Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "management challenge area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

300 Area Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFRC) Field Site Management Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has established the 300 Area Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (300 Area IFRC) on the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State for the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) within the Office of Science. The project is funded by the Environmental Remediation Sciences Division (ERSD). The purpose of the project is to conduct research at the 300 IFRC to investigate multi-scale mass transfer processes associated with a subsurface uranium plume impacting both the vadose zone and groundwater. The management approach for the 300 Area IFRC requires that a Field Site Management Plan be developed. This is an update of the plan to reflect the installation of the well network and other changes.

Freshley, Mark D.

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

2

Cryptographic Challenges for Smart Grid Home Area ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Cryptographic Challenges for Smart Grid Home Area Networks Secure Networking Author – Apurva Mohan, Honeywell ACS Labs ...

2012-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

3

Microsoft Word - Management Challenges Final.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audit Services Special Report Management Challenges at the Department of Energy DOE/IG-0712 December 2005 SPECIAL REPORT ON MANAGEMENT CHALLENGES AT THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY TABLE OF CONTENTS Analysis of Management Challenges Background 1 Department Successes in Meeting the President's Management Agenda 1 Management Challenges 2 Appendices 1. Watch List 16 2. Comparison of Management Challenges Reported by Various Groups 19 3. Related Reports Issued in Fiscal Year 2005 20 Analysis of Management Challenges ______________________________________________________________________

4

DOE Challenge Home Recommended Quality Management Provisions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recommended Quality Recommended Quality Management Provisions RECOMMENDED QUALITY MANAGEMENT PROVISIONS QM Provision Builder Documentation & Verification Requirements Rater/Verifier Requirements QM #1: Project Documentation Complete construction documents shall be qualified as Designed to Earn ENERGY STAR and document all additional provisions and specifications required for DOE Challenge Home including mandatory provisions: 2012 IECC envelope insulation levels, ENERGY STAR windows, duct work in conditioned space, hot water distribution requirements requirements for indoor fixtures, EPA Indoor airPLUS checklist, and Renewable Energy Ready Home Checklists. Develop and store construction documents which, at a minimum, shall include all content required to consistently implement

5

Microsoft Word - Management Challenges Report _FY 2009_.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Special Special Report Management Challenges at the Department of Energy DOE/IG-0808 December 2008 ______________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________ Table of Contents Introduction ...................................................................................................1 Management Challenges ...................................................................................3 Watch List ....................................................................................................8 Appendices ....................................................................................................l1

6

Federal Energy Management Program: Program Areas  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

program areas of the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) focus on specific energy management actions to help Federal agencies deploy the available technologies appropriate...

7

Solid waste management challenges for cities in developing countries  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stakeholders. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Factors affecting performance waste management systems. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Questionnaire as Annex for waste management baseline assessment. - Abstract: Solid waste management is a challenge for the cities' authorities in developing countries mainly due to the increasing generation of waste, the burden posed on the municipal budget as a result of the high costs associated to its management, the lack of understanding over a diversity of factors that affect the different stages of waste management and linkages necessary to enable the entire handling system functioning. An analysis of literature on the work done and reported mainly in publications from 2005 to 2011, related to waste management in developing countries, showed that few articles give quantitative information. The analysis was conducted in two of the major scientific journals, Waste Management Journal and Waste Management and Research. The objective of this research was to determine the stakeholders' action/behavior that have a role in the waste management process and to analyze influential factors on the system, in more than thirty urban areas in 22 developing countries in 4 continents. A combination of methods was used in this study in order to assess the stakeholders and the factors influencing the performance of waste management in the cities. Data was collected from scientific literature, existing data bases, observations made during visits to urban areas, structured interviews with relevant professionals, exercises provided to participants in workshops and a questionnaire applied to stakeholders. Descriptive and inferential statistic methods were used to draw conclusions. The outcomes of the research are a comprehensive list of stakeholders that are relevant in the waste management systems and a set of factors that reveal the most important causes for the systems' failure. The information provided is very useful when planning, changing or implementing waste management systems in cities.

Abarca Guerrero, Lilliana, E-mail: l.abarca.guerrero@tue.nl [Built Environment Department, Eindhoven University of Technology, Den Dolech, 25612 AZ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Maas, Ger, E-mail: g.j.maas@tue.nl [Built Environment Department, Eindhoven University of Technology, Den Dolech, 25612 AZ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Hogland, William, E-mail: william.hogland@lnu.se [School of Natural Sciences, Linnaeus University, SE-391 82 Kalmar (Sweden)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

8

Wildlife Management Areas (Maryland) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wildlife Management Areas (Maryland) Wildlife Management Areas (Maryland) Wildlife Management Areas (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Maryland Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Maryland Department of Natural Resources Wildlife Management Areas exist in the State of Maryland as wildlife sanctuaries, and vehicles, tree removal, and construction are severely

9

Groundwater Management Areas (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management Areas (Texas) Management Areas (Texas) Groundwater Management Areas (Texas) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Texas Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Texas Commission on Environmental Quality This legislation authorizes the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality and the Texas Water Development Board to establish Groundwater Management Areas to provide for the conservation, preservation, protection, recharging, and prevention of waste of groundwater and groundwater

10

Surface Water Management Areas (Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Surface Water Management Areas (Virginia) Surface Water Management Areas (Virginia) Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General...

11

Microsoft Word - Management Challenges FY 2008 _3_ _6_.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

_____________________________________________________________________ Table of Contents Special Report Management Challenges at the Department of Energy DOE/IG-0782 December 2007 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audit Services Department of Energy Washington, DC 2 0 5 8 5 December 1 3 , 2 0 0 7 MEMORANDUM FROM: Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATIOIV: Special Report on "Management Challenges at the Department of Encrgy" BACKGROUND Annually, the Office of Inspector General identifies what it considers to be the most significant management challenges facing the Department of Energy. Now required by the Reports

12

: H. Jack Elackwell, Area Manager, LAAO DATE:  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

O.&E b.&AORANDti l > : H. Jack Elackwell, Area Manager, LAAO DATE: June 5, 1973 70 : ?ZH-Division Leader ,WE,T : ENVIRONMENTAL RADIOACTIVITY SURVEY OF LOS ALAMOS COMIMUNITY...

13

OM Forum---Operations Management Challenges for Some “Cleantech” Firms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A “cleantech” firm is one with an innovative technology and/or business model for serving an existing market with dramatically reduced environmental impact. This paper describes operations management OM challenges faced by five cleantech ... Keywords: bankruptcy, capacity investment, energy, environment, process innovation, public policy, supply chain management

Erica L. Plambeck

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Key Management Challenges in Smart Grid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Agenda Awarded in February 2011 Team of industry and research organizations Project Objectives Address difficult issues Complexity Diversity of systems Scale Longevity of solution Participate in standards efforts and working groups Develop innovative key management solutions Modeling and simulation ORNL Cyber Security Econometric Enterprise System Demonstrate effectiveness of solution Demonstrate scalability

Sheldon, Frederick T [ORNL; Duren, Mike [Sypris Electronics, LLC

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Wildlife Management Areas (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Minnesota) Minnesota) Wildlife Management Areas (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting Certain areas of the State are designated as wildlife protection areas and refuges; new construction and development is restricted in these areas

16

Wildlife Management Areas (Florida) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Florida) Florida) Wildlife Management Areas (Florida) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Florida Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission Certain sites in Florida are designated as wildlife management areas, and

17

Managing Imported Fire Ants in Urban Areas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The imported fire ant is found in much of Texas and across the southeastern U.S. This publication describes options for managing the pest in specific locations such as home lawns, gardens and buildings. Other topics include fire ant treatment methods, fire ant identification, medical problems, and organizing an area-wide suppression program. There is also a guide to fire ant insecticides.

Drees, Bastiaan M.

2006-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

18

TECHNICAL INTEGRATION ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT FOCUS AREAS  

SciTech Connect

This contract involved a team of companies led by WPI (formerly the Waste Policy Institute). In addition to WPI, the team included four subcontractors--TRW (formerly BDM Federal), SAIC, Energetics, and the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC). The team of companies functioned as a ''seamless team'' assembled to support the Environmental Management Program Focus Areas. Staff resources were applied in the following offices: Richland, Washington, Idaho Falls, Idaho, Morgantown, West Virginia, Grand Forks, North Dakota, Aiken, South Carolina, Gaithersburg, Maryland, and Blacksburg, Virginia. These locations represented a mixture of site support offices at the field focus area locations and central staff to support across the focus areas. The management of this dispersed resource base relied on electronic communication links to allow the team to function as a ''virtual office'' to address tasks with the best qualified staff matched to the task assignments. A variety of tasks were assigned and successfully completed throughout the life of the contract that involved program planning and analysis, program execution, program information management and communication and data transmission.

Carey R. Butler

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

TECHNICAL INTEGRATION ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT FOCUS AREAS  

SciTech Connect

This contract involved a team of companies led by WPI (formerly the Waste Policy Institute). In addition to WPI, the team included four subcontractors--TRW (formerly BDM Federal), SAIC, Energetics, and the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC). The team of companies functioned as a ''seamless team'' assembled to support the Environmental Management Program Focus Areas. Staff resources were applied in the following offices: Richland, Washington, Idaho Falls, Idaho, Morgantown, West Virginia, Grand Forks, North Dakota, Aiken, South Carolina, Gaithersburg, Maryland, and Blacksburg, Virginia. These locations represented a mixture of site support offices at the field focus area locations and central staff to support across the focus areas. The management of this dispersed resource base relied on electronic communication links to allow the team to function as a ''virtual office'' to address tasks with the best qualified staff matched to the task assignments. A variety of tasks were assigned and successfully completed throughout the life of the contract that involved program planning and analysis, program execution, program information management and communication and data transmission.

Carey R. Butler

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Summary Results of Challenges and Opportunities for Technology Areas of the Grid  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5, 2012 5, 2012 Summary Results of Challenges & Opportunities for Technology Areas of the Grid From Breakout Group Sessions DOE Grid Tech Team Vision of a 21 st Century Distribution System A seamless, cost-effective electricity system, from generation to end-use, capable of meeting all clean energy demands and capacity requirements, while allowing consumer participation and electricity use as desired: * Significant scale-up of clean energy (renewables, natural gas, nuclear, fossil with CCUS) * Allows 100% consumer participation and choice (including distributed generation, demand-side management, electrification of transportation, and energy efficiency) * 100% holistically designed (including regional diversity, AC-DC transmission and distribution solutions, microgrids, and centralized-

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "management challenge area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Mixed Waste Focus Area program management plan  

SciTech Connect

This plan describes the program management principles and functions to be implemented in the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA). The mission of the MWFA is to provide acceptable technologies that enable implementation of mixed waste treatment systems developed in partnership with end-users, stakeholders, tribal governments and regulators. The MWFA will develop, demonstrate and deliver implementable technologies for treatment of mixed waste within the DOE Complex. Treatment refers to all post waste-generation activities including sampling and analysis, characterization, storage, processing, packaging, transportation and disposal.

Beitel, G.A.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Aviation Manager Functional Area Qualification Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-STD-1165-2003 September 2003 CHANGE NOTICE NO. 1 December 2009 DOE STANDARD AVIATION MANAGER FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1165-2003 CH-1 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ DOE-STD-1165-2003 CH-1 iv List of Changes Page/paragraph Change Page ii Change to new FAQS format Page iii Change in approval signature Page iv Added list of changes Page v Changes to Table of Contents Page vii Changes to organizational names and

23

Technology Challenges in the Development of Wireless Personal Area Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wireless personal area networks (WPANs) will be major components of the heterogeneous communication environment of the future. The devices in a WPAN must be low cost and operate for a long time from a battery. As a consequence, they pose demanding ... Keywords: 4G networks, packaging technology, processing technology, wireless personal area networks

Marc Engels

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Radiation and Chemical Risk Management [EVS Program Area]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation and Chemical Risk Management Radiation and Chemical Risk Management EVS helps meet the challenge of protecting human health and the environment through the management of risk associated with radiation and chemicals in the environment. Protecting human health, welfare, and the environment in a world affected by energy production and technology is a global challenge. EVS helps to meet this challenge through research and analysis on the management of risk associated with radiation and chemicals in the environment. To improve the management of risk associated with nuclear and chemical materials and wastes at contaminated sites, we develop information and tools that support decision making related to health, safety, environmental, economic, and social-cultural concerns. Nuclear Materials and Waste Disposition

25

Using Roadmapping to Meet the Challenge of Implementing the Environmental Management's 2012 Vision at the INEEL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soon after becoming the Program Secretarial Officer (PSO) for the Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) Program, Jessie Roberson initiated a thorough Top-to-Bottom review of the EM Program and challenged the sites to conduct business differently. As an example, she emphasized risk reduction, not just risk management. INEEL's 2070 cleanup baseline was considered too long and must be completed significantly sooner. The cleanup costs must also be significantly reduced from the current baseline of $41 Billion. The challenge is to complete most of the cleanup by 2012 and to reduce the EM footprint at the INEEL to one site area, the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), also by 2012. The difficulty of the challenge is increased by the requirement to perform the work within nearly flat budgets. The bottom line: do more work in less time for less money. Further complications were added when funding for EM's technology development program was greatly reduced, cutting out most of the technology support to the operational projects. To face this incredible challenge, the INEEL began a several month effort to develop an implementation strategy and the tactics required for success. The strategies to meet EM's challenge under these constraints require the scope of work to be crisply defined with a clear understanding of the completion criteria. A number of techniques will be discussed in this paper that were used to more fully define the completion criteria as well as redefine the cleanup projects and their system boundaries. The mechanics of redefining and recasting cleanup projects at the INEEL to focus on how all the work fits together for an entire site area along with some of the advantages will be discussed. This paper highlights how roadmapping techniques and processes were used to gather information about the site's cleanup programs, review the system boundaries, identify the project risks to completing the cleanup tasks, and to help recast the projects to meet the stewardship requirements for that portion of the site. This paper will discuss how site cleanup projects were recast into geographical areas. Some geographical areas were divided into several sub-projects while others site areas were completed within one project depending on the amount and type of integration required to complete the cleanup. The paper also addresses some of the other changes that are needed to facilitate implementation of the revised structuring of the cleanup project. Some of these changes include organizational modifications and resources allocation enhancements.

Murphy, J.; Mascareqas, C.; McNeel, K.; Stiger, S.; Thiel, E.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

26

Management Challenges at the Department of Energy, IG-0808 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

808 808 Management Challenges at the Department of Energy, IG-0808 On an annual basis, the Office of Inspector General identifies what it considers to be the most significant management challenges facing the Department. This initiative is an important component of our effort to assess the Department's progress in addressing previously identified challenges, and it serves to highlight emerging issues facing the agency. The management challenge process also assists the Office of Inspector General in setting priorities for its reviews of Department programs and operations. This year, we identified six management challenges: * Contract Administration * Cyber Security * Energy Supply * Environmental Cleanup * Safeguards and Security * Stockpile Stewardship Management Challenges at the Department of Energy, IG-0808

27

The grand challenge of managing the petascale facility.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is the result of a study of networks and how they may need to evolve to support petascale leadership computing and science. As Dr. Ray Orbach, director of the Department of Energy's Office of Science, says in the spring 2006 issue of SciDAC Review, 'One remarkable example of growth in unexpected directions has been in high-end computation'. In the same article Dr. Michael Strayer states, 'Moore's law suggests that before the end of the next cycle of SciDAC, we shall see petaflop computers'. Given the Office of Science's strong leadership and support for petascale computing and facilities, we should expect to see petaflop computers in operation in support of science before the end of the decade, and DOE/SC Advanced Scientific Computing Research programs are focused on making this a reality. This study took its lead from this strong focus on petascale computing and the networks required to support such facilities, but it grew to include almost all aspects of the DOE/SC petascale computational and experimental science facilities, all of which will face daunting challenges in managing and analyzing the voluminous amounts of data expected. In addition, trends indicate the increased coupling of unique experimental facilities with computational facilities, along with the integration of multidisciplinary datasets and high-end computing with data-intensive computing; and we can expect these trends to continue at the petascale level and beyond. Coupled with recent technology trends, they clearly indicate the need for including capability petascale storage, networks, and experiments, as well as collaboration tools and programming environments, as integral components of the Office of Science's petascale capability metafacility. The objective of this report is to recommend a new cross-cutting program to support the management of petascale science and infrastructure. The appendices of the report document current and projected DOE computation facilities, science trends, and technology trends, whose combined impact can affect the manageability and stewardship of DOE's petascale facilities. This report is not meant to be all-inclusive. Rather, the facilities, science projects, and research topics presented are to be considered examples to clarify a point.

Aiken, R. J.; Mathematics and Computer Science

2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

28

Special Report Management Challenges at the Department of Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With an annual appropriation of approximately $24 billion, the Department of Energy (Department) is a multi-faceted agency that encompasses a broad range of national security, scientific, and environmental activities. Since the passage of the Department of Energy Organization Act in 1977, the Department has shifted its emphasis and priorities over time as the energy and security needs of the Nation have changed. In recent years, the Department has refocused its efforts in areas such as energy efficiency and conservation, environmental cleanup, nuclear nonproliferation, and weapons stewardship. In order to accomplish its mission, the Department employs approximately 110,000 Federal and contractor personnel and manages assets valued at more than $134 billion, including a complex of national laboratories.

None

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

February 9, 2004, Board Public Meeting Presentations … DOE Management Challenges for 2004  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Deputy Secretary of Energy The Deputy Secretary of Energy Washington, DC 20585 January 22,2004 MEMORANDUM FOR ALL DEPARTMENTAL ELEMENTS FROM: KYLE E. McSLARROW /Management Challenges Considerable progress has been made in the past year to aggressively confront and address broad management challenges facing the Department. The Inspector General's (IG) November 2003 report, Special Report on Management Challenges at the Department of Energy, acknowledged our progress by removing two of the management challenges - performance management and worker and community safety - and placing them on the IG's watch list. Despite the progress to date, significant work remains to address fundamental challenges that affect the Department's ability to fulfill its critical missions. At

30

Coastal Area Management Program (Alabama) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coastal Area Management Program (Alabama) Coastal Area Management Program (Alabama) Coastal Area Management Program (Alabama) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Alabama Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Management This program regulates coastal activities, permits required, discharges to coastal waters and siting, construction and operation of energy facilities. ADEM's Coastal Program rules include the review and permitting for the following types of activities when they are to occur within the Coastal Area: beach and dune construction projects, developments and subdivision of properties greater than five (5) acres in size, dredging and filling of state water bottoms and wetlands, the drilling and operation of groundwater

31

Schedule for 2013 Oak Ridge Wildlife Management Area (ORWMA)...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Schedule for 2013 Oak Ridge Wildlife Management Area (ORWMA) Spring Turkey Hunts Scouting day - April 6th Hunt Weekend - April 13th-14th Hunt Weekend - April 20th -21st These...

32

Rainwater Wildlife Area Management Plan : Executive Summary.  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the project is to protect, enhance, and mitigate fish and wildlife resources impacted by Columbia River Basin hydroelectric development. The effort is one of several wildlife mitigation projects in the region developed to compensate for terrestrial habitat losses resulting from the construction of McNary and John Day Hydroelectric facilities located on the mainstem Columbia River. While this project is driven primarily by the purpose and need to mitigate for wildlife habitat losses, it is also recognized that management strategies will also benefit many other non-target fish and wildlife species and associated natural resources. The Northwest Power Act directs the NPPC to develop a program to ''protect, mitigate, and enhance'' fish and wildlife of the Columbia River and its tributaries. The overarching goals include: A Columbia River ecosystem that sustains an abundant, productive, and diverse community of fish and wildlife; Mitigation across the basin for the adverse effects to fish and wildlife caused by the development and operation of the hydrosystem; Sufficient populations of fish and wildlife for abundant opportunities for tribal trust and treaty right harvest and for non-tribal harvest; and Recovery of the fish and wildlife affected by the development and operation of the hydrosystem that are listed under the Endangered Species Act.

Childs, Allen B.; Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation in Oregon.

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Management of the Future Internet: Status and Challenges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 4th IEEE/IFIP International Workshop on Management of the Future Internet (ManFI 2012) was held on April 16, 2012 in Maui, USA. This report summarizes the keynotes, presentations and discussions in ManFI 2012 and provides a high-level view of ideas, ... Keywords: Autonomic networking, Future Internet, Future Internet management, Management architecture, Network management, OpenFlow-based Future Internet architectures

Filip Turck; Yoshiaki Kiriha; James Won-Ki Hong

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Management of Specific Flood Plain Areas (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management of Specific Flood Plain Areas (Iowa) Management of Specific Flood Plain Areas (Iowa) Management of Specific Flood Plain Areas (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Iowa Department of Natural Resources Floodplain management orders by the Iowa Department of Natural Resources as

35

Magnetotellurics At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Magnetotellurics At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Magnetotellurics Activity Date 2008 - 2008 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Vulcan increased exploration efforts in the summer and fall of 2008, during which time the company drilled two temperature gradient holes (86-15 O on Pad 1 and 17-16 O on Pad 3); conducted seismic, gravity and magnetotelluric surveys; and drilled deep exploration wells at Pads 6 and 8 and binary wells at Pads 1, 2, 4, and 7. Notes Data from these wells is proprietary, and so were unavailable for inclusion

36

Nevada Test Site 2008 Waste Management Monitoring Report Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental monitoring data were collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada Test Site. These data are associated with radiation exposure, air, groundwater, meteorology, vadose zone, subsidence, and biota. This report summarizes the 2008 environmental data to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and to support environmental compliance and performance assessment (PA) activities.

NSTec Environmental Management

2009-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

37

Major Management Challenges and Program Risks : Department of Energy GAO/OCG-99-6  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GAO GAO Performance and Accountability Series January 1999 Major Management Challenges and Program Risks Department of Energy GAO/OCG-99-6 GAO United States General Accounting Office Washington, D.C. 20548 Comptroller General of the United States January 1999 The President of the Senate The Speaker of the House of Representatives This report addresses the major performance and management challenges that have limited the effectiveness of the Department of Energy (DOE) in carrying out its mission. For many years, we have reported significant management challenges at DOE. These challenges include difficulties in completing large projects, making the transition to external regulation, modifying the Department's organizational structure to correct challenges, reforming its contracting practices,

38

Municipal solid waste management in Malaysia: Practices and challenges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rapid economic development and population growth, inadequate infrastructure and expertise, and land scarcity make the management of municipal solid waste become one of Malaysia's most critical environmental issues. The study is aimed at evaluating the generation, characteristics, and management of solid waste in Malaysia based on published information. In general, the per capita generation rate is about 0.5-0.8 kg/person/day in which domestic waste is the primary source. Currently, solid waste is managed by the Ministry of Housing and Local Government, with the participation of the private sector. A new institutional and legislation framework has been structured with the objectives to establish a holistic, integrated, and cost-effective solid waste management system, with an emphasis on environmental protection and public health. Therefore, the hierarchy of solid waste management has given the highest priority to source reduction through 3R, intermediate treatment and final disposal.

Manaf, Latifah Abd [Department of Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Environmental Studies, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia)], E-mail: latifah@env.upm.my; Samah, Mohd Armi Abu; Zukki, Nur Ilyana Mohd [Department of Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Environmental Studies, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

39

Challenges in Providing Analysis Tools and Managing Information...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Managing Information in the Design and Operation of Buildings Speaker(s): Azam Khan Date: May 14, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Philip...

40

Data Management Plan and Functional System Design for the Information Management System of the Clinch River Remedial Investigation and Waste Area Grouping 6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Data Management Plan and Functional System Design supports the Clinch River Remedial Investigation (CRRI) and Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 Environmental Monitoring Program. The objective of the Data Management Plan and Functional System Design is to provide organization, integrity, security, traceability, and consistency of the data generated during the CRRI and WAG 6 projects. Proper organization will ensure that the data are consistent with the procedures and requirements of the projects. The Information Management Groups (IMGs) for these two programs face similar challenges and share many common objectives. By teaming together, the IMGs have expedited the development and implementation of a common information management strategy that benefits each program.

Ball, T.; Brandt, C.; Calfee, J.; Garland, M.; Holladay, S.; Nickle, B.; Schmoyer, D.; Serbin, C.; Ward, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "management challenge area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

PREFERRED WATERFLOOD MANAGEMENT PRACTICES FOR THE SPRABERRY TREND AREA  

SciTech Connect

The naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area is one of the largest reservoirs in the domestic U.S. and is the largest reservoir in area extent in the world. Production from Spraberry sands is found over a 2,500 sq. mile area and Spraberry reservoirs can be found in an eight county area in west Texas. Over 150 operators produce 65,000 barrels of oil per day (bopd) from the Spraberry Trend Area from more than 9,000 production wells. Recovery is poor, on the order of 7-10% due to the profoundly complicated nature of the reservoir, yet billions of barrels of hydrocarbons remain. We estimate over 15% of remaining reserves in domestic Class III reservoirs are in Spraberry Trend Area reservoirs. This tremendous domestic asset is a prime example of an endangered hydrocarbon resource in need of immediate technological advancements before thousands of wells are permanently abandoned. This report describes the final work of the project, ''Preferred Waterflood Management Practices for the Spraberry Trend Area.'' The objective of this project is to significantly increase field-wide production in the Spraberry Trend in a short time frame through the application of preferred practices for managing and optimizing water injection. Our goal is to dispel negative attitudes and lack of confidence in water injection and to document the methodology and results for public dissemination to motivate waterflood expansion in the Spraberry Trend. This objective has been accomplished through research in three areas: (1) detail historical review and extensive reservoir characterization, (2) production data management, and (3) field demonstration. This provides results of the final year of the three-year project for each of the three areas.

David S. Schechter

2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

42

CAR SHARING AND MOBILITY MANAGEMENT: FACING NEW CHALLENGES WITH TECHNOLOGY AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 CAR SHARING AND MOBILITY MANAGEMENT: FACING NEW CHALLENGES WITH TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATIVE passengers. This pa- per describes an important movement towards new "Mobility Management" in which competi- tion no longer favors a particular mode. Rather, this new mobility framework could be used to increase

Kammen, Daniel M.

43

Management Challenges at the Department of Energy … Fiscal Year 2012, IG-0858  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management Challenges at the Management Challenges at the Department of Energy DOE/IG-0858 November 2011 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 November 10, 2011 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: "Management Challenges at the Department of Energy - Fiscal Year 2012" INTRODUCTION Responsible for executing some of the Nation's most complex and technologically advanced missions, the Department of Energy faces an array of challenges that are as wide-ranging and complex as at any time in its history. While the Department's origins can be traced to the Manhattan Project and the 1973-1974 oil embargo, it has evolved into a multi-faceted agency that encompasses a broad range of national security, scientific, energy and environmental activities

44

The Grand Challenge of Managing the Petascale Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of matter. This talk will discuss the evolution of the DOE/NNSA research program in this area, highlight of the NNSA labs, and the relation ship between the NNSA and the broader DOE. At LLNL, Dr. Budil's research

45

Small Water System Management Program: 100 K Area  

SciTech Connect

Purposes of this document are: to provide an overview of the service and potable water system presently in service at the Hanford Site`s 100 K Area; to provide future system forecasts based on anticipated DOE activities and programs; to delineate performance, design, and operations criteria; and to describe planned improvements. The objective of the small water system management program is to assure the water system is properly and reliably managed and operated, and continues to exist as a functional and viable entity in accordance with WAC 246-290-410.

Hunacek, G.S. Jr. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

46

Senior Technical Safety Manager Functional Area Qualification Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MEASUREMENT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1175-2013 October 2013 DOE STANDARD SENIOR TECHNICAL SAFETY MANAGER FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1175-2013 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Website at http://energy.gov/hss/information-center/department-energy-technical-standards-program ii DOE-STD-11 75-2013 APPROVAL The Federal Technical Capability Panel consists of senior U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) managers responsible for overseeing the Federal Technical Capability Program. This Panel is responsible for reviewing and approving the Qualification Standard for Department-wide

47

Visualizing Diurnal Population Change in Urban Areas for Emergency Management  

SciTech Connect

There is an increasing need for a quick, simple method to represent diurnal population change in metropolitan areas for effective emergency management and risk analysis. Many geographic studies rely on decennial U.S. Census data that assume that urban populations are static in space and time. This has obvious limitations in the context of dynamic geographic problems. The U.S. Department of Transportation publishes population data at the transportation analysis zone level in fifteen-minute increments. This level of spatial and temporal detail allows for improved dynamic population modeling. This article presents a methodology for visualizing and analyzing diurnal population change for metropolitan areas based on this readily available data. Areal interpolation within a geographic information system is used to create twenty-four (one per hour) population surfaces for the larger metropolitan area of Salt Lake County, Utah. The resulting surfaces represent diurnal population change for an average workday and are easily combined to produce an animation that illustrates population dynamics throughout the day. A case study of using the method to visualize population distributions in an emergency management context is provided using two scenarios: a chemical release and a dirty bomb in Salt Lake County. This methodology can be used to address a wide variety of problems in emergency management.

Kobayashi, Tetsuo [University of Utah; Medina, Richard M [ORNL; Cova, Thomas [University of Utah

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Forrest Conservation Area : Management & Implementation FY 2004 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes) acquired the Forrest Conservation Area during July of 2002. The property is located in the Upper John Day subbasin within the Columbia basin. The property consists of two parcels comprising 4,232 acres. The Mainstem parcel consists of 3,445 acres and is located 1/2 mile to the east of Prairie City, Oregon on the mainstem John Day River. The Middle Fork parcel consists of 786 acres and is located one mile to the west of the town of Austin, OR on the Middle Fork John Day River. The Forrest Conservation Area is under a memorandum of agreement with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to provide an annual written report generally describing the real property interests of the project and management activities undertaken or in progress. Acquisition of the Forrest Conservation Area was funded by BPA as part of their program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife habitat affected by hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. The intent of the Conservation Area is to partially mitigate fish and wildlife impacts for the John Day Dam on the Columbia River as outlined in the Northwest Power Planning Council's Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994, {section}11.1, {section}7.6). While the Tribes hold fee-title to the property, the BPA has assured a level of management funding for the protection and restoration of fish and wildlife habitat through a memorandum of agreement.

Smith, Brent

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

The 300 Area Integrated Field Research Challenge Quality Assurance Project Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and a group of expert collaborators are using the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site 300 Area uranium plume within the footprint of the 300-FF-5 groundwater operable unit as a site for an Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFRC). The IFRC is entitled Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Processes Controlling Natural Attenuation and Engineered Remediation: An IFRC Focused on the Hanford Site 300 Area Uranium Plume Project. The theme is investigation of multi-scale mass transfer processes. A series of forefront science questions on mass transfer are posed for research that relate to the effect of spatial heterogeneities; the importance of scale; coupled interactions between biogeochemical, hydrologic, and mass transfer processes; and measurements/approaches needed to characterize and model a mass transfer-dominated system. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the 300 Area IFRC Project. This plan is designed to be used exclusively by project staff.

Fix, N. J.

2009-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

50

Senior Technical Safety Manager Functional Area Qualification Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

75-2006 75-2006 i NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1175-2006 October 2006 DOE STANDARD SENIOR TECHNICAL SAFETY MANAGER FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1175-2006 ii This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161,

51

Project L-070, ``300 Area process sewer piping system upgrade`` Project Management Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is the project management plan for Project L-070, 300 Area process sewer system upgrades.

Wellsfry, H.E.

1994-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

52

Editorial: Management and decision sciences, challenge and opportunities for control and optimization applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In these pages I intend to illustrate the different components of the area management and decision sciences that I will be in charge of, as an area editor, for the coming years. To do so I will rely mostly on some research topics I know well for having ...

Alain B. Haurie

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

PREFERRED WATERFLOOD MANAGEMENT PRACTICES FOR THE SPRABERRY TREND AREA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the work performed during the second year of the project, ''Preferred Waterflood Management Practices for the Spraberry Trend Area''. The objective of this project is to significantly increase field-wide production in the Spraberry Trend in a short time frame through the application of preferred practices for managing and optimizing water injection. Our goal is to dispel negative attitudes and lack of confidence in water injection and to document the methodology and results for public dissemination to motivate waterflood expansion in the Spraberry Trend. To achieve this objective, in this period we concentrated our effort on characterization of Germania Unit using an analog field ET ODaniel unit and old cased hole neutron. Petrophysical Characterization of the Germania Spraberry units requires a unique approach for a number of reasons--limited core data, lack of modern log data and absence of directed studies within the unit. The need for characterization of the Germania unit has emerged as a first step in the review, understanding and enhancement of the production practices applicable within the unit and the trend area in general. In the absence or lack of the afore mentioned resources, an approach that will rely heavily on previous petrophysical work carried out in the neighboring ET O'Daniel unit (6.2 miles away), and normalization of the old log data prior to conventional interpretation techniques will be used. A log-based rock model has been able to guide successfully the prediction of pay and non-pay intervals within the ET O'Daniel unit, and will be useful if found applicable within the Germania unit. A novel multiple regression technique utilizing non-parametric transformations to achieve better correlations in predicting a dependent variable (permeability) from multiple independent variables (rock type, shale volume and porosity) will also be investigated in this study. A log data base includes digitized formats of Gamma Ray, Cased Hole Neutron, limited Resistivity and Neutron/Density/Sonic porosity logs over a considerable wide area. In addition, a progress report on GSU waterflood pilot is reported for this period. We have seen positive response of water injection on new wells. We believe by proper data acquisition and precise reservoir engineering techniques, any lack of confidence in waterflooding can be overcome. Therefore, we develop field management software to control a vast data from the pilot and to perform precise reservoir engineering techniques such as decline curve analysis, gas and oil material balances, bubble map plot and PVT analysis. The manual for this software is listed in the Appendix-A.

C. M. Sizemore; David S. Schechter

2003-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

54

Nevada National Security Site 2011 Waste Management Monitoring Report, Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site  

SciTech Connect

Environmental monitoring data are collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). These data are associated with radiation exposure, air, groundwater, meteorology, and vadose zone. This report summarizes the 2011 environmental data to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and to support environmental compliance and performance assessment (PA) activities. Some of these data (e.g., radiation exposure, air, and groundwater) are presented in other reports. Direct radiation monitoring data indicate exposure levels at the RWMSs are within the range of background levels measured at the NNSS. Slightly elevated exposure levels outside the Area 3 RWMS are attributed to nearby historical aboveground nuclear weapons tests. Air monitoring data show tritium concentrations in water vapor and americium and plutonium concentrations in air particles are only slightly above detection limits and background levels. The measured levels of radionuclides in air particulates and moisture are below derived concentration guides for these radionuclides. During the last 2 weeks of March 2011, gamma spectroscopy results for air particles showed measurable activities of iodine-131 (131I), cesium-134 (134Cs), and cesium-137 (137Cs). These results are attributed to the release of fission products from the damaged Fukushima Daiichi power plant in Japan. The remaining gamma spectroscopy results for air particulates collected at the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS were below minimum detectable concentrations. Groundwater monitoring data indicate the groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the Area 5 RWMS is not impacted by RWMS operations. Results of groundwater analysis from wells around the Area 5 RWMS were all below established investigation levels. The 86.3 millimeters (mm) (3.40 inches [in.]) of precipitation at the Area 3 RWMS during 2011 is 44% below the average of 154.1 mm (6.07 in.), and the 64.8 mm (2.55 in.) of precipitation at the Area 5 RWMS during 2011 is 47% below the average of 122.4 mm (4.82 in.). Water balance measurements indicate that evapotranspiration from the vegetated weighing lysimeter dries the soil and prevents downward percolation of precipitation more effectively than evaporation from the bare-soil weighing lysimeter. Automated vadose zone monitoring on Area 5 RWMS operational waste covers was not done during 2011 due to construction of the final evapotranspiration cover at these monitoring locations. Moisture from precipitation did not percolate below 122 centimeters (4 feet) in the vegetated final mono-layer cover on the U-3ax/bl disposal unit at the Area 3 RWMS before being removed by evapotranspiration. During 2011, there was no drainage through 2.4 meters (8 feet) of soil from the Area 3 drainage lysimeters that received only natural precipitation. Ten percent of the applied precipitation and irrigation drained from the bare-soil drainage lysimeter that received 3 times natural precipitation. All 2011 monitoring data indicate that the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are performing within expectations of the model and parameter assumptions for the facility PAs.

NSTec Environmental Management

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

55

Nevada National Security Site 2012 Waste Management Monitoring Report Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site  

SciTech Connect

Environmental monitoring data are collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). These data are associated with radiation exposure, air, groundwater, meteorology, and vadose zone. This report summarizes the 2012 environmental data to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and to support environmental compliance and performance assessment (PA) activities. Some of these data (e.g., radiation exposure, air, and groundwater) are presented in other reports (National Security Technologies, LLC, 2012; 2013a; 2013b). Direct radiation monitoring data indicate exposure levels at the RWMSs are within the range of background levels measured at the NNSS. Slightly elevated exposure levels outside the Area 3 RWMS are attributed to nearby historical aboveground nuclear weapons tests. Air monitoring data show tritium concentrations in water vapor and americium and plutonium concentrations in air particles are only slightly above detection limits and background levels. The measured levels of radionuclides in air particulates and moisture are below Derived Concentration Standards for these radionuclides. Groundwater monitoring data indicate the groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the Area 5 RWMS is not impacted by RWMS operations. Results of groundwater analysis from wells around the Area 5 RWMS were all below established investigation levels. Leachate samples collected from the leachate collection system at the mixed low-level waste cell were below established contaminant regulatory limits. The 133.9 millimeters (mm) (5.27 inches [in.]) of precipitation at the Area 3 RWMS during 2012 is 12% below the average of 153.0 mm (6.02 in.), and the 137.6 mm (5.42 in.) of precipitation at the Area 5 RWMS during 2012 is 11% below the average of 122.4 mm (4.82 in.). Water balance measurements indicate that evapotranspiration from the vegetated weighing lysimeter dries the soil and prevents downward percolation of precipitation more effectively than evaporation from the bare-soil weighing lysimeter. Automated vadose zone monitoring on Area 5 and Area 3 RWMS cell covers show no evidence of precipitation percolating through the cover to the waste. Moisture from precipitation did not percolate below 60 centimeters (cm) (2 feet [ft]) in the vegetated final cover on the U-3ax/bl disposal unit at the Area 3 RWMS, and moisture from precipitation and irrigation did not percolate below 45 cm (1.5 ft) on the 92-Acre Area final cover. Irrigation was applied to this cover for seed germination and plant growth. During 2012, there was no drainage through 2.4 meters (8 ft) of soil from the Area 3 drainage lysimeters that received only natural precipitation. Twenty percent of the applied precipitation and irrigation drained from the bare-soil drainage lysimeter that received 3 times natural precipitation. All 2012 monitoring data indicate that the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are performing within expectations of the model and parameter assumptions for the facility PAs.

Hudson, David B.

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

56

REFERRED WATERFLOOD MANAGEMENT PRACTICES FOR THE SPRABERRY TREND AREA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the work performed during the first semi-annual third year of the project, ''Preferred Waterflood Management Practices for the Spraberry Trend Area''. The objective of this project is to significantly increase field-wide production in the Spraberry Trend in a short time frame through the application of preferred practices for managing and optimizing water injection. Our goal is to dispel negative attitudes and lack of confidence in water injection and to document the methodology and results for public dissemination to motivate waterflood expansion in the Spraberry Trend. To achieve this objective, in this period we concentrated our effort on analyzing production and injection data to optimize the reservoir management strategies for Germania Spraberry Unit. This study address the reservoir characterization and monitoring of the waterflooding project and propose alternatives of development of the current and future conditions of the reservoir to improve field performance. This research should serve as a guide for future work in reservoir simulation and can be used to evaluate various scenarios for additional development as well as to optimize the operating practices in the field. The results indicate that under the current conditions, a total of 1.410 million barrels of oil can be produced in the next 20 years through the 64 active wells and suggest that the unit can be successfully flooded with the current injection rate of 1600 BWPD and the pattern consisting of 6 injection wells aligned about 36 degrees respect to the major fracture orientation. In addition, a progress report on GSU waterflood pilot is reported for this period.

C. M. Sizemore; David S. Schechter

2004-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

57

Nevada National Security Site 2010 Waste Management Monitoring Report Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites  

SciTech Connect

Environmental monitoring data were collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). These data are associated with radiation exposure, air, groundwater, meteorology, vadose zone, subsidence, and biota. This report summarizes the 2010 environmental data to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and to support environmental compliance and performance assessment (PA) activities. Some of these data (e.g., radiation exposure, air, and groundwater) are presented in other reports (National Security Technologies, LLC, 2010a; 2010b; 2011). Direct radiation monitoring data indicate exposure levels at the RWMSs are within the range of background levels measured at the NNSS. Air monitoring data at the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs indicate that tritium concentrations are slightly above background levels. All gamma spectroscopy results for air particulates collected at the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS were below the minimum detectable concentrations, and concentrations of americium and plutonium are only slightly above detection limits. The measured levels of radionuclides in air particulates and moisture are below derived concentration guides for these radionuclides. Groundwater monitoring data indicate that the groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the Area 5 RWMS is not impacted by facility operations. The 246.9 millimeters (mm) (9.72 inches [in.]) of precipitation at the Area 3 RWMS during 2010 is 56 percent above the average of 158.7 mm (6.25 in.), and the 190.4 mm (7.50 in.) of precipitation at the Area 5 RWMS during 2010 is 50 percent above the average of 126.7 mm (4.99 in.). Soil-gas tritium monitoring at borehole GCD-05 continues to show slow subsurface migration consistent with previous results. Water balance measurements indicate that evapotranspiration from the vegetated weighing lysimeter dries the soil and prevents downward percolation of precipitation more effectively than evaporation from the bare-soil weighing lysimeter. Data from the automated vadose zone monitoring system for the operational waste pit covers show that moisture from precipitation did not percolate below 90 centimeters (cm) (3 feet [ft]) before being removed by evaporation. Moisture from precipitation did not percolate below 61 cm (2 ft) in the vegetated final mono-layer cover on the U-3ax/bl disposal unit at the Area 3 RWMS before being removed by evapotranspiration. During 2010, there was no drainage through 2.4 meters (8 ft) of soil from the Area 3 drainage lysimeters that received only natural precipitation. Water drained from both the bare-soil drainage lysimeter and the invader species drainage lysimeter that received 3 times natural precipitation. All 2010 monitoring data indicate that the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are performing within expectations of the model and parameter assumptions for the facility PAs.

NSTec Environmental Management

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

INFORMATION: Special Report on "Management Challenges at the Department of Energy"  

SciTech Connect

Responsible for some of the Nation's most important and technically advanced missions, the Department of Energy faces an array of challenges that are more wide-ranging and complex than at any time in its history. While its origins can be largely traced to the Manhattan Project, the Department has evolved into a multi-faceted agency that encompasses a broad range of scientific, environmental, and national security activities. Since its creation under the Department of Energy Organization Act in 1977, the Department has shifted its emphasis and priorities over time as the energy and security needs of the Nation have changed. The Department has recently refocused these efforts, adding particular emphasis on the science and renewable energy components of its portfolio. In this regard, the Department has taken a lead role in the implementation and execution of the energy technology initiatives related to the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act). As a means of accomplishing these initiatives, the Department received a substantial increase in its annual appropriation, rising from nearly $25 billion in 2008 to approximately $34 billion in 2009 as a result of additional funding in the Department's loan program and numerous science, energy, and national security initiatives. In addition, the Department was provided more than $36 billion in Recovery Act funding to be used over a two to three year period. Further, the Department, through existing authorities and those expanded by the Recovery Act, has been authorized to provide more than $100 billion in loan guarantees for innovative, clean energy technologies. To accomplish its vital missions, the Department employs approximately 115,000 Federal and contractor personnel and manages assets valued at more than $189 billion, including the 17 national laboratories at the heart of its science program. On an annual basis, the Office of Inspector General is required to identify what it considers to be the most significant management challenges facing the Department. Our effort addresses new or emerging issues and evaluates the Department's progress in resolving previously identified challenges. The challenges identified by this process represent risks inherent in the Department's wide ranging and complex operations, as well as those related to problems with specific management processes. As noted in past reports, we recognize that often these challenges cannot be resolved in a single year and must, therefore, be addressed through a concentrated, persistent effort over time. Consistent with our mission, the overall goal is to focus attention on significant issues with the objective of working with Department managers to enhance the effectiveness of agency programs and operations. During the past year, the Department has taken a number of actions to promote its ongoing strategy of resolving the management challenges identified in our prior reports. There have been many notable advances. However, in our judgment, on the basis of the results of our work during the past year and other risk assement tools, the following management challenges remain for Fiscal Year (FY) 2010: Contract Administration; Cyber Security; Energy Supply; Environmental Cleanup; Safeguards and Security; and Stockpile Stewardship. As with a number of Federal agencies, the Department received an unprecedented infusion of funds as a result of the Recovery Act. These funds, along with the overarching goals set forth in the Act, were transformative in nature. On a positive note, the Department and its staff have been energized by the new and evolving programmatic initiatives resulting from the Recovery Act. However, as would be expected in an effort of this magnitude, the Departmnent has experienced significantly increased management stresses and strains, impacting virtually every program and operation. In fact, the essentially unavoidable burden placed on existing human capital and other resources has, in our judgment, affected the Department's ability to resolve its existing management challenges, a

None

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Lifecycle Management of Protection, Control and Associated Data Acquisition Infrastructure: Challenges and R&D Needs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Protection and control technologies are experiencing fundamental and revolutionary changes. In the transition from legacy electro-mechanical relays to the state of the art digital assets, utilities are facing the emerging challenges in the life-cycle management of a highly diverse and increasingly complicated P&C infrastructure. Most installed electro-mechanical devices are aging and close to their designed life cycle; meanwhile, new generation of microprocessor relays tend to have a much ...

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

60

From Petascale to Exascale: Eight Focus Areas of R&D Challenges for HPC Simulation Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Programming models bridge the gap between the underlying hardware architecture and the supporting layers of software available to applications. Programming models are different from both programming languages and application programming interfaces (APIs). Specifically, a programming model is an abstraction of the underlying computer system that allows for the expression of both algorithms and data structures. In comparison, languages and APIs provide implementations of these abstractions and allow the algorithms and data structures to be put into practice - a programming model exists independently of the choice of both the programming language and the supporting APIs. Programming models are typically focused on achieving increased developer productivity, performance, and portability to other system designs. The rapidly changing nature of processor architectures and the complexity of designing an exascale platform provide significant challenges for these goals. Several other factors are likely to impact the design of future programming models. In particular, the representation and management of increasing levels of parallelism, concurrency and memory hierarchies, combined with the ability to maintain a progressive level of interoperability with today's applications are of significant concern. Overall the design of a programming model is inherently tied not only to the underlying hardware architecture, but also to the requirements of applications and libraries including data analysis, visualization, and uncertainty quantification. Furthermore, the successful implementation of a programming model is dependent on exposed features of the runtime software layers and features of the operating system. Successful use of a programming model also requires effective presentation to the software developer within the context of traditional and new software development tools. Consideration must also be given to the impact of programming models on both languages and the associated compiler infrastructure. Exascale programming models must reflect several, often competing, design goals. These design goals include desirable features such as abstraction and separation of concerns. However, some aspects are unique to large-scale computing. For example, interoperability and composability with existing implementations will prove critical. In particular, performance is the essential underlying goal for large-scale systems. A key evaluation metric for exascale models will be the extent to which they support these goals rather than merely enable them.

Springmeyer, R; Still, C; Schulz, M; Ahrens, J; Hemmert, S; Minnich, R; McCormick, P; Ward, L; Knoll, D

2011-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "management challenge area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Mgt. Challenges 2004  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management Challenges at the Department of Energy DOE/IG-0626 November 2003 Analysis of Management Challenges Background ................................................................................1 Mission Related Challenges ...................................................... 1 Internal Control Challenges ....................................................... 6 Appendices 1. Watch List .......................................................................... 13 2. Table Comparing Management Challenges Reported by Various Groups ............................................................. 15 3. Related Reports Issued in Fiscal Year 2003 ...................... 16 MANAGEMENT CHALLENGES AT THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY TABLE OF

62

Current Activities in the Scheduling and Resource Management Area of the Global Grid Forum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Global Grid Forum's Scheduling and Resource Management Area is actively pursuing the standards that are needed for interoperability of Grid resource management systems. This includes work in defining architectures, language standards, APIs and protocols. ...

Bill Nitzberg; Jennifer M. Schopf

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex Administrative Boundary Survey  

SciTech Connect

A package sent to the Bureau of Land Management containing a property description, a notice of intent to relinquish, aerial photos, and engineering drawings

NSTec Environmental Management

2009-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

64

Coastal Area Management Program (Alabama) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Policy Yes Implementing Sector StateProvince Program Administrator Alabama Department of Environmental Management Primary Website http:www.adem.state.al.usalEnviroRegLaws...

65

RCRA Groundwater Monitoring Plan for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area A-AX at the Hanford Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes the interim status groundwater monitoring plan for Waste Management Area A-AX.

Narbutovskih, Susan M.; Horton, Duane G.

2001-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

66

Production system improvement : floor area reduction and visual management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis suggests on the development process of a new layout design and visual management tools to improve the efficiency of a production line in a medical device company. Lean production philosophy and common lean ...

Chen, Zhuling, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Municipal solid waste management challenges in developing countries - Kenyan case study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of the state of municipal solid waste management (MSWM) by local authorities in Kenya as a case study of a low-income developing country. Approaches of possible solutions that can be undertaken to improve municipal solid waste (MSW) services are discussed. Poor economic growth (1.1% in 1993) has resulted in an increase in the poverty level which presently stands at 56%. Migration from the rural areas to the urban areas has resulted in unplanned settlements in suburban areas accommodating about 60% of the urban population on only 5% urban land area. Political interference also hampers smooth running of local authorities. Vulnerability of pollution of surface and groundwater is high because local authorities rarely considered environmental impact in siting MSW disposal sites. Illegal dumping of MSW on the river banks or on the roadside poses environmental and economic threats on nearby properties. Poor servicing of MSW collection vehicles, poor state of infrastructure and the lack of adequate funding militate against optimization of MSW disposal service. The rural economy needs to be improved if rural-urban migration is to be managed. Involvement of stakeholders is important to achieve any meaningful and sustainable MSWM. The role of the informal sector through community-based organizations (CBOs), Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) and the private sector in offering solutions towards improvement of MSWM also is explored.

Henry, Rotich K. [College of Environment and Resources, Jilin University, Changchun 130026 (China); Zhao Yongsheng [College of Environment and Resources, Jilin University, Changchun 130026 (China)]. E-mail: zhaoyongsheng@jlu.edu.cn; Dong Jun [College of Environment and Resources, Jilin University, Changchun 130026 (China)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Preferred Waterflood Management Practices for the Spraberry Trend Area  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this report was to propose the location of new injection wells, to review wellbore status in Germania unit and to forecast the incremental oil recovery based on waterflooding performance in other waterflood pilot area in order to demonstrate the benefit of waterflooding in Germania unit area.

Sizemore, C.M.; Schechter, David S.; Vance, Harold

2003-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

69

Electric Energy Challenges of the Future Future Grid Thrust Area 1 White Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

being developed for the smart grid will change grid operations and grid characteristics. With high- prove system reliability and facilitate the management of variable renewable resources. Smart Grid Technologies Future smart grid technologies will also impact reserve requirement determination and our ability

70

PREFERRED WATERFLOOD MANAGEMENT PRACTICES FOR THE SPRABERRY TREND AREA  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to significantly increase field-wide production in the Spraberry Trend in a short time frame by application of preferred practices for managing and optimizing water injection. A secondary and synergistic objective is purification and injection of produced water into Spraberry reservoirs.

David S. Schechter

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Management Challenges at the Department of Energy … Fiscal Year 2014  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 DOE/IG-0899 November 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits & Inspections Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 November 26, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Special Report on "Management Challenges at the Department of Energy - Fiscal Year 2014" BACKGROUND The Department of Energy executes some of the Nation's most complex and technologically advanced missions. Since the passage of the Department of Energy Organization Act in 1977, the Department has shifted its emphasis and priorities over time as the Nation's energy and security needs have evolved. In recent years, the Department has focused on issues such as clean

72

PREFERRED WATERFLOOD MANAGEMENT PRACTICES FOR THE SPRABERRY TREND AREA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to significantly increase field-wide production in the Spraberry Trend in a short time frame through the application of preferred practices for managing and optimizing water injection. Our goal is to dispel negative attitudes and lack of confidence in water injection and to document the methodology and results for public dissemination to motivate waterflood expansion in the Spraberry Trend.

David S. Schechter

2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

73

Characterization Report for the 92-Acre Area of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office manages two low-level Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site. The Area 5 RWMS uses engineered shallow-land burial cells to dispose of packaged waste. This report summarizes characterization and monitoring work pertinent to the 92-Acre Area in the southeast part of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites. The decades of characterization and assessment work at the Area 5 RWMS indicate that the access controls, waste operation practices, site design, final cover design, site setting, and arid natural environment contribute to a containment system that meets regulatory requirements and performance objectives for the short- and long-term protection of the environment and public. The available characterization and Performance Assessment information is adequate to support design of the final cover and development of closure plans. No further characterization is warranted to demonstrate regulatory compliance. U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office is proceeding with the development of closure plans for the six closure units of the 92-Acre Area.

Bechtel Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Challenges Associated with Apatite Remediation of Uranium in the 300 Area Aquifer  

SciTech Connect

Sequestration of uranium as insoluble phosphate phases appears to be a promising alternative for treating the uranium-contaminated groundwater at the Hanford 300 Area. The proposed approach involves both the direct formation of autunite by the application of a polyphosphate mixture, as well as the formation of apatite in the aquifer as a continuing source of phosphate for long-term treatment of uranium. After a series of bench-scale tests, a field treatability test was conducted in a well at the 300 Area. The objective of the treatability test was to evaluate the efficacy of using polyphosphate injections to treat uranium-contaminated groundwater in situ. A test site consisting of an injection well and 15 monitoring wells was installed in the 300 Area near the process trenches that had previously received uranium-bearing effluents. The results indicated that while the direct formation of autunite appears to have been successful, the outcome of the apatite formation of the test was more limited. Two separate overarching issues impact the efficacy of apatite remediation for uranium sequestration within the 300 Area: 1) the efficacy of apatite for sequestering uranium under the present geochemical and hydrodynamic conditions, and 2) the formation and emplacement of apatite via polyphosphate technology. This paper summarizes these issues.

Wellman, Dawn M.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Williams, Mark D.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Distributed wide-area traffic management for cloud services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of interactive cloud services depends heavily on which data centers handle client requests, and which wide-area paths carry traffic. While making these decisions, cloud service providers also need to weigh operational considerations like ... Keywords: joint optimization, multi-homed routing, request mapping

Srinivas Narayana; Joe Wenjie Jiang; Jennifer Rexford; Mung Chiang

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

M-Area hazardous waste management facility groundwater monitoring report -- first quarter 1994. Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during first quarter 1994 as required by South Carolina Hazardous Waste Permit SC1-890-008-989 and section 264.100(g) of the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations. During first quarter 1994, 42 point-of-compliance (POC) wells at the M-Area HWMF were sampled for drinking water parameters.

Evans, C.S.; Washburn, F.; Jordan, J.; Van Pelt, R.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Thermal Gradient Holes At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Gradient Holes At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Thermal Gradient Holes At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date 2008 - 2008 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Vulcan increased exploration efforts in the summer and fall of 2008, during which time the company drilled two temperature gradient holes (86-15 O on Pad 1 and 17-16 O on Pad 3); conducted seismic, gravity and magnetotelluric surveys; and drilled deep exploration wells at Pads 6 and 8 and binary wells at Pads 1, 2, 4, and 7. Notes

78

Exploratory Well At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploratory Well At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Exploratory Well At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Exploratory Well At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Exploratory Well Activity Date 2008 - 2008 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Vulcan increased exploration efforts in the summer and fall of 2008, during which time the company drilled two temperature gradient holes (86-15 O on Pad 1 and 17-16 O on Pad 3); conducted seismic, gravity and magnetotelluric surveys; and drilled deep exploration wells at Pads 6 and 8 and binary wells at Pads 1, 2, 4, and 7. Notes Data from these wells is proprietary, and so were unavailable for inclusion

79

Ground Gravity Survey At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Ground Gravity Survey Activity Date 2008 - 2008 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Vulcan increased exploration efforts in the summer and fall of 2008, during which time the company drilled two temperature gradient holes (86-15 O on Pad 1 and 17-16 O on Pad 3); conducted seismic, gravity and magnetotelluric surveys; and drilled deep exploration wells at Pads 6 and 8 and binary wells at Pads 1, 2, 4, and 7. Notes Data from these wells is proprietary, and so were unavailable for inclusion

80

Development of a Groundwater Management Model for the Project Shoal Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes the development of a user-friendly and efficient groundwater management model of the Project Shoal Area (PSA and surrounding area that will allow the U.S. Department of Energy and State of Nevada personnel to evaluate the impact of proposed water-use scenarios. The management model consists of a simple hydrologic model within an interactive groundwater management framework. This framework is based on an object user interface that was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey and has been used by the Desert Research Institute researchers and others to couple disparate environmental resource models, manage temporal and spatial data, and evaluate model results for management decision making. This framework was modified and applied to the PSA and surrounding Fairview Basin. The utility of the management model was demonstrated through the application of hypothetical future scenarios including mineral mining, regional expansion of agriculture, and export of water to large urban areas outside the region. While the results from some of the scenarios indicated potential impacts to groundwater levels near the PSA and others did not, together they demonstrate the utility of the management tool for the evaluation of proposed changes in groundwater use in or near the PSA.

G. Lamorey; S. Bassett; R. Schumer; D. Boyle; G. Pohll; J. Chapman

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "management challenge area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

The framework and tools for the Western Area Power Administration`s Environmental Risk Management Program  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is working with various government agencies to develop and implement environmental risk management programs. One such program is being developed for the U.S. Department of Energy`s Western Area Power Administration (Western). In this paper, we describe the risk framework and assessment tools being developed by Western and PNL to help Western`s management staff make effective and defensible decisions on issues that involve environmental risk.

Di Massa, F.V.; Glantz, C.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Roybal, A.L. [Western Area Power Administration, Golden, CO (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Opportunities and challenges to unify workload, power, and cooling management in data centers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Independent optimization for workload and power management, and active cooling control have been studied extensively to improve data center energy efficiency. Recently, proposals have started to advocate unified workload, power, and cooling management ...

Zhikui Wang; Niraj Tolia; Cullen Bash

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Management of Riparian Areas on Electric Transmission Line Rights-of-Way  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric transmission line rights-of-way (ROWs) commonly cross streams, rivers, ponds, and lakes. Plant communities along the edges of these water resources are important because of their role in soil conservation and habitat diversity as well as the influence they have on fauna and aquatic ecosystems. The area of vegetation affected by the water-based habitatand that in turn affects the wateris the riparian area. This report provides guidance on the definition and management considerations for riparian ...

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

84

PAFC Cost Challenges  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PAFC Cost Challenges Sridhar Kanuri Manager, PAFC Technology *Sridhar.Kanuri@utcpower.com 2 AGENDA Purecell 400 cost challenge Cost reduction opportunities Summary 3 PURECELL ...

85

The Challenge  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Challenge Challenge CalPortland is a major building materials and construction solutions provider to the western United States and Canada. In 2003, CalPortland's management team was focused on performing plant expansions and developing its business. In the process, CalPortland discovered that further monitoring of energy performance and utility costs was needed along with increased accountability for energy use. CalPortland's management team sought to improve energy efficiency and incorporate accountability into its energy management approach. Building an Energy Program To begin managing its energy performance, CalPortland enlisted the expertise of a senior engineer to create an effective corporate-wide

86

The AMI Database Project: Atlas Data Challenge Bookkeeping, and the Tag Collector, a new tool for Release Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many database tools have the same or similar requirements. The Atlas Metadata Interface (AMI) project aims to provide a set of generic tools for managing database applications. AMI has a three-tier architecture with a core that supports a connection to any RDBMS using JDBC and SQL. The middle layer assumes that the databases have an AMI compliant self-describing structure. It provides a generic web interface and a generic command line interface. The top layer contains application specific features. Currently 7 such applications exist. Two of these applications are described. The first, and principal use of AMI, is the Atlas Data Challenge Production Bookkeeping interface. The second application is called Tag Collector, a web tool for release management, has many features which have greatly facilitated Atlas software management.

Solveig Albrand; Johann Collot; Jerome Fulachier

2003-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

87

A Program to Stabilize Nuclear Materials as Managed by the Plutonium Focus Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the program to stabilize nuclear materials, consistent with the Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (EM) plan, Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure. The program is managed by the Plutonium Stabilization and Disposition Focus Area, which defines and manages technology development programs to stabilize nuclear materials and assure their subsequent safe storage and final disposition. The scope of the Plutonium Stabilization and Disposition Focus Area (PFA) activities includes non-weapons plutonium materials, special isotopes, and other fissile materials. The PFA provides solutions to site-specific and complex wide technology issues associated with plutonium remediation, stabilization, and preparation for disposition. Our paper describes an important programmatic function of the Department of Energy nuclear materials stabilization program, including the tie-in of policy to research needs and funding for the nuclear materials disposition area. The PFA uses a rigorous systems engineering determination of technology needs and gaps, under the guidance of a Technical Advisory Panel, consisting of complex-wide experts. The Research and Development planning provides an example for other waste areas and should be of interest to Research and Development managers. The materials disposition maps developed by the PFA and described in this paper provide an evaluation of research needs, data gaps and subsequent guidance for the development of technologies for nuclear materials disposition. This paper also addresses the PFA prioritization methodology and its ability to forecast actual time to implementation.

B. Kenley (Kenley Consulting); B. Scott; B. Seidel (ANL-W); D. Knecht (LMITCO); F. Southworth; K. Osborne (DOE-ID); N. Chipman; T. Creque

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Semiannual Correction Action Report, Vol. I and II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) at the Savannah River Site is routinely monitored for selected hazardous and radioactive constituents. This report presents the results of the required groundwater monitoring program.

Chase, J.

1999-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

89

Managing everyday identity challenges at work : stories from a biotech company  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Work identity, how we view ourselves in a working capacity, is a central part of who we are and an indispensable element of our lives. Yet, difficult moments frequently occur that challenge our identity as competent and ...

Xu, Heng, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project : Rainwater Wildlife Area Final Management Plan.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Draft Management Plan has been developed by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) to document how the Rainwater Wildlife Area (formerly known as the Rainwater Ranch) will be managed. The plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Appendix A and Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus our management actions and prioritize funding during the Fiscal 2001-2005 planning period. This plan is a product of nearly two years of field studies and research, public scoping, and coordination with the Rainwater Advisory Committee. The committee consists of representatives from tribal government, state agencies, local government, public organizations, and members of the public. The plan is organized into several sections with Chapter 1 providing introductory information such as project location, purpose and need, project goals and objectives, common elements and assumptions, coordination efforts and public scoping, and historical information about the project area. Key issues are presented in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 discusses existing resource conditions within the wildlife area. Chapter 4 provides a detailed presentation on management activities and Chapter 5 outlines a monitoring and evaluation plan for the project that will help assess whether the project is meeting the intended purpose and need and the goals and objectives. Chapter 6 displays the action plan and provides a prioritized list of actions with associated budget for the next five year period. Successive chapters contain appendices, references, definitions, and a glossary.

Childs, Allen

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Central Facilities Area Facilities Radioactive Waste Management Basis and DOE Manual 435.1-1 Compliance Tables  

SciTech Connect

Department of Energy Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management,' along with its associated manual and guidance, requires development and maintenance of a radioactive waste management basis for each radioactive waste management facility, operation, and activity. This document presents a radioactive waste management basis for Idaho National Laboratory's Central Facilities Area facilities that manage radioactive waste. The radioactive waste management basis for a facility comprises existing laboratory-wide and facilityspecific documents. Department of Energy Manual 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual,' facility compliance tables also are presented for the facilities. The tables serve as a tool for developing the radioactive waste management basis.

Lisa Harvego; Brion Bennett

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

The Wide-area Energy Management System Phase 2 Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The higher penetration of intermittent generation resources (including wind and solar generation) in the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and California Independent System Operator (CAISO) balancing authorities (BAs) raises issue of requiring expensive additional fast grid balancing services in response to additional intermittency and fast up and down power ramps in the electric supply system. The overall goal of the wide-area energy management system (WAEMS) project is to develop the principles, algorithms, market integration rules, a functional design, and a technical specification for an energy storage system to help cope with unexpected rapid changes in renewable generation power output. The resulting system will store excess energy, control dispatchable load and distributed generation, and utilize inter-area exchange of the excess energy between the California ISO and Bonneville Power Administration control areas. A further goal is to provide a cost-benefit analysis and develop a business model for an investment-based practical deployment of such a system. There are two tasks in Phase 2 of the WAEMS project: the flywheel field tests and the battery evaluation. Two final reports, the Wide-area Energy Management System Phase 2 Flywheel Field Tests Final Report and the Wide-area Energy Storage and Management System Battery Storage Evaluation, were written to summarize the results of the two tasks.

Lu, Ning; Makarov, Yuri V.; Weimar, Mark R.

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

93

Western Area Power Administration Record of Decision for the Energy Planning and Management Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

81 81 Federal Register / Vol. 60, No. 197 / Thursday, October 12, 1995 / Notices at 941 North Capitol Street, NE., Washington, DC 20426. Lois D. Cashell, Secretary. [FR Doc. 95-25230 Filed 10-11-95; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6717-01-M Western Area Power Administration Record of Decision for the Energy Planning and Management Program AGENCY: Western Area Power Administration, DOE. ACTION: Record of decision. SUMMARY: The Department of Energy, Western Area Power Administration (Western) completed a draft and final environmental impact statement (EIS), DOE/EIS-0182, on its Energy Planning and Management Program (Program). Western is publishing this Record of Decision (ROD) to adopt the Program, which will require the preparation of integrated resource plans (IRP) by Western's long-term firm power

94

RCRA Assessment Plan for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area A-AX at the Hanford Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes a groundwater assessment plan for the single-shell tank systems in Waste Management Area A-AX at the Hanford Site.

Narbutovskih, Susan M.; Chou, Charissa J.

2006-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

95

RCRA Groundwater Monitoring Plan for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area C at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the groundwater monitoring plan for Waste Management Area C located in the 200 East Area of the DOE Hanford Site. This plan is required under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA).

Horton, Duane G.; Narbutovskih, Susan M.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Proposed framework for the Western Area Power Administration Environmental Risk Management Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Western Area Power Administration (Western) views environmental protection and compliance as a top priority as it manages the construction, operation, and maintenance of its vast network of transmission lines, substations, and other facilities. A recent Department of Energy audit of Western`s environmental management activities recommends that Western adopt a formal environmental risk program. To accomplish this goal, Western, in conjunction with Pacific Northwest Laboratory, is in the process of developing a centrally coordinated environmental risk program. This report presents the results of this design effort, and indicates the direction in which Western`s environmental risk program is heading. Western`s environmental risk program will consist of three main components: risk communication, risk assessment, and risk management/decision making. Risk communication is defined as an exchange of information on the potential for threats to human health, public safety, or the environment. This information exchange provides a mechanism for public involvement, and also for the participation in the risk assessment and management process by diverse groups or offices within Western. The objective of risk assessment is to evaluate and rank the relative magnitude of risks associated with specific environmental issues that are facing Western. The evaluation and ranking is based on the best available scientific information and judgment and serves as input to the risk management process. Risk management takes risk information and combines it with relevant non-risk factors (e.g., legal mandates, public opinion, costs) to generate risk management options. A risk management tool, such as decision analysis, can be used to help make risk management choices.

Glantz, C.S.; DiMassa, F.V.; Pelto, P.J.; Brothers, A.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Roybal, A.L. [Western Area Power Administration, Golden, CO (United States)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Tacoma/Trimble Area Management Plan, Technical Report 2001-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2000 and 2001, the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) continued to mitigate the wildlife habitat losses as part of the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project. Utilizing Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds, the Kalispel Tribe of Indians (Tribe) purchased three projects totaling nearly 1,200 acres. The Tacoma/Trimble Wildlife Management Area is a conglomeration of properties now estimated at 1,700 acres. It is the Tribe's intent to manage these properties in cooperation and collaboration with the Pend Oreille County Public Utility District (PUD) No. 1 and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to benefit wildlife habitats and associated species, populations, and guilds.

Entz, Ray; Lockwood, Jr., Neil; Holmes, Darren

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Tacoma/Trimble Area Management Plan, Technical Report 2001-2003.  

SciTech Connect

In 2000 and 2001, the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) continued to mitigate the wildlife habitat losses as part of the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project. Utilizing Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds, the Kalispel Tribe of Indians (Tribe) purchased three projects totaling nearly 1,200 acres. The Tacoma/Trimble Wildlife Management Area is a conglomeration of properties now estimated at 1,700 acres. It is the Tribe's intent to manage these properties in cooperation and collaboration with the Pend Oreille County Public Utility District (PUD) No. 1 and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to benefit wildlife habitats and associated species, populations, and guilds.

Entz, Ray; Lockwood, Jr., Neil; Holmes, Darren

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Underground Test Area Project Waste Management Plan (Rev. No. 2, April 2002)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV) initiated the UGTA Project to characterize the risk posed to human health and the environment as a result of underground nuclear testing activities at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The UGTA Project investigation sites have been grouped into Corrective Action Units (CAUs) in accordance with the most recent version of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. The primary UGTA objective is to gather data to characterize the groundwater aquifers beneath the NTS and adjacent lands. The investigations proposed under the UGTA program may involve the drilling and sampling of new wells; recompletion, monitoring, and sampling of existing wells; well development and hydrologic/ aquifer testing; geophysical surveys; and subsidence crater recharge evaluation. Those wastes generated as a result of these activities will be managed in accordance with existing federal and state regulations, DOE Orders, and NNSA/NV waste minimization and pollution prevention objectives. This Waste Management Plan provides a general framework for all Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project participants to follow for the characterization, storage/accumulation, treatment, and disposal of wastes generated by UGTA Project activities. The objective of this waste management plan is to provide guidelines to minimize waste generation and to properly manage wastes that are produced. Attachment 1 to this plan is the Fluid Management Plan and details specific strategies for management of fluids produced under UGTA operations.

IT Corporation, Las Vegas

2002-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

100

Detecting Climate Variations and Change: New Challenges for Observing and Data Management Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several essential aspects of weather observing and the management of weather data are discussed as related to improving knowledge of climate variations and change in the surface boundary layer and the resultant consequences for socioeconomic and ...

Thomas R. Karl; Robert G. Quayle; Pavel Ya Groisman

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "management challenge area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

The future of energy markets and the challenge of decentralized self-management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Complex, intelligent, distributed systems in dynamic environments, such as the power grid need to be designed to adapt autonomously. Self-management, in particular of large scale adaptive systems such as the power grid, is necessarily distributed. Agent ...

Frances Brazier; Elth Ogston; Martijn Warnier

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Rainwater Wildlife Area, Watershed Management Plan, A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project, 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Management Plan has been developed by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) to document how the Rainwater Wildlife Area (formerly known as the Rainwater Ranch) will be managed. The plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Appendix A and Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus our management actions and prioritize funding during the Fiscal 2001-2005 planning period. This plan is a product of nearly two years of field studies and research, public scoping, and coordination with the Rainwater Advisory Committee. The committee consists of representatives from tribal government, state agencies, local government, public organizations, and members of the public. The plan is organized into several sections with Chapter 1 providing introductory information such as project location, purpose and need, project goals and objectives, common elements and assumptions, coordination efforts and public scoping, and historical information about the project area. Key issues are presented in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 discusses existing resource conditions within the wildlife area. Chapter 4 provides a detailed presentation on management activities and Chapter 5 outlines a monitoring and evaluation plan for the project that will help assess whether the project is meeting the intended purpose and need and the goals and objectives. Chapter 6 displays the action plan and provides a prioritized list of actions with associated budget for the next five year period. Successive chapters contain appendices, references, definitions, and a glossary. The purpose of the project is to protect, enhance, and mitigate fish and wildlife resources impacted by Columbia River Basin hydroelectric development. The effort is one of several wildlife mitigation projects in the region developed to compensate for terrestrial habitat losses resulting from the construction of McNary and John Day Hydroelectric facilities located on the mainstem Columbia River. While this project is driven primarily by the purpose and need to mitigate for wildlife habitat losses, it is also recognized that management strategies will also benefit many other non-target fish and wildlife species and associated natural resources. The Rainwater project is much more than a wildlife project--it is a watershed project with potential to benefit resources at the watershed scale. Goals and objectives presented in the following sections include both mitigation and non-mitigation related goals and objectives.

Childs, Allen B.

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

DOE-STD-1159-2003; DOE Standard Waste Management Functional Area Qualification Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

59-2003 59-2003 January 2003 DOE STANDARD WASTE MANAGEMENT FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-STD-1159-2003 iii APPROVAL The Federal Technical Capability Panel consists of senior Department of Energy managers

104

Rainwater Wildlife Area Management Plan Executive Summary : A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project.  

SciTech Connect

This Executive Summary provides an overview of the Draft Rainwater Wildlife Area Management Plan. The comprehensive plan can be viewed on the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) website at: www.umatilla.nsn.us or requested in hard copy from the CTUIR at the address below. The wildlife area was established in September 1998 when the CTUIR purchased the Rainwater Ranch through Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for purposes of fish and wildlife mitigation for the McNary and John Day dams. The Management Plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by BPA for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus management actions and prioritize funding during the 2002-2006 planning period. Since acquisition of the property in late 1998, the CTUIR has conducted an extensive baseline resource assessment in preparation for the management plan, initiated habitat restoration in the Griffin Fork drainage to address road-related resource damage caused by roads constructed for forest practices and an extensive flood event in 1996, and initiated infrastructure developments associated with the Access and Travel Management Plan (i.e., installed parking areas, gates, and public information signs). In addition to these efforts, the CTUIR has worked to set up a long-term funding mechanism with BPA through the NPPC Fish and Wildlife Program. The CTUIR has also continued to coordinate closely with local and state government organizations to ensure consistency with local land use laws and maintain open lines of communication regarding important issues such as big game hunting, tribal member exercise of treaty rights, and public access. During the past two years, non-Indian public concern over big game hunting issues has at times overwhelmed other issues related to the wildlife area. In 2001, the CTUIR Fish and Wildlife Committee closed the wildlife area to tribal branch antlered bull elk harvest in response to harvest data that indicated harvest rates were greater than expected. In addition, illegal harvest of mature bull elk in southeastern Washington during the 2001 season exceeded the legal tribal and nontribal harvest combined which has created a potential significant regression in the bull;cow ratio in the Blue Mountain Elk herd. CTUIR Fish and Wildlife Committee and staff and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Regional Director and staff have been coordinating regularly to develop strategies to address harvest rates and ensure protection of viable big game herds in southeastern Washington. The CTUIR Fish and Wildlife Committee and WDFW has jointly agreed to continue close coordination on this and other issues and continue working together to ensure the long-term vigor of the elk herd on the Rainwater Wildlife Area. The purpose of the project is to protect, enhance, and mitigate fish and wildlife resources impacted by Columbia River Basin hydroelectric development. The effort is one of several wildlife mitigation projects in the region developed to compensate for terrestrial habitat losses resulting from the construction of McNary and John Day Hydroelectric facilities located on the mainstem Columbia River. While this project is driven primarily by the purpose and need to mitigate for wildlife habitat losses, it is also recognized that management strategies will also benefit many other non-target fish and wildlife species and associated natural resources.

Childs, Allen B.

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Building organizational technical capabilities: a new approach to address the office of environmental management cleanup challenges in the 21. century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for the nations nuclear weapons program legacy wastes cleanup. The EM cleanup efforts continue to progress, however the cleanup continues to be technologically complex, heavily regulated, long-term, and a high life cycle cost estimate (LCCE) effort. Over the past few years, the EM program has undergone several changes to accelerate its cleanup efforts with varying degrees of success. Several cleanup projects continued to experience schedule delays and cost growth. The schedule delays and cost growth have been attributed to several factors such as changes in technical scope, regulatory and safety considerations, inadequacy of acquisition approach and project management. This article will briefly review the background and schools of thought on strategic management and organizational change practiced in the United States over the last few decades to improve an organisation's competitive edge and cost performance. The article will briefly review examples such as the change at General Electric, and the recent experience obtained from the nuclear industry, namely the long-term response to the 1986 Chernobyl accident. The long-term response to Chernobyl, though not a case of organizational change, could provide some insight in the strategic management approaches used to address people issues. The article will discuss briefly EM attempts to accelerate cleanup over the past few years, and the subsequent paradigm shift. The paradigm shift targets enhancing and/or creating organizational capabilities to achieve cost savings. To improve its ability to address the 21. century environmental cleanup challenges and achieve cost savings, EM has initiated new corporate changes to develop new and enhance existing capabilities. These new and enhanced organizational capabilities include a renewed emphasis on basics, especially technical capabilities including safety, project management, acquisition management and people. The new enhanced organizational capabilities coupled with more effective communications; oversight and decision-making processes are expected to help EM meet the 21. century challenges. This article will focus on some of the initiatives to develop and enhance organizational technical capabilities. Some of these development initiatives are a part of DOE corporate actions to respond to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) recommendations 93-3 and 2004-1. Other development initiatives have been tailored to meet EM specific needs for organizational capabilities such as case studies analysis and cost estimating. (authors)

Fiore, J.J.; Rizkalla, E.I. [Office of Environmental Management, The United States Dept. of Energy, Washington, D.C. (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Closure Plan for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

The Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RMWS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) is managed and operated by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). This document is the first update of the preliminary closure plan for the Area 5 RWMS at the NTS that was presented in the Integrated Closure and Monitoring Plan (DOE, 2005a). The major updates to the plan include a new closure schedule, updated closure inventory, updated site and facility characterization data, the Title II engineering cover design, and the closure process for the 92-Acre Area of the RWMS. The format and content of this site-specific plan follows the Format and Content Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Closure Plans (DOE, 1999a). This interim closure plan meets closure and post-closure monitoring requirements of the order DOE O 435.1, manual DOE M 435.1-1, Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 191, 40 CFR 265, Nevada Administrative Code (NAC) 444.743, and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements as incorporated into NAC 444.8632. The Area 5 RWMS accepts primarily packaged low-level waste (LLW), low-level mixed waste (LLMW), and asbestiform low-level waste (ALLW) for disposal in excavated disposal cells.

NSTec Environmental Management

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

The Challenges of Developing and Integrating a Quality Management System in a Research and Development Organization  

SciTech Connect

Tailoring a quality management system to the specific needs of an organization is difficult to say the least. The existence of quality system models and standards help facilitate this process immensely. However, what does an organization do when its work is so unique that quality system models and standards do not exist for it? This and other obstacles are what the Nonproliferation, Arms Control, and International Security (NAI) Directorate at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) encountered during strategic initiatives to develop and integrate a new quality management system. This paper will answer this question to help similar initiatives by: Introducing NAI and its unique mission, organization, history, culture and the security environment in which it operates; Examining the obstacles to designing and integrating NAI's quality management system; Discussing the steps taken to ensure success of the strategic quality initiatives; Presenting the quality management system and plan that resulted from these efforts; Presenting the improvements in NAI and LLNL that resulted from these strategic initiatives; and Presenting lessons learned and practical recommendations.

Ryan, E.; Werne, R.W.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

HEALTH COMMUNICATION AND HEALTH MANAGEMENT IN TRADITIONAL MEDICINE: A CHALLENGE, A RESPONSE!  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT: Health communication in health management process contributes to the overall efficiency of the health-care delivery systems. For this the individual health worker should be able to co-ordinate, integrate and adopt his functions. This is basically required which is minutely discussed in this paper by the author. Health Communication has been defined as the study (and application) of communication parameters (levels, functions and methodologies) applied in health situations / contexts 1. Planning, organizing, staffing, directing / commanding, controlling, innovating / creating, decision making, leading, motivating, communicating and coordinating are widely accepted as basic elements in the management process 2, when applied in health situations, contexts and organizations from the health management process. Communication in health organizations operates at 4 basic levels: individual, interpersonal, group and organizational. Communication serves at least 3 primary functions: co – ordination, integration and adaptation. By combing these two analytic features into a 4 x 3 matrix, we get 12 combinations of level and type, each component contributing to the overall efficiency of the health – care delivery system 3. The individual level How a medical practitioner conducts himself is conditioned by the perspective he takes self – centred, 4 patient – centred or medical field – centred. 5 The individual physician will thus have to co-ordinate his activities in such a way that he ‘ manages ’ health – care delivery. If there is clear role – perception by the individual he is better able to coordinate his activities 6. A physician has to work with so many different kinds of people that a stable personality – state and a good value system are very necessary, for it is only then can it be gauged whether the individual has integrated within himself alternative choices between professional reputation and financial success; concern for patients and commitment to coast – containment; running a practice and practice management 7. Change is a fact within any health organization today. The growth of

K. Sundari

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Optimization of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site Closure Cover  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy Manual DOE M 435.1-1, “Radioactive Waste Management Manual,” requires that performance assessments demonstrate that releases of radionuclides to the environment are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). Quantitative cost benefit analysis of radiation protection options is one component of the ALARA process. This report summarizes a quantitative cost benefit analysis of closure cover thickness for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) on the Nevada Test Site. The optimum cover thickness that maintains doses ALARA is shown to be the thickness with the minimum total closure cost. Total closure cost is the sum of cover construction cost and the health detriment cost. Cover construction cost is estimated based on detailed cost estimates for closure of the 92-acre Low-Level Waste Management Unit (LLWMU). The health detriment cost is calculated as the product of collective dose and a constant monetary value of health detriment in units of dollars per unit collective dose. Collective dose is the sum of all individual doses in an exposed population and has units of person-sievert (Sv). Five discrete cover thickness options ranging from 2.5 to 4.5 meters (m) (8.2 to 15 feet [ft]) are evaluated. The optimization was subject to the constraints that (1) options must meet all applicable regulatory requirements and that (2) individual doses be a small fraction of background radiation dose. Total closure cost is found to be a monotonically increasing function of cover thickness for the 92-ac LLWMU, the Northern Expansion Area, and the entire Area 5 RWMS. The cover construction cost is orders of magnitude greater than the health detriment cost. Two-thousand Latin hypercube sampling realizations of the relationship between total closure cost and cover thickness are generated. In every realization, the optimum cover thickness is 2.5 m (8.2 ft) for the 92-ac Low-Level Waste Management Unit, the Northern Expansion Area, and the entire Area 5 RWMS. The conclusions of the optimization are found to be insensitive to all input parameters, the monetary value of the health detriment over a range of values from $200,000 to $15,000,000 per person-Sv, and the period of integration of collective dose. A 2.5 m (8.2 ft) closure cover at the Area 5 RWMS can meet all applicable regulatory requirements and maintain radionuclide releases ALARA.

Shott, Greg; Yucel, Vefa

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Hydrologic Resources Management Program and Underground Test Area Project FY2005 Progress Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes FY 2005 technical studies conducted by the Chemical Biology and Nuclear Science Division (CBND) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in support of the Hydrologic Resources Management Program (HRMP) and the Underground Test Area Project (UGTA). These programs are administered by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) through the Defense Programs and Environmental Restoration Divisions, respectively. HRMP-sponsored work is directed toward the responsible management of the natural resources at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), enabling its continued use as a staging area for strategic operations in support of national security. UGTA-funded work emphasizes the development of an integrated set of groundwater flow and contaminant transport models to predict the extent of radionuclide migration from underground nuclear testing areas at the NTS. The report is organized on a topical basis and contains five chapters that highlight technical work products produced by CBND. However, it is important to recognize that most of this work involves collaborative partnerships with the other HRMP and UGTA contract organizations. These groups include the Energy and Environment Directorate at LLNL (LLNL-E&E), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Desert Research Institute (DRI), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), and Bechtel Nevada (BN).

Eaton, G F; Genetti, V; Hu, Q; Hudson, G B; Kersting, A B; Lindvall, R E; Moran, J E; Nimz, G J; Ramon, E C; Rose, T P; Shuller, L; Williams, R W; Zavarin, M; Zhao, P

2007-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

111

An aerial radiological survey of the Fernald Environmental Management Project and surrounding area, Fernald, Ohio  

SciTech Connect

An aerial radiological survey was conducted from May 17--22, 1994, over a 36 square mile (93 square kilometer) area centered on the Fernald Environmental Management Project located in Fernald, Ohio. The purpose of the survey was to detect anomalous gamma radiation in the environment surrounding the plant. The survey was conducted at a nominal altitude of 150 feet (46 meters) with a line spacing of 250 feet (76 meters). A contour map of the terrestrial gamma exposure rate extrapolated to 1 meter (3.3 feet) above ground was prepared and overlaid on an aerial photograph of the area. Analysis of the data for man made sources showed five sites within the boundaries of the Fernald Environmental Management Project having elevated readings. The exposure rates outside the plant boundary were typical of naturally occurring background radiation. Soil samples and pressurized ion chamber measurements were obtained at four locations within the survey boundaries to supplement the aerial data. It was concluded that although the radionuclides identified in the high-exposure-rate areas are naturally occurring, the levels encountered are greatly enhanced due to industrial activities at the plant.

Phoenix, K.A.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Nevada Test Site 2007 Data Report: Groundwater Monitoring Program Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site  

SciTech Connect

This report is a compilation of the groundwater sampling results from three monitoring wells located near the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada, for calendar year 2007. The NTS is an approximately 3,561 square kilometer (1,375 square mile) restricted-access federal installation located approximately 105 kilometers (65 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1). Pilot wells UE5PW-1, UE5PW-2, and UE5PW-3 are used to monitor the groundwater at the Area 5 RWMS (Figure 2). In addition to groundwater monitoring results, this report includes information regarding site hydrogeology, well construction, sample collection, and meteorological data measured at the Area 5 RWMS. The disposal of low-level radioactive waste and mixed low-level radioactive waste at the Area 5 RWMS is regulated by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management'. The disposal of mixed low-level radioactive waste is also regulated by the state of Nevada under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulation Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 265, 'Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities' (CFR, 1999). The format of this report was requested by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) in a letter dated August 12, 1997. The appearance and arrangement of this document have been modified slightly since that date to provide additional information and to facilitate the readability of the document. The objective of this report is to satisfy any Area 5 RWMS reporting agreements between DOE and NDEP.

NSTec Environmental Management

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Participatory Simulation for Collective Management of Protected Areas for Biodiversity Conservation and Social Inclusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract — In this paper, we introduce a research project aimed at methodological and computer-based support for participatory management of protected areas, in order to promote biodiversity conservation and social inclusion. Our starting point is the “companion modelling ” approach, as defined by the ComMod group, a movement of researchers created in 2003. Their method, called MAS/RPG, consists in iterations coupling role-playing games (RPG) and agent-based simulations (MAS), in order to model collective management and support negotiation between stakeholders. It has been applied to the collective management of natural renewable resources. The agent-based simulations are used to foresee, display and discuss the impact of individual actions on the environment. For obvious reasons, companion modelling does not provide stakeholders with a pre-defined solution to their conflicts. More recently, an evolution of the MAS/RPG approach named “agent-based participatory simulations ” proved able to prompt participants to create innovative distributed solutions to complex problems. These simulations rely more heavily on computer support (distribution, logs, assistant agents) and integrate the agent-based simulation with the role-playing game, thus reducing the need for iterations. Our objective is to propose and evaluate the use of this methodology and the associated software tools on different national parks for conservation of natural resources in Brazil. Our first case study is the Tijuca National Park, in Rio de Janeiro. It is inserted in the urban net of a great metropolis (Rio de Janeiro) and suffers from different kinds of human pressure and their impacts, e.g., illegal occupation, water contamination and social tension. This case study addresses the question of conflict resolution, one of the key questions for the participatory management of protected areas.

Jean-pierre Briot

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

DOE-STD-1165-2003; Aviation Manager Functional Area Qualification Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5-2003 5-2003 September 2003 DOE STANDARD AVIATION MANAGER FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1165-2003 ii This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000.

115

DOE-STD-1181-2004; Facility Maintenance Management Functional Area Qualification Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-STD-1181-2004 March 2004 DOE STANDARD FACILITY MAINTENANCE MANAGEMENT FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1181-2004 i This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-STD-1181-2004 ii

116

DOE-STD-1178-2004; Technical Program Manager Functional Area Qualification Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

78-2004 78-2004 February 2004 DOE STANDARD TECHNICAL PROGRAM MANAGER FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1178-2004 i This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-STD-1178-2004

117

DOE-STD-1180-2004; Construction Management Functional Area Qualification Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MEASUREMENT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1180-2004 March 2004 DOE STANDARD CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1180-2004 i This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161;

118

DOE-STD-1175-2003; Senior Technical Safety Manager Functional Area Qualification Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MEASUREMENT DOE-STD-1175-2003 December 2003 DOE STANDARD SENIOR TECHNICAL SAFETY MANAGER FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1175-2003 ii This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161, (703) 605-6000.

119

DOE-STD-1177-2004; Emergency Management Functional Area Qualification Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-STD-1177-2004 January 2004 DOE STANDARD EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1177-2004 i This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161;

120

DOE-STD-1155-2002; Transportation and Traffic Management Functional Area Qualification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-STD-1155-2002 September 2002 DOE STANDARD TRANSPORTATION AND TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1155-2002 This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-STD-1155-2002 i APPROVAL

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "management challenge area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Nevada National Security Site 2010 Data Report: Groundwater Monitoring Program Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site  

SciTech Connect

This report is a compilation of the groundwater sampling results from the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS). The data have been collected since 1993 and include calendar year 2010 results. During 2010, groundwater samples were collected and static water levels were measured at the three pilot wells surrounding the Area 5 RWMS. Samples were collected at UE5PW-1 on March 10 and August 10, 2010; at UE5PW-2 on March 10, August 10, and August 25, 2010; and at UE5PW-3 on March 31, August 10, and August 25, 2010. Static water levels were measured at each of the three pilot wells on March 1, April 26, August 9, and November 9, 2010. Groundwater samples were analyzed for the following indicators of contamination: pH, specific conductance, total organic carbon, total organic halides, and tritium. Indicators of general water chemistry (cations and anions) were also measured. Results from all samples collected in 2010 were within the limits established by agreement with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for each analyte. These data indicate that there has been no measurable impact to the uppermost aquifer from the Area 5 RWMS. There were no significant changes in measured groundwater parameters compared to previous years. The report contains an updated cumulative chronology for the Area 5 RWMS Groundwater Monitoring Program and a brief description of the site hydrogeology.

NSTec Environmental Management

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

AREA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AREA AREA FAQ # Question Response 316 vs DCAA FAQ 1 An inquiry from CH about an SBIR recipient asking if a DCAA audit is sufficient to comply with the regulation or if they need to add this to their audit they have performed yearly by a public accounting firm. 316 audits are essentially A-133 audits for for-profit entities. They DO NOT replace DCAA or other audits requested by DOE to look at indirect rates or incurred costs or closeouts. DCAA would never agree to perform A-133 or our 316 audits. They don't do A-133 audits for DOD awardees. The purpose of the audits are different, look at different things and in the few instances of overlap, from different perspectives. 316

123

Result Summary for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site Performance Assessment Model Version 4.113  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Preliminary results for Version 4.113 of the Nevada National Security Site Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site performance assessment model are summarized. Version 4.113 includes the Fiscal Year 2011 inventory estimate.

Shott, G. J.

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

124

Frog fence along Vermont Rt. 2 in sandbar wildlife management area collaboration between Vermont Agency of Transportation and Vermont Agency of Natural Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FROG FENCE ALONG VERMONT RT. 2MANAGEMENT AREA COLLABORATION BETWEEN VERMONT AGENCY OFTRANSPORTATION AND VERMONT AGENCY OF NATURAL RESOURCES

Hoffman, Nelson

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Correction Action Report, Third and Fourth Quarter 1998, Volumes I and II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF), also known as the F-Area Seepage Basins, at the Savannah Site (SRS) is monitored periodically for selected hazardous and radioactive constituents. This report presents the results of the required groundwater monitoring program.

Chase, J.

1999-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

126

Development and Testing of a Groundwater Management Model for the Faultless Underground Nuclear Test, Central Nevada Test Area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document describes the development and application of a user-friendly and efficient groundwater management model of the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA) and surrounding areas that will allow the U.S. Department of Energy and state personnel to evaluate the impact of future proposed scenarios. The management model consists of a simple hydrologic model within an interactive groundwater management framework. This framework is based on an object user interface that was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey and has been used by the Desert Research Institute researchers and others to couple disparate environmental resource models, manage the necessary temporal and spatial data, and evaluate model results for management decision making. This framework was modified and applied to the CNTA and surrounding Hot Creek Valley. The utility of the management model was demonstrated through the application of hypothetical future scenarios including mineral mining, regional expansion of agriculture, geothermal energy production, and export of water to large urban areas outside the region. While the results from some of the scenarios indicated potential impacts to the region near CNTA and others did not, together they demonstrate the usefulness of the management tool for managers who need to evaluate the impact proposed changes in groundwater use in or near CNTA may have on radionuclide migration.

Douglas P. Boyle; Gregg Lamorey; Scott Bassett; Greg Pohll; Jenny Chapman

2006-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

127

Nevada National Security Site 2011 Data Report: Groundwater Monitoring Program Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site  

SciTech Connect

This report is a compilation of the groundwater sampling results from the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS). The data have been collected since 1993 and include calendar year 2011 results. During 2011, groundwater samples were collected and static water levels were measured at the three pilot wells surrounding the Area 5 RWMS. Samples were collected at UE5PW-1 on March 8, August 2, August 24, and October 19, 2011; at UE5PW-2 on March 8, August 2, August 23, and October 19, 2011; and at UE5PW-3 on March 8, August 2, August 23, and October 19, 2011. Static water levels were measured at each of the three pilot wells on March 1, June 7, August 1, and October 17, 2011. Groundwater samples were analyzed for the following indicators of contamination: pH, specific conductance, total organic carbon, total organic halides, and tritium. Indicators of general water chemistry (cations and anions) were also measured. Initial total organic carbon and total organic halides results for samples collected in August 2011 were above previous measurements and, in some cases, above the established investigation limits. However, after field sample pumps and tubing were disinfected with Clorox solution, the results returned to normal levels. Final results from samples collected in 2011 were within the limits established by agreement with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for each analyte. These data indicate that there has been no measurable impact to the uppermost aquifer from the Area 5 RWMS. There were no significant changes in measured groundwater parameters compared to previous years. The report contains an updated cumulative chronology for the Area 5 RWMS Groundwater Monitoring Program and a brief description of the site hydrogeology.

NSTec Environmental Management

2012-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

128

Data Package for Past and Current Groundwater Flow and Contamination beneath Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This appendix summarizes historic and recent groundwater data collected from the uppermost aquifer beneath the 200 East and 200 West Areas. Although the area of interest is the Hanford Site Central Plateau, most of the information discussed in this appendix is at the scale of individual single-shell tank waste management areas. This is because the geologic, and thus the hydraulic, properties and the geochemical properties (i.e., groundwater composition) are different in different parts of the Central Plateau.

Horton, Duane G.

2007-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

129

Red River Wildlife Management Area HEP Report, Habitat Evaluation Procedures, Technical Report 2004.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis conducted on the 314-acre Red River Wildlife Management Area (RRWMA) managed by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game resulted in 401.38 habitat units (HUs). Habitat variables from six habitat suitability index (HSI) models, comprised of mink (Mustela vison), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), common snipe (Capella gallinago), black-capped chickadee (Parus altricapillus), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), and white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), were measured by Regional HEP Team (RHT) members in August 2004. Cover types included wet meadow, riverine, riparian shrub, conifer forest, conifer forest wetland, and urban. HSI model outputs indicate that the shrub component is lacking in riparian shrub and conifer forest cover types and that snag density should be increased in conifer stands. The quality of wet meadow habitat, comprised primarily of introduced grass species and sedges, could be improved through development of ephemeral open water ponds and increasing the amount of persistent wetland herbaceous vegetation e.g. cattails (Typha spp.) and bulrushes (Scirpus spp.).

Ashley, Paul

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Closure Plan for the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada Test Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RMWS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) is managed and operated by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec) for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). This document is the first update of the interim closure plan for the Area 3 RWMS, which was presented in the Integrated Closure and Monitoring Plan (ICMP) (DOE, 2005). The format and content of this plan follows the Format and Content Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Closure Plans (DOE, 1999a). The major updates to the plan include a new closure date, updated closure inventory, the new institutional control policy, and the Title II engineering cover design. The plan identifies the assumptions and regulatory requirements, describes the disposal sites and the physical environment in which they are located, presents the design of the closure cover, and defines the approach and schedule for both closing and monitoring the site. The Area 3 RWMS accepts low-level waste (LLW) from across the DOE Complex in compliance with the NTS Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSA/NSO, 2006). The Area 3 RWMS accepts both packaged and unpackaged unclassified bulk LLW for disposal in subsidence craters that resulted from deep underground tests of nuclear devices in the early 1960s. The Area 3 RWMS covers 48 hectares (119 acres) and comprises seven subsidence craters--U-3ax, U-3bl, U-3ah, U-3at, U-3bh, U-3az, and U-3bg. The area between craters U-3ax and U-3bl was excavated to form one large disposal unit (U-3ax/bl); the area between craters U-3ah and U-3at was also excavated to form another large disposal unit (U-3ah/at). Waste unit U-3ax/bl is closed; waste units U-3ah/at and U-3bh are active; and the remaining craters, although currently undeveloped, are available for disposal of waste if required. This plan specifically addresses the closure of the U-3ah/at and the U-3bh LLW units. A final closure cover has been placed on unit U-3ax/bl (Corrective Action Unit 110) at the Area 3 RWMS. Monolayer-evapotranspirative closure cover designs for the U-3ah/at and U-3bh units are provided in this plan. The current-design closure cover thickness is 3 meters (10 feet). The final design cover will have an optimized cover thickness, which is expected to be less than 3 m (10 ft). Although waste operations at the Area 3 RWMS have ceased at the end of June 2006, disposal capacity is available for future disposals at the U-3ah/at and U-3bh units. The Area 3 RWMS is expected to start closure activities in fiscal year 2025, which include the development of final performance assessment and composite analysis documents, closure plan, closure cover design for construction, cover construction, and initiation of the post-closure care and monitoring activities. Current monitoring at the Area 3 RWMS includes monitoring the cover of the closed mixed waste unit U-3ax/bl as required by the Nevada Department of Environmental Protection, and others required under federal regulations and DOE orders. Monitoring data, collected via sensors and analysis of samples, are needed to evaluate radiation doses to the general public, for performance assessment maintenance, to demonstrate regulatory compliance, and to evaluate the actual performance of the RWMSs. Monitoring provides data to ensure the integrity and performance of waste disposal units. The monitoring program is designed to forewarn management and regulators of any failure and need for mitigating actions. The plan describes the program for monitoring direct radiation, air, vadose zone, biota, groundwater, meteorology, and subsidence. The requirements of post-closure cover maintenance and monitoring will be determined in the final closure plan.

NSTec Environmental Management

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

THE WIDE-AREA ENERGY STORAGE AND MANAGEMENT SYSTEM PHASE II Final Report - Flywheel Field Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operated for the U.S. department of Energy (DOE) by Battelle Memorial Institute for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), California Institute for Energy and Environment (CIEE) and California Energy Commission (CEC). A wide-area energy management system (WAEMS) is a centralized control system that operates energy storage devices (ESDs) located in different places to provide energy and ancillary services that can be shared among balancing authorities (BAs). The goal of this research is to conduct flywheel field tests, investigate the technical characteristics and economics of combined hydro-flywheel regulation services that can be shared between Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and California Independent System Operator (CAISO) controlled areas. This report is the second interim technical report for Phase II of the WAEMS project. This report presents: 1) the methodology of sharing regulation service between balancing authorities, 2) the algorithm to allocate the regulation signal between the flywheel and hydro power plant to minimize the wear-and-tear of the hydro power plants, 3) field results of the hydro-flywheel regulation service (conducted by the Beacon Power), and 4) the performance metrics and economic analysis of the combined hydro-flywheel regulation service.

Lu, Ning; Makarov, Yuri V.; Weimar, Mark R.; Rudolph, Frank; Murthy, Shashikala; Arseneaux, Jim; Loutan, Clyde; Chowdhury, S.

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

132

Hydrologic Resources Management Program and Underground Test Area Project FY 2006 Progress Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes FY 2006 technical studies conducted by the Chemical Biology and Nuclear Science Division (CBND) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in support of the Hydrologic Resources Management Program (HRMP) and the Underground Test Area Project (UGTA). These programs are administered by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) through the Defense Programs and Environmental Restoration Divisions, respectively. HRMP-sponsored work is directed toward the responsible management of the natural resources at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), enabling its continued use as a staging area for strategic operations in support of national security. UGTA-funded work emphasizes the development of an integrated set of groundwater flow and contaminant transport models to predict the extent of radionuclide migration from underground nuclear testing areas at the NTS. The report is organized on a topical basis and contains four chapters that highlight technical work products produced by CBND. However, it is important to recognize that most of this work involves collaborative partnerships with the other HRMP and UGTA contract organizations. These groups include the Energy and Environment Directorate at LLNL (LLNL-E&E), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Desert Research Institute (DRI), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), and National Security Technologies (NSTec). Chapter 1 is a summary of FY 2006 sampling efforts at near-field 'hot' wells at the NTS, and presents new chemical and isotopic data for groundwater samples from four near-field wells. These include PM-2 and U-20n PS 1DDh (CHESHIRE), UE-7ns (BOURBON), and U-19v PS No.1ds (ALMENDRO). Chapter 2 is a summary of the results of chemical and isotopic measurements of groundwater samples from three UGTA environmental monitoring wells. These wells are: ER-12-4 and U12S located in Area 12 on Rainier Mesa and USGS HGH No.2 WW2 located in Yucca Flat. In addition, three springs were sampled White Rock Spring and Captain Jack Spring in Area 12 on Rainier Mesa and Topopah Spring in Area 29. Chapter 3 is a compilation of existing noble gas data that has been reviewed and edited to remove inconsistencies in presentation of total vs. single isotope noble gas values reported in the previous HRMP and UGTA progress reports. Chapter 4 is a summary of the results of batch sorption and desorption experiments performed to determine the distribution coefficients (Kd) of Pu(IV), Np(V), U(VI), Cs and Sr to zeolitized tuff (tuff confining unit, TCU) and carbonate (lower carbonate aquifer, LCA) rocks in synthetic NTS groundwater Chapter 5 is a summary of the results of a series of flow-cell experiments performed to examine Np(V) and Pu(V) sorption to and desorption from goethite. Np and Pu desorption occur at a faster rate and to a greater extent than previously reported. In addition, oxidation changes occurred with the Pu whereby the surface-sorbed Pu(IV) was reoxidized to aqueous Pu(V) during desorption.

Culham, H W; Eaton, G F; Genetti, V; Hu, Q; Kersting, A B; Lindvall, R E; Moran, J E; Blasiyh Nuno, G A; Powell, B A; Rose, T P; Singleton, M J; Williams, R W; Zavarin, M; Zhao, P

2008-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

133

Evapotranspiration Cover for the 92-Acre Area Retired Mixed Waste Pits, Area 5 Waste Management Division, Nevada National Security Site, Final CQA Report  

SciTech Connect

The report is the Final Construction Quality Assurance (CQA) Report for the 92-Acrew Evapotranspiration Cover, Area 5 Waste Management Division Retired Mixed Waste Pits, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, for the period of January 20, 2011, to January 31, 2012 The Area 5 RWMS uses engineered shallow-land burial cells to dispose of packaged waste. The 92-Acre Area encompasses the southern portion of the Area 5 RWMS, which has been designated for the first final closure operations. This area contains 13 Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) boreholes, 16 narrow trenches, and 9 broader pits. With the exception of two active pits (P03 and P06), all trenches and pits in the 92-Acre Area had operational covers approximately 2.4 meters thick, at a minimum, in most areas when this project began. The units within the 92-Acre Area are grouped into the following six informal categories based on physical location, waste types and regulatory requirements: (1) Pit 3 Mixed Waste Disposal Unit (MWDU); (2) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 111; (3) CAU 207; (4) Low-level waste disposal units; (5) Asbestiform low-level waste disposal units; and (6) One transuranic (TRU) waste trench.

NSTec Environmental Management; The Delphi Groupe, Inc.; J. A. Cesare and Associates, Inc.

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

134

Characterization ReportOperational Closure Covers for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

Bechtel Nevada (BN) manages two low-level Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). The Area 3 RWMS is located in south-central Yucca Flat and the Area 5 RWMS is located about 15 miles south, in north-central Frenchman Flat. Though located in two separate topographically closed basins, they are similar in climate and hydrogeologic setting. The Area 5 RWMS uses engineered shallow-land burial cells to dispose of packaged waste, while the Area 3 RWMS uses subsidence craters formed from underground testing of nuclear weapons for the disposal of packaged and unpackaged bulk waste. Over the next several decades, most waste disposal units at both the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are anticipated to be closed. Closure of the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs will proceed through three phases: operational closure, final closure, and institutional control. Many waste disposal units at the Area 5RWMS are operationally closed and final closure has been placed on one unit at the Area 3 RWMS (U-3ax/bl). Because of the similarities between the two sites (e.g., type of wastes, environmental factors, operational closure cover designs, etc.), many characterization studies and data collected at the Area 3 RWMS are relevant and applicable to the Area 5 RWMS. For this reason, data and closure strategies from the Area 3 RWMS are referred to as applicable. This document is an interim Characterization Report – Operational Closure Covers, for the Area 5 RWMS. The report briefly describes the Area 5 RWMS and the physical environment where it is located, identifies the regulatory requirements, reviews the approach and schedule for closing, summarizes the monitoring programs, summarizes characterization studies and results, and then presents conclusions and recommendations.

Bechtel Nevada Geotechnical Sciences

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Precious Lands Wildlife Management Area, Technical Report 2000-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) currently manages a 15,325 acre parcel of land known as the Precious Lands Wildlife Management Area that was purchased as mitigation for losses incurred by construction of the four lower Snake River dams. The Management Area is located in northern Wallowa County, Oregon and southern Asotin County, Washington (Figure 1). It is divided into three management parcels--the Buford parcel is located on Buford Creek and straddles the WA-OR state line, and the Tamarack and Basin parcels are contiguous to each other and located between the Joseph Creek and Cottonwood Creek drainages in Wallowa County, OR. The project was developed under the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 (P.L. 96-501), with funding from the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The acreage protected under this contract will be credited to BPA as habitat permanently dedicated to wildlife and wildlife mitigation. A modeling strategy known as Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and adopted by BPA as a habitat equivalency accounting system. Nine wildlife species models were used to evaluate distinct cover type features and provide a measure of habitat quality. Models measure a wide range of life requisite variables for each species and monitor overall trends in vegetation community health and diversity. One product of HEP is an evaluation of habitat quality expressed in Habitat Units (HUs). This HU accounting system is used to determine the amount of credit BPA receives for mitigation lands. After construction of the four lower Snake River dams, a HEP loss assessment was conducted to determine how many Habitat Units were inundated behind the dams. Twelve target species were used in that evaluation: Canada goose, mallard, river otter, downy woodpecker, song sparrow, yellow warbler, marsh wren, western meadowlark, chukar, ring-necked pheasant, California quail, and mule deer. The U.S. Army Corp of Engineers and the Washington Department of fish and Wildlife subsequently purchased numerous properties to mitigate for the identified Snake River losses. These projects, however, were not sufficient to mitigate for all the HU's lost. The Northwest Power Planning Council amended the remaining 26,774 HU's into their 1994-1995 Fish and Wildlife Program as being unmitigated (NPPC 2000), which allowed the Nez Perce Tribe to contract with BPA to provide HU's through the Precious Lands Project. The Precious Lands project contains a different composition of cover types than those assessed during the lower Snake loss assessment. For example, no mallard or Canada goose habitat exists on Precious Lands but the area does contain conifer forest, which was not present on the area inundated by dam construction. These cover type differences have resulted in a slightly different suite of species for the current HEP assessment. Target species for Precious Lands are downy woodpecker, yellow warbler, song sparrow, California Quail, mule deer, sharp-tailed grouse (brood rearing), west em meadowlark, beaver, and black-capped chickadee. This list is a reflection of the available cover types and the management objectives of the Nez Perce Tribe. For example, chukar was not used in the present assessment because it is an introduced Eurasian game bird that does not provide an accurate representation of the ecological health of the native grasslands it was supposed to represent. Initial model runs using the chukar confirmed this suspicion so the brood-rearing section of the sharp-tailed grouse model was used instead. Additionally, the beaver model was used in place of the river otter model because the otter model used in the loss assessment was not a published model, was overly simplistic, and did not provide an accurate assessment of riparian condition. The beaver model, however, provides a detailed evaluation of overstory class structure that the NPT felt was a good compliment to the yellow warbler and song sparrow models that evaluated understory shrub layers. Overall, such substituti

Kozusko, Shana

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Yakama Nation Wildlife Management Areas, Technical Report 1999-2000.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Construction of the Dalles, Bonneville, McNary, and John Day Dams on the Columbia River by the federal government resulted in a substantial loss of riparian bottomland along the Columbia River. Impacts associated with the Mid-Columbia Projects were assessed for several wildlife species using the Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USDI-FWS 1980). The studies documented the loss of riparian habitat and established a baseline against which mitigation measures could be developed (USDI-FWS 1990 and USDE-BPA 1990). The impact assessments established a mitigation goal, a portion of which would be satisfied by the creation, restoration, and enhancement of riparian lands on tributaries to the Columbia River, including the Yakima Valley. The Yakama Nation (YN), the Northwest Power Planning Council, and the Bonneville Power Administration have agreed that the Yakama Nation would be funded to implement habitat restoration on lands within and adjacent to their reservation. Some of the targeted lands are owned by the Yakama Nation, some are trust lands, and some lands have been in private ownership. Since the early 1990s, the Yakama Nation has been in the process of assembling riparian lands into Wildlife Management Areas, and restoring natural hydrology and natural cover-types on these lands. The Northwest Power Planning Council, through the Bonneville Power Administration, has supported the program. HEP studies were performed by the Yakama Nation in 1990 (Bich et al. 1991) to establish baseline conditions and inventory wildlife habitat at the initiation of the restoration project. The 1990 HEP used a simplified version of the HEP to quantify baseline conditions. The present assessment is designed to evaluate the progress of the mitigation plan in meeting its stated goals. The 1999 HEP assessment has two distinct tasks: (1) Evaluation of the mitigation plan as currently implemented using the simplified YN HEP methodologies for the Wildlife Management Areas; and (2) Evaluation of the simplified YN HEP methodologies as a means of measuring mitigation progress.

Raedeke, Kenneth; Raedeke, Dorothy

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Assessment of the Emergency Management Program Training and Drills Functional Area at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, August 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LANL-2011-08-04 LANL-2011-08-04 Site: Los Alamos National Laboratory Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report of the Assessment of the Emergency Management Program Training and Drills Functional Area Dates of Activity : 08/01/2011 - 08/04/2011 Report Preparer: David Odland/Randy Griffin Activity Description/Purpose: Since the 2007 Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) inspection of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) emergency management program, HSS personnel have conducted periodic visits to follow-up on the corrective actions taken to address the findings in the review. This 2011 assessment was conducted to continue the corrective action follow-up activities and to support the Los Alamos Site Office (LASO) Emergency Management Program Manager in accomplishing

138

Hydrologic Resources Management Program and Underground Test Area Project FY 2000 Progress Report  

SciTech Connect

This report highlights the results of FY 2000 technical studies conducted by the Analytical and Nuclear Chemistry Division (ANCD) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in support of the Hydrology and Radionuclide Migration Program (HRMP) and Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project. This is the latest in a series of annual reports published by LLNL-ANCD to document recent investigations of radionuclide migration and transport processes at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The HRMP is sponsored by Defense Programs (DP) at the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOENV), and supports DP operations at the NTS through studies of radiochemical and hydrologic processes that are relevant to the DP mission. Other organizations that support the HRMP include Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the Desert Research Institute (DRI) of the University of Nevada, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPS), and Bechtel Nevada (BN). The UGTA Project is sponsored by the Environmental Management (EM) program at DOENV; its goal is to determine the extent of radionuclide contamination in groundwater resulting from underground nuclear testing at the NTS. The project strategy follows guidelines set forth in a Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order between the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Department of Defense, and the State of Nevada. Participating contractors include LLNL (both ANCD and the Energy and Environmental Sciences Directorate), LANL, USGS, DRI, BN, and IT Corporation (with subcontract support from Geotrans Inc.).

Davisson, M L; Eaton, G F; Hakemi, N L; Hudson, G B; Hutcheon, I D; Lau, C A; Kersting, A B; Kenneally, J M; Moran, J E; Phinney, D L; Rose, T P; Smith, D K; Sylwester, E R; Wang, L; Williams, R; Zavarin, M

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

WIPP Sampling and Analysis Plan for Solid Waste Management Units and Areas of Concern.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) has been prepared to fulfill requirements of Module VII, Section VII.M.2 and Table VII.1, requirement 4 of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Hazardous Waste Permit, NM4890139088-TSDF (the Permit); (NMED [New Mexico Environment Department], 1999a). This SAP describes the approach for investigation of the Solid Waste Management Units (SWMU) and Areas of Concern (AOC) specified in the Permit. This SAP addresses the current Permit requirements for a RCRA Facility Investigation(RFI) investigation of SWMUs and AOCs. It uses the results of previous investigations performed at WIPP and expands the investigations as required by the Permit. As an alternative to the RFI specified in Module VII of the Permit, current NMED guidance identifies an Accelerated Corrective Action Approach (ACAA) that may be used for any SWMU or AOC (NMED, 1998). This accelerated approach is used to replace the standard RFI work plan and report sequence with a more flexible decision-making approach. The ACAA process allows a facility to exit the schedule of compliance contained in the facility's Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) permit module and proceed on an accelerated time frame. Thus, the ACAA process can beentered either before or after a RFI work plan. According to NMED's guidance, a facility can prepare a RFI work plan or SAP for any SWMU or AOC (NMED, 1998).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2000-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

140

Project Management Plan (PMP), W-364, 209E septic system upgrade, 200 East Area  

SciTech Connect

The document is the Project Management Plan (PMP) of the design and installation of the 209E Septic System Upgrade.

Lott, D.T.

1994-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "management challenge area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

GAO-04-611 Nuclear Waste: Absence of Key Management Reforms on Hanford's Cleanup Project Adds to Challenges of Achieving Cost and Schedule Goals  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Committee on Government Committee on Government Reform, House of Representatives June 2004 NUCLEAR WASTE Absence of Key Management Reforms on Hanford's Cleanup Project Adds to Challenges of Achieving Cost and Schedule Goals GAO-04-611 www.gao.gov/cgi-bin/getrpt?GAO-04-611. To view the full product, including the scope and methodology, click on the link above. For more information, contact Robin M. Nazzaro at (202) 512-3841 or nazzaror@gao.gov. Highlights of GAO-04-611, a report to the Committee on Government Reform, House of Representatives June 2004 NUCLEAR WASTE Absence of Key Management Reforms on Hanford's Cleanup Project Adds to Challenges of Achieving Cost and Schedule Goals DOE's initial approach called for treating 10 percent of the site's high-level waste by 2018 and for operating the plant until treatment was completed in

142

2007 Challenge X Competition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Year Three of Argonne-Managed Challenge X Competition Comes to a Close Year Three of Argonne-Managed Challenge X Competition Comes to a Close Group shot of winning Mississippi State University team after Challenge X awards ceremony First place Mississippi State team after the Challenge X 2007 Final Awards ceremony held at GM World Headquarters in Detroit, Michigan on June 7, 2007. Photo © Roy Feldman. The third year of the four-year, Argonne-managed Challenge X collegiate engineering competition came to a close on June 7, 2007, with Mississippi State University taking top honors. Staff and engineers from Argonne National Laboratory have managed Challenge X and its predecessor competitions since the Department of Energy (DOE) first began holding them in the early 1990s. In the current year's competition, the Mississippi State team was among 17

143

RCRA Assessment Plan for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area TX-TY at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

A groundwater quality assessment plan was prepared to investigate the rate and extent of aquifer contamination beneath Waste Management Area TX-TY on the Hanford Site in Washington State. This plan is an update of a draft plan issued in February 1999, which guided work performed in fiscal year 2000.

Hodges, Floyd N.; Chou, Charissa J.

2001-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

144

Performance Assessment Transport Modeling of Uranium at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada National Security Site  

SciTech Connect

Following is a brief summary of the assumptions that are pertinent to the radioactive isotope transport in the GoldSim Performance Assessment model of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, with special emphasis on the water-phase reactive transport of uranium, which includes depleted uranium products.

NSTec Radioactive Waste

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

145

Phase 1 RCRA Facility Investigation and Corrective Measures Study Work Plan for Single Shell Tank Waste Management Areas  

SciTech Connect

This document is the master work plan for the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) for single-shell tank (SST) farms at the Hanford Site. Evidence indicates that releases at four of the seven SST waste management areas have impacted.

ROGERS, P.M.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Best management practices plan for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This Best Management Practices (BMP) Plan has been developed as part of the environmental monitoring program at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. The BMP Plan describes the requirements for personnel training, spill prevention and control, environmental compliance, and sediment/erosion control as they relate to environmental monitoring activities and installation of Monitoring Station 4 at WAG 6.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Composite Analysis for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of a Composite Analysis (CA) for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS). The Area 5 RWMS is a US Department of Energy (DOE)-operated low-level radioactive waste (LLW) management site located in northern Frenchman Flat on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The Area 5 RWMS has disposed of low-level radioactive waste in shallow unlined pits and trenches since 1960. Transuranic waste (TRU) and high-specific activity waste was disposed in Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) boreholes from 1983 to 1989. The purpose of this CA is to determine if continuing operation of the Area 5 RWMS poses an acceptable or unacceptable risk to the public considering the total waste inventory and all other interacting sources of radioactive material in the vicinity. Continuing operation of the Area 5 RWMS will be considered acceptable if the total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) is less than 100 mrem in a year. If the TEDE exceeds 30 mrem in a year, a cost-benefit options analysis must be performed to determine if cost-effective management options exist to reduce the dose further. If the TEDE is found to be less than 30 mrem in a year, an analysis may be performed if warranted to determine if doses are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA).

V. Yucel

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

2010 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Management Sites at the Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office performed an annual review of the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) Performance Assessments (PAs) and Composite Analyses (CAs) in fiscal year (FY) 2010. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2010 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors (e.g., waste forms and containers, facility design, and waste receipts), closure plans, monitoring results, and research and development (R&D) activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) (formerly the Nevada Test Site) relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R&D activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the CAs.

NSTec Environmental Management

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

2004 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Maintenance Plan for the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site (Bechtel Nevada, 2000) requires an annual review to assess the adequacy of the performance assessments (PAs) and composite analyses (CAs) for each of the facilities, and reports the results in an annual summary report to the U.S. Department of Energy Headquarters. The Disposal Authorization Statements for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) also require that such reviews be made and that secondary or minor unresolved issues be tracked and addressed as part of the maintenance plan (U.S. Department of Energy [DOE]). The U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office performed annual reviews in fiscal year (FY) 2004 by evaluating operational factors and research results that impact the continuing validity of the PA and CA results. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2004 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors, such as the waste form and containers, facility design, waste receipts, closure plans, as well as monitoring results and research and development (R&D) activities were reviewed in FY 2004 for the determination of the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada Test Site relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R&D activities were reviewed for the determination of the adequacy of the CAs.

Vefa Yucel

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Technical solution and GIS for improving the waste management in Sibiu surrouding area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper creates a role model to simplify and streamline how waste management is currently in Romania. This model can be further improved and extended to larger scale. To begin an analysis was made concrete in the Sibiu Surroundings on the current ... Keywords: compactor, composting, database, management, redigitize, waste

Sorin Borza; Carmen Simion; Ioan Bandrea

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Wide-Area Energy Storage and Management system to Balance Intermittent Resources in the Bonneville Power Administration and California ISO Control Areas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The entire project addresses the issue of mitigating additional intermittency and fast ramps that occur at higher penetration of intermittent resources, including wind genera-tion, in the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the California Independent Sys-tem Operator (California ISO) control areas. The proposed Wide Area Energy Storage and Management System (WAEMS) will address the additional regulation requirement through the energy exchange between the participating control areas and through the use of energy storage and other generation resources. For the BPA and California ISO control centers, the new regulation service will look no different comparing with the traditional regulation resources. The proposed project will benefit the regulation service in these service areas, regardless of the actual degree of penetration of the intermittent resources in the regions. The project develops principles, algorithms, market integration rules, functional de-sign and technical specifications for the WAEMS system. The project is sponsored by BPA and supported in kind by California ISO, Beacon Power Corporation, and the Cali-fornia Energy Commission (CEC).

Makarov, Yuri V.; Yang, Bo; DeSteese, John G.; Lu, Shuai; Miller, Carl H.; Nyeng, Preben; Ma, Jian; Hammerstrom, Donald J.; Vishwanathan, Vilanyur V.

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

152

WIPP Facility Work Plan for Solid Waste Management Units and Areas of Concern  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This 2002 Facility Work Plan (FWP) has been prepared as required by Module VII, Permit Condition VII.U.3 of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, NM4890139088-TSDF (the Permit) (New Mexico Environment Department [NMED], 1999a), and incorporates comments from the NMED received on December 6, 2000 (NMED, 2000a). This February 2002 FWP describes the programmatic facility-wide approach to future investigations at Solid Waste Management Units (SWMU) and Areas of Concern (AOC) specified in the Permit. The Permittees are evaluating data from previous investigations of the SWMUs and AOCs against the most recent guidance proposed by the NMED. Based on these data, and completion of the August 2001 sampling requested by the NMED, the Permittees expect that no further sampling will be required and that a request for No Further Action (NFA) at the SWMUs and AOCs will be submitted to the NMED. This FWP addresses the current Permit requirements. It uses the results of previous investigations performed at WIPP and expands the investigations as required by the Permit. As an alternative to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) specified in Module VII of the Permit, current NMED guidance identifies an Accelerated Corrective Action Approach (ACAA) that may be used for any SWMU or AOC (NMED, 1998). This accelerated approach is used to replace the standard RFI Work Plan and Report sequence with a more flexible decision-making approach. The ACAA process allows a facility to exit the schedule of compliance contained in the facility's Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) permit module and proceed on an accelerated time frame. Thus, the ACAA processcan be entered either before or after an RFI Work Plan. According to the NMED's guidance, a facility can prepare an RFI Work Plan or Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) for any SWMU or AOC (NMED, 1998). Based on this guidance, a SAP constitutes an acceptable alternative to the RFI Work Plan specified in the Permit. The NMED accepted that the Permittees are using the ACAA in a letter dated April 20, 2000.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2002-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

153

WIPP Facility Work Plan for Solid Waste Management Units and Areas of Concern  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

his 2002 Facility Work Plan (FWP) has been prepared as required by Module VII,Permit Condition VII.U.3 of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, NM4890139088-TSDF (the Permit) (New Mexico Environment Department [NMED], 1999a), and incorporates comments from the NMED received onDecember 6, 2000 (NMED, 2000a). This February 2002 FWP describes the program-matic facility-wide approach to future investigations at Solid Waste Management Units (SWMU) and Areas of Concern (AOC) specified in the Permit. The Permittees are evaluating data from previous investigations of the SWMUs and AOCs against the mostrecent guidance proposed by the NMED. Based on these data, and completion of the August 2001 sampling requested by the NMED, the Permittees expect that no further sampling will be required and that a request for No Further Action (NFA) at the SWMUs and AOCs will be submitted to the NMED. This FWP addresses the current Permit requirements. It uses the results of previous investigations performed at WIPP and expands the investigations as required by the Permit. As an alternative to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)Facility Investigation (RFI) specified in Module VII of the Permit, current NMED guidance identifies an Accelerated Corrective Action Approach (ACAA) that may beused for any SWMU or AOC (NMED, 1998). This accelerated approach is used toreplace the standard RFI Work Plan and Report sequence with a more flexible decision-making approach. The ACAA process allows a facility to exit the schedule of compliance contained in the facility's Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) permit module and proceed on an accelerated time frame. Thus, the ACAA process can be entered either before or after an RFI Work Plan. According to the NMED's guidance, a facility can prepare an RFI Work Plan or Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) for any SWMU or AOC (NMED, 1998). Based on this guidance, a SAP constitutes an acceptable alternative to the RFI Work Plan specified in the Permit. The NMED accepted that the Permittees are using the ACAA in a letter dated April 20, 2000.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2002-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

154

Maintenance Plan for the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1 requires that performance assessments (PAs) and composite analyses (CAs) for low-level waste (LLW) disposal facilities be maintained by the field offices. This plan describes the activities to be performed in maintaining the Performance Assessment (PA) and Composite Analysis (CA) for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The Disposal Authorization Statement (DAS) for the continuing operations of a LLW facility at the DOE complex specifies the conditions for operations based on approval of a PA and CA, and requires the facility to implement a maintenance program to assure that these conditions will remain protective of the public health and the environment in the future. The goal of the maintenance program is to provide that assurance. The maintenance process is an iterative one in which changing conditions may result in a revision of PA and CA; the revised PA and CA may impose a different set of conditions for facility operation, closure, and postclosure. The maintenance process includes managing uncertainty, performing annual reviews, submitting annual summary reports to DOE Headquarters (DOE/HQ), carrying out special analyses, and revising the PAs and CAs, if necessary. Management of uncertainty is an essential component of the maintenance program because results of the original PAs and CAs are understood to be based on uncertain assumptions about the conceptual models; the mathematical models and parameters; and the future state of the lands, disposal facilities, and human activities. The annual reviews for the PAs include consideration of waste receipts, facility specific factors, results of monitoring, and results of research and development (R&D) activities. Likewise, results of ongoing R&D, changes in land-use planning, new information on known sources of residual radioactive materials, and identification of new sources may warrant an evaluation to determine the impacts on the conclusions of the CAs.

V. Yucel

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

RCRA Assessment Plan for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area S-SX at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

A groundwater quality assessment plan was prepared for waste management area S-SX at the Hanford Site. Groundwater monitoring is conducted at this facility in accordance with Title 40, Code of Federal Regulation (CFR) Part 265, Subpart F [and by reference of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-400(3)]. The facility was placed in assessment groundwater monitoring program status after elevated waste constituents and indicator parameter measurements (i.e., chromium, technetium-99 and specific conductance) in downgradient monitoring wells were observed and confirmed. A first determination, as allowed under 40 CFR 265.93(d), provides the owner/operator of a facility an opportunity to demonstrate that the regulated unit is not the source of groundwater contamination. Based on results of the first determination it was concluded that multiple source locations in the waste management area could account for observed spatial and temporal groundwater contamination patterns. Consequently, a continued investigation is required. This plan, developed using the data quality objectives process, is intended to comply with the continued investigation requirement. Accordingly, the primary purpose of the present plan is to determine the rate and extent of dangerous waste (hexavalent chromium and nitrate) and radioactive constituents (e.g., technetium-99) in groundwater and to determine their concentrations in groundwater beneath waste management area S-SX. Comments and concerns expressed by the Washington State Department of Ecology on the initial waste management area S-SX assessment report were addressed in the descriptive narrative of this plan as well as in the planned activities. Comment disposition is documented in a separate addendum to this plan.

Chou, C.J.; Johnson, V.G.

1999-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

156

RPP-PLAN-47325 Revision 0 Radioactive Waste Determination Process Plan for Waste Management Area C Tank  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This plan describes the radioactive waste determination process that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will use for Hanford Site Waste Management Area C (WMA C) tank waste residuals subject to DOE authority under DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. Preparation of this plan is a required component of actions the DOE-Office of River Protection (ORP) must take to fulfill proposed Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order Milestone M-045-80. Waste Management Area C is comprised of various single-shell tanks, encased and direct-buried pipes, diversion boxes, pump pits, and unplanned release sites (sites contaminated as a result of spills of tank waste to the environment). Since operations began in the late 1940s, the tanks in WMA C have continuously stored waste managed as high-level waste (HLW) that was derived from defense-related nuclear research, development, and weapons production activities. Planning for the final closure of WMA C is underway. This radioactive waste determination process plan assumes that tank closure will follow retrieval of as much tank waste as technically and economically practical. It is also assumed for the purposes of this plan that after completion

Waste Residuals; J. R. Robertson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility. Fourth Quarter 1994, Groundwater Monitoring Report  

SciTech Connect

The unlined settling basin operated from 1958 until 1985, receiving waste water that contained volatile organic solvents used for metal degreasing and chemical constituents and depleted uranium from fuel fabrication process in M Area. The underground process sewer line transported M-Area process waste waters to the basin. Water periodically overflowed from the basin through the ditch to the seepage area adjacent to the ditch and to Lost Lake.

Chase, J.A.

1995-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

158

The Confusing Allure of Combined Heat and Power: The Financial Attraction and Management Challenge of Reducing Energy Spend and Resulting Carbon Emissions Through Onsite Power Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sixty-one percent of global executives surveyed by McKinsey & Co. (in 2008) expect the issues associated with climate change to boost profits—if managed well. What these executives recognize is that new regulations, higher energy costs, and increased scrutiny by private gate-keepers (such as Wal-Mart) offer an opportunity to identify and implement more efficient practices in commercial and industrial environments. One of the most impactful solutions for the industrial sector—from the perspective of reducing energy spending and energy-related carbon emissions—is combined heat and power ("CHP"), sometimes referred to as cogeneration. However, the results of CHP deployment to date have been mixed—largely because companies do not fully appreciate the challenges of maintaining and operating a CHP system, optimizing its performance, and taking full advantage of the many benefits it offers. Despite these challenges, the slogan for CHP should perhaps be: "CHP, now more than ever".

Davis, R.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Shallow Land Disposal Area - PA 45  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Shallow Land Disposal Area - PA 45 Shallow Land Disposal Area - PA 45 FUSRAP Considered Sites Shallow Land Disposal Area, PA Alternate Name(s): Parks Township Shallow Land Disposal Area Nuclear Materials and Equipment Corporation (NUMEC) Babcox and Wilcox Parks Facilities PA.45-1 PA.45-5 PA.45-6 Location: PA Route 66 and Kissimere Road, Parks Township, Apollo, Pennsylvania PA.45-1 Historical Operations: Fabricated nulcear fuel under an NRC license as an extension of NUMEC Apollo production facilities. PA.45-1 PA.45-5 Eligibility Determination: Eligible PA.45-6 Radiological Survey(s): None Site Status: Cleanup in progress by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. PA.45-6 USACE Website Long-term Care Requirements: To be determined upon completion. Also see Documents Related to Shallow Land Disposal Area, PA

160

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- LASL Tracks Eastern Area No 3 - NM 10  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Tracks Eastern Area No 3 - NM Tracks Eastern Area No 3 - NM 10 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: LASL TRACKS EASTERN AREA NO. 3 (NM.10 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Area No. 3 , Los Alamos County , New Mexico NM.10-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 NM.10-2 Site Operations: These tracts were part of LASL and were subject to contamination from laboratory operations. NM.10-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Radiation levels below criteria per environmental radiation survey NM.10-3 Radioactive Materials Handled: None Indicated Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: None Indicated Radiological Survey(s): Yes NM.10-3 Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to LASL TRACKS EASTERN AREA NO. 3

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "management challenge area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Recharge Data Package for Hanford Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) assists CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., in its preparation of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation report. One of the PNNL tasks is to use existing information to estimate recharge rates for past and current conditions as well as future scenarios involving cleanup and closure of tank farms. The existing information includes recharge-relevant data collected during activities associated with a host of projects, including those of RCRA, the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), the CH2M HILL Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, and the PNNL Remediation and Closure Science Project. As new information is published, the report contents can be updated. The objective of this data package was to use published data to provide recharge estimates for the scenarios being considered in the RCRA Facility Investigation. Recharge rates were estimated for areas that remain natural and undisturbed, areas where the vegetation has been disturbed, areas where both the vegetation and the soil have been disturbed, and areas that are engineered (e.g., surface barrier). The recharge estimates supplement the estimates provided by PNNL researchers in 2006 for the Hanford Site using additional field measurements and model analysis using weather data through 2006.

Fayer, Michael J.; Keller, Jason M.

2007-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

162

Strategic Project Grants Target Area Descriptions 1. Advanced Communications and Management of Information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on their energy flows and material resources. Researchers are encouraged to identify and assess the industrial. Quality Foods and Novel Bioproducts 6. Safety and Security 7. Sustainable Energy Systems (Production an "exceptional opportunity" within the target area. Context Few fields have experienced the same rate of change

Handy, Todd C.

163

A Self-Managing Wide-Area Data Streaming Service using Model-based Online Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-latency robust data streaming between the corresponding distributed components. For example, a typical Grid-- Efficient and robust data streaming services are a critical requirement of emerging Grid applications, which for wide-area high-performance distributed computing. As Grid technologies and testbeds mature

Parashar, Manish

164

DOE O 350.2B, Use of Management and Operating or Other Facility Management Contractor Employees for Services to DOE in the Washington, D.C. Area  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To establish policies and procedures for management of Department of Energy (DOE), including National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), management and ...

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

165

Chicago Green Office Challenge | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chicago Green Office Challenge Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction...

166

DOE & Strategic Sourcing "New Challenges, New Opportunities"  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE & Strategic Sourcing "New Challenges, New Opportunities" What is it? NNSA Model DOE Future Activities Bill Marks, Commodity Manager, NNSA Supply Chain Management Center Gary...

167

M-Area and Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facilities groundwater monitoring and corrective-action report (U). Third and fourth quarters 1996, Vol. I  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) and the Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) HWMF at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during 1996.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Geochemistry and Distribution of Contaminants in the Vadose Zone of the Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Areas at the Hanford Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This chapter provides a description of the geochemical processes that affect contaminant mobility in the vadose zone at the single-shell tank waste management areas located at the Hanford Site.

Cantrell, Kirk J.

2008-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

169

RCRA Assessment Plan for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area B-BX-BY at the Hanford Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document was prepared as a groundwater quality assessment plan revision for the single-shell tank systems in Waste Management Area B-BX-BY at the Hanford Site. Groundwater monitoring is conducted at this facility in accordance with 40 CFR Part 265, Subpart F. In FY 1996, the groundwater monitoring program was changed from detection-level indicator evaluation to a groundwater quality assessment program when elevated specific conductance in downgradient monitoring well 299 E33-32 was confirmed by verification sampling. During the course of the ensuing investigation, elevated technetium-99 and nitrate were observed above the drinking water standard at well 299-E33-41, a well located between 241-B and 241-BX Tank Farms. Earlier observations of the groundwater contamination and tank farm leak occurrences combined with a qualitative analysis of possible solutions, led to the conclusion that waste from the waste management area had entered the groundwater and were observed in this well. Based on 40 CFR 265.93 [d] paragraph (7), the owner-operator must continue to make the minimum required determinations of contaminant level and rate/extent of migrations on a quarterly basis until final facility closure. These continued determinations are required because the groundwater quality assessment was implemented prior to final closure of the facility.

Narbutovskih, Susan M.

2006-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

170

RCRA Assessment Plan for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area TX-TY  

SciTech Connect

WMA TX-TY contains underground, single-shell tanks that were used to store liquid waste that contained chemicals and radionuclides. Most of the liquid has been removed, and the remaining waste is regulated under the RCRA as modi¬fied in 40 CFR Part 265, Subpart F and Washington State’s Hazardous Waste Management Act . WMA TX-TY was placed in assessment monitoring in 1993 because of elevated specific conductance. A groundwater quality assessment plan was written in 1993 describing the monitoring activities to be used in deciding whether WMA TX-TY had affected groundwater. That plan was updated in 2001 for continued RCRA groundwater quality assessment as required by 40 CFR 265.93 (d)(7). This document further updates the assessment plan for WMA TX-TY by including (1) information obtained from ten new wells installed at the WMA after 1999 and (2) information from routine quarterly groundwater monitoring during the last five years. Also, this plan describes activities for continuing the groundwater assessment at WMA TX TY.

Horton, Duane G.

2007-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

171

Addendum 1 Composite Analysis for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

A disposal authorization statement (DAS) was issued by the U.S. Department of Energy/Headquarters (DOE/HQ) on December 5, 2000, authorizing the DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office to continue the operation of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site for the disposal of low-level waste and mixed low-level waste. Prior to the issuance of the DAS, the Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group (LFRG) had conducted reviews of the performance assessment (PA) and the composite analysis (CA) for the Area 5 RWMS, in accordance with the requirements of the DOE Radioactive Waste Management Order DOE O 435.1. A brief history of the reviews is as follows. (The reviews were conducted by independent review teams chartered by the LFRG; the review findings and recommendations were issued in review team reports to the LFRG.) The LFRG accepted the initial PA, with conditions, on August 30, 1996. Revision 2.1 to the PA was issued in January 1998, implementing the conditions of acceptance of the 1996 PA. The LFRG reviewed Revision 2.1 as part of the Area 5 RWMS CA review during 2000, and found it acceptable. The CA and the Supplemental Information provided in response to issues identified during the initial review of the CA were accepted by the LFRG. The Supplemental Information (including the responses to four key issues) is included in the Review Team Report to the LFRG, which recommends that it be incorporated into the CA and issued to all known holders of the CA. The Area 5 RWMS DAS requires that the Supplemental Information generated during the DOE/HQ review of the CA be incorporated into the CA within one year of the date of issuance of the DAS. This report, the first addendum to the Area 5 CA, is prepared to fulfill that requirement. The Supplemental Information includes the following: Issues Identified in the Review Team Report; Crosswalk Presentation; and Maintaining Doses As Low As Reasonably Achievable. A summary of this information is included in this report, with the complete text presented in the appendices.

Vefa Yucel

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Earthquake Risk Management of Underground Lifelines in the Urban Area of Catania  

SciTech Connect

Lifelines typically include the following five utility networks: potable water, sewage natural gas, electric power, telecommunication and transportation system. The response of lifeline systems, like gas and water networks, during a strong earthquake, can be conveniently evaluated with the estimated average number of ruptures per km of pipe. These ruptures may be caused either by fault ruptures crossing, or by permanent deformations of the soil mass (landslides, liquefaction), or by transient soil deformations caused by seismic wave propagation. The possible consequences of damaging earthquakes on transportation systems may be the reduction or the interruption of traffic flow, as well as the impact on the emergency response and on the recovery assistance. A critical element in the emergency management is the closure of roads due to fallen obstacles and debris of collapsed buildings.The earthquake-induced damage to buried pipes is expressed in terms of repair rate (RR), defined as the number of repairs divided by the pipe length (km) exposed to a particular level of seismic demand; this number is a function of the pipe material (and joint type), of the pipe diameter and of the ground shaking level, measured in terms of peak horizontal ground velocity (PGV) or permanent ground displacement (PGD). The development of damage algorithms for buried pipelines is primarily based on empirical evidence, tempered with engineering judgment and sometimes by analytical formulations.For the city of Catania, in the present work use has been made of the correlation between RR and peak horizontal ground velocity by American Lifelines Alliance (ALA, 2001), for the verifications of main buried pipelines. The performance of the main buried distribution networks has been evaluated for the Level I earthquake scenario (January 11, 1693 event I = XI, M 7.3) and for the Level II earthquake scenario (February 20, 1818 event I = IX, M 6.2).Seismic damage scenario of main gas pipelines and water has been obtained, with PGV values calculated for level I and level II earthquake scenarios.

Grasso, S.; Maugeri, M. [University of Catania, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Viale A. Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

173

M-area hazardous waste management facility groundwater monitoring and corrective-action report, First quarter 1995, Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report, in three volumes, describes the ground water monitoring and c corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during the fourth quarter 1994 and first quarter 1995. Concise description of the program and considerable data documenting the monitoring and remedial activities are included in the document. This is Volume 1 covering the following topics: sampling and results; hydrogeologic assessment; water quality assessment; effectiveness of the corrective-action program; corrective-action system operation and performance; monitoring and corrective-action program assessment; proposed monitoring and corrective-action program modifications. Also included are the following appendicies: A-standards; B-flagging criteria; C-figures; D-monitoring results tables; E-data quality/usability assessment.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Phase 1 RCRA Facility Investigation & Corrective Measures Study Work Plan for Single Shell Tank (SST) Waste Management Areas  

SciTech Connect

This document is the master work plan for the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) Corrective Action Program (RCAP) for single-shell tank (SST) farms at the US. Department of Energy's (DOE'S) Hanford Site. The DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) initiated the RCAP to address the impacts of past and potential future tank waste releases to the environment. This work plan defines RCAP activities for the four SST waste management areas (WMAs) at which releases have contaminated groundwater. Recognizing the potential need for future RCAP activities beyond those specified in this master work plan, DOE has designated the currently planned activities as ''Phase 1.'' If a second phase of activities is needed for the WMAs addressed in Phase 1, or if releases are detected at other SST WMAs, this master work plan will be updated accordingly.

MCCARTHY, M.M.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediments from C Waste Management Area: Investigation of the C-152 Transfer Line Leak  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in January 2007. The overall goal of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities at Hanford. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., tasked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediments from within waste management area (WMA) C. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physiochemical characterization data compiled on vadose zone sediment recovered from direct-push samples collected around the site of an unplanned release (UPR), UPR-200-E-82, adjacent to the 241-C-152 Diversion Box located in WMA C.

Brown, Christopher F.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Lanigan, David C.; Vickerman, Tanya S.; Clayton, Ray E.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Iovin, Cristian; Clayton, Eric T.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Baum, Steven R.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Orr, Robert D.

2008-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

176

Status of Environmental Management Initiatives to Accelerate the Reduction of Environmental Risks and Challenges Posed by the Legacy of the Cold War  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fifty years of nuclear weapons production and energy research in the United States during the Cold War generated large amounts of radioactive wastes, spent nuclear fuel (SNF), excess plutonium and uranium, thousands of contaminated facilities, and contaminated soil and groundwater. During most of that half century, the Nation did not have the environmental regulatory structure or nuclear waste cleanup technologies that exist today. The result was a legacy of nuclear waste that was stored and disposed of in ways now considered unacceptable. Cleaning up and ultimately disposing of these wastes is the responsibility of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In 1989, DOE established the Office of Environmental Management (EM) to solve the large scale and technically challenging risks posed by the world's largest nuclear cleanup. This required EM to build a new nuclear cleanup infrastructure, assemble and train a technically specialized workforce, and develop the technologies and tools required to safely decontaminate, disassemble, stabilize, disposition, and remediate unique radiation hazards. The sites where nuclear activities produced legacy waste and contamination include the original Manhattan Project sites--Los Alamos, New Mexico; Hanford, Washington; and Oak Ridge, Tennessee--as well as major Cold War sites, such as Savannah River Site, South Carolina; the Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho; Rocky Flats Plant, Colorado; and Fernald, Ohio. Today EM has responsibility for nuclear cleanup activities at 21 sites covering more than two million acres in 13 states, and employs more than 30,000 Federal and contractor employees, including scientists, engineers and hazardous waste technicians. This cleanup poses unique, technically complex problems, which must be solved under the most hazardous of conditions, and which will require billions of dollars a year for several more decades. The EM program focus during its first 10 years was on managing the most urgent risks and maintaining safety at each site while negotiating state and Federal environmental compliance agreements. The program also concentrated on characterizing waste and nuclear materials and assessing the magnitude and extent of environmental contamination. By the late 1990s, EM had made significant progress in identifying and characterizing the extent of contamination and cleanup required and began transitioning from primarily a characterization and stabilization program to an active cleanup and closure program. During that time, EM formulated multi-year cleanup and closure plans, which contributed to cleanup progress; however, reducing the overall environmental risk associated with the cleanup program remained a challenge. In response, the Secretary of Energy directed a review of the EM program be undertaken. The resulting 'Top-to Bottom Review' re-directed the program focus from managing risks to accelerating the reduction of these risks.

None

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan. Appendix D, Conservation, Load Management and Fuel Switching Analysis : Draft Environmental Impact Statement.  

SciTech Connect

Various conservation, load management, and fuel switching programs were considered as ways to reduce or shift system peak load. These programs operate at the end-use level, such as residential water heat. Figure D-1a shows what electricity consumption for water heat looks like on normal and extreme peak days. Load management programs, such as water heat control, are designed to reduce electricity consumption at the time of system peak. On the coldest day in average winter, system load peaks near 8:00 a.m. In a winter with extremely cold weather, electricity consumption increases fr all hours, and the system peak shifts to later in the morning. System load shapes in the Puget Sound area are shown in Figure D-1b for a normal winter peak day (February 2, 1988) and extreme peak day (February 3, 1989). Peak savings from any program are calculated to be the reduction in loads on the entire system at the hour of system peak. Peak savings for all programs are measured at 8:00 a.m. on a normal peak day and 9:00 a.m. on an extreme peak day. On extremely cold day, some water heat load shifts to much later in the morning, with less load available for shedding at the time of system peak. Models of hourly end-use consumption were constructed to simulate the impact of conservation, land management, and fuel switching programs on electricity consumption. Javelin, a time-series simulating package for personal computers, was chosen for the hourly analysis. Both a base case and a program case were simulated. 15 figs., 7 tabs.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Safety & Emergency Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coordination Management andor Coordination of APS Site WorkServices Safety & Emergency Management Database Maintenance Personnel Safety & Emergency Management Area...

179

The NIAC Convergence of Physical and Cyber Technbologies and Related Security Management Challenges Working Group Final Report and Recommendations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

T T T H H E E N N I I A A C C C C O O N N V V E E R R G G E E N N C C E E O O F F P P H H Y Y S S I I C C A A L L A A N N D D C C Y Y B B E E R R T T E E C C H H N N O O L L O O G G I I E E S S A A N N D D R R E E L L A A T T E E D D S S E E C C U U R R I I T T Y Y M M A A N N A A G G E E M M E E N N T T C C H H A A L L L L E E N N G G E E S S W W O O R R K K I I N N G G G G R R O O U U P P F F I I N N A A L L R R E E P P O O R R T T A A N N D D R R E E C C O O M M M M E E N N D D A A T T I I O O N N S S B B Y Y T T H H E E C C O O U U N N C C I I L L J J A A N N U U A A R R Y Y 1 1 6 6 , , 2 2 0 0 0 0 7 7 MARGARET E. GRAYSON WORKING GROUP CO-CHAIR PRESIDENT GRAYSON AND ASSOCIATES GREGORY PETERS WORKING GROUP CO-CHAIR MANAGING PARTNER COLLECTIVE IQ GEORGE CONRADES WORKING GROUP CO-CHAIR EXECUTIVE CHAIRMAN AKAMAI TECHNOLOGIES TABLE OF CONTENTS I. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS.........................................................................................1 Working Group Members:

180

PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT TO SUPPORT CLOSURE OF SINGLE-SHELL TANK WASTE MANAGEMENT AREA C AT THE HANFORD SITE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current proposed regulatory agreements (Consent Decree) at the Hanford Site call for closure of the Single-Shell Tank (SST) Waste Management Area (WMA) C in the year 2019. WMA C is part of the SST system in 200 East area ofthe Hanford Site and is one of the first tank farm areas built in mid-1940s. In order to close WMA C, both tank and facility closure activities and corrective actions associated with existing soil and groundwater contamination must be performed. Remedial activities for WMA C and corrective actions for soils and groundwater within that system will be supported by various types of risk assessments and interim performance assessments (PA). The U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) and the State ofWashington Department of Ecology (Ecology) are sponsoring a series of working sessions with regulators and stakeholders to solicit input and to obtain a common understanding concerning the scope, methods, and data to be used in the planned risk assessments and PAs to support closure of WMA C. In addition to DOE-ORP and Ecology staff and contractors, working session members include representatives from the U.S. Enviromnental Protection Agency, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), interested tribal nations, other stakeholders groups, and members of the interested public. NRC staff involvement in the working sessions is as a technical resource to assess whether required waste determinations by DOE for waste incidental to reprocessing are based on sound technical assumptions, analyses, and conclusions relative to applicable incidental waste criteria.

BERGERON MP

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "management challenge area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

M-Area and Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facilities Groundwate Monitoring and Corrective-Action Report, First and Second Quarters 1998, Volumes I, II, & III  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous waste Management Facility (HWMF) and the Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) HWMF at the Savannah river Site (SRS) during first and second quarters 1998. This program is required by South Carolina Hazardous Waste Permit SC1-890-008-989 and Section 264.100(g) of the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations. Report requirements are described in the 1995 RCRA Renewal Permit, effective October 5, 1995, Section IIIB.H.11.b for the M-Area HWMF and Section IIIG.H.11.b for the Met Lab HWMF.

Chase, J.

1998-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

182

Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediment: Slant Borehole SX-108 in the S-SX Waste Management Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-extractable sodium data from Table 4.17. The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in February 2002. The overall goal of the of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., asked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediment from within the S-SX Waste Management Area. This report is the fourth in a series of four reports to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from a slant borehole installed beneath tank SX-108 (or simply SX-108 slant borehole).

Serne, R. Jeffrey; Last, George V.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Lanigan, David C.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Ainsworth, Calvin C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Legore, Virginia L.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Orr, Robert D.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Wilson, Teresa C.; Wagnon, Kenneth B.; Williams, Bruce A.; Burke, Deborah S.

2008-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

183

Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediment: Borehole 41-09-39 in the S-SX Waste Management Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-extractable sodium data from Table 5.15. The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in February 2002. The overall goal of the of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., asked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediment from within the S-SX Waste Management Area. This report is one in a series of four reports to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from borehole 41-09-39 installed adjacent to tank SX-109.

Serne, R. Jeffrey; Last, George V.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Lanigan, David C.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Ainsworth, Calvin C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Legore, Virginia L.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Orr, Robert D.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Wilson, Teresa C.; Wagnon, Kenneth B.; Williams, Bruce A.; Burke, Deborah S.

2008-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

184

Wanaket Wildlife Area Management Plan : Five-Year Plan for Protecting, Enhancing, and Mitigating Wildlife Habitat Losses for the McNary Hydroelectric Facility.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) propose to continue to protect, enhance, and mitigate wildlife and wildlife habitat at the Wanaket Wildlife Area. The Wanaket Wildlife Area was approved as a Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) in 1993. This management plan will provide an update of the original management plan approved by BPA in 1995. Wanaket will contribute towards meeting BPA's obligation to compensate for wildlife habitat losses resulting from the construction of the McNary Hydroelectric facility on the Columbia River. By funding the enhancement and operation and maintenance of the Wanaket Wildlife Area, BPA will receive credit towards their mitigation debt. The purpose of the Wanaket Wildlife Area management plan update is to provide programmatic and site-specific standards and guidelines on how the Wanaket Wildlife Area will be managed over the next five years. This plan provides overall guidance on both short and long term activities that will move the area towards the goals, objectives, and desired future conditions for the planning area. The plan will incorporate managed and protected wildlife and wildlife habitat, including operations and maintenance, enhancements, and access and travel management. Specific project objectives are related to protection and enhancement of wildlife habitats and are expressed in terms of habitat units (HU's). Habitat units were developed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service's Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP), and are designed to track habitat gains and/or losses associated with mitigation and/or development projects. Habitat Units for a given species are a product of habitat quantity (expressed in acres) and habitat quality estimates. Habitat quality estimates are developed using Habitat Suitability Indices (HSI). These indices are based on quantifiable habitat features such as vegetation height, shrub cover, or other parameters, which are known to provide life history requisites for mitigation species. Habitat Suitability Indices range from 0 to 1, with an HSI of 1 providing optimum habitat conditions for the selected species. One acre of optimum habitat provides one Habitat Unit. The objective of continued management of the Wanaket Wildlife Mitigation Area, including protection and enhancement of upland and wetland/wetland associated cover types, is to provide and maintain 2,334 HU's of protection credit and generate 2,495 HU's of enhancement credit by the year 2004.

Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation Wildlife Program

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Challenge Home  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Challenge Home DOE Challenge Home Sam Rashkin Building Technologies Office samuel.rashkin@ee.doe.gov/202-2897-1994 April 3, 2013 DOE Challenge Home: Leveraging Our Nation's Investment in High-Performance Home Innovations 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: The U.S. Housing industry is extremely slow to adopt proven innovations from DOE's Building America program that provide compelling benefits to

186

EIS-0442: Reauthorization of Permits, Maintenance, and Vegetation Management on Western Area Power Administration Transmission Lines on Forest Service Lands, Colorado, Nebraska, and Utah  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EIS is being prepared jointly by DOE’s Western Area Power Administration and the U.S. Forest Service. The EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of Western’s proposed changes to vegetation management along its transmission line rights-of-way on National Forest System lands in Colorado, Utah, and Nebraska.

187

ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry promotional posters | ENERGY...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Challenge for Industry helpful tools and resources ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry promotional posters Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login...

188

Special Analysis of the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the methods and results of a special analysis (SA) of the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The purpose of the SA is to determine if the approved performance assessment (PA) and composite analysis (CA) (Shott et al., 2001) remain valid. The Area 3 RWMS PA and CA were prepared as a single document and received conditional approval on October 6, 1999. A conditional Disposal Authorization Statement (DAS) for the Area 3 RWMS was issued on October 20, 1999. Since preparation of the approved PA and CA, new information and additional environmental monitoring data have been used to update the PA and CA. At the same time, continual advancements in computer processors and software have allowed improvement to the PA and CA models. Annual reviews of the PA and CA required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order DOE O 435.1 have documented multiple changes occurring since preparation of the PA and CA. Potentially important changes include: Development of a new and improved baseline PA and CA model implemented in the probabilistic GoldSim simulation platform. A significant increase in the waste inventory disposed at the site. Revision and updating of model parameters based on additional years of site monitoring data and new research and development results. Although changes have occurred, many important PA/CA issues remain unchanged, including the site conceptual model, important features, events, and processes, and the points of compliance. The SA is performed to document the current status of the PA/CA model and to quantitatively assess the impact of cumulative changes on the PA and CA results. The results of the SA are used to assess the validity of the approved PA/CA and make a determination if revision of the PA or CA is necessary. The SA was performed using the Area 3 RWMS, version 2.102, GoldSim model, the current baseline PA/CA model. Comparison of the maximum SA results with the PA performance objectives indicates that there continues to be a reasonable expectation of compliance. The resident exposure scenario was evaluated for compliance with the air pathway and all-pathways annual total effective dose (TED) performance objectives. The maximum mean air pathway TED, 7E-6 millisievert (mSv) at 1,000 years (y) has decreased relative to the approved PA and is significantly less than the 0.1 mSv limit. The maximum mean all-pathways annual TED, 7E-5 mSv at 1,000 y has increased but remains a small fraction of the 0.25 mSv limit. The SA maximum mean radon-222 (222Rn) flux density, 0.03 becquerel per square meter per second (Bq m-2 s-1), has increased relative to the PA results but is significantly less than the 0.74 Bq m-2 s-1 limit. The SA results continue to support a conclusion that the disposed waste inventory is protective of intruders and groundwater resources. The maximum mean intruder TED, 0.01 mSv for an acute construction scenario at the U-3ah/at disposal unit, was less than the 5 mSv performance measure. Site monitoring data and research results continue to support a conclusion that a groundwater pathway will not exist within the 1,000 y compliance period. Projected releases to the environment are a small fraction of the performance objectives. Cost-effective options for reducing releases further are unlikely to exist. Therefore, releases from the Area 3 RWMS are judged to be as low as reasonably achievable. Comparison of the maximum CA result with the 0.3 mSv CA dose constraint indicates that no action is required to reduce the dose from the Area 3 RWMS and all interacting sources of residual radioactive contamination. The SA maximum mean CA annual TED, 0.02 mSv at 1,000 y, has increased from the approved CA result but remains less than 10% of the dose constraint. The CA TED continues to be due predominantly to inhalation of plutonium-239 resuspended from soils contaminated by nuclear weapons tests conducted near the Area 3 RWMS. The SA results estimated with the Area 3 RWMS version 2.102 model indicate that changes to the PA and CA do not

National Security Technologies, LLC, Environmental Management

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

189

Supercomputing challenge  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Supercomputing challenge Supercomputing challenge Community Connections: Our link to Northern New Mexico Communities Latest Issue:Dec. 2013 - Jan. 2014 All Issues » submit La Cueva High School takes top prize at the Lab's Supercomputing Challenge The competition supports the country's next-generation scientists. May 1, 2013 La Cueva student make supercomputing challenge presentaiton Student from La Cueva helps present the team's work. Contact Editor Linda Anderman Email Community Programs Office Kurt Steinhaus Email A team of three students (including a brother and sister) from Albuquerque's La Cueva High School won the New Mexico Supercomputing Challenge this year with its project "Learning and Analyzing Topics in Human Language." The team, made up of Ari Echt-Wilson, Eli Echt-Wilson and Justin Sanchez,

190

Post-Closure Evaluation of the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada National Security Site in Support of the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The post-closure performance of the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) and Area 5 RWMS are evaluated for the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement using current performance assessment and composite analysis methods and models. Two alternatives with different future waste volumes and inventories are evaluated. The No Action Alternative evaluates the inventory disposed through fiscal year (FY) 2010 plus an additional 4.5E5 cubic meters (m3) (1.59E7 cubic feet [ft3]) of waste disposed at the Area 5 RWMS. The Expanded Operations Alternative evaluates the FY 2010 inventory plus an additional 1.42E6 m3 (5.03E7 ft3) of waste disposed at the Area 5 RWMS and 4.93E4 m3 (1.74E6 ft3) disposed at the Area 3 RWMS. Both the No Action and Expanded Operations Alternatives have a reasonable expectation of meeting all performance objectives of U.S. Department of Energy Order DOE O 435.1, “Radioactive Waste Management.” No significant difference between the two alternatives was found because the waste concentrations are similar. The performance assessment model assesses radiological risk for residents at the RWMS boundary where risk is more closely related to waste concentration than total waste inventory. Results for the composite analysis also indicate that the dose constraint and dose limit can be met for both alternatives.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

191

C&W Environmental Challenge Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

C&W ENVIRONMENTAL CHALLENGE A call-to-action to improve the environmental efficiency of C&W's managed properties January 2010 Newsletter This newsletter outlines upcoming Challenge...

192

Biochange Challenge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... volumes, V 1 and V 2 , the fractional change is (V 2 /V 1 - 1). ... Download and read the Biochange Challenge Protocol and email or fax a Statement of ...

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

193

2008 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada: Review of the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Maintenance Plan for the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site requires an annual review to assess the adequacy of the Performance Assessments (PAs) and Composite Analyses (CAs) for each of the facilities, with the results submitted annually to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters. The Disposal Authorization Statements for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) also require that such reviews be made and that secondary or minor unresolved issues be tracked and addressed as part of the maintenance plan. The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) performed an annual review in fiscal year (FY) 2008 by evaluating operational factors and research results that impact the continuing validity of the PAs and CAs. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2008 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors (e.g., waste forms and containers, facility design, and waste receipts), closure plans, monitoring results, and research and development (R&D) activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada Test Site relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R&D activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the CAs.

NSTec Environmental Management

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

194

Submeter Challenge  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Submeter Challenge Submeter Challenge Jason Koman US Department of Energy Jason.Koman@ee.DOE.Gov 202-287-1578 April 2, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: To most effectively improve a building's energy efficiency, energy use must be measured. However, (near) real-time energy use data are not available for many buildings, often due to the high cost of metering and gathering data. The commercial building market, including the Federal

195

Submeter Challenge  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Submeter Challenge Submeter Challenge Jason Koman US Department of Energy Jason.Koman@ee.DOE.Gov 202-287-1578 April 2, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: To most effectively improve a building's energy efficiency, energy use must be measured. However, (near) real-time energy use data are not available for many buildings, often due to the high cost of metering and gathering data. The commercial building market, including the Federal

196

Synchrophasor Data Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nationwide deployment of synchrophasor technology has significantly expanded as a result of the funding provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). As installations of phasor measurement units (PMUs) near completion, the power industry is achieving unprecedented wide-area synchrophasor coverage of the North American grid. With over 1000 synchrophasors installed and continuously streaming data, there will be new challenges in managing, storing, and using data. The objective of ...

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

197

KALwEN: a new practical and interoperable key management scheme for body sensor networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Key management is the pillar of a security architecture. Body sensor networks (BSNs) pose several challenges–some inherited from wireless sensor networks (WSNs), some unique to themselves–that require a new key management scheme to be tailor-made. ... Keywords: body area networks, body sensor networks, healthcare, key management, security

Yee Wei Law; Giorgi Moniava; Zheng Gong; Pieter Hartel; Marimuthu Palaniswami

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

2011 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada: Review of the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Maintenance Plan for the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site (National Security Technologies, LLC, 2007a) requires an annual review to assess the adequacy of the Performance Assessments (PAs) and Composite Analyses (CAs), with the results submitted annually to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management. The Disposal Authorization Statements for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) also require that such reviews be made and that secondary or minor unresolved issues be tracked and addressed as part of the maintenance plan (DOE, 1999a; 2000). The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office performed an annual review of the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS PAs and CAs for fiscal year (FY) 2011. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2011 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors (e.g., waste forms and containers, facility design, and waste receipts), closure plans, monitoring results, and research and development (R and D) activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) (formerly the Nevada Test Site) relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R and D activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the CAs. Important developments in FY 2011 include the following: (1) Operation of a new shallow land disposal unit and a new Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)-compliant lined disposal unit at the Area 5 RWMS; (2) Development of new closure inventory estimates based on disposals through FY 2011; (3) Evaluation of new or revised waste streams by special analysis; (4) Development of version 2.102 of the Area 3 RWMS GoldSim PA model; and (5) Development of version 4.113 of the Area 5 RWMS GoldSim PA model. Analysis of the latest available data using the Area 5 RWMS v4.113 GoldSim PA model indicates that all performance objectives can be met. The results and conclusions of the Area 5 RWMS PA are judged valid, and there is no need to the revise the PA. The Area 3 RWMS has been in inactive status since July 1, 2006, with the last shipment received in April 2006. In FY 2011, there were no operational changes, monitoring results, or R and D results for the Area 3 RWMS that would impact PA validity. Despite the increase in waste volume and inventory at the Area 3 RWMS since 1996 when the PA was approved, the facility performance evaluated with the Area 3 RWMS PA GoldSim model, version 2.0 (with the final closure inventory), remains well below the performance objectives set forth in U.S. Department of Energy Order DOE O 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management' (DOE, 2001). The conclusions of the Area 3 RWMS PA remain valid. A special analysis was prepared to update the PA and CA results for the Area 3 RWMS in FY 2011. Release of the special analysis is planned for FY 2012. The continuing adequacy of the CAs was evaluated with the new models, and no significant changes that would alter CA results or conclusions were found. Inclusion of the Frenchman Flat Underground Test Area (UGTA) results in the Area 5 RWMS CA is scheduled for FY 2016, pending the completion of the closure report for the Frenchman Flat UGTA corrective action unit (CAU) in FY 2015. An industrial site, CAU 547, with corrective action sites near the Area 3 RWMS was found to have a significant plutonium inventory in 2009. CAU 547 will be evaluated for inclusion of future revisions or updates of the Area 3 RWMS CA. The revision of the Area 3 RWMS CA, which will include the UGTA source terms, is expected in FY 2024, following the completion of the Yucca Flat CAU Corrective Action Decision Document, scheduled for FY 2023. Near-term R and D efforts will focus on continuing development of the Are

NSTec Environmental Management

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

199

3Q/4Q99 F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Corrective Action Report - Third and Fourth Quarter 1999, Volumes I and II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Savannah River Site (SRS) monitors groundwater quality at the F-Area Hazardous Waste management Facility (HWMF) and provides results of this monitoring to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) semiannually as required by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permit. SRS also performs monthly sampling of the Wastewater Treatment Unit (WTU) effluent in accordance with Section C of the Underground Injection Control (UIC) application.

Chase, J.

2000-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

200

Opportunities and Challenges to Careers in Materials Science and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... employer (job location – (domestic or foreign, staff versus management, etc.) ... Materials Science and Engineering in the Canadian Oil Sands - Challenges & ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "management challenge area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediment: RCRA Borehole 299-E33-338 Located Near the B-BX-BY Waste Management Area  

SciTech Connect

This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-extractable sodium data from Table 4.8. The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in June 2003. The overall goals of the of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., are: 1) to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities, 2) to identify and evaluate the efficacy of interim measures, and 3) to aid via collection of geotechnical information and data, future decisions that must be made by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) regarding the near-term operations, future waste retrieval, and final closure activities for the single-shell tank waste management areas. For a more complete discussion of the goals of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, see the overall work plan, Phase 1 RCRA Facility Investigation/Corrective Measures Study Work Plan for the Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Areas (DOE 1999). Specific details on the rationale for activities performed at the B-BX-BY tank farm waste management area are found in CH2M HILL (2000).

Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Gee, Glendon W.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Lanigan, David C.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Clayton, Ray E.; Legore, Virginia L.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Baum, Steven R.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Brown, Christopher F.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Vickerman, Tanya S.; Royack, Lisa J.

2008-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

202

Approach to Service Management in SOA Space Approach to Service Management In SOA Space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SOA Management covers the Management and Monitoring of applications, services, processes, middleware, infrastructure, and software tools in accordance with the business goals. Managing SOA is a multi-faced task, as it covers IT Management and Business Service Management. Service management can be classified into two areas (i) Runtime (ii) Design time. Some of the activities involved in runtime may trigger activities in design time. Design time activities are part of the service development and maintenance lifecycle. The majority of the service management aspects concentrate on Registry, Repository, Metamodel, Configurability, Policy Management and Enforcement, and Operational aspects of service infrastructure. This paper consolidates the management of SOA at different layers and the various challenges that are faced for SOA management.

Gopala Krishna Behara; Srikanth Inaganti

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

2012 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada: Review of the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses  

SciTech Connect

The Maintenance Plan for the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site (National Security Technologies, LLC 2007a) requires an annual review to assess the adequacy of the performance assessments (PAs) and composite analyses (CAs), with the results submitted to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management. The Disposal Authorization Statements for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) also require that such reviews be made and that secondary or minor unresolved issues be tracked and addressed as part of the maintenance plan (DOE 1999a, 2000). The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office performed an annual review of the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS PAs and CAs for fiscal year (FY) 2012. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2012 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors (e.g., waste forms and containers, facility design, and waste receipts), closure plans, monitoring results, and research and development (R&D) activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R&D activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the CAs. Important developments in FY 2012 include the following: ? Release of a special analysis for the Area 3 RWMS assessing the continuing validity of the PA and CA ? Development of a new Area 5 RWMS closure inventory estimate based on disposals through FY 2012 ? Evaluation of new or revised waste streams by special analysis ? Development of version 4.114 of the Area 5 RWMS GoldSim PA model The Area 3 RWMS has been in inactive status since July 1, 2006, with the last shipment received in April 2006. The FY 2012 review of operations, facility design, closure plans, monitoring results, and R&D results for the Area 3 RWMS indicates no changes that would impact PA validity. A special analysis using the Area 3 RWMS v2.102 GoldSim PA model was prepared to update the PA results for the Area 3 RWMS in FY 2012. The special analysis concludes that all performance objectives can be met and the Area 3 RWMS PA remains valid. There is no need to the revise the Area 3 RWMS PA. Review of Area 5 RWMS operations, design, closure plans, monitoring results, and R&D activities indicates no significant changes other than an increase in the inventory disposed. The FY 2012 PA results, generated with the Area 5 RWMS v4.114 GoldSim PA model, indicate that there continues to be a reasonable expectation of meeting all performance objectives. The results and conclusions of the Area 5 RWMS PA are judged valid, and there is no need to the revise the PA. A review of changes potentially impacting the CAs indicates that no significant changes occurred in FY 2012. The continuing adequacy of the CAs was evaluated with the new models, and no significant changes that would alter CA results or conclusions were found. The revision of the Area 3 RWMS CA, which will include the Underground Test Area source term (Corrective Action Unit [CAU] 97), is scheduled for FY 2024, following the completion of the Yucca Flat CAU 97 Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan in FY 2016. Inclusion of the Frenchman Flat CAU 98 results in the Area 5 RWMS CA is scheduled for FY 2016, pending the completion of the CAU 98 closure report in FY 2015. Near-term R&D efforts will focus on continuing development of the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS GoldSim PA/CA and inventory models.

Shott, G. [National Security Technologies, LLC

2013-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

204

Result Summary for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site Performance Assessment Model Version 4.110  

SciTech Connect

Results for Version 4.110 of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) performance assessment (PA) model are summarized. Version 4.110 includes the fiscal year (FY) 2010 inventory estimate, including a future inventory estimate. Version 4.110 was implemented in GoldSim 10.11(SP4). The following changes have been implemented since the last baseline model, Version 4.105: (1) Updated the inventory and disposal unit configurations with data through the end of FY 2010. (1) Implemented Federal Guidance Report 13 Supplemental CD dose conversion factors (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1999). Version 4.110 PA results comply with air pathway and all-pathways annual total effective dose (TED) performance objectives (Tables 2 and 3, Figures 1 and 2). Air pathways results decrease moderately for all scenarios. The time of the maximum for the air pathway open rangeland scenario shifts from 1,000 to 100 years (y). All-pathways annual TED increases for all scenarios except the resident scenario. The maximum member of public all-pathways dose occurs at 1,000 y for the resident farmer scenario. The resident farmer dose was predominantly due to technetium-99 (Tc-99) (82 percent) and lead-210 (Pb-210) (13 percent). Pb-210 present at 1,000 y is produced predominantly by radioactive decay of uranium-234 (U-234) present at the time of disposal. All results for the postdrilling and intruder-agriculture scenarios comply with the performance objectives (Tables 4 and 5, Figures 3 and 4). The postdrilling intruder results are similar to Version 4.105 results. The intruder-agriculture results are similar to Version 4.105, except for the Pit 6 Radium Disposal Unit (RaDU). The intruder-agriculture result for the Shallow Land Burial (SLB) disposal units is a significant fraction of the performance objective and exceeds the performance objective at the 95th percentile. The intruder-agriculture dose is due predominantly to Tc-99 (75 percent) and U-238 (9.5 percent). The acute intruder scenario results comply with all performance objectives (Tables 6 and 7, Figures 5 and 6). The acute construction result for the SLB disposal units decreases significantly with this version. The maximum acute intruder dose occurs at 1,000 y for the SLB disposal units under the acute construction scenario. The acute intruder dose is caused by multiple radionuclides including U-238 (31 percent), Th-229 (28 percent), plutonium-239 (8.6 percent), U-233 (7.8 percent), and U-234 (6.7 percent). All results for radon-222 (Rn-222) flux density comply with the performance objective (Table 8, Figure 7). The mean Pit 13 RaDU flux density is close to the 0.74 Bq m{sup -2} s{sup -1} limit.

NSTec Environmental Management

2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

205

Impacts of Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing alternatives on utility demand-side management and conservation and renewable energy programs  

SciTech Connect

The Western Area Power Administration (Western) requires all of its long-term firm power customers to implement programs that promote the conservation of electric energy or facilitate the use of renewable energy resources. Western has also proposed that all customers develop integrated resource plans that include cost-effective demand-side management programs. As part of the preparation of Western`s Electric Power Marketing Environmental Impact Statement, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) developed estimates of the reductions in energy demand resulting from Western`s conservation and renewable energy activities in its Salt Lake City Area Office. ANL has also estimated the energy-demand reductions from cost-effective, demand-side management programs that could be included in the integrated resource plans of the customers served by Western`s Salt Lake City Area Office. The results of this study have been used to adjust the expected hourly demand for Western`s major systems in the Salt Lake City Area. The expected hourly demand served as the basis for capacity expansion plans develops with ANL`s Production and Capacity Expansion (PACE) model.

Cavallo, J.D.; Germer, M.F.; Tompkins, M.M.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

2009 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada: Review of the Performance Assessments and Composite Analysis  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office performed an annual review of the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Wate Management Site (RWMS) Performance Assessments (PAs) and Composite Analyses (CAs) in fiscal year (FY) 2009. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2009 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors (e.g., waste forms and containers, facility design, and waste receipts), closure plans, monitoring results, and research and development (R&D) activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada Test Site relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R&D activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the CAs.

NSTec Environmental Management

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

207

IEEE JOURNAL ON SELECTED AREAS IN COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. 19, NO. 7, JULY 2001 1235 Energy Efficient Battery Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Battery Management Carla-Fabiana Chiasserini, Member, IEEE, and Ramesh R. Rao, Senior Member, IEEE run time of terminals can be maximized. In this paper, we present a detailed electrochem- ical battery model and a simple stochastic model that captures the fundamental behavior of the battery

208

Waste Management Plan for the Remedial Investigation of Waste Area Grouping 10, Operable Unit 3, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Waste Management Plan (WMP) supplements the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Project WMP and defines the criteria and methods to be used for managing and characterizing waste generated during activities associated with the RI of 23 wells near the Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF). These wells are within the Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5 area of contamination (AOC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Field activities for the limited RI of Operable Unit (OU) 3 of WAG 10 will involve sampling and measurement of various environmental media (e.g., liquids and gases). Many of these activities will occur in areas known to be contaminated with radioactive materials or hazardous chemical substances, and it is anticipated that contaminated solid and liquid wastes and noncontaminated wastes will be generated as a result of these activities. On a project-wide basis, handling of these waste materials will be accomplished in accordance with the RI/FS Project WMP and the procedures referenced throughout the plan.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Developing a holistic strategy for integrated waste management within municipal planning: Challenges, policies, solutions and perspectives for Hellenic municipalities in the zero-waste, low-cost direction  

SciTech Connect

The present position paper addresses contemporary waste management options, weaknesses and opportunities faced by Hellenic local authorities. It focuses on state-of-the-art, tested as well as innovative, environmental management tools on a municipal scale and identifies a range of different collaboration schemes between local authorities and related service providers. Currently, a policy implementation gap is still experienced among Hellenic local authorities; it appears that administration at the local level is inadequate to manage and implement many of the general policies proposed; identify, collect, monitor and assess relevant data; and safeguard efficient and effective implementation of MSWM practices in the framework of integrated environmental management as well. This shortfall is partly due to the decentralisation of waste management issues to local authorities without a parallel substantial budgetary and capacity support, thus resulting in local activity remaining often disoriented and isolated from national strategies, therefore yielding significant planning and implementation problems and delays against pressing issues at hand as well as loss or poor use of available funds. This paper develops a systemic approach for MSWM at both the household and the non-household level, summarizes state-of-the-art available tools and compiles a set of guidelines for developing waste management master plans at the municipal level. It aims to provide a framework in the MSWM field for municipalities in Greece as well as other countries facing similar problems under often comparable socioeconomic settings.

Zotos, G. [Division of Business Studies, Dept. of Economics, Aristotle University, GR-54124, Thessaloniki (Greece); Karagiannidis, A. [Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University, GR-54124, Thessaloniki (Greece); Zampetoglou, S. [Municipal Development Company of Kalamaria, GR-55132 (Greece); Malamakis, A. [Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University, GR-54124, Thessaloniki (Greece)], E-mail: amalama@aix.meng.auth.gr; Antonopoulos, I.-S.; Kontogianni, S. [Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University, GR-54124, Thessaloniki (Greece); Tchobanoglous, G. [Department of civil and environmental Engineering, University of California, Davis (United States)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

210

A brief analysis and description of transuranic wastes in the Subsurface Disposal Area of the radioactive waste management complex at INEL  

SciTech Connect

This document presents a brief summary of the wastes and waste types disposed of in the transuranic contaminated portions of the Subsurface Disposal Area of the radioactive waste management complex at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory from 1954 through 1970. Wastes included in this summary are organics, inorganics, metals, radionuclides, and atypical wastes. In addition to summarizing amounts of wastes disposed and describing the wastes, the document also provides information on disposal pit and trench dimensions and contaminated soil volumes. The report also points out discrepancies that exist in available documentation regarding waste and soil volumes and make recommendations for future efforts at waste characterization. 19 refs., 3 figs., 17 tabs.

Arrenholz, D.A.; Knight, J.L.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Rooting Characteristics of Vegetation Near Areas 3 and 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site--Part 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy emplaced high-specific-activity low-level radioactive wastes and limited quantities of classified transuranic wastes in Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) boreholes from 1984 to 1989. The boreholes are located at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in southern Nevada. The boreholes were backfilled with native alluvium soil. The surface of these boreholes and trenches is expected to be colonized by native vegetation in the future. Considering the long-term performance of the disposal facilities, bioturbation (the disruption of buried wastes by biota) is considered a primary release mechanism for radionuclides disposed in GCD boreholes as well as trenches at both Areas 3 and 5 RWMSs. This report provides information about rooting characteristics of vegetation near Areas 3 and 5 RWMSs. Data from this report are being used to resolve uncertainties involving parameterization of performance assessment models used to characterize the biotic mixing of soils and radionuclide transport processes by biota. The objectives of this study were to: (1) survey the prior ecological literature on the NTS and identify pertinent information about the vegetation, (2) conduct limited field studies to describe the current vegetation in the vicinity of Areas 3 and 5 RWMSs so as to correlate findings with more extensive vegetation data collected at Yucca Mountain and the NTS, ( 3 ) review prior performance assessment documents and evaluate model assumptions based on current ecological information, and (4) identify data deficiencies and make recommendations for correcting such deficiencies.

D. J. Hansen

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

212

Research Areas | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Research Research Areas Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, & Biosciences (CSGB) Division CSGB Home About Research Areas Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) DOE Energy Innovation Hubs Scientific Highlights Reports & Activities Principal Investigators' Meetings BES Home Research Areas Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page To meet the challenge of supporting basic research programs that are also energy relevant, the Division manages portfolio components that consist of distinct Core Research Activities (CRAs), which align with the Division's organizational and budget structures. The CRAs are structured as scientific disciplines, rather than as technology areas, to facilitate the cross-cutting nature of basic research and to align our programs with the

213

The Nuclear Material Focus Area Roadmapping Process Utilizing Environmental Management Complex-Wide Nuclear Material Disposition Pathways  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the process that the Nuclear Materials Focus Area (NMFA) has developed and utilizes in working with individual Department of Energy (DOE) sites to identify, address, and prioritize research and development efforts in the stabilization, disposition, and storage of nuclear materials. By associating site technology needs with nuclear disposition pathways and integrating those with site schedules, the NMFA is developing a complex wide roadmap for nuclear material technology development. This approach will leverage technology needs and opportunities at multiple sites and assist the NMFA in building a defensible research and development program to address the nuclear material technology needs across the complex.

Sala, D. R.; Furhman, P.; Smith, J. D.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

214

Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research has indicated that, depending upon driver and passenger characteristics, passengers can have either a positive or negative influence upon driver behaviour. In conclusion to a recent study investigating the roles that passengers can play to influence, positively and negatively, driver behaviour, Regan and Mitsopoulos (2001) recommended, among other things, that the principles of Crew Resource Management (CRM) training may increase passengers ’ ability to positively influence driver behaviour and also drivers ’ ability to accept constructive feedback. The present study investigated the potential application of CRM training within young driver training in the Australian Capital Territory (ACT). This involved a literature review, an analysis of the differences between the driving and aviation domains, an analysis of the team-based activities and the knowledge, skills and attitudes required during driving to perform those activities, consultation with CRM experts from the aviation and medicine domains and the conduct of six focus groups involving young learner drivers, provisional licence drivers and course teachers. The findings indicate that CRM training as part of young driver training in the ACT is a viable concept to pursue. The application of CRM training within young driver training has potential to significantly enhance the positive and reduce the negative effects of passengers on young driver behaviour, and thus the safety of young drivers and passengers alike. The outcomes of this study formed the basis for a set of recommendations for the development of a young driver CRM training program in the ACT.

Young Drivers; Eve Mitsopoulos; Michael Regan; Janet Anderson; Paul Salmon; Jessica Edquist; Ii Report Documentation Page

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

CES-21 THE CHALLENGE:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CES-21 CES-21 THE CHALLENGE: California and other Western states need to expand their energy infrastructure and improve the way it is managed to meet future energy needs, while also reducing such environmental impacts as carbon emissions. The power grid also needs to be modernized to better integrate and manage energy from alternative sources such as wind as well as accommodate expected growth. CALIFORNIA ENERGY SYSTEMS FOR THE 21 ST CENTURY A NEW APPROACH: The California Public Utilities Commission and state investor-owned utilities (IOUs) are collaborating with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to improve and expand energy systems to meet 21st century needs. "The California Energy Systems for the 21 st Century collaboration (or CES-21) will improve the information

216

Special Analysis of Transuranic Waste in Trench T04C at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This Special Analysis (SA) was prepared to assess the potential impact of inadvertent disposal of a limited quantity of transuranic (TRU) waste in classified Trench 4 (T04C) within the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The Area 5 RWMS is a low-level radioactive waste disposal site in northern Frenchman Flat on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The Area 5 RWMS is regulated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under DOE Order 435.1 and DOE Manual (DOE M) 435.1-1. The primary objective of the SA is to evaluate if inadvertent disposal of limited quantities of TRU waste in a shallow land burial trench at the Area 5 RWMS is in compliance with the existing, approved Disposal Authorization Statement (DAS) issued under DOE M 435.1-1. In addition, supplemental analyses are performed to determine if there is reasonable assurance that the requirements of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 191, Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level, and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes, can be met. The 40 CFR 191 analyses provide supplemental information regarding the risk to human health and the environment of leaving the TRU waste in T04C. In 1989, waste management personnel reviewing classified materials records discovered that classified materials buried in trench T04C at the Area 5 RWMS contained TRU waste. Subsequent investigations determined that a total of 102 55-gallon drums of TRU waste from Rocky Flats were buried in trench T04C in 1986. The disposal was inadvertent because unclassified records accompanying the shipment indicated that the waste was low-level. The exact location of the TRU waste in T04C was not recorded and is currently unknown. Under DOE M 435.1-1, Chapter IV, Section P.5, low-level waste disposal facilities must obtain a DAS. The DAS specifies conditions that must be met to operate within the radioactive waste management basis, consisting of a performance assessment (PA), composite analysis (CA), closure plan, monitoring plan, waste acceptance criteria, and a PA/CA maintenance plan. The DOE issued a DAS for the Area 5 RWMS in 2000. The Area 5 RWMS DAS was, in part, based on review of a CA as required under DOE M 435.1-1, Chapter IV, Section P.(3). A CA is a radiological assessment required for DOE waste disposed before 26 September 1988 and includes the radiological dose from all sources of radioactive material interacting with all radioactive waste disposed at the Area 5 RWMS. The approved Area 5 RWMS CA, which includes the inventory of TRU waste in T04C, indicates that the Area 5 RWMS waste inventory and all interacting sources of radioactive material can meet the 0.3 mSv dose constraint. The composite analysis maximum annual dose for a future resident at the Area 5 RWMS was estimated to be 0.01 mSv at 1,000 years. Therefore, the inadvertent disposal of TRU in T04C is protective of the public and the environment, and compliant with all the applicable requirements in DOE M 435.1-1 and the DAS. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency promulgated 40 CFR 191 to establish standards for the planned disposal of spent nuclear fuel, high level, and transuranic wastes in geologic repositories. Although not required, the National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office requested a supplemental analysis to evaluate the likelihood that the inadvertent disposal of TRU waste in T04C meets the requirements of 40 CFR 191. The SA evaluates the likelihood of meeting the 40 CFR 191 containment requirements (CRs), assurance requirements, individual protection requirements (IPRs), and groundwater protection standards. The results of the SA indicate that there is a reasonable expectation of meeting all the requirements of 40 CFR 191. The conclusion of the SA is that the Area 5 RWMS with the TRU waste buried in T04C is in compliance with all requirements in DOE M 435.1-1 and the DAS. Compliance with the DAS is demonstrated by the results of the Area 5 RWMS CA. Supplemental analyses in the SA indicate there is a

Greg Shott, Vefa Yucel, Lloyd Desotell

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Western Area Power Administration combined power system financial statements September 30, 1994 and 1993 and management overview and performance measurements  

SciTech Connect

The attached report presents the results of the independent certified public accountant`s audit of the Department of Energy`s Western Area Power Administration`s (Western) combined financial statements as of September 30, 1994. The auditors have expressed an unqualified opinion on Western`s 1994 statements. Their reports on Western`s internal control structure and on compliance with laws and regulations are also provided. Western was established in December 1977, and has the responsibility for the Federal electric power marketing and transmission functions in 15 central and western states. Western markets power, as required by existing law, at the lowest possible rates consistent with sound business principles to recover the costs of operation and capital invested in power facilities.

Marwick, P.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

218

Data management implementation plan for the site characterization of the Waste Area Grouping 1 Groundwater Operable Unit at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 1 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, is undergoing a site characterization. This project is not mandated by the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA); therefore, no formalized meetings for data quality objective (DQO) development were held. Internally, DQOs were generated by the project team based on the end uses of the data to be collected. The 150-acre WAG 1 is contained within the ORNL security area. It includes all of the former ORNL radioisotope research, production, and maintenance facilities; former waste management areas; and some former administrative facilities. The goal of the WAG 1 Groundwater Site Characterization is to provide the necessary data on the nature and extent of groundwater contamination with an acceptable level of uncertainty to support the selection of remedial alternatives and to identify additional data needs for future actions. Primary objectives for the site characterization are: (1) To identify and characterize contaminant migration pathways based on the collection of groundwater data; (2) to identify sources of groundwater contamination and evaluate remedial actions which could be implemented to control or eliminate these sources; and (3) To conduct groundwater monitoring in support of other OUs in WAG 1 and the ORNL Groundwater OU.

Ball, T.S.; Nickle, E.B.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediment: Borehole 299-E33-45 Near BX-102 in the B-BX-BY Waste Management Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-extractable sodium data from Table 4.22. The data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The remaining text is unchanged from the original report issued in 2002. The overall goal of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., asked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediments from within Waste Management Area B-BX-BY. This report is the first in a series of four reports to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from borehole 299-E33-45 installed northeast of tank BX-102.

Serne, R. Jeffrey; Last, George V.; Gee, Glendon W.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Lanigan, David C.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Clayton, Ray E.; Legore, Virginia L.; Orr, Robert D.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Baum, Steven R.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Brown, Christopher F.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Vickerman, Tanya S.

2008-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

220

MANAGEMENT OF TRANSURANIC (TRU) WASTE RETRIEVAL PROJECT RISKS SUCCESSES IN THE STARTUP OF THE HANFORD 200 AREA TRU WASTE RETRIEVAL PROJECT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A risk identification and mitigation method applied to the Transuranic (TRU) Waste Retrieval Project performed at the Hanford 200 Area burial grounds is described. Retrieval operations are analyzed using process flow diagramming. and the anticipated project contingencies are included in the Authorization Basis and operational plans. Examples of uncertainties assessed include degraded container integrity, bulged drums, unknown containers, and releases to the environment. Identification and mitigation of project risks contributed to the safe retrieval of over 1700 cubic meters of waste without significant work stoppage and below the targeted cost per cubic meter retrieved. This paper will be of interest to managers, project engineers, regulators, and others who are responsible for successful performance of waste retrieval and other projects with high safety and performance risks.

GREENWLL, R.D.

2005-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "management challenge area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Summary of Natural Resources that Potentially Influence Human Intrusion at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1993, Raytheon Services Nevada completed a review of natural resource literature and other sources to identify potentially exploitable resources and potential future land uses near the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada, that could lead to future inadvertent human intrusion and subsequent release of radionuclides to the accessible environment. National Security Technologies, LLC, revised the original limited-distribution document to conform to current editorial standards and U.S. Department of Energy requirements for public release. The researchers examined the potential for future development of sand, gravel, mineral, petroleum, water resources, and rural land uses, such as agriculture, grazing, and hunting. The study was part of the performance assessment for Greater Confinement Disposal boreholes. Sand and gravel are not considered exploitable site resources because the materials are common throughout the area and the quality at the Area 5 RWMS is not ideal for typical commercial uses. Site information also indicates a very low mineral potential for the area. None of the 23 mining districts in southern Nye County report occurrences of economic mineral deposits in unconsolidated alluvium. The potential for oil and natural gas is low for southern Nye County. No occurrences of coal, tar sand, or oil shale on the NTS are reported in available literature. Several potential future uses of water were considered. Agricultural irrigation is impractical due to poor soils and existing water supply regulations. Use of water for geothermal energy development is unlikely because temperatures are too low for typical commercial applications using current technology. Human consumption of water has the most potential for cause of intrusion. The economics of future water needs may create a demand for the development of deep carbonate aquifers in the region. However, the Area 5 RWMS is not an optimal location for extraction of groundwater from the deep carbonate aquifer. Grazing and hunting are unlikely to be potential causes for inadvertent human intrusion into waste areas because of vegetation characteristics and lack of significant game animal populations.

NSTec Environmental Management

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Rooftop Solar Challenge to Cut Solar's Red Tape | Department...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Challenge to Cut Solar's Red Tape Rooftop Solar Challenge to Cut Solar's Red Tape December 1, 2011 - 4:35pm Addthis Ginny Simmons Ginny Simmons Former Managing Editor for...

223

Rooftop Solar Challenge to Cut Solar's Red Tape | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rooftop Solar Challenge to Cut Solar's Red Tape Rooftop Solar Challenge to Cut Solar's Red Tape December 1, 2011 - 4:35pm Addthis Ginny Simmons Ginny Simmons Former Managing Editor...

224

Project Management | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Management Project Management Project Management A worker suppresses dust during the demolition of Building 21-5, which was part of the DP West site. The last of 14 buildings at the historic DP West site at Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Technical Area 21 (TA-21) was demolished, reducing the Lab’s footprint by more than 100,000 square feet. A worker suppresses dust during the demolition of Building 21-5, which was part of the DP West site. The last of 14 buildings at the historic DP West site at Los Alamos National Laboratory's Technical Area 21 (TA-21) was demolished, reducing the Lab's footprint by more than 100,000 square feet. EM CAPITAL PORTFOLIO EM is tasked with solving the large scale, technically challenging risks and hazardous conditions posed by the world's largest nuclear cleanup.

225

Tanks Focus Area annual report FY2000  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) continues to face a major radioactive waste tank remediation effort with tanks containing hazardous and radioactive waste resulting from the production of nuclear materials. With some 90 million gallons of waste in the form of solid, sludge, liquid, and gas stored in 287 tanks across the DOE complex, containing approximately 650 million curies, radioactive waste storage tank remediation is the nation's highest cleanup priority. Differing waste types and unique technical issues require specialized science and technology to achieve tank cleanup in an environmentally acceptable manner. Some of the waste has been stored for over 50 years in tanks that have exceeded their design lives. The challenge is to characterize and maintain these contents in a safe condition and continue to remediate and close each tank to minimize the risks of waste migration and exposure to workers, the public, and the environment. In 1994, the DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM) created a group of integrated, multiorganizational teams focusing on specific areas of the EM cleanup mission. These teams have evolved into five focus areas managed within EM's Office of Science and Technology (OST): Tanks Focus Area (TFA); Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area; Nuclear Materials Focus Area; Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area; and Transuranic and Mixed Waste Focus Area.

None

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Borehole Data Package for RCRA Well 299-W22-47 at Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area S-SX, Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect

One new Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) groundwater assessment well was installed at single-shell tank Waste Management Area (WMA) S-SX in fiscal year (FY) 2005 to fulfill commitments for well installations proposed in Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, Milestone M-24-57 (2004). The need for the new well, well 299-W22-47, was identified during a data quality objectives process for establishing a RCRA/ Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA)/Atomic Energy Act (AEA) integrated 200 West and 200 East Area Groundwater Monitoring Network. This document provides a compilation of all available geologic data, spectral gamma ray logs, hydrogeologic data and well information obtained during drilling, well construction, well development, pump installation, aquifer testing, and sample collection/analysis activities. Appendix A contains the Well Summary Sheets, the Well Construction Summary Report, the geologist's Borehole Log, well development and pump installation records, and well survey results. Appendix B contains analytical results from groundwater samples collected during drilling. Appendix C contains complete spectral gamma ray logs and borehole deviation surveys.

Horton, Duane G.; Chamness, Mickie A.

2006-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

227

Award Recipient of the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Boeing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Award Recipient of the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Boeing Long Beach - Douglas Center Complex Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility...

228

Medtronic - MECC: Award Recipient of the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Award Recipient of the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Award Recipient of the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Medtronic - MECC 6700 Shingle Creek Pkwy Brooklyn Center, MN 55430 The Medtronic-MECC facility is part of the Cardiac Rhythm and Disease Management division and specializes in the manufacturing of batteries, capacitors and other electrical components. The site also produces a variety of other components for other divisions within the Corporation. Medtronic-MECC achieved the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry in 2009. This plant reached 10% reduction in energy intensity in one year of its baseline. The site achieved the Challenge through fine tuning and scheduling of HVAC units and adjusting set points in manufacturing areas. Another achievement was absorbing additional manufacturing capacity within existing operations. Overall,

229

3Q/4Q00 Annual M-Area and Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facilities Groundwater Monitoring and Corrective-Action Report - Third and Fourth Quarters 2000 - Volumes I, II, and II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) and the Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) HWMF at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during 2000. This program is required by South Carolina Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Hazardous Waste Permit SC1890008989 and Section 264.100(g) of the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations.

Cole, C.M. Sr.

2001-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

230

Smart Grid Communications: Overview of Research Challenges, Solutions, and Standardization Activities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimization of energy consumption in future intelligent energy networks (or Smart Grids) will be based on grid-integrated near-real-time communications between various grid elements in generation, transmission, distribution and loads. This paper discusses some of the challenges and opportunities of communications research in the areas of smart grid and smart metering. In particular, we focus on some of the key communications challenges for realizing interoperable and future-proof smart grid/metering networks, smart grid security and privacy, and how some of the existing networking technologies can be applied to energy management. Finally, we also discuss the coordinated standardization efforts in Europe to harmonize communications standards and protocols.

Fan, Zhong; Gormus, Sedat; Efthymiou, Costas; Kalogridis, Georgios; Sooriyabandara, Mahesh; Zhu, Ziming; Lambotharan, Sangarapillai; Chin, Woon Hau

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Fate and transport processes controlling the migration of hazardous and radioactive materials from the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS)  

SciTech Connect

Desert vadose zones have been considered as suitable environments for the safe and long-term isolation of hazardous wastes. Low precipitation, high evapotranspiration and thick unsaturated alluvial deposits commonly found in deserts make them attractive as waste disposal sites. The fate and transport of any contaminant in the subsurface is ultimately determined by the operating retention and transformation processes in the system and the end result of the interactions among them. Retention (sorption) and transformation are the two major processes that affect the amount of a contaminant present and available for transport. Retention processes do not affect the total amount of a contaminant in the soil system, but rather decrease or eliminate the amount available for transport at a given point in time. Sorption reactions retard the contaminant migration. Permanent binding of solute by the sorbent is also possible. These processes and their interactions are controlled by the nature of the hazardous waste, the properties of the porous media and the geochemical and environmental conditions (temperature, moisture and vegetation). The present study summarizes the available data and investigates the fate and transport processes that govern the migration of contaminants from the Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). While the site is currently used only for low-level radioactive waste disposal, past practices have included burial of material now considered hazardous. Fundamentals of chemical and biological transformation processes are discussed subsequently, followed by a discussion of relevant results.

Estrella, R.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediment: Borehole 299-E33-46 Near B 110 in the B BX-BY Waste Management Area  

SciTech Connect

This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-ectractable sodium data from Table 4.17. The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in December 2002. The overall goal of the of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., asked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediment from within the B-BX-BY Waste Management Area. This report is the third in a series of three reports to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from a borehole installed approximately 4.5 m (15 ft) northeast of tank B- 110 (borehole 299-E33-46).

Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Gee, Glendon W.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Lanigan, David C.; mccain, r. G.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Orr, Robert D.; Legore, Virginia L.; Clayton, Ray E.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Kutynakov, I. V.; Baum, Steven R.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Vickerman, Tanya S.; Royack, Lisa J.

2008-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

233

Challenges and Directions in Knowledge Asset Trading  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper addresses the area that is at the intersection of Knowledge Management and Electronic Commerce. This area refers to the exchange and trade of explicit and implicit knowledge at an inter-organisational level. Electronic knowledge marketplaces ...

Dimitris Apostolou; Gregory Mentzas; Andreas Abecker; Wolf-Christian Eickhoff; Wolfgang Maas; Panos Georgolios; Kostas Kafentzis; Sophia Kyriakopoulou

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

1Q/2Q00 M-Area and Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facilities Groundwater Monitoring and Corrective-Action Report - First and Second Quarters 2000 - Volumes I, II, and II  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) and the Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) HWMF at the Savannah River site (SRS) during first and second quarters of 2000.

Chase, J.

2000-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

235

Computational Challenges and Analysis under Increasingly Dynamic and Uncertain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computational Challenges and Analysis under Increasingly Dynamic and Uncertain Electric Power Empowering Minds to Engineer the Future Electric Energy System #12;Thrust Area 5 White Paper Computational Challenges and Analysis Under Increasingly Dynamic and Uncertain Electric Power System Conditions Project

236

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Western Area PowerAdministratio...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Colorado River Storage Project Management Center Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Western Area Power Administration-Colorado River Storage Project Management Center...

237

Meeting the Human Capital Management Challenge  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A A A M M A A N N A A G G E E R R ' ' S S D D E E S S K K R R E E F F E E R R E E N N C C E E O O N N H H U U M M A A N N C C A A P P I I T T A A L L M M A A N N A A G G E E M M E E N N T T F F L L E E X X I I B B I I L L I I T T I I E E S S © Microsoft Office Online ClipArt October 2010 Office of the Chief Human Capital Officer 2 Table of Contents INTRODUCTION --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 3 RECRUITMENT INCENTIVE ------------------------------------------------------------------------- 5 RECRUITMENT INCENTIVE FAQs ----------------------------------------------------------------- 6 RELOCATION INCENTIVE --------------------------------------------------------------------------- 8 RELOCATION INCENTIVE FAQs-------------------------------------------------------------------- 9

238

Big data challenge: a data management perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a trend that, virtually everyone, ranging from big Web companies to traditional enterprisers to physical science researchers to social scientists, is either already experiencing or anticipating unprecedented growth in the amount of data available ... Keywords: big data, databases, performance

Jinchuan Chen; Yueguo Chen; Xiaoyong Du; Cuiping Li; Jiaheng Lu; Suyun Zhao; Xuan Zhou

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Moving Objects Information Management: The Database Challenge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Miniaturization of computing devices, and advances in wireless communication and sensor technology are some of the forces that are propagating computing from the stationary desktop to the mobile outdoors. Some important classes of new applications that ...

Ouri Wolfson

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Management Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Immobilization Research Immobilization Research Kurt Gerdes U.S. DOE, Office of Engineering and Technology John Vienna Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Environmental Management May 19, 2009 2009 Hanford - Idaho - Savannah River Technical Exchange 2 Objectives Perform research and development to advance the waste stabilization technology options by through closely- coupled theory, experimentation, and modeling Develop solutions for Hanford, Idaho, Savannah River, and Oak Ridge wastes challenges (along with facilitating management of future wastes) Environmental Management General Approach Balance between near-term incremental technology improvements and long-term transformational solutions Address the requirements for high risk waste streams - high-level tank waste (RPP, SRS)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "management challenge area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Reservoir management using streamline simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geostatistical techniques can generate fine-scale description of reservoir properties that honor a variety of available data. The differences among multiple geostatistical realizations indicate the presence of uncertainty due to the lack of information and sparsity of data. Quantifying this uncertainty in terms of reservoir performance forecast poses a major reservoir management challenge. One solution to this problem is flow simulation of a large number of these plausible reservoir descriptions. However, this approach is not feasible in practice because of the computational costs associated with multiple detailed flow simulations. Other major reservoir management challenges include the determination of the swept and unswept areas at a particular time of interest in the life of a reservoir. Until now, sweep efficiency correlations have generally been limited to homogeneous 2-D cases. Calculating volumetric sweep efficiency in a 3-D heterogeneous reservoir is difficult due to the inherent complexity of multiple layers and arbitrary well configurations. Identifying the swept and unswept areas is primarily important for making a decision on the infill locations. Most of the mature reservoirs all over the world are under waterflood. Managing a waterflood requires an understanding of how injection wells displace oil to producing wells. By quantifying the fluid movements, the displacement process can be actively managed. Areas that are not being swept can be developed, and inefficiencies, such as water cycling, can be removed. Conventional simulation provides general answers to almost all of these problems, however time constraint prohibits using a detailed model to capture complexities for each well. Three dimensional streamline simulation can meet most of these reservoir management challenges. Moreover use of fast streamline-based simulation technique offers significant potential in terms of computational efficiency. Its high performance simulation speed makes it well suited for describing flow characteristics for high resolution reservoir models and can be used on a routine basis to make effective and efficient reservoir management decisions. In this research, we extend the capability of streamline simulation as an efficient tool for reservoir management purposes. We show its application in terms of swept volume calculations, ranking of stochastic reservoir models, pattern rate allocation and reservoir performance forecasting under uncertainty.

Choudhary, Manoj Kumar

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Can we talk? Communications management for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, a complex nuclear waste management project  

SciTech Connect

Sandia Nuclear Waste Management Program is pursuing for DOE an option for permanently disposing radioactive waste in deep geologic repositories. Included in the Program are the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Project for US defense program mixed waste the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) for spent power reactor fuel and vitrified high-level waste, projects for other waste types, and development efforts in environmental decision support technologies. WIPP and YMP are in the public arena, of a controversial nature, and provide significant management challenges. Both projects have large project teams, multiple organization participants, large budgets, long durations, are very complex, have a high degree of programmatic risk, and operate in an extremely regulated environment requiring legal defensibility. For environmental projects like these to succeed, SNL`s Program is utilizing nearly all areas in PMI`s Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) to manage along multiple project dimensions such as the physical sciences (e.g., geophysics and geochemistry; performance assessment; decision analysis) management sciences (controlling the triple constraint of performance, cost and schedule), and social sciences (belief systems; public participation; institutional politics). This discussion focuses primarily on communication challenges active on WIPP. How is the WIPP team meeting the challenges of managing communications?`` and ``How are you approaching similar challenges?`` will be questions for a dialog with the audience.

Goldstein, S.A.; Pullen, G.M.; Brewer, D.R.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

C&W announced the Environmental Challenge  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

announced the Environmental Challenge in October 2009. The firm is challenging its portfolio announced the Environmental Challenge in October 2009. The firm is challenging its portfolio of managed properties in the US to reduce energy consumption, water use, and waste disposal by 10% by 2012, compared to a 2008 baseline. Progress is being acknowledged annually through a recognition and awards program. C&W recently announced the results of the 2009 edition of the program.

244

Resource management plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation. Volume 30, Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park natural areas and reference areas--Oak Ridge Reservation environmentally sensitive sites containing special plants, animals, and communities  

SciTech Connect

Areas on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) that contain rare plant or animal species or are special habitats are protected through National Environmental Research Park Natural Area (NA) or Reference Area (RA) designations. The US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park program is responsible for identifying species of vascular plants that are endangered, threatened, or rare and, as much as possible, for conserving those areas in which such species grow. This report includes a listing of Research Park NAs and RAs with general habitat descriptions and a computer-generated map with the areas identified. These are the locations of rare plant or animal species or special habitats that are known at this time. As the Reservation continues to be surveyed, it is expected that additional sites will be designated as Research Park NAs or RAs. This document is a component of a larger effort to identify environmentally sensitive areas on ORR. This report identifies the currently known locations of rare plant species, rare animal species, and special biological communities. Floodplains, wetlands (except those in RAs or NAs), and cultural resources are not included in this report.

Pounds, L.R. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (US); Parr, P.D.; Ryon, M.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Challenge X 2006 Competition Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6: Virginia Tech Takes Top Honors 6: Virginia Tech Takes Top Honors A student team from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University won the second-year Challenge X: Crossover to Sustainable Mobility, a three-year engineering competition designed to improve the fuel efficiency and reduce the environmental impact of a 2005 Chevrolet Equinox. The Virginia Tech team developed and built a hybrid version of the Equinox that uses two electric motors and runs on E85, a fuel blend containing 85 percent ethanol and 15 percent gasoline. The Virginia Tech vehicle also exhibited the best braking and handling, the lowest tailpipe emissions, and the lowest petroleum usage. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and General Motors Corporation (GM) are the lead sponsors for Challenge X, in which 17 teams of North American engineering students are participating (see box). Argonne manages the competition every year.

246

Distributed Systems for Energy Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

buildings-to-grid, responsive loads, on-line monitoring of efficiency programs, microgrids, and other forms of distributed resource management. A key challenge will be the...

247

A study of the necessary and optimal conditions for success in the most challenging human endeavors : modem day Manhattan Projects are needed for overcoming contemporary global challenges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is possible to categorize four contemporary challenges as the greatest threats to global well-being and the persistence of humankind. These challenges are global climate and ecological change, poor human health management, ...

Chowdhury, Anando A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

LPP Risk Management Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

History and Process History and Process Slide 2 M E Environmental Management Environmental Management History ◦ Current Baseline Process Overview ◦ Identification ◦ Simulation ◦ Management Successes & Challenges Slide 3 M E Environmental Management Environmental Management Current Baseline Risks ◦ 1 Week Risk Summit held week of August 4 th , 2008 Broad representation from all levels of Isotek, DOE, PTC, and outside consultants Focused on risk and opportunity identification Included risk description, assumptions, and triggers No quantification or analysis No restrictions, constraints, or filtering HQ provided facilitator Prescribed format and capture methodology Slide 4 M E Environmental Management Environmental Management Current Baseline Risks ◦ Risk Summit Results

249

Research Areas | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Research Areas Research Areas Materials Sciences and Engineering (MSE) Division MSE Home About Research Areas Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) DOE Energy Innovation Hubs BES Funding Opportunities The Computational Materials and Chemical Sciences Network (CMCSN) Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics Scientific Highlights Reports and Activities Principal Investigators' Meetings BES Home Research Areas Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page To meet the challenge of supporting basic research programs that are also energy relevant, the Division manages portfolio components that consist of distinct Core Research Activities (CRAs), which align with the Division's organizational .pdf file (51KB) and budget structures. The CRAs are structured as scientific disciplines, rather than as technology

250

Other Challenges | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DataTools ResearchTech Services Apps Challenges Blogs Let's Talk Manufacturing You are here Data.gov Communities Manufacturing Challenge.gov Energy Challenges...

251

Education Challenges | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Challenges Education Grants Developers Data Apps Challenges International Classroom Education You are here Data.gov Communities Education Education Challenges Interested in...

252

2004 AQUAINT Challenge Problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Ben Barnett, Trina Pitcher, John Calhoun, Eileen Boiling (Admin); Antonio Sanfilippo (Project Manager). Roadmap. Feb 23. ...

2004-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

253

A Clean Slate 4D Approach to Network Control and Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Clean Slate 4D Approach to Network Control and Management Albert Greenberg, Gisli Hjalmtysson on this crucially important and intellectually challenging area. Categories and Subject Descriptors C.2.1 [Network Architecture and Design]: Packet Switching Net- works; C.2.2 [Network Protocols]: Routing Protocols; C.2

Xie, Geoffrey

254

New Approaches for Understanding the Hanford 300 Area Project...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Science New Approaches for Understanding the Hanford 300 Area New Approaches for Understanding the Hanford 300 Area Yoram.jpg Key Challenges: Simultaneously...

255

Coal Combustion Products: Challenges  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Products: Challenges and Opportunities American Coal Ash Association Conference St. Petersburg, FL January 27-30, 2003 Carl O. Bauer National Energy Technology Laboratory...

256

Argonne Transportation - Challenge Bibendum  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

mobility. Every year, the Challenge presents the best inventions from the world's largest vehicle manufacturers, equipment manufacturers, and energy suppliers through a series of...

257

ENERGY STAR Challenge  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

STAR Challenge for Industry Participant Handbook June 2013 ENERGY STAR is a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Program helping organizations and individuals fight climate change...

258

Enterprise level IT risk management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing IT budget and over-dependence of business on IT infra-structure makes risk management a critical component of enterprise management. The creation and sustenance of an IT risk management framework is one of the crucial and challenging tasks ... Keywords: enterprise level, information technology, risk management

Nadhirah Azizi; Khairuddin Hashim

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Counties - Challenges | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Challenge.gov for an ongoing list of open challenges and prizes for great uses of open data. Combine city and federal data to showcase your talents More Challenges Challenge.gov...

260

State - Challenges | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Challenge.gov for an ongoing list of open challenges and prizes for great uses of open data. Combine city and federal data to showcase your talents More Challenges Challenge.gov...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "management challenge area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Challenger | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Challenger Challenger Data and Networking Challenger is the home for the prod-devel job submission queue. Moving the prod-devel queue to Challenger clears the way for capability...

262

Better Buildings Challenge - Lend Lease Commitment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Buildings Challenge Buildings Challenge Lend Lease Commitment Krista Sprenger, VP-Director Sustainability, Americas Duncan Prahl, Research Architect, IBACOS March, 2012 Goals of the Better Buildings Challenge Make buildings 20% more efficient by 2020; save $40 billion annually for US organizations; create American jobs  Overcoming market barriers/persistent obstacles with replicable, marketplace solutions  Market leaders stepping forward to share data and real solutions  Demonstrating leadership  Showcasing real solutions  Connecting the market  Partnering with industry leaders to better understand policy and technical opportunities 3 More Than 50 Years' Property Experience *Areas of operation highlighted in green Lend Lease  Creating innovative property and infrastructure

263

EV Everywhere Challenge Kick-Off  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EV Everywhere Challenge Kick-Off Patrick Davis, Vehicle Technologies Program Manager Jacob Ward, Vehicle Technologies Senior Analyst June 21, 2012 Hyatt Regency, Dearborn, Michigan EV Everywhere Workshops * Recruit the best and brightest American scientists, engineers, and businesses to tackle this electric vehicle challenge * Re-evaluate and refine the existing technical goals for increasing performance and cutting costs Topic Date Location Electric Drive Components July 24-25 Chicago, IL Advanced Batteries July 26 Chicago, IL Consumer Behavior and Charging Infrastructure July 31 - Aug 1 Los Angeles, CA Lightweight Vehicles and Structures TBD TBD The EV Everywhere Challenge Involves All of DOE The EV Everywhere Challenge Key Parameters * 5-passenger vehicle suitable for an average American family

264

ENERGY STAR Challenge  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

STAR Challenge STAR Challenge for Industry Participant Handbook June 2013 ENERGY STAR is a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Program helping organizations and individuals fight climate change through superior energy efficiency. Learn more at energystar.gov/buildings. 2 Contents Overview ............................................................................................................................. 3 Participation Eligibility .......................................................................................................... 4 How to Participate ............................................................................................................... 5 Step 1: Establish an energy intensity metric ................................................................ 5

265

Decontamination & decommissioning focus area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In January 1994, the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE EM) formally introduced its new approach to managing DOE`s environmental research and technology development activities. The goal of the new approach is to conduct research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE, utilizing the best talent in the Department and in the national science community. To facilitate this solutions-oriented approach, the Office of Science and Technology (EM-50, formerly the Office of Technology Development) formed five Focus AReas to stimulate the required basic research, development, and demonstration efforts to seek new, innovative cleanup methods. In February 1995, EM-50 selected the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to lead implementation of one of these Focus Areas: the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D & D) Focus Area.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Integrating Variable Renewable Energy: Challenges and Solutions  

SciTech Connect

In the U.S., a number of utilities are adopting higher penetrations of renewables, driven in part by state policies. While power systems have been designed to handle the variable nature of loads, the additional supply-side variability and uncertainty can pose new challenges for utilities and system operators. However, a variety of operational and technical solutions exist to help integrate higher penetrations of wind and solar generation. This paper explores renewable energy integration challenges and mitigation strategies that have been implemented in the U.S. and internationally, including forecasting, demand response, flexible generation, larger balancing areas or balancing area cooperation, and operational practices such as fast scheduling and dispatch.

Bird, L.; Milligan, M.; Lew, D.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

2006 Presidents' Management Agenda Update Fi  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Message from the Secretary of Energy Message from the Secretary of Energy 2006 Presidents' Management Agenda Update Fi v e years ago, President Bush challenged the Federal government to make itself more efficient, more effective, more results-oriented and more accountable to the taxpayers. The President recognized that "government likes to begin things. But good beginnings are not the measure of success. What matters in the end is completion. Not just making promises, but making good on promises." The President's Management Agenda (PMA) has been the Department of Energy's framework for transforming our management culture and focusing on results. Over the last year, we have intensified our efforts to improve in some key functional areas. We have crafted a new strategic plan that will serve as our roadmap to improve both national security and

268

Reconnaissance geochemical assessment of the Clover Mountains Bureau of Land Management Wilderness Study Area (NV-050-139), Lincoln County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a mineral survey of the Clover Mountains Wilderness Study Area, Lincoln County, Nevada. The Clover Mountains Geology-Energy-Minerals (GEM) Resource Area (GRA) includes the Clover Mountains Wilderness Study Area (WSA) NV 050-0139. The GRA is located in south-central Lincoln County, Nevada, near the town of Caliente. There are two mining districts on the periphery of the WSA: (1) the Pennsylvania district, just northwest of the WSA, which is still active and has produced about $50,000 worth of gold, silver, and copper; (2) the Viola district, on the southern boundary of the WSA, the total production of which was less than $400,000, mostly from fluorspar. No patented or unpatented claims exist within the WSA. The rocks exposed in the WSA are almost entirely Tertiary rhyolites; below these rocks are Paleozoic and Mesozoic sedimentary rocks that have been locally mineralized, as in the Pennsylvania district. Stream-sediment and heavy-mineral-concentrate samples were collected and analyzed spectrographically by the US Geological Survey. The analytical results indicate that anomalous concentrations of thorium and barium occur along the western border of the WSA. Minor thorium, barium, and tin anomalies are scattered throughout the WSA. 6 refs., 5 tabs. (ACR)

Hoffman, J.D.; Day, G.W.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Multicore Programming Challenges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The computer industry is facing fundamental challenges that are driving a major change in the design of computer processors. Due to restrictions imposed by quantum physics, one historical path to higher computer processor performance - by increased clock ...

Michael Perrone

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

NSTB Summarizes Vulnerable Areas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NSTB Summarizes Vulnerable Areas NSTB Summarizes Vulnerable Areas Commonly Found in Energy Control Systems Experts at the National SCADA Test Bed (NSTB) discovered some common areas of vulnerability in the energy control systems assessed between late 2004 and early 2006. These vulnerabilities ranged from conventional IT security issues to specific weaknesses in control system protocols. The paper "Lessons Learned from Cyber Security Assessments of SCADA and Energy Management Systems" describes the vulnerabilities and recommended strategies for mitigating them. It should be of use to asset owners and operators, control system vendors, system integrators, and third-party vendors interested in enhancing the security characteristics of current and future products.

271

Mixed Waste Management Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The management of mixed waste presents serious challenges to nuclear utilities. Regulatory and practical predicaments make compliance with the letter of all applicable regulations extremely difficult. Utility experts developed these guidelines to identify opportunities for improving work practices and regulatory compliance while minimizing any potential adverse impacts of mixed waste management.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

272

ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry: Poster, "Rise to the Challenge...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

business resources State and local government resources ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry: Poster, "Rise to the Challenge" (Version 1) This co-brandable poster (V.1) is for...

273

ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry: Poster, "Rise to the Challenge...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

business resources State and local government resources ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry: Poster, "Rise to the Challenge" (Version 2) This co-brandable poster (V.2) is for...

274

ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry: Poster, "Rise to the Challenge...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

business resources State and local government resources ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry: Poster, "Rise to the Challenge" (Version 3) This poster (V.3) is for industrial...

275

Thermal energy storage application areas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of thermal energy storage in the areas of building heating and cooling, recovery of industrial process and waste heat, solar power generation, and off-peak energy storage and load management in electric utilities is reviewed. (TFD)

Not Available

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

EM Reviews Budget, Technology Challenges with Advisory Board | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reviews Budget, Technology Challenges with Advisory Board Reviews Budget, Technology Challenges with Advisory Board EM Reviews Budget, Technology Challenges with Advisory Board June 21, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Associate Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary Alice Williams, left, and EM Senior Advisor Dave Huizenga, center, talk with Environmental Management Advisory Board Vice-Chair Dennis Ferrigno at the recent board meeting. Associate Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary Alice Williams, left, and EM Senior Advisor Dave Huizenga, center, talk with Environmental Management Advisory Board Vice-Chair Dennis Ferrigno at the recent board meeting. AUGUSTA, Ga. - EM leadership met with the Environmental Management Advisory Board (EMAB) recently to discuss a range of topics, from EM's fiscal year 2014 budget request to its technology challenges.

277

EMSL: Science: Biogeochemistry Grand Challenge  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biogeochemistry Grand Challenge Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 growing on a hematite surface Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 growing on a hematite surface. A Grand Challenge in...

278

challenge | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

challenge Home Rmckeel's picture Submitted by Rmckeel(287) Contributor 19 April, 2013 - 14:44 2013 Civic Hacking Day Ideas Apps challenge hackathon The folks at Rally are...

279

Business Challenges | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Business USA? Check Out the Winners From These Previous Challenges Startup America Policy Challenge How can we knock down barriers to innovation in health care IT, clean...

280

Energy Programs | The Energy Challenge  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Challenge Page 1 of 3 Our nation faces a grand challenge: finding alternatives to fossil fuels and improving energy efficiency to meet our exponentially growing energy...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "management challenge area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Albuquerque duo wins Supercomputing Challenge  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Challenge Erika DeBenedictis and Tony Huang captured the top prize during the 2008 New Mexico Supercomputing Challenge award ceremony. April 22, 2008 Los Alamos National Laboratory...

282

MANAGEMENT SUMMARY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

need to effectively manage business performance. This has never been more true than in today’s complex, highly regulated and confusing business environment which requires better decisions and improved execution now! In spite of the billions of dollars invested in infor-mation technology to address these challenges, managers and executives in many organizations still make key decisions underpinned by their own personal versions of documents and spread-sheets. Their organization struggles to provide a seamless flow of trusted information between customers, suppliers and their employees. The result is that most organizations cannot provide their people with the right information at the right time, and in attempting to do so are committing significant resources to compiling and auditing numbers instead of using them to inform the business. Consequently, they are far more reac-tive than proactive and ultimately they are not efficiently and effectively managing their current and future performance. Leading organizations are investing in managing information and developing predictive insights to drive sustainable business results. These com-panies have become masters in Performance Management- going beyond mere users of business intelligence to become the “Intelligent Enterprises.” “...a new breed of company is upping the stakes....have dominated their fields by deploy-ing industrial-strength analytics across a wide variety of activities. In essence, they are trans-forming their organiza-tions into armies of killer apps and crunching their way to victory.”

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Banff Challenge 2  

SciTech Connect

Experimental particle physics collaborations constantly seek newer and better ideas for improving the sensitivity of their searches for new particles and phenomena. Statistical techniques are the last step in interpreting the results of an experiment; they are used to make discoveries (hypothesis testing), and to measure parameters (point estimation). They are also used in the first step - experiment and analysis design. Banff Challenge 2 asks participants to test their methods of discovering hidden signals in simulated datasets and of measuring the properties of these signals. The Challenge problems are described, and the performances of the submitted entries is summarized, for datasets with and without simulated signals present.

Junk, Thomas R.; /Fermilab

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Research Areas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Areas Areas Research Areas Print Scientists from a wide variety of fields come to the ALS to perform experiements. Listed below are some of the most common research areas covered by ALS beamlines. Below each heading are a few examples of the specific types of topics included in that category. Click on a heading to learn more about that research area at the ALS. Energy Science Photovoltaics, photosynthesis, biofuels, energy storage, combustion, catalysis, carbon capture/sequestration. Bioscience General biology, structural biology. Materials/Condensed Matter Correlated materials, nanomaterials, magnetism, polymers, semiconductors, water, advanced materials. Physics Atomic, molecular, and optical (AMO) physics; accelerator physics. Chemistry Surfaces/interfaces, catalysts, chemical dynamics (gas-phase chemistry), crystallography, physical chemistry.

285

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGYCONTRACT AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CONTRACT AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT ROOT CAUSE ANALYSIS CORRECTIVE ACTION PLAN CORRECTIVE MEASURE 7 IMPROVE DOE OVERSIGHT AND MANAGEMENT OF PROJECTS, CONTRACTS, AND CONTRACTORS FINAL REPORT OCTOBER 2010 iii Executive Summary Opportunities remain within the U.S. Department of Energy [hereafter referred to as DOE or the Department and inclusive of the National Nuclear Security Admin- istration (NNSA)] for further improvement in the areas of contract and project management. A root cause analysis (RCA) and corresponding corrective action plan (CAP) were completed in 2008 to identify significant contract and project management deficiencies and underlying causes for past challenges. Eight cor- rective measures were developed and are currently being implemented to make

286

Integrated Energy and Greenhouse Gas Management System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With Climate Change legislation on the horizon, the need to integrate energy reduction initiatives with greenhouse gas reduction efforts is critical to manufactures competitiveness and financial strength going forward. MPC has developed an integrated Energy and Greenhouse Gas Management System that allows companies to reduce energy and carbon intensity at the same time all the while bolstering bottom line performance. Reducing energy use and greenhouse gases is not an option but a necessity today. All manufacturing companies need to develop in-house capabilities to manage these important resources or pay the price of high carbon taxes and/or face a depletion in operating margins. MPC will present a case history highlighting the steps taken, the results obtained and the lessons learned in developing an integrated Energy and Greenhouse Gas Management System with a major industrial manufacturing company in the Midwest. Key subject areas covered include: Integration of Climate Change and Energy Management Strategies- a winning approach to meet the challenge; Turn a potential cost of compliance into a new cash flow source; Leveraging Energy Management Systems to optimize savings; Navigating through the new Greenhouse Gas reporting requirements; Utilizing Plant and Corporate Energy Management Dashboards to Control Energy Consumption and Greenhouse Gas emissions.

Spates, C. N.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Western Area Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Loveland Area Projects November 29-30, 2011 2 Agenda * Overview of Western Area Power Administration * Post-1989 Loveland Area Projects (LAP) Marketing Plan * Energy Planning and Management Program * Development of the 2025 PMI Proposal * 2025 PMI Proposal * 2025 PMI Comment Period & Proposal Information * Questions 3 Overview of Western Area Power Administration (Western) * One of four power marketing administrations within the Department of Energy * Mission: Market and deliver reliable, renewable, cost-based Federal hydroelectric power and related services within a 15-state region of the central and western U.S. * Vision: Provide premier power marketing and transmission services Rocky Mountain Region (RMR) is one of five regional offices 4 Rocky Mountain Region

288

States - More Challenges | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

States - More Challenges States Data Apps Challenges Policies States You are here Data.gov Communities States Challenge.gov...

289

counties - more challenges | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- more challenges Counties Data Apps Challenges Policies Counties You are here Data.gov Communities Counties Challenge.gov...

290

Product management in software as a service  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Software product management within Software as a Service is key domain of interest given the recent advances in Cloud Computing. This thesis explores the product management challenges within this domain. It makes a ...

Rajasekharan, Karthikeyan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ENERGY STAR plant certification ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry See who has taken the Challenge See who has achieved the Challenge See who is promoting the Challenge ENERGY...

292

borrow_area.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

information information at Weldon Spring, Missouri. This site is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. developed by the former WSSRAP Community Relations Department to provide comprehensive descriptions of key activities that took place throughout the cleanup process The Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) approved a plan on June 9, 1995, allowing the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP) to excavate nearly 2 million cubic yards of clay material from land in the Weldon Spring Conservation Area. Clay soil from a borrow area was used to construct the permanent disposal facility at the Weldon Spring site. Clay soil was chosen to construct the disposal facility because it has low permeability when

293

Focus Area 3 Deliverables  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 - Commercial Grade item and Services 3 - Commercial Grade item and Services Dedication Implementation and Nuclear Services Office of Environmental Management And Energy Facility Contractors Group Quality Assurance Improvement Project Plan Project Focus Area Task # and Description Deliverable Project Area 3-Commercial Grade Item and Services Dedication 3.1-Complete a survey of selected EM contractors to identify the process and basis for their CGI dedication program including safety classification of items being dedicated for nuclear applications within their facilities Completed Survey Approvals: Yes/No/NA Project Managers: S. Waisley, D. Tuttel Yes Executive Committee: D. Chung, J. Yanek, N. Barker, D. Amerine No EM QA Corporate Board: No Energy Facility Contractors Group

294

ICME Challenges and Education  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 11, 2013 ... Enabling technologies in the areas of advanced physics-based models, computational methods, materials and process data availability and ...

295

LANSCE | Lujan Center | Thrust Area | Local Structure, Magnetism, and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

User Instruments User Instruments Reflectometers Asterix SPEAR Powder Diffractometers HIPD HIPPO NPDF Engineering Diffraction SMARTS Chemical Spectroscopy FDS Small Angle Scattering LQD Protein Crystallography PCS Inelastic Neutron Spectrometer Pharos Single Crystal Diffractometer SCD Contacts Lujan Center Leader Mark Bourke 505.667.6069 Deputy Leader (Interim) Anna Llobet 505.665.1367 Experimental Area Manager) Charles Kelsey 505.665.5579 Experiment Coordinator Leilani Conradson 505.665.9505 User Office Administrator Lisa Padilla 505.667.5649 Administrative Assistant Melissa Martinez 505.665.0391 Thrust Area Local Structure, Magnetism, and Nanomaterials The Lujan Neutron Scattering Center encompasses a set of powder diffractometers, instrument scientist specialists, and sample environments (pressure, temperature, and magnetic field) equipped to address challenges

296

Focus Areas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mission » Focus Areas Mission » Focus Areas Focus Areas Safety With this focus on cleanup completion and risk reducing results, safety still remains the utmost priority. EM will continue to maintain and demand the highest safety performance. All workers deserve to go home as healthy as they were when they came to the job in the morning. There is no schedule or milestone worth any injury to the work force. Project Management EM is increasing its concentration on project management to improve its overall performance toward cost-effective risk reduction. This will involve review of validated project baselines, schedules, and assumptions about effective identification and management of risks. Instrumental in refining the technical and business approaches to project management are the senior

297

Research Areas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Areas Print Research Areas Print Scientists from a wide variety of fields come to the ALS to perform experiements. Listed below are some of the most common research areas covered by ALS beamlines. Below each heading are a few examples of the specific types of topics included in that category. Click on a heading to learn more about that research area at the ALS. Energy Science Photovoltaics, photosynthesis, biofuels, energy storage, combustion, catalysis, carbon capture/sequestration. Bioscience General biology, structural biology. Materials/Condensed Matter Correlated materials, nanomaterials, magnetism, polymers, semiconductors, water, advanced materials. Physics Atomic, molecular, and optical (AMO) physics; accelerator physics. Chemistry Surfaces/interfaces, catalysts, chemical dynamics (gas-phase chemistry), crystallography, physical chemistry.

298

Benefits and Challenges  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Benefits and Challenges Benefits and Challenges Benefits Photo: Fuel cell exhaust emits no harmful pollutants Less Greenhouse Gas Emissions Gasoline- and diesel-powered vehicles emit greenhouse gases (GHGs), mostly carbon dioxide (CO2), that contribute to global climate change. Fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) powered by pure hydrogen emit no GHGs from their tailpipe, only heat and water. Producing the hydrogen to power FCVs can generate GHGs, depending on the production method, but much less than that emitted by conventional gasoline and diesel vehicles. more... The chart below shows the GHGs generated by various vehicle types and considers all steps of the energy chain from fuel extraction or production to fuel use by the vehicle, not just tailpipe emissions. Even when accounting for the GHGs emitted during hydrogen production, conventional

299

Vehicle Technologies Office: EV Everywhere Grand Challenge  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Challenge Challenge With their immense potential for increasing the country's energy, economic, and environmental security, plug-in hybrid electric and all-electric vehicles (also known as plug-in electric vehicles, or PEVs) will play a key role in the country's transportation future. In fact, transitioning to electric drive vehicles (including hybrid-electric) could reduce U.S. oil dependence by more than 80% and greenhouse gas emissions by more than 60%. The EV Everywhere Grand Challenge focuses on the U.S. becoming the first nation in the world to produce plug-in electric vehicles that are as affordable for the average American family as today's gasoline-powered vehicles within the next 10 years. To learn more about electric vehicles, see our Plug-in Electric Vehicle Basics page. To help meet the EV Everywhere goals, the Vehicle Technologies Office supports efforts in a variety of areas:

300

Office of Resource Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resource Management Resource Management Home Sub Offices › Business Operations › Information Management › Human Resources and Administration Mission and Functions HSS Standard Operating Practices (For Internal Users Only) HSS Subject Matter Experts and Functional Points of Contacts Contact Us HSS Logo Office of Resource Management Direct Report to the Chief Health, Safety and Security Officer Mission and Functions Mission The Office of Resource Management supports the infrastructure of the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) by providing balanced, unbiased, technically competent, and customer focused services in the areas of: (1) Financial Management, including budget formulation and execution; (2) Procurement Management, including contract and credit card programs; (3) Information Management, including technology-based solutions and programs; (4) Quality Assurance; (5) Human Resources, including recruitment and retention programs; (6) Administrative Services, including property management, travel, and work space management; and; (7) Strategic and Program Planning including performance and efficiency measures.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "management challenge area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Wide-area situation awareness in electric power grid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two primary elements of the US energy policy are demand management and efficiency and renewable sources. Major objectives are clean energy transmission and integration, reliable energy transmission, and grid cyber security. Development of the Smart Grid seeks to achieve these goals by lowering energy costs for consumers, achieving energy independence and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The Smart Grid is expected to enable real time wide-area situation awareness (SA) for operators. Requirements for wide-area SA have been identified among interoperability standards proposed by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and the National Institute of Standards and Technology to ensure smart-grid functionality. Wide-area SA and enhanced decision support and visualization tools are key elements in the transformation to the Smart Grid. This paper discusses human factors research to promote SA in the electric power grid and the Smart Grid. Topics that will be discussed include the role of human factors in meeting US energy policy goals, the impact and challenges for Smart Grid development, and cyber security challenges.

Greitzer, Frank L.

2010-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

302

Third Power Delivery Asset Management Conference Proceedings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Today's utility managers face an array of conflicting business objectives. In response, many utilities are considering implementing asset management concepts. The Third EPRI Power Delivery Asset Management Conference highlighted the work of researchers, consultants, software providers, and utilities in identifying and overcoming challenges faced in implementing asset management programs for transmission, distribution, and independent system operator (ISO) business segments of power delivery.

2007-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

303

Precautionary Areas in U.S. Waters | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Precautionary Areas in U.S. Waters Energy Data Apps Maps Challenges Resources Blogs Let's Talk Energy Beta You are here Data.gov Communities Energy Data Precautionary...

304

Exascale opportunities and challenges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite the availability of petascale systems for scientific computing, demand for computational capability grows unabated, with areas of national and commercial interest including global climate change, alternative energy sources, defense and medicine, ... Keywords: architecture, exascale, parallelism

Katherine Yelick

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Challenges of deep drilling. Part 2  

SciTech Connect

This installment delineates current deep drilling technology limitations and discusses needed advances for the future. Problem areas are identified as material and seal problems in wellhead equipment, new fluid carriers for well stimulation, quality control/inspection/testing for equipment and performance flaws, arctic environment conditions, and experienced personnel. The main factors of operating environment that challenge advanced deep drilling are identified as temperature extremes, pressure extremes, acid gases, and deep-water presence.

Chadwick, C.E.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Electric Powertrains: Opportunities and Challenges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Managing impending environmental and energy challenges in the transport sector requires a dramatic reduction in both the petroleum consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of in-use vehicles. This study quantifies the potential of electric and hybrid-electric powertrains, such as gasoline hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs), plug-in hybrid vehicles (PHEVs), fuel-cell vehicles (FCVs), and battery-electric vehicles (BEVs), to offer such reductions. The evolution of key enabling technologies was evaluated over a 30 year time horizon. These results were integrated with software simulations to model vehicle performance and tank-towheel energy consumption; the technology evaluation was also used to estimate costs. Well-towheel energy and GHG emissions of future vehicle technologies were estimated by integrating the vehicle technology evaluation with assessments of different fuel pathways. While electric powertrains can reduce or eliminate the transport sector’s reliance on petroleum, their GHG and energy reduction potential are constrained by continued reliance on fossil-fuels for producing electricity and hydrogen. In addition, constraints on growth of new vehicle technologies and slow rates of fleet turnover imply that these technologies take decades to effect meaningful change. As such, they do not offer a silver bullet: new technologies must be

Matthew A. Kromer; John B. Heywood

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

The Global Energy Challenge  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The expected doubling of global energy demand by 2050 challenges our traditional patterns of energy production, distribution and use. The continued use of fossil fuels raises concerns about supply, security, environment and climate. New routes are needed for the efficient conversion of energy from chemical fuel, sunlight, and heat to electricity or hydrogen as an energy carrier and finally to end uses like transportation, lighting, and heating. Opportunities for efficient new energy conversion routes based on nanoscale materials will be presented, with emphasis on the sustainable energy technologies they enable.

Crabtree, George (ANL)

2007-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

308

DOE Challenge Home Student Competition  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Challenge Home Challenge Home Student Competition April 2013 Contents Background ................................................................................................................................. 3 Summit Participants .................................................................................................................... 4 Key Results .................................................................................................................................. 5 Proposed Framework .................................................................................................................. 6 Suggestions for Submittal Requirements/Scoring Criteria ............................................................ 8 Suggested Competition Prize Options .......................................................................................... 9

309

DOE Challenge Home Label Methodology  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 2012 1 October 2012 1 Label Methodology DOE Challenge Home Label Methodology October 2012 DOE Challenge Home October 2012 2 Label Methodology Contents Background ............................................................................................................................................... 3 Methodology ............................................................................................................................................. 5 Comfort/Quiet .......................................................................................................................................... 5 Healthy Living ........................................................................................................................................... 7

310

Challenges and Solutions for Multifamily Modeling  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Challenges and Solutions for Multifamily Modeling IMPROVING THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT Srikanth Puttagunta, P.E. Steven Winter Associates, Inc. © 2013 Steven Winter Associates, Inc. All rights reserved. Overview  Multifamily modeling in BEopt  BA HSP for multifamily?  Benchmark Definition (based on IECC and Federal minimum appliance standards)  Use Profiles  Infiltration measurements  New metric for existing? © 2013 Steven Winter Associates, Inc. All rights reserved. Apartment vs. Whole-Building  Currently only can model apartments in BEopt  Can not distinguish common areas from living areas  5 bedroom max  Can only specify single components (mechanicals and appliances)  Benchmark source energy home size adjuster

311

Green Button Gamer: Driver Challenge | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Green Button Gamer: Driver Challenge Green Button Gamer: Driver Challenge Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Green Button Gamer Agency/Company /Organization: Green Button Gamer Sector: Energy Focus Area: Vehicles Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website, Mobile Device Website: greenbuttongamer.com/ Web Application Link: greenbuttongamer.com/ Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): Featured, Challenge Generated Green Button Gamer Screenshot References: Green Button Gamer[1] Challenge.gov[2] Challenge.gov Submission Page[3] Logo: Green Button Gamer The merger of social apps and gamification of real time vehicle and energy data. Overview GBG Driver Challenge allows users to compete with celebrities, friends, themselves and strangers on games that reinforce good driving habits and

312

ICME Infrastructure Challenges and Opportunities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... industrial-standard, robust infrastructure. Challenges and opportunities relative to an ICME infrastructure will be presented. Proceedings Inclusion? Undecided ...

313

Face and Ocular Challenge Series  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Ocular Challenge. A significant amount research has gone into iris recognition from "high" quality iris images captured from cooperative subjects. ...

2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

314

Unusual HVAC challenges require innovative solutions  

SciTech Connect

There were many reasons behind Motorola`s decision to build the first 225,000 sq ft of a planned one million sq ft manufacturing facility in Chihuahua, Mexico. Among these were the availability of skilled labor in the area, lower construction costs, some export tax advantages, and the close proximity to the US border. The new facility is made up of a variety of functional areas that together create an impressively efficient plant. Phase 1 construction included a large manufacturing floor, shipping and receiving areas, a bulk storage facility, and a large office area with a view of the factory floor. The structure also houses a retail store where Motorola consumer products are sold, a conference and banquet center, a commercial kitchen, and dining facilities for 750. The design cooling load is 750 tons; the heating load is 4.5 million Btuh. The paper discusses the challenging location, the HVAC system, and the future expansion planned.

Jardine, G.M.; Gwin, O.D. [Heery International, Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States)

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Energy Challenge Four: The Baltimore Neighborhood Energy Challenge |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Challenge Four: The Baltimore Neighborhood Energy Challenge Challenge Four: The Baltimore Neighborhood Energy Challenge Energy Challenge Four: The Baltimore Neighborhood Energy Challenge June 28, 2010 - 10:00am Addthis John Lippert We've already seen over the past three Mondays how cooperation among the public sector, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit private sector firms can produce some real benefits. We've also seen how the success of a project or program can depend on the ability to mobilize the local community. Let's look at another case where these elements successfully converge: The Baltimore Neighborhood Energy Challenge (BNEC). BNEC is a pilot program of the Baltimore Office of Sustainability (part of the Baltimore City Department of Planning) and the Baltimore Community Foundation, a tax-exempt, publicly supported organization serving the Greater Baltimore

316

Radiological Areas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Revision to Clearance Policy Associated with Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Revision to Clearance Policy Associated with Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Radiological Areas On July 13, 2000, the Secretary of Energy imposed an agency-wide suspension on the unrestricted release of scrap metal originating from radiological areas at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities for the purpose of recycling. The suspension was imposed in response to concerns from the general public and industry groups about the potential effects of radioactivity in or on material released in accordance with requirements established in DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment. The suspension was to remain in force until DOE developed and implemented improvements in, and better informed the public about, its release process. In addition, in 2001 the DOE announced its intention to prepare a

317

Announcing the Apps for Vehicles Challenge | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Announcing the Apps for Vehicles Challenge Announcing the Apps for Vehicles Challenge Announcing the Apps for Vehicles Challenge December 5, 2012 - 9:00am Addthis Announcing the Apps for Vehicles Challenge Patrick B. Davis Patrick B. Davis Vehicle Technologies Program Manager How can I participate? You can learn more about the competition at: http://go.usa.gov/g87k. Here at the Energy Department's Vehicle Technologies Program, we're revved up about the next great smartphone app: yours. That's why we're launching the Apps for Vehicles Challenge, which is looking for the best business plans, app ideas and product designs that use open vehicle data to help vehicle owners save fuel, save money and stay safe. Improving fuel efficiency is a national priority. With the country spending about $1 billion per day on foreign oil, the Administration spearheaded

318

Rooftop Solar Challenge: Empowering Innovators to Reach for the Sun |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Challenge: Empowering Innovators to Reach for the Sun Challenge: Empowering Innovators to Reach for the Sun Rooftop Solar Challenge: Empowering Innovators to Reach for the Sun November 6, 2013 - 8:00am Addthis Checkout the infogaphic for an overview of the first round of the Rooftop Solar Challenge. | Infographic by Sarah Gerrity. Checkout the infogaphic for an overview of the first round of the Rooftop Solar Challenge. | Infographic by Sarah Gerrity. Minh Le Minh Le Program Manager, Solar Program Cyrus Wadia Assistant Director for Clean Energy and Materials R&D, The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy LEARN MORE Stay up to date on the Department's solar energy initiatives by visiting energy.gov/solar. View guidebooks, education curricula and other resources developed

319

Borehole Data Package for Two RCRA Wells 299-W11-25B and 299-W11-46 at Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area T, Hanford Site, Washington  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One new Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) groundwater monitoring and assessment well was installed at single-shell tank Waste Management Area (WMA) T in calendar year 2005 in partial fulfillment of commitments for well installations proposed in Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, Milestone M-24-57 (2004). The need for increased monitoring capability at this WMA was identified during a data quality objectives process for establishing a RCRA/Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA)/Atomic Energy Act (AEA) integrated 200 West and 200 East Area Groundwater Monitoring Network. The initial borehole, 299-W11-25B, was located about 20 ft from existing downgradient well 299 W11-39. The specific objective for the borehole was to determine the vertical distribution of contaminants in the unconfined aquifer at the northeast corner of WMA T. The permanent casing in borehole 299-W11-25B was damaged beyond repair during well construction and replacement borehole, 299-W11-46, was drilled about 10 ft from borehole 299-W11-25B (Figure 1). Borehole 299-W11-46 was completed as a RCRA monitoring well. This document provides a compilation of all available geologic data, geophysical logs, hydrogeologic data and well information obtained during drilling, well construction, well development, pump installation, groundwater sampling and analysis activities, and preliminary results of slug tests associated with wells 299-W11-25B and 299-W11-46. Appendix A contains geologists logs, Well Construction Summary Reports, Well Summary Sheets (as-built diagrams), and Well Development and Testing Data sheets. Appendix B contains the results of chemical analysis of groundwater samples. Appendix C contains complete spectral gamma-ray logs and borehole deviation surveys and Appendix D contains initial results of slug tests. The non-conformance report for borehole 299-W11-46 is provided in Appendix E.

Horton, Duane G.; Chamness, Mickie A.

2006-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

320

CHALLENGE MEASUREMENTS FOR AUTHENTICATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Authentication of systems with an information barrier that protects sensitive information is difficult; in particular, the information barrier can allow a hidden switch to be implemented by the system fabricator and operator. The hidden switch is the operator’s ability to subvert the measurement system and force it to produce a desired and false result. It is usually discussed in the context of an attribute measurement in which a faked item is presented in place of a real item regulated by an agreement, with the driving motivation being the ability to preserve a stock of valuable items. In simple terms, the hidden switch enables a shell game with assets, and the information barrier protects the switch. This presentation outlines challenge measurements that could be used to detect the implementation of a hidden switch and assist the authentication process.

Pitts, W. Karl

2009-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "management challenge area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Future nuclear fuel cycles: prospects and challenges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solvent extraction has played, from the early steps, a major role in the development of nuclear fuel cycle technologies, both in the front end and back end. Today's stakes in the field of energy enhance further than before the need for a sustainable management of nuclear materials. Recycling actinides appears as a main guideline, as much for saving resources as for minimizing the final waste impact, and many options can be considered. Strengthened by the important and outstanding performance of recent PUREX processing plants, solvent-extraction processes seem a privileged route to meet the new and challenging requirements of sustainable future nuclear systems. (author)

Boullis, Bernard [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, Direction de l'Energie Nucleaire, Centre de Saclay, 91191, Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Restricted Areas in U.S. Waters | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Restricted Areas in U.S. Waters Energy Data Apps Maps Challenges Resources Blogs Let's Talk Energy Beta You are here Data.gov Communities Energy Data Restricted Areas in...

323

EM-21 Retrieval Knowledge Center: Waste Retrieval Challenges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EM-21 is the Waste Processing Division of the Office of Engineering and Technology, within the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM). In August of 2008, EM-21 began an initiative to develop a Retrieval Knowledge Center (RKC) to provide the DOE, high level waste retrieval operators, and technology developers with centralized and focused location to share knowledge and expertise that will be used to address retrieval challenges across the DOE complex. The RKC is also designed to facilitate information sharing across the DOE Waste Site Complex through workshops, and a searchable database of waste retrieval technology information. The database may be used to research effective technology approaches for specific retrieval tasks and to take advantage of the lessons learned from previous operations. It is also expected to be effective for remaining current with state-of-the-art of retrieval technologies and ongoing development within the DOE Complex. To encourage collaboration of DOE sites with waste retrieval issues, the RKC team is co-led by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Two RKC workshops were held in the Fall of 2008. The purpose of these workshops was to define top level waste retrieval functional areas, exchange lessons learned, and develop a path forward to support a strategic business plan focused on technology needs for retrieval. The primary participants involved in these workshops included retrieval personnel and laboratory staff that are associated with Hanford and Savannah River Sites since the majority of remaining DOE waste tanks are located at these sites. This report summarizes and documents the results of the initial RKC workshops. Technology challenges identified from these workshops and presented here are expected to be a key component to defining future RKC-directed tasks designed to facilitate tank waste retrieval solutions.

Fellinger, Andrew P.; Rinker, Michael W.; Berglin, Eric J.; Minichan, Richard L.; Poirier, Micheal R.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Martin, Bruce A.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Saldivar, Eloy; Mullen, O Dennis; Chapman, Noel F.; Wells, Beric E.; Gibbons, Peter W.

2009-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

324

DOE Office of Environmental Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Management Environmental Management Project and Contract Management Improvement Timeline Improving DOE contract and project management is a top priority of the Department's senior management and entire organization. The DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM) has put in place a "Roadmap" for Journey to Excellence that sets specific performance expectations for continuous improvements in contract and project management. Following are some highlights of EM's improvement actions over the past five years. In 2006, the National Academy of Public Administration (NAPA) began a study of EM, which included acquisition and project management among its key focus areas. The resultant report from the study,

325

Bringing high performance computing to the biologist’s workbench: approaches, applications and challenges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data-intensive and high-performance computing are poised to significantly impact the future of biological research which is increasingly driven by the prevalence of high-throughput experimental methodologies for genome sequencing, transcriptomics, proteomics, and other areas. Large centers such as NIH’s National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), The Institute for Genomic Research (TIGR), and the DOE’s Joint Genome Institute (JGI) Integrated Microbial Genome (IMG) have made extensive use of multiprocessor architectures to deal with some of the challenges of processing, storing and curating exponentially growing genomic and proteomic datasets—enabling end users to rapidly access a growing public data source, as well as utilize analysis tools transparently on high-performance computing resources. Applying this computational power to single-investigator analysis, however, often relies on users to provide their own computational resources, forcing them to endure the learning curve of porting, building, and running software on multiprocessor architectures. Solving the next generation of large-scale biology challenges using multiprocessor machines—from small clusters to emerging petascale machines—can most practically be realized if this learning curve can be minimized through a combination of workflow management, data management and resource allocation as well as intuitive interfaces and compatibility with existing common data formats.

Oehmen, Christopher S.; Cannon, William R.

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Energy Challenge Three: The Greenbelt Green Neighborhood Challenge |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Challenge Three: The Greenbelt Green Neighborhood Challenge Energy Challenge Three: The Greenbelt Green Neighborhood Challenge Energy Challenge Three: The Greenbelt Green Neighborhood Challenge June 21, 2010 - 5:52pm Addthis John Lippert Lore Rosenthal, a principal leader behind the Greenbelt Climate Action Network, attended a meeting in Greenbelt, Maryland, on an energy purchasing cooperative more than a year ago. Also attending the meeting was Lore's neighbor, Sylvia Lewis, on the board of both the Greenbelt Community Foundation (GCF) and Greenbelt Homes, Inc. (GHI). The energy purchasing co-op spokesperson was offering electricity at a lower rate than that offered by PEPCO, our local utility. Lore longed for a similar arrangement-a bulk electricity purchase but with wind energy. She spoke to Sylvia, who thought it was a good idea. Lore

327

Managing IT Projects An Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Order data Project >2M 15/05/2012 Benefits: reduce costs Project >2M - Excel-like interfaceManaging IT Projects An Introduction Jean-Louis Binot 15/05/2012 Jean-Louis Binot #12;IT Applications and IT Projects2 Why Project Management ?1 Agenda Challenges of IT Projects3 IT Project Life Cycle

Wolper, Pierre

328

Towards Exascale Distributed Data Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

â??Exascale eScience infrastructuresâ? will face important and critical challenges, both from computational and data perspectives. Increasingly complex and parallel scientific codes will lead to the production of a huge amount of data. The ... Keywords: data analysis, data replication, distributed data management, metadata management, parallel I/O

Giovanni Aloisio; Sandro Fiore

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

On the classification and management of Virtual Organisation Breeding Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wide variety of domains and applications have identified the need for collaboration among heterogeneous, autonomous and geographically disperse organisations. Virtual Organisations (VOs) represent a main form of network for goal-oriented ... Keywords: VBE challenges, VBE competency management, VBE management, VBE trust management, breeding environments, collaboration, collaborative networks, information management, information technology, technology management, virtual organisations

Hamideh Afsarmanesh; Luis M. Camarinha-Matos

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

AREA SESS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1. This standard is approved for use by all Departments and Agencies of the Department of Defense (DoD). 2. This issue of MIL-STD-130 provides further clarification and increased insight and guidance for the implementation of machine-readable information (MRI) processes for item identification marking and facilitating automatic data capture. Based solely on non-Government standards, MRI provides a valuable tool for life-cycle asset management from acquisition through manufacture to logistics and final disposition. However, the application of free text information item identification marking is still necessary for many end users of the identified item. Finding the most effective use of both marking protocols, either singly or in combination, is the prime responsibility of the acquiring activity. 3. This standard provides the criteria by which product designers develop specific item identification marking requirements. Product designers must include in product definition data the specific requirements as to marking content, size, location, and application process. Simply stating in the product definition data that the marking be in accordance with this standard is not sufficient for initial manufacture and subsequent production of replenishment spare items.

unknown authors

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Exascale Challenge (2011) | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Video Gallery > Exascale Challenge (2011) Exascale Challenge (2011) Exascale Challenge (2011) From: NNSANews...

332

Challenges associated with shale gas production | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Challenges associated with shale gas production Challenges associated with shale gas production What challenges are associated with shale gas production? More Documents &...

333

See More Challenges | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

See More Challenges Education Grants Developers Data Apps Challenges International Classroom Education You are here Data.gov Communities Education Challenge.gov logo...

334

Cities - Challenges and Opportunities | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Challenges and Opportunities Cities Data Apps Challenges Policies Cities You are here Data.gov Communities Cities Challenges and Opportunities City and federal government are...

335

Building Technologies Office: DOE Challenge Home  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Challenge Home on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: DOE Challenge Home on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: DOE Challenge Home on Delicious Rank Building...

336

Management Plan Management Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a coevolving naturalcultural system. Suitable ecosystem attributes can be achieved by managing human maintenance that protects the riparian corridor. · Manage recreational use to protect riparian values Creek and the Warm Springs River during runoff periods. · Road systems and upland management practices

337

Special Analysis for the Disposal of the Consolidated Edison Uranium Solidification Project Waste Stream at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this Special Analysis (SA) is to determine if the Oak Ridge (OR) Consolidated Edison Uranium Solidification Project (CEUSP) uranium-233 (233U) waste stream (DRTK000000050, Revision 0) is acceptable for shallow land burial (SLB) at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The CEUSP 233U waste stream requires a special analysis because the concentrations of thorium-229 (229Th), 230Th, 232U, 233U, and 234U exceeded their NNSS Waste Acceptance Criteria action levels. The acceptability of the waste stream is evaluated by determining if performance assessment (PA) modeling provides a reasonable expectation that SLB disposal is protective of human health and the environment. The CEUSP 233U waste stream is a long-lived waste with unique radiological hazards. The SA evaluates the long-term acceptability of the CEUSP 233U waste stream for near-surface disposal as a two tier process. The first tier, which is the usual SA process, uses the approved probabilistic PA model to determine if there is a reasonable expectation that disposal of the CEUSP 233U waste stream can meet the performance objectives of U.S. Department of Energy Manual DOE M 435.1-1, “Radioactive Waste Management,” for a period of 1,000 years (y) after closure. The second tier addresses the acceptability of the OR CEUSP 233U waste stream for near-surface disposal by evaluating long-term site stability and security, by performing extended (i.e., 10,000 and 60,000 y) modeling analyses, and by evaluating the effect of containers and the depth of burial on performance. Tier I results indicate that there is a reasonable expectation of compliance with all performance objectives if the OR CEUSP 233U waste stream is disposed in the Area 5 RWMS SLB disposal units. The maximum mean and 95th percentile PA results are all less than the performance objective for 1,000 y. Monte Carlo uncertainty analysis indicates that there is a high likelihood of compliance with all performance objectives. Tier II results indicate that the long-term performance of the OR CEUSP 233U waste stream is protective of human health and the environment. The Area 5 RWMS is located in one of the least populated and most arid regions of the U.S. Site characterization data indicate that infiltration of precipitation below the plant root zone at 2.5 meters (8.2 feet) ceased 10,000 to 15,000 y ago. The site is not expected to have a groundwater pathway as long as the current arid climate persists. The national security mission of the NNSS and the location of the Area 5 RWMS within the Frenchman Flat Corrective Action Unit require that access controls and land use restrictions be maintained indefinitely. PA modeling results for 10,000 to 60,000 y also indicate that the OR CEUSP 233U waste stream is acceptable for near-surface disposal. The mean resident air pathway annual total effective dose (TED), the resident all-pathways annual TED, and the acute drilling TED are less than their performance objectives for 10,000 y after closure. The mean radon-222 (222Rn) flux density exceeds the performance objective at 4,200 y, but this is due to waste already disposed at the Area 5 RWMS and is only slightly affected by disposal of the CEUSP 233U. The peak resident all-pathways annual TED from CEUSP key radionuclides occurs at 48,000 y and is less than the 0.25 millisievert performance objective. Disposal of the OR CEUSP 233U waste stream in a typical SLB trench slightly increases PA results. Increasing the depth was found to eliminate any impacts of the OR CEUSP 233U waste stream. Containers could not be shown to have any significant impact on performance due to the long half-life of the waste stream and a lack of data for pitting corrosion rates of stainless steel in soil. The results of the SA indicate that all performance objectives can be met with disposal of the OR CEUSP 233U waste stream in the SLB units at the Area 5 RWMS. The long-term performance of the OR CEUSP 233U waste stream disposed in the near surface is protective of human health

NSTec Environmental Management

2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

338

Special Analysis for the Disposal of the Consolidated Edison Uranium Solidification Project Waste Stream at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Special Analysis (SA) is to determine if the Oak Ridge (OR) Consolidated Edison Uranium Solidification Project (CEUSP) uranium-233 (233U) waste stream (DRTK000000050, Revision 0) is acceptable for shallow land burial (SLB) at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The CEUSP 233U waste stream requires a special analysis because the concentrations of thorium-229 (229Th), 230Th, 232U, 233U, and 234U exceeded their NNSS Waste Acceptance Criteria action levels. The acceptability of the waste stream is evaluated by determining if performance assessment (PA) modeling provides a reasonable expectation that SLB disposal is protective of human health and the environment. The CEUSP 233U waste stream is a long-lived waste with unique radiological hazards. The SA evaluates the long-term acceptability of the CEUSP 233U waste stream for near-surface disposal as a two tier process. The first tier, which is the usual SA process, uses the approved probabilistic PA model to determine if there is a reasonable expectation that disposal of the CEUSP 233U waste stream can meet the performance objectives of U.S. Department of Energy Manual DOE M 435.1-1, “Radioactive Waste Management,” for a period of 1,000 years (y) after closure. The second tier addresses the acceptability of the OR CEUSP 233U waste stream for near-surface disposal by evaluating long-term site stability and security, by performing extended (i.e., 10,000 and 60,000 y) modeling analyses, and by evaluating the effect of containers and the depth of burial on performance. Tier I results indicate that there is a reasonable expectation of compliance with all performance objectives if the OR CEUSP 233U waste stream is disposed in the Area 5 RWMS SLB disposal units. The maximum mean and 95th percentile PA results are all less than the performance objective for 1,000 y. Monte Carlo uncertainty analysis indicates that there is a high likelihood of compliance with all performance objectives. Tier II results indicate that the long-term performance of the OR CEUSP 233U waste stream is protective of human health and the environment. The Area 5 RWMS is located in one of the least populated and most arid regions of the U.S. Site characterization data indicate that infiltration of precipitation below the plant root zone at 2.5 meters (8.2 feet) ceased 10,000 to 15,000 y ago. The site is not expected to have a groundwater pathway as long as the current arid climate persists. The national security mission of the NNSS and the location of the Area 5 RWMS within the Frenchman Flat Corrective Action Unit require that access controls and land use restrictions be maintained indefinitely. PA modeling results for 10,000 to 60,000 y also indicate that the OR CEUSP 233U waste stream is acceptable for near-surface disposal. The mean resident air pathway annual total effective dose (TED), the resident all-pathways annual TED, and the acute drilling TED are less than their performance objectives for 10,000 y after closure. The mean radon-222 (222Rn) flux density exceeds the performance objective at 4,200 y, but this is due to waste already disposed at the Area 5 RWMS and is only slightly affected by disposal of the CEUSP 233U. The peak resident all-pathways annual TED from CEUSP key radionuclides occurs at 48,000 y and is less than the 0.25 millisievert performance objective. Disposal of the OR CEUSP 233U waste stream in a typical SLB trench slightly increases PA results. Increasing the depth was found to eliminate any impacts of the OR CEUSP 233U waste stream. Containers could not be shown to have any significant impact on performance due to the long half-life of the waste stream and a lack of data for pitting corrosion rates of stainless steel in soil. The results of the SA indicate that all performance objectives can be met with disposal of the OR CEUSP 233U waste stream in the SLB units at the Area 5 RWMS. The long-term performance of the OR CEUSP 233U waste stream disposed in the near surface is protective of human health

NSTec Environmental Management

2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

339

FAQS Reference Guide – Waste Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This reference guide addresses the competency statements in the January 2003 edition of DOE-STD-1159-2003, Waste Management Functional Area Qualification Standard.

340

Adaptive connection management for scalable MPI over InfiniBand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Supporting scalable and efficient parallel programs is a major challenge in parallel computing with the widespread adoption of large-scale computer clusters and supercomputers. One of the pronounced scalability challenges is the management of connections ...

Weikuan Yu; Qi Gao; Dhabaleswar K. Panda

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "management challenge area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Western Area Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Colorado River Storage Project Management Center Colorado River Storage Project Management Center Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Western Area Power Administration-Colorado River Storage Project Management Center Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued by Western Area Power Administration-Colorado River Storage Project Management Center. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD January 25, 2011 CX-005545: Categorical Exclusion Determination Installation of Metering and Circuit Breaker at Powell 69-Kilovolt Substation CX(s) Applied: B4.11 Date: 01/25/2011 Location(s): Page, Arizona Office(s): Western Area Power Administration-Colorado River Storage Project Management Center October 26, 2009 CX-005544: Categorical Exclusion Determination Power Rate Formula for the Provo River Project of the Western Area Power

342

Field Research Challenge Site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Previous experiments at the Rifle, Colorado Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site demonstrated that field-scale addition of acetate to groundwater reduced the ambient soluble uranium concentration. In this report, sediment samples collected before and after acetate field addition were used to assess the active microbes via {sup 13}C acetate stable isotope probing on 3 phases [coarse sand, fines (8-approximately 150 {micro}m), groundwater (0.2-8 {micro}m)] over a 24-day time frame. TRFLP results generally indicated a stronger signal in {sup 13}C-DNA in the 'fines' fraction compared to the sand and groundwater. Before the field-scale acetate addition, a Geobacter-like group primarily synthesized {sup 13}C-DNA in the groundwater phase, an alpha Proteobacterium primarily grew on the fines/sands, and an Acinetobacter sp. and Decholoromonas-like OTU utilized much of the {sup 13}C acetate in both groundwater and particle-associated phases. At the termination of the field-scale acetate addition, the Geobacter-like species was active on the solid phases rather than the groundwater, while the other bacterial groups had very reduced newly synthesized DNA signal. These findings will help to delineate the acetate utilization patterns of bacteria in the field and can lead to improved methods for stimulating distinct microbial populations in situ.

Kerkhof, L.; Williams, K.H.; Long, P.E.; McGuinness, L.

2011-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

343

Beyond the Inventory: An Interagency Collaboration to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the Greater Yellowstone Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As one of the largest, intact ecosystems in the continental United States, land managers within the Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA) have recognized the importance of compiling and understanding agency greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The 10 Federal units within the GYA have taken an active role in compiling GHG inventories on a unit- and ecosystem-wide level, setting goals for GHG mitigation, and identifying mitigation strategies for achieving those goals. This paper details the processes, methodologies, challenges, solutions, and lessons learned by the 10 Federal units within the GYA throughout this ongoing effort.

Kandt, A.; Hotchkiss, E.; Fiebig, M.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Challenging beliefs through multi-level participatory modelling in Indonesia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A critical challenge for science in times of increasingly depleted natural resources is how policy and management can be improved to attain a pathway to sustainability. This paper argues that facilitating a learning experience for decision makers by ... Keywords: Agent-based modelling, Indonesia, Multi-level governance, Participatory modelling

Alexander Smajgl

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Scientific Challenges for Understanding the Quantum Universe  

SciTech Connect

A workshop titled "Scientific Challenges for Understanding the Quantum Universe" was held December 9-11, 2008, at the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center-National Accelerator Laboratory. The primary purpose of the meeting was to examine how computing at the extreme scale can contribute to meeting forefront scientific challenges in particle physics, particle astrophysics and cosmology. The workshop was organized around five research areas with associated panels. Three of these, "High Energy Theoretical Physics," "Accelerator Simulation," and "Experimental Particle Physics," addressed research of the Office of High Energy Physics’ Energy and Intensity Frontiers, while the"Cosmology and Astrophysics Simulation" and "Astrophysics Data Handling, Archiving, and Mining" panels were associated with the Cosmic Frontier.

Khaleel, Mohammad A.

2009-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

346

Challenges in Accelerator Beam Instrumentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The challenges in beam instrumentation and diagnostics for present and future particle accelerator projects are presented. A few examples for advanced hadron and lepton beam diagnostics are given.

Wendt, M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Challenges in Accelerator Beam Instrumentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The challenges in beam instrumentation and diagnostics for present and future particle accelerator projects are presented. A few examples for advanced hadron and lepton beam diagnostics are given.

Wendt, M.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

EPA Federal Green Challenge 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. EPA Federal Green Challenge 2012 DOE Sustainability Assistance Network Conference Call Ellen Fortier June 20, 2013 2 Executive Order...

349

ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Challenge for Industry Professional Engineers' Guide for Validating Statements of Energy Improvement Office of Air and Radiation Climate Protection Partnerships Division May 2013...

350

Ris Energy Report 6 Energy challenges 3 Energy challenges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in their potential for renewable energy. In most countries, the dominant renewable energy source is large-scale hydro-generation biofuels, hydro- gen, fuel cells and low-energy buildings, among others. In transport, there is a targetRisø Energy Report 6 Energy challenges 3 Energy challenges POUL ERIk MORTHORsT, RIsø DTU; Jø

351

Risk Management RM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Risk Management Review Module Risk Management Review Module March 2010 CD-0 O 0 OFFICE OF C CD-1 F ENVIRO Standard R Risk M Rev Critical Decis CD-2 M ONMENTAL Review Plan Managem view Module sion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 L MANAGE (SRP) ment e pplicability D-3 EMENT CD-4 Post Ope eration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM project review process encompasses key milestones established by DOE O 413.3A, Change 1, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, DOE-STD-1189-2008, Integration of Safety into the Design Process, and EM's internal

352

Competency Management Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Competency Management Program Competency Management Program Competency Management Program The DOE faces a talent challenge derived from a number of factors including a dynamic operating environment, an anticipated wave of retirements from the workforce, and a projected shortage of workers with needed skills. The Office of the Chief Human Capital Officer (CHCO) is charged with leading the effort to address the talent challenge. The strategic identification, development and use of competencies are key enablers "for strategically aligning the agency's workforce to its missions through effective management of human capital policies and programs." Competency-centric Learning and Development facilitates the selection, development, training, and management of a highly skilled, productive, and diverse workforce.

353

Research Areas - Argonne National Laboratories, Materials Sicence Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

http://www.msd.anl.gov http://www.msd.anl.gov 2014-01-12T01:06:27+00:00 Joomla! 1.6 - Open Source Content Management Dynamics of Active Self-Assemble Materials 2011-05-13T17:17:28+00:00 2011-05-13T17:17:28+00:00 http://www.msd.anl.gov/research-areas/dynamics-of-active-self-assemble-materials Ken Krajniak krajniak@anl.gov Self-assembly, a natural tendency of simple building blocks to organize into complex architectures is a unique opportunity for materials science. In-depth understanding of self-assembly paves the way for design of tailored smart materials for emerging energy technologies. However, self-assembled materials pose a formidable challenge: they are intrinsically complex, with an often hierarchical organization occurring on many nested length and time scales. This program

354

3M's Motor Challenge Showcase Demonstration Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In January 1994, 3M began the task of optimizing the electric motor systems at 3M Center, a 26 building, 7 million square foot corporate campus. A cross-functional, cross-company team was established which included four 3M employees representing two different departments within 3M, an engineer specializing in demand side management programs from Northern States Power Company, and a sales engineer from General Electric Supply Company. The team was later joined by an engineering specialist from Landis & Staefa, Inc., a building automation controls supplier. The team began the task of identifying the projects that could save energy and provide a reasonable return on 3M's investment on a building by building approach. As surveys were completed, proposals were prepared and presented to management requesting funding. The team continued the process of identifying projects in remaining buildings and took on the responsibility of designing, contracting and implementing projects as funding was approved for those already studied. Follow-up measurements to ascertain that the savings predicted was actually achieved are done before project close-out. This project was submitted and accepted as a Motor Challenge Showcase Demonstration Project. The Motor Challenge is a U.S. Department of Energy initiative to promote the efficient use of energy in electric motor systems. Showcase Demonstration Projects are used to exemplify the benefits that motor system optimization can provide. This Showcase Project is different from most as it emphasizes the process that was developed to carry out a project of this magnitude rather than any single specific technologies or applications. The team has completed the project at 3M Center. Measured savings are $823,000 per year. This paper will discuss the Motor Challenge Showcase Demonstration project that was completed at 3M Center, the motor systems survey methodology the team developed, analysis tools and techniques and the results that have been attained.

Schultz, S. C.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

3M's Motor Challenge Showcase Demonstration Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In January 1994, 3M began the task of optimizing the electric motor systems at 3M Center, a 26 building, 7 million square foot corporate campus. A cross-functional, cross-company team was established which included four 3M employees representing two different departments within 3M, an engineer specializing in demand side management programs from Northern States Power Company, and a sales engineer from General Electric Supply Company. The team was later joined by an engineering specialist from Landis & Gyr, Inc., a building automation controls supplier. The team began the task of identifying the projects that could save energy and provide a reasonable return on 3M's investment on a building by building approach. As surveys were completed, proposals were prepared and presented to management requesting funding. The team continued the process of identifying projects in remaining buildings and took on the responsibility of designing, contracting and implementing projects as funding was approved for those already studied. Follow-up measurements to ascertain that the savings predicted was actually achieved are done before project close-out. This project was submitted and has been accepted as a Motor Challenge Showcase Demonstration Project. The Motor Challenge is a U. S. Department of Energy initiative to promote the efficient use of energy in electric motor systems. Showcase Demonstration Projects are used to exemplify the benefits that motor system optimization can provide. This Showcase Project is different from most as it emphasizes the process that was developed to carry out a project of this magnitude rather than any single specific technologies or applications. The team has nearly completed the studies at 3M Center and is well into the implementation phase with six buildings being complete. Savings identified to date are approximately $810,000 per year. This paper will discuss the Motor Challenge Showcase Demonstration project currently underway at 3M Center, the motor systems survey methodology the team developed, analysis tools and techniques and the results that have been attained.

Schultz, S. C.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Challenges for high-performance networking for exascale computing.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Achieving the next three orders of magnitude performance increase to move from petascale to exascale computing will require a significant advancements in several fundamental areas. Recent studies have outlined many of the challenges in hardware and software that will be needed. In this paper, we examine these challenges with respect to high-performance networking. We describe the repercussions of anticipated changes to computing and networking hardware and discuss the impact that alternative parallel programming models will have on the network software stack. We also present some ideas on possible approaches that address some of these challenges.

Barrett, Brian W.; Hemmert, K. Scott; Underwood, Keith Douglas (Intel Corporation, Hillsboro, OR); Brightwell, Ronald Brian

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Research Projects Addressing Technical Challenges to Environmentally...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Research Projects Addressing Technical Challenges to Environmentally Acceptable Shale Gas Development Selected by DOE Research Projects Addressing Technical Challenges to...

358

Showcasing California Better Buildings Challenge Partners' Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Showcasing California Better Buildings Challenge Partners' Energy Saving Solutions Showcasing California Better Buildings Challenge Partners' Energy Saving Solutions August 28,...

359

Vehicle Technologies Office: Workplace Charging Challenge Partner...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies Office: Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Chrysler Group LLC on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Workplace Charging Challenge Partner:...

360

Vehicle Technologies Office: Workplace Charging Challenge Partner...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office: Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: WESCO International, Inc. on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: WESCO...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "management challenge area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Managing PCBs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Compliance with Environmental Protection Agency regulations for managing the polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) that were widely distributed in electrical equipment will be costly to the utility industry, estimated at over $5 billion over a ten-year period by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). Most of the budget could be needed to identify and reclaim 2.5 million contaminated transformers. Three divisions are coordinating EPRI research efforts with those of other companies and utilities in the areas of detection, destruction, spill cleanup, disposal, and health effects. (DCK)

Lihach, N.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Management Plan  

SciTech Connect

As a federal agency, the U.S. Department of Energy has been directed by Congress, the U.S. president, and the American public to provide leadership in the preservation of prehistoric, historic, and other cultural resources on the lands it administers. This mandate to preserve cultural resources in a spirit of stewardship for the future is outlined in various federal preservation laws, regulations, and guidelines such as the National Historic Preservation Act, the Archaeological Resources Protection Act, and the National Environmental Policy Act. The purpose of this Cultural Resource Management Plan is to describe how the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office will meet these responsibilities at the Idaho National Laboratory. This Laboratory, which is located in southeastern Idaho, is home to a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least 13,500 years of human occupation in the southeastern Idaho area. These resources are nonrenewable; bear valuable physical and intangible legacies; and yield important information about the past, present, and perhaps the future. There are special challenges associated with balancing the preservation of these sites with the management and ongoing operation of an active scientific laboratory. The Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office is committed to a cultural resource management program that accepts these challenges in a manner reflecting both the spirit and intent of the legislative mandates. This document is designed for multiple uses and is intended to be flexible and responsive to future changes in law or mission. Document flexibility and responsiveness will be assured through annual reviews and as-needed updates. Document content includes summaries of Laboratory cultural resource philosophy and overall Department of Energy policy; brief contextual overviews of Laboratory missions, environment, and cultural history; and an overview of cultural resource management practices. A series of appendices provides important details that support the main text.

Lowrey, Diana Lee

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Management Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a federal agency, the U.S. Department of Energy has been directed by Congress, the U.S. president, and the American public to provide leadership in the preservation of prehistoric, historic, and other cultural resources on the lands it administers. This mandate to preserve cultural resources in a spirit of stewardship for the future is outlined in various federal preservation laws, regulations, and guidelines such as the National Historic Preservation Act, the Archaeological Resources Protection Act, and the National Environmental Policy Act. The purpose of this Cultural Resource Management Plan is to describe how the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office will meet these responsibilities at Idaho National Laboratory in southeastern Idaho. The Idaho National Laboratory is home to a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least 13,500 years of human occupation in the southeastern Idaho area. These resources are nonrenewable, bear valuable physical and intangible legacies, and yield important information about the past, present, and perhaps the future. There are special challenges associated with balancing the preservation of these sites with the management and ongoing operation of an active scientific laboratory. The Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office is committed to a cultural resource management program that accepts these challenges in a manner reflecting both the spirit and intent of the legislative mandates. This document is designed for multiple uses and is intended to be flexible and responsive to future changes in law or mission. Document flexibility and responsiveness will be assured through regular reviews and as-needed updates. Document content includes summaries of Laboratory cultural resource philosophy and overall Department of Energy policy; brief contextual overviews of Laboratory missions, environment, and cultural history; and an overview of cultural resource management practices. A series of appendices provides important details that support the main text.

Julie Braun Williams

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Management Plan  

SciTech Connect

As a federal agency, the U.S. Department of Energy has been directed by Congress, the U.S. president, and the American public to provide leadership in the preservation of prehistoric, historic, and other cultural resources on the lands it administers. This mandate to preserve cultural resources in a spirit of stewardship for the future is outlined in various federal preservation laws, regulations, and guidelines such as the National Historic Preservation Act, the Archaeological Resources Protection Act, and the National Environmental Policy Act. The purpose of this Cultural Resource Management Plan is to describe how the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office will meet these responsibilities at the Idaho National Laboratory. This Laboratory, which is located in southeastern Idaho, is home to a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least 13,500 years of human occupation in the southeastern Idaho area. These resources are nonrenewable; bear valuable physical and intangible legacies; and yield important information about the past, present, and perhaps the future. There are special challenges associated with balancing the preservation of these sites with the management and ongoing operation of an active scientific laboratory. The Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office is committed to a cultural resource management program that accepts these challenges in a manner reflecting both the spirit and intent of the legislative mandates. This document is designed for multiple uses and is intended to be flexible and responsive to future changes in law or mission. Document flexibility and responsiveness will be assured through annual reviews and as-needed updates. Document content includes summaries of Laboratory cultural resource philosophy and overall Department of Energy policy; brief contextual overviews of Laboratory missions, environment, and cultural history; and an overview of cultural resource management practices. A series of appendices provides important details that support the main text.

Lowrey, Diana Lee

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Report to Congress on the U.S. Department of Energy`s Environmental Management Science Program: Research funded and its linkages to environmental cleanup problems, and Environmental Management Science Program research award abstracts. Volume 2 of 3 -- Appendix B  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy`s Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) serves as a catalyst for the application of scientific discoveries to the development and deployment of technologies that will lead to reduction of the costs and risks associated with cleaning up the nation`s nuclear complex. Appendix B provides details about each of the 202 research awards funded by the EMSP. This information may prove useful to researchers who are attempting to address the Department`s environmental management challenges in their work, program managers who are planning, integrating, and prioritizing Environmental Management projects, and stakeholders and regulators who are interested in the Department`s environmental challenges. The research award information is organized by the state and institution in which the lead principal investigator is located. In many cases, the lead principal investigator is one of several investigators at a number of different institutions. In these cases, the lead investigator (major collaborator) at each of the additional institutions is listed. Each research award abstract is followed by a list of high cost projects that can potentially be impacted by the research results. High cost projects are Environmental Management projects that have total costs greater than $50 million from the year 2007 and beyond, based on the March 1998 Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure Draft data, and have costs or quantities of material associated with an Environmental Management problem area. High cost projects which must remain active in the year 2007 and beyond to manage high risk are also identified. Descriptions of these potentially related high cost Environmental Management projects can be found in Appendix C. Additional projects in the same problem area as a research award can be located using the Index of High Cost Environmental Management Projects by Problem Area, at the end of Appendices B and C.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

FAQS Qualification Card - Transportation and Traffic Management |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transportation and Traffic Management Transportation and Traffic Management FAQS Qualification Card - Transportation and Traffic Management A key element for the Department's Technical Qualification Programs is a set of common Functional Area Qualification Standards (FAQS) and associated Job Task Analyses (JTA). These standards are developed for various functional areas of responsibility in the Department, including oversight of safety management programs identified as hazard controls in Documented Safety Analyses (DSA). For each functional area, the FAQS identify the minimum technical competencies and supporting knowledge and skills for a typical qualified individual working in the area. FAQC-TransportationAndTrafficManagement.docx Description Transportation and Traffic Management Qualification Card

367

TANK OPERATIONS CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT METHODOLOGY UTILIZING THE AGENCY METHOD OF CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT  

SciTech Connect

Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) has faced significant project management challenges in managing Davis-Bacon construction work that meets contractually required small business goals. The unique challenge is to provide contracting opportunities to multiple small business constructioin subcontractors while performing high hazard work in a safe and productive manner. Previous to the WRPS contract, construction work at the Hanford Tank Farms was contracted to large companies, while current Department of Energy (DOE) Contracts typically emphasize small business awards. As an integral part of Nuclear Project Management at Hanford Tank Farms, construction involves removal of old equipment and structures and installation of new infrastructure to support waste retrieval and waste feed delivery to the Waste Treatment Plant. Utilizing the optimum construction approach ensures that the contractors responsible for this work are successful in meeting safety, quality, cost and schedule objectives while working in a very hazardous environment. This paper descirbes the successful transition from a traditional project delivery method that utilized a large business general contractor and subcontractors to a new project construction management model that is more oriented to small businesses. Construction has selected the Agency Construction Management Method (John E Schaufelberger, Len Holm, "Management of Construction Projects, A Constructor's Perspective", University of Washington, Prentice Hall 2002). This method was implemented in the first quarter of Fiscal Year 2009 (FY2009), where Construction Management is performed by substantially home office resources from the URS Northwest Office in Richland, Washington. The Agency Method has allowed WRPS to provide proven Construction Managers and Field Leads to mentor and direct small business contractors, thus providing expertise and assurance of a successful project. Construction execution contracts are subcontracted directly by WRPS to small or disadvantaged contractors that are mentored and supported by URS personnel. Each small contractor is mentored and supported utilizing the principles of the Construction Industry Institute (CII) Partnering process. Some of the key mentoring and partnering areas that are explored in this paper are, internal and external safety professional support, subcontractor safety teams and the interface with project and site safety teams, quality assurance program support to facilitate compliance with NQA-1, construction, team roles and responsibilities, work definition for successful fixed price contracts, scheduling and interface with project schedules and cost projection/accruals. The practical application of the CII Partnering principles, with the Construction Management expertise of URS, has led to a highly successful construction model that also meets small business contracting goals.

LESKO KF; BERRIOCHOA MV

2010-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

368

TANK OPERATIONS CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT METHODOLOGY UTILIZING THE AGENCY METHOD OF CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT  

SciTech Connect

Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) has faced significant project management challenges in managing Davis-Bacon construction work that meets contractually required small business goals. The unique challenge is to provide contracting opportunities to multiple small business constructioin subcontractors while performing high hazard work in a safe and productive manner. Previous to the WRPS contract, construction work at the Hanford Tank Farms was contracted to large companies, while current Department of Energy (DOE) Contracts typically emphasize small business awards. As an integral part of Nuclear Project Management at Hanford Tank Farms, construction involves removal of old equipment and structures and installation of new infrastructure to support waste retrieval and waste feed delivery to the Waste Treatment Plant. Utilizing the optimum construction approach ensures that the contractors responsible for this work are successful in meeting safety, quality, cost and schedule objectives while working in a very hazardous environment. This paper descirbes the successful transition from a traditional project delivery method that utilized a large business general contractor and subcontractors to a new project construction management model that is more oriented to small businesses. Construction has selected the Agency Construction Management Method (John E Schaufelberger, Len Holm, "Management of Construction Projects, A Constructor's Perspective", University of Washington, Prentice Hall 2002). This method was implemented in the first quarter of Fiscal Year 2009 (FY2009), where Construction Management is performed by substantially home office resources from the URS Northwest Office in Richland, Washington. The Agency Method has allowed WRPS to provide proven Construction Managers and Field Leads to mentor and direct small business contractors, thus providing expertise and assurance of a successful project. Construction execution contracts are subcontracted directly by WRPS to small or disadvantaged contractors that are mentored and supported by URS personnel. Each small contractor is mentored and supported utilizing the principles of the Construction Industry Institute (CII) Partnering process. Some of the key mentoring and partnering areas that are explored in this paper are, internal and external safety professional support, subcontractor safety teams and the interface with project and site safety teams, quality assurance program support to facilitate compliance with NQA-1, construction, team roles and responsibilities, work definition for successful fixed price contracts, scheduling and interface with project schedules and cost projection/accruals. The practical application of the CII Partnering principles, with the Construction Management expertise of URS, has led to a highly successful construction model that also meets small business contracting goals.

LESKO KF; BERRIOCHOA MV

2010-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

369

The 'America's Next Top Energy Innovator' Challenge Begins Today |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The 'America's Next Top Energy Innovator' Challenge Begins Today The 'America's Next Top Energy Innovator' Challenge Begins Today The 'America's Next Top Energy Innovator' Challenge Begins Today May 2, 2011 - 12:02pm Addthis Lasers used for photovoltaic research in one of SERI's PV labs. | Photo courtesy of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Lasers used for photovoltaic research in one of SERI's PV labs. | Photo courtesy of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Ginny Simmons Ginny Simmons Former Managing Editor for Energy.gov, Office of Public Affairs What does this mean for me? The Energy Department's 17 national laboratories currently hold more than 15,000 patents. As part of 'America's Next Top Energy Innovator' challenge, companies can obtain up to three patents from a single lab for $1,000. In a year, the Energy Department will showcase the start-up

370

Event:WBI-Clean Development Mechanism Programme of Activities: Challenges  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

WBI-Clean Development Mechanism Programme of Activities: Challenges WBI-Clean Development Mechanism Programme of Activities: Challenges and Opportunities Jump to: navigation, search Calendar.png WBI-Clean Development Mechanism Programme of Activities: Challenges and Opportunities: on 2011/11/07 "Learning objectives: Understand the rationale for developing PoAs Understand the rules, structure and program development cycle Understand the key roles and responsibilities of the coordinating / managing entity (CME) Identify suitable business models for PoA implementation across different sectors Examine possible financing opportunities for PoAs Course Delivery Dates: November 7th -18th, 2011 " Event Details Name WBI-Clean Development Mechanism Programme of Activities: Challenges and Opportunities Date 2011/11/07 Location Online

371

Chicago Green Office Challenge | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chicago Green Office Challenge Chicago Green Office Challenge Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section How can we help you? Build an energy program Improve building and plant performance Earn the ENERGY STAR and other recognition Benchmark energy use ENERGY STAR in action Communicate and educate ENERGY STAR communications toolkit Bring Your Green to Work with ENERGY STAR

372

Cushman & Wakefield Environmental Challenge | ENERGY STAR Buildings &  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cushman & Wakefield Environmental Challenge Cushman & Wakefield Environmental Challenge Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section How can we help you? Build an energy program Improve building and plant performance Earn the ENERGY STAR and other recognition Benchmark energy use ENERGY STAR in action Communicate and educate ENERGY STAR communications toolkit Bring Your Green to Work with ENERGY STAR

373

Energy Efficiency Challenges in Heating Supply System of Turkmenistan and Potential Solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The poor condition and inefficient operation of the existing heat and hot water supply system in Turkmenistan is causing serious economic, social and environmental problems. Yet, the situation may very well change to the worse as increase of energy consumption is projected for near future. The country's commitment to reduce greenhouse gases emissions faces the challenge of ensuring that both the short- and long-term environmental impacts can be minimized while service levels of heat and hot water supply to the population are simultaneously improved. Despite the energy, economic, and environmental benefits of energy efficiency in Turkmenistan, little has been done to eliminate energy waste. Due historic legacy, there is a limited institutional capacity to increase energy efficiency. Achieving energy and environmental goals will require a basic institutional transformation. Gaps in polices and legislation in the area of energy efficiency and the lack capacity and institutional expertise in managing local, regional and national energy efficiency programs have to be addressed.

Zomov, A.; Behnke, R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Management Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3MS Environment and Waste Management Programs Environment and Waste Management Programs Environment and Waste Management Programs AN L-934 Surveillance of Site A and Plot M...

375

Management Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment and Waste Management Programs Environment and Waste Management Programs Environment and Waste Management Programs AN L-9213 Surveillance of Site A and Plot M Report...

376

Management Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

r Environment and Waste Management Programs Environment and Waste Management Programs Environment and Waste Management Programs ANL-949 Surveillance of Site A and Plot M Report...

377

Electric powertrains : opportunities and challenges in the US light-duty vehicle fleet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Managing impending environmental and energy challenges in the transport sector requires a dramatic reduction in both the petroleum consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of in-use vehicles. This study quantifies ...

Kromer, Matthew A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Top Ten Challenges in Extreme-Scale Visual Analytics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the current special issue of IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications (CG&A), researchers share their research and development (R&D) findings and results on applying visual analytics to extreme-scale data. Having surveyed the special issue articles and other related R&D efforts in the area, we have identified what we consider to be the top challenges of extreme-scale visual analytics. To cater to the diverse readership of CG&A, our discussion evaluates challenges in all areas of the field, including algorithms, hardware, software, engineering, and social issues.

Wong, Pak C.; Shen, Han-Wei; Johnson, Christopher R.; Chen, Chaomei; Ross, Rob

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

379

Managing nontechnical risks associated with seismic operations in the tropical rain forests of Ecuador  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Companies operating in sensitive areas are being challenged to address the environmental and social issues while preserving these areas for future generations. This increased international attention on environmental and sociocultural issues has led Amoco to focus efforts on developing new ideas and strategies to facilitate environmental and cultural management. In Ecuador, the major oil producing region is the Ecuadorian portion of the Amazon Basin, referred to locally as the Oriente. Amoco Ecuador BV recently completed a seismic acquisition program in the Oriente with minimum impact to the environment and the communities within the project area. The goal of this article is to describe Amoco`s experience in managing environmental, social, and public perception issues associated with seismic operations in the rain forests of Ecuador.

Barker, G.; Smith, G.R.; Vacas, F.J. [Amoco Corp., Houston, TX (United States); Swingholm, E.K.; Yuill, R.M.; Aleman, M.A.

1997-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

380

DOE Energy Challenge Project  

SciTech Connect

Project Objectives: 1. Promote energy efficiency concepts in undergraduate and graduate education. 2. Stimulate and interest in pulp and paper industrial processes, which promote and encourage activities in the area of manufacturing design efficiency. 3. Attract both industrial and media attention. Background and executive Summary: In 1997, the Institute of Paper Science and Technology in conjunction with the U.S. Department of Energy developed a university design competition with an orientation to the Forest Products Industry. This university design competition is in direct alignment with DOE’s interests in instilling in undergraduate education the concepts of developing energy efficient processes, minimizing waste, and providing environmental benefits and in maintaining and enhancing the economic competitiveness of the U.S. forest products industry in a global environment. The primary focus of the competition is projects, which are aligned with the existing DOE Agenda 2020 program for the industry and the lines of research being established with the colleges comprising the Pulp and Paper Education and Research Alliance (PPERA). The six design competitions were held annually for the period 1999 through 2004.

Frank Murray; Michael Schaepe

2009-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "management challenge area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Energy Challenge Three: The Greenbelt Green Neighborhood Challenge |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Three: The Greenbelt Green Neighborhood Challenge Three: The Greenbelt Green Neighborhood Challenge Energy Challenge Three: The Greenbelt Green Neighborhood Challenge June 21, 2010 - 5:52pm Addthis John Lippert Lore Rosenthal, a principal leader behind the Greenbelt Climate Action Network, attended a meeting in Greenbelt, Maryland, on an energy purchasing cooperative more than a year ago. Also attending the meeting was Lore's neighbor, Sylvia Lewis, on the board of both the Greenbelt Community Foundation (GCF) and Greenbelt Homes, Inc. (GHI). The energy purchasing co-op spokesperson was offering electricity at a lower rate than that offered by PEPCO, our local utility. Lore longed for a similar arrangement-a bulk electricity purchase but with wind energy. She spoke to Sylvia, who thought it was a good idea. Lore

382

Underground Distribution Cable Fleet Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes industry research and data collection related to distribution cable system management. Focus areas include international practices for cable system management, international research activities, and application of diagnostic testing techniques. This report is a follow-up to the 2010 effort to catalog leading practices for distribution cable fleet management.

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

383

Data Management Group Annual Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Management Group Annual Report 1997 #12;Data Management Group Annual Report 1997 A co-operative project that is jointly funded by members of the Toronto Area Transportation Planning Data Collection: (416) 978-3941 #12;Data Management Group 1997 Annual Report Table of Contents 1 INTRODUCTION

Toronto, University of

384

Organizational structure : management techniques and lessons learned in aligning technical and program management resources in engineering-intensive organizations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The roles of systems engineering, program and project management, and engineering management are continuously blurred and challenged in complex engineering organizations. The demands made of each of these functions can ...

Siddiqui, Talha, 1969-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

An integrated framework for warehouse management using wireless sensor networks and decision support systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Storage Warehouse managers face diverse challenges in operating and managing a warehouse. Problems range from capacity-planning and inventory management of stored goods, loss or damage of stored goods due to weather changes, pest infestation and improper ...

Punit Ahluwalia; Anand Ramachandran

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Demand Side Management in the Smart Grid: Information Processing for the Power Switch  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article we discuss the most recent developments in the area of load management, and consider possible interaction schemes of novel architectures with distributed energy resources (DER). In order to handle the challenges faced by tomorrow’s smart grid, which are caused by volatile load and generation profiles (from the large number of plug-in EVs and from renewable integration), the conventional grid operating principle of load-following needs to be changed into load-shaping or generation-following. Demand Side Management will be a most promising and powerful solution to the above challenges. However, many other issues such as load forecasting, pricing structure, market policy, renewable integration interface, and even the AC/DC implementation at the distribution side, need to be taken into the design in order to search for the most effective and applicable solution.

Alizadeh, Mahnoosh; LI, Xiao; Wang, Zhifang; Scagilone, Anna; Melton, Ronald B.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

The Challenges of Germany's "Energiewende"  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to the "Energiewende" were made in 2011, in the aftermath of the melt-down of the nuclear power plant in Fukushima, Japan. German policy-makers are now facing the challenge...

388

Challenges in Integrating Renewable Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PV, solar thermal, and wave. Breakthroughs are also needed in large-scale energy storage technologies reliability and econ- omy. The challenges of integrating high penetrations of renewable energy technologies

389

Albuquerque trio wins Supercomputing Challenge  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Huang, and Chris Hong from La Cueva High School captured the top prize in the 2009 New Mexico Supercomputing Challenge. April 21, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of...

390

Microsoft PowerPoint - 6_Rowe-Future Challenges for Global Fuel Cycle Material Accounting Final_Updated.pptx  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Future Challenges Future Challenges for Global Fuel Cycle Material Accounting Nathan Rowe Chris Pickett Oak Ridge National Laboratory Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System Users Annual Training Meeting May 20-23, 2013 St. Louis, Missouri 2 Future Challenges for Global Fuel Cycle Material Accounting Introduction * Changing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Activities * Nuclear Security Challenges * How to Respond? - Additional Protocol - State-Level Concept - Continuity of Knowledge * Conclusion 3 Future Challenges for Global Fuel Cycle Material Accounting Nuclear Fuel Cycle Source: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Nuclear Fuel Cycle Information System (NFCIS) web site IAEA Safeguards Begins Here 4 Future Challenges for Global Fuel Cycle Material Accounting Nuclear Weapons Cycle Conversion

391

Guidance for Preparing ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Plant Profile  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Long Beach Douglas Center Long Beach Douglas Center The Boeing Company 4000 Lakewood Blvd. Long Beach, CA 90808 The Boeing Long Beach Douglas Center campus hosts a wide array of activities supporting the development of commercial airplanes including: Airplane Programs Engineering, Product Support Engineering, Modification Services, Spares, and Continental Data Graphics. This site achieved the Challenge for Industry in 2010, 2011 and 2012. Achieving the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry has been a key factor in Boeing's 'four walls' strategy to reduce energy usage and waste along with reducing the environmental footprint of its operations. The energy savings was achieved by upgrading air-conditioning, lighting and energy-management systems,

392

India-Natural Resource Management Plan | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Natural Resource Management Plan Jump to: navigation, search Name India-Natural Resource Management Plan AgencyCompany Organization Government of India Sector Land Focus Area...

393

Federal Energy Management Program: Qualified List of Energy Service...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Federal Energy Management Program Search Search Help Federal Energy Management Program HOME ABOUT THE PROGRAM PROGRAM AREAS LAWS & REGULATIONS INFORMATION RESOURCES PROJECT FUNDING...

394

Challenges for Plant Nutrition Management from the Fertilizer Industry's Viewpoint  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fish and meat products. Bioenergy requirements will alsofood, fibre, feed and bioenergy. Pressure on agricultural

Maene, Luc M; Olegario, Angela B

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Rising challenges for the petroleum refiners in managing corrosion ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2014 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Materials Aspects of Corrosion and Fouling in Oil Refining and Exploration.

396

Challenges for Plant Nutrition Management from the Fertilizer Industry's Viewpoint  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007/08.International Fertilizer Industry Association (IFA),International Fertilizer Industry Association (IFA), Paris,International Fertilizer Industry Association (IFA), Paris,

Maene, Luc M; Olegario, Angela B

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Challenges for Plant Nutrition Management from the Fertilizer Industry's Viewpoint  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Demand Estimates, July 2009. United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Washington, DC, USA.

Maene, Luc M; Olegario, Angela B

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

The Grand Challenge of Managing the Petascale Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 2010 ­ p. 1/ #12;CEBAF - The Way It Is. CLAS12 Software Workshop - May 25, 2010 ­ p. 2/ #12;CEBAF Software Workshop - May 25, 2010 ­ p. 4/ #12;A New CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS12). The CLAS12

399

The Challenges of Dynamic Water Management in the American West  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

11. For the first time, desalination projects look like they2004, some two dozen desalination projects had been proposedCOM- MISSION, SEAWATER DESALINATION AND THE CALIFORNIA

Doremus, Holly; Hanemann, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Best Practices for Managing Organizational Diversity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Organizations with increasingly diverse workforces and customer populations face challenges in reaping diversity's benefits while managing its potentially disruptive effects. This article defines workplace diversity and identifies best practices supporting planned and positive diversity management. It explores how academic libraries can apply diversity management best practices and provides a reading list for leaders and human resource managers wishing to optimize their organization's approach to diversity.

Kreitz, Patricia; /SLAC

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "management challenge area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Challenges in Flexible Aggregation of Pervasive Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The vision of billions of users connected to millions of services using trillions of devices is fast becoming a reality. The result will be a vast network of mobile communication devices and data sources, including sensors, newsfeeds, web services, and databases. Potential uses of this data span a wide range of application domains, including medical monitoring, traffic routing, proximity detection, electricity management, and service-fleet dispatching. Applications require flexible mechanisms for constructing condensed and refined views of the raw data, possibly in ways unanticipated by the data providers. Aggregation comprises collection of high volumes of raw data from data sources, composition of the raw data into less voluminous refined data, and timely delivery of the refined data to applications. There are difficult challenges inherent in creating an aggregation system that is sufficiently flexible, scalable, and reliable to address the needs of applications. 1 The aggregation...

Norman H. Cohen; Norman H. Cohen; Apratim Purakayastha; Apratim Purakayastha; John Turek; John Turek; Luke Wong; Luke Wong; Danny Yeh; Danny Yeh

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Office of Management | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Management Office of Management The mission of the Department of Energy is to assure America’s security and prosperity by addressing its energy, environmental and nuclear challenges through transformative science and technology solutions. The mission of the Department of Energy is to assure America's security and prosperity by addressing its energy, environmental and nuclear challenges through transformative science and technology solutions. Featured Initiatives Conference Reporting Activities Facilities Initiatives Root Cause Analysis (RCA) & Corrective Action Plan (CAP) Energy Reduction at HQ HQ EMS Policy Freedom of Information Act Financial Assistance Procurement and Acquisition Project Management Career Development Program Project Management Workshops and Awards

403

The challenge of an inner city practice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Just over eight years ago, I moved from a rural practice, to an inner city practice in the Crumlin Road area of North Belfast. Although there were many similarities, for example the routine of surgeries and home visits, there were also considerable differences. In some ways general practice in an inner city area may seem very unattractive, but it may equally be regarded as a challenge. The term "inner city " has come to be synonymous with severe social deprivation with characteristics such as a high density of population, a high concentration of unskilled workers, high levels of unemployment and poor housing. These factors are all present to a greater or lesser extent in our area. Many inner cities also have problems due to a high percentage of people from ethnic minorities. In Belfast, instead of this, we have had considerable inter-community tension and, until recently, terrorist atrocities. I propose to look at two aspects of the health of those living in an inner city area, and show how these contrast with the population as a whole. I

G R Rea

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Architecting dependable systems with proactive fault management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Management of an ever-growing complexity of computing systems is an everlasting challenge for computer system engineers. We argue that we need to resort to predictive technologies in order to harness the system's complexity and transform a vision of ...

Felix Salfner; Miroslaw Malek

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

2010 NIST Mobile Microrobotics Challenge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... one or more of: system reliability, level of autonomy, power management and ... About 200 of these robots could stretch in a line across the top of a ...

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

406

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Western Area PowerAdministratio...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Colorado Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region June 5, 2012 CX-008778: Categorical Exclusion Determination Combined Crew Vegetation Management on...

407

Focus Area 3 - Enabling Technologies : BioEnergy Science Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enabling Technologies BESC researchers in (Enabling Technologies) characterization, modeling, and data management areas are engaged in 1) applying advanced technologies to analyze...

408

Challenges and Research Directions in Agent-Oriented Software Engineering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Agent-based computing is a promising approach for developing applications in complex domains. However, despite the great deal of research in the area, a number of challenges still need to be faced (i) to make agent-based computing a widely accepted paradigm ... Keywords: agent-oriented software engineering, intelligence engineering, multiagent systems, self-organisation

Franco Zambonelli; Andrea Omicini

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Moving into the future with James Bay: Laforge-1 meets the challenges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydro-Quebec is commissioning the final unit of its 840-MW Laforge-1 hydropower facility. Faced with substantial logistical, technical, and environmental challenges, project managers have relied on extended and detailed planning, aggressive project management, and creativity from contractors to bring the giant project on-line within budget and more than a year ahead of schedule.

Rancourt, M.; Parent, L.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Lessons from the private sector on performance-based management  

SciTech Connect

Implementation of the Government Performance and Results Act of 1993 (GPRA) has provided a unique challenge for Federal Agencies, such as the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Waste Management (OWM). While performance measurement, as required by GPRA, is new to Federal Agencies, private industry has applied it at all organizational levels to better manage their operations for some time. There has been significant discussion about how the private sector uses performance measures, but there have been very few empirical studies systematically examining their use. To gather information on comparable private industry practices, waste management industry firms were surveyed through questionnaires and follow-on interviews. Questionnaires were sent to 75 waste management firms throughout the United States and Canada. Twenty-four percent of the firms responded to the questionnaire and participated in the follow-on interviews. The questionnaires were typically completed by vice-presidents or senior financial officers. Information collected from the questionnaire and follow-on interviews provided valuable insight into industry practices in the area of performance measurement. This paper discusses the study results and how they can be incorporated in the DOE OWM performance measures and influence the character of the ``critical few`` metrics used by senior DOE managers.

Stoeckle, K.E. [USDOE (United States). Office of Waste Management; Kolster, W.G. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Shangraw, R.F. [Project Performance Corp. (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Challenge members to achieve a goal | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Challenge members to achieve a goal Challenge members to achieve a goal Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Partner with ENERGY STAR Encourage members to benchmark Challenge members to achieve a goal Tell members how to save Deliver training to members Give recognition Tie it all together in a campaign Challenge members to achieve a goal Benchmarking and goal-setting go hand-in-hand. No matter what type of

412

Statistical Analysis of Traffic Measurements in a Disaster Area Scenario  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

challenges of information sharing in OOH [Out-of-Hospital] disaster response."([1]) Performance evaluationStatistical Analysis of Traffic Measurements in a Disaster Area Scenario Considering Heavy Load-- Catastrophes cause an area of destruction including destroyed infrastructure. These disaster area scenarios

Frank, Matthias

413

i6 Green Challenge - EERE Commercialization Office  

i6 Green Challenge. The i6 Green Challenge is part of the Obama Administration's Startup America initiative at the U.S. Department of Energy. The ...

414

Supercomputing Challenge top winners: Los Alamos schools  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Supercomputing Challenge top winners: Los Alamos schools Supercomputing Challenge top winners: Los Alamos schools Cole Kendrick won the top prize for his research project,...

415

Sunshot Rooftop Solar Challenge | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Centers Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Sunshot Rooftop Solar Challenge Sunshot Rooftop Solar Challenge Sunshot Rooftop Solar...

416

Shale Gas Development Challenges: Fracture Fluids | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Centers Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Shale Gas Development Challenges: Fracture Fluids Shale Gas Development Challenges: Fracture...

417

Shale Gas Development Challenges: Earthquakes | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Centers Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Shale Gas Development Challenges: Earthquakes Shale Gas Development Challenges: Earthquakes...

418

Shale Gas Development Challenges: Surface Impacts | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Centers Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Shale Gas Development Challenges: Surface Impacts Shale Gas Development Challenges: Surface...

419

Intrepid / Challenger / Eureka File Systems | Argonne Leadership...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IntrepidChallengerSurveyor Decommissioning of BGP Systems and Resources Introducing Challenger Quick Reference Guide System Overview Data Transfer Data Storage & File Systems...

420

Vehicle Technologies Office: Workplace Charging Challenge Partner...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vehicle Technologies Office: Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: ABB Inc. on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: ABB Inc....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "management challenge area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Building Technologies Office: Better Buildings Challenge  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Better Buildings Challenge on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Better Buildings Challenge on Delicious Rank...

422

Vehicle Technologies Office: Workplace Charging Challenge Partner...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies Office: Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Cisco Systems, Inc. on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Cisco...

423

Vehicle Technologies Office: Workplace Charging Challenge Partner...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: 3M on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: 3M on...

424

Webinar: International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges-NOW...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Webinar: International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges-NOW, DOE, and NEDO Webinar: International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges-NOW, DOE, and NEDO December 16, 2013 8:00AM...

425

Laboratory hosts 12th annual HAZMAT Challenge  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

annual HAZMAT Challenge Laboratory hosts 12th annual HAZMAT Challenge Teams from New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Arizona will demonstrate their hazardous materials response skills and...

426

Federal Facilities Liaison Weighs in on EM Achievements, Challenges at  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Facilities Liaison Weighs in on EM Achievements, Challenges Federal Facilities Liaison Weighs in on EM Achievements, Challenges at Savannah River Site Federal Facilities Liaison Weighs in on EM Achievements, Challenges at Savannah River Site December 27, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Shelly Wilson, third from right, participates in a roundtable discussion at the Intergovernmental Meeting with the DOE in New Orleans this month. Also pictured are Maryland Delegate Sally Jameson, left to right, Office of River Protection Deputy Manager Stacy Charboneau, Willie Preacher, Director of DOE-related projects for Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and Eddy County, N.M., Commissioner Roxanne Lara. Shelly Wilson, third from right, participates in a roundtable discussion at the Intergovernmental Meeting with the DOE in New Orleans this month. Also

427

Federal Facilities Liaison Weighs in on EM Achievements, Challenges at  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Facilities Liaison Weighs in on EM Achievements, Challenges Federal Facilities Liaison Weighs in on EM Achievements, Challenges at Savannah River Site Federal Facilities Liaison Weighs in on EM Achievements, Challenges at Savannah River Site December 27, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Shelly Wilson, third from right, participates in a roundtable discussion at the Intergovernmental Meeting with the DOE in New Orleans this month. Also pictured are Maryland Delegate Sally Jameson, left to right, Office of River Protection Deputy Manager Stacy Charboneau, Willie Preacher, Director of DOE-related projects for Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and Eddy County, N.M., Commissioner Roxanne Lara. Shelly Wilson, third from right, participates in a roundtable discussion at the Intergovernmental Meeting with the DOE in New Orleans this month. Also

428

EV Everywhere Grand Challenge Blueprint  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Message from A Message from the Assistant Secretary Every challenge presents an even greater opportunity, and the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge is no exception. The need for clean energy solutions drives the most important economic development race of the 21st century, providing opportunity for America to invent, manufacture, and export clean energy technologies. Recognizing that vehicle electrification is an essential part of our country's "all-of-the above" energy strategy, President Obama issued the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge to the nation in March 2012 with the bold goal to be the first nation in the world to produce plug-in electric vehicles that are as affordable for the average American family as today's gasoline-powered vehicles within the next 10 years.

429

ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Challenge Challenge for Industry Professional Engineers' Guide for Validating Statements of Energy Improvement Office of Air and Radiation Climate Protection Partnerships Division May 2013 Revised ii Introduction The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (U.S. EPA) ENERGY STAR program provides guidance, tools, and recognition to help companies improve their energy performance. ENERGY STAR is a voluntary partnership program that companies choose to join. Through ENERGY STAR, U.S. EPA offers a number of forms of recognition for achievements in energy efficiency. The ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry recognizes individual industrial sites for achieving a 10 percent reduction in energy intensity within 5 years from the conclusion of an established baseline. To be

430

Seismological challenges for stellar structure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Helioseismology has provided very detailed information about the solar interior, and extensive data on a large number of stars, although at less detail, are promised by the ongoing and upcoming asteroseismic projects. In the solar case there remain serious challenges in understanding the inferred solar structure, particularly in the light of the revised determinations of the solar surface composition. Also, a secure understanding of the origins of solar rotation as inferred from helioseismology, both in the radiative interior and in the convection zone, is still missing. In the stellar case challenges are certain to appear as the data allow more detailed inferences of the properties of stellar cores. Large remaining uncertainties in modelling concerns the properties of convective cores and other processes that may cause mixing. As a result of developing asteroseismic signatures addressing these and other issues, we can look forward to a highly challenging, and hence exciting, era of stellar astrophysics.

Christensen-Dalsgaard, J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Bioenergy crop models: Descriptions, data requirements and future challenges  

SciTech Connect

Field studies that address the production of lignocellulosic biomass as a potential source of renewable energy are making available critical information for the development, validation, and use of bioenergy crop models. A literature survey revealed that 14 models have been developed and validated for herbaceous and woody bioenergy crops, and for Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) crops adapted to arid lands. These models simulate field-scale production of biomass for switchgrass (ALMANAC, EPIC, and Agro-BGC), miscanthus (MISCANFOR, MISCANMOD, and WIMOVAC), sugarcane (APSIM, AUSCANE, and CANEGRO), and poplar and willow (SECRETS and 3PG). Two models are adaptations of dynamic global vegetation models and simulate biomass yields of miscanthus and sugarcane as plant function types at regional scales (Agro-IBIS and LPJmL). A model of biomass production in CAM plants has been developed (EPI), but lacks the sophistication of the other models. Except for CAM plants, all the models include representations of leaf area dynamics, radiation interception and utilization, biomass production, and partitioning of biomass to roots and shoots. A few of the models are capable of simulating soil water, nutrient, and carbon cycle processes, making them especially useful for assessing environmental consequences (e.g., erosion and nutrient losses) associated with the field-scale deployment of bioenergy crops. Similar to other process-based models, simulations are challenged by computing and data management issues and an integrated framework for model testing and inter-comparison is needed. Considerable work remains concerning the development of models for unconventional bioenergy crops like CAM plants, generation and distribution of high-quality field data for model development and validation, and development of an integrated framework for efficient execution of large-scale simulations for use in planning regional to global sustainable bioenergy production systems.

Surendran Nair, Sujith; Kang, Shujiang; Zhang, Xuesong; Miguez, Fernando; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Post, W. M.; Dietze, Michael; Lynd, Lee R.; Wullschleger, Stan D.

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

432

Chronic disease management: a business intelligence perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chronic disease management is one of the main areas in healthcare that Health Knowledge Management (HKM) can provide beneficial outcomes. Information Communication Technology (ICT) enabled Chronic disease management network (cdmNet) delivers comprehensive ... Keywords: business intelligence, chronic disease management, data mining

Leelani Kumari Wickramasinghe, Damminda Alahakoon, Michael Georgeff, Peter Schattner, Daswin De Silva, Oshadi Alahakoon, Akuh Adaji, Kay Jones, Am Leon Piterman

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Nuclear Safeguards and Security Challenge:  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Safeguards and Security Nuclear Safeguards and Security Challenge: The international safeguards and security system is being challenged by evolving proliferation and terrorism threats, expanding International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) responsibilities, a retiring safeguards workforce, and the need for better technologies to detect and deter proliferation, theft, and sabotage. Response: Revitalize, strengthen, and sustain U.S. and international safeguards and security capabilities through the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) and International Nuclear Security programs that: * Support the development of safeguards and security policies, concepts and approaches * Develop human capital through training and education * Develop and implement new safeguards systems,

434

Solid-State Lighting: Market Challenges  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Market Challenges to someone by Market Challenges to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: Market Challenges on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: Market Challenges on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Market Challenges on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Market Challenges on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: Market Challenges on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: Market Challenges on AddThis.com... Why SSL LED Basics OLED Basics Using LEDs R&D Challenges Market Challenges Market Challenges Resources Compact Fluorescent Lighting in America PDF Guiding Market Introduction of SSL Products PDF LED Directional Lamps PDF LED MR16 Lamps Recessed LED Downlights PDF General Service LED Lamps PDF What to Ask - A Checklist for Buyers of LED Lighting Products PDF

435

Challenges  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Extended Period of Time Medical Care for People with Chronic Illness Could be Disrupted Essential Services You Depend on May be Disrupted Plan for the possibility that usual...

436

FAQS Qualification Card - Construction Management | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Construction Management Construction Management FAQS Qualification Card - Construction Management A key element for the Department's Technical Qualification Programs is a set of common Functional Area Qualification Standards (FAQS) and associated Job Task Analyses (JTA). These standards are developed for various functional areas of responsibility in the Department, including oversight of safety management programs identified as hazard controls in Documented Safety Analyses (DSA). For each functional area, the FAQS identify the minimum technical competencies and supporting knowledge and skills for a typical qualified individual working in the area. FAQC-ConstructionManagement.docx Description Construction Management Qualification Card More Documents & Publications FAQS Gap Analysis Qualification Card - Construction Management

437

Performance Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Performance Management. ... If you are unable to access these PDF files, please contact the Office of Workforce Management.

2013-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

438

Data Mining: Opportunities and Challenges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Data Mining: Opportunities and Challenges Xindong Wu University of Vermont, USA; Hefei University Systems 2004 ...... #12;3 Outline 1.1. Data Mining OpportunitiesData Mining Opportunities Major Conferences and Journals in Data Mining Main Topics in Data Mining Some Research Directions in Data Mining 2

Wu, Xindong

439

Water in the Challenge for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and implemented. #12;3.06 Folie 6 Some of the challenges for security architectures for Smart Grids · Control to be considered in Smart Grid architectures as well as in the development of future Network infrastructures now information on energy consumption. · Smart meters are essential, but the core functionality of smart grids

Selker, John

440

D4 Project Innovations and Challenges  

SciTech Connect

In 2005, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) launched the third generation of closure contracts, including the River Corridor Closure (RCC) Contract at the Hanford Site, which was awarded to Washington Closure Hanford (WCH). One portion of the WCH company structure is known as the D4 project, where D4 represents the deactivation, decommissioning, decontamination, and demolition of excess facilities. The RCC Contract scope requires that approximately 485 excess facilities undergo the D4 process. During 2005 and 2006, significant acceleration has been achieved in completing the D4 of these facilities. By the end of November 2006, more than 70 facilities had been completed, while only 22 were sch