A. lakoocha and F. semicordata had significantly higher growth. Allometric regression equations were developed to predict foliage, total wood, and total biomass yield of F. semicordata, and B. variegata. Individual-tree models were developed. For B. variegata, diameter at 50 cm. and for F. semicordata, crown diameter and height gave the best fitted equations. Regression equations for three sites did not differ significantly. Therefore, data were pooled and a common model was estimated for each species. In on-farm regression models, height and crown diameter were the best predictors for F. semicordata and dbh gave the best fit for B. variegata. The models for the two species were used to construct regional fodder and fuelwood biomass tables. An improved crop-livestock-fodder agroforestry system was designed for a village in Nepal. Linear programming was used to demonstrate the use of a tool to optimize land allocation maximizing net returns while satisfying the supply of minimum needs of food, fodder, and fuelwood. The optimal solution indicated that, by improving the returns to labor and by applying more compost, the village should be able to increase the annual net farm returns from NRs. 2.94 million to NRs. 3.85 million. The food, fodder and fuelwood production levels were shown to increase by 17%, 130%, and 537% respectively. The labor and compost requirements were up by 138% and 59% respectively, over the five year period. The soil loss through run-off was estimated to decrease by about 15% over the same period.

  1. Online Project Management Certification Syllabus Project management has evolved into a business practice that is closely aligned with the organizational and strategic goals of today's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reisslein, Martin

    a project as well as helping with less tangible but vital areas like establishing good communication into a business practice that is closely aligned with the organizational and strategic goals of today's companies and proven methods which offer a more complete and systematic framework for defining and controlling

  2. Social marketing, financial, and regulatory mechanisms for adoption of water conservation and stormwater management practices by single-family households

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Youngerman, Zach (Zach Reuben)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the latter half of the nineteenth century, water delivery and stormwater removal have been managed largely by engineering staff at water utilities, municipal departments and multi-jurisdiction authorities. In recent ...

  3. The Influence of Hotel Managers’ Intentions for Green Marketing Practices: An Application of the Theory of Planned Behavior in Turkey 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yilmaz, Nese

    2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    , the framework aimed to assess how marketing intentions translates to actual green marketing behavior among hotel managers throughout Turkey. Based on previous studies, an online survey was designed to measure the above constructs. A census was taken of all one...

  4. Encouraging low-impact-development stormwater-management practices / Assabet River Watershed sub-basin case study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, James E. (James Edward), 1969-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Regulatory codes and ordinances create a framework that guide stormwater management decision processes. These regulations are designed to protect the health and safety of the public and to preserve the natural integrity ...

  5. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Glass Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy management system discussed above, including setting up a monitoringenergy monitoring and process control systems can play an important role in energy management

  6. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Pharmaceutical Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Internal support for a business energy management program ishowever, support for business energy management programs canProducts for Business Description: ENERGY STAR identifies

  7. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for Cement Making. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    internal support for a business energy management program ishowever, support for business energy management programs canProducts for Business Description: ENERGY STAR identifies

  8. Implementing an Energy Management System at TOTAL Prot Arthur Refinery: The process to improving and sustaining energy efficiency performance at a facility.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoyle, A.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PROPRIETARY INFORMATION? 2011 KBC Advanced Technologies plc. All Rights Reserved. Implementing an Energy Management System at TOTAL Port Arthur Refinery: The process to improving and sustaining energy efficiency performance at a facility May... Improvements ? Cost-savings initiatives ? Increasing environmental awareness ? Increasing throughput by debottlenecking processes ? Increasing government mandates 2May 2013 Energy Costs for a 200kBPD Complex refinery Typically, energy efficiency programs...

  9. Evaluating the Economics of Best Management Practices for Tarrant Regional Water District’s Eagle Mountain Lake Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Jason L.

    manag e me n t unit of analys i s is one designated wetland project encompassing 20.6 acres. In-Lake BMPs Based on feedback from TRWD personne l , it was noted that BMP 20 (Hypolimnetic Aeration ) and BMP 21 (P Inactiva t i o n with Alum... years. The manage me n t unit of analysi s is one designa t e d hypol i mn e t i c aerat i o n proj ec t withi n the Eagle Mountai n Lake watersh e d . BMP 21 P Inactivation with Alum. T h e addition of powdered alum at variou s lake depths...

  10. Kitchen Appliance Upgrades Improve Water Efficiency at DOD Exchange Facilities: Best Management Practice Case Study #11: Commercial Kitchen Equipment (Brochure), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetter Report:40PM to 2:05PM PDTKimberlee KearfottDepartment

  11. Water Efficiency Improvements At Various Environmental Protection Agency Sites: Best Management Practices Case Study #12 „ Laboratory/Medical Equipment (Brochure), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and03/02ReportWaste-to-Energy and FuelDepartment of

  12. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center Improves Cooling System Performance: Best Management Practice Case Study #10: Cooling Towers (Revised) (Fact Sheet), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in Many Devils Wash, Shiprock, New Mexico

  13. Towards an Integration of the Lean Enterprise System, Total Quality Management, Six Sigma and Related Enterprise Process Improvement Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bozdogan, Kirkor

    2010-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The lean enterprise system, total quality management, six sigma, theory of constraints, agile manufacturing,

  14. Analyzing the Effect of Variations in Soil and Management Practices on the Sustainability of Corn Stover-Based Bioethanol Production in Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woli, Prem; Paz, Joel

    2011-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The inherent variability in corn stover productivity due to variations in soils and crop management practices might contribute to a variation in corn stover-based bioethanol sustainability. This study was carried out to examine how changes in soil types and crop management options would affect corn stover yield (CSY) and the sustainability of the stover-based ethanol production in the Delta region of Mississippi. Based on potential acreage and geographical representation, three locations were selected. Using CERES-Maize model, stover yields were simulated for several scenarios of soils and crop management options. Based on 'net energy value (NEV)' computed from CSYs, a sustainability indicator for stover-based bioethanol production was established. The effects of soils and crop management options on CSY and NEV were determined using ANOVA tests and regression analyses. Both CSY and NEV were significantly different across sandy loam, silt loam, and silty clay loam soils and also across high-, mid-, and low-yielding cultivars. With an increase in irrigation level, both CSY and NEV increased initially and decreased after reaching a peak. A third-degree polynomial relationship was found between planting date and CSY and NEV each. By moving from the lowest to the highest production scenario, values of CSY and NEV could be increased by 86 to 553%, depending on location and weather condition. The effects of variations in soils and crop management options on NEV were the same as on CSY. The NEV was positive for all scenarios, indicating that corn stover-based ethanol production system in the Delta region is sustainable.

  15. READY MIX CONCRETE INDUSTRY ENVIRONMENTAL CODE OF PRACTICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waste Solids Disposal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Solid Waste Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Solids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Process Description and Waste Management Practices. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Waste

  16. Statistical methods for nuclear material management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowen W.M.; Bennett, C.A. (eds.) [eds.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book is intended as a reference manual of statistical methodology for nuclear material management practitioners. It describes statistical methods currently or potentially important in nuclear material management, explains the choice of methods for specific applications, and provides examples of practical applications to nuclear material management problems. Together with the accompanying training manual, which contains fully worked out problems keyed to each chapter, this book can also be used as a textbook for courses in statistical methods for nuclear material management. It should provide increased understanding and guidance to help improve the application of statistical methods to nuclear material management problems.

  17. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for Breweries: An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitsky, Christina; Martin, Nathan; Worrell, Ernst; Lehman, Bryan

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Annually, breweries in the United States spend over $200 million on energy. Energy consumption is equal to 38 percent of the production costs of beer, making energy efficiency improvement an important way to reduce costs, especially in times of high energy price volatility. After a summary of the beer making process and energy use, we examine energy efficiency opportunities available for breweries. We provide specific primary energy savings for each energy efficiency measure based on case studies that have implemented the measures, as well as references to technical literature. If available, we have also listed typical payback periods. Our findings suggest that given available technology, there are still opportunities to reduce energy consumption cost-effectively in the brewing industry. Brewers value highly the quality, taste and drinkability of their beer. Brewing companies have and are expected to continue to spend capital on cost-effective energy conservation measures that meet these quality, taste and drinkability requirements. For individual plants, further research on the economics of the measures, as well as their applicability to different brewing practices, is needed to assess implementation of selected technologies.

  18. INTEGRATING SNOW MANAGEMENT PROCESSES AND PRACTICES INTO A DETAILED SNOW-PACK MODEL. RELEVANCE, APPLICATIONS AND PROSPECTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flin, Frédéric

    of snow industry. Demand for optimization and diagnostics have been growing quickly among professionals tickets in 2013 and winter tourism generated about 10 billion U.S. $. Ski industry is a worldwide market). For these reasons, heavy demand exists for scientific investigation of both snow management optimization in terms

  19. Improved Management of the Technical Interfaces Between the Hanford Tank Farm Operator and the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant - 13383

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, Garth M. [Bechtel National Inc., 2435 Stevens Center Place, Richland, Washington, 99352 (United States)] [Bechtel National Inc., 2435 Stevens Center Place, Richland, Washington, 99352 (United States); Saunders, Scott A. [Washington River Protection Solutions, P.O. Box 850, Richland, Washington, 99352 (United States)] [Washington River Protection Solutions, P.O. Box 850, Richland, Washington, 99352 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is constructing the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at the Hanford site in Washington to treat and immobilize approximately 114 million gallons of high level radioactive waste (after all retrievals are accomplished). In order for the WTP to be designed and operated successfully, close coordination between the WTP engineering, procurement, and construction contractor, Bechtel National, Inc. and the tank farms operating contractor (TOC), Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, is necessary. To develop optimal solutions for DOE and for the treatment of the waste, it is important to deal with the fact that two different prime contractors, with somewhat differing contracts, are tasked with retrieving and delivering the waste and for treating and immobilizing that waste. The WTP and the TOC have over the years cooperated to manage the technical interface. To manage what is becoming a much more complicated interface as the WTP design progresses and new technical issues have been identified, an organizational change was made by WTP and TOC in November of 2011. This organizational change created a co-located integrated project team (IPT) to deal with mutual and interface issues. The Technical Organization within the One System IPT includes employees from both TOC and WTP. This team has worked on a variety of technical issues of mutual interest and concern. Technical issues currently being addressed include: - The waste acceptance criteria; - Waste feed delivery and the associated data quality objectives (DQO); - Evaluation of the effects of performing a riser cut on a single shell tank on WTP operations; - The disposition of secondary waste from both TOC and WTP; - The close coordination of the TOC double shell tank mixing and sampling program and the Large Scale Integrated Test (LSIT) program for pulse jet mixers at WTP along with the associated responses to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 2010-2; - Development of a set of alternatives to the current baseline that involve aspects of direct feed, feed conditioning, and design changes. The One System Technical Organization has served WTP, TOC, and DOE well in managing and resolving issues at the interface. This paper describes the organizational structure used to improve the interface and several examples of technical interface issues that have been successfully addressed by the new organization. (authors)

  20. Improved Battery Pack Thermal Management to Reduce Cost and Increase Energy Density: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-12-499

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, K.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under this CRADA NREL will support Creare's project for the Department of Energy entitled 'Improved Battery Pack Thermal Management to Reduce Cost and Increase Energy Density' which involves the development of an air-flow based cooling product that increases energy density, safety, and reliability of hybrid electric vehicle battery packs.

  1. Industrial-Load-Shaping: The Practice of and Prospects for Utility/Industry Cooperation to Manage Peak Electricity Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bules, D. J.; Rubin, D. E.; Maniates, M. F.

    in programs that influence electric demand in ways that produce desired changes in the pattern and magnitude of a utility's electric load profile. These programs, commonly termed "de mand side management" (DSH) , have a customer orien tation... such a rescheduling. The residential customer class appears least suited to load-shaping efforts. Al though characterized by a relatively low load-profile (high peak-to-average ratio) and consistent electricity consumption pat terns, the timing...

  2. Managing Energy Efficiency Improvement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almaguer, J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    efficiency opportunities as well as promote the use of energy efficient methodologies and technologies. If, as program results suggest, 15% to 20% of the gas that is now consumed at by plant operations can be saved through efficiencies, it would save $500...

  3. Sustainable MSD prevention: management for continuous improvement between prevention and production. Ergonomic intervention in two assembly line companies.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    to the development of production management systems: Kaizen, one piece flow, Kanban, etc. The aim of such systems

  4. Improved water allocation utilizing probabilistic climate forecasts: Short-term water contracts in a risk management framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arumugam, Sankar

    . Thus, integrated supply and demand management can be achieved. In this paper, a single period multiuser, forecast consumers, water managers and reservoir operators, have difficulty interpreting such products in a risk management framework A. Sankarasubramanian,1 Upmanu Lall,2 Francisco Assis Souza Filho,3

  5. MUSHROOM WASTE MANAGEMENT PROJECT LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of solid and liquid wastes generated at mushroom producing facilities. Environmental guidelines#12;MUSHROOM WASTE MANAGEMENT PROJECT LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT PHASE I: AUDIT OF CURRENT PRACTICE The Mushroom Waste Management Project (MWMP) was initiated by Environment Canada, the BC Ministry

  6. Evaluating the Economics of Best Management Practices for Tarrant Regional Water District’s Eagle Mountain Lake Watershed 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Jason L.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Economics Texas A&M University and Texas AgriLife Extension Service Executive Summary The object i ve of this asses s me n t was to identi f y the most cost-e f f e c t i v e means of reduci n g (and/o r preven t i n g ) tota l phosph o r u s (TP...) inflow s into the Eagle Mountain Lake from a compr e h e n s i v e set of Best Manag e me n t Pract i c e s (BMPs ) . Additi o na l l y , the reduce d total nitrog e n (TN), and sedime n t inflow s result i n g from adoption of these BMPs was also...

  7. Task 1.13 - Data Collection and Database Development for Clean Coal Technology By-Product Characteristics and Management Practices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Debra F. Pflughoeft-Hassett

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Technology Center-Morgantown (DOE FETC) efforts in the areas of fossil fuels and clean coal technology (CCT) have included involvement with both conventional and advanced process coal conversion by-products. In 1993, DOE submitted a Report to Congress on "Barriers to the Increased Utilization of Coal Combustion Desulfurization Byproducts by Governmental and Commercial Sectors" that provided an outline of activities to remove the barriers identified in the report. DOE charged itself with participation in this process, and the work proposed in this document facilitates DOE's response to its own recommendations for action. The work reflects DOE's commitment to the coal combustion by-product (CCB) industry, to the advancement of clean coal technology, and to cooperation with other government agencies. Information from DOE projects and commercial endeavors in fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) and coal gasification is the focus of this task. The primary goal is to provide an easily accessible compilation of characterization information on the by-products from these processes to government agencies and industry to facilitate sound regulatory and management decisions. Additional written documentation will facilitate the preparation of an updated final version of background information collected for DOE in preparation of the Report to Congress on barriers to CCB utilization.

  8. MENTOR-BASED EFFORT TO ADVANCE IMPLEMENTATION OF PREFERRED MANAGEMENT PRACTICES (PMPS) FOR OIL PRODUCERS IN SOUTH MIDCONTINENT (OKLAHOMA/ARKANSAS) AND WEST COAST (CALIFORNIA) REGIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald F. Duttlinger; E. Lance Cole

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) and cooperating Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs) in its South Midcontinent (Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, Oklahoma) and West Coast (University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California) regions conducted a ''Mentor-Based Effort to Advance Implementation of Preferred Management Practices (PMPs) For Oil Producers'' (DE-FC26-01BC15272) under an award in Phase I of Department of Energy's (DOE's) PUMP (Preferred Upstream Management Practices) program. The project's objective was to enable producers in California, Oklahoma and Arkansas to increase oil production, moderating or potentially reversing production declines and extending the life of marginal wells in the near term. PTTC identified the primary constraints inhibiting oil production through surveys and PUMPer direct contacts in both regions. The leading common constraint was excess produced water and associated factors. Approaches for addressing this common constraint were tailored for each region. For Oklahoma and Arkansas, the South Midcontinent Region developed a concise manual titled ''Produced Water And Associated Issues'' that led to multiple workshops across the region, plus workshops in several other regions. In California, the West Coast Region leveraged PUMP funding to receive an award from the California Energy Commission for $300,000 to systematically evaluate water control solutions for the California geological environment. Products include still-developing remedial action templates to help producers identify underlying causes of excess water production and screen appropriate solutions. Limited field demonstrations are being implemented to build producer confidence in water control technologies. Minor leverage was also gained by providing technology transfer support to a Global Energy Partners project that demonstrated affordable approaches for reducing power consumption. PTTC leveraged PUMP project results nationally through expanding workshops to other regions, providing coverage in its newsletter, through columns and case studies in trade journals, and through coordinating presentations at association and professional society meetings. Combined, there were more than 800 participants. Applying ''application percentages'' from PTTC's total technology transfer program, more than 250 participants are likely to be applying technologies (39% of industry participants). Polymer gel water-shutoff (WSO) treatments and wellbore management were a focus in the Midcontinent area. A major provider of polymer gel WSO treatments has experienced a significant increase in treatment activity in Oklahoma, some of which can be logically attributed to this project. A provider of polylined tubing, a product related to wellbore management, has noted a 280% increase in their independent customer base and opening of a new market due to their involvement in PUMP-spinoff technology transfer. Detailed case studies on polymer gel WSO treatments and wellbore management, along with more global analyses, demonstrate the economic value of these technologies to producers. Among the many information sources that producers consider when applying technology, PTTC knows it is an important source in these technology areas.

  9. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Pharmaceutical Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    O&M Best Practices for Energy-Efficient Buildings. PreparedGenentech, Vacaville: New Energy Efficient Site. Oakland,200,000 per Year with Energy-Efficient Motors. New York, New

  10. Guidelines for Developing Soil and Water Management Programs: Irrigated Pecans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miyamoto, S.

    Guidelines for Developing Soil and Water Management Programs: Irrigated Pecans Agricultural Research and Extension Center at El Paso March 2002 Texas Agricultural Experiment Station The Texas A&M University System Texas Water Resources Institute... by soil and water testing and appraisal, and evaluation of soil improvement options. Finally, orchard management practices, such as soil and irrigation management, fertilization and weed control should be fine- tuned. The significance of each measure may...

  11. Avocado response to diverse nutrient and irrigation management practices Nicholas Kiggundu1, Kati W. Migliaccio1, Jonathan H. Crane1, Bruce Schaffer1, Yuncong Li1, James W. Jones2, and Kirk Hatfield3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Migliaccio, Kati White

    Avocado response to diverse nutrient and irrigation management practices Nicholas Kiggundu1, Kati W and reduce nutrient leaching without reducing the yields of `Simmonds' avocados (Persea americana Mill). Introduction · Yield results suggest that avocado is responsive to well maintained soil water regime

  12. Management Analyst

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Wind and Water Power Technologies Office (WWPTO) manages efforts to improve performance, lower costs, and accelerate deployment of wind and water power technologies, which can play a...

  13. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Glass Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Raising Awareness Awareness of energy efficiency createdExternal Recognition Awareness of energy efficiency createdout energy audits, improving motivation and awareness in all

  14. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanet, Eric

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    London, England. Good Practice Guide 149. Energy EfficiencyLondon, England. Good Practice Guide 279. Energy EfficiencyLondon, England. Good Practice Guide 279. Energy Efficiency

  15. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Dairy Processing Industry: An ENERGY STAR? Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brush, Adrian

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    London, England. Good Practice Guide 279. Energy EfficiencyLondon, England. Good Practice Guide 279. Energy EfficiencyLondon, England. Good Practice Guide 302. Energy Efficiency

  16. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neelis, Maarten

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Programme (1994). Good Practice Guide 141: Waste heatProgramme (1998). Good Practice Guide 249: Energy Savings inProgramme (1999a). Good Practice Guide 225: Industrial

  17. Best Management Practice #10: Cooling Tower Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cooling towers regulate temperature by dissipating heat from recirculating water used to cool chillers, air-conditioning equipment, or other process equipment. Heat is rejected from the tower...

  18. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Glass Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    often used is that boiler efficiency can be increased by 1%gas by 1% increases boiler efficiency by 2.5%, although this2001a). Boilers and Heaters, Improving Energy Efficiency.

  19. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Vehicle Assembly Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Powder Coating. Good Practice Guide 260. Best Practiceand Stoving Ovens. Good Practice Guide 271. Bloss, D. , R.

  20. Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for the Corn Wet Milling Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Ruth, Michael

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Programme. (1997). Good Practice Guide 149: Rotary Drying inProgramme. (1998). Good Practice Guide 249: Energy Savings

  1. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Programme (1998). Good Practice Guide 249: Energy Savings inProgramme (1999). Good Practice Guide 225: Industrial

  2. Valrie Chanal. and Chris Kimble. Born to be Wild: Using Communities of Practice as a Tool for Knowledge Management. Paper presented at the Ethicomp 2010: The 'Backwards,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimble, Chris

    Valérie Chanal. and Chris Kimble. Born to be Wild: Using Communities of Practice as a Tool of ICT, Tarragona, Spain, April, 2010, pp. 71 - 80. Born to be Wild: Using Communities of Practice and benefits of cultivating Communities of Practice rather than leaving them 'in the wild'. The paper presents

  3. Information technology and innovative drainage management practices for selenium load reduction from irrigated agriculture to provide stakeholder assurances and meet contaminant mass loading policy objectives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, N.W.T.

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Many perceive the implementation of environmental regulatory policy, especially concerning non-point source pollution from irrigated agriculture, as being less efficient in the United States than in many other countries. This is partly a result of the stakeholder involvement process but is also a reflection of the inability to make effective use of Environmental Decision Support Systems (EDSS) to facilitate technical information exchange with stakeholders and to provide a forum for innovative ideas for controlling non-point source pollutant loading. This paper describes one of the success stories where a standardized Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) methodology was modified to better suit regulation of a trace element in agricultural subsurface drainage and information technology was developed to help guide stakeholders, provide assurances to the public and encourage innovation while improving compliance with State water quality objectives. The geographic focus of the paper is the western San Joaquin Valley where, in 1985, evapoconcentration of selenium in agricultural subsurface drainage water, diverted into large ponds within a federal wildlife refuge, caused teratogenecity in waterfowl embryos and in other sensitive wildlife species. The fallout from this environmental disaster was a concerted attempt by State and Federal water agencies to regulate non-point source loads of the trace element selenium. The complexity of selenium hydrogeochemistry, the difficulty and expense of selenium concentration monitoring and political discord between agricultural and environmental interests created challenges to the regulation process. Innovative policy and institutional constructs, supported by environmental monitoring and the web-based data management and dissemination systems, provided essential decision support, created opportunities for adaptive management and ultimately contributed to project success. The paper provides a retrospective on the contentious planning process and offers suggestions as to how the technical and institutional issues could have been resolved faster through early adoption of some of the core principles of sound EDSS design.

  4. Economic and ecological implications of alternative brush management and restoration scenarios designed to improve water yield in two Texas watersheds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olenick, Keith Layne

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Costs of additional water are lower for sub-basins within the Edwards study area (ranging from $32 to $70 per acre-foot of water added) than in the Twin Buttes (ranging from $63 to $218 per acre-foot), meaning that brush management efforts are more...

  5. Contract/Project Management

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    by FY12. 95% Line Item 85% Cleanup 97% Line Item 85% Cleanup EVM represents Earned Value Management. FY2011 Second Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Improvement...

  6. Contract/Project Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    by FY12. 95% Line Item 85% Cleanup 100% Line Item 88% Cleanup EVM represents Earned Value Management. FY2011 Fourth Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Improvement...

  7. Contract/Project Management

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    by FY12. 95% Line Item 85% Cleanup 97% Line Item 89% Cleanup EVM represents Earned Value Management. FY2011 Third Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Improvement...

  8. Energy Efficient Resource Management in Virtualized Cloud Data Centers Anton Beloglazov* and Rajkumar Buyya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melbourne, University of

    Energy Efficient Resource Management in Virtualized Cloud Data Centers Anton Beloglazov of the improvements in energy efficiency of the hardware, overall energy con- sumption continues to grow due to the greenhouse effect. A number of practices can be applied to achieve energy- efficiency, such as improvement

  9. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanet, Eric

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    actions, develop an energy management plan for business; andInternal support for a business energy management program ishowever, support for business energy management programs can

  10. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Vehicle Assembly Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    internal support for a business energy management program ishowever, support for business energy management programs cansupport). Support for a business energy management program

  11. IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2005. Navigating Energy Management: A Roadmap for Business.Characteristics and Energy Management Opportunities. BurtonCaffal, C. 1995. Energy Management in Industry. Centre for

  12. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Vehicle Assembly Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Caffal, C. (1995). Energy Management in Industry. Centre forPollution Prevention/Energy Management. General Motorsactions, develop an energy management plan for business; and

  13. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanet, Eric

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    actions, develop an energy management plan for business; andCaffal, C. (1995). Energy Management in Industry. Centre forEquipment. Federal Energy Management Program, Washington,

  14. Creating an asset management model for Massachusetts state-aided public housing : a study of policies and practices to inform the Massachusetts Department of Housing and Community Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Creeley, Hannah Highton

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Local housing authorities in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts currently manage over 50,000 state-aided public housing units on a consolidated, authority-wide level-a style of property management that does not allow for ...

  15. Study site in Son La Province, Vietnam investigating appropriate soil-water-plant management practices for sustainable crop and livestock production (CRP project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    Study site in Son La Province, Vietnam investigating appropriate soil-water-plant management Schmitter). To Our Readers The Soil and Water Management and Crop Nutrition (SWMCN) Section and the SWMCN-2013 programme with other FAO Divisions through result-based activities relating to soil and water management

  16. Managing asbestos: Ten costly sins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denson, F.A.; Onderick, W.A.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article describes how to build an ongoing, continuous, and improved asbestos management program. Asbestos management is one of the toughest jobs facing a plant or environmental engineer today; even seasoned engineers can make mistakes. Much confusion exists about how best to manage this issue, especially in plant settings. Whether the company is small, medium, or large, asbestos has the power to steal from profits if not managed properly. To help POWER readers examine their current asbestos management programs, here are 10 common errors that could be stopped or avoided by practicing preventive techniques. The 10 costly sins presented are not mutually exclusive, and they certainly are not all-inclusive. They are offered as a way to stimulate ideas on how to build an ongoing, continuous, and improved asbestos management program. These include Sin 1: No written policy. Sin 2: Lack of corporate guidance. Sin 3: Not complying with regulations. Sin 4: Not worrying about other respirable fibers. Sin 5: Lawsuits--not culpable. Sin 6: No visible emissions, no problems. Sin 7: Managing asbestos manually.

  17. Water Management of Noninsulating and Insulating Sheathings: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smegal, J.; Lstiburek, J.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is an increasing market in liquid (or fluid) applied water management barriers for residential applications that could be used in place of tapes and other self-adhering membranes if applied correctly, especially around penetrations in the enclosure. This report discusses current best practices, recommends ways in which the best practices can be improved, and looks at some current laboratory testing and testing standards.

  18. Trends in Energy Management Technology - Part 4: Review of Advanced Applications in Energy Management, Control, and Information Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yee, Gaymond; Webster, Tom

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    L. , “State of Practice of Energy Management, Control, andResearch to Practice , Pacific Energy Center, San Francisco,pdf Trends in Energy Management Technology

  19. The Role of the George Kuzmycz Training Center in Improving the Nuclear Material Management Culture in Ukraine.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gavrylyuk, V. I. (Viktor I.); Scherbachenko, A. M. (Alexander M.); Bazavov, D. A. (Dmitri A.); Kyryshchuk, V. I. (Volodymyr I.); Robinson, P. (Phil); Sheppard, G. A. (Gregory A.)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The George Kuzmycz Training Center for Physical Protection, Control and Accounting (GKTC) was established in 1998 in a collaborative endeavor of the State Nuclear Regulatory Administration of Ukraine, the Ukrainian Academy of Sciences, and the U.S. Department of Energy. Located at the Institute for Nuclear Research in Kyiv, the GKTC provides theoretical and practical training in physical protection, control, and accounting techniques and systems that are employed to reduce the risk of unauthorized use, theft, or diversion of weapons-usable nuclear material. Participants in GKTC workshops and courses include nuclear facility specialists as well as officials of the State's regulatory authorities. Recently, the training scope has been broadened to include students from other nations in the region.

  20. Economic Improvement Districts (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A legislative body may adopt an ordinance establishing an economic improvement district and an Economic Improvement Board to manage development in a respective district. The Board can choose to...

  1. Development of Methodologies for Technology Deployment for Advanced Outage Control Centers that Improve Outage Coordination, Problem Resolution and Outage Risk Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shawn St. Germain; Ronald Farris; Heather Medeman

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research effort is a part of the Light-Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, which is a research and development (R&D) program sponsored by Department of Energy (DOE) and performed in close collaboration with industry R&D programs that provides the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of current nuclear power plants. The LWRS program serves to help the U.S. nuclear industry adopt new technologies and engineering solutions that facilitate the continued safe operation of the plants and extension of the current operating licenses. The long term viability of existing nuclear power plants in the U.S. will depend upon maintaining high capacity factors, avoiding nuclear safety issues and reducing operating costs. The slow progress in the construction on new nuclear power plants has placed in increased importance on maintaining the output of the current fleet of nuclear power plants. Recently expanded natural gas production has placed increased economic pressure on nuclear power plants due to lower cost competition. Until recently, power uprate projects had steadily increased the total output of the U.S. nuclear fleet. Errors made during power plant upgrade projects have now removed three nuclear power plants from the U.S. fleet and economic considerations have caused the permanent shutdown of a fourth plant. Additionally, several utilities have cancelled power uprate projects citing economic concerns. For the past several years net electrical generation from U.S. nuclear power plants has been declining. One of few remaining areas where significant improvements in plant capacity factors can be made is in minimizing the duration of refueling outages. Managing nuclear power plant outages is a complex and difficult task. Due to the large number of complex tasks and the uncertainty that accompanies them, outage durations routinely exceed the planned duration. The ability to complete an outage on or near schedule depends upon the performance of the outage management organization. During an outage, the outage control center (OCC) is the temporary command center for outage managers and provides several critical functions for the successful execution of the outage schedule. Essentially, the OCC functions to facilitate information inflow, assist outage management in processing information and to facilitate the dissemination of information to stakeholders. Currently, outage management activities primarily rely on telephone communication, face to face reports of status and periodic briefings in the OCC. Much of the information displayed in OCCs is static and out of date requiring an evaluation to determine if it is still valid. Several advanced communication and collaboration technologies have shown promise for facilitating the information flow into, across and out of the OCC. Additionally, advances in the areas of mobile worker technologies, computer based procedures and electronic work packages can be leveraged to improve the availability of real time status to outage managers.

  2. Private Lands, Public Goods: Engaging Landowners in Ecosystem Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferranto, Shasta Patricia

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    practice: implementing ecosystem management objectives in2009. Science for managing ecosystem services: Beyondthe Millennium Ecosystem Assessment. Proceedings of the

  3. Energy Management and Control System: Desired Capabilities and Functionality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hatley, Darrel D.; Meador, Richard J.; Katipamula, Srinivas; Brambley, Michael R.; Wouden, Carl

    2005-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This document discusses functions and capabilities of a typical building/facility energy management and control systems (EMCS). The overall intent is to provide a building operator, manager or engineer with basic background information and recommended functions, capabilities, and good/best practices that will enable the control systems to be fully utilized/optimized, resulting in improved building occupant quality of life and more reliable, energy efficient facilities.

  4. Realistic payments could encourage farmers to adopt practices that sequester carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howitt, Richard E; Catala Luque, Rosala; De Gryze, Steven; Wicks, Santhi; Six, Johan

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    National crop residue management surveys. West Lafayette,the first comprehensive survey of conservation management ina survey of all farmers practicing conservation management

  5. Revolving Loan Funds: Basics and Best Practices

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Opportunity * How to Setup an RLF * Best Practices * Risk Management * Results National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future Summary * A revolving loan...

  6. Field practice internship final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foster, T.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This field practice internship final report gives an overview of the field practice, which was completed at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Environmental Management Department, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The field practice focused on the completion of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) Title III, Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act Section 312, Tier II Report. The field practice internship was conducted on a full-time basis between December 13, 1993 through February 18, 1994. Sheila Poligone, Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) Coordinator served as the field practice preceptor.

  7. Hazardous Waste Management (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The state supports the implementation of source reduction, recycling, and other alternative solid waste management practices over incineration and land disposal. The Department of Environmental...

  8. Solid Waste Management (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The state supports the implementation of source reduction, recycling, and other alternative solid waste management practices over incineration and land disposal. The Indiana Department of...

  9. Building America Best Practices Series: Volume 2. Builders and Buyers Handbook for Improving New Home Efficiency, Comfort, and Durability in the Hot-Dry and Mixed-Dry Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baechler, M. C.; Taylor, Z. T.; Bartlett, R.; Gilbride, T.; Hefty, M.; Love, P. M.

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This best practices guide is part of a series produced by Building America. The guidebook is a resource to help builders large and small build high-quality, energy-efficient homes that achieve 30% energy savings in space conditioning and water heating in the hot-dry and mixed-dry climates. The savings are in comparison with the 1993 Model Energy Code. The guide contains chapters for every member of the builder?s team?from the manager to the site planner to the designers, site supervisors, the trades, and marketers. There is also a chapter for homeowners on how to use the book to provide help in selecting a new home or builder.

  10. Theorizing Practice and Practicing Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feldman, Martha S.

    his paper describes the emerging field of practice theory as it is practiced in relation to organizational phenomena. We identify three approaches—empirical, theoretical, and philosophical—that relate to the what, the how, ...

  11. CAMPUS BLUEPRINT ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT COUNCIL'S

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powers, Robert

    CAMPUS BLUEPRINT ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT COUNCIL'S STRATEGIC ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT PLAN 2012'S ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT COUNCIL'S STRATEGIC ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT PLAN 2012-2017 Report Outline Building a Big: Student Recruitment Initiatives Sharing Our Story of Quality Improving the Academic Profile and Student

  12. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neelis, Maarten

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Caffal, C. (1995). Energy Management in Industry. Centre forU.S. DOE-OIT (2003a). Energy Management Program Benefits.actions, develop an energy management plan for business; and

  13. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    actions, develop an energy management plan for business; andFigure 8-1. Main elements of a strategic energy managementCaffal, C. (1995). Energy Management in Industry. Centre for

  14. Corps Improvement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the Upper Trinity River Basin was mainly from findings in a Corps environmental impact statement (EIS) report in the 1980s, according to Gene Rice, Corps project manager of the Dallas Floodway and Dallas Floodway Extension projects, two of the Trinity River... to mitigate environmental impacts of the proj- ect. The Corps? Fort Worth District and the City of Dallas are using an innovative approach to return floodplain value to the Trinity River, while improving flood damage reduction. Big Fossil Creek Watershed...

  15. Increasing waterflood reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field through improved reservoir characterization and reservoir management. Annual report, March 21, 1995--March 20, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, D.; Clarke, D.; Walker, S.; Phillips, C.; Nguyen, J.; Moos, D.; Tagbor, K.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project uses advanced reservoir characterization tools, including the pulsed acoustic cased-hole logging tool, geologic three- dimensional (3-D) modeling software, and commercially available reservoir management software to identify sands with remaining high oil saturation following waterflood. Production from the identified high oil saturation sands will be stimulated by recompleting existing production and injection wells in these sands using conventional means as well as short radius and ultra-short radius laterals. Although these reservoirs have been waterflooded over 40 years, researchers have found areas of remaining oil saturation. Areas such as the top sand in the Upper Terminal Zone Fault Block V, the western fault slivers of Upper Terminal Zone Fault Block V, the bottom sands of the Tar Zone Fault Block V, and the eastern edge of Fault Block IV in both the Upper Terminal and Lower Terminal Zones all show significant remaining oil saturation. Each area of interest was uncovered emphasizing a different type of reservoir characterization technique or practice. This was not the original strategy but was necessitated by the different levels of progress in each of the project activities.

  16. Improving Life through Science and Technology Texas AgriLife Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    into water Improve agricultural and urban water use efficiency Address Storm Water issues · Investments and Quantity ($4M) Detect and model water contaminants Develop management practices to reduce loadings 0.5M acre-feet/year of water from Edwards Aquifer Developed preventative measures for golden algae

  17. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neelis, Maarten

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    site energy monitoring and management systems can increaseenergy monitoring and process control systems can play an important role in energy management

  18. Managing Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Emily

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and Texas Water --------------------------------------------- Project Managers Cecilia Wagner, Kevin Wagner, Danielle Supercinski, Dr. Bill Fox and Lucas Gregory work to link university researchers and Extension specialists to appropriate funding agen... Irrigators Network. Kevin Wagner, who joined TWRI in 2005 from TSSWCB, has spent several years working with environmental issues. He is currently pursuing his doctorate evaluating best management practices for reducing bacterial runoff from cattle wastes...

  19. Improve Your Boiler's Combustion Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This revised ITP tip sheet on boiler combustion efficiency provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

  20. Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for the Corn Wet Milling Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Ruth, Michael

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corn wet milling is the most energy intensive industry within the food and kindred products group (SIC 20), using 15 percent of the energy in the entire food industry. After corn, energy is the second largest operating cost for corn wet millers in the United States. A typical corn wet milling plant in the United States spends approximately $20 to $30 million per year on energy, making energy efficiency improvement an important way to reduce costs and increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy-price volatility. This report shows energy efficiency opportunities available for wet corn millers. It begins with descriptions of the trends, structure and production of the corn wet milling industry and the energy used in the milling and refining process. Specific primary energy savings for each energy efficiency measure based on case studies of plants and references to technical literature are provided. If available, typical payback periods are also listed. The report draws upon the experiences of corn, wheat and other starch processing plants worldwide for energy efficiency measures. The findings suggest that given available resources and technology, there are opportunities to reduce energy consumption cost-effectively in the corn wet milling industry while maintaining the quality of the products manufactured. Further research on the economics of the measures, as well as the applicability of these to different wet milling practices, is needed to assess the feasibility of implementation of selected technologies at individual plants.

  1. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Vehicle Assembly Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitsky, Christina; Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The motor vehicle industry in the U.S. spends about $3.6 billion on energy annually. In this report, we focus on auto assembly plants. In the U.S., over 70 assembly plants currently produce 13 million cars and trucks each year. In assembly plants, energy expenditures is a relatively small cost factor in the total production process. Still, as manufacturers face an increasingly competitive environment, energy efficiency improvements can provide a means to reduce costs without negatively affecting the yield or the quality of the product. In addition, reducing energy costs reduces the unpredictability associated with variable energy prices in today?s marketplace, which could negatively affect predictable earnings, an important element for publicly-traded companies such as those in the motor vehicle industry. In this report, we first present a summary of the motor vehicle assembly process and energy use. This is followed by a discussion of energy efficiency opportunities available for assembly plants. Where available, we provide specific primary energy savings for each energy efficiency measure based on case studies, as well as references to technical literature. If available, we have listed costs and typical payback periods. We include experiences of assembly plants worldwide with energy efficiency measures reviewed in the report. Our findings suggest that although most motor vehicle companies in the U.S. have energy management teams or programs, there are still opportunities available at individual plants to reduce energy consumption cost effectively. Further research on the economics of the measures for individual assembly plants, as part of an energy management program, is needed to assess the potential impact of selected technologies at these plants.

  2. USACE Value Engineering Manual of Practice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    1 1 USACE Value Engineering Manual of Practice Foreward. This Value Engineering (VE) Manual of Practice has been prepared to provide guidance to USACE District Value Engineering Officers (VEOs the Project Management Plan; VE program planning, management and execution, including USACE metrics; records

  3. Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan. Part 1: ASC software quality engineering practices, Version 2.0.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sturtevant, Judith E.; Heaphy, Robert; Hodges, Ann Louise; Boucheron, Edward A.; Drake, Richard Roy; Minana, Molly A.; Hackney, Patricia; Forsythe, Christi A.; Schofield, Joseph Richard, Jr. (,; .); Pavlakos, Constantine James; Williamson, Charles Michael; Edwards, Harold Carter

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. The plan defines the ASC program software quality practices and provides mappings of these practices to Sandia Corporate Requirements CPR 1.3.2 and 1.3.6 and to a Department of Energy document, ASCI Software Quality Engineering: Goals, Principles, and Guidelines. This document also identifies ASC management and software project teams responsibilities in implementing the software quality practices and in assessing progress towards achieving their software quality goals.

  4. Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan part 2 mappings for the ASC software quality engineering practices, version 2.0.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heaphy, Robert; Sturtevant, Judith E.; Hodges, Ann Louise; Boucheron, Edward A.; Drake, Richard Roy; Minana, Molly A.; Hackney, Patricia; Forsythe, Christi A.; Schofield, Joseph Richard, Jr. (,; .); Pavlakos, Constantine James; Williamson, Charles Michael; Edwards, Harold Carter

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. The plan defines the ASC program software quality practices and provides mappings of these practices to Sandia Corporate Requirements CPR001.3.2 and CPR001.3.6 and to a Department of Energy document, ''ASCI Software Quality Engineering: Goals, Principles, and Guidelines''. This document also identifies ASC management and software project teams' responsibilities in implementing the software quality practices and in assessing progress towards achieving their software quality goals.

  5. Waste Management Trends in Texas Industrial Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, C. S.; Heffington, W. M.

    have become familiar with several plant waste management practices. This paper discusses waste management practices in industrial plants in Texas with particular attention to the requirements of the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission...

  6. Used oil generation and management in the automotive industries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jhanani S; Kurian Joseph

    Used oil has been classified as hazardous wastes by the Ministry of Environment and Forests, Government of India which demands its proper management to avoid serious threat to the environment and for economic gains. Used oil could be recovered or reprocessed and reused as base oil thus saving the use of virgin oil. This paper presents an assessment of the used oil generation and management practices by the automotive industries located in Chennai and Kancheepuram in Tamilnadu. Used oil generation and management in eight automotive industries in this area were studied by means of questionnaires, direct observations and interviews. Studies were also undertaken for specific used oil generation from the most common process – reaming and rolling. The specific used oil generation rate varies from 93-336 L/cubic metre of metal cut depending on whether the industries use online centrifuging system for re-refining. Suggestions for the improvement of the used oil management practices are included in this paper.

  7. Energy Management Working Group: Accelerating Energy Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scheihing, P.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Standardization (ISO) published the ISO 50001 energy management standard in 2011. ISO 50001 provides industrial companies with guidelines for integrating energy efficiency into their management practices— including fine-tuning production processes... efficiency. GSEP’s Energy Management Working Group (EMWG) advocates the increased adoption of EnMS or ISO 50001 in industry and commercial buildings. It goal is to accelerate the adoption and use of energy management systems in industrial facilities...

  8. Environmental Management System Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, Robert; Thorson, Patrick; Horst, Blair; Speros, John; Rothermich, Nancy; Hatayama, Howard

    2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Executive Order 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management establishes the policy that Federal agencies conduct their environmental, transportation, and energy-related activities in a manner that is environmentally, economically and fiscally sound, integrated, continually improving, efficient, and sustainable. The Department of Energy (DOE) has approved DOE Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program and DOE Order 430.2B, Departmental Energy, Renewable Energy and Transportation Management as the means of achieving the provisions of this Executive Order. DOE Order 450.1A mandates the development of Environmental Management Systems (EMS) to implement sustainable environmental stewardship practices that: (1) Protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources potentially impacted by facility operations; (2) Meet or exceed applicable environmental, public health, and resource protection laws and regulations; and (3) Implement cost-effective business practices. In addition, the DOE Order 450.1A mandates that the EMS must be integrated with a facility's Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) established pursuant to DOE P 450.4, 'Safety Management System Policy'. DOE Order 430.2B mandates an energy management program that considers energy use and renewable energy, water, new and renovated buildings, and vehicle fleet activities. The Order incorporates the provisions of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007. The Order also includes the DOE's Transformational Energy Action Management initiative, which assures compliance is achieved through an Executable Plan that is prepared and updated annually by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL, Berkeley Lab, or the Laboratory) and then approved by the DOE Berkeley Site Office. At the time of this revision to the EMS plan, the 'FY2009 LBNL Sustainability Executable Plan' represented the most current Executable Plan. These DOE Orders and associated policies establish goals and sustainable stewardship practices that are protective of environmental, natural, and cultural resources, and take a life cycle approach that considers aspects such as: (1) Acquisition and use of environmentally preferable products; (2) Electronics stewardship; (3) Energy conservation, energy efficiency, and renewable energy; (4) Pollution prevention, with emphasis on toxic and hazardous chemical and material reduction; (5) Procurement of efficient energy and water consuming materials and equipment; (6) Recycling and reuse; (7) Sustainable and high-performance building design; (8) Transportation and fleet management; and (9) Water conservation. LBNL's approach to sustainable environmental stewardship required under Order 450.1A poses the challenge of implementing its EMS in a compliance-based, performance-based, and cost-effective manner. In other words, the EMS must deliver real and tangible business value at a minimal cost. The purpose of this plan is to describe Berkeley Lab's approach for achieving such an EMS, including an overview of the roles and responsibilities of key Laboratory parties. This approach begins with a broad-based environmental policy consistent with that stated in Chapter 11 of the LBNL Health and Safety Manual (PUB-3000). This policy states that Berkeley Lab is committed to the following: (1) Complying with applicable environmental, public health, and resource conservation laws and regulations. (2) Preventing pollution, minimizing waste, and conserving natural resources. (3) Correcting environmental hazards and cleaning up existing environmental problems, and (4) Continually improving the Laboratory's environmental performance while maintaining operational capability and sustaining the overall mission of the Laboratory. A continual cycle of planning, implementing, evaluating, and improving processes will be performed to achieve goals, objectives, and targets that will help LBNL carry out this policy. Each year, environmental aspects will be identified and their impacts to the environm

  9. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanet, Eric

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy monitoring systems are key tools that play an important role in energy management. Energy monitoring systems

  10. Corps Improvement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tx H 2 O | pg. 6 O ne of the key federal players in the restoration of the Trinity River Basin is the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, whose primary civil mission is developing and managing the nation?s water resources, including projects to reduce... flood damage; improve navigation channels and harbors; protect wetlands; and preserve, safeguard and enhance the environment. The Corps has been involved in the Trinity River Basin for more than 50 years, but the impetus for the current projects...

  11. Seasonal Performance Variations for Storm-Water Management Systems in Cold Climate Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    headings: Stormwater management; Best management practice; Performance characteristics; Water qualitySeasonal Performance Variations for Storm-Water Management Systems in Cold Climate Conditions. An examination of six varied LID designs, in contrast with conventional best-management practices BMPs

  12. Minimization of Cost, Sediment Load, and Sensitivity to Climate Change in a Watershed Management Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eppstein, Margaret J.

    caused by non-point source impacts from developed lands, structural Best Management Practices (BMPs management practice (BMP) plans for entire watersheds. Each of these alternative BMP configurations are non: multiobjective, differential evolution, robustness to uncertainty, stormwater management, best management

  13. Energy from Waste: A good practice guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    including central and local Government, the public and professional waste managers. Since the publication of a more sustainable approach to waste management, involving public participation, greater levels new to municipal waste management, and drawing on good practice from the UK and overseas, I am sure

  14. 2006-2007 Special Projects Kissel: Video Education and Marketing for Soil Testing as a Best Management Practice in the Southern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to labs. Scientifically, increased soil testing by non- agricultural audiences will improve University of certain nutrients (phosphorus is one example), which could be compared between urban and agricultural Rate of Mature Wastewater Drainfield Systems with Varying Interface Architecture On June 27-28, 2006

  15. Teacher In Charge: Improving teaching practices through

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watanabe, Tad

    , and analyzing various types of data, among other tasks, it is imperative that professional learning be directed of learning for all students, teachers, and administrators requires a form of professional learning in ongoing teams that meet on a regular basis, preferably several times a week, for the purposes of learning

  16. Proceedings: EPRI Power Delivery Asset Management Workshop: New York City 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of EPRI's Asset Management Toolkit Project, the first annual EPRI Power Delivery Asset Management Workshop furnished an opportunity for leading utilities, consultants, and academicians to present and review the best practices in power delivery asset management. The workshop focused on current activities, new developments, and future utility needs, bringing together a wide range of domestic and international managers and executives in a forum for open exchange. The workshop covered all power delivery system assets, with emphasis on lowering life-cycle costs, improving asset utilization, and increasing return on capital investment while maintaining high levels of system performance and customer service.

  17. A Review of the Environmental Management Program (presented by the Top-to-Bottom Review Team)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2002, at the direction of the Secretary of Energy, EM conducted a self-assessment of the overall status of the program under DOE Order 435.1 Radioactive Waste Management, and found a number of areas that needed improvement, including contract strategies and approaches; risk prioritization; and internal business practices.

  18. Radioactive Waste Management in Hungary at the Turn of the Millennium 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pellet, S.; Temesi, A.; Fritz, A.

    2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper deals with the Hungarian radioactive waste management practice from the beginning up to now. It gives a historical overview which is extended with the detailed description of activity of the present temporary waste disposal facility in Puespoekszilagy. In addition the plan for improving of the facility is also discussed.

  19. IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy management into their business and manufacturing operations, leading to reduced costscosts. Available at: http://www.energystar.gov/ia/business/government/Financial_Energy_

  20. IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3. defining the performance indicator(s) to use to measureand targets; 6. performance indicators; 7. appropriateManager/Energy Performance Indicators. Extensive regular

  1. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    actions, develop an energy management plan for business; andProducts for Business Description: ENERGY STAR identifiessupport Energy Team Members from business units, operations/

  2. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neelis, Maarten

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    actions, develop an energy management plan for business; andProducts for Business Description: ENERGY STAR identifiesplan. The energy conservation leader sponsors business and

  3. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Vehicle Assembly Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    eines Energiemanagementsystems bei BMW Motoren. Europeanits business operations. BMW adopted an energy management2.6 years (CADDET, 1995c). BMW applied powder coats at their

  4. Benchmarking Corporate Energy Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norland, D. L.

    BENCHMARKING CORPORATE ENERGY MANAGEMENT Dr. Douglas L. Norland Director of Research and Industrial Programs Alliance to Save Energy Washington, DC ABSTRACT There is growing interest among energy managers in finding out how their company...'s energy management procedures and perfonnance compare to that of other companies. Energy management involves everything from setting goals and targets to implementing best maintenance practices. This paper, however, discusses benchmarking energy...

  5. Information requirements of self-managing teams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Aken, E.M.

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to the significant challenges organizations face today, many managers have put in place continuous improvement efforts to help the organization on enhance its competitive position. A key element of continuous improvement efforts is employee involvement, and one of the most complex, mature, and effective forms of employee involvement is self-managing teams. A self-managing team is a group of employees, usually eight to fifteen, which is responsible for planning, implementing, controlling, and improving work processes. There are many characteristics of self-managing teams which are discussed frequently in the literature and are common topics of seminars and workshops on SMTs, including the role of the first-line supervisor, the structure of teams, the training necessary, and the pay system for SMTs. However, one area which has not been as widely researched is the role of information - what types of information do self-managing teams need? This paper addresses this question. Results from a multiple case study research project focusing on the information requirements of SMTs are presented. Specifically, seven types of information SMTs need are identified, as well as general characteristics of the information system. By information system, I mean very broadly, the system (both formal and informal) which provides information of any kind to a self-managing team. The results of this research can be thought of as ``design features`` for an information system to support SMTs. Practicing managers can use these design features in two ways: they can design them into beginning SMT efforts; or, for SMTs already established, managers can compare them to the existing information system and adjust accordingly.

  6. Information requirements of self-managing teams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Aken, E.M.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to the significant challenges organizations face today, many managers have put in place continuous improvement efforts to help the organization on enhance its competitive position. A key element of continuous improvement efforts is employee involvement, and one of the most complex, mature, and effective forms of employee involvement is self-managing teams. A self-managing team is a group of employees, usually eight to fifteen, which is responsible for planning, implementing, controlling, and improving work processes. There are many characteristics of self-managing teams which are discussed frequently in the literature and are common topics of seminars and workshops on SMTs, including the role of the first-line supervisor, the structure of teams, the training necessary, and the pay system for SMTs. However, one area which has not been as widely researched is the role of information - what types of information do self-managing teams need This paper addresses this question. Results from a multiple case study research project focusing on the information requirements of SMTs are presented. Specifically, seven types of information SMTs need are identified, as well as general characteristics of the information system. By information system, I mean very broadly, the system (both formal and informal) which provides information of any kind to a self-managing team. The results of this research can be thought of as design features'' for an information system to support SMTs. Practicing managers can use these design features in two ways: they can design them into beginning SMT efforts; or, for SMTs already established, managers can compare them to the existing information system and adjust accordingly.

  7. Charting Collaborative Practices: Acknowledgements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belanger, Alisa; Crumly, Allison

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Collaborative Practices: Acknowledgements Each issue ofCollaborative Practices: Acknowledgements Alisa Belanger and

  8. 07%20SEATTLE%20Best%20Practices%20in%20Transportation%20Demand...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    07%20SEATTLE%20Best%20Practices%20in%20Transportation%20Demand%20Management.pdf 07%20SEATTLE%20Best%20Practices%20in%20Transportation%20Demand%20Management.pdf...

  9. Stormwater Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaber, Fouad

    2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    . Stormwater also may wash bacteria and other pathogens into swimming areas, creating health hazards that often close beaches. Stormwater may carry debris, such as plastic bags, six-pack rings, and cigarette butts, into water bodies; such debris can choke... the development and implementation of best management practices (BMPs) and achievement of measurable goals at levels sufficient to satisfy each of six minimum control measures and an optional seventh control measure: 1. Public education and outreach...

  10. Practicing Precision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supercinski, Danielle

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Piccinni, PIN project leader and assistant professor of crop physiology with the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station at Uvalde. ?While some growers are doing a very good job using limited irrigation strategies, others are overwatering their crops...tx H 2 O | pg. 24 W intergarden and High Plains researchers and county agents worked with 30 growers from various counties to conduct on-farm research demonstrations evaluating the extent to which limited irrigation practices may provide water...

  11. PROGRAMMATIC ASSESSMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT NUCLEAR FUEL AND WASTE PROGRAMS. Operational Planning and Development (Activity No. AR OS 10 05 K; ONL-WN06)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Gilbert/Commonwealth (G/C) has performed an assessment of the waste management operations at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The objective of this study was to review radioactive waste management as practiced at ORNL and to recommend improvements or alternatives for further study. The study involved: 1) an on-site survey of ORNL radioactive waste management operations; 2) a review of radioactive waste source data, records, and regulatory requirements; 3) an assessment of existing and planned treatment, storage, and control facilities; and 4) identification of alternatives for improving waste management operations. Information for this study was obtained from both personal interviews and written reports. The G/C suggestions for improving ORNL waste management operations are summarized. Regulatory requirements governing ORNL waste management operations are discussed. Descriptions and discussions of the radioactive liquid, solid, and gaseous waste systems are presented. The waste operations control complex is discussed.

  12. Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for the Corn Wet Milling Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Ruth, Michael

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Canadian Industry Program for Energy Conservation (CIPEC). (2001a). Boilers and Heaters, Improving Energy Efficiency.Resources Canada, Office of Energy Efficiency. August.

  13. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    rule of thumb is that boiler efficiency can be increased bytemperature, and boiler efficiency. They are a recommendedresult is improved boiler efficiency. Turbulator installers

  14. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neelis, Maarten

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    7.1 summarizes the boiler efficiency measures, while Tablerule of thumb is that boiler efficiency can be increased by2001). Boilers and Heaters, Improving Energy Efficiency.

  15. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nath (2000). Improve Steam Turbine Efficiency. HydrocarbonOIT (1999). Rebuilding steam turbine generator reduces costscan be driven by a steam turbine or an electric motor. Hot

  16. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neelis, Maarten

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nath (2000). Improve Steam Turbine Efficiency. HydrocarbonOIT (2000c). New steam turbine saves chemical manufacturer $demand. Back-pressure steam turbines which may be used to

  17. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanet, Eric

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    E. Masanet (2005a). Energy Efficiency Improvement and CostA.R. Ganji (2005). Energy Efficiency Opportunities in FreshSummer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry, American

  18. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural gas expansion turbine Steam Distribution SystemNath (2000). Improve Steam Turbine Efficiency. Hydrocarbona steam boiler and steam turbine (back pressure turbine) to

  19. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neelis, Maarten

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steam expansion turbines Steam Distribution Systems andNath (2000). Improve Steam Turbine Efficiency. HydrocarbonOIT (2000c). New steam turbine saves chemical manufacturer $

  20. IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy monitoring and process control systems are key tools in energy management and reduction. Metering systemsmanagement (monitoring) system to incorporate real-time data (e.g. , pressure, flow, system demand, and energy

  1. WM2014 Conference - Building the Community of Practice for Performance...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    WM2014 Conference - Building the Community of Practice for Performance and Risk Assessment in Support of Risk-Informed Environmental Management Decisions WM2014 Conference -...

  2. area models practices: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and analyzed issues in the areas of architecture, peopleorganization -management, and business models. 1 Introduction 1.1 Why Product Line Practice? Historically, software...

  3. Communities of Practice: A Tool for Creating Institutional Change...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Management Program could use communities of practice as tools to stimulate organizational, social, and cultural change to support energy efficiency, renewable energy, and...

  4. FEMP ESPC Best Practices: Agency Plan and Variances

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Document serves as a checklist for tracking agency use of Federal Energy Management Program energy savings performance contracts (ESPC) best practices.

  5. Georgia Comprehensive Solid Waste Management Act of 1990 (Georgia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Georgia Comprehensive Solid Waste Management Act (SWMA) of 1990 was implemented in order to improve solid waste management procedures, permitting processes and management throughout the state. ...

  6. BUSINESS PROCESS MANAGEMENT (BPMA) Bachelor of Commerce Degree

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habib, Ayman

    Process Management is boring Business process management is anything but boring! People who work improvement initiatives work with disciplined project management techniques Related OrganizationsBUSINESS PROCESS MANAGEMENT (BPMA) Bachelor of Commerce Degree Business Process Management (BPMA

  7. Business Practices

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced MaterialsEnergy,EnvelopeJeffersonBusinessPractices Sign In About |

  8. Tentative Syllabus Environmental Nutrient Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    management practices (BMPs) and practices used in sustainable agriculture and organic farming COURSE1 Tentative Syllabus SWS 4116 Environmental Nutrient Management 3 credits Fall 2014 INSTRUCTOR: Dr. Samira Daroub Professor, Soil and Water Science Dept. sdaroub@ufl.edu Main office: University of Florida

  9. South Carolina Solid Waste Policy and Management Act (South Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The state of South Carolina supports a regional approach to solid waste management and encourages the development and implementation of alternative waste management practices and resource recovery....

  10. CIRP Design Conference 2011 Product Lifecycle Management Model for Design Information Management in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    CIRP Design Conference 2011 Product Lifecycle Management Model for Design Information Management Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) is one way to improve productivity in all manufacturing companies. Keywords: Product Lifecycle Management, Product Process Organisation Model, Unified Modelling Language 1

  11. Digitization Best Practices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xue, Fei [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Holtkamp, Irma S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Knudson, Frances L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This project involved performing tests and documenting results to determine best practices for digitizing older print documents. The digitization process is complicated, especially when original documents exhibit non-standard fonts and are faded. Tests focused on solutions to improve high quality scanning, increase OCR accuracy, and efficiently use embedded metadata. Results are summarized. From the test results on the right sides, we know that when we plan to digitize documents, we should balance Quantity and Quality based on our expectation, and then make final decision for the digitization process.

  12. Management Plan Management Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plan, Management Plan Page MP­ 1 #12;Management Plan water quality standards, instream flows, privateManagement Plan Management Plan "Management and restoration programs for native salmonids have communities" J. Lichatowich et al. 1998. A Conceptual Foundation for the Management of Native Salmonids

  13. Forest Resources and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Resources and Management Centre for The Centre for Forest Resources and Management aims the forest resource. Our aim is that British forests ­ from their creation to maturity and regeneration-energy development, forest resource forecasting, genetic improvement, woodland regeneration and creation, management

  14. Use of behavioral economics and social psychology to improve treatment of acute respiratory infections (BEARI): rationale and design of a cluster randomized controlled trial [1RC4AG039115-01] - study protocol and baseline practice and provider characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    practices in a 2 × 2 × 2 factorial design to receive up togroup rando- mized in the factorial design to receive bothrepre- sented the full factorial design (2 × 2 × 2 design).

  15. Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan : ASC software quality engineering practices Version 3.0.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turgeon, Jennifer L.; Minana, Molly A.; Hackney, Patricia; Pilch, Martin M.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. Quality is defined in the US Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Agency (DOE/NNSA) Quality Criteria, Revision 10 (QC-1) as 'conformance to customer requirements and expectations'. This quality plan defines the SNL ASC Program software quality engineering (SQE) practices and provides a mapping of these practices to the SNL Corporate Process Requirement (CPR) 001.3.6; 'Corporate Software Engineering Excellence'. This plan also identifies ASC management's and the software project teams responsibilities in implementing the software quality practices and in assessing progress towards achieving their software quality goals. This SNL ASC Software Quality Plan establishes the signatories commitments to improving software products by applying cost-effective SQE practices. This plan enumerates the SQE practices that comprise the development of SNL ASC's software products and explains the project teams opportunities for tailoring and implementing the practices.

  16. NS&T MANAGEMENT OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gianotto, David

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The INL Management Observation Program (MOP) is designed to improve managers and supervisors understanding of work being performed by employees and the barriers impacting their success. The MOP also increases workers understanding of managements’ expectations as they relate to safety, security, quality, and work performance. Management observations (observations) are designed to improve the relationship and trust between employees and managers through increased engagement and interactions between managers and researchers in the field. As part of continuous improvement, NS&T management took initiative to focus on the participation and quality of observations in FY 14. This quarterly report is intended to (a) summarize the participation and quality of management’s observations, (b) assess observations for commonalities or trends related to facility or process barriers impacting research, and (c) provide feedback and make recommendations for improvements NS&T’s MOP.

  17. IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melody, Moya; Dunham Whitehead, Camilla; Brown, Richard

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    As American drinking water agencies face higher production costs, demand, and energy prices, they seek opportunities to reduce costs without negatively affecting the quality of the water they deliver. This guide describes resources for cost-effectively improving the energy efficiency of U.S. public drinking water facilities. The guide (1) describes areas of opportunity for improving energy efficiency in drinking water facilities; (2) provides detailed descriptions of resources to consult for each area of opportunity; (3) offers supplementary suggestions and information for the area; and (4) presents illustrative case studies, including analysis of cost-effectiveness.

  18. Project Management Plan Project Title: Natural Resources Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    DEFINITION. The NRM Gateway is a knowledge management resource, designed to serve the needs of the NRMP; · Preserve institutional knowledge; · Develop practical and agency-approved webpages that provide usefulProject Management Plan Project Title: Natural Resources Management (NRM) Gateway Website

  19. Save Energy Now (SEN) Assessment Helps Expand Energy Management Program at Shaw Industries: Flooring Company Saves $872,000 Annually by Improving Steam System Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This case study describes how the Shaw Industries plant #20 in Dalton, Georgia, achieved annual savings of $872,000 and 93,000 MMBtu after receiving a DOE Save Energy Now energy assessment and implementing recommendations to improve the efficiency of its steam system.

  20. Increased Mercury Bioaccumulation Follows Water Quality Improvement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogle, M.A.; Peterson, M.J.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.

    1999-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Changes in physical and chemical characteristics of aquatic habitats made to reduce or eliminate ecological risks can sometimes have unforeseen consequences. Environmental management activities on the U.S. Dept. of Energy reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee,have succeeded in improving water quality in streams impacted by discharges fi-om industrial facilities and waste disposal sites. The diversity and abundance of pollution-sensitive components of the benthic macroinvertebrate communities of three streams improved after new waste treatment systems or remedial actions reduced inputs of various toxic chemicals. Two of the streams were known to be mercury-contaminated from historical spills and waste disposal practices. Waterborne mercury concentrations in the third were typical of uncontaminated systems. In each case, concentrations of mercury in fish, or the apparent biological availability of mercury increased over the period during which ecological metrics indicated improved water quality. In the system where waterborne mercury concentrations were at background levels, increased mercury bioaccumulation was probably a result of reduced aqueous selenium concentrations; however, the mechanisms for increased mercury accumulation in the other two streams remain under investigation. In each of the three systems, reduced inputs of metals and inorganic anions was followed by improvements in the health of aquatic invertebrate communities. However, this reduction in risk to aquatic invertebrates was accompanied by increased risk to humans and piscivorous wildlife related to increased mercury concentrations in fish.

  1. Best Management Practice #6: Toilets and Urinals

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Toilets and urinals can account for nearly one-third of building water consumption. Old and inefficient toilet and urinal fixtures can be a major source of water waste in most commercial,...

  2. Best Management Practices for Creating a Community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashland, OR Daniel R. Williams U.S. Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station Fort Collins, CO Sam

  3. Managing acute oak decline Practice Note

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the canopy ­ caused by the loss of twigs and fine branches ­ and, in severe cases, branch dieback. Trees suffering from decline may appear `stag-headed'. Less often, trees may have a dark, watery fluid running

  4. Best Management Practice #14: Alternative Water Sources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Many federal facilities may have water uses that can be met with non-potable water from alternative water sources. Potentially available alternative water sources for Federal sources include municipal-supplied reclaimed water, treated gray water from on-site sanitary sources, and storm water.

  5. Best Management Practice #7: Faucets and Showerheads

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Most federal buildings have faucets in restrooms, kitchens, and laboratories. Many federal installations have showers, including barracks, family housing, recreation facilities, and locker rooms....

  6. Best Management Practices for Surface Water Protection

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presenter: Mick Wiest, B&W Y-12 Technical Services, L.L.C., Y-12 National Security Complex Track 7-8

  7. Best Practices in Industrial Data Management

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    May explain unexpected poor performances due to other variables (e.g. changes in weather data or production data) Reveals the big picture and next steps Even if...

  8. Best Management Practice #8: Steam Boiler Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Boilers and steam generators are commonly used in large heating systems, institutional kitchens, or in facilities where large amounts of process steam are used. This equipment consumes varying amounts of water depending on system size, the amount of steam used, and the amount of condensate returned.

  9. Sustainable Disposal Cell Covers: Legacy Management Practices,

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014,Zaleski -BlueprintThis document

  10. Sustainable Disposal Cell Covers: Legacy Management Practices,

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015 - January 16, 2015 SummarySuspect andResearch &Sustainable

  11. GIDAP Best Management Practice | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°, -86.0529604°Wisconsin:FyreStorm IncLSE COMP POSTGHD

  12. ECU Physicians Group Practice Policy and Procedure Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ECU Physicians Group Practice Policy and Procedure Manual Topic: Advance Care Planning - #C31 Planning practices. IV. Procedure: A. The Social Work and Case Management Department will insure Group Practice Policy and Procedure Manual Topic: Advance Care Planning - #C31 Section No. 2 Section

  13. Spatially Similar Practice Immediately Following Motor Sequence Learning Eliminates Offline Gains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handa, Atul

    2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    after initial practice has been revealed to eliminate offline improvement. The present experiment assessed the relative impact of experiencing supplemental practice of a spatially or a motorically-similar procedural task immediately following practice...

  14. Assistant Director, Prospect Management Description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Portman, Douglas

    and to the Prospect Management Data Wranglers to assist their efforts in improving the quality of Prospect Management Management · Enter and monitor prospect assignments and new prospect records requests. · Monitor data quality of all functions and systems related to prospect management, including software applications, industry

  15. Advanced Technologies and Practices - Building America Top Innovations...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in specific technologies and construction practices that improve the building envelope; heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC); water heating components; and indoor...

  16. Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan. Part 1 : ASC software quality engineering practices version 1.0.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minana, Molly A.; Sturtevant, Judith E.; Heaphy, Robert; Hodges, Ann Louise; Boucheron, Edward A.; Drake, Richard Roy; Forsythe, Christi A.; Schofield, Joseph Richard, Jr.; Pavlakos, Constantine James; Williamson, Charles Michael; Edwards, Harold Carter

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. Quality is defined in DOE/AL Quality Criteria (QC-1) as conformance to customer requirements and expectations. This quality plan defines the ASC program software quality practices and provides mappings of these practices to the SNL Corporate Process Requirements (CPR 1.3.2 and CPR 1.3.6) and the Department of Energy (DOE) document, ASCI Software Quality Engineering: Goals, Principles, and Guidelines (GP&G). This quality plan identifies ASC management and software project teams' responsibilities for cost-effective software engineering quality practices. The SNL ASC Software Quality Plan establishes the signatories commitment to improving software products by applying cost-effective software engineering quality practices. This document explains the project teams opportunities for tailoring and implementing the practices; enumerates the practices that compose the development of SNL ASC's software products; and includes a sample assessment checklist that was developed based upon the practices in this document.

  17. GAO-12-645, FEDERAL REAL PROPERTY: National Strategy and Better Data Needed to Improve Management of Excess and Underutilized Property

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2: FinalOffers3.pdf0-45.pdf0 Budget Fossil EnergyFull Text Management andGGGGUnitedREAL

  18. Waste Minimization Improvements Achieved Through Six Sigma Analysis Result In Significant Cost Savings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mousseau, Jeffrey, D.; Jansen, John, R.; Janke, David, H.; Plowman, Catherine, M.

    2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Improved waste minimization practices at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) are leading to a 15% reduction in the generation of hazardous and radioactive waste. Bechtel, BWXT Idaho, LLC (BBWI), the prime management and operations contractor at the INEEL, applied the Six Sigma improvement process to the INEEL Waste Minimization Program to review existing processes and define opportunities for improvement. Our Six Sigma analysis team: composed of an executive champion, process owner, a black belt and yellow belt, and technical and business team members used this statistical based process approach to analyze work processes and produced ten recommendations for improvement. Recommendations ranged from waste generator financial accountability for newly generated waste to enhanced employee recognition programs for waste minimization efforts. These improvements have now been implemented to reduce waste generation rates and are producing positive results.

  19. Earned Value Management System (EVMS)

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Guide supports the Departments initiatives to improve program, project, and contract management through the implementation and surveillance of contractors earned value management systems. Canceled by DOE G 413.3-10A.

  20. Capability Improvement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Trinity NERSC-8 Capability Improvement Trinity NERSC-8 Capability Improvement As stated in Section 3.5 of the Technical Requirements, The performance of the ASC and NERSC...

  1. Integrated Solid Waste Management Act (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act affirms the state's support for alternative waste management practices, including waste reduction and resource recovery. Each county and municipality is required to file an integrated...

  2. ONLINE LEARNING Managing energy for a sustainable future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    ONLINE LEARNING Managing energy for a sustainable future The Energy Resource Management Certificate energy management. Pursuing sustainable energy management strategies can be a powerful tool for achieving the California Energy Commission. Gain practical knowledge that matters n Explore the practical, sustainable

  3. High performance in Procurement Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsha, Maya (Olsha-Yehiav)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research on Procurement Risk Management has been conducted by Accenture and MIT in order to identify the best practices used to manage commodity price volatility and supplier risk. In today's increasingly turbulent market ...

  4. Using Airborne Geophysics to Improve the Management of Produced Water from Coal Bed Natural Gas Extraction in the Powder River Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sams, J.I.; Lipinski, B.A.; Hammack, R.W.; Veloski, G.A.; Ackman, T.E.; Harbert, W.P. (Univ. of Pittsburgh)

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming and Montana has seen a boom in drilling for coalbed natural gas (CBNG), the natural gas contained in coal seams. Large quantities of water are coproduced during the extraction process. The water is currently managed by land application (irrigation), returned to shallow groundwater aquifers via infiltration basins, directly discharged to ephemeral or perennial streams, or injected into the deep subsurface via injection wells. At present, there are over 28,000 CBNG wells permitted or drilled in the PRB and it is estimated that another 50,000 to 100,000 new wells will be drilled in the future. Produced water management is a major challenge to the oil and gas industry as well as federal and state regulators. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of airborne electromagnetic (AEM) methods for the large-scale mapping of vadose zone properties. The base maps derived from the AEM data show the location of conductive anomalies within the vadose zone. These conductive anomalies have been identified as conditions related to soil properties, geologic features, saturated areas, and seepage zones. In the PRB, the data can be used to identify suitable locations for constructing impoundments in areas that avoid highly conductive soils where infiltrating water may leach salts through the vadose zone and into shallow aquifers. Hydrologic changes within the vadose zone were evaluated by completing an AEM survey in 2003 and 2004 over two coincident spatial areas. The data were analyzed to determine statistical relationships between the data sets, in particular data outliers which may represent areas of significant change between each year. Some outliers plot near areas of CBNG development. Ultimately, it is hoped that the information from these surveys will identify cost effective treatment or disposal options for produced water that address both production and environmental issues.

  5. Efficient airflow design for cleanrooms improves business bottom lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Tengfang

    2003-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on a review of airflow design factors and in-situ energy measurements in ISO Cleanliness Class-5 cleanrooms, this paper addresses the importance of energy efficiency in airflow design and opportunities of cost savings in cleanroom practices. The paper discusses design factors that can long lastingly affect cleanroom system performance, and demonstrates benefits of energy efficient cleanroom design from viewpoints of environmental control and business operations. The paper suggests that a high performance cleanroom should not only be effective in contamination control, but also be efficient in energy and environmental performance. The paper also suggests that energy efficient design practice stands to bring in immediate capital cost savings and operation cost savings, and should be regarded by management as a strategy to improve business bottom lines.

  6. Best Management Practice #10: Cooling Tower Management | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergy Christopher| Department ofBeowaweBerylliumBest

  7. Best Management Practice #1: Water Management Planning | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergy Christopher| Departmentof Energy 12:Energy 1:

  8. Guidance for the design and management of a maintenance plan to assure safety and improve the predictability of a DOE nuclear irradiation facility. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booth, R.S.; Kryter, R.C.; Shepard, R.L.; Smith, O.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Upadhyaya, B.R. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Rowan, W.J.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A program is recommended for planning the maintenance of DOE nuclear facilities that will help safety and enhance availability throughout a facility`s life cycle. While investigating the requirements for maintenance activities, a major difference was identified between the strategy suitable for a conventional power reactor and one for a research reactor facility: the latter should provide a high degree of predicted availability (referred to hereafter as ``predictability``) to its users, whereas the former should maximize total energy production. These differing operating goals necessitate different maintenance strategies. A strategy for scheduling research reactor facility operation and shutdown for maintenance must balance safety, reliability,and predicted availability. The approach developed here is based on three major elements: (1) a probabilistic risk analysis of the balance between assured reliability and predictability (presented in Appendix C), (2) an assessment of the safety and operational impact of maintenance activities applied to various components of the facility, and (3) a data base of historical and operational information on the performance and requirements for maintenance of various components. These factors are integrated into a set of guidelines for designing a new highly maintainable facility, for preparing flexible schedules for improved maintenance of existing facilities, and for anticipating the maintenance required to extend the life of an aging facility. Although tailored to research reactor facilities, the methodology has broader applicability and may therefore be used to improved the maintenance of power reactors, particularly in anticipation of peak load demands.

  9. Minimization of cost, sediment load, and sensitivity to climate change in a watershed management application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eppstein, Margaret J.

    : Multiobjective Differential evolution Robustness to uncertainty Stormwater management Best management practices-scale, multiobjective framework for generating a diverse family of stormwater best management practice (BMP) plans-point source impacts from developed lands, structural Best Management Practices (BMPs) such as detention ponds

  10. APBI 402 / SOIL 502 SUSTAINABLE SOIL MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Anthony P.

    1 APBI 402 / SOIL 502 SUSTAINABLE SOIL MANAGEMENT TERM 1 - 2014/15 Lead Instructors*: Maja Krzic indicators to assess sustainability of land management practices. Characterize the soil chemical environment 402-Sustainable Soil Management SOIL 502-Advanced Sustainable Soil Management Final exam 35% Final

  11. Records Management Strategy Originator name: Suzie Mereweather

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doran, Simon J.

    1 Records Management Strategy Originator name: Suzie Mereweather Department: Information Compliance records management and will seek to develop records management systems consistent with the Lord Chancellor's Code of Practice on the Management of Records issued under section 46 of the Freedom of Information Act

  12. Adaptive Systems Engineering: A Medical Paradigm for Practicing Systems Engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Douglas Hamelin; Ron D. Klingler; Christopher Dieckmann

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From its inception in the defense and aerospace industries, SE has applied holistic, interdisciplinary tools and work-process to improve the design and management of 'large, complex engineering projects.' The traditional scope of engineering in general embraces the design, development, production, and operation of physical systems, and SE, as originally conceived, falls within that scope. While this 'traditional' view has expanded over the years to embrace wider, more holistic applications, much of the literature and training currently available is still directed almost entirely at addressing the large, complex, NASA and defense-sized systems wherein the 'ideal' practice of SE provides the cradle-to-grave foundation for system development and deployment. Under such scenarios, systems engineers are viewed as an integral part of the system and project life-cycle from conception to decommissioning. In far less 'ideal' applications, SE principles are equally applicable to a growing number of complex systems and projects that need to be 'rescued' from overwhelming challenges that threaten imminent failure. The medical profession provides a unique analogy for this latter concept and offers a useful paradigm for tailoring our 'practice' of SE to address the unexpected dynamics of applying SE in the real world. In short, we can be much more effective as systems engineers as we change some of the paradigms under which we teach and 'practice' SE.

  13. Managerial information behaviour: Relationships among Total Quality Management orientation, information use environments, and managerial roles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simard, C; Rice, Ronald E

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    total quality management and socio-technical systems theory.management creates control systems that maintain and improve quality,

  14. "Managing Department Climate Change"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    "Managing Department Climate Change" #12;Presenters · Ronda Callister Professor, Department Department Climate? · Assesment is essential for determining strategies for initiating change · In a research climate · Each panelist will describe an intervention designed to improve department climate ­ Ronda

  15. Program Management at the National Nuclear Security Administration Office of Defense Nuclear Security: A Review of Program Management Documents and Underlying Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madden, Michael S.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The scope of this paper is to review the National Nuclear Security Administration Office of Defense Nuclear Security (DNS) program management documents and to examine the underlying processes. The purpose is to identify recommendations for improvement and to influence the rewrite of the DNS Program Management Plan (PMP) and the documentation supporting it. As a part of this process, over 40 documents required by DNS or its stakeholders were reviewed. In addition, approximately 12 other documents produced outside of DNS and its stakeholders were reviewed in an effort to identify best practices. The complete list of documents reviewed is provided as an attachment to this paper.

  16. IMPROVEMENTS IN CONTAINER MANAGEMENT OF TRANSURANIC (TRU) AND LOW LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE STORED AT THE CENTRAL WASTE COMPLEX (CWC) AT HANFORD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    UYTIOCO EM

    2007-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Central Waste Complex (CWC) is the interim storage facility for Resource Conservation & Recovery Act (RCRA) mixed waste, transuranic waste, transuranic mixed waste, low-level and low-level mixed radioactive waste at the Department of Energy's (DOE'S) Hanford Site. The majority of the waste stored at the facility is retrieved from the low-level burial grounds in the 200 West Area at the Site, with minor quantities of newly generated waste from on-site and off-site waste generators. The CWC comprises 18 storage buildings that house 13,000 containers. Each waste container within the facility is scanned into its location by building, module, tier and position and the information is stored in a site-wide database. As waste is retrieved from the burial grounds, a preliminary non-destructive assay is performed to determine if the waste is transuranic (TRU) or low-level waste (LLW) and subsequently shipped to the CWC. In general, the TRU and LLW waste containers are stored in separate locations within the CWC, but the final disposition of each waste container is not known upon receipt. The final disposition of each waste container is determined by the appropriate program as process knowledge is applied and characterization data becomes available. Waste containers are stored within the CWC based on their physical chemical and radiological hazards. Further segregation within each building is done by container size (55-gallon, 85-gallon, Standard Waste Box) and waste stream. Due to this waste storage scheme, assembling waste containers for shipment out of the CWC has been time consuming and labor intensive. Qualitatively, the ratio of containers moved to containers in the outgoing shipment has been excessively high, which correlates to additional worker exposure, shipment delays, and operational inefficiencies. These inefficiencies impacted the LLW Program's ability to meet commitments established by the Tri-Party Agreement, an agreement between the State of Washington, the Department of Energy, and the Environmental Protection Agency. These commitments require waste containers to be shipped off site for disposal and/or treatment within a certain time frame. Because the program was struggling to meet production demands, the Production and Planning group was tasked with developing a method to assist the LLW Program in fulfilling its requirements. Using existing databases for container management, a single electronic spreadsheet was created to visually map every waste container within the CWC. The file displays the exact location (e.g., building, module, tier, position) of each container in a format that replicates the actual layout in the facility. In addition, each container was placed into a queue defined by the LLW and TRU waste management programs. The queues were developed based on characterization requirements, treatment type and location, and potential final disposition. This visual aid allows the user to select containers from similar queues and view their location within the facility. The user selects containers in a centralized location, rather than random locations, to expedite shipments out of the facility. This increases efficiency for generating the shipments, as well as decreasing worker exposure and container handling time when gathering containers for shipment by reducing movements of waste container. As the containers are collected for shipment, the remaining containers are segregated by queue, which further reduces future container movements.

  17. Energy manager design for microgrids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    signals to a building energy management system already inStadler. 2003 “Distributed Energy Resources in Practice: Aof µGrid Distributed Energy Resource Potential Using DER-CAM

  18. FORMALDEHYDE Formaldehyde Management Plan i

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    )5-3960 (Industrial Hygiene, Biological Safety, Occupational Safety, Hazardous Waste Management, Fire Protection Prepared by: Industrial Hygienist Date Reviewed and Approved by: Chair- UM EH&S Operations Committee Date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 PERSONAL HYGIENE PRACTICES

  19. Biodiesel Safety and Best Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dongwon

    Biodiesel Safety and Best Management Practices for Small-Scale Noncommercial Use and Production you produce biodiesel: · Chemical-resistantgloves(butylrubberisbestfor methanol and lye........................................................................... 1 FuelOptionsfromBiomassOilFeedstocks ......................... 1 UsingBiodiesel

  20. Expert Secondary Inclusive Classroom Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montague, Marcia

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to gain an understanding of the management practices of expert secondary general education teachers in inclusive classrooms. Specifically, expert teachers of classrooms who included students with severe cognitive...

  1. Maui Smart Grid Demonstration Project Managing Distribution System Resources for Improved Service Quality and Reliability, Transmission Congestion Relief, and Grid Support Functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Maui Smart Grid Project (MSGP) is under the leadership of the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute (HNEI) of the University of Hawaii at Manoa. The project team includes Maui Electric Company, Ltd. (MECO), Hawaiian Electric Company, Inc. (HECO), Sentech (a division of SRA International, Inc.), Silver Spring Networks (SSN), Alstom Grid, Maui Economic Development Board (MEDB), University of Hawaii-Maui College (UHMC), and the County of Maui. MSGP was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under Cooperative Agreement Number DE-FC26-08NT02871, with approximately 50% co-funding supplied by MECO. The project was designed to develop and demonstrate an integrated monitoring, communications, database, applications, and decision support solution that aggregates renewable energy (RE), other distributed generation (DG), energy storage, and demand response technologies in a distribution system to achieve both distribution and transmission-level benefits. The application of these new technologies and procedures will increase MECO’s visibility into system conditions, with the expected benefits of enabling more renewable energy resources to be integrated into the grid, improving service quality, increasing overall reliability of the power system, and ultimately reducing costs to both MECO and its customers.

  2. IRO INTERNAL MANAGEMENT Funded by the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Management · OGPI approach · Information and Management Systems #12;· The analysis will be focus "tools" that improve the quality of the costs management: The Economic Management Tool (IntranetIRO INTERNAL MANAGEMENT - UA - Funded by the European Union 3rd Workshop: IROs Models Tunisia, 30

  3. An evaluation of the management system verification pilot at Hanford

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BRIGGS, C.R.

    1998-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Chemical Management System (CMS), currently under development at Hanford, was used as the ''test program'' for pilot testing the value added aspects of the Chemical Manufacturers Association's (CMA) Management Systems Verification (MSV) process. The MSV process, which was developed by CMA's member chemical companies specifically as a tool to assist in the continuous improvement of environment, safety and health (ESH) performance, represents a commercial sector ''best practice'' for evaluating ESH management systems. The primary purpose of Hanford's MSV Pilot was to evaluate the applicability and utility of the MSV process in the Department of Energy (DOE) environment. However, because the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) is the framework for ESH management at Hanford and at all DOE sites, the pilot specifically considered the MSV process in the context of a possible future adjunct to Integrated Safety Management System Verification (ISMSV) efforts at Hanford and elsewhere within the DOE complex. The pilot involved the conduct of two-hour interviews with four separate panels of individuals with functional responsibilities related to the CMS including the Department of Energy Richland Operations (DOE-RL), Fluor Daniel Hanford (FDH) and FDH's major subcontractors (MSCS). A semi-structured interview process was employed by the team of three ''verifiers'' who directed open-ended questions to the panels regarding the development, integration and effectiveness of management systems necessary to ensure the sustainability of the CMS effort. An ''MSV Pilot Effectiveness Survey'' also was completed by each panel participant immediately following the interview.

  4. Practical Alternative Financing Strategies for Building Commissioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhaveri, A.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Practical Alternative Financing Strategies for Building Commissioning Arun Jhaveri, Regional Manager Federal Energy Management Program U. S. Dept. of Energy/Western Regional Office Seattle, Washington ABSTRACT Owning and operating a... or retro-commissioning of existing buildings/facilities that are going through major retrofit/renovation. In a recent study of some 60 commercial buildings, the Portland Energy Conservation, Inc.(PECI) found the following alarming conditions - i) more...

  5. Demonstration of a Novel, Integrated, Multi-Scale Procedure for High-Resolution 3D Reservoir Characterization and Improved CO2-EOR/Sequestration Management, SACROC Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott R. Reeves

    2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary goal of this project was to demonstrate a new and novel approach for high resolution, 3D reservoir characterization that can enable better management of CO{sub 2} enhanced oil recovery (EOR) projects and, looking to the future, carbon sequestration projects. The approach adopted has been the subject of previous research by the DOE and others, and relies primarily upon data-mining and advanced pattern recognition approaches. This approach honors all reservoir characterization data collected, but accepts that our understanding of how these measurements relate to the information of most interest, such as how porosity and permeability vary over a reservoir volume, is imperfect. Ideally the data needed for such an approach includes surface seismic to provide the greatest amount of data over the entire reservoir volume of interest, crosswell seismic to fill the resolution gap between surface seismic and wellbore-scale measurements, geophysical well logs to provide the vertical resolution sought, and core data to provide the tie to the information of most interest. These data are combined via a series of one or more relational models to enable, in its most successful application, the prediction of porosity and permeability on a vertical resolution similar to logs at each surface seismic trace location. In this project, the procedure was applied to the giant (and highly complex) SACROC unit of the Permian basin in West Texas, one of the world's largest CO{sub 2}-EOR projects and a potentially world-class geologic sequestration site. Due to operational scheduling considerations on the part of the operator of the field, the crosswell data was not obtained during the period of project performance (it is currently being collected however as part of another DOE project). This compromised the utility of the surface seismic data for the project due to the resolution gap between it and the geophysical well logs. An alternative approach was adopted that utilized a relational model to predict porosity and permeability profiles from well logs at each well location, and a 3D geostatistical variogram to generate the reservoir characterization over the reservoir volume of interest. A reservoir simulation model was built based upon this characterization and history-matched without making significant changes to it, thus validating the procedure. While not the same procedure as originally planned, the procedure ultimately employed proved successful and demonstrated that the general concepts proposed (i.e., data mining and advanced pattern recognition methods) have the flexibility to achieve the reservoir characterization objectives sought even with imperfect or incomplete data.

  6. Examining Synergies between Energy Management and Demand Response: A Case Study at Two California Industrial Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsen, Daniel

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Capabilities due to Energy Management Improvement inSummary Introduction Energy Management Demand Responseand Processes Energy Management and Demand Response History

  7. Information resource management concepts for records managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seesing, P.R.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information Resource Management (ERM) is the label given to the various approaches used to foster greater accountability for the use of computing resources. It is a corporate philosophy that treats information as it would its other resources. There is a reorientation from simply expenditures to considering the value of the data stored on that hardware. Accountability for computing resources is expanding beyond just the data processing (DP) or management information systems (MIS) manager to include senior organization management and user management. Management`s goal for office automation is being refocused from saving money to improving productivity. A model developed by Richard Nolan (1982) illustrates the basic evolution of computer use in organizations. Computer Era: (1) Initiation (computer acquisition), (2) Contagion (intense system development), (3) Control (proliferation of management controls). Data Resource Era: (4) Integration (user service orientation), (5) Data Administration (corporate value of information), (6) Maturity (strategic approach to information technology). The first three stages mark the growth of traditional data processing and management information systems departments. The development of the IRM philosophy in an organization involves the restructuring of the DP organization and new management techniques. The three stages of the Data Resource Era represent the evolution of IRM. This paper examines each of them in greater detail.

  8. An overview of the sustainability of solid waste management at military installations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borglin, S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid Waste." Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response:Developing Integrated Solid Waste Management Plans at ArmyQuality Fact Sheet on Solid Waste Management practices.

  9. Research opportunities to improve DSM impact estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Misuriello, H.; Hopkins, M.E.F. [Fleming Group, Washington, DC (United States)

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was commissioned by the California Institute for Energy Efficiency (CIEE) as part of its research mission to advance the energy efficiency and productivity of all end-use sectors in California. Our specific goal in this effort has been to identify viable research and development (R&D) opportunities that can improve capabilities to determine the energy-use and demand reductions achieved through demand-side management (DSM) programs and measures. We surveyed numerous practitioners in California and elsewhere to identify the major obstacles to effective impact evaluation, drawing on their collective experience. As a separate effort, we have also profiled the status of regulatory practices in leading states with respect to DSM impact evaluation. We have synthesized this information, adding our own perspective and experience to those of our survey-respondent colleagues, to characterize today`s state of the art in impact-evaluation practices. This scoping study takes a comprehensive look at the problems and issues involved in DSM impact estimates at the customer-facility or site level. The major portion of our study investigates three broad topic areas of interest to CIEE: Data analysis issues, field-monitoring issues, issues in evaluating DSM measures. Across these three topic areas, we have identified 22 potential R&D opportunities, to which we have assigned priority levels. These R&D opportunities are listed by topic area and priority.

  10. Impacts of hazardous waste regulation on low-level waste management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharples, F.E.; Eyman, L.D.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984 have greatly expanded the universe of what, and who, is regulated under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Handling requirements for hazardous waste are becoming increasingly more stringent, particularly where land disposal is concerned. DOE needs to begin actively pursuing strategies directed at keeping the management of LLW clearly separated from wastes that are legitimately regulated under RCRA. Such strategies would include instituting systemwide changes in internal management practices, establishing improved location standards for LLW disposal, and negotiating interagency compromise agreements to obtain variances from RCRA requirements where necessary and appropriate.

  11. Total Quality Management: Managing the Human Dimension in Natural Resource Agencies1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    Total Quality Management: Managing the Human Dimension in Natural Resource Agencies1 Denzil Verardo business is conducted in the public sector, and Total Quality Management (TQM) can be the avenue relationships within the DPR and make recommendations for change. Total Quality Management team practices were

  12. Order Module--DOE-HDBK-1203-97, GUIDE TO GOOD PRACTICES FOR TRAINING...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    HDBK-1203-97, GUIDE TO GOOD PRACTICES FOR TRAINING OF TECHNICAL STAFF AND MANAGERS, DOE-HDBK-1204-97, GUIDE TO GOOD PRACTICES FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF TEST ITEMS,DOE-HDBK-1205-97,...

  13. Improving haul truck productivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiscor, S.

    2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper reviews developments in payload management and cycle times. These were discussed at a roundtable held at the Haulage and Loading 2007 conference held in May in Phoenix, AZ, USA. Several original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) explaind what their companies were doing to improve cycle times for trucks, shovels and excavators used in surface coal mining. Quotations are given from Dion Domaschenz of Liebherr and Steve Plott of Cat Global Mining. 4 figs.

  14. NNSA project receives DOE Secretary's Award for Project Management...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    project receives DOE Secretary's Award for Project Management Improvement | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the...

  15. Electric Vehicle Battery Thermal Issues and Thermal Management Techniques (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rugh, J. P.; Pesaran, A.; Smith, K.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation examines the issues concerning thermal management in electric drive vehicles and management techniques for improving the life of a Li-ion battery in an EDV.

  16. Secure Transportation Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbs, P. W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Secure Transport Management Course (STMC) course provides managers with information related to procedures and equipment used to successfully transport special nuclear material. This workshop outlines these procedures and reinforces the information presented with the aid of numerous practical examples. The course focuses on understanding the regulatory framework for secure transportation of special nuclear materials, identifying the insider and outsider threat(s) to secure transportation, organization of a secure transportation unit, management and supervision of secure transportation units, equipment and facilities required, training and qualification needed.

  17. Radioactive Waste Management Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. The purpose of the Manual is to catalog those procedural requirements and existing practices that ensure that all DOE elements and contractors continue to manage DOE's radioactive waste in a manner that is protective of worker and public health and safety, and the environment. Does not cancel other directives.

  18. http://stir.ac.uk/4l Why study Management?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Little, Tony

    http://stir.ac.uk/4l BSc(Hons) Management #12;Why study Management? Management essentially combines the flow of patients through hospital departments. Other modules include: Business Strategy, Project Management Case Studies and Energy Supply Case Study. Did you know? Excellent Management practice is required

  19. Lesson Learned by Environmental Management Complex-wide Activity-level Work Planning and Control

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Slide Presentation by Roger Claycomb, Work Control Program Manager, DOE Idaho Operations Office. Office of Environmental Management Work Planning and Control Oversight. Contractor Good Practices and DOE EM Good Practices.

  20. Working lives of prison managers: exploring agency and structure in the late modern prison 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bennett, Jamie Stewart

    2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This study explores the contemporary working lives of prison managers. It attempts to understand the ways in which globalised changes in management practices have intersected with localised practices and occupational ...