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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manage electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Controlling electrical costs with energy management  

SciTech Connect

Energy Management Systems have been proven to be extremely effective in reducing electrical energy costs. This particular system is also capable of monitoring natural gas usage and even regulating that usage with the control of valves. Controlling electrical energy usage must be a cooperative effort between the plant where the system is to be installed and the manufacturer of the Energy Management Controller. The latter can be assisted by being advised of which loads are able to be shed and how shedding those loads affect production.

Collins, W.M.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost Calculator for Electric and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Cost Energy Cost Calculator for Electric and Gas Water Heaters to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost Calculator for Electric and Gas Water Heaters on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost Calculator for Electric and Gas Water Heaters on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost Calculator for Electric and Gas Water Heaters on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost Calculator for Electric and Gas Water Heaters on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost Calculator for Electric and Gas Water Heaters on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost Calculator for Electric and Gas Water Heaters on AddThis.com...

3

Load management strategies for electric utilities: a production cost simulation  

SciTech Connect

This paper deals with the development and application of a simulation model for analyzing strategies for managing the residential loads of electric utilities. The basic components of the model are (1) a production-cost model, which simulates daily operation of an electric power system; (2) a load model, which disaggregates system loads into appliance loads and other loads; and (3) a comparison model, which compares the production costs and energy consumption needed to meet a particular load profile to the corresponding costs and energy consumption required for another load profile. The profiles in each pair define alternative ways of meeting the same demand. A method for disaggregating load profiles into appliance components is discussed and several alternative strategies for residential load management for a typical northeastern electric utility are formulated. The method is based on an analysis of the composition of electric loads for a number of classes of residential customers in the model utility system. The effect of alternative load management strategies on the entire residential loadcurve is determined by predicting the effects of these strategies on the specific appliance components of the loadcurve. The results of using the model to analyze alternative strategies for residential load management suggest that load management strategies in the residential sector, if adopted by utilities whose operating and load characteristics are similar to those of the system modeled here, must take into account a wide variety of appliances to achieve significant changes in the total load profile. Moreover, the results also suggest that it is not easy to reduce costs significantly through new strategies for managing residential loads only and that, to be worthwhile, cost-reducing strategies will have to encompass many kinds of appliances.

Blair, P.D.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Electricity Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Emissions Caps and the Impact of a Radical Change in Nuclear Electricity Costs journal International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy volume year month chapter...

5

Target Cost Management Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Target cost management (TCM) is an innovation of Japanese management accounting system and by common sense has been considered with great interest by practitioners. Nowadays, TCM related

Okano, Hiroshi

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Chemical Lifecycle Management Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Lifecycle Management Cost Presented by: J.M. Hieb, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company CHPRC1204-04 Chemical Lifecycle Management Cost Everyone is trying to stretch a...

7

Cost of Fuel to General Electricity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Fuel to Generate Electricity of Fuel to Generate Electricity Cost of Fuel to Generate Electricity Herb Emmrich Gas Demand Forecast, Economic Analysis & Tariffs Manager SCG/SDG&E SCG/SDG&E Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) 2009 Fall Meeting November 18, 2009 Ontario, California The Six Main Costs to Price Electricity are:  Capital costs - the cost of capital investment (debt & equity), depreciation, Federal & State income taxes and property taxes and property taxes  Fuel costs based on fuel used to generate electricity - hydro, natural gas, coal, fuel oil, wind, solar, photovoltaic geothermal biogas photovoltaic, geothermal, biogas  Operating and maintenance costs  Transmission costs  Distribution costs  Social adder costs - GHG adder, low income adder,

8

Assessing the Environmental Costs and Benefits of Households Electricity Consumption Management.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? In this study the environmental costs and benefits of smart metering technology systems installed in households in Norway have been assessed. Smart metering technology (more)

Segtnan, Ida Lund

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Unit Cost Electricity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8 8 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142281518 Varnish cache server Unit Cost Electricity Dataset Summary Description Provides annual energy usage for years 1989 through 2010 for UT at Austin; specifically, electricity usage (kWh), natural gas usage (Mcf), associated costs. Also provides water consumption for 2005 through 2010. Source University of Texas (UT) at Austin, Utilities & Energy Management Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords Electricity Consumption Natural Gas Texas Unit Cost Electricity Unit Cost Natural Gas University Water Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Energy and Water Use Data for UT-Austin (xls, 32.8 KiB) Quality Metrics

10

Electric power substation capital costs  

SciTech Connect

The displacement or deferral of substation equipment is a key benefit associated with several technologies that are being developed with the support of the US Department of Energy`s Office of Utility Technologies. This could occur, for example, as a result of installing a distributed generating resource within an electricity distribution system. The objective of this study was to develop a model for preparing preliminary estimates of substation capital costs based on rudimentary conceptual design information. The model is intended to be used by energy systems analysts who need ``ballpark`` substation cost estimates to help establish the value of advanced utility technologies that result in the deferral or displacement of substation equipment. This cost-estimating model requires only minimal inputs. More detailed cost-estimating approaches are recommended when more detailed design information is available. The model was developed by collecting and evaluating approximately 20 sets of substation design and cost data from about 10 US sources, including federal power marketing agencies and private and public electric utilities. The model is principally based on data provided by one of these sources. Estimates prepared with the model were compared with estimated and actual costs for the data sets received from the other utilities. In general, good agreement (for conceptual level estimating) was found between estimates prepared with the cost-estimating model and those prepared by the individual utilities. Thus, the model was judged to be adequate for making preliminary estimates of typical substation costs for US utilities.

Dagle, J.E.; Brown, D.R.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost Calculator for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost Calculator for Air-Cooled Electric Chillers to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost Calculator for Air-Cooled Electric Chillers on...

12

Definition: Reduced Electricity Cost | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cost Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Electricity Cost Functions that provide this benefit could help alter customer usage patterns (demand response with price...

13

Comparing Infrastructure Costs for Hydrogen and Electricity ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

infrastructure cost estimates for * hydrogen refueling stations (HRS) and electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) Compare retail costs on a common transportation energy *...

14

Scheduling for Electricity Cost in Smart Grid Mihai Burcea1,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scheduling for Electricity Cost in Smart Grid Mihai Burcea1, , Wing-Kai Hon2 , Hsiang-Hsuan Liu2 management in smart grid. Consumers send in power requests with a flexible set of timeslots during which arising in "demand response manage- ment" in smart grid [7, 9, 18]. The electrical smart grid is one

Wong, Prudence W.H.

15

Cost Effectiveness of Electricity Energy Efficiency Programs | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cost Effectiveness of Electricity Energy Efficiency Programs Cost Effectiveness of Electricity Energy Efficiency Programs Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Cost Effectiveness of Electricity Energy Efficiency Programs Agency/Company /Organization: Resources for the Future Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Finance Resource Type: Publications Website: www.rff.org/RFF/Documents/RFF-DP-09-48.pdf Cost Effectiveness of Electricity Energy Efficiency Programs Screenshot References: Cost Effectiveness of Electricity Energy Efficiency Programs[1] Abstract "We analyze the cost-effectiveness of electric utility rate payer-funded programs to promote demand-side management (DSM) and energy efficiency investments. We develop a conceptual model that relates demand growth rates to accumulated average DSM capital per customer and changes in energy

16

Electric Demand Cost Versus Labor Cost: A Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electric Utility companies charge industrial clients for two things: demand and usage. Depending on type of business and hours operation, demand cost could be very high. Most of the operations scheduling in a plant is achieved considering labor cost. For small plants, it is quite possible that a decrease in labor could result in an increase in electric demand and cost or vice versa. In this paper two cases are presented which highlight the dependence of one on other.

Agrawal, S.; Jensen, R.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Activity-Based Costing for Electric Utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Activity-Based costing (ABC) is a cost-management approach that can help utility managers make better decisions through more-accurate process and product cost information and a better understanding of activities that either do or do not add value. This report is a primer on ABC.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

LIFE Cost of Electricity, Capital and Operating Costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Successful commercialization of fusion energy requires economic viability as well as technical and scientific feasibility. To assess economic viability, we have conducted a pre-conceptual level evaluation of LIFE economics. Unit costs are estimated from a combination of bottom-up costs estimates, working with representative vendors, and scaled results from previous studies of fission and fusion plants. An integrated process model of a LIFE power plant was developed to integrate and optimize unit costs and calculate top level metrics such as cost of electricity and power plant capital cost. The scope of this activity was the entire power plant site. Separately, a development program to deliver the required specialized equipment has been assembled. Results show that LIFE power plant cost of electricity and plant capital cost compare favorably to estimates for new-build LWR's, coal and gas - particularly if indicative costs of carbon capture and sequestration are accounted for.

Anklam, T

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

19

Electrical Demand Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Demand Management Plan set forth in this paper has proven to be a viable action to reduce a 3 million per year electric bill at the Columbus Works location of Western Electric. Measures are outlined which have reduced the peak demand 5% below the previous year's level and yielded $150,000 annual savings. These measures include rescheduling of selected operations and demand limiting techniques such as fuel switching to alternate power sources during periods of high peak demand. For example, by rescheduling the startup of five heat treat annealing ovens to second shift, 950 kW of load was shifted off peak. Also, retired, non-productive steam turbine chillers and a diesel air compressor have been effectively operated to displaced 1330 kW during peak periods each day. Installed metering devices have enabled the recognition of critical demand periods. The paper concludes with a brief look at future plans and long range objectives of the Demand Management Plan.

Fetters, J. L.; Teets, S. J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment Installed Cost Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More than 140,000 plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) have been sold since December 2010. Critical to maintaining this upward trend is achievement of a diverse and available charging infrastructure. The purpose of this study is to analyze one key element of the charging infrastructurethe cost of installation. While the fuel cost of electricity to charge a PEV is significantly lower than the cost of gasoline, the cost to hire an electrician to install electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) for ...

2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manage electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

The Rising Cost of Electricity Generation  

SciTech Connect

Through most of its history, the electric industry has experienced a stable or declining cost structure. Recently, the economic fundamentals have shifted and generating costs are now rising and driving up prices at a time when the industry faces new challenges to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. New plant investment faces the most difficult economic environment in decades.

Tobey Winters

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

22

The rising cost of electricity generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Through most of its history, the electric industry has experienced a stable or declining cost structure. Recently, the economic fundamentals have shifted and generating costs are now rising and driving up prices at a time when the industry faces new challenges to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. New plant investment faces the most difficult economic environment in decades. (author)

Winters, Tobey

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

23

Price of electricity tracks cost of living  

SciTech Connect

The retail price of electricity and the consumer price index are rising at about the same rate: 241.5 and 242.6, respectively, based on a 1967 index of 100. Increases in fossil fuel costs, wages, and the cost of borrowed funds have contributed to these changes. Details of the annual percentage changes are summarized in five tables. (DCK)

Not Available

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Electricity Transmission Congestion Costs: A Review of Recent...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electricity Transmission Congestion Costs: A Review of Recent Reports Electricity Transmission Congestion Costs: A Review of Recent Reports This study reviews reports of congestion...

25

Cutting Electricity Costs in Miami-Dade County, Florida | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Cutting Electricity Costs in Miami-Dade County, Florida Cutting Electricity Costs in Miami-Dade County,...

26

Rising Electricity Costs: A Challenge For Consumers, Regulators...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rising Electricity Costs: A Challenge For Consumers, Regulators, And Utilities Rising Electricity Costs: A Challenge For Consumers, Regulators, And Utilities Presentation covers...

27

External Costs Associated to Electricity Generation Options in Brazil  

SciTech Connect

This presentation discusses external costs associated with electricity generation options in Brazil.

Jacomino, V.M.F.; Arrone, I.D.; Albo, J.; Grynberg, S.; Spadaro, J.

2004-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

28

Project Scoping and CostProject Scoping and Cost Management:Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project Scoping and CostProject Scoping and Cost Management:Management: Office Overview Scoping and NEPA/MEPAScoping and NEPA/MEPA Scoping and Cost EstimatesScoping and Cost Estimates Project Define a Project so we canOffice Focus: Better Define a Project so we can have a more accurate cost

Minnesota, University of

29

Electrical Cost Reduction Via Steam Turbine Cogeneration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steam turbine cogeneration is a well established technology which is widely used in industry. However, smaller previously unfeasible applications can now be cost effective due to the packaged system approach which has become available in recent years. The availability of this equipment in a packaged system form makes it feasible to replace pressure reducing valves with turbine generator sets in applications with flows as low as 4000 pounds of steam per hour. These systems produce electricity for $0.01 to $.02 per kWh (based on current costs of gas and oil); system cost is between $200 and $800 per kW of capacity. Simple system paybacks between one and three years are common.

Ewing, T. S.; Di Tullio, L. B.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

U.S. electric utility demand-side management 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand-side management activities in the United States at the national, regional, and utility levels. Data is included for energy savings, peakload reductions, and costs.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Electrical Safety Management Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to an employer Application: Direct This course is for people who are employed as electrical apprentices. Students business. First-rate facilities As an apprentice studying at Swinburne, you will have access to the state that gives builders, plumbers and other construction apprentices the opportunity to receive training

Smith, Graeme

32

Volatile Energy Costs and the Floundering Deregulation of Electricity...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A generation capacity shortage, combined with spiraling natural gas costs and a flawed electricity market structure, have led to unprecedented wholesale electricity prices,...

33

Electricity Without CO2 Emissions: Assessing the Costs of Carbon...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Johnson and Keith: Electricity without CO 2 ... 1 ELECTRICITY FROM FOSSIL FUELS WITHOUT CO 2 EMISSIONS: ASSESSING THE COSTS OF CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE AND SEQUESTRATION IN US...

34

Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Electricity Generation Plants  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This paper provides information on the cost of building new electricity power plants. These cost estimates are critical inputs in the development of energy projections and analyses.

Michael Leff

2010-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

35

Estimating and understanding DOE waste management costs`  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines costs associated with cleaning up the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) nuclear facilities, with particular emphasis on the waste management program. Life-cycle waste management costs have been compiled and reported in the DOE Baseline Environmental Management Report (BEMR). Waste management costs are a critical issue for DOE because of the current budget constraints. The DOE sites are struggling to accomplish their environmental management objectives given funding scenarios that are well below anticipated waste management costs. Through the BEMR process, DOE has compiled complex-wide cleanup cost estimates and has begun analysis of these costs with respect to alternative waste management scenarios and policy strategies. From this analysis, DOE is attempting to identify the major cost drivers and prioritize environmental management activities to achieve maximum utilization of existing funding. This paper provides an overview of the methodology DOE has used to estimate and analyze some waste management costs, including the key data requirements and uncertainties.

Kang, J.S. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Sherick, M.J. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Comparing the Costs of Intermittent and Dispatchable Electricity Generating Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic evaluations of alternative electric generating technologies typically rely on comparisons between their expected life-cycle production costs per unit of electricity supplied. The standard life-cycle cost metric ...

Joskow, Paul L.

37

A Review of Electric Vehicle Cost Studies: Assumptions, Methodologies, and Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

assumptions Battery costs and capacities: Lead acid batteryElectricity cost Battery cost and capacity: Lead acidElectricity cost Battery cost and capacity: N i C d

Lipman, Timothy

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Provides comprehensive information concerning the quality, quantity, and cost of fossil fuels used to produce electricity in the United States.

Dean Fennell

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Smarter Meters Help Customers Budget Electric Service Costs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1) two-way communications which allow customers to monitor their electricity consumption and take steps to better manage their electric bills; 2) a voluntary, pre-payment...

40

As Electric Vehicles Take Charge, Costs Power Down | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

As Electric Vehicles Take Charge, Costs Power Down As Electric Vehicles Take Charge, Costs Power Down As Electric Vehicles Take Charge, Costs Power Down January 13, 2012 - 1:29pm Addthis Thanks to a cost-sharing project with the Energy Department, General Motors has been able to develop the capacity to build electric and hybrid motors internally. That capacity has made cars like the upcoming Chevy Spark EV (above) possible. | Image courtesy of General Motors. Thanks to a cost-sharing project with the Energy Department, General Motors has been able to develop the capacity to build electric and hybrid motors internally. That capacity has made cars like the upcoming Chevy Spark EV (above) possible. | Image courtesy of General Motors. Patrick B. Davis Patrick B. Davis Vehicle Technologies Program Manager The record number of electric-drive vehicles on the floor of Detroit's

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manage electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1997  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1997 Executive Summary Background Demand-side management (DSM) programs consist of the planning, implementing, and monitoring ...

42

Electricity Transmission Congestion Costs: A Review of Recent Reports |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electricity Transmission Congestion Costs: A Review of Recent Electricity Transmission Congestion Costs: A Review of Recent Reports Electricity Transmission Congestion Costs: A Review of Recent Reports This study reviews reports of congestion costs and begins to assess their implications for the current national discussion on the importance of the U.S. electricity transmission system for enabling competitive wholesale electricity markets. As a guiding principle, we posit that a more robust electricity system could reduce congestion costs; and thereby, 1) facilitate more vibrant and fair competition in wholesale electricity markets, and 2)enable consumers to seek out the lowest prices for electricity. Yet, examining the details suggests that, sometimes, there will be trade-offs between these goals. Therefore, it is

43

Electric Power Controller for Steering Wheel Management in Electric Cars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electric Power Controller for Steering Wheel Management in Electric Cars Vicente Milanés, Joshué. An electric car has been equipped with the system designed and tests to prove the behavior of the system transportation systems. Among these topics, the automation of the actuators involved in the management of a car

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

44

Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost Calculator for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Urinals to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost Calculator for Urinals on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost...

45

Unit costs of waste management operations  

SciTech Connect

This report provides estimates of generic costs for the management, disposal, and surveillance of various waste types, from the time they are generated to the end of their institutional control. Costs include monitoring and surveillance costs required after waste disposal. Available data on costs for the treatment, storage, disposal, and transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive, low-level radioactive, transuranic radioactive, hazardous, mixed (low-level radioactive plus hazardous), and sanitary wastes are presented. The costs cover all major elements that contribute to the total system life-cycle (i.e., ``cradle to grave``) cost for each waste type. This total cost is the sum of fixed and variable cost components. Variable costs are affected by operating rates and throughput capacities and vary in direct proportion to changes in the level of activity. Fixed costs remain constant regardless of changes in the amount of waste, operating rates, or throughput capacities. Key factors that influence cost, such as the size and throughput capacity of facilities, are identified. In many cases, ranges of values for the key variables are presented. For some waste types, the planned or estimated costs for storage and disposal, projected to the year 2000, are presented as graphics.

Kisieleski, W.E.; Folga, S.M.; Gillette, J.L.; Buehring, W.A.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Figure 38. Levelized costs of nuclear electricity generation in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 38. Levelized costs of nuclear electricity generation in two cases, 2025 (2011 dollars per megawatthour) Reference Small Modular Reactor

47

Production cost models with regard to liberalised electricity markets.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This book makes a contribution to the formulation and implementation of production cost models for the modelling of liberalized electricity markets by addressing issues associated (more)

Martinez Diaz, David Jos

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Cost-Effectiveness of Electricity Energy Efficiency Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the cost-effectiveness of electric utility rate payerfunded programs to promote demand-side management (DSM) and energy efficiency investments. We develop a conceptual model that relates demand growth rates to accumulated average DSM capital per customer and changes in energy prices, income, and weather. We estimate that model using nonlinear least squares for two different utility samples. Based on the results for the most complete sample, we find that DSM expenditures over the last 18 years have resulted in a central estimate of 1.1 percent electricity savings at a weighted average cost to utilities (or other program funders) of about 6 cents per kWh saved. Econometrically-based policy simulations find that incremental DSM spending by utilities that had no or relatively low levels of average DSM spending per customer in 2006 could produce 14 billion kWh in additional savings at an expected incremental cost to the utilities of about 3 cents per kWh saved.

Toshi H. Arimura; Richard G. Newell; Karen Palmer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Cost and quality of fuels for electric plants 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants (C&Q) presents an annual summary of statistics at the national, Census division, State, electric utility, and plant levels regarding the quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels used to produce electricity. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decision-makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on issues regarding electric power.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Electricity Prices in a Competitive Environment: Marginal Cost Pricing  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presents the results of an analysis that focuses on two questions: (1) How are prices for competitive generation services likely to differ from regulated prices if competitive prices are based on marginal costs rather than regulated cost-of-service pricing? (2) What impacts will the competitive pricing of generation services (based on marginal costs) have on electricity consumption patterns, production costs, and the financial integrity of electricity suppliers?

Information Center

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

COMPARATIVE COSTS OF CALIFORNIA CENTRAL STATION ELECTRICITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commission, nor has the California Energy Commission passed upon the accuracy or adequacy of the information and cost sensitivity analysis curves. The Energy Commission also uses the fixed cost data of the Model in conjunction with the variable cost information of a production cost market simulation model to produce

52

U.S. electric utility demand-side management 1995  

SciTech Connect

The US Electric Utility Demand-Side Management report is prepared by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternative Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. The report presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand-side management (DSM) activities in the US at the national, regional, and utility levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decision makers, government policy makers, analysts, and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding DSM as it relates to the US electric power industry. The first chapter, ``Profile: US Electric Utility Demand-Side Management``, presents a general discussion of DSM, its history, current issues, and a review of key statistics for the year. Subsequent chapters present discussions and more detailed data on energy savings, peak load reductions and costs attributable to DSM. 9 figs., 24 tabs.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Wind turbine cost of electricity and capacity factor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind turbines are currently designed to minimize the cost of electricity at the wind turbine (the busbar cost) in a given wind regime, ignoring constraints on the capacity factor (the ratio of the average power output to the maximum power output). The trade-off between these two quantities can be examined in a straightforward fashion; it is found that the capacity factor can be increased by a factor of 30 percent above its value at the cost minimum for a ten percent increase in the busbar cost of electricity. This has important implications for the large-scale integration of wind electricity on utility grids where the cost of transmission may be a significant fraction of the cost of delivered electricity, or where transmission line capacity may be limited.

Cavallo, A.J. [Cavallo (A.J.), Princeton, NJ (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Federal Energy Management Program: Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Cost Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable Buildings to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable Buildings on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable Buildings on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable Buildings on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable Buildings on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable Buildings on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable Buildings on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Basics

55

Cost and quality of fuels for electric utility plants, 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents an annual summary of statistics at the national, Census division, State, electric utility, and plant levels regarding the quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels used to produce electricity. Purpose of this publication is to provide energy decision-makers with accurate, timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on issues regarding electric power.

NONE

1995-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

56

Cost and quality of fuels for electric utility plants, 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This publication presents an annual summary of statistics at the national, Census division, State, electric utility, and plant levels regarding the quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels used to produce electricity. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decision-makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on issues regarding electric power.

Not Available

1993-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

57

US electric utility demand-side management, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The report presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand-side management (DSM) activities in US at the national, regional, and utility levels. Objective is provide industry decision makers, government policy makers, analysts, and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding DSM as it relates to the US electric power industry. The first chapter, ``Profile: US Electric Utility Demand-Side Management,`` presents a general discussion of DSM, its history, current issues, and a review of key statistics for the year. Subsequent chapters present discussions and more detailed data on energy savings, peak load reductions, and costs attributable to DSM.

NONE

1995-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

58

ELECTRICITY CASE: ECONOMIC COST ESTIMATION FACTORS FOR ECONOMIC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of numbers of people affected DRAFT #12;6 · costs per hour of disruption or outage are used in conjunction with consequences in terms of duration, which is particularly common in electric power outages · costs per dollar for residences. Per Unit of Duration of Outage Duration as an influence in the cost of outages has received a lot

Wang, Hai

59

Electric Utility Demand-Side Management  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Demand side management (DSM) activities in the electric power industry. The report presents a general discussion of DSM, its history, current issues, and a ...

60

Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1997  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE/EIA-0589(97) Distribution Category UC-950 U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1997 December 1998 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manage electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

DOE Releases Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Risk Management...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

that help them manage their cybersecurity risks more effectively." Feedback provided by industry, vendors, and other electricity subsector stakeholders during two comment periods...

62

Electricity storage: Location, location, location and cost ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... nuclear reactors ... Environment. Greenhouse ... providing energy management and load leveling services while taking advantage of differences in the wholesale ...

63

Waste Management Facilities Cost Information Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Waste Management Facility Cost Information (WMFCI) Report, commissioned by the US Department of Energy (DOE), develops planning life-cycle cost (PLCC) estimates for treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. This report contains PLCC estimates versus capacity for 26 different facility cost modules. A procedure to guide DOE and its contractor personnel in the use of estimating data is also provided. Estimates in the report apply to five distinctive waste streams: low-level waste, low-level mixed waste, alpha contaminated low-level waste, alpha contaminated low-level mixed waste, and transuranic waste. The report addresses five different treatment types: incineration, metal/melting and recovery, shredder/compaction, solidification, and vitrification. Data in this report allows the user to develop PLCC estimates for various waste management options.

Feizollahi, F.; Shropshire, D.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Electricity transmission congestion costs: A review of recent reports  

SciTech Connect

Recently, independent system operators (ISOs) and others have published reports on the costs of transmission congestion. The magnitude of congestion costs cited in these reports has contributed to the national discussion on the current state of U.S. electricity transmission system and whether it provides an adequate platform for competition in wholesale electricity markets. This report reviews reports of congestion costs and begins to assess their implications for the current national discussion on the importance of the U.S. electricity transmission system for enabling competitive wholesale electricity markets. As a guiding principle, we posit that a more robust electricity system could reduce congestion costs; and thereby, (1) facilitate more vibrant and fair competition in wholesale electricity markets, and (2) enable consumers to seek out the lowest prices for electricity. Yet, examining the details suggests that, sometimes, there will be trade-offs between these goals. Therefore, it is essential to understand who pays, how much, and how do they benefit in evaluating options (both transmission and non-transmission alternatives) to address transmission congestion. To describe the differences among published estimates of congestion costs, we develop and motivate three ways by which transmission congestion costs are calculated in restructured markets. The assessment demonstrates that published transmission congestion costs are not directly comparable because they have been developed to serve different purposes. More importantly, critical information needed to make them more comparable, for example in order to evaluate the impacts of options to relieve congestion, is sometimes not available.

Lesieutre, Bernard C.; Eto, Joseph H.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Volatile Energy Costs and the Floundering Deregulation of Electricity: A  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Volatile Energy Costs and the Floundering Deregulation of Electricity: A Volatile Energy Costs and the Floundering Deregulation of Electricity: A Fresh Look at Integrating Supply-Side and Demand-Side Resources Speaker(s): Bill Kelly Robert Redlinger Date: January 19, 2001 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3148 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Julie Osborn The restructuring of the California electricity industry has not proceeded as intended. A generation capacity shortage, combined with spiraling natural gas costs and a flawed electricity market structure, have led to unprecedented wholesale electricity prices, power outages, and a political and financial crisis for the State. This crisis will not be solved through increasing electricity supply alone. Energy industry observers agree that 1.) energy efficiency, 2.) distributed on-site generation, and 3.) price

66

OpenEI - Unit Cost Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

at University of Texas at Austin http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode62

Provides annual energy usage for years 1989 through 2010 for UT at Austin; specifically, electricity usage...

67

An Analysis of the Retail and Lifecycle Cost of Battery-Powered Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1997. Electric and hybrid electric vehicles: a technology1998. An assessment of electric vehicle life cycle costs tothe benets of electric vehicles. Union of Concerned

Delucchi, Mark; Lipman, Timothy

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Forecasting Electric Vehicle Costs with Experience Curves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

April, 5. R 2~1. Dino. "Forecasting the Price Evolution of 1ElectromcProducts," Ioumal of Forecasting, oL4, No I, 1985.costs and a set of forecasting tools that can be refined as

Lipman, Timonthy E.; Sperling, Daniel

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Cost of New Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Coal Electricity Generation...................... 17  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Future demand for electricity can be met with a range of technologies, with fuels including coal, nuclear, natural gas, biomass and other renewables, as well as with energy efficiency and demand management approaches. Choices among options will depend on factors including capital cost, fuel cost, market and regulatory uncertainty, greenhouse gas emissions, and other environmental impacts. This paper estimates the costs of new electricity generation. The approach taken here is to provide a transparent and verifiable analysis based mainly on recent data provided

Seth Borin; Todd Levin; Valerie M. Thomas; Seth Borin; Todd Levin; Valerie M. Thomas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

U.S. electric utility demand-side management 1996  

SciTech Connect

The US Electric Utility Demand-Side Management report presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand-side management (DSM) activities in the US at the national, regional, and utility levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decision makers, government policy makers, analysts, and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding DSM as it related to the US electric power industry. The first chapter, ``Profile: U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management,`` presents a general discussion of DSM, its history, current issues, and a review of key statistics for the year. Subsequent chapters present discussions and more detailed data on energy savings, peak load reductions and costs attributable to DSM. 9 figs., 24 tabs.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Minimizing electricity costs with an auxiliary generator using stochastic programming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis addresses the problem of minimizing a facility's electricity costs by generating optimal responses using an auxiliary generator as the parameter of the control systems. The-goal of the thesis is to find an ...

Rafiuly, Paul, 1976-

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Electricity Energy Storage Technology Options 2012 System Cost Benchmarking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an update on the current capital and lifecycle costs estimates of electric energy storage options for a variety of grid and end-user applications. Data presented in this report update 2010 data provided in EPRI Technical Report 1020676. The goal of this research was to develop objective and consistent installed costs and operational and maintenance costs for a set of selected energy storage systems in the identified applications. Specific objectives included development of ...

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

73

Cost analysis of energy storage systems for electric utility applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under the sponsorship of the Department of Energy, Office of Utility Technologies, the Energy Storage System Analysis and Development Department at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) conducted a cost analysis of energy storage systems for electric utility applications. The scope of the study included the analysis of costs for existing and planned battery, SMES, and flywheel energy storage systems. The analysis also identified the potential for cost reduction of key components.

Akhil, A. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Swaminathan, S.; Sen, R.K. [R.K. Sen & Associates, Inc., Bethesda, MD (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Strategic cost management in a global supply chain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the face of an economic downturn, cost has become a focal point of supply chain management. Cost management is increasingly being recognized as a vital core competency needed for survival. As companies transition from ...

Rao, Venkatesh G. (Venkatesh Gopalkrishna), 1971-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Electrical energy and cost savings potential at DOD facilities  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Defense (DOD) has been mandated to reduce energy consumption and costs by 20% from 1985 to 2000 and by 30% from 1985 to 2005. Reduction of electrical energy consumption at DOD facilities requires a better understanding of energy consumption patterns and energy and financial savings potential. This paper utilizes two independent studies--EDA (End-Use Disaggregation Algorithm) and MEIP (Model Energy Installation Program)--and whole-installation electricity use data obtained from a state utility to estimate electrical energy conservation potential (ECP) and cost savings potential (CSP) at the Fort Hood, Texas, military installation and at DOD nationwide. At Fort Hood, the authors estimated an annual electricity savings of 62.2 GWh/yr (18%), a peak demand savings of 10.1 MW (14%), and an annual energy cost savings of $6.5 million per year. These savings could be attained with an initial investment of $41.1 million, resulting in a simple payback of 6.3 years. Across the DOD, they estimated an annual electricity savings of 4,900 GWh/yr, a peak demand savings of 694 MW, and an annual energy cost savings of $316 million per year. The estimated cost savings is 16% of the total nationwide DOD 1993 annual energy costs. These savings could be attained with an initial investment of $1.23 billion, resulting in a simple payback of 3.9 years.

Konopacki, S.; Akbari, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.; Lister, L.; DeBaille, L. [Army Construction Engineering Research Labs., Champaign, IL (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1) 1) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 2001 March 2004 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Preface Background The Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 2001 is prepared by the Electric Power Divi- sion; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); U.S.

77

Strategies to address transition costs in the electricity industry  

SciTech Connect

Transition costs are the potential monetary losses that electric- utility shareholders, ratepayers, or other parties might experience because of structural changes in the electricity industry. Regulators, policy analysts, utilities, and consumer groups have proposed a number of strategies to address transition costs, such as immediately opening retail electricity markets or delaying retail competition. This report has 3 objectives: identify a wide range of strategies available to regulators and utilities; systematically examine effects of strategies; and identify potentially promising strategies that may provide benefits to more than one set of stakeholders. The many individual strategies are grouped into 6 major categories: market actions, depreciation options, rate-making actions, utility cost reductions, tax measures, and other options. Of the 34 individual strategies, retail ratepayers have primary or secondary responsibility for paying transition costs in 19 of the strategies, shareholders in 12, wheeling customers in 11, taxpayers in 8, and nonutility suppliers in 4. Most of the strategies shift costs among different segments of the economy, although utility cost reductions can be used to offset transition costs. Most of the strategies require cooperation of other parties, including regulators, to be implemented successfully; financial stakeholders must be engages in negotiations that hold the promise of shared benefits. Only by rejecting ``winner-take-all`` strategies will the transition-cost issue be expeditiously resolved.

Baxter, L.; Hadley, S.; Hirst, E.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Transition-cost issues for a restructuring US electricity industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilities regulators can use a variety of approaches to calculate transition costs. We categorized these approaches along three dimensions. The first dimension is the use of administrative vs. market procedures to value the assets in question. Administrative approaches use analytical techniques to estimate transition costs. Market valuation relies on the purchase price of particular assets to determine their market values. The second dimension concerns when the valuation is done, either before or after the restructuring of the electricity industry. The third dimension concerns the level of detail involved in the valuation, what is often called top-down vs. bottom-up valuation. This paper discusses estimation approaches, criteria to assess estimation methods, specific approaches to estimating transition costs, factors that affect transition-cost estimates, strategies to address transition costs, who should pay transition costs, and the integration of cost recovery with competitive markets.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to compare and contrast utility scale power plant characteristics used in data sets that support energy market models. Characteristics include both technology cost and technology performance projections to the year 2050. Cost parameters include installed capital costs and operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. Performance parameters include plant size, heat rate, capacity factor or availability factor, and plant lifetime. Conventional, renewable, and emerging electricity generating technologies were considered. Six data sets, each associated with a different model, were selected. Two of the data sets represent modeled results, not direct model inputs. These two data sets include cost and performance improvements that result from increased deployment as well as resulting capacity factors estimated from particular model runs; other data sets represent model input data. For the technologies contained in each data set, the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) was also evaluated, according to published cost, performance, and fuel assumptions.

Tidball, R.; Bluestein, J.; Rodriguez, N.; Knoke, S.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information Resources Information Resources Site Map Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs on AddThis.com... Publications Software FAQs Building Life Cycle Cost Programs

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manage electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Concept for Management of the Future Electricity System (Smart...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Concept for Management of the Future Electricity System (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Concept for Management of the Future Electricity System...

82

Summary: DUF6 Management Cost Analysis Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7650 7650 Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program Summary of the COST ANALYSIS REPORT for the Long-term Management of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Prepared for the Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory September 1997 DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor the University of California nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer,

83

Integrated Vehicle Thermal Management - Combining Fluid Loops in Electric Drive Vehicles (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and electric vehicles have increased vehicle thermal management complexity, using separate coolant loop for advanced power electronics and electric motors. Additional thermal components result in higher costs. Multiple cooling loops lead to reduced range due to increased weight. Energy is required to meet thermal requirements. This presentation for the 2013 Annual Merit Review discusses integrated vehicle thermal management by combining fluid loops in electric drive vehicles.

Rugh, J. P.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Electricity Use and Management in the Municipal Water Supply and Wastewater Industries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of electricity for water and wastewater treatment is increasing due to demands for expanded service capacity and new regulations for upgraded treatment. Options available to control the electricity costs include technological changes, improved management, and participation in electric utility sponsored energy management programs. Appropriate options for a specific system will vary depending on the system characteristics, availability of electric utility programs to assist the water and ...

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

85

Electric Power Costs in Texas in 1985 and 1990  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A major problem associated with energy conservation projects is how to estimate the financial savings associated with a reduction in energy consumption. Although many conservation projects can be implemented in a matter of months, the energy savings may extend over a period of years or decades. The decision to initiate a conservation project often hinges upon the favorable outcome of an "engineering economics" or "present worth" analysis which compares present costs and future incomes. For a conservation project, four sets of data are required for the economic analysis: project cost, rate of return or discount rate, the amount of energy saved, and the future price of energy. Estimating the future price of electricity requires considerable effort since utilities in Texas will be using a mix of fuels. This paper analyzes the cost of generating electricity from nuclear power, out-of-state coal, in-state lignite, fuel oil, natural gas, geothermal, and solar power. These costs are then used to estimate system costs for an electric utility with various mixes of power plants. The electricity costs can then be used to determine the economic value of various conservation projects.

Gordon, J. B.; White, D. M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Electricity Generation Cost Simulation Model (GenSim)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electricity Generation Cost Simulation Model (GenSim) is a user-friendly, high-level dynamic simulation model that calculates electricity production costs for variety of electricity generation technologies, including: pulverized coal, gas combustion turbine, gas combined cycle, nuclear, solar (PV and thermal), and wind. The model allows the user to quickly conduct sensitivity analysis on key variables, including: capital, O&M, and fuel costs; interest rates; construction time; heat rates; and capacity factors. The model also includes consideration of a wide range of externality costs and pollution control options for carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and mercury. Two different data sets are included in the model; one from the US. Department of Energy (DOE) and the other from Platt's Research Group. Likely users of this model include executives and staff in the Congress, the Administration and private industry (power plant builders, industrial electricity users and electric utilities). The model seeks to improve understanding of the economic viability of various generating technologies and their emissions trade-offs. The base case results, using the DOE data, indicate that in the absence of externality costs, or renewable tax credits, pulverized coal and gas combined cycle plants are the least cost alternatives at 3.7 and 3.5 cents/kwhr, respectively. A complete sensitivity analysis on fuel, capital, and construction time shows that these results coal and gas are much more sensitive to assumption about fuel prices than they are to capital costs or construction times. The results also show that making nuclear competitive with coal or gas requires significant reductions in capital costs, to the $1000/kW level, if no other changes are made. For renewables, the results indicate that wind is now competitive with the nuclear option and is only competitive with coal and gas for grid connected applications if one includes the federal production tax credit of 1.8cents/kwhr.

DRENNEN, THOMAS E.; KAMERY, WILLIAM

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Electricity Generation Cost Simulation Model (GenSim).  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electricity Generation Cost Simulation Model (GenSim) is a user-friendly, high-level dynamic simulation model that calculates electricity production costs for variety of electricity generation technologies, including: pulverized coal, gas combustion turbine, gas combined cycle, nuclear, solar (PV and thermal), and wind. The model allows the user to quickly conduct sensitivity analysis on key variables, including: capital, O&M, and fuel costs; interest rates; construction time; heat rates; and capacity factors. The model also includes consideration of a wide range of externality costs and pollution control options for carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and mercuty. Two different data sets are included in the model; one from the US. Department of Energy (DOE) and the other from Platt's Research Group. Likely users of this model include executives and staff in the Congress, the Administration and private industry (power plant builders, industrial electricity users and electric utilities). The model seeks to improve understanding of the economic viability of various generating technologies and their emissions trade-offs. The base case results, using the DOE data, indicate that in the absence of externality costs, or renewable tax credits, pulverized coal and gas combined cycle plants are the least cost alternatives at 3.7 and 3.5 cents/kwhr, respectively. A complete sensitivity analysis on fuel, capital, and construction time shows that these results coal and gas are much more sensitive to assumption about fuel prices than they are to capital costs or construction times. The results also show that making nuclear competitive with coal or gas requires significant reductions in capital costs, to the $1000/kW level, if no other changes are made. For renewables, the results indicate that wind is now competitive with the nuclear option and is only competitive with coal and gas for grid connected applications if one includes the federal production tax credit of 1.8cents/kwhr.

Kamery, William (Hobart and William Smith Colleges, Geneva, NY); Baker, Arnold Barry; Drennen, Thomas E.

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Low-cost load research for electric utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Golden Valley Electric Association (GVEA) developed two pragmatic approaches to meet most load-research objectives at a substantially lower cost than would be incurred with traditional techniques. GVEA serves three customer classes, with most of its load in the Fairbanks area. GVEA's new approaches simulate load curves for individual customer classes to the degree necessary to meet most load-research objectives for the utility, including applications to cost-of-service analysis, rate design, demand-side management, and load forecasting. These approaches make class load-shape information available to utilities that cannot otherwise afford to develop such data. Although the two approaches were developed for a small utility, they are likely to work at least as well for medium and large utilities. The first approach simulates class curves by combining load data from system feeders with information on customer mix and energy usage. GVEA's supervisory control and data acquisition system gives hourly data on feeder loads, and its billing database provides the number of customers and kilowatt-hour usage by customer class on each feeder. The second approach enhances load-research results by redefining target parameters. Data from several like-hours are used to calculate substitutes for the parameters traditionally defined from single-hour data points. The precision of peak responsibility estimates, for example, can be improved if several of the highest hourly demands in a given time period are used rather than the single highest hourly demand. Arguably, use of several highest hourly demands can also improve the reliability of the allocation of responsibility.

Gray, D.A.; Butcher, M.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Smarter Meters Help Customers Budget Electric Service Costs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tri-State Smart Grid Investment Grant Tri-State Smart Grid Investment Grant 1 Tri-State's service area includes parts of Fannin County, Georgia; Polk County, Tennessee; and Cherokee County, North Carolina. Smarter Meters Help Customers Budget Electric Service Costs Tri-State Electric Membership Cooperative (Tri-State) is a distribution rural electric cooperative that primarily serves more than 12,000 rural customers, many of whom have low-incomes living at or near poverty level across a multi-state region (see map). Under their smart grid project, Tri-State has replaced conventional electromechanical meters with solid-state smart meters and implemented advanced electricity service programs in order to give customers greater control over their energy use and costs.

90

A stochastic model for the measurement of electricity outage costs  

SciTech Connect

The measurement of customer outage costs has recently become an important subject of research for electric utilities. This paper uses a stochastic dynamic model as the starting point in developing a market-based method for the evaluation of outage costs. Specifically, the model postulates that once an electricity outage occurs, all production activity stops. Full production is resumed once the electricity outage is over. This process repeats itself indefinitely. The business customer maximizes his expected discounted profits (the expected value of the firm), taking into account his limited ability to respond to repeated random electricity outages. The model is applied to 11 industrial branches in Israel. The estimates exhibit a large variation across branches. 34 refs., 3 tabs.

Grosfeld-Nir, A.; Tishler, A. (Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Nuclear electricity is the least-cost option  

SciTech Connect

The use of integrated resource planning (IRP) as a tool for selecting the means to satisfy the need for new electricity heavily favors those options that are evaluated to have the least cost. The least-cost option these days, generally combined cycle burning natural gas, can generate electricity for between 3.5 to 4.0 {cents}/kW {times} h. The average generating cost of nuclear electricity, by comparison, is {approximately} 7.0 {cents}/kW {times} h, indicative of the economic challenge facing the nuclear industry. The future for the nuclear option may be better, if you believe that natural gas prices will increase. Studies by General Electric (GE) show that if these prices escalate at 3.5% above inflation, as DRI and others forecast, advanced nuclear plants will be in an economic dead heat with coal and combined-cycle/natural-gas plants, the primary baseload options. The use of environmental externalities can also change the evaluation of these competing technology options. When the cost of pollution emissions from fossil plants are factored in, studies show that nuclear electricity generation is the best economic option.

Redding, J.R. [GE, San Jose, CA (United States); Yates, R. [GE, Schenectady, NY (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

92

Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost Calculator for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8000 hours Number of lamps in retrofit project Hours operating per week hours Average cost of electricity 0.06 kWh Relamper labor costs hr Time taken to retrofit all lamps...

93

The Costs of Reducing Electricity Sector CO2 Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a high-level analysis of some of the critical challenges associated with cutting United States electricity-sector CO2 emissions and an order of magnitude feeling for what it will cost to meet emission-reduction targets now under consideration. Three basic strategies to limit emissions are illustrated to give readers a basic understanding of the tradeoff between CO2 reductions and additional cost inherent in several generation choices. Regional power market system simulations are then...

2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

94

Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost Calculator for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electric and Gas Water Heaters Vary equipment size, energy cost, hours of operation, and or efficiency level. INPUT SECTION Input the following data (if any parameter is missing,...

95

ELECTRICITY SUBSECTOR CYBERSECURITY RISK MANAGEMENT PROCESS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SUBSECTOR CYBERSECURITY SUBSECTOR CYBERSECURITY RISK MANAGEMENT PROCESS U.S. Department of Energy May 2012 DOE/OE-0003 Acknowledgments This electricity subsector cybersecurity Risk Management Process (RMP) guideline was developed by the Department of Energy (DOE), in collaboration with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC). Members of industry and utility-specific trade groups were included in authoring this guidance designed to be meaningful and tailored for the electricity sector. The primary goal of this guideline is to describe an RMP that is tuned to the specific needs of electricity subsector organizations. The NIST Special Publication (SP) 800-39, Managing Information Security Risk, provides the foundational methodology for this document. The NIST Interagency Report

96

Rising Electricity Costs: A Challenge For Consumers, Regulators, And Utilities  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electricity: 30 Years of Electricity: 30 Years of Electricity: 30 Years of Electricity: 30 Years of Industry Change Industry Change David K. Owens Executive Vice President Edison Electric Institute 30 Years of Energy Information and Analysis April 7, 2008 EIA Key to Policy Development and EIA Key to Policy Development and Advocacy Activities Advocacy Activities EIA Has Kept Pace With an Evolving EIA Has Kept Pace With an Evolving Energy Industry Energy Industry n EIA clearly provides more with less budgetary support l 1979: $347 million l 2007: $91 million (both in Real $2007) n EIA staff resource distribution has tracked changing energy markets and information needs Resource Management Oil & Gas Coal, Nuclear, Electric, Alt Fuels Energy Markets & End Use Integrated Analysis / Forecasting Information Technology

97

Electricity Demand and Energy Consumption Management System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This project describes the electricity demand and energy consumption management system and its application to the Smelter Plant of Southern Peru. It is composted of an hourly demand-forecasting module and of a simulation component for a plant electrical system. The first module was done using dynamic neural networks, with backpropagation training algorithm; it is used to predict the electric power demanded every hour, with an error percentage below of 1%. This information allows management the peak demand before this happen, distributing the raise of electric load to other hours or improving those equipments that increase the demand. The simulation module is based in advanced estimation techniques, such as: parametric estimation, neural network modeling, statistic regression and previously developed models, which simulates the electric behavior of the smelter plant. These modules allow the proper planning because it allows knowing the behavior of the hourly demand and the consumption patterns of the plant, in...

Sarmiento, Juan Ojeda

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Cost management improvement in the Office of Environmental Management 1991-1995. Progress report  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Environmental Management (EM) has been proactive in meeting the cost management challenges of environmental management activities. EM recognized the need for defining and establishing good cost management practices and has, during the first half of the 1990s, initiated more than a dozen major cost-management-related activities that have resulted in: Measureable improvement in cost-and cost-related management practices; Improved communication between field and Headquarters and among field sites; Development of cost management tools; Hiring of cost professionals; Involving regulators and stakeholders early in the planning process. The purposes of this progress report are to summarize EM`s cost management initiatives, report on the results of its proactive approach to cleaning up the environment at reasonable cost, and identify future cost management needs.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Analysis of electricity production costs from the geopressured geothermal resource  

SciTech Connect

The economics of the geopressured geothermal resource along the northern coast of the Gulf of Mexico is assessed. Geopressured waters are nearly under twice the normal hydrostatic pressure and believed to be saturated with methane. The costs of generating electricity from this resource are estimated based on the description and conceptual development plans provided by the United States Geological Survey (USGS). Methane content and selling prices are the most important factors affecting the commercial potential of geopressured resources--so it is important that electrical generation be viewed as a by-product of methane production. On the same incremental cost basis, the cost of electricity generated from the geohydraulic energy is potentially competitive with conventional energy sources. This would require development of a small commercial high pressure, hydraulic turbine to extract geohydraulic energy at the wellhead in plants of about 3 MW capacity. Price/quantity relationships are developed for electricity generation from geopressured resources for each of three development plans proposed by USGS. Studies, based on field constructed plants, indicated an optimum power plant size in the range of 20 to 60 MWe, depending on water temperature. However, if standardized thermal conversion power plants could be factory produced in the 6 MWe range competitively with larger field constructed plants, then the optimum plant size might be reduced to single wellhead units.Wellhead units would completely eliminate fluid transmission costs, but would probably incur higher costs for heat rejection, power plant operation, and electrical transmission. The upper cost target for competitive wellhead plants would be on the order of $800/kW in 1975 dollars.

Bloomster, C.H.; Knutsen, C.A.

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

The effects of utility DSM programs on electricity costs and prices  

SciTech Connect

More and more US utilities are running more and larger demand-side management (DSM) programs. Assessing the cost-effectiveness of these programs raises difficult questions for utilities and their regulators. Should these programs aim to minimize the total cost of providing electric-energy services or should they minimize the price of electricity? This study offers quantitative estimates on the tradeoffs between total costs and electricity prices. This study uses a dynamic model to assess the effects of energy-efficiency programs on utility revenues, total resource costs, electricity prices, and electricity consumption for the period 1990 to 2010. These DSM programs are assessed under alternative scenarios. In these cases, fossil-fuel prices, load growth, the amount of excess capacity the utility has in 1990, planned retirements of power plants, the financial treatment of DSM programs, and the costs of energy- efficient programs vary. These analyses are conducted for three utilities: a ``base`` that is typical of US utilities; a ``surplus`` utility that has excess capacity, few planned retirements, and slow growth in fossil-fuel prices and incomes; and a ``deficit`` utility that has little excess capacity, many planned retirements, and rapid growth in fossil-fuel prices and incomes. 28 refs.

Hirst, E.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manage electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

The effects of utility DSM programs on electricity costs and prices  

SciTech Connect

More and more US utilities are running more and larger demand-side management (DSM) programs. Assessing the cost-effectiveness of these programs raises difficult questions for utilities and their regulators. Should these programs aim to minimize the total cost of providing electric-energy services or should they minimize the price of electricity This study offers quantitative estimates on the tradeoffs between total costs and electricity prices. This study uses a dynamic model to assess the effects of energy-efficiency programs on utility revenues, total resource costs, electricity prices, and electricity consumption for the period 1990 to 2010. These DSM programs are assessed under alternative scenarios. In these cases, fossil-fuel prices, load growth, the amount of excess capacity the utility has in 1990, planned retirements of power plants, the financial treatment of DSM programs, and the costs of energy- efficient programs vary. These analyses are conducted for three utilities: a base'' that is typical of US utilities; a surplus'' utility that has excess capacity, few planned retirements, and slow growth in fossil-fuel prices and incomes; and a deficit'' utility that has little excess capacity, many planned retirements, and rapid growth in fossil-fuel prices and incomes. 28 refs.

Hirst, E.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost Calculator for Commercial  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Cost Energy Cost Calculator for Commercial Heat Pumps (5.4 >=< 20 Tons) to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost Calculator for Commercial Heat Pumps (5.4 >=< 20 Tons) on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost Calculator for Commercial Heat Pumps (5.4 >=< 20 Tons) on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost Calculator for Commercial Heat Pumps (5.4 >=< 20 Tons) on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost Calculator for Commercial Heat Pumps (5.4 >=< 20 Tons) on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost Calculator for Commercial Heat Pumps (5.4 >=< 20 Tons) on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Energy

103

Landscape Fragmentation and Electric Transmission Corridor Siting and Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses landscape fragmentation and electric transmission corridor siting and management.

2003-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

104

RCDA: Architecting as a risk- and cost management discipline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose to view architecting as a risk- and cost management discipline. This point of view helps architects identify the key concerns to address in their decision making, by providing a simple, relatively objective way to assess architectural significance. ... Keywords: Cost management, Risk Management, Software architecture

Eltjo R. Poort; Hans Van Vliet

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 1997  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 Tables 7 Tables May 1998 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration/Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 1997 Tables ii Contacts The annual publication Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants (C&Q) is no longer published by the EIA. The tables presented in this document are intended to replace that annual publication. Questions

106

New Zealand Interactive Electricity Generation Cost Model 2010 | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » New Zealand Interactive Electricity Generation Cost Model 2010 Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: New Zealand Interactive Electricity Generation Cost Model 2010 Agency/Company /Organization: New Zealand Energy Authority Sector: Energy Topics: Finance, Implementation, Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.med.govt.nz/templates/MultipageDocumentTOC____45553.aspx Country: New Zealand Cost: Free Australia and New Zealand Coordinates: -40.900557°, 174.885971°

107

Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Updated Capital Cost Estimates Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants April 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants ii This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies.

108

Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost and Performance Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies Rick Tidball, Joel Bluestein, Nick Rodriguez, and Stu Knoke ICF International Fairfax, Virginia Subcontract Report NREL/SR-6A20-48595 November 2010 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies Rick Tidball, Joel Bluestein, Nick Rodriguez, and Stu Knoke ICF International Fairfax, Virginia NREL Technical Monitor: Jordan Macknick

109

Energy Conservation and Management for Electric Utility Industrial Customers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comprehensive energy management assistance within the industrial section is currently being offered by a growing number of electric utilities as part of their efforts to - provide additonal demand side services to their industrial customers. One of the keys to these enhanced services is the availability of a unique Industrial Energy Conservation and Management (EC&M) computer model that can be used to evaluate the technical and economic benefits of installing proposed process related energy management systems within an industrial plant. Details of an EPRI sponsored pilot program are summarized and results presented on the use of the computer model to provide comprehensive EC&M system evaluations of potential energy management opportunities in HL&P's and other utility service areas. This capability is currently being offered to HL&P's industrial customers and is primarily concerned with identifying and evaluating possible process heat recovery and other energy management opportunities to show how a plant's energy related operating costs can be reduced.

McChesney, H. R.; Obee, T. N.; Mangum, G. F.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Guidelines for Energy Cost Savings Resulting from Tracking and Monitoring Electrical nad Natural Gas Usage, Cost, and Rates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses how improved energy information in schools and hospitals from tracking and monitoring electrical and natural gas usage, cost, and optional rate structures, can reduce energy costs. Recommendations, methods, and guidelines for monitoring and tracking of utilities are provided. These recommendations, methods, and guidelines are the result of on-site work for schools and hospitals . Recently completed energy usage survey and observations of several hospitals in Texas are included. Opportunities exist for schools, hospitals, and other buildings t o achieve significant dollar savings by good utility management. Understanding utility rate structures is essential for minimizing energy costs. The authors' data is for Texas schools and hospitals, but the principles presented apply to other geographic areas.

McClure, J. D.; Estes, M. C.; Estes, J. M.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Will stranded cost recovery distort Pennsylvania`s electricity market?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is ironic indeed that the forecasting errors of Keystone State utilities that have led to today`s claims of stranded costs are now to be remediated in new legislation which, unaccountably, utterly fails to take account of the same problem: utility forecasting errors. On December 3, 1996, the Governor of Pennsylvania signed into law the Electricity Generation Customer Choice and Competition Act (66 Pa. C.S. 2801 et seq.). The Act set in motion an ambitious timetable for restructuring Pennsylvania`s electric utility industry to substantially deregulate its generation component. Customer choice of electricity supplier is to be phased in over a two year period beginning January 1, 1999. As indicated by the appearance of the word {open_quotes}competition{close_quotes} in the official title of the Act, the resulting institutional transformation is expected to foster free market competition in the generation and retail sale of electricity. However, there is already dispute among the Act`s commentators and critics, who are legion, as to whether its strategy for achieving this commendable objective will produce significant cost savings to consumers any time soon. One need look no further than the Act`s transition cost recovery provisions to find cause for skepticism. Section 2808 of the Act empowers the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission to impose, for a period of up to nine years from January 1, 1997 (or longer at the Commission`s discretion), a {open_quotes}competitive transition charge{close_quotes} (CTC) upon {open_quotes}every customer accessing the transmission or distribution network.{close_quotes} The CTC is intended to afford Pennsylvania`s regulated electric utilities the opportunity to recover those of their {open_quotes}transition or stranded costs{close_quotes} (collectively {open_quotes}stranded costs{close_quotes}) approved by the Commission.

Caplan, R.L. [Caplan & Luber, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost Calculator for Compact  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compact Fluorescent Lamps to someone by E-mail Compact Fluorescent Lamps to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost Calculator for Compact Fluorescent Lamps on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost Calculator for Compact Fluorescent Lamps on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost Calculator for Compact Fluorescent Lamps on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost Calculator for Compact Fluorescent Lamps on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost Calculator for Compact Fluorescent Lamps on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost Calculator for Compact Fluorescent Lamps on AddThis.com... Energy-Efficient Products Federal Requirements Covered Product Categories

113

Vegetation Management by Electric Utilities: Use of Herbicides and Other Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the essential elements and principles comprising electric utility vegetation management programs, defines management problems, and discusses possible research on vegetation management issues. The report particularly focuses on the use of herbicides and their effects on wildlife and human health. Legal and regulatory aspects and cost control issues are also covered.

1995-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

114

Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost Calculator for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Unitary Air Conditioner (Rooftops) to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost Calculator for Commercial Unitary Air Conditioner (Rooftops)...

115

Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost Calculator for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Faucets and Showerheads to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost Calculator for Faucets and Showerheads on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy...

116

Marginal cost of electricity 1980-1995: an approximation based on the cost of new coal and nuclear generating plants  

SciTech Connect

This report presents estimates of the costs of new coal and nuclear base-load generating capacity which is either currently under construction or planned by utilities to meet their load-growth expectations during the period from 1980 to 1995. These capacity cost estimates are used in conjunction with announced plant capacities and commercial-operation dates to develop state-level estimates of busbar costs of electricity. From these projected busbar costs, aggregated estimates of electricity costs at the retail level are developed for DOE Regions. The introductory chapter explains the rationale for using the cost of electricity from base-load plants to approximate the marginal cost of electricity. The next major section of the report outlines the methodology and major assumptions used. This is followed by a detailed description of the empirical analysis, including the equations used for each of the cost components. The fourth section presents the resultant marginal cost estimates.

Nieves, L.A.; Patton, W.P.; Harrer, B.J.; Emery, J.C.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Preface. The U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management report is prepared by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Elec-

118

Bottling Electricity: Storage as a Strategic Tool for Managing...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bottling Electricity: Storage as a Strategic Tool for Managing Variability and Capacity Concerns in the Modern Grid - EAC Report (December 2008) Bottling Electricity: Storage as a...

119

Management of electric vehicle battery charging in distribution networks.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis investigated the management of electric vehicle battery charging in distribution networks. Different electric vehicle fleet sizes and network locations were considered. The energy (more)

Grau, Iaki

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Staff Draft Report. Comparative Cost of California Central Station Electricity Generation Technologies.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Energy Commission staff draft report presents preliminary levelized cost estimates for several generic central-station electricity generation technologies. California has traditionally adopted energy policies that balance the goals of supporting economic development, improving environmental quality and promoting resource diversity. In order to be effective, such policies must be based on comprehensive and timely gathering of information. With this goal in mind, the purpose of the report is to provide comparative levelized cost estimates for a set of renewable (e.g., solar) and nonrenewable (e.g., natural gas-fired) central-station electricity generation resources, based on each technology's operation and capital cost. Decision-makers and others can use this information to compare the generic cost to build specific technology. These costs are not site specific. If a developer builds a specific power plant at a specific location, the cost of siting that plant at that specific location must be considered. The Energy Commission staff also identifies the type of fuel used by each technology and a description of the manner in which the technology operates in the generation system. The target audiences of this report are both policy-makers and anyone wishing to understand some of the fundamental attributes that are generally considered when evaluating the cost of building and operating different electricity generation technology resources. These costs do not reflect the total cost to consumers of adding these technologies to a resources portfolio. These technology characterizations do not capture all of the system, environmental or other relevant attributes that would typically be needed by a portfolio manager to conduct a comprehensive ''comparative value analysis''. A portfolio analysis will vary depending on the particular criteria and measurement goals of each study. For example, some form of firm capacity is typically needed with wind generation to support system reliability. [DJE-2005

Badr, Magdy; Benjamin, Richard

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manage electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Staff Draft Report. Comparative Cost of California Central Station Electricity Generation Technologies.  

SciTech Connect

This Energy Commission staff draft report presents preliminary levelized cost estimates for several generic central-station electricity generation technologies. California has traditionally adopted energy policies that balance the goals of supporting economic development, improving environmental quality and promoting resource diversity. In order to be effective, such policies must be based on comprehensive and timely gathering of information. With this goal in mind, the purpose of the report is to provide comparative levelized cost estimates for a set of renewable (e.g., solar) and nonrenewable (e.g., natural gas-fired) central-station electricity generation resources, based on each technology's operation and capital cost. Decision-makers and others can use this information to compare the generic cost to build specific technology. These costs are not site specific. If a developer builds a specific power plant at a specific location, the cost of siting that plant at that specific location must be considered. The Energy Commission staff also identifies the type of fuel used by each technology and a description of the manner in which the technology operates in the generation system. The target audiences of this report are both policy-makers and anyone wishing to understand some of the fundamental attributes that are generally considered when evaluating the cost of building and operating different electricity generation technology resources. These costs do not reflect the total cost to consumers of adding these technologies to a resources portfolio. These technology characterizations do not capture all of the system, environmental or other relevant attributes that would typically be needed by a portfolio manager to conduct a comprehensive ''comparative value analysis''. A portfolio analysis will vary depending on the particular criteria and measurement goals of each study. For example, some form of firm capacity is typically needed with wind generation to support system reliability. [DJE-2005

Badr, Magdy; Benjamin, Richard

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

122

Department of Energy Environmental Management cost infrastructure development program: Cost analysis requirements  

SciTech Connect

This report was prepared to support development of the Department of Energy Environmental Management cost infrastructure -- a new capability to independently estimate and analyze costs. Currently, the cost data are reported according to a structure that blends level of effort tasks with product and process oriented tasks. Also. the budgetary inputs are developed from prior year funding authorizations and from contractor-developed parametric estimates that have been adjusted to planned funding levels or appropriations. Consequently, it is difficult for headquarters and field-level activities to use actual cost data and technical requirements to independently assess the costs generated and identify trends, potential cost savings from process improvements, and cost reduction strategies.

Custer, W.R. Jr.; Messick, C.D.

1996-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

123

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents a comparison of the costs and benefits (reduced petroleum consumption) of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles relative to hybrid electric and conventional vehicles.

Markel, T.; Simpson, A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Waste management facilities cost information for transuranic waste  

SciTech Connect

This report contains preconceptual designs and planning level life-cycle cost estimates for managing transuranic waste. The report`s information on treatment and storage modules can be integrated to develop total life-cycle costs for various waste management options. A procedure to guide the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractor personnel in the use of cost estimation data is also summarized in this report.

Shropshire, D.; Sherick, M.; Biagi, C.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1999  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1999 Executive Summary Background Demand-side management (DSM) programs consist of the planning, implementing, and monitoring ...

126

Electric Vehicle Battery Thermal Issues and Thermal Management Techniques (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation examines the issues concerning thermal management in electric drive vehicles and management techniques for improving the life of a Li-ion battery in an EDV.

Rugh, J. P.; Pesaran, A.; Smith, K.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Capping the electricity cost of cloud-scale data centers with impacts on power markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose a novel electricity cost capping algorithm that not only minimizes the electricity cost of operating cloud-scale data centers, but also enforces a cost budget on the monthly electricity bill. Our solution first explicitly models the impacts of power demands on electricity prices and the power consumption of cooling and networking in the minimization of electricity cost. In the second step, if the electricity cost exceeds a desired monthly budget due to unexpectedly high workloads, our solution guarantees the quality of service for premium customers and trades off the request throughput of ordinary customers. We formulate electricity cost capping as two related constrained optimization problems and propose an efficient algorithm based on mixed integer programming. Simulation results show that our solution outperforms the state-ofthe-art solutions by having lower electricity costs and achieves desired cost capping with maximized request throughput.

Yanwei Zhang; Yefu Wang; Xiaorui Wang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

DOE Releases Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Risk Management Process  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Releases Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Risk Management Releases Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Risk Management Process (RMP) Guideline DOE Releases Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Risk Management Process (RMP) Guideline May 23, 2012 - 9:30am Addthis News Media Contact: (202) 586-4940 For Immediate Release: May 23, 2012 Department of Energy Releases Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Risk Management Process (RMP) Guideline Public-Private Sector Collaboration Produces Guidance to Help Electric Utilities Better Understand and Assess Cybersecurity Risk WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, in collaboration with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC), today released guidance to help

129

Optimal management of batteries in electric systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electric system including at least a pair of battery strings and an AC source minimizes the use and maximizes the efficiency of the AC source by using the AC source only to charge all battery strings at the same time. Then one or more battery strings is used to power the load while management, such as application of a finish charge, is provided to one battery string. After another charge cycle, the roles of the battery strings are reversed so that each battery string receives regular management.

Atcitty, Stanley (Albuquerque, NM); Butler, Paul C. (Albuquerque, NM); Corey, Garth P. (Albuquerque, NM); Symons, Philip C. (Morgan Hill, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Energy Management Strategies for Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Summarizes and compares potential energy management strategies for plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, accounting for duty cycle distance.

Gonder, J.; Markel, T.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-In Hybrid-Electric Vehicle Technology (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presents a cost-benefit of analysis of plug-in hybrid electric vehicle technology, including potential petroleum use reduction.

Pesaran, A.; Markel, T.; Simpson, A.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Does EIA have data on the costs for electricity transmission and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

EIA does not have data on the costs to build or operate electricity transmission lines and distribution networks. However, ...

133

Demand-side management of China`s electric power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article presents an analysis of China`s strategies for electricity demand-side management (DSM) by the year 2000. It discusses electricity shortages, potential for electricity conservation, and measures to cope with the problems. It concludes that the country should speed up the reform of electricity pricing, make executable laws, and invest capital in demand-side management.

Yang, M. [Asian Inst. of Tech., Bangkok (Thailand). School of Environment, Resources and Development

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Waste management facilities cost information: System cost model product description. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

In May of 1994, Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company (LITCO) in Idaho Falls, Idaho and subcontractors developed the System Cost Model (SCM) application. The SCM estimates life-cycle costs of the entire US Department of Energy (DOE) complex for designing; constructing; operating; and decommissioning treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities for mixed low-level, low-level, transuranic, and mixed transuranic waste. The SCM uses parametric cost functions to estimate life-cycle costs for various treatment, storage, and disposal modules which reflect planned and existing facilities at DOE installations. In addition, SCM can model new facilities based on capacity needs over the program life cycle. The SCM also provides transportation costs for DOE wastes. Transportation costs are provided for truck and rail and include transport of contact-handled, remote-handled, and alpha (transuranic) wastes. The user can provide input data (default data is included in the SCM) including the volume and nature of waste to be managed, the time period over which the waste is to be managed, and the configuration of the waste management complex (i.e., where each installation`s generated waste will be treated, stored, and disposed). Then the SCM uses parametric cost equations to estimate the costs of pre-operations (designing), construction costs, operation management, and decommissioning these waste management facilities.

Lundeen, A.S.; Hsu, K.M.; Shropshire, D.E.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Electric Vehicles: Performances, Life Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sealed lead-acid electric and vehicle battery development.A. (1987a) ture for electric vehicles. In Resources ElectricInternational Conference. Electric Vehicle De- Universityof

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost Calculator for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

41000 gal 41000 gal Gas Cost therm 0.60 therm 0.60 therm Electricity Cost kWh 0.06 kWh 0.06 kWh Minutes per Day of Operation minutes 30 minutes 20 minutes Days...

137

Minimizing Building Electricity Costs in a Dynamic Power Market: Algorithms and Impact on Energy Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Minimizing Building Electricity Costs in a Dynamic Power Market: Algorithms and Impact on Energy of Computing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, P. R. China 2 Department of Electrical and the electricity bills nowa- days are leading to unprecedented costs. Electricity price is market-based and dynamic

Wang, Dan

138

Optimal Power Cost Management Using Stored Energy in Data Centers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the electricity bill of a data center constitutes a significant portion of its overall operational costs, reducing this has become important. We investigate cost reduction opportunities that arise by the use of uninterrupted power supply (UPS) units as energy storage devices. This represents a deviation from the usual use of these devices as mere transitional fail-over mechanisms between utility and captive sources such as diesel generators. We consider the problem of opportunistically using these devices to reduce the time average electric utility bill in a data center. Using the technique of Lyapunov optimization, we develop an online control algorithm that can optimally exploit these devices to minimize the time average cost. This algorithm operates without any knowledge of the statistics of the workload or electricity cost processes, making it attractive in the presence of workload and pricing uncertainties. An interesting feature of our algorithm is that its deviation from optimality reduces as the...

Urgaonkar, Rahul; Neely, Michael J; Sivasubramaniam, Anand

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

A Review of Recent RTO Benefit-Cost Studies: Toward MoreComprehensive Assessments of FERC Electricity RestructuringPolicies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the past three years, government and private organizations have issued more than a dozen studies of the benefits and costs of Regional Transmission Organizations (RTOs). Most of these studies have focused on benefits that can be readily estimated using traditional production-cost simulation techniques, which compare the cost of centralized dispatch under an RTO to dispatch in the absence of an RTO, and on costs associated with RTO start-up and operation. Taken as a whole, it is difficult to draw definitive conclusions from these studies because they have not examined potentially much larger benefits (and costs) resulting from the impacts of RTOs on reliability management, generation and transmission investment and operation, and wholesale electricity market operation. This report: (1) Describes the history of benefit-cost analysis of FERC electricity restructuring policies; (2)Reviews current practice by analyzing 11 RTO benefit-cost studies that were published between 2002 and 2004 and makes recommendations to improve the documentation of data and methods and the presentation of findings in future studies that focus primarily on estimating short-run economic impacts; and (3) Reviews important impacts of FERC policies that have been overlooked or incompletely treated by recent RTO benefit-cost studies and the challenges to crafting more comprehensive assessments of these impacts based on actual performance, including impacts on reliability management, generation and transmission investment and operation, and wholesale electricity market operation.

Eto, Joseph H.; Lesieutre, Bernard C.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Rural electric cooperatives and the cost structure of the electric power industry: A multiproduct analysis  

SciTech Connect

Since 1935, the federal government of the United States has administered a program designed to make electricity available to rural Americans. This dissertation traces the history of the rural electrification program, as well as its costs. While the Congress intended to simply provide help in building the capital structure of rural electric distribution systems, the program continues to flourish some 35 years after these systems first fully covered the countryside. Once the rural distribution systems were built, the government began to provide cooperatives with billions of dollars in subsidized loans for the generation of electric power. Although this program costs the taxpayers nearly $1 billion per year, no one has ever tested its efficacy. The coops' owner/members do not have the right to trade their individual ownership shares. The RECs do not fully exploit the scale and scope economies observed in the investor-owned sector of this industry. This dissertation compares the relative productive efficiencies of the RECs and the investor-owned electric utilities (IOUs) in the United States. Using multiproduct translog cost functions, the estimated costs of cooperatives are compared to those of IOUs in providing identical output bundles. Three separate products are considered as outputs: (1) wholesale power; (2) power sold to large industrial customers; and (3) power sold to residential and commercial customers. It is estimated that, were the RECs forced to pay market prices for their inputs, their costs would exceed those incurred by the IOUs by about 24 percent. Several policy recommendations are made: (1) the RECs should be converted to stockholder-owned, tax-paying corporations; (2) the government should discontinue its subsidized loan program; (3) the government should sell its hydroelectric power at market prices, nullifying the current preference given to cooperatives and municipal distributors in the purchase of this currently underpriced power.

Berry, D.M.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manage electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

50 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SMART GRID, VOL. 3, NO. 1, MARCH 2012 Coordinated Energy Cost Management of Distributed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the electricity market price and have no influence on determining the price. #12;RAO et al.: COORDINATED ENERGY50 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SMART GRID, VOL. 3, NO. 1, MARCH 2012 Coordinated Energy Cost Management centers (IDCs) has been skyrocketing. While most existing research focuses on reducing electric energy

142

Electrical power distribution control methods, electrical energy demand monitoring methods, and power management devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrical power distribution control methods, electrical energy demand monitoring methods, and power management devices are described. In one aspect, an electrical power distribution control method includes providing electrical energy from an electrical power distribution system, applying the electrical energy to a load, providing a plurality of different values for a threshold at a plurality of moments in time and corresponding to an electrical characteristic of the electrical energy, and adjusting an amount of the electrical energy applied to the load responsive to an electrical characteristic of the electrical energy triggering one of the values of the threshold at the respective moment in time.

Chassin, David P. (Pasco, WA); Donnelly, Matthew K. (Kennewick, WA); Dagle, Jeffery E. (Richland, WA)

2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

143

Electrical power distribution control methods, electrical energy demand monitoring methods, and power management devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrical power distribution control methods, electrical energy demand monitoring methods, and power management devices are described. In one aspect, an electrical power distribution control method includes providing electrical energy from an electrical power distribution system, applying the electrical energy to a load, providing a plurality of different values for a threshold at a plurality of moments in time and corresponding to an electrical characteristic of the electrical energy, and adjusting an amount of the electrical energy applied to the load responsive to an electrical characteristic of the electrical energy triggering one of the values of the threshold at the respective moment in time.

Chassin, David P. (Pasco, WA); Donnelly, Matthew K. (Kennewick, WA); Dagle, Jeffery E. (Richland, WA)

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

144

The Market Value and Cost of Solar Photovoltaic Electricity Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Renew- ables, The Electricity Journal, Volume 14 (2001),from Real-Time Retail Electricity Pricing: Bill VolatilityReal- Time Retail Electricity Pricing, Energy Journal,28(

Borenstein, Severin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

The Market Value and Cost of Solar Photovoltaic Electricity Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Borenstein, Severin. Electricity Rate Structures and thePrice of Electricity Annual Real Interest Rate DiscountedReal Price of Electricity Annual Real Interest Rate Table 4:

Borenstein, Severin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Electric Vehicles: Performances, Life Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Engineer- an electric car practical with existingN. (1987) The BMW electric car--current devel- for electricinfrastructure for electric cars. TRRL Report LR812.

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Innovative and Progressive Electric Utility Demand-Side Management Strategies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conservation of electric energy has been a concern of energy users in the residential, commercial and industrial sectors for several decades, and has increased in significance since the 1973 energy shortages. During this time, it has also become increasing difficult for electric utilities to install new generating capacity due to public concerns about nuclear energy and environmental issues. In many areas of the country, utilities now find themselves capacity short during their peak periods, and have concerns about providing a reliable supply of electricity. These utilities have initiated programs which encourage their customers to conserve electric energy, and shift or lower use during the utility's peak periods. In other areas of the country there are utilities which have more than adequate electric supplies. These utilities have developed programs which ensure that costs of electricity are such that existing customers are maintained. Programs which address demand issues of an energy utility are referred to as Demand-Side Management (DSM) and are extremely rigorous in scope. Electric utilities have pursued many different DSM policies and strategies during the past decade. These programs have addressed various technologies and have included rebates for efficient lighting, electric motors and packaged air conditioning systems. More recently, however, many utilities have implemented very innovative programs, which indicates an increased commitment towards demand planning, and requires a substantial financial investment in new equipment and engineering services. Some programs have addressed such areas as thermal storage and industrial processes, and others have included comprehensive facility energy studies where greater than fifty percent of the cost of energy retrofits may be covered by the utility. Progressive pricing strategies have included real-time pricing and aggressive curtailable rates for commercial and industrial buildings. Further, new standards are being established by electric utilities which promote energy efficient new construct ion. All of these programs can have considerable impacts on both the customer's and utility's energy use patterns and load shapes. This paper will discuss a number of more significant and innovative DSM programs, and will explain the potential load and energy impacts.

Epstein, G. J.; Fuller, W. H.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Plug-In Electric Vehicle Lithium-Ion Battery Cost and Advanced Battery Technologies Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Batteries are a critical cost factor for plug-in electric vehicles, and the current high cost of lithium ion batteries poses a serious challenge for the competitiveness of Plug-In Electric Vehicles (PEVs). Because the market penetration of PEVs will depend heavily on future battery costs, determining the direction of battery costs is very important. This report examines the cost drivers for lithium-ion PEV batteries and also presents an assessment of recent advancements in the growing attempts to ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

149

Electric Vehicles: Performances, Life Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table3 to the incre- no oil costs, and that Na/S batteries,costs, of vehicles Oil costs, percent ofgasoline vehiclestires are (M&R) costs (we exclude fires and oil) than ICEVs,

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

DSM strikes again. [Demand-side management of gas and electric utilities  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses and explains demand-side management (DSM) of the gas and electric utility companies. It contrasts the advantages that electric utilities offering economic incentives (with any cost passed on to rate payers) to increase demand while such offerings are rarely available from the gas utilities. It then discusses the cause and cost of pollution from conventional electrical facilities compared to gas-operated equipment and facilities. The paper goes on to discuss fuel switching and other incentives to get individuals and facilities to switch to natural gas.

Katz, M.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

A Review of Recent RTO Benefit-Cost Studies: Toward More Comprehensive Assessments of FERC Electricity Restructuring Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Administration. 2004. Electricity Transmission in aInterruptions to U.S. Electricity Customers. September. (Cost Models in Electricity Planning and Pricing.

Eto, Joseph H.; Lesieutre, Bernard C.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Life cycle cost and risk estimation of environmental management options  

SciTech Connect

The evaluation process is demonstrated in this paper through comparative analysis of two alternative scenarios identified for the management of the alpha-contaminated fixed low-level waste currently stored at INEL. These two scenarios, the Base Case and the Delay Case, are realistic and based on actual data, but are not intended to exactly match actual plans currently being developed at INEL. Life cycle cost estimates were developed for both scenarios using the System Cost Model; resulting costs are presented and compared. Life cycle costs are shown as a function of time and also aggregated by pretreatment, treatment, storage, and disposal activities. Although there are some short-term cost savings for the Delay Case, cumulative life cycle costs eventually become much higher than costs for the Base Case over the same period of time, due mainly to the storage and repackaging necessary to accommodate the longer Delay Case schedule. Life cycle risk estimates were prepared using a new risk analysis method adapted to the System Cost Model architecture for automated, systematic cost/risk applications. Relative risk summaries are presented for both scenarios as a function of time and also aggregated by pretreatment, treatment, storage, and disposal activities. Relative risk of the Delay Case is shown to be higher than that of the Base Case. Finally, risk and cost results are combined to show how the collective information can be used to help identify opportunities for risk or cost reduction and highlight areas where risk reduction can be achieved most economically.

Shropshire, D.; Sherick, M.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Long-run incremental costs and the pricing of electricity. Part II. [Comparative evaluation of marginal cost pricing and average cost pricing  

SciTech Connect

Total costs have essentially the same cost components whether long-run average costs or long-run incremental costs are used. The variable components, chiefly fuel, may be somewhat different in the new incremental plant compared to the old average plant; where the difference is between nuclear fuel and fossil fuel, its size is substantial. However, given the same kind of plant, the current prices of materials and labor will be essentially the same whether used in the new or the old plant with long-run incremental costs (LRIC) or long-run average costs (LRAC). The lower cost of electricity produced in nuclear plants constructed today, as compared to fossil fuel plants constructed at the same time, is not to be confused with the relation between LRIC and LRAC. LRAC is the average cost of electricity from all existing plants priced at their historical costs, which were generally lower than current costs. These average historical costs per kilowatt are still likely to be lower than the current incremental cost per kilowatt of the newest nuclear plant built at present price levels. LRAC is, therefore, still likely to be lower than LRIC for either fossil or nuclear. Data from the Wisconsin Power and Light Company, the Madison Gas and Electric Company, and Tuscon Gas and Electric Company are examined to study some comparisons. Some pricing principles that vary seasonally for resort hotels are reviewed. (MCW)

Morton, W.A.

1976-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

154

Electric Energy Management in the Smart Home: Perspectives on Enabling Technologies and Consumer Behavior: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Smart homes hold the potential for increasing energy efficiency, decreasing costs of energy use, decreasing the carbon footprint by including renewable resources, and transforming the role of the occupant. At the crux of the smart home is an efficient electric energy management system that is enabled by emerging technologies in the electric grid and consumer electronics. This article presents a discussion of the state-of-the-art in electricity management in smart homes, the various enabling technologies that will accelerate this concept, and topics around consumer behavior with respect to energy usage.

Zipperer, A.; Aloise-Young, P. A.; Suryanarayanan, S.; Roche, R.; Earle, L.; Christensen, D.; Bauleo, P.; Zimmerle. D.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Electrical Energy Conservation and Load Management - An Industrial User's Viewpoint  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conservation of electrical energy and load management can reduce industry's electric bills, conserves natural resources and reduces the need for new generating plants. In recent years, industry has implemented extensive conservation programs. Some load management has been implemented already. Additional load management is possible; however, optimizing it will require close industry and electric utility company cooperation to develop new incentives and rate structures to make it economically attractive. The limitations of existing rate structures and needed improvements are presented.

Jackson, C. E.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

#tipsEnergy: Ways to Save on Electricity Costs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

#tipsEnergy: Ways to Save on Electricity Costs #tipsEnergy: Ways to Save on Electricity Costs #tipsEnergy: Ways to Save on Electricity Costs July 22, 2013 - 4:18pm Addthis Rebecca Matulka Rebecca Matulka Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs #tipsEnergy: Ways to Save on Electricity Costs Every month we ask you to share your energy-saving tips, and we feature some of the best ideas in a Storify to encourage others to save energy and money at home. For this month's #tipsEnergy, we want to know how you save on electricity costs. Storified by Energy Department · Fri, Jul 26 2013 10:27:57 From powering our homes' lights and kitchen appliances to running our TVs and computers -- electricity is an essential part of our modern life. It should be no surprise that the average residential electricity bill is more than $110 a month, according to the Energy

157

#tipsEnergy: Ways to Save on Electricity Costs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electricity Costs Electricity Costs #tipsEnergy: Ways to Save on Electricity Costs July 22, 2013 - 4:18pm Addthis Rebecca Matulka Rebecca Matulka Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs #tipsEnergy: Ways to Save on Electricity Costs Every month we ask you to share your energy-saving tips, and we feature some of the best ideas in a Storify to encourage others to save energy and money at home. For this month's #tipsEnergy, we want to know how you save on electricity costs. Storified by Energy Department · Fri, Jul 26 2013 10:27:57 From powering our homes' lights and kitchen appliances to running our TVs and computers -- electricity is an essential part of our modern life. It should be no surprise that the average residential electricity bill is more than $110 a month, according to the Energy

158

Hybrid vehicle potential assessment. Volume 10. Electric and hybrid vehicle cost handbook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this interim cost handbood is to provide a consistent single-point source of data and procedures for estimating the costs of electric and hybrid vehicles. These costs include manufacturing, acquisition (purchase price), operating, and life cycle. Each suggested Cost Estimating Relation (CER) presented herein is a result of the compilation of currently existing cost estimates and cost relationships. No independent cost analysis was performed for this handbook, nor was any analysis performed to rework existing cost data for consistency in all primary assumptions. The cost data is presented in terms of major component and subassembly costs so that any vehicle (electric, hybrid, or conventional) can be costed. The cost estimating relations presented in this handbook are subjective averages of the several independent estimates for each component.

Heft, R.C.; Heller, S.C.

1979-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

159

Total Thermal Management System for Hybrid and Full Electric Vehicles  

Total Thermal Management System for Hybrid and Full Electric Vehicles Note: The technology described above is an early stage opportunity. Licensing rights to this ...

160

U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Final issue of this report. - Presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand side management (DSM) activities in the United States at the national, regional, and utility levels.

Information Center

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manage electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Review of Electrical System Configuration Management and Design...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Review of Electrical System Configuration Management and Design Change Control at the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building Project July 2011 Office of...

162

Managing Wind Power Forecast Uncertainty in Electric Grids.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Electricity generated from wind power is both variable and uncertain. Wind forecasts provide valuable information for wind farm management, but they are not perfect. Chapter (more)

Mauch, Brandon Keith

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Federal Energy Management Program: Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable Buildings Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable Buildings To help facility managers make sound decisions, FEMP provides guidance and resources on applying life cycle cost analysis (LCCA) to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of energy and water efficiency investments. Federal Requirements Life cycle cost (LCC) rules are promulgated in 10 CFR 436 A, Life Cycle Cost Methodology and Procedures and conforms to requirements in the National Energy Conservation Policy Act and subsequent energy conservation legislation as well as Executive Order 13423. The LCC guidance and materials provided here assume discount rates and energy price projections (TXT 17 KB) determined annually by FEMP and the Energy Information Administration. Building Life Cycle Cost Software FEMP's Building Life Cycle Cost (BLCC) software can help you calculate life cycle costs, net savings, savings-to-investment ratio, internal rate of return, and payback period for Federal energy and water conservation projects funded by agencies or alternatively financed. BLCC also estimates emissions and emission reductions. An energy escalation rate calculator (EERC) computes an average escalation rate for energy savings performance contracts when payments are based on energy cost savings.

164

Electricity transmission congestion costs: A review of recent reports  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Making Competition Work in Electricity. John Wiley and Sons.Report on the New York Electricity Markets. June. Patton,Market Report: New York Electricity Markets. April. PJM (PJM

Lesieutre, Bernard C.; Eto, Joseph H.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Electric and Gasoline Vehicle Lifecycle Cost and Energy-Use Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Auto Industry Models to Review Electric Vehicle Costing andElectric Vehicles in the Nation's Energy Future , DE86-003295, Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois, November (1984). Auto industry

Delucchi, Mark; Burke, Andy; Lipman, Timothy; Miller, Marshall

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents a comparison of vehicle purchase and energy costs, and fuel-saving benefits of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles relative to hybrid electric and conventional vehicles.

Simpson, A.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

The Market Value and Cost of Solar Photovoltaic Electricity Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adjusting for Time-Varying Production SACRAMENTO flat-rateSolar Photovoltaic Electricity Production Severin BorensteinPhotovoltaic Electricity Production Severin Borenstein 1

Borenstein, Severin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Electricity transmission congestion costs: A review of recent reports  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in wholesale electricity trade, and enable consumers to seekelectricity markets rely on offer-based, centralized, wholesale tradeas reported in the trade press. These electricity hub prices

Lesieutre, Bernard C.; Eto, Joseph H.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

The Market Value and Cost of Solar Photovoltaic Electricity Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

during electricity transmission and distribution increasesand distribution infrastructure if less electricity needselectricity, and also ignores the potential savings in transmission and distribution

Borenstein, Severin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Managing Electricity Reliability Risk Through the Futures Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-47645 Managing Electricity Reliability Risk Through the Futures Markets Afzal S. Siddiqui Environmental Energy Technologies Division Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley for Operations Research and the Management Sciences INFORMS Annual Meeting in San Antonio, TX, November 2000

171

How much does it cost to generate electricity with different types ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How much does it cost to generate electricity with different types of power plants? EIA has historical data on the average annual operation, maintenance, ...

172

How much does it cost to generate electricity with different types ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Reserves, production, prices, employ- ment and productivity, distribution, ... How much does it cost to generate electricity with different types of power plants?

173

Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants 2006 and 2007  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE/EIA-0191(2007) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants 2006 and 2007 December 2008 Energy Information Administration

174

Quantifying the system balancing cost when wind energy is incorporated into electricity generation system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Incorporation of wind energy into the electricity generation system requires a detailed analysis of wind speed in order to minimize system balancing cost and avoid (more)

Issaeva, Natalia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Lifecycle Costs of Ultracapacitors in Electric Vehicle Applications A. G. Simpson G. R. Walker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and cost of the battery under consideration. However, it is likely that the lifecycle cost benefits that examines the lifecycle costs of ultracapacitors in battery electric vehicle applications. The lifecycle). · The high capital cost and relatively short lifetime (commonly 3 years) of electrochemical batteries, which

Walker, Geoff

176

Electric power high-voltage transmission lines: Design options, cost, and electric and magnetic field levels  

SciTech Connect

This report provides background information about (1) the electric and magnetic fields (EMFs) of high-voltage transmission lines at typical voltages and line configurations and (2) typical transmission line costs to assist on alternatives in environmental documents. EMF strengths at 0 {+-} 200 ft from centerline were calculated for ac overhead lines, and for 345 and 230-kV ac underground line and for a {+-}450-kV dc overhead line. Compacting and height sensitivity factors were computed for the variation in EMFs when line conductors are moved closer or raised. Estimated costs for the lines are presented and discussed so that the impact of using alternative strategies for reducing EMF strengths and the implications of implementing the strategies can be better appreciated.

Stoffel, J.B.; Pentecost, E.D.; Roman, R.D.; Traczyk, P.A.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Historical plant cost and annual production expenses for selected electric plants, 1982  

SciTech Connect

This publication is a composite of the two prior publications, Hydroelectric Plant Construction Cost and Annual Production Expenses and Thermal-Electric Plant Construction Cost and Annual Production Expenses. Beginning in 1979, Thermal-Electric Plant Construction Cost and Annual Production Expenses contained information on both steam-electric and gas-turbine electric plant construction cost and annual production expenses. The summarized historical plant cost described under Historical Plant Cost in this report is the net cumulative-to-date actual outlays or expenditures for land, structures, and equipment to the utility. Historical plant cost is the initial investment in plant (cumulative to the date of initial commercial operation) plus the costs of all additions to the plant, less the value of retirements. Thus, historical plant cost includes expenditures made over several years, as modifications are made to the plant. Power Production Expenses is the reporting year's plant operation and maintenance expenses, including fuel expenses. These expenses do not include annual fixed charges on plant cost (capital costs) such as interest on debt, depreciation or amortization expenses, and taxes. Consequently, total production expenses and the derived unit costs are not the total cost of producing electric power at the various plants. This publication contains data on installed generating capacity, net generation, net capability, historical plant cost, production expenses, fuel consumption, physical and operating plant characteristics, and other relevant statistical information for selected plants.

1984-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

178

Using time-driven activity-based costing to manage digital forensic readiness in large organisations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A digital forensic readiness (DFR) programme consists of a number of activities that should be chosen and managed with respect to cost constraints and risk. Traditional cost systems, however, can not provide the cost of individual activities. This makes ... Keywords: Cost management, Digital forensic readiness, Forensics management, Time-driven activity-based costing

K. Reddy; H. S. Venter; M. S. Olivier

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Electric power transmission and distribution systems: costs and their allocation. Research report  

SciTech Connect

Transmission and distribution costs contribute significantly to the total costs of providing electrical service. The costs derived from the transmission and distribution (TandD) system have historically comprised about 2/3 the costs of producing and delivering electricity to residential-commercial customers, and over 1/3 the total costs supplying electricity to large industrial customers. This report: (1) estimates the differences in transmission and distribution equipment required to serve industrial and residential-commercial customers and allocates to the above two customer classes the average costs of installing this equipment; (2) estimates the costs of operation and maintenance of the transmission and distribution system, and allocates these costs to the customer classes; and (3) calculates the TandD derived average costs for the two customer classes. (GRA)

Baughman, M.L.; Bottaro, D.J.

1975-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Ecological and Wildlife Risk Assessment of Chemicals Encountered in Vegetation Management on Electric Utility Rights-of-Way  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The management of vegetation on electric utility rights-of-way (ROWs) is an essential part of managing electrical transmission and distribution systems. A variety of manual, mechanical, and chemical methods, singly or in combination, are used for this purpose. The method or methods selected must be safe for humans and the environment and cost-effective in accomplishing the goals of ROW management. This report reviews environmental and wildlife safety through an assessment of risk to the environment, incl...

2004-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manage electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technology | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technology Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technology Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technology Focus Area: Electricity Topics: Policy Impacts Website: www.nrel.gov/vehiclesandfuels/vsa/pdfs/40485.pdf Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/cost-benefit-analysis-plug-hybrid-ele Language: English Policies: "Regulations,Financial Incentives" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. Regulations: Fuel Efficiency Standards This paper presents a comparison of the costs and benefits of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) relative to hybrid electric and conventional vehicles. A detailed simulation model is used to predict

182

Understanding the Cost of Power Interruptions to U.S. Electricity Consumers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Understanding the Cost of Power Interruptions to U.S. Electricity Understanding the Cost of Power Interruptions to U.S. Electricity Consumers Understanding the Cost of Power Interruptions to U.S. Electricity Consumers The massive electric power blackout in the northeastern United States and Canada on August 14-15, 2003 resulted in the U.S. electricity system being called "antiquated" and catalyzed discussions about modernizing the grid. Industry sources suggested that investments of $50 to $100 billion would be needed. This report seeks to quantify an important piece of information that has been missing from these discussions: how much do power interruptions and fluctuations in power quality (power-quality events) cost U.S. electricity consumers? Accurately estimating this cost will help assess the potential benefits of investments in improving the reliability

183

Facilitating Sound, Cost-Effective Federal Energy Management (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet is an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). The Federal Government, as the nation's largest energy consumer, has a tremendous opportunity and acknowledged responsibility to lead by example. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) plays a critical role in this effort. FEMP facilitates the Federal Government's implementation of sound, cost-effective energy management and investment practices to enhance the nation's energy security and environmental stewardship. FEMP does this by focusing on the needs of its Federal customers, delivering an array of services across a variety of program areas.

Not Available

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Development of mobile workforce management system for electricity supply industries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research paper presents the features of a proposed Mobile Workforce Management System (MWMS) that will be used for the Electricity Supply Industries (ESI). The paper wraps up the types of related works that has been executed; the study on problems ... Keywords: electricity supply industry, mobile workforce management system

Faridah Hani Mohamed Salleh; Zaihisma Che Cob; Mohana Shanmugam; Siti Salbiah Mohamed Shariff

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Predictive energy management for hybrid electric vehicles -Prediction horizon and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Predictive energy management for hybrid electric vehicles - Prediction horizon and battery capacity of a combined hybrid electric vehicle. Keywords: Hybrid vehicles, Energy Management, Predictive control, Optimal on a sliding window in order to minimize the hybrid vehicle fuel consumption. For real time implementation

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

186

DUF6 Management Cost Analysis Report (CAR): Part 2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

. . . Cost Analysis Report for the Long-Term Management of May 1997 Figure 4.5 Total Costs of Manufacture of Metal Options 900 800 700 Ctj 300 3 200 100 0 Metal Shielding Oxide Shielding Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride and Oxide Shielding s Decontamination & Decommissioning QI Operations & Maintenance s Regulatory Compliance u Balance of Plant u Manufacturing Facilities s Manufacturing Equipment u Engineering Development 57 ..- . Cost Analysis Report for the Long-Term Management of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride May 1997 4.4 Long-term Storage Storage of depleted uranium is predicated on its use at some later date. In the engineering analysis, storage options are defined by the type of storage facility, and suboptions are defined by the chemical form in which the depleted uranium is stored. The types of storage facilities analyzed are (1) buildings, (2) below ground vaults,

187

A Low Cost Energy Management Program at Engelhard Industries Division  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engelhard Corporation, established as an independent company on May 20, 1981, consists of the Engelhard Industries and the Minerals and Chemicals Divisions of the former Engelhard Minerals and Chemicals Corporation. Engelhard is a world leader in technology related to precious metals and nonmetallic minerals. It manufactures high-performance chemical and precious metals products, including catalysts for the petroleum and automotive industries. Engelhard's energy costs have risen dramatically over the past few years. Increases over 19% were experienced both in 1979 and 1980. Energy cost in 1980 was over $7.8 million. Engelhard Industries management realizes that with the continuously escalating cost of energy, energy management has become extremely important to the profitability of the division.

Brown, T. S.; Michalek, R.; Reiter, S.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Electricity derivatives and risk management S.J. Denga,*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity derivatives and risk management S.J. Denga,* , S.S. Orenb a School of Industrial Engineering and Operations Research, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA Abstract Electricity of electricity production and distribution. Uncontrolled exposure to market price risks can lead to devastating

189

Electricity transmission congestion costs: A review of recent reports  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Market Report: New York Electricity Markets. April. PJM (PJM Interconnection, LLC).2002. PJM Interconnection State of the Market Report 2001.

Lesieutre, Bernard C.; Eto, Joseph H.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Cost Analysis of Proposed National Regulation of Coal Combustion Residuals from the Electric Generating Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This analysis quantifies the potential cost to the coal-fired electric generation industry from EPA's proposed rule on the disposal of coal combustion residuals. It includes an assessment of the incremental compliance costs of the Subtitle C proposed regulatory option. Costs for this analysis were developed at the individual generating unit and plant level and aggregated to develop a national industry cost estimate. The analytical model used to estimate the costs utilizes a Monte Carlo framework to accou...

2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

191

The Market Value and Cost of Solar Photovoltaic Electricity Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

per kWh produced than baseload coal, nuclear or combined-even. The model includes a baseload technology with high ?annual production cost are: Baseload (coal) Cost = $208247/M

Borenstein, Severin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

The Market Value and Cost of Solar Photovoltaic Electricity Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy generation from wind, geothermal, biomass, and central station solar thermal, with a 5% annual increase in the real cost

Borenstein, Severin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Electricity Plant Cost Uncertainties (released in AEO2009)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Construction costs for new power plants have increased at an extraordinary rate over the past several years. One study, published in mid-2008, reported that construction costs had more than doubled since 2000, with most of the increase occurring since 2005. Construction costs have increased for plants of all types, including coal, nuclear, natural gas, and wind.

Information Center

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

194

Small Town Using Wind Power to Offset Electricity Costs | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Town Using Wind Power to Offset Electricity Costs Town Using Wind Power to Offset Electricity Costs Small Town Using Wind Power to Offset Electricity Costs September 8, 2010 - 10:00am Addthis Kevin Craft Carmen, Oklahoma, is not your average small town. It was the first recipient of an Energy Efficiency and Conservation block grant - and the small town of 412 is using that Recovery Act funding to cut costs through wind energy. Through a $242,500 Recovery Act grant, town officials purchased four 5 kW and one 10 kW wind turbines. Officials are using wind energy to offset electricity costs for all town-owned buildings and save an estimated $24,000 a year. According to Therese Kephart, Carmen's town clerk and treasurer, the goal of the project is to produce enough electricity to run all town-owned buildings.

195

Analysis of the total system life cycle cost for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program  

SciTech Connect

The total-system life-cycle cost (TSLCC) analysis for the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program is an ongoing activity that helps determine whether the revenue-producing mechanism established by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 -- a fee levied on electricity generated in commercial nuclear power plants -- is sufficient to cover the cost of the program. This report provides cost estimates for the sixth annual evaluation of the adequacy of the fee and is consistent with the program strategy and plans contained in the DOE`s Draft 1988 Mission Plan Amendment. The total-system cost for the system with a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a facility for monitored retrievable storage (MRS), and a transportation system is estimated at $24 billion (expressed in constant 1988 dollars). In the event that a second repository is required and is authorized by the Congress, the total-system cost is estimated at $31 to $33 billion, depending on the quantity of spent fuel to be disposed of. The $7 billion cost savings for the single-repository system in comparison with the two-repository system is due to the elimination of $3 billion for second-repository development and $7 billion for the second-repository facility. These savings are offset by $2 billion in additional costs at the first repository and $1 billion in combined higher costs for the MRS facility and transportation. 55 refs., 2 figs., 24 tabs.

NONE

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Lawrence Livermore National Security Cost Model Functional Management Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The scope of the Functional Management Assessment of the cost model included a review of the plan and progress of the Cost Model Review Team. The review focused on processes in place to ensure simplicity, compliance with cost accounting standards and indirect cost allocation methodology, and the change management plan. This was intended to be a high-level initial review in order to provide recommendations for a subsequent more comprehensive review. The single document reviewed by the team during the assessment was the Indirect Cost Recovery Model Review, which describes how the indirect rate restructure and new organizational structure have resulted in streamlined charging practices to better understand and strategically manage costs. ISSUE 1: The cost model focuses heavily on rate structure but not on cost management. Significant progress has been made to simplify the rate structure. The number of indirect rates has been reduced from 67 different indirect rates used under the prior contract to 32 rates in the first year of the LLNS contract, with a goal of further reduction to 16 for FY09. The reductions are being recommended by a broad-based Working Group driven by Lab leadership desiring a simplified rate structure that would make it easier to analyze the true cost of overhead, be viewed as equitable, and ensure appropriate use of Service, i.e., operations, Centers. This has been a real challenge due to the significant change in approach from one that previously involved a very complex rate structure. Under this prior approach, the goal was to manage the rates, and rates were established at very detailed levels that would 'shine the light' on pools of overhead costs. As long as rates stayed constant or declined, not as much attention tended to be given to them, particularly with so many pools to review (184 indirect rate pools in FY05). However, as difficult and important as simplifying the rate structure has been, the fundamental reason for the simplification is to make it easier to analyze the true cost of overhead so the costs can be effectively managed. For the current year, the overall the goal of keeping the total cost of an FTE to FY07 levels. This approach reflects the past practice of managing to rates rather than focusing on costs, although streamlined with the more simplified rate structure. Given all the challenges being faced with the contract transition, this was a reasonable interim tactic for dealing with the known cost increases such as fees and taxes. Nonetheless, in order to take full advantage of the opportunities that exist for making sound decisions for further reducing the rates themselves, the Laboratory needs to implement an ongoing and disciplined approach to understanding and managing overhead cost. ISSUE 2: The NIF has a significantly different rate structure than other Laboratory work. Because of its significant size and unique organizational structure as a major construction project, the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has indirect charges that vary from the norm. These variations were reviewed and approved by and disclosed to the NNSA in the Laboratory's past annual Disclosure Statements. In mid-FY 09, NIF will begin transition from a construction line item to an operational center. The reallocation of costs when this occurs could significantly impact the Laboratory's rates and rate structure planning for that transition from a cost- and rate- impact standpoint should begin soon. ISSUE 3: The new rate model must be finalized shortly in order to implement the model beginning in FY 09. As noted in Issue No.1, a Working Group has developed a simplified rate structure for the Lab to use for FY09. The Working Group has evaluated the cost impacts of the simplified rate structure at the major program level and identified a disparate impact in the Safeguards and Security area where a substantial increase in overhead cost allocation may need to be mitigated. The simplified rate structure will need to be approved by the Laboratory Director and issued within the Laboratory to formulate detailed bu

Tevis, J; Hirahara, J; Thomas, B; Mendez, M

2008-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

197

Electricity pricing as a demand-side management strategy: Western lessons for developing countries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric utilities in the Western world have increasingly realized that load commitments can be met not only by constructing new generating plants but also by influencing electricity demand. This demand-side management (DSM) process requires that electric utilities promote measures on the customer's side of the meter to directly or indirectly influence electricity consumption to meet desired load objectives. An important demand-side option to achieve these load objectives is innovative electricity pricing, both by itself and as a financial incentive for other demand-site measures. This study explores electricity pricing as a DSM strategy, addressing four questions in the process: What is the Western experience with DSM in general and electricity pricing in particular Do innovative pricing strategies alter the amount and pattern of electricity consumption Do the benefits of these pricing strategies outweigh the costs of implementation What are future directions in electricity pricing Although DSM can be used to promote increases in electricity consumption for electric utilities with excess capacity as well as to slow demand growth for capacity-short utilities, emphasis here is placed on the latter. The discussion should be especially useful for electric utilities in developing countries that are exploring alternatives to capacity expansion to meet current and future electric power demand.

Hill, L.J.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Table 8.13 Electric Utility Demand-Side Management Programs ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Savings: Electric Utility Costs 4: ... motor drive) with less electricity. Examples include high-efficiency appliances, ... advanced electric motor drives, and

199

OR Forum---Modeling the Impacts of Electricity Tariffs on Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Charging, Costs, and Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) have been touted as a transportation technology with lower fuel costs and emissions impacts than other vehicle types. Most analyses of PHEVs assume that the power system operator can either directly or indirectly ... Keywords: environment, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, pricing

Ramteen Sioshansi

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Electricity Transmission Pricing: How much does it cost to get it wrong?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PWP-058 Electricity Transmission Pricing: How much does it cost to get it wrong? Richard Green Channing Way Berkeley, California 94720-5180 www.ucei.berkeley.edu/ucei #12;Electricity Transmission optimal prices for electricity transmission. These are rarely applied in practice. This paper develops

California at Berkeley. University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manage electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Electricity Markets and Policy Group Energy Analysis Department The Cost of Transmission for Wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity Markets and Policy Group · Energy Analysis Department 1 The Cost of Transmission Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory February 2009 #12;Electricity Markets and Policy Group · Energy Implications and Future Work #12;Electricity Markets and Policy Group · Energy Analysis Department 3 Motivation

202

Regional comparison of nuclear and fossil electric power generation costs  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear's main disadvantages are its high capital investment cost and uncertainty in schedule compared with alternatives. Nuclear plant costs continue to rise whereas coal plant investment costs are staying relative steady. Based on average experience, nuclear capital investment costs are nearly double those of coal-fired generation plants. The capital investment cost disadvantage of nuclear is balanced by its fuel cost advantages. New base load nuclear power plants were projected to be competitive with coal-fired plants in most regions of the country. Nuclear power costs wre projected to be significantly less (10% or more) than coal-fired power costs in the South Atlantic region. Coal-fired plants were projected to have a significant economic advantage over nuclear plants in the Central and North Central regions. In the remaining seven regions, the levelized cost of power from either option was projected to be within 10%. Uncertainties in future costs of materials, services, and financing affect the relative economics of the nuclear and coal options significantly. 10 figures.

Bowers, H.I.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Bottling Electricity: Storage as a Strategic Tool for Managing Variability  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bottling Electricity: Storage as a Strategic Tool for Managing Bottling Electricity: Storage as a Strategic Tool for Managing Variability and Capacity Concerns in the Modern Grid - EAC Report (December 2008) Bottling Electricity: Storage as a Strategic Tool for Managing Variability and Capacity Concerns in the Modern Grid - EAC Report (December 2008) The objectives of this report are to provide the Secretary of Energy with the Electricity Advisory Committee's proposed five-year plan for integrating basic and applied research on energy storage technology applications. This report recommends policies that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) should consider as it develops and implements an energy storage technologies program, as authorized by the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007. Bottling Electricity: Storage as a Strategic Tool for Managing Variability

204

Moving Forward with the Electric Sector Cybersecurity Risk Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Moving Forward with the Electric Sector Cybersecurity Risk Moving Forward with the Electric Sector Cybersecurity Risk Management Maturity Initiative Moving Forward with the Electric Sector Cybersecurity Risk Management Maturity Initiative January 20, 2012 - 10:28am Addthis Since the January 5, 2012 launch of the "Electric Sector Cybersecurity Risk Management Maturity" program, a White House initiative led by the Department of Energy in partnership with the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to create a more comprehensive and consistent approach to protecting the nation's electric grid against cyber attacks, we have seen a tremendous response from the electric sector. More and more companies are stepping forward, saying they want to participate. We are capitalizing on the growing momentum in several ways. One of our

205

Electricity Cost and Firm Performance: Evidence from India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Despite the widely acknowledged importance of infrastructure for economic growth, there has been relatively little research on how infrastructure affects the decisions of firms. Using data on Indian manufacturing firms, this paper provides evidence on how electricity prices affect a firms industry choice and productivity growth. I construct an instrument for electricity price as the interaction between the price of coal paid by power utilities, which is arguably exogenous to firm characteristics, and the initial share of thermal generation in a states total electricity generation capacity. I find that, in response to an exogenous increase in electricity price, firms reduce their electricity consumption and switch to industries with less electricity-intensive production processes. I also find that firm output, machine intensity and labor productivity decline with an increase in electricity price. In addition to these level effects, I show that firm output and productivity growth rates are negatively affected by high electricity prices. These results suggest that electricity constraints faced by firms may limit a countrys growth by leading firms to operate in industries with fewer productivity-enhancing opportunities.

Ama Baafra Abeberese

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

The Market Value and Cost of Solar Photovoltaic Electricity Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are a form of distributed generation. The current directPV. As a form of distributed generation, solar PV is alsoprovisions for distributed generation. hour when electricity

Borenstein, Severin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

EIA - Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Electricity Generation Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Almost all of these factors can vary by region, as do capacity factors for renewable generation, operations and maintenance costs associated with individual ...

208

An economic and legal perspective on electric utility transition costs  

SciTech Connect

The issue of possibly unrecoverable cost incurred by a utility, or `stranded costs,` has emerged as a major obstacle to developing a competitive generation market. Stranded or transition costs are defined as costs incurred by a utility to serve its customers that were being recovered in rates but are no longer due to availability of lower-priced alternative suppliers. The idea of `stranded cost,` and more importantly arguments for its recovery, is a concept with little basis in economic theory, legal precedence, or precedence in other deregulated industries. The main argument recovery is that the ``regulatory compact`` requires it. This is based on the misconception that the regulator compact is simply: the utility incurs costs on behalf of its customers because of the ``obligation to serve`` so, therefore, customers are obligated to pay. This is a mischaracterization of what the compact was and how it developed. Another argument is that recovery is required for economic efficiency. This presumes, however, a very narrow definition of efficiency based on preventing ``uneconomic`` bypass of the utility and that utilities minimize costs. A broader definition of efficiency and the likelihood of cost inefficiencies in the industry suggest that the cost imposed on customers from inhibiting competition could exceed the gains from preventing uneconomic bypass. Both these issues are examined in this paper.

Rose, K.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

EIA - Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Electricity Generation Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... by the costs has changed significantly. Prior estimates were for a highly efficient plant employing gasification and a combined cycle generator; the new ...

210

The Market Value and Cost of Solar Photovoltaic Electricity Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

have a much higher cost per kWh produced than baseload coal,life to 30 years on the cost per kWh is fairly small due tocosts through non-energy payments, which are incorporated as a constant per-kWh

Borenstein, Severin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Modeling of Cost Curves 1.0 Costs of Generating Electrical Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

production costs. Some typical average costs of fuel are given in the following table for coal, petroleum [1] Petroleum [2] Natural Gas [3] All Fossil Fuels Receipts (Billion BTU) Average Cost Avg. Sulfur fuel, kerosene, petroleum coke (converted to liquid petroleum, see Technical Notes for conversion

McCalley, James D.

212

ELECTRICITY SUBSECTOR CYBERSECURITY RISK MANAGEMENT PROCESS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

complementary to and should be used as part of a more comprehensive enterprise risk management program. i | contents 1. INTRODUCTION ......

213

Using Key Performance Indicators to Manage Energy Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modern management systems rely heavily on information technology to set goals, track performance and communicate results. Energy management approaches (such as those offered by the US Department of Energy and Natural Resources Canada) and measurement and verification protocols (such as IPMVP 2001) often highlight the importance an information system has in maximizing results. The increasing adoption of energy information systems has led, however, to an interesting paradox: while it is now cost-effective to collect much more data than ever before, many energy managers find themselves drowning in the volume of data generated. Business information systems faced a similar challenge a decade ago, and it is now common practice to use Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) to summarize volumes of data into a few critical nuggets of actionable information. These KPIs provide both the metrics that will be used to determine the success of a business plan as well as the timely information managers need to track performance and make adjustments to ensure success. A similar approach can be used in the practice of energy management, where KPIs can be designed to measure the success of key elements in an energy management plan and provide energy managers with the timely nuggets of information they need to ensure success. This paper describes how to define and use KPIs to track the performance and measure the success of an energy management plan. A framework is provided to assist in selecting measurable goals from an energy management plan and determine the raw data and processing required to generate the associated KPIs.

Van Gorp, J. C.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Introduction to the OR Forum Article: Modeling the Impacts of Electricity Tariffs on Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Charging, Costs, and Emissions by Ramteen Sioshansi  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Comment on Modeling the Impacts of Electricity Tariffs on Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Charging, Costs, and Emissions by Ramteen Sieshansi. Keywords: energy, environment, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, pricing

Edieal J. Pinker

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Facilitating Sound, Cost-Effective Federal Energy Management (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet is an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). The Federal Government, as the nation's largest energy consumer, has a tremendous opportunity and acknowledged responsibility to lead by example. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) plays a critical role in this effort. FEMP facilitates the Federal Government's implementation of sound, cost-effective energy management and investment practices to enhance the nation's energy security and environmental stewardship. FEMP does this by focusing on the needs of its Federal customers, delivering an array of services across a variety of program areas.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

The Market Value and Cost of Solar Photovoltaic Electricity Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by low price caps, the di?erence between solar PV powersolar PV power using hourly wholesale electricity prices and5. Real-time Prices for Valuing the Power from Solar PVs As

Borenstein, Severin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

A statistical model for risk management of electric outage forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Risk management of power outages caused by severe weather events, such as hurricanes, tornadoes, and thunderstorms, plays an important role in electric utility distribution operations. Damage prediction based on weather forecasts on an appropriate spatial ...

H. Li; L. A. Treinish; J. R. M. Hosking

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Final issue of this report. - 1996 - Presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand side management (DSM) activities in the United States at the national, regional, and utility levels.

Information Center

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Cost Maps for Fossil Assets Management: Based on a Case Study With Minnesota Power Company  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The key to effective management of utility assets is determining the benefits and costs of options over various timeframes. This report describes and illustrates a structured approach to asset management decision making using cost maps.

1995-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

220

Managing Wind Power Forecast Uncertainty in Electric Brandon Keith Mauch  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

i Managing Wind Power Forecast Uncertainty in Electric Grids Brandon Keith Mauch Co in Electric Grids Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy for aggregated wind farms are often modeled with Gaussian distributions. However, data from several studies have

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manage electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Cost Quality Management Assessment for the Idaho Operations Office. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Engineering and Cost Management (EM-24) conducted a Cost Quality Management Assessment of EM-30 and EM-40 activities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory on Feb. 3--19, 1992 (Round I). The CQMA team assessed the cost and cost-related management activities at INEL. The Round II CQMA, conducted at INEL Sept. 19--29, 1994, reviewed EM-30, EM-40, EM-50, and EM-60 cost and cost-related management practices against performance objectives and criteria. Round II did not address indirect cost analysis. INEL has made measurable progress since Round I.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

General Equilibrium, Electricity Generation Technologies and the Cost of Carbon Abatement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity generation is a major contributor to carbon dioxide emissions, and a key determinant of abatement costs. Ex-ante assessments of carbon policies mainly rely on either of two modeling paradigms: (i) partial ...

Lanz, Bruno, 1980-

223

Rising Electricity Costs: A Challenge For Consumers, Regulators, And Utilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Update Update Steve Kiesner Director, National Customer Markets FUPWG Spring 2010 Meeting April 14, 2010 What's On the Minds of Your Utilities?  Transformation of the Electricity Industry  Emerging smart technology  Financial reform  Reliability  Major initiatives to address climate change  Gaps / Lack of Clarity in Federal / State Decisions on Infrastructure and Market Issues  Operating in a carbon constrained world EEI  Our members serve 95% of the ultimate customers in the shareholder-owned segment of the industry,  and represent approximately 70% of the U.S. electric power industry.  We also have more than 80 international electric companies as Affiliate Members  Organized in 1933, EEI works closely with all of its members, representing their interests and

224

Development of a right-of-way cost estimation and cost estimate management process framework for highway projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Escalation of right-of-way (ROW) costs have been shown to be a prime contributor to project cost escalation in the highway industry. Two problems contribute to ROW cost escalation: 1) the ROW cost estimation and cost estimate management process generally lacks structure and definition as compared to other areas of cost estimation; and 2) there is a lack of integration and communication between those responsible for ROW cost estimating and those responsible for general project cost estimating. The research for this thesis was preceded by a literature review to establish the basis for the study. Data collection was completed through interviews of seven state highway agencies (SHAs) and two local public agencies (LPAs). The findings of the research are presented in a set of ROW flowcharts which document the steps, inputs, and outputs of the ROW cost estimation and cost estimate management process. Three ROW cost estimates and a cost management process take place throughout project development. An effort was made from the onset of the research to relate the ROW cost estimating and cost estimate management process to the first four project development phases (planning, programming. preliminary design, and final design). There are five flowcharts produced as a result of this research: 1) an agency-level flowchart showing all cost estimates and the interaction of ROW with the project development process; 2) a conceptual ROW cost estimating flowchart which depicts the required steps during planning; 3) a baseline ROW cost estimating flowchart which depicts the required steps during programming; 4) an update ROW cost estimating flowchart which depicts the required steps during preliminary design to include a cost estimate management loop; and 5) a ROW cost management flowchart which depicts the required steps during final design. Although selected SHA contacts provided input following the development of the flowcharts, the flowcharts were only validated to a limited extent due to time and budget constraints. These flowcharts attempt to address the two contributing problems to ROW cost escalation by providing structure to the ROW cost estimation process and by developing the ROW process flowcharts linked to the project development process. Based on the input provided by SHA contacts, the flowcharts appear to have the potential to provide guidance to SHAs in improving the accuracy of ROW cost estimates through addressing these two problems.

Lucas, Matthew Allen

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Hotel dual-cogeneration plant saving 33% on electricity costs  

SciTech Connect

Hotel Del Coronado in California has two cogeneration systems in operation, one gas turbine based, the other an advanced solar photovoltaic installation which cuts its electric bill by $400,000 per year. In order to make the new installation as unobstrusive as possible, the gas turbine and waste heat boiler units were placed underground. The sunlight-to-electricity efficiency of the photovoltaic cogeneration system is about 8% and the thermal conversion efficiency about 50%. That makes for an overall 58% cogeneration efficiency. The design uses silicon solar cells specially designed for concentrator application.

Stambler, I.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Electric Cable Reel Rubber-Tired Gantry Cranes: Costs and Benefits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Port equipment manufacturers have responded to the increased focus on air quality control by creating a variety of cleaner equipment and making more electric equipment available to ports. Included in this equipment is the rubber-tired gantry (RTG) crane, which was historically available only with a diesel engine. Electric cable reel RTG cranes, relatively new to the U.S. market, may reduce port crane operating costs due to their lower energy costs, higher energy efficiencies, and longer equipment life. E...

2010-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

227

Fiscal interactions and the costs of controlling pollution from electricity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

I quantify the costs of controlling SO{sub 2}, carbon, and NOx emissions from power generation, accounting for interactions between environmental policies and the broader fiscal system. I distinguish a dirty technology (coal) that satisfies baseload demand and a clean technology (gas) that is used at peak period, and I distinguish sectors with and without regulated prices. Estimated emissions control costs are substantially lower than in previous models of fiscal interactions that assume a single, constant-returns technology and competitive pricing. The results are reasonably robust to alternative scenarios, such as full price deregulation, and market power in the deregulated sector.

Parry, I.W.H.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

New, Cost-Competitive Solar Plants for Electric Utilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Amonix to develop its 7700 Amonix to develop its 7700 system, which drastically reduces the requirement for costly solar cells by using Fresnel lenses to concentrate sunlight 500 times onto small, highly efficient photovoltaic cells. This reduces the cell area so that expensive solar cell materials can be replaced with inexpensive plastic lenses. Amonix Inc. (Torrance, CA), founded in 1989, develops and

229

Different approaches to estimating transition costs in the electric- utility industry  

SciTech Connect

The term ``transition costs`` describes the potential revenue shortfall (or welfare loss) a utility (or other actor) may experience through government-initiated deregulation of electricity generation. The potential for transition costs arises whenever a regulated industry is subject to competitive market forces as a result of explicit government action. Federal and state proposals to deregulate electricity generation sparked a national debate on transition costs in the electric-utility industry. Industry-wide transition cost estimates range from about $20 billion to $500 billion. Such disparate estimates raise important questions on estimation methods for decision makers. This report examines different approaches to estimating transition costs. The study has three objectives. First, we discuss the concept of transition cost. Second, we identify the major cost categories included in transition cost estimates and summarize the current debate on which specific costs are appropriately included in these estimates. Finally, we identify general and specific estimation approaches and assess their strengths and weaknesses. We relied primarily on the evidentiary records established at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and the California Public Utilities Commission to identify major cost categories and specific estimation approaches. We also contacted regulatory commission staffs in ten states to ascertain estimation activities in each of these states. We refined a classification framework to describe and assess general estimation options. We subsequently developed and applied criteria to describe and assess specific estimation approaches proposed by federal regulators, state regulators, utilities, independent power companies, and consultants.

Baxter, L.W.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Advanced battery thermal management for electrical-drive vehicles using reciprocating cooling flow and spatial-resolution, lumped-capacitance thermal model.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The thermal management of traction battery systems for electrical-drive vehicles directly affects vehicle dynamic performance, long-term durability and cost of the battery systems. The (more)

Mahamud, Rajib

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Assessing strategies to address transition costs in a restructuring electricity industry  

SciTech Connect

Restructuring the US electricity industry has become the nation`s central energy issue for the 1990s. Restructuring proposals at the federal and state levels focus on more competitive market structures for generation and the integration of transmission within those structures. The proposed move to more competitive generation markets will expose utility costs that are above those experienced by alternative suppliers. Debate about these above-market, or transition, costs (e.g., their size,who will pay for them and how) has played a prominent role in restructuring proceedings. This paper presents results from a project to systematically assess strategies to address transition costs exposed by restructuring the electricity industry.

Baxter, L.; Hadley, S.; Hirst, E.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Diagnostics-while drilling: Reducing the cost of geothermal-produced electricity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this document is to estimate the potential impact of proposed new Diagnostics-While-Drilling technology on the cost of electricity (COE) produced with geothermal energy. A cost model that predicts the COE was developed and exercised over the range of conditions found for geothermal plants in flashed-steam, binary, and enhanced-reservoir (e.g., Hot Dry Rock) applications. The calculations were repeated assuming that DWD technology is available to reduce well costs and improve well productivity. The results indicate that DWD technology would reduce the geothermal COE by 2--31%, depending on well depth, well productivity, and the type of geothermal reservoir. For instance, for a typical 50-MW, flashed-steam geothermal power plant employing 3-MW wells, 6,000-ft deep, the model predicts an electricity cost of 4.9 cents/kwh. With the DWD technology envisioned, the electricity cost could be reduced by nearly 20%, to less than 4 cents/kwh. Such a reduction in the cost of electricity would give geothermal power a competitive edge over other types of power at many locations across the US and around the world. It is thus believed that DWD technology could significantly expand the role of geothermal energy in providing efficient, environment-friendly electric generating capacity.

PRAIRIE,MICHAEL R.; GLOWKA,DAVID A.

2000-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

233

Cutting Electricity Costs in Miami-Dade County, Florida | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cutting Electricity Costs in Miami-Dade County, Florida Cutting Electricity Costs in Miami-Dade County, Florida Cutting Electricity Costs in Miami-Dade County, Florida Addthis Description Miami-Dade County, Florida will be piping methane gas from their regional landfill to the adjacent wastewater plant to generate a significant portion of the massive facility's future electricity needs. Speakers Carlos Alvarez, LeAnn Oliver, Steve Kronheim, Jorge Gonzalez, Kathleen Woods-Richardson Duration 2:05 Topic Commercial Heating & Cooling Energy Sources Innovation Energy Economy Energy Sector Jobs Credit Energy Department Video Thank you for coming to celebrate a milestone in Miami-Dade. We are going to be turning biogas into energy. In Miami-Dade County, we've been a leader in the whole sustainability effort. I met with our sustainability

234

Effects of regional insolation differences upon advanced solar thermal electric power plant performance and energy costs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study determines the performance and cost of four 10 MWe advanced solar thermal electric power plants sited in various regions of the continental United States. The solar plants are conceptualized to begin commercial operation in the year 2000. It is assumed that major subsystem performance will have improved substantially as compared to that of pilot plants currently operating or under construction. The net average annual system efficiency is therefore roughly twice that of current solar thermal electric power plant designs. Similarly, capital costs reflecting goals based on high-volume mass production that are considered to be appropriate for the year 2000 have been used. These costs, which are approximately an order of magnitude below the costs of current experimental projects, are believed to be achievable as a result of the anticipated sizeable solar penetration into the energy market in the 1990 to 2000 timeframe. The paraboloidal dish, central receiver, cylindrical parabolic trough, and compound parabolic concentrators comprise the advanced collector concepts studied. All concepts exhibit their best performance when sited in regional areas such as the sunbelt where the annual insolation is high. The regional variation in solar plant performance has been assessed in relation to the expected rise in the future cost of residential and commercial electricity in the same regions. A discussion of the regional insolation data base, a description of the solar systems performance and costs, and a presentation of a range for the forecast cost of conventional electricity by region and nationally over the next several decades are given.

Latta, A.F.; Bowyer, J.M.; Fujita, T.; Richter, P.H.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Strategic planning in electric utilities: Using wind technologies as risk management tools  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper highlights research investigating the ownership of renewable energy technologies to mitigate risks faced by the electric utility industry. Renewable energy technology attributes of fuel costs, environmental costs, lead time, modularity, and investment reversibility are discussed. Incorporating some of these attributes into an economic evaluation is illustrated using a municipal utility`s decision to invest in either wind generation or natural gas based generation. The research concludes that wind and other modular renewable energy technologies, such as photovoltaics, have the potential to provide decision makers with physical risk-management investments.

Hoff, T E [Pacific Energy Group, Stanford, CA (United States); Parsons, B [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Ancillary-service costs for 12 US electric utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ancillary services are those functions performed by electrical generating, transmission, system-control, and distribution-system equipment and people to support the basic services of generating capacity, energy supply, and power delivery. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission defined ancillary services as ``those services necessary to support the transmission of electric power from seller to purchaser given the obligations of control areas and transmitting utilities within those control areas to maintain reliable operations of the interconnected transmission system.`` FERC divided these services into three categories: ``actions taken to effect the transaction (such as scheduling and dispatching services) , services that are necessary to maintain the integrity of the transmission system [and] services needed to correct for the effects associated with undertaking a transaction.`` In March 1995, FERC published a proposed rule to ensure open and comparable access to transmission networks throughout the country. The rule defined six ancillary services and developed pro forma tariffs for these services: scheduling and dispatch, load following, system protection, energy imbalance, loss compensation, and reactive power/voltage control.

Kirby, B.; Hirst, E.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Production Cost Modeling of Cogenerators in an Interconnected Electric Supply System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Optimal State Electricity Supply System in Texas (OSEST) research project is part of the continuing Public Utility Commission of Texas (PUCT) effort to identify possible improvements in the production, transmission, and use of electricity in the state. The OSEST project is designed to identify the general configuration of the optimal electric supply system resulting from coordinated system planning and operation from a statewide perspective. The Optimized Generation Planning Program (OGP) and Multi-Area Production Simulation Program with Megawatt Flow (MAPS/MWFLOW) are two computer programs developed by General Electric that are being used in the study. Both of these programs perform production costing calculations to evaluate the performance of various electric supply system configurations necessary to appropriately model the present and future cogeneration activity in the service areas of the electric utilities that compose the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT).

Ragsdale, K.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

User's guide to SERICPAC: A computer program for calculating electric-utility avoided costs rates  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

SERICPAC is a computer program developed to calculate average avoided cost rates for decentralized power producers and cogenerators that sell electricity to electric utilities. SERICPAC works in tandem with SERICOST, a program to calculate avoided costs, and determines the appropriate rates for buying and selling of electricity from electric utilities to qualifying facilities (QF) as stipulated under Section 210 of PURA. SERICPAC contains simulation models for eight technologies including wind, hydro, biogas, and cogeneration. The simulations are converted in a diversified utility production which can be either gross production or net production, which accounts for an internal electricity usage by the QF. The program allows for adjustments to the production to be made for scheduled and forced outages. The final output of the model is a technology-specific average annual rate. The report contains a description of the technologies and the simulations as well as complete user's guide to SERICPAC.

Wirtshafter, R.; Abrash, M.; Koved, M.; Feldman, S.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Geothermal Electricity Technologies Evaluation Model DOE Tool for Assessing Impact of Research on Cost of Power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a spreadsheet model to provide insight as to how its research activities can impact of cost of producing power from geothermal energy. This model is referred to as GETEM, which stands for Geothermal Electricity Technologies Evaluation Model. Based on user input, the model develops estimates of costs associated with exploration, well field development, and power plant construction that are used along with estimated operating costs to provide a predicted power generation cost. The model allows the user to evaluate how reductions in cost, or increases in performance or productivity will impact the predicted power generation cost. This feature provides a means of determining how specific technology improvements can impact generation costs, and as such assists DOE in both prioritizing research areas and identifying where research is needed.

Greg Mines

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Concept for Management of the Future Electricity System (Smart Grid  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Concept for Management of the Future Electricity System (Smart Grid Concept for Management of the Future Electricity System (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Concept for Management of the Future Electricity System Country Denmark Coordinates 56.26392°, 9.501785° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":56.26392,"lon":9.501785,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manage electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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241

Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of Standards and Labeling for Refrigerators and Air Conditioners in India Title Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of Standards and Labeling for Refrigerators and Air Conditioners in India Publication Type Conference Paper Refereed Designation Unknown LBNL Report Number LBNL-2322E Year of Publication 2009 Authors McNeil, Michael A., and Maithili Iyer Date Published 06/2009 Keywords Air Conditioners, Appliance Efficiency, appliance energy efficiency, energy efficiency, greenhouse gas emissions, india, Labels, MEPS, refrigerators, Standards and labeling URL https://isswprod.lbl.gov/library/view-docs/public/output/rpt77250.PDF Refereed Designation Unknown Attachment Size

242

Managing electricity reliability risk through the futures markets  

SciTech Connect

In competitive electricity markets, the vertically integrated utilities that were responsible for ensuring system reliability in their own service territories, or groups of territories, often cease to exist. Typically, the burden falls to an independent system operator (ISO) to insure that enough ancillary services (AS) are available for safe, stable, and reliable operation of the grid, typically defined, in part, as compliance with officially approved engineering specifications for minimum levels of AS. In order to characterize the behavior of market participants (generators, retailers, and an ISO) in a competitive electricity market with reliability requirements, we model a spot market for electricity and futures markets for both electricity and AS. By assuming that each participant seeks to maximize its expected utility of wealth and that all markets clear, we solve for the optional quantities of electricity and AS traded in each market by all participants, as well as the corresponding market-clearing prices. We show that future prices for both electricity and AS depend on expectations of the spot price, statistical aspects of system demand, and production cost parameters. More important, our model captures the fact that electricity and AS are substitute products for the generators, implying that anticipated changes in the spot market will affect the equilibrium futures positions of both electricity and AS. We apply our model to the California electricity and AS markets to test its viability.

Siddiqui, Afzal S.

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Los Alamos Waste Management Cost Estimation Model; Final report: Documentation of waste management process, development of Cost Estimation Model, and model reference manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This final report completes the Los Alamos Waste Management Cost Estimation Project, and includes the documentation of the waste management processes at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for hazardous, mixed, low-level radioactive solid and transuranic waste, development of the cost estimation model and a user reference manual. The ultimate goal of this effort was to develop an estimate of the life cycle costs for the aforementioned waste types. The Cost Estimation Model is a tool that can be used to calculate the costs of waste management at LANL for the aforementioned waste types, under several different scenarios. Each waste category at LANL is managed in a separate fashion, according to Department of Energy requirements and state and federal regulations. The cost of the waste management process for each waste category has not previously been well documented. In particular, the costs associated with the handling, treatment and storage of the waste have not been well understood. It is anticipated that greater knowledge of these costs will encourage waste generators at the Laboratory to apply waste minimization techniques to current operations. Expected benefits of waste minimization are a reduction in waste volume, decrease in liability and lower waste management costs.

Matysiak, L.M.; Burns, M.L.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Impacts on irrigated agriculture of changes in electricity costs resulting from Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing alternatives  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Irrigation is a major factor in the growth of US agricultural productivity, especially in western states, which account for more than 85% of the nation`s irrigated acreage. In some of these states, almost all cropland is irrigated, and nearly 50% of the irrigation is done with electrically powered pumps. Therefore, even small increases in the cost of electricity could have a disproportionate impact on irrigated agriculture. This technical memorandum examines the impacts that could result from proposed changes in the power marketing programs of the Western Area Power Administration`s Salt Lake City Area Office. The changes could increase the cost of power to all Western customers, including rural municipalities and irrigation districts that rely on inexpensive federal power to pump water. The impacts are assessed by translating changes in Western`s wholesale power rate into changes in the cost of pumping water as an input for agricultural production. Farmers can adapt to higher electricity prices in many ways, such as (1) using different pumping fuels, (2) adding workers and increasing management to irrigate more efficiently, and (3) growing more drought-tolerant crops. This study projects several responses, including using less groundwater and planting fewer waterintensive crops. The study finds that when dependence on Western`s power is high, the cost of power can have a major effect on energy use, agricultural practices, and the distribution of planted acreage. The biggest percentage changes in farm income would occur (1) in Nevada and Utah (however, all projected changes are less than 2% of the baseline) and (2) under the marketing alternatives that represent the lowest capacity and energy offer considered in Western`s Electric Power Marketing Environmental Impact Statement. The aggregate impact on farm incomes and the value of total farm production would be much smaller than that suggested by the changes in water use and planted acreage.

Edwards, B.K.; Flaim, S.J.; Howitt, R.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Palmer, S.C. [Western Area Power Administration, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Levelized Costs for Nuclear, Gas and Coal for Electricity, under the Mexican Scenario  

SciTech Connect

In the case of new nuclear power stations, it is necessary to pay special attention to the financial strategy that will be applied, time of construction, investment cost, and the discount and return rate. The levelized cost quantifies the unitary cost of the electricity (the kWh) generated during the lifetime of the nuclear power plant; and allows the immediate comparison with the cost of other alternative technologies. The present paper shows levelized cost for different nuclear technologies and it provides comparison among them as well as with gas and coal electricity plants. For the calculations we applied our own methodology to evaluate the levelized cost considering investment, fuel and operation and maintenance costs, making assumptions for the Mexican market, and taking into account the gas prices projections. The study also shows comparisons using different discount rates (5% and 10%), and some comparisons between our results and an OECD 1998 study. The results are i n good agreement and shows that nuclear option is cost competitive in Mexico on the basis of levelized costs.

Palacios, J.C.; Alonso, G.; Ramirez, R.; Gomez, A.; Ortiz, J.; Longoria, L.C.

2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

246

New England Wind Forum: Wind Compared to the Cost of Other Electricity  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Wind Compared to the Cost of Other Electricity Generation Options Wind Compared to the Cost of Other Electricity Generation Options Figure 1: Average Cumulative Wind and Wholesale Power Prices by Region The chart shows average cumulative wind and wholesale power prices by region. Click on the graph to view a larger version. View a larger version of the graph. In terms of direct costs, larger wind farms in windier areas are now considered economically competitive with "conventional" fossil fuel power plants in many locations. In New England, direct costs for wind power at larger sites with strong winds are approaching the cost of alternatives, particularly given the recent high natural gas and oil prices. Figure 1 compares wind contract prices1 with wholesale electricity market prices in different U.S. regions for 2006. Although not directly comparable to wind prices due to wind's production timing and intermittence, the value of wind Renewable Energy Credits and carbon offsets, and the cost of wind integration and transmission, the average wholesale market energy price is a good indicator of the cost of alternative generation options. This graph demonstrates several points:

247

Batteries for electric drive vehicles: Evaluation of future characteristics and costs through a Delphi study  

SciTech Connect

Uncertainty about future costs and operating attributes of electric drive vehicles (EVs and HEVs) has contributed to considerable debate regarding the market viability of such vehicles. One way to deal with such uncertainty, common to most emerging technologies, is to pool the judgments of experts in the field. Data from a two-stage Delphi study are used to project the future costs and operating characteristics of electric drive vehicles. The experts projected basic vehicle characteristics for EVs and HEVs for the period 2000-2020. They projected the mean EV range at 179 km in 2000, 270 km in 2010, and 358 km in 2020. The mean HEV range on battery power was projected as 145 km in 2000, 212 km in 2010, and 244 km in 2020. Experts` opinions on 10 battery technologies are analyzed and characteristics of initial battery packs for the mean power requirements are presented. A procedure to compute the cost of replacement battery packs is described, and the resulting replacement costs are presented. Projected vehicle purchase prices and fuel and maintenance costs are also presented. The vehicle purchase price and curb weight predictions would be difficult to achieve with the mean battery characteristics. With the battery replacement costs added to the fuel and maintenance costs, the conventional ICE vehicle is projected to have a clear advantage over electric drive vehicles through the projection period.

Vyas, A.D.; Ng, H.K.; Anderson, J.L.; Santini, D.J.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Cost effective waste management through composting in Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The financial/social/institutional sustainability of waste management in Africa is analysed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This note is a compendium of a study on the potential for GHG control via improved zero waste in Africa. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study provides the framework for Local Authorities for realizing sustained GHG reductions. - Abstract: Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions per person from urban waste management activities are greater in sub-Saharan African countries than in other developing countries, and are increasing as the population becomes more urbanised. Waste from urban areas across Africa is essentially dumped on the ground and there is little control over the resulting gas emissions. The clean development mechanism (CDM), from the 1997 Kyoto Protocol has been the vehicle to initiate projects to control GHG emissions in Africa. However, very few of these projects have been implemented and properly registered. A much more efficient and cost effective way to control GHG emissions from waste is to stabilise the waste via composting and to use the composted material as a soil improver/organic fertiliser or as a component of growing media. Compost can be produced by open windrow or in-vessel composting plants. This paper shows that passively aerated open windrows constitute an appropriate low-cost option for African countries. However, to provide an usable compost material it is recommended that waste is processed through a materials recovery facility (MRF) before being composted. The paper demonstrates that material and biological treatment (MBT) are viable in Africa where they are funded, e.g. CDM. However, they are unlikely to be instigated unless there is a replacement to the Kyoto Protocol, which ceases for Registration in December 2012.

Couth, R. [CRECHE, Centre for Environmental, Coastal and Hydrological Engineering, Civil Engineering Programme, School of Engineering, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4041 (South Africa); Trois, C., E-mail: troisc@ukzn.ac.za [CRECHE, Centre for Environmental, Coastal and Hydrological Engineering, Civil Engineering Programme, School of Engineering, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4041 (South Africa)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

249

Energy accounting - Tracking electric use and cost with a spreadsheet program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One definition of Energy Accounting is a formal method of recording and analyzing energy use and costs. Records of monthly energy use and cost are organized into managerial reports. Would you manage a business or organization without using a financial accounting system. You could not make sound decisions or expenditures or budgets and you could not tell if the business was healthy or operating at a loss. The same principles apply to energy management. Without an energy accounting system, a manager cannot make informed decisions on operations, projects, or even identify patterns in energy use that may affect the facility or business. Yet many businesses and property managers have no method for Energy Accounting in their operations. Energy accounting is a key element in a successful energy management program. The conservation staff at Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) have developed an easy to use PC spreadsheet program that is available to Energy Managers to use in starting an energy accounting system.

Weisner, R.; Codina, R.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Best Management Practices for Vegetation Management at Electric Utility Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Controlling vegetation inside key electric utility facilities is a necessary maintenance activity for a utilitys safe and reliable operation. Substations, switchyards, and other facilities require perpetual maintenance to maintain a vegetation-free environment. At a minimum, vegetation-maintenance treatment needs to be conducted annually; in some climatic regions, multiple treatments may be required. The objective of this research paper was to define current industry practices by means of a ...

2013-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

251

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 5014: Electricity Price Effect on Electrolysis Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5014 Date: December 15, 2005 5014 Date: December 15, 2005 Title: Electricity Price Effect on Electrolysis Cost Originator: Roxanne Garland Approved by: JoAnn Milliken Date: January 2, 2006 Item: Effect of Electricity Price on Distributed Hydrogen Production Cost (Assumes: 1500 GGE/day, electrolyzer at 76% efficiency, and capital cost of $250/kW) The graph is based on the 2010 target of a 1500 kg/day water electrolysis refueling station described on page 3-12 of the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan, February 2005. The graph uses all the same assumptions associated with the target, except for electricity price: Reference: - 76% efficient electrolyzer - 75% system efficiency

252

Nuclear electric generation: Political, social, and economic cost and benefit to Indonesia. Master`s thesis  

SciTech Connect

Indonesia, the largest archipelagic country with a population the fourth biggest in the world, is now in the process of development. It needs a large quantity of energy electricity to meet the industrial and household demands. The currently available generating capacity is not sufficient to meet the electricity demand for the rapidly growing industries and the increasing population. In order to meet the future demand for electricity, new generating capacity is required to be added to the current capacity. Nuclear electricity generation is one possible alternative to supplement Indonesia`s future demand of electricity. This thesis investigates the possibility of developing nuclear electricity generation in Indonesia, considering the political, social, and economic cost and benefit to Indonesia.

Waliyo

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Cost of Power Interruptions to Electricity Consumers in the UnitedStates (U.S.)  

SciTech Connect

The massive electric power blackout in the northeastern U.S.and Canada on August 14-15, 2003 catalyzed discussions about modernizingthe U.S. electricity grid. Industry sources suggested that investments of$50 to $100 billion would be needed. This work seeks to better understandan important piece of information that has been missing from thesediscussions: What do power interruptions and fluctuations in powerquality (power-quality events) cost electricity consumers? We developed abottom-up approach for assessing the cost to U.S. electricity consumersof power interruptions and power-quality events (referred to collectivelyas "reliability events"). The approach can be used to help assess thepotential benefits of investments in improving the reliability of thegrid. We developed a new estimate based on publicly availableinformation, and assessed how uncertainties in these data affect thisestimate using sensitivity analysis.

Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina; Eto, Joseph H.

2006-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

254

Advanced design nuclear power plants: Competitive, economical electricity. An analysis of the cost of electricity from coal, gas and nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an updated analysis of the projected cost of electricity from new baseload power plants beginning operation around the year 2000. Included in the study are: (1) advanced-design, standardized nuclear power plants; (2) low emissions coal-fired power plants; (3) gasified coal-fired power plants; and (4) natural gas-fired power plants. This analysis shows that electricity from advanced-design, standardized nuclear power plants will be economically competitive with all other baseload electric generating system alternatives. This does not mean that any one source of electric power is always preferable to another. Rather, what this analysis indicates is that, as utilities and others begin planning for future baseload power plants, advanced-design nuclear plants should be considered an economically viable option to be included in their detailed studies of alternatives. Even with aggressive and successful conservation, efficiency and demand-side management programs, some new baseload electric supply will be needed during the 1990s and into the future. The baseload generating plants required in the 1990s are currently being designed and constructed. For those required shortly after 2000, the planning and alternatives assessment process must start now. It takes up to ten years to plan, design, license and construct a new coal-fired or nuclear fueled baseload electric generating plant and about six years for a natural gas-fired plant. This study indicates that for 600-megawatt blocks of capacity, advanced-design nuclear plants could supply electricity at an average of 4.5 cents per kilowatt-hour versus 4.8 cents per kilowatt-hour for an advanced pulverized-coal plant, 5.0 cents per kilowatt-hour for a gasified-coal combined cycle plant, and 4.3 cents per kilowatt-hour for a gas-fired combined cycle combustion turbine plant.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Cost and quality of fuels for electric utility plants: Energy data report. 1980 annual  

SciTech Connect

In 1980 US electric utilities reported purchasng 594 million tons of coal, 408.5 million barrels of oil and 3568.7 billion ft/sup 3/ of gas. As compared with 1979 purchases, coal rose 6.7%, oil decreased 20.9%, and gas increased for the fourth year in a row. This volume presents tabulated and graphic data on the cost and quality of fossil fuel receipts to US electric utilities plants with a combined capacity of 25 MW or greater. Information is included on fuel origin and destination, fuel types, and sulfur content, plant types, capacity, and flue gas desulfurization method used, and fuel costs. (LCL)

1981-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

256

Improved supplier selection and cost management for globalized automotive production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For many manufacturing and automotive companies, traditional sourcing decisions rely on total landed cost models to determine the cheapest supplier. Total landed cost models calculate the cost to purchase a part plus all ...

Franken, Joseph P., II (Joseph Philip)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Historical Costs of Coal-Fired Electricity and Implications for the Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the costs of coal-fired electricity in the United States between 1882 and 2006 by decomposing it in terms of the price of coal, transportation costs, energy density, thermal efficiency, plant construction cost, interest rate, and capacity factor. The dominant determinants of costs at present are the price of coal and plant construction cost. The price of coal appears to fluctuate more or less randomly while the construction cost follows long-term trends, decreasing from 1902 - 1970, increasing from 1970 - 1990, and leveling off or decreasing a little since then. This leads us to forecast that even without carbon capture and storage, and even under an optimistic scenario in which construction costs resume their previously decreasing trending behavior, the cost of coal-based electricity will drop for a while but eventually be determined by the price of coal, which varies stochastically but shows no long term decreasing trends. Our analysis emphasizes the importance of using long time series and compari...

McNerney, James; Farmer, J Doyne

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Develop nickel--zinc battery suitable for electric vehicle propulsion. Task A: design and cost study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A three-month design and cost study for the use of nickel--zinc batteries in electric vehicles is presented. Battery configuration is analyzed, and expected performance is set forth. Current development problems concern component materials and capacity decline on cycling, electrolyte maintenance, and thermal characteristics. The manufacturing process is outlined, and estimates are made for cost, materials requirements, capital needs, etc. 61 figures, 24 tables. (RWR)

None

1977-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

259

Plug-In Electric Vehicle Handbook for Fleet Managers (Brochure)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) are entering the automobile market and are viable alternatives to conventional vehicles. This guide for fleet managers describes the basics of PEV technology, PEV benefits for fleets, how to select the right PEV, charging a PEV, and PEV maintenance.

Not Available

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Understanding the cost of power interruptions to U.S. electricity consumers  

SciTech Connect

The massive electric power blackout in the northeastern United States and Canada on August 14-15, 2003 resulted in the U.S. electricity system being called ''antiquated'' and catalyzed discussions about modernizing the grid. Industry sources suggested that investments of $50 to $100 billion would be needed. This report seeks to quantify an important piece of information that has been missing from these discussions: how much do power interruptions and fluctuations in power quality (power-quality events) cost U.S. electricity consumers? Accurately estimating this cost will help assess the potential benefits of investments in improving the reliability of the grid. We develop a comprehensive end-use framework for assessing the cost to U.S. electricity consumers of power interruptions and power-quality events (referred to collectively as ''reliability events''). The framework expresses these costs as a function of: (1) Number of customers by type in a region; (2) Frequency and type of reliability events experienced annually (including both power interruptions and power-quality events) by these customers; (3) Cost of reliability events; and (4) Vulnerability of customers to these events. The framework is designed so that its cost estimate can be improved as additional data become available. Using our framework, we estimate that the national cost of power interruptions is about $80 billion annually, based on the best information available in the public domain. However, there are large gaps in and significant uncertainties about the information currently available. Notably, we were not able to develop an estimate of power-quality events. Sensitivity analysis of some of these uncertainties suggests that the total annual cost could range from less than $30 billion to more than $130 billion. Because of this large range and the enormous cost of the decisions that may be based on this estimate, we encourage policy makers, regulators, and industry to jointly under take the comparatively modest-cost improvements needed in the information used to estimate the cost of reliability events. Specific areas for improvement include: coordinated, nationwide collection of updated information on the cost of reliability events; consistent definition and recording of the duration and frequency of reliability events, including power-quality events; and improved information on the costs of and efforts by consumers to reduce their vulnerability to reliability events.

LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Eto, Joseph H.

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manage electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Understanding the cost of power interruptions to U.S. electricity consumers  

SciTech Connect

The massive electric power blackout in the northeastern United States and Canada on August 14-15, 2003 resulted in the U.S. electricity system being called ''antiquated'' and catalyzed discussions about modernizing the grid. Industry sources suggested that investments of $50 to $100 billion would be needed. This report seeks to quantify an important piece of information that has been missing from these discussions: how much do power interruptions and fluctuations in power quality (power-quality events) cost U.S. electricity consumers? Accurately estimating this cost will help assess the potential benefits of investments in improving the reliability of the grid. We develop a comprehensive end-use framework for assessing the cost to U.S. electricity consumers of power interruptions and power-quality events (referred to collectively as ''reliability events''). The framework expresses these costs as a function of: (1) Number of customers by type in a region; (2) Frequency and type of reliability events experienced annually (including both power interruptions and power-quality events) by these customers; (3) Cost of reliability events; and (4) Vulnerability of customers to these events. The framework is designed so that its cost estimate can be improved as additional data become available. Using our framework, we estimate that the national cost of power interruptions is about $80 billion annually, based on the best information available in the public domain. However, there are large gaps in and significant uncertainties about the information currently available. Notably, we were not able to develop an estimate of power-quality events. Sensitivity analysis of some of these uncertainties suggests that the total annual cost could range from less than $30 billion to more than $130 billion. Because of this large range and the enormous cost of the decisions that may be based on this estimate, we encourage policy makers, regulators, and industry to jointly under take the comparatively modest-cost improvements needed in the information used to estimate the cost of reliability events. Specific areas for improvement include: coordinated, nationwide collection of updated information on the cost of reliability events; consistent definition and recording of the duration and frequency of reliability events, including power-quality events; and improved information on the costs of and efforts by consumers to reduce their vulnerability to reliability events.

LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Eto, Joseph H.

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

An examination of the costs and critical characteristics of electric utility distribution system capacity enhancement projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report classifies and analyzes the capital and total costs (e.g., income tax, property tax, depreciation, centralized power generation, insurance premiums, and capital financing) associated with 130 electricity distribution system capacity enhancement projects undertaken during 1995-2002 or planned in the 2003-2011 time period by three electric power utilities operating in the Pacific Northwest. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in cooperation with participating utilities, has developed a large database of over 3,000 distribution system projects. The database includes brief project descriptions, capital cost estimates, the stated need for each project, and engineering data. The database was augmented by additional technical (e.g., line loss, existing substation capacities, and forecast peak demand for power in the area served by each project), cost (e.g., operations, maintenance, and centralized power generation costs), and financial (e.g., cost of capital, insurance premiums, depreciations, and tax rates) data. Though there are roughly 3,000 projects in the database, the vast majority were not included in this analysis because they either did not clearly enhance capacity or more information was needed, and not available, to adequately conduct the cost analyses. For the 130 projects identified for this analysis, capital cost frequency distributions were constructed, and expressed in terms of dollars per kVA of additional capacity. The capital cost frequency distributions identify how the projects contained within the database are distributed across a broad cost spectrum. Furthermore, the PNNL Energy Cost Analysis Model (ECAM) was used to determine the full costs (e.g., capital, operations and maintenance, property tax, income tax, depreciation, centralized power generation costs, insurance premiums and capital financing) associated with delivering electricity to customers, once again expressed in terms of costs per kVA of additional capacity. The projects were sorted into eight categories (capacitors, load transfer, new feeder, new line, new substation, new transformer, reconductoring, and substation capacity increase) and descriptive statistics (e.g., mean, total cost, number of observations, and standard deviation) were constructed for each project type. Furthermore, statistical analysis has been performed using ordinary least squares regression analysis to identify how various project variables (e.g., project location, the primary customer served by the project, the type of project, the reason for the upgrade, size of the upgrade) impact the unit cost of the project.

Balducci, Patrick J.; Schienbein, Lawrence A.; Nguyen, Tony B.; Brown, Daryl R.; Fathelrahman, Eihab M.

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Energy Cost Calculator for Electric and Gas Water Heaters | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric and Gas Water Heaters Electric and Gas Water Heaters Energy Cost Calculator for Electric and Gas Water Heaters October 8, 2013 - 2:26pm Addthis Vary equipment size, energy cost, hours of operation, and /or efficiency level. INPUT SECTION Input the following data (if any parameter is missing, calculator will set to default value). Defaults Type of Water Heater Electric Gas Electric Average Daily Usage (gallons per day)* gallons 64* Energy Factor† 0.92 (electric) 0.61 (gas) Energy Cost $ / kWh $0.06 per kWh $.60 per therm Quantity of Water Heaters to be Purchased unit(s) 1 unit * See assumptions for various daily water use totals. † The comparison assumes a storage tank water heater as the input type. To allow demand water heaters as the comparison type, users can specify an input EF of up to 0.85; however, 0.66 is currently the best available EF for storage water heaters.

264

Electricity prices in a competitive environment: Marginal cost pricing of generation services and financial status of electric utilities. A preliminary analysis through 2015  

SciTech Connect

The emergence of competitive markets for electricity generation services is changing the way that electricity is and will be priced in the United States. This report presents the results of an analysis that focuses on two questions: (1) How are prices for competitive generation services likely to differ from regulated prices if competitive prices are based on marginal costs rather than regulated {open_quotes}cost-of-service{close_quotes} pricing? (2) What impacts will the competitive pricing of generation services (based on marginal costs) have on electricity consumption patterns, production costs, and the financial integrity patterns, production costs, and the financial integrity of electricity suppliers? This study is not intended to be a cost-benefit analysis of wholesale or retail competition, nor does this report include an analysis of the macroeconomic impacts of competitive electricity prices.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Incremental cost of electricity used as backup for passive heated homes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The impact of passive technologies on a north-central US utility has been studied. A method of utility cost and fuel use analysis, developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory, was used to compute the long run incremental costs and incremental fuel use required for supplementary electricity to houses with Trombe walls or with direct gain features. For comparison, a reference house with no passive features and a house with an energy conservation design were also analyzed. The results show that the total long run incremental cost to the utility of providing supplementary power to the passive houses costs no more than the cost to supply electricity to heat the reference house or the conservation house. An analysis of the annual homeowner costs for the various types of heating systems suggests that the Trombe wall technology is not promising for use in this climate. The passive technologies, as modelled in this study reduced the requirements for conventional energy by about 10% (7 to 10 kilojoules/year). For all of the house types studied, the use of electricity for heating, instead of oil or gas, reduced the overall (utility plus residential) use of oil or gas by only about 30 to 40% even out through the 1990's.

Martorella, J; Bright, R; Davitian, H

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

A framework and review of customer outage costs: Integration and analysis of electric utility outage cost surveys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A clear understanding of the monetary value that customers place on reliability and the factors that give rise to higher and lower values is an essential tool in determining investment in the grid. The recent National Transmission Grid Study recognizes the need for this information as one of growing importance for both public and private decision makers. In response, the U.S. Department of Energy has undertaken this study, as a first step toward addressing the current absence of consistent data needed to support better estimates of the economic value of electricity reliability. Twenty-four studies, conducted by eight electric utilities between 1989 and 2002 representing residential and commercial/industrial (small, medium and large) customer groups, were chosen for analysis. The studies cover virtually all of the Southeast, most of the western United States, including California, rural Washington and Oregon, and the Midwest south and east of Chicago. All variables were standardized to a consistent metric and dollar amounts were adjusted to the 2002 CPI. The data were then incorporated into a meta-database in which each outage scenario (e.g., the lost of electric service for one hour on a weekday summer afternoon) is treated as an independent case or record both to permit comparisons between outage characteristics and to increase the statistical power of analysis results. Unadjusted average outage costs and Tobit models that estimate customer damage functions are presented. The customer damage functions express customer outage costs for a given outage scenario and customer class as a function of location, time of day, consumption, and business type. One can use the damage functions to calculate outage costs for specific customer types. For example, using the customer damage functions, the cost experienced by an ''average'' customer resulting from a 1 hour summer afternoon outage is estimated to be approximately $3 for a residential customer, $1,200 for small-medium commercial and industrial customer, and $82,000 for large commercial and industrial customer. Future work to improve the quality and coverage of information on the value of electricity reliability to customers is described.

Lawton, Leora; Sullivan, Michael; Van Liere, Kent; Katz, Aaron; Eto, Joseph

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Topology, Design, Analysis, and Thermal Management of Power Electronics for Hybrid Electric Vehicle Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Power electronics circuits play an important role in the success of electric, hybrid and fuel cell vehicles. Typical power electronics circuits in hybrid vehicles include electric motor drive circuits and DC/DC converter circuits. Conventional circuit topologies, such as buck converters, voltage source inverters and bidirectional boost converters are challenged by system cost, efficiency, controllability, thermal management, voltage and current capability, and packaging issues. Novel topologies, such as isolated bidirectional DC/DC converters, multilevel converters, and Z-source inverters, offer potential improvement to hybrid vehicle system performance, extended controllability and power capabilities. This paper gives an overview of the topologies, design, and thermal management, and control of power electronics circuits in hybrid vehicle applications.

Mi, C.; Peng, F. Z.; Kelly, K. J.; O'Keefe, M.; Hassani, V.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Influence of driving patterns on life cycle cost and emissions of hybrid and plug-in electric vehicle powertrains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

assessment Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles a b s t r a c t We compare the potential of hybrid, extended-range plug-in hybrid, and battery electric vehicles to reduce lifetime cost and life cycle greenhouse gas, 2009­04­11). Plug-in vehicles, including plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) and battery electric

Michalek, Jeremy J.

269

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

utilities use more electricity for distribution (48 millionthe most electricity for distribution. For the utilitiesUse Treatment electricity cost Distribution electricity use

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Early, Cost-Effective Applications of Photovoltaics in the Electric Utility Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Photovoltaic (PV)-powered systems can compete economically with conventional utility approaches such as distribution line extensions and step-down transformer installation for powering small electric loads. This study identified more than 60 cost-effective applications of PV-powered systems for utilities and their customers.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Statistical analysis of electric power production costs JORGE VALENZUELA and MAINAK MAZUMDAR*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

* Industrial Engineering Department, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA E-mail: mmazumd be sucient production at all times to meet the demand for electric power. If a low-cost generating unit fails variable because it depends upon two uncertain quantities, demand and the availability of the generating

Mazumdar, Mainak

272

Cost and design study for electric vehicle lead--acid batteries  

SciTech Connect

A design and cost study for electric-vehicle lead--acid batteries is presented; a research and development program leading to demonstration and testing of 20- to 30-kWh batteries is proposed. Both flat pasted and tubular positive electrodes are included. Detailed testing programs are set forth. 110 figures, 8 tables (RWR)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Nuclear Fuel Recycling - the Value of the Separated Transuranics and the Levelized Cost of Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) for three different fuel cycles: a Once-Through Cycle, in which the spent fuel is sent for disposal after one use in a reactor, a Twice-Through Cycle, in which the spent ...

Parsons, John E.

274

Low cost, compact, and high efficiency traction motor for electric and hybrid electric vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new motor drive, the switched reluctance motor drive, has been developed for hybrid-electric vehicles. The motor drive has been designed, built and tested in the test bed at a near vehicle scale. It has been shown that the switched reluctance motor drive is more suitable for traction application than any other motor drive.

Ehsani, Mark

2002-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

275

SIMULATED LIFECYCLE COSTS OF ULTRACAPACITORS IN BATTERY ELECTRIC VEHICLES A.G. Simpson*, P.C. Sernia and G.R. Walker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SIMULATED LIFECYCLE COSTS OF ULTRACAPACITORS IN BATTERY ELECTRIC VEHICLES A.G. Simpson*, P, vehicle driving range, battery pack lifetime, and potential reductions in system lifecycle cost costs of ultracapacitors in battery electric vehicle applications. The lifecycle operation

Walker, Geoff

276

Perception of price when price information is costly: evidence from electricity demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Economic theory predicts that a well-informed consumer facing multiple prices responds to marginal price rather than to average price because he equates benefits with costs at the margin. The marginal price postulate, however, may not be true if information regarding marginal price is costly. Residential consumption of electricity is an example of a good for which it is costly to determine marginal price since the price changes with quantity purchased according to a declining-block schedule. If the cost of determining marginal price exceeds its expected benefits, the consumer will base his consumption on simpler information rather than on marginal price. The most obvious candidate is the monthly bill. Since electricity expenditures are greater than they would be if priced at marginal price, perceived price is anticipated to be higher than marginal price. The model includes a price perception variable that depends on the complexity of the rate structure as measured by the ratio of average to marginal price. Pooled annual data from 1960 to 1980 on the seven Ohio electric utilities are used for estimation. The evidence supports the hypothesis that the residential consumer responds to average price. Further, the expected increase in consumer's surplus, if marginal price were correctly perceived, is calculated at the sample mean and found to be negligible compared to any possible cost of determining marginal price.

Shin, J.S.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

An estimate of the cost of electricity production from hot-dry rock  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper gives an estimate of the cost to produce electricity from hot-dry rock (HDR). Employment of the energy in HDR for the production of electricity requires drilling multiple wells from the surface to the hot rock, connecting the wells through hydraulic fracturing, and then circulating water through the fracture system to extract heat from the rock. The basic HDR system modeled in this paper consists of an injection well, two production wells, the fracture system (or HDR reservoir), and a binary power plant. Water is pumped into the reservoir through the injection well where it is heated and then recovered through the production wells. Upon recovery, the hot water is pumped through a heat exchanger transferring heat to the binary, or working, fluid in the power plant. The power plant is a net 5.1-MW[sub e] binary plant employing dry cooling. Make-up water is supplied by a local well. In this paper, the cost of producing electricity with the basic system is estimated as the sum of the costs of the individual parts. The effects on cost of variations to certain assumptions, as well as the sensitivity of costs to different aspects of the basic system, are also investigated.

Pierce, K.G. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Livesay, B.J. (Livesay Consultants, Inc., Encinitas, CA (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 2000 Tables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0) 0) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 2000 Tables August 2001 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts The annual publication Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants (C&Q) is no longer published by the EIA. The tables presented in this document are intended to replace that annual publication. Questions

279

Low-Cost Manufacturable Microchannel Systems for Passive PEM Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Manufacturable Manufacturable Microchannel Systems for Passive PEM Water Management IIPS Number 16910 Low Low - - Cost Cost Manufacturable Manufacturable Microchannel Systems for Passive Microchannel Systems for Passive PEM Water Management PEM Water Management IIPS Number 16910 IIPS Number 16910 Ward TeGrotenhuis, Susie Stenkamp, Curt Lavender Pacific Northwest National Laboratories Richland, WA HFCIT Kick Off Meeting February 2007 2 Project objective: Create a low cost and passive PEM water management system Project objective: Project objective: Create a low cost Create a low cost and passive PEM water management system and passive PEM water management system Specific Targets Addressed for 3.4.2 Automotive-Scale: 80 kWe Integrated Transportation Fuel Cell Power Systems Operating on Direct Hydrogen

280

Electrical load management for the California water system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To meet its water needs California has developed an extensive system for transporting water from areas with high water runoff to areas with high water demand. This system annually consumes more than 6 billion kilowatt hours (kWh) of electricity for pumping water and produces more than 12 billion kWh/year of hydroelectric power. From the point of view of energy conservation, the optimum operation of the California water supply system would require that pumping be done at night and generation be done during the day. Night pumping would reduce electric power peak load demand and permit the pumps to be supplied with electricity from ''base load'' generating plants. Daytime hydro power generation would augment peak load power generation by fossil-fuel power plants and save fuel. The technical and institutional aspects of this type of electric power load management for water projects are examined for the purpose of explaining some of the actions which might be pursued and to develop recommendations for the California Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission (ERCDC). The California water supply system is described. A brief description is given of various energy conservation methods, other than load management, that can be used in the management of water resources. An analysis of load management is presented. Three actions for the ERCDC are recommended: the Commission should monitor upcoming power contract negotiations between the utilities and the water projects; it should determine the applicability of the power-pooling provisions of the proposed National Energy Act to water systems; and it should encourage and support detailed studies of load management methods for specific water projects.

Krieg, B.; Lasater, I.; Blumstein, C.

1977-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manage electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Cost estimation for solid waste management in industrialising regions - Precedents, problems and prospects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We review cost estimation approaches for solid waste management. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unit cost method and benchmarking techniques used in industrialising regions (IR). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Variety in scope, quality and stakeholders makes cost estimation challenging in IR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Integrate waste flow and cost models using cost functions to improve cost planning. - Abstract: The importance of cost planning for solid waste management (SWM) in industrialising regions (IR) is not well recognised. The approaches used to estimate costs of SWM can broadly be classified into three categories - the unit cost method, benchmarking techniques and developing cost models using sub-approaches such as cost and production function analysis. These methods have been developed into computer programmes with varying functionality and utility. IR mostly use the unit cost and benchmarking approach to estimate their SWM costs. The models for cost estimation, on the other hand, are used at times in industrialised countries, but not in IR. Taken together, these approaches could be viewed as precedents that can be modified appropriately to suit waste management systems in IR. The main challenges (or problems) one might face while attempting to do so are a lack of cost data, and a lack of quality for what data do exist. There are practical benefits to planners in IR where solid waste problems are critical and budgets are limited.

Parthan, Shantha R., E-mail: shantha.parthan@pg.canterbury.ac.nz [Department of Civil and Natural Resources Engineering, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch 8140 (New Zealand); Milke, Mark W., E-mail: mark.milke@canterbury.ac.nz [Department of Civil and Natural Resources Engineering, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch 8140 (New Zealand); Wilson, David C., E-mail: waste@davidcwilson.com [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Cocks, John H., E-mail: john.h.cocks@mwhglobal.com [MWH New Zealand Limited, Dunedin (New Zealand)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

282

Commissioning: A Highly Cost-Effective Building Energy Management Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commissioning: A Highly Cost-Effective Building Energypractice of building commissioning is a particularly potentefficiency. Although commissioning has earned increased

Mills, Evan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Estimating the potential of controlled plug-in hybrid electric vehicle charging to reduce operational and capacity expansion costs for electric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimating the potential of controlled plug-in hybrid electric vehicle charging to reduce quantify the benefits of controlled charging of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles. Costs are determined expansion Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles Controlled charging Wind power integration a b s t r a c

McGaughey, Alan

284

The Potential of Energy Management and Control Systems for Real-Time Electricity Pricing Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In implementing an integrated electric utility network, direct communication between the utility and customers is an important component. The rapid penetration of computer building control technology in larger commercial and industrial customers provides an opportunity for the utility to implement this network by linking directly with equipment already in place: customer-owned energy management and control systems (EMCS). This paper assesses the potential use of EMCSs in utility real-time pricing (RTP) efforts by discussing the procedures and technical requirements for transferring prices to the EMCS. The perspectives and objectives of the customer and the utility will also be discussed. We will discuss how price information can be used by the customer and the EMCS to implement demand-limiting strategies, both in currently available demand-management algorithms, and in potential price-responsive cost-management algorithms.

Akbari, H.; Heinemeier, K. E.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Managing Water Resource Requirements for Growing Electric Generation Demands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a general guide to analytical techniques used to address water resource management as related to long-term sustainability planning, and short-term regulatory requirements, including total maximum daily loads, endangered species, and relicensing of hydropower facilities. The example applications presented in the report highlight the capability of the techniques, and help electric power company and government regulatory staffs identify the best approach for a specific need.

2009-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

286

Photovoltaics for municipal planners. Cost-effective municipal applications of photovoltaics for electric power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This booklet is intended for city and county government personnel, as well as community organizations, who deal with supplying, regulating, or recommending electric power resources. Specifically, this document deals with photovoltaic (PV) power, or power from solar cells, which is currently the most cost-effective energy source for electricity requirements that are relatively small, located in isolated areas, or difficult to serve with conventional technology. Recently, PV has been documented to be more cost-effective than conventional alternatives (such as line extensions or engine generators) in dozens of applications within the service territories of electric, gas, and communications utilities. Here, we document numerous cost-effective urban applications, chosen by planners and utilities because they were the most cost-effective option or because they were appropriate for environmental or logistical reasons. These applications occur within various municipal departments, including utility, parks and recreation, traffic engineering, transportation, and planning, and they include lighting applications, communications equipment, corrosion protection, irrigation control equipment, remote monitoring, and even portable power supplies for emergency situations.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Survey of Technologies and Cost Estimates for Residential Electricity Services Jason W. Black, Marija Ilic, IEEE Fellow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Survey of Technologies and Cost Estimates for Residential Electricity Services Jason W. Black This survey contains a sample of the available technologies for implementing residential electricity services understanding of the potential for implementation of residential services. The estimation of the costs

Ilic, Marija D.

288

Facilitating Sound, Cost-Effective Federal Energy Management (Fact Sheet), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

include energy savings performance include energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs), utility energy service contracts (UESCs), on-site renewable power purchase agreements (PPAs), and various Federal and state energy incen- tives programs. With assistance from FEMP, the Federal Government's energy management com- mitment has accelerated and grown in recent years. Since 2005, FEMP facili- tated $3.1 billion of efficiency invest- ments in Federal Government facilities from performance-based contracts, which resulted in cost savings of approximately $8.5 billion over the life of the energy- saving measures. Using sustainable design practices to create high-performance buildings: FEMP helps Federal agencies imple- ment sustainable design practices that

289

Waste Management Facilities cost information for mixed low-level waste. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains preconceptual designs and planning level life-cycle cost estimates for managing mixed low-level waste. The report`s information on treatment, storage, and disposal modules can be integrated to develop total life-cycle costs for various waste management options. A procedure to guide the US Department of Energy and its contractor personnel in the use of cost estimation data is also summarized in this report.

Shropshire, D.; Sherick, M.; Biadgi, C.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Development of Low Cost Carbonaceous Materials for Anodes in Lithium-Ion Batteries for Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Final report on the US DOE CARAT program describes innovative R & D conducted by Superior Graphite Co., Chicago, IL, USA in cooperation with researchers from the Illinois Institute of Technology, and defines the proper type of carbon and a cost effective method for its production, as well as establishes a US based manufacturer for the application of anodes of the Lithium-Ion, Lithium polymer batteries of the Hybrid Electric and Pure Electric Vehicles. The three materials each representing a separate class of graphitic carbon, have been developed and released for field trials. They include natural purified flake graphite, purified vein graphite and a graphitized synthetic carbon. Screening of the available on the market materials, which will help fully utilize the graphite, has been carried out.

Barsukov, Igor V.

2002-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

291

Industrial Approaches to Reducing Energy Costs in a Restructuring Electric Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electric restructuring, currently proposed in California and being reviewed elsewhere, can produce many opportunities for large companies to reduce their electricity costs. As the electricity market changes, electric utilities and other potential suppliers are likely to develop a portfolio of options and creative pricing to attract customers in a competitive market. In attempting to be "energy neutral," i.e., to be indifferent to energy costs in one state or utility service area versus another, many companies are looking at a corporate approach to energy procurement, similar to the procurement of other products. Industrial customers may be looking for regional or even national energy suppliers for their facilities. Electric utilities, in an attempt to be competitive and retain customers, will likely work to be this regional or national energy supplier. The expectation will be that these suppliers can offer competitive pricing and a portfolio of options from which to choose. These options may resemble those that have developed in the natural gas market as a result of restructuring in the fuels industry.

Lowe, E. T.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Effects of vaporizer and evaporative-condenser size on geofluid effectiveness and cost of electricity for geothermal binary power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A special study was conducted to investigate the influences of minimum approach temperature differences occurring in supercritical-heater/vaporizer and evaporative-condenser heat rejection systems on geothermal-electric binary power plant performance and cost of electricity. For the systems investigated optimum pinch points for minimizing cost of electricity were estimated to range from 5 to 7/sup 0/F for the heater vaporizer. The minimum approach of condensing temperature to wet-bulb temperature for evaporative condensers was estimated to be about 30/sup 0/F in order to achieve the lowest cost of electricity.

Demuth, O.J.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Does Weather Explain the Cost and Quality? An Analysis of UK Electricity Distribution Companies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and business consumers are described in Yu et al. (2007). Energy loss (EL) is measured in GWh and valued at average industrial electricity price. The price of Opex and Totex is by convention set to 1. The weather data were obtained from the UK... www.electricitypolicy.org.uk E P R G W O R K IN G P A P E R Abstract Does Weather Explain the Cost and Quality Performance? An Analysis of UK Electricity Distribution Companies EPRG Working Paper 0827 Cambridge Working Paper...

Yu, William; Jamasb, Tooraj; Pollitt, Michael G.

294

Design of a low-cost thermoacoustic electricity generator and its experimental verification  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the design and testing of a low cost thermoacoustic generator. A travelling-wave thermoacoustic engine with a configuration of a looped-tube resonator is designed and constructed to convert heat to acoustic power. A commercially available, low-cost loudspeaker is adopted as the alternator to convert the engine's acoustic power to electricity. The whole system is designed using linear thermoacoustic theory. The optimization of different parts of the thermoacoustic generator, as well as the matching between the thermoacoustic engine and the alternator are discussed in detail. A detailed comparison between the preliminary test results and linear thermoacoustic predictions is provided.

Backhaus, Scott N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yu, Z [UNIV OF MANCHESTER; Jaworski, A J [UNIV OF MANCHESTER

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Improved Battery Pack Thermal Management to Reduce Cost and Increase Energy Density: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-12-499  

SciTech Connect

Under this CRADA NREL will support Creare's project for the Department of Energy entitled 'Improved Battery Pack Thermal Management to Reduce Cost and Increase Energy Density' which involves the development of an air-flow based cooling product that increases energy density, safety, and reliability of hybrid electric vehicle battery packs.

Smith, K.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Facilitating Sound, Cost-Effective Federal Energy Management (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet is an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP).

Not Available

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis; Non-Energy Project BLCC conducts economic analyses by evaluating the relative cost effectiveness of alternative buildings and building-related systems or components....

298

Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost Calculator for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(RTUs). Learn more about the High Performance Rooftop Unit Challenge. To calculate the energy and money you could save with an efficient commercial air conditioner, use the cost...

299

Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Cost Calculator for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Urinals Vary water cost, frequency of operation, and or efficiency level. INPUT SECTION This calculator assumes that early replacement of a urinal or toilet will take place with...

300

Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies for Electrical Energy Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6719 6719 November 2009 Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies for Electrical Energy Storage D. Steward, G. Saur, M. Penev, and T. Ramsden National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-560-46719 November 2009 Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies for Electrical Energy Storage D. Steward, G. Saur, M. Penev, and T. Ramsden Prepared under Task No. H278.3400 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manage electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Should we transport coal, gas, or electricity: cost, efficiency, and environmental implications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors examine the life cycle costs, environmental discharges, and deaths of moving coal via rail, coal to synthetic natural gas via pipeline, and electricity via wire from the Powder River Basin (PRB) in Wyoming to Texas. Which method has least social cost depends on how much additional investment in rail line, transmission, or pipeline infrastructure is required, as well as how much and how far energy is transported. If the existing rail lines have unused capacity, coal by rail is the cheapest method (up to 200 miles of additional track could be added). If no infrastructure exists, greater distances and larger amounts of energy favor coal by rail and gasified coal by pipeline over electricity transmission. For 1,000 miles and 9 gigawatts of power, a gas pipeline is cheapest, has less environmental discharges, uses less land, and is least obtrusive. 28 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Joule A. Bergerson; Lester B. Lave [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (US)

2005-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

302

Benchmarking Distributed Generation Cost of Electricity and Characterization of Green House Gas Emission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding the economic competitiveness and green house gas (GHG) footprint of all energy supply-side options has been identified by EPRI advisors as a key priority. This project benchmarks the cost of electricity and characterizes the GHG footprint of distributed generation (DG) options in various applications. DG technologies include small gas turbines, spark-ignited and diesel internal combustion engines, micro turbines, several types of fuel cells, Stirling engines, and photovoltaic systems.

2009-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

303

Total Cost of Ownership Model for Current Plug-in Electric Vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) market has grown dramatically in the past three years, but the central question concerning PEV acceptance in the marketplace still remains: When compared to a hybrid or conventional vehicle, is a PEV worth the additional up-front cost to consumers? Given the incomplete understanding of changes in driving patterns due to vehicle purchases, the baseline analysis described in this report does not model customer adaptation, nor does it attempt to address non-tangible ...

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

304

Unneeded electric plant's cost draws manufacturer shutdown threat  

SciTech Connect

If the Big Rivers Electric Corp. succeeds in raising its rates to cover the cost of surplus capacity resulting from new constrcution, an aluminum smelter threatens to stop manufacturing, which would raise rates even higher for the remaining consumers. Efforts to sell power out of state and to generate financial assistance from the Rural Electrification Administration are underway. The comment period for rate intervenors ends in mid November.

Efron, S.

1984-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

305

Comparison of Life Cycle Costs for LLRW Management in Texas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents a comparison of life-cycle costs of an assured isolation facility in Texas versus the life-cycle costs for a traditional belowground low-level radioactive waste disposal facility designed for the proposed site near Sierra Blanca, Texas.

Baird, R. D.; Rogers, B. C.; Chau, N.; Kerr, Thomas A

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Nuclear power: least cost option for base-load electricity in Finland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As a result of the outstanding operating experience and the low electricity production costs of the existing Finnish nuclear power plants, energy-intensive process industries in particular have a strong belief in nuclear power. There is a potential interest in building more nuclear capacity, the fifth unit, in order to guarantee for Finnish industry the availability of cheap electrical energy in the future. In any case more baseload generation capacity will be needed by 2010 to meet the future growth of electricity consumption in Finland. Nuclear power generation matches excellently with the long-duration load profile of the Finnish power system. The good performance of Finnish nuclear power has yielded benefits also to consumers through its contribution to decreasing the electricity price. Furthermore, the introduction of nuclear power has resulted in a clear drop in the carbon dioxide emissions from electricity generation during the 1970s and 1980s, as shown in Figure 1. In 1999 the four Finnish nuclear power units at Loviisa and Olkiluoto generated 22.1 TWh of electricity, roughly equivalent to one third of the total

Risto Tarjanne; Sauli Rissanen

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Tools for Designing Thermal Management of Batteries in Electric Drive Vehicles (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Temperature has a significant impact on life, performance, and safety of lithium-ion battery technology, which is expected to be the energy storage of choice for electric drive vehicles (xEVs). High temperatures degrade Li-ion cells faster while low temperatures reduce power and energy capabilities that could have cost, reliability, range, or drivability implications. Thermal management of battery packs in xEVs is essential to keep the cells in the desired temperature range and also reduce cell-to-cell temperature variations, both of which impact life and performance. The value that the battery thermal management system provides in reducing battery life and improving performance outweighs its additional cost and complexity. Tools that are essential for thermal management of batteries are infrared thermal imaging, isothermal calorimetry, thermal conductivity meter and computer-aided thermal analysis design software. This presentation provides details of these tools that NREL has used and we believe are needed to design right-sized battery thermal management systems.

Pesaran, A.; Keyser, M.; Kim, G. H.; Santhanagopalan, S.; Smith, K.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Managing the Cost, Energy Consumption, and Carbon Footprint of Internet Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

enough to be useful even in the absence of brown energy caps, different electricity prices, or green ser- vice and realistic data on energy and carbon offset prices (gathered from various sources distribution based on hourly electricity prices to reduce the energy cost of Internet services [3]. We

Martonosi, Margaret

309

Facilitating Sound, Cost-Effective Federal Energy Management (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet is an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP).

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Federal Energy Management Program: Energy and Cost Savings Calculators for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Cost Savings Calculators for Energy-Efficient Products and Cost Savings Calculators for Energy-Efficient Products The energy and cost calculators below allow Federal agencies to enter their own input values (such as utility rates, hours of use) to estimate energy and cost savings for energy-efficient products. Some are Web-based tools; others are Excel spreadsheets provided by ENERGY STAR® for download. Lighting Compact Fluorescent Lamps Exit Signs Commercial and Industrial Equipment Commercial Unitary Air Conditioners Air-Cooled Chillers Commercial Heat Pumps Boilers Food Service Equipment Dishwashers Freezers Fryers Griddles Hot Food Holding Cabinets Ovens Refrigerators Steam Cookers Ice Machines Office Equipment Computers, Monitors, and Imaging Equipment Appliances Dishwashers Clothes Washers Residential Equipment Central Air Conditioners

311

A framework and review of customer outage costs: Integration and analysis of electric utility outage cost surveys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Std Dev Cost Per Annual Cost Per kWh Usage Peak kW AverageStd Dev Cost Per Annual Cost Per kWh Usage Peak kW Average3-2. Logged Outage Cost per Annual kWh Figure 3-3. Logged

Lawton, Leora; Sullivan, Michael; Van Liere, Kent; Katz, Aaron; Eto, Joseph

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Optimal Tariff Period Determination Cost of electricity generation is closely related to system demand. In general, the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,Pakistan,Nepal and Bangladesh) direct management is all the more Flat-rate electricity tariffs induce farmers to pump more of annual hours of pump operation,electric (flat tariff) and diesel pumpsets Water Policy Briefing 2 #12,there are strong theoretical arguments in favor of the metered electricity tariff. Farmers would learn the real

313

Electric Power Interruption Cost Estimates for Individual Industries, Sectors, and the U.S. Economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Distributed energy resources (DER) have been promoted as the least-cost approach to meeting steadily increasing energy demand. However, it is unclear whether DER deployment can maintain or improve the electric power supply reliability and quality currently available to consumers. This report address two key factors relating to this question: 1) characteristics of existing power supply reliability, and 2) costs resulting from supply interruptions characteristic of the existing power grid. Interruption cost data collected by the University of Saskatchewan was used in conjunction with data generated by the Census Bureaus Annual Survey of Manufacturers (Census Bureau, 1995), along with industry shares of gross domestic product (Bureau of Economic Analysis, 1995a) and gross output (Bureau of Economic Analysis, 1995b) to derive interruption cost estimates for U.S. industries at the 2-digit Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) level, as well as for broader sectors and the U.S. economy. Interruption cost estimates are presented as a function of outage duration (e.g., 20 minutes, 1-hour, 3-hour), and are normalized in terms of dollars per peak kW.

Balducci, P. J.; Roop, J. M.; Schienbein, L. A.; DeSteese, J. G.; Weimar, M. R.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

A survey-based type-2 fuzzy logic system for energy management in hybrid electrical vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hybrid electrical vehicles combine two or more energy sources (at least one electrical) to benefit from their different characteristics regarding autonomy, reversibility and dynamic response. Energy management consists in discovering an energy distribution ... Keywords: Energy management, Group decision making, Hybrid electrical vehicles, Linguistic modelling, Survey-based fuzzy logic systems, Type-2 fuzzy sets

Javier Solano Martnez; Robert I. John; Daniel Hissel; Marie-Ccile Pra

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Energy Management System for an Hybrid Electric Vehicle, Using Ultracapacitors and Neural Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Management System for an Hybrid Electric Vehicle, Using Ultracapacitors and Neural Networks management system for hybrid electric vehicles (HEV), using neural networks (NN), was developed and tested, similar in shape and size to a Chevrolet S-10, which was converted to an electric vehicle

Rudnick, Hugh

316

Facilitating Sound, Cost-Effective Federal Energy Management...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of E.O. 13514 and other regulations. Managing energy-efficient and alternative fuel vehicle (AFV) fleets: The Federal fleet consists of approxi- mately 650,000 domestic...

317

U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

10. U.S. Electric Utility Energy Savings by North American Electric Reliability Council Region and ... design, advanced electric motors and drive systems,

318

Reducing emissions from the electricity sector: the costs and benefits nationwide and for the Empire State  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using four models, this study looks at EPA's Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) as originally proposed, which differs in only small ways from the final rule issued in March 2005, coupled with several approaches to reducing emissions of mercury including one that differs in only small ways from the final rule also issued in March 2005. This study analyzes what costs and benefits each would incur to New York State and to the nation at large. Benefits to the nation and to New York State significantly outweigh the costs associated with reductions in SO{sub 2}, NOx and mercury, and all policies show dramatic net benefits. The manner in which mercury emissions are regulated will have important implications for the cost of the regulation and for emission levels for SO{sub 2} and NOx and where those emissions are located. Contrary to EPA's findings, CAIR as originally proposed by itself would not keep summer emissions of NOx from electricity generators in the SIP region below the current SIP seasonal NOx cap. In the final CAIR, EPA added a seasonal NOx cap to address seasonal ozone problems. The CAIR with the seasonal NOx cap produces higher net benefits. The effect of the different policies on the mix of fuels used to supply electricity is fairly modest under scenarios similar to the EPA's final rules. A maximum achievable control technology (MACT) approach, compared to a trading approach as the way to achieve tighter mercury targets (beyond EPA's proposal), would preserve the role of coal in electricity generation. The evaluation of scenarios with tighter mercury emission controls shows that the net benefits of a maximum achievable control technology (MACT) approach exceed the net benefits of a cap and trade approach. 39 refs., 10 figs., 30 figs., 5 apps.

Karen Palmer; Dallas Butraw; Jhih-Shyang Shih

2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

319

Electric and Gasoline Vehicle Lifecycle Cost and Energy-Use Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicles (Workshop Proceedings,J. Oros, President, Electric Vehicle Infrastructure, Inc. ,Hydride Batteries for Electric Vehicles, presented at the

Delucchi, Mark; Burke, Andy; Lipman, Timothy; Miller, Marshall

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Electric Vehicles: Performance, Life-Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sealed lead-acid electric and vehicle battery development.A. (1987a) ture for electric vehicles. In Resources ElectricInternational Conference. Electric Vehicle De- Universityof

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manage electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Understanding the Cost of Power Interruptions to U.S. Electricity Consumers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5718 5718 Understanding the Cost of Power Interruptions to U.S. Electricity Consumers Kristina Hamachi LaCommare and Joseph H. Eto Energy Analysis Department Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California Berkeley Berkeley, California 94720 Environmental Energy Technologies Division September 2004 http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMP/EMP-pubs.html This work described in this paper was funded by the Office of Electric Transmission and Distribution, Energy Storage Program and by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Planning, Budget, and Analysis of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC03-76F00098. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY

322

Advanced gas turbines: The choice for low-cost, environmentally superior electric power generation  

SciTech Connect

In July 1993, the US Department of Energy (DOE) initiated an ambitious 8-year program to advance state-of-the-art gas turbine technology for land-based electric power generation. The program, known as the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Program, is a joint government/industry program with the objective to demonstrate advanced industrial and utility gas turbine systems by the year 2000. The goals of the ATS Program are to develop gas turbine systems capable of providing low-cost electric power, while maintaining environmental superiority over competing power generation options. A progress report on the ATS Program pertaining to program status at DOE will be presented and reviewed in this paper. The technical challenges, advanced critical technology requirements, and systems designs meeting the goals of the program will be described and discussed.

Zeh, C.M.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Optimal Energy Management for a Hybrid Energy Storage System for Electric Vehicles Based on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

}@lea.uni-paderborn.de Abstract--For electric and hybrid electric cars, commonly nickel-metal hydride and lithium-ion batteries. The BMW Mini-E is an all electric powered car field-tested in the United States, United KingdomOptimal Energy Management for a Hybrid Energy Storage System for Electric Vehicles Based

Noé, Reinhold

324

A STOCHASTIC OPTIMAL CONTROL APPROACH FOR POWER MANAGEMENT IN PLUG-IN HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A STOCHASTIC OPTIMAL CONTROL APPROACH FOR POWER MANAGEMENT IN PLUG-IN HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLES.e., the engine and electric machines) in a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV). Existing studies focus mostly. INTRODUCTION This paper examines plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), i.e., automobiles that can extract

Krstic, Miroslav

325

Total Cost of Ownership for Current Plug-in Electric Vehicles: Fall 2013 Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dramatic growth over the last three years in the plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) market has resulted in many unanswered questions concerning total cost of ownership (TCO). In June 2013, EPRI released a public study that presented a new way of analyzing driving data for the purpose of calculating TCO for PEV ownership (EPRI report 3002001728). That studywhich focused on the 2013 Chevrolet Volt and 2013 Nissan LEAFused a full years worth of driving data to calculate the TCO of ...

2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

326

Management of lifecycle costs and benefits: Lessons from information systems practice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Assessing the economic feasibility of information systems (IS) projects and operations remains a challenge for most organizations. This research investigates lifecycle cost and benefit management practices and demonstrates that, overall, although organizations ... Keywords: IT governance, IT value, Information management, Information system evaluation, Information system value

Egon Berghout; Menno Nijland; Philip Powell

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

California load management research 1977: a first year report to the Federal Energy Administration on the FEA/California Electric Utilities Demonstration Project. Annual report for 1977  

SciTech Connect

The California Electric Utilities Demonstration Project (EUDP) seeks to identify cost effective ways to implement load management. The three-year, six-million-dollar project will involve 24 field experiments, four electric utilities, and 7000 residential, commercial and industrial utility customers. Each experiment tries to measure how the tested management measure reduces system peak demand and shifts kilowatt-hour use in both customer and system load curves. Results of three experiments are given. The four participating utilities (Southern California Edison, Pacific Gas and Electric, Sacramento Municipal Utility District, and San Diego Gas and Electric) are described. A load curve data catalog is discussed. An appendix to the report shows how to select load management equipment. Another discusses both United States and European load management experiences.

Hairston, R.

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Project Cost Management in the Israeli High-Tech Industry: State of the Practice and Perceived Needs*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost management is a topic of main interest in the area of project management. This paper reports on an exploratory study designed to ascertain the current state of the practice in the area of project cost management among Israeli high technology firms. Three main issues were examined: (1) the extent by which project managers implement various cost management tools and techniques; (2) project managers perceptions of the contribution of various cost management tools to improvement of the organization's cost management system; (3) project managers ' perception of the usefulness of the organization's cost management tools and cost management system in promoting its needs. Data was collected with a structured questionnaire administered to a sample of 31 high-tech companies or divisions of large companies in Israel. The respondents were high-level senior project managers or managers of departments or units whose main activity is project management. Following the statistical analysis of the data we point out several directions for further development. Project Cost Management in the Israeli High-Tech Industry: 1.

Joseph Aharony; Dan Elnathan; Tzvi Raz; Joseph Aharony; Dan Elnathan; Tzvi Raz

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Summary of the cost analysis report for the long-term management of depleted uranium hexafluoride  

SciTech Connect

This report is a summary of the Cost Analysis Report which provides comparative cost data for the management strategy alternatives. The PEIS and the Cost Analysis Report will help DOE select a management strategy. The Record of Decision, expected in 1998, will complete the first part of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program. The second part of the Program will look at specific sites and technologies for carrying out the selected strategy. The Cost Analysis Report estimates the primary capital and operating costs for the different alternatives. It reflects the costs of technology development construction of facilities, operation, and decontamination and decommissioning. It also includes potential revenues from the sale of by-products such as anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (ABF). These estimates are based on early designs. They are intended to help in comparing alternatives, rather than to indicate absolute costs for project budgets or bidding purposes. More detailed estimates and specific funding sources will be considered in part two of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program.

Dubrin, J.W.; Rahm-Crites, L.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Battery management system for Li-Ion batteries in hybrid electric vehicles.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Battery Management System (BMS) is the component responsible for the effcient and safe usage of a Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) battery pack. Its main (more)

Marangoni, Giacomo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

A comparative analysis of energy management strategies for hybrid electric vehicles.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The dissertation offers an overview of the energy management problem in hybrid electric vehicles. Several control strategies described in literature are presented and formalized in (more)

Serrao, Lorenzo

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Multidisciplinary Optimization of Hybrid Electric Vehicles: Component Sizing and Power Management Logic.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A survey of the existing literature indicates that optimization on the power management logic of hybrid electric vehicle is mostly performed after the design of (more)

Fan, Brian Su-Ming

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Increase Your Boiler Pressure to Decrease Your Electric Bill: The True Cost of CHP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The majority of small scale steam turbine generator projects are installed as an afterthought to overall plant design. As a plant manager or process engineer, the primary concern is providing the process with the thermal load it needs at the lowest $ per Btu. The viability of installing a steam turbine generator set comes after the plant is in operation and pressure reducing valves (PRV's) have been installed, providing the opportunity has been proven to be sufficient for onsite power generation. This methodology produces reliable systems that operate with whatever steam conditions were present. What if users could take a step back to the initial design of the steam boiler? Plant engineers can proactively analyze the impact of folding a steam turbine generator set into the overall plant design at the pre-construction phase, significantly decreasing total energy costs and reducing the net $ per Btu. This paper analyzes the costs and benefits of integrating a steam turbine generator set into the initial boiler plant design, with marginal fuel increase and equipment cost yet providing the added benefit of clean, low cost and reliable onsite power production.

Downing, A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Modeling the Impacts of Electricity Tarrifs on PHEV Charging, Costs, and Emissions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

R&M Project 2A: R&M Project 2A: Evaluating the Effects of Managing Controllable Demand and Distributed Energy Resources Locally on System Performance and Costs Tim Mount, Eilyan Bitar and Ray Zimmerman Cornell University Alberto Lamadrid Lehigh University CERTS Review, Cornell, August 6 th - 7 th , 2013 An NSF I/UCRC PART I: Storage (Mount) PART II: Ramping* (Lamadrid) PART III: Robust Optimization* (Bitar) *(Note: This is a new part of the project that began on 3/30/13) 2 OUTLINE OF THE PRESENTATION An NSF I/UCRC PART I: Storage Wooyoung Jeon Hao Lu Jung Youn Mo 3 An NSF I/UCRC Context of the Research: An Integrated Multi-Scale Framework 4 SuperOPF  Costs PEV charger capacities  Commuting Patterns  Nodal Capabilities

335

Conceptual design and cost evaluation of organic Rankine cycle electric generating plant powered by medium temperature geothermal water  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The economic production of electrical power from high temperature steam and liquid dominated geothermal resources has been demonstrated. Large quantities of geothermal energy are considered to exist at moderate temperatures, however, the economics of converting this energy into electricity has not been established. This paper presents the design concept of a dual boiler isobutane cycle selected for use with the moderate temperature hydrothermal resource and presents a cost estimate for a 10 and 50 MW power plant. Cost of electrical power from these plants is estimated and compared with that from coal, oil and nuclear plants. The impact of selling a portion of the residual heat in the geothermal effluent is assessed. (auth)

Dart, R.H.; Neill, D.T.; Whitbeck, J.F.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Thermal energy storage for space cooling. Technology for reducing on-peak electricity demand and cost  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cool storage technology can be used to significantly reduce energy costs by allowing energy intensive, electrically driven cooling equipment to be predominantly operated during off-peak hours when electricity rates are lower. In addition, some system configurations may result in lower first costs and/or lower operating costs. Cool storage systems of one type or another could potentially be cost-effectively applied in most buildings with a space cooling system. A survey of approximately 25 manufacturers providing cool storage systems or components identified several thousand current installations, but less than 1% of these were at Federal facilities. With the Federal sector representing nearly 4% of commercial building floor space and 5% of commercial building energy use, Federal utilization would appear to be lagging. Although current applications are relatively few, the estimated potential annual savings from using cool storage in the Federal sector is $50 million. There are many different types of cool storage systems representing different combinations of storage media, charging mechanisms, and discharging mechanisms. The basic media options are water, ice, and eutectic salts. Ice systems can be further broken down into ice harvesting, ice-on-coil, ice slurry, and encapsulated ice options. Ice-on-coil systems may be internal melt or external melt and may be charged and discharged with refrigerant or a single-phase coolant (typically a water/glycol mixture). Independent of the technology choice, cool storage systems can be designed to provide full storage or partial storage, with load-leveling and demand-limiting options for partial storage. Finally, storage systems can be operated on a chiller-priority or storage priority basis whenever the cooling load is less than the design conditions. The first section describes the basic types of cool storage technologies and cooling system integration options. The next three sections define the savings potential in the Federal sector, present application advice, and describe the performance experience of specific Federal users. A step-by-step methodology illustrating how to evaluate cool storage options is presented next, followed by a case study of a GSA building using cool storage. Latter sections list manufacturers, selected Federal users, and reference materials. Finally, the appendixes give Federal life-cycle costing procedures and results for a case study.

None

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Effects of vaporizer and evaporative condenser pinch points on geofluid effectiveness and cost of electricity for geothermal binary power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A brief study was conducted in support of the DOE/DGHT Heat Cycle Research Program to investigate the influences of minimum approach temperature differences occurring in supercritical-heater/vaporizer and evaporative-condenser heat rejection systems on geothermal-electric binary power plant performance and cost of electricity. For the systems investigated optimum pinch points for minimizing cost of electricity were estimated to range from 5 to 7/sup 0/F (3 to 4/sup 0/C) for the heater vaporizer. The minimum approach of condensing temperature to wet-bulb temperature for evaporative condensers was estimated to be about 15/sup 0/F (8/sup 0/C) in order to achieve the highest plant net geofluid effectiveness, and approximately 30/sup 0/F (17/sup 0/C) to attain the minimum cost of electricity.

Demuth, O.J.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Phase 2 cost quality management assessment report for the Office of Technology Development (EM-50)  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Environmental Management (EM) Head quarters (HQ) Cost Quality Management Assessment (CQMA) evaluated the practices of the Office of Technology Development (EM-50). The CQMA reviewed EM-50 management documents and reported results in the HQ CQMA Phase 1 report (March 1993). In this Assessment Phase, EM-50 practices were determined through interviews with staff members. The interviews were conducted from the end of September through early December 1993. EM-50 management documents (Phase 1) and practices (Phase 2) were compared to the Performance Objectives and Criteria (POCs) contained in the DOE/HQ Cost Quality Management Assessment Handbook. More detail on the CQMA process is provided in section 2. Interviewees are listed in appendix A. Documents reviewed during Phase 2 are listed in appendix B. Section 3 contains detailed observations, discussions, and recommendations. A summary of observations and recommendations is presented.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Managing electricity reliability risk through the futures markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

negatively with the electricity spot price. Consequently,is incurred only for actual electricity generation, i.e. ,to produce electricity sold as energy, and to operate any AS

Siddiqui, Afzal S.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Toward More Comprehensive Assessments of FERC Electricity Restructuring Policies: A Review of Recent Benefit-Cost Studies of RTOs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Joseph Joseph H. Eto is a Staff Scientist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, where he manages the program office for the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions. Douglas R. Hale recently retired from the Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration, where he served as a senior economist most recently working in the areas of energy price risk management, modeling electricity transmission pricing, and electricity transmission data. Bernard C. Lesieutre is a Staff Scientist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, where he conducts public-interest research on the electric power grid and electricity markets. The work described in this article was funded by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02- 05CH11231. This article is based on a longer technical report

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manage electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Pinellas Plant General Electric...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Pinellas Plant General Electric Co - FL 07 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Pinellas Plant General Electric Co. (FL.07) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year:...

342

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Westinghouse Electric Corp...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Electric Corp - NJ 03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: WESTINGHOUSE ELECTRIC CORP. ( NJ.03 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name:...

343

Dynamic power distribution management for all electric aircraft.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In recent years, with the rapid development of electric and electronic technology, the All-Electric Aircraft (AEA) concept has attracted more and more attention, which only (more)

Xia, Xiuxian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Electric Vehicles: Performance, Life-Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Engineer- an electric car practical with existingN. (1987) The BMW electric car--current devel- for electricinfrastructure for electric cars. TRRL Report LR812.

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Understanding the cost of power interruptions to U.S. electricity consumers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratory, Berkeley CA. Electric Power Research Institute.Spectrum, 30 (6), 40. Electric Power Research Institute.Applications. Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto

LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Eto, Joseph H.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Understanding the cost of power interruptions to U.S. electricity consumers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At the local/electricity distribution level, storage canthat the U.S. electricity distribution system is designed toto the design of electricity distribution systems, larger

LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Eto, Joseph H.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

A framework and review of customer outage costs: Integration and analysis of electric utility outage cost surveys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BPA, Southern Company, Duke Energy, Southern California1999) Niagara Mohawk (1985) Duke Energy Company (1992, 1997)Gas and Electric, and Duke Energy) the same customer classes

Lawton, Leora; Sullivan, Michael; Van Liere, Kent; Katz, Aaron; Eto, Joseph

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

State of health aware charge management in hybrid electrical energy storage systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is the first to present an efficient charge management algorithm focusing on extending the cycle life of battery elements in hybrid electrical energy storage (HEES) systems while simultaneously improving the overall cycle efficiency. In particular, ... Keywords: charge management, hybrid electrical energy storage system, state of health

Qing Xie; Xue Lin; Yanzhi Wang; Massoud Pedram; Donghwa Shin; Naehyuck Chang

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Integrated Decision Algorithms for Auto-steered Electric Transmission System Asset Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric power transmission systems are comprised of a large number of physical assets, including transmission lines, power transformers, and circuit breakers, that are capital-intensive, highly distributed, and may fail. Managing these assets under ... Keywords: Benders decomposition, asset management, condition monitoring, decision algorithms, electric transmission, optimization, service-oriented architecture, software-hardware

James Mccalley; Vasant Honavar; Sarah Ryan; William Meeker; Daji Qiao; Ron Roberts; Yuan Li; Jyotishman Pathak; Mujing Ye; Yili Hong

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Interim report: Waste management facilities cost information for mixed low-level waste  

SciTech Connect

This report contains preconceptual designs and planning level life-cycle cost estimates for treating alpha and nonalpha mixed low-level radioactive waste. This report contains information on twenty-seven treatment, storage, and disposal modules that can be integrated to develop total life cycle costs for various waste management options. A procedure to guide the US Department of Energy and its contractor personnel in the use of estimating data is also summarized in this report.

Feizollahi, F.; Shropshire, D.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Topology, design, analysis and thermal management of power electronics for hybrid electric vehicle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for fuel cells and advanced heavy-duty hybrid electric vehicles. He also has experience with alternativeTopology, design, analysis and thermal management of power electronics for hybrid electric vehicle an important role in the success of electric, hybrid and fuel cell vehicles. Typical power electronics circuits

Mi, Chunting "Chris"

352

Electric Vehicles: Performance, Life-Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table3 to the incre- no oil costs, and that Na/S batteries,costs, of vehicles Oil costs, percent ofgasoline vehiclestires are (M&R) costs (we exclude fires and oil) than ICEVs,

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Fuel Inventory Management for Electric Companies: Current Uses of the EPRI Utility Fuel Inventory Model (UFIM)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes current applications of the Utility Fuel Inventory Model (UFIM) developed by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). This model is designed to help electric companies to better manage policy and operational decisions related to managing power plant fuel inventories. This report specifically address: (i) problems currently faced by electric power companies where fuel inventories can be used to address the problems; and, (ii) how the UFIM analysis tool can be used to ...

2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

354

Emission Cuts Realities Electricity Generation Cost and CO2 emissions projections for different electricity generation options for Australia to 2050 By  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Five options for cutting CO2 emissions from electricity generation in Australia are compared with a Business as Usual ? option over the period 2010 to 2050. The six options comprise combinations of coal, gas, nuclear, wind and solar thermal technologies. The conclusions: The nuclear option reduces CO2 emissions the most, is the only option that can be built quickly enough to make the deep emissions cuts required, and is the least cost of the options that can cut emissions sustainably. Solar thermal and wind power are the highest cost of the options considered. The cost of avoiding emissions is lowest with nuclear and highest with solar and wind power.

Peter Lang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Audit of health benefit costs at the Department`s Management and Operating Contractors  

SciTech Connect

The audit disclosed that the Department and certain of its contractors had initiated several positive actions to contain health benefit costs: improving data collection, increasing training, reviewing changes to health plans, improving the language in one contract, increasing the employees, share of health costs at one contractor, and initiating self-insurance at another contractor. Despite these actions, further improvements are needed in the administration of the contractor employee health benefit plans. It was found that the Department did not have the policies and procedures necessary to ensure that the health benefit costs met the tests for reasonableness. The audit of $95 million in health benefit costs incurred at six Management and Operating contractors showed that $15.4 million of these costs were excessive compared to national norms.

1994-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

356

Cost-effective applications of photovoltaics for electric utilities: An overview  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cost targets for the large-scale entry of photovoltaic (PV) systems keep moving, subject to the vagaries of global oil prices and the economic health of the world. Over the last four decades since a practical PV device was announced, costs have come down by a factor of 20 or more and this downward trend is expected to continue, albeit at a slower pace. Simultaneously, conversion efficiencies have nearly tripled. There are many applications today for which PV is cost-effective. In recognition of this, utility interest in PV is increasing and this is manifested by projects such as PVUSA and Central and South West`s renewable resource development effort. While no major technical barriers for the entry of PV systems have been uncovered, several key issues such as power quality, system reliability, ramp rates, spinning reserve requirements, and misoperation of protection schemes will have to be dealt with as the penetration of this technology increases. PV is still in the evolutionary phase and is expected to grow for several decades to come. Fueled by environmental considerations, interest in PV is showing a healthy rise both in the minds of the public and in the planning realms of the electric power community. In recognition of this, the Energy Development Subcommittee of the IEEE Energy Development and Power Generation Committee organized a Panel Session on photovoltaics applications at the 1993 International Joint Power Generation Conference held in Kansas City, Missouri. Summaries of the four presentations are assembled here for the benefit of the readers of this Review.

Bigger, J.E. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

357

A cost/benefit model for insertion of technological innovation into a total quality management program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study provides economic justification for insertion of technological innovation into a total quality management (TQM) program in a remanufacturing environment. One of the core principles of TQM is continuous improvement. A preferred metric for measuring quality improvement is the cost of quality. Traditionally, comprehensive quality cost reports have regularly been issued in a fixed format to identify opportunities for improvement and provide guidelines for improvement over time. However, current research has shown that continuous improvement is enhanced by a quality cost approach that is much more flexible [1]. This approach is based upon exposure of the cost savings directly related to quality improvement. in many cases a process-level engineer, who may not be trained in quality costing techniques, will be responsible for the economic analysis to justify a quality improvement initiative. Research has shown that most engineers, simply do not have the training or experience to adequately cost justify quality improvement. The results of this study provide process-level engineers with a cost/benefit model template, which can be used to cost justify technological improvement based upon total quality costs.

Ratliff, William L

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

A Development Path to the Efficient and Cost-Effective Bulk Storage of Electrical Energy  

SciTech Connect

Efficient and cost-effective means for storing electrical energy is becoming an increasing need in our electricity-oriented society. For example, for electric utilities an emerging need is for distributed storage systems, that is, energy storage at substations, at solar or wind-power sites, or for load-leveling at the site of major consumers of their electricity. One of the important consequences of distributed storage for the utilities would be the reduction in transmission losses that would result from having a local source of load-leveling power. For applications such as these there are three criteria that must be satisfied by any new system that is developed to meet such needs. These criteria are: (1) high 'turn-around' efficiency, that is, high efficiency of both storing and recovering the stored energy in electrical form, (2) long service life (tens of years), with low maintenance requirements, and, (3) acceptably low capital cost. An additional requirement for these particular applications is that the system should have low enough standby losses to permit operation on a diurnal cycle, that is, storing the energy during a portion of a given day (say during sunlight hours) followed several hours later by its use during night-time hours. One answer to the spectrum of energy storage needs just outlined is the 'electromechanical battery'. The E-M battery, under development for several years at the Laboratory and elsewhere in the world, has the potential to solve the above energy storage problems in a manner superior to the electro-chemical battery in the important attributes of energy recovery efficiency, cycle lifetime, and amortized capital cost. An electromechanical battery is an energy storage module consisting of a high-speed rotor, fabricated from fiber composite, and having an integrally mounted generator/motor. The rotor operates at high speed, in vacuo, inside of a hermetically sealed enclosure, supported by a 'magnetic bearing', that is, a bearing that uses magnetic forces to support the rotor against gravity. Magnetic bearings are a virtual necessity for the E-M battery in order to achieve long service life, and to minimize frictional losses so that the battery does not lose its charge (run down) too rapidly. These considerations mitigate against the use of conventional mechanical bearings in the E-M battery for most applications. The Laboratory has pioneered the development of a new form of magnetic bearing to meet the special requirements of the E-M battery: the 'ambient-temperature passive magnetic bearing'. Simpler, and potentially much less expensive than the existing 'active' magnetic bearings (ones requiring electronic amplifiers and feedback circuits for their operation) development of the ambient-temperature passive magnetic bearing represents a technological breakthrough. Beyond its use in the E-M battery, the ambient-temperature magnetic bearing could have important applications in replacing conventional lubricated mechanical bearings in electrical machinery. Here the gains would be two-fold: reduced frictional losses, leading to higher motor efficiency, and, of equal importance, the elimination of the need for lubricants and for routine replacement of the bearings owing to mechanical wear. Thus an added benefit from a vigorous pursuit of our electromechanical battery concepts could be its impact on many other areas of industry where rotating machinery in need of improved bearings is involved. If perfected, passive magnetic bearings would seem to represent an almost ideal replacement for the mechanical bearings in many types of industrial electrical machinery. Returning to the issued of energy storage, the E-M battery itself has much to contribute in the area of improving the efficiency of stationary energy storage systems. For example, many electrical utilities utilize 'pumped hydro' energy storage systems as a means of improving the utilization of their 'base-load' power plants. That is, electrical energy is stored during off-

Post, R F

2009-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

359

A Development Path to the Efficient and Cost-Effective Bulk Storage of Electrical Energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Efficient and cost-effective means for storing electrical energy is becoming an increasing need in our electricity-oriented society. For example, for electric utilities an emerging need is for distributed storage systems, that is, energy storage at substations, at solar or wind-power sites, or for load-leveling at the site of major consumers of their electricity. One of the important consequences of distributed storage for the utilities would be the reduction in transmission losses that would result from having a local source of load-leveling power. For applications such as these there are three criteria that must be satisfied by any new system that is developed to meet such needs. These criteria are: (1) high 'turn-around' efficiency, that is, high efficiency of both storing and recovering the stored energy in electrical form, (2) long service life (tens of years), with low maintenance requirements, and, (3) acceptably low capital cost. An additional requirement for these particular applications is that the system should have low enough standby losses to permit operation on a diurnal cycle, that is, storing the energy during a portion of a given day (say during sunlight hours) followed several hours later by its use during night-time hours. One answer to the spectrum of energy storage needs just outlined is the 'electromechanical battery'. The E-M battery, under development for several years at the Laboratory and elsewhere in the world, has the potential to solve the above energy storage problems in a manner superior to the electro-chemical battery in the important attributes of energy recovery efficiency, cycle lifetime, and amortized capital cost. An electromechanical battery is an energy storage module consisting of a high-speed rotor, fabricated from fiber composite, and having an integrally mounted generator/motor. The rotor operates at high speed, in vacuo, inside of a hermetically sealed enclosure, supported by a 'magnetic bearing', that is, a bearing that uses magnetic forces to support the rotor against gravity. Magnetic bearings are a virtual necessity for the E-M battery in order to achieve long service life, and to minimize frictional losses so that the battery does not lose its charge (run down) too rapidly. These considerations mitigate against the use of conventional mechanical bearings in the E-M battery for most applications. The Laboratory has pioneered the development of a new form of magnetic bearing to meet the special requirements of the E-M battery: the 'ambient-temperature passive magnetic bearing'. Simpler, and potentially much less expensive than the existing 'active' magnetic bearings (ones requiring electronic amplifiers and feedback circuits for their operation) development of the ambient-temperature passive magnetic bearing represents a technological breakthrough. Beyond its use in the E-M battery, the ambient-temperature magnetic bearing could have important applications in replacing conventional lubricated mechanical bearings in electrical machinery. Here the gains would be two-fold: reduced frictional losses, leading to higher motor efficiency, and, of equal importance, the elimination of the need for lubricants and for routine replacement of the bearings owing to mechanical wear. Thus an added benefit from a vigorous pursuit of our electromechanical battery concepts could be its impact on many other areas of industry where rotating machinery in need of improved bearings is involved. If perfected, passive magnetic bearings would seem to represent an almost ideal replacement for the mechanical bearings in many types of industrial electrical machinery. Returning to the issued of energy storage, the E-M battery itself has much to contribute in the area of improving the efficiency of stationary energy storage systems. For example, many electrical utilities utilize 'pumped hydro' energy storage systems as a means of improving the utilization of their 'base-load' power plants. That is, electrical energy is stored during off-peak hours for delivery at times of peak usage. These pumped hydro sys

Post, R F

2009-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

360

Plug-In Electric Vehicle Handbook for Fleet Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in to electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE). EVs must be charged regu- larly, and charging PHEVs regularly&E's Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment Installation Manual (http:// evtransportal.org/evmanual.pdf) and e. They consume no petroleum-based fuel while driving and produce no tailpipe emissions. EVSE (electric vehicle

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manage electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Comparative costs of flexible package cells and rigid cells for lithium-ionhybrid electric vehicle batteries.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We conducted a design study to compare the manufacturing costs at a level of 100,000 hybrid vehicle batteries per year for flexible package (Flex) cells and for rigid aluminum container (Rigid) cells. Initially, the Rigid cells were considered to have welded closures and to be deep-drawn containers of about the same shape as the Flex cells. As the study progressed, the method of fabricating and sealing the Rigid cells was expanded to include lower cost options including double seaming and other mechanically fastened closures with polymer sealants. Both types of batteries were designed with positive electrodes containing Li(Ni{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3})O{sub 2} and graphite negative electrodes. The use of a different combination of lithium-ion electrodes would have little effect on the difference in costs for the two types of cells. We found that 20-Ah cells could be designed with excellent performance and heat rejection capabilities for either type of cell. Many parts in the design of the Flex cells are identical or nearly identical to those of the Rigid Cell, so for these features there would be no difference in the cost of manufacturing the two types of batteries. We judged the performance, size and weight of the batteries to be sufficiently similar that the batteries would have the same value for their application. Some of the design features of the Flex cells were markedly different than those of the deep-drawn and welded Rigid cells and would result in significant cost savings. Fabrication and processing steps for which the Flex cells appear to have a cost advantage over these Rigid cells are (1) container fabrication and sealing, (2) terminal fabrication and sealing, and (3) intercell connections. The costs of providing cooling channels adjacent to the cells and for module and battery hardware appear to favor Rigid cell batteries slightly. Overall, Flex cell batteries appear to have an advantage of about $1.20-$3.70 per cell for a 25-kW Battery of 20 cells or about $24 to $74 per battery. Container experts assisted with this study, including a paid consultant and personnel at container manufacturing companies. Some of the companies are considering entering the business of manufacturing containers for hybrid vehicle battery manufacturers. For this reason they provided valuable guidance on overall approaches to reducing the costs of the cell containers. They have retained the description of some specific designs and procedures for future possible work with battery manufacturers, with whom they are now in contact. Through the guidance of these experts, we determined that a new type of container could be manufactured that would have the best features of performance and low cost of both the Rigid and Flex containers. For instance, the aluminum layer in a tri-layer sheet can be sufficiently thick to form a rigid container that can be fabricated in two halves, much like a Flex container, and mechanically joined at the edges for strength. In addition to the mechanical joint, this container can be sealed at the edges, much like a Flex container, by means of an inner polymer liner that can be heat-sealed or ultrasonically welded. The terminals can be flat strips of metal sealed into the top of the container as part of the edge sealing of the container, as for the Flex cell. Ridges can be stamped into one side of the container to provide cooling channels and the exterior layer of the container stock can be coated with a thin, electrically insulating, polymer layer. We expect this type of container will provide excellent sealing and durability and be less expensive than either the Flex or the Rigid container, which the study initially considered. A major cost for the original Rigid container is the welding required for sealing the container. However, the welding of the current collector tabs to the terminal piece may be even more complex and costly than welding the container. It is important, therefore, to develop an inexpensive procedure for attachment of the foils to the terminal pieces. A lower-cost procedure, such as

Nelson, P. A.; Jansen, A. N.

2006-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

362

Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program Cost and Schedule Baseline; Revision 3  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to establish quantitative expressions of proposed costs and schedule to serve as a basis for measurement of program performance. It identifies the components of the Program Cost and Schedule Baseline (PCSB) that will be subject to change control by the Executive (Level 0) and Program (Level 1) Change Control Boards (CCBS) and establishes their baseline values. This document also details PCSB reporting, monitoring, and corrective action requirements. The Program technical baseline contained in the Waste Management System Description (WMSD), the Waste Management System Requirements (WMSR), and the Physical System Requirements documents provide the technical basis for the PCSB. Changes to the PCSB will be approved by the Pregrain Change Control Board (PCCB)In addition to the PCCB, the Energy System Acquisition Advisory Board Baseline CCB (ESAAB BCCB) will perform control functions relating to Total Project Cost (TPC) and major schedule milestones for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project and the Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) Project.

NONE

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Understanding the cost of power interruptions to U.S. electricity consumers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2004. Pilot Evaluation of Electricity-Reliability and Power-in the Economic Value of Electricity Reliability to the U.S.of the economic value of electricity reliability, the U.S.

LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Eto, Joseph H.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Examining the effectiveness of municipal solid waste management systems: An integrated cost-benefit analysis perspective with a financial cost modeling in Taiwan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to develop a sound material-cycle society, cost-effective municipal solid waste (MSW) management systems are required for the municipalities in the context of the integrated accounting system for MSW management. Firstly, this paper attempts to establish an integrated cost-benefit analysis (CBA) framework for evaluating the effectiveness of MSW management systems. In this paper, detailed cost/benefit items due to waste problems are particularly clarified. The stakeholders of MSW management systems, including the decision-makers of the municipalities and the citizens, are expected to reconsider the waste problems in depth and thus take wise actions with the aid of the proposed CBA framework. Secondly, focusing on the financial cost, this study develops a generalized methodology to evaluate the financial cost-effectiveness of MSW management systems, simultaneously considering the treatment technological levels and policy effects. The impacts of the influencing factors on the annual total and average financial MSW operation and maintenance (O and M) costs are analyzed in the Taiwanese case study with a demonstrative short-term future projection of the financial costs under scenario analysis. The established methodology would contribute to the evaluation of the current policy measures and to the modification of the policy design for the municipalities.

Weng, Yu-Chi, E-mail: clyde.weng@gmail.com [Solid Waste Management Research Center, Okayama University, Okayama (Japan); Fujiwara, Takeshi [Solid Waste Management Research Center, Okayama University, Okayama (Japan)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

365

Electric-utility DSM-program costs and effects, 1991 to 2001  

SciTech Connect

For the past three years (1989, 1990, and 1991), all US electric utilities that sell more than 120 GWh/year have been required to report to the Energy Information Administration data on their demand-side management (DSM) programs. These data provide a rich and uniquely comprehensive picture of electric-utility DSM programs in the United States. Altogether, 890 utilities (of about 3250 in the United States) ran DSM programs in 1991; of these, 439 sold more than 120 GWh and reported details on their DSM programs. These 439 utilities represent more than 80% of total US electricity sales and revenues. Altogether, these utilities spent almost $1.8 billion on DSM programs in 1991, equal to 1.0% of total utility revenues that year. In return for these (and prior-year) expenditures, utility DSM programs cut potential peak demand by 26,700 MW (4.8% of the national total) and cut annual electricity use by 23,300 GWh (0.9% of the national total). These 1991 numbers represent substantial increases over the 1989 and 1990 numbers on utility DSM programs. Specifically, utility DSM expenditures doubled, energy savings increased by almost 50%, and demand reductions increased by one-third between 1989 and 1991. Utilities differed enormously in their DSM-program expenditures and effects. Almost 12% of the reporting utilities spent more than 2% of total revenues on DSM programs in 1991, while almost 60% spent less than 0.5% of revenues on DSM. Utility estimates of future DSM-program expenditures and benefits show continuing growth. By the year 2001, US utilities expect to spend 1.2% of revenues on DSM and to cut demand by 8.8% and annual sales by 2.7%. Here, too, expectations vary by region. Utilities in the West and Northwest plan to spend more than 2% of revenues on DSM that year, while utilities in the Mid-Atlantic, Midwest, Southwest, Central, and North Central regions plan to spend less than 1% of revenues on DSM.

Hirst, E.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Understanding the cost of power interruptions to U.S. electricity consumers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is designed so that its cost estimate can be improved asin data used for cost estimates. At the other extreme,Typically, outage-cost estimates are based on surveys that

LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Eto, Joseph H.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Cost of Power Interruptions to Electricity Consumers in the United States (U.S.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ever power-quality- cost estimate of $26 billion per yearcovers. Typically, outage-cost estimates are based on whatof uncertainty in the cost estimates that have been prepared

Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina; Eto, Joseph H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

An Analysis of the Retail and Lifecycle Cost of Battery-Powered Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

metal hydride (NiMH) battery costs, several dierent ``in other cases. The battery cost per mile is low in partstorage energy and hence battery cost required to supply

Delucchi, Mark; Lipman, Timothy

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

An Analysis of the Retail and Lifecycle Cost of Battery-Powered Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

vehicles: Social costs and benets in France. TransportationTransportation Research Part D 6 (2001) 371404 Table 5 The social cost

Delucchi, Mark; Lipman, Timothy

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

General Electric Uses an Integrated Framework for Product Costing, Demand Forecasting, and Capacity Planning of New Photovoltaic Technology Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

General Electric (GE) Energy's nascent solar business has revenues of over $100 million, expects those revenues to grow to over $1 billion in the next three years, and has plans to rapidly grow the business beyond this period. GE Global Research (GEGR), ... Keywords: capital budgeting, cost analysis, facilities planning, forecasting, mathematical programming, risk

Bex George Thomas; Srinivas Bollapragada

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

125. Statistics and Evaluation with University Libraries Simultaneous Interpretation: Yes Library Management with Cost Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper deals with methods of cost analysis in libraries and with the use of cost data in library management. It explains the difference of cost accounting to the traditional statistics of income and expenses and shows the value of cost data for organizational decisions. Cost accounting must always be seen in connection with the mission and goals of the library and with quality measures; it should be used as one component of an integrated controlling. Libraries today are experiencing growing problems when organising their work and offering their services within the given budget and resources. The rapid development of electronic publications and technology raises the demand for new web-based-services and for information delivery directly to the working place. On the other side, funding cuts and rising prices reduce the scope for acting: The dilemma is how to accomplish more with less resources. In addition, there is a general demand for transparency as to costs and quality in all areas, especially in the public sector. Funders, institutions, and the public want to know about the resources spent and the values achieved. Thus, financial problems as well as evaluation procedures make it imperative to use more differentiated methods of cost analysis than the

Roswitha Poll

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Preliminary estimates of the total-system cost for the restructured program: An addendum to the May 1989 analysis of the total-system life cycle cost for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program  

SciTech Connect

The total-system life-cycle cost (TSLCC) analysis for the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program is an ongoing activity that helps determine whether the revenue-producing mechanism established by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 - a fee levied on electricity generated and sold by commercial nuclear power plants - is sufficient to cover the cost of the program. This report provides cost estimates for the sixth annual evaluation of the adequacy of the fee. The costs contained in this report represent a preliminary analysis of the cost impacts associated with the Secretary of Energy`s Report to Congress on Reassessment of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program issued in November 1989. The major elements of the restructured program announced in this report which pertain to the program`s life-cycle costs are: a prioritization of the scientific investigations program at the Yucca Mountain candidate site to focus on identification of potentially adverse conditions, a delay in the start of repository operations until 2010, the start of limited waste acceptance at the monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility in 1998, and the start of waste acceptance at the full-capability MRS facility in 2,000. Based on the restructured program, the total-system cost for the system with a repository at the candidate site at Yucca Mountain in Nevada, a facility for monitored retrievable storage (MRS), and a transportation system is estimated at $26 billion (expressed in constant 1988 dollars). In the event that a second repository is required and is authorized by the Congress, the total-system cost is estimated at $34 to $35 billion, depending on the quantity of spent fuel and high-level waste (HLW) requiring disposal. 17 figs., 17 tabs.

NONE

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

ALTERNATIVE ENERGY TESTBED ELECTRIC VEHICLE AND THERMAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEM INVESTIGATION.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Methodology of and details on designing, constructing, and testing an efficient low power electric vehicle for alternative energy testing purposes. Experimental analysis of the drive (more)

Gregg, Christopher B

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

ELECTRICAL LOAD MANAGEMENT FOR THE CALIFORNIA WATER SYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dam and the Thermalito pumped storage units in the north,This generation pumped storage, and recovery generation, (electricity demand. In a pumped-storage system, water is

Krieg, B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Proposed insurance and reserve management scheme for Singapore electricity market.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of the research is to improve the market design in the Singapore Electricity Market. There are three aspects that this thesis tries to (more)

Xia, Linmin.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Managing market risks in the Australian national electricity market.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The restructuring of many national and state electricity industries over the last two decades has created new sets of laws and regulations, market design and (more)

Tham, Poh Weng

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

An Estimate of the Cost of Electricity from Light Water Reactors and Fossil Plants with Carbon Capture and Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

As envisioned in this report, LIFE technology lends itself to large, centralized, baseload (or 'always on') electrical generation. Should LIFE plants be built, they will have to compete in the electricity market with other generation technologies. We consider the economics of technologies with similar operating characteristics: significant economies of scale, limited capacity for turndown, zero dependence on intermittent resources and ability to meet environmental constraints. The five generation technologies examined here are: (1) Light Water Reactors (LWR); (2) Coal; (3) Coal with Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS); (4) Natural Gas; and (5) Natural Gas with Carbon Capture and Sequestration. We use MIT's cost estimation methodology (Du and Parsons, 2009) to determine the cost of electricity at which each of these technologies is viable.

Simon, A J

2009-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

378

Costs and Emissions Associated with Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Charging in the Xcel Energy Colorado Service Territory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Costs and Emissions Costs and Emissions Associated with Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Charging in the Xcel Energy Colorado Service Territory K. Parks, P. Denholm, and T. Markel Technical Report NREL/TP-640-41410 May 2007 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 Costs and Emissions Associated with Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Charging in the Xcel Energy Colorado Service Territory K. Parks, P. Denholm, and T. Markel Prepared under Task No. WR61.2001 Technical Report NREL/TP-640-41410 May 2007 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle

379

Method and system for managing an electrical output of a turbogenerator  

SciTech Connect

The system and method manages an electrical output of a turbogenerator in accordance with multiple modes. In a first mode, a direct current (DC) bus receives power from a turbogenerator output via a rectifier where turbogenerator revolutions per unit time (e.g., revolutions per minute (RPM)) or an electrical output level of a turbogenerator output meet or exceed a minimum threshold. In a second mode, if the turbogenerator revolutions per unit time or electrical output level of a turbogenerator output are less than the minimum threshold, the electric drive motor or a generator mechanically powered by the engine provides electrical energy to the direct current bus.

Stahlhut, Ronnie Dean (Bettendorf, IA); Vuk, Carl Thomas (Denver, IA)

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

380

Method and system for managing an electrical output of a turbogenerator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The system and method manages an electrical output of a turbogenerator in accordance with multiple modes. In a first mode, a direct current (DC) bus receives power from a turbogenerator output via a rectifier where turbogenerator revolutions per unit time (e.g., revolutions per minute (RPM)) or an electrical output level of a turbogenerator output meet or exceed a minimum threshold. In a second mode, if the turbogenerator revolutions per unit time or electrical output level of a turbogenerator output are less than the minimum threshold, the electric drive motor or a generator mechanically powered by the engine provides electrical energy to the direct current bus.

Stahlhut, Ronnie Dean (Bettendorf, IA); Vuk, Carl Thomas (Denver, IA)

2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manage electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Hybrid energy storage systems and battery management for electric vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric vehicles (EV) are considered as a strong alternative of internal combustion engine vehicles expecting lower carbon emission. However, their actual benefits are not yet clearly verified while the energy efficiency can be improved in many ways. ... Keywords: battery-supercapacitor hybrid, charging/discharging asymmetry, electric vehicle, regenerative braking

Sangyoung Park, Younghyun Kim, Naehyuck Chang

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Energy efficient navigation management for hybrid electric vehicles on highways  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEVs) are gaining popularity due to their economical efficiency as well as their contribution to environmental preservation. PHEVs allow the driver to use exclusively electric power for 30-50 miles of driving, and switch ... Keywords: formal model, navigation plan, plug-in hybrid vehicle

Mohammad Ashiqur Rahman, Qi Duan, Ehab Al-Shaer

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Costs and Emissions Associated with Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Charging in the Xcel Energy Colorado Service Territory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The combination of high oil costs, concerns about oil security and availability, and air quality issues related to vehicle emissions are driving interest in plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). PHEVs are similar to conventional hybrid electric vehicles, but feature a larger battery and plug-in charger that allows electricity from the grid to replace a portion of the petroleum-fueled drive energy. PHEVs may derive a substantial fraction of their miles from grid-derived electricity, but without the range restrictions of pure battery electric vehicles. As of early 2007, production of PHEVs is essentially limited to demonstration vehicles and prototypes. However, the technology has received considerable attention from the media, national security interests, environmental organizations, and the electric power industry. The use of PHEVs would represent a significant potential shift in the use of electricity and the operation of electric power systems. Electrification of the transportation sector could increase generation capacity and transmission and distribution (T&D) requirements, especially if vehicles are charged during periods of high demand. This study is designed to evaluate several of these PHEV-charging impacts on utility system operations within the Xcel Energy Colorado service territory.

Parks, K.; Denholm, P.; Markel, T.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

The economic impact of state ordered avoided cost rates for photovoltaic generated electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) of 1978 requires that electric utilities purchase electricity generated by small power producers (QFs) such as photovoltaic systems at rates that will encourage the ...

Bottaro, Drew

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Moving Forward with the Electric Sector Cybersecurity Risk Management...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sector Cybersecurity Risk Management Maturity" program, a White House initiative led by the Department of Energy in partnership with the Department of Homeland Security...

386

A Framework for Evaluating the Benefits and Costs of Investments in Electric Vehicle Infrastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric vehicles151including hybrid electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, and battery-only vehicles151are desirable alternatives to vehicles powered by internal combustion engines because they produce considerably less or no direct emissions of greenhouse gases and other pollutants that are attributed to the transportation sector. However, they use electricity to charge their batteries, the generation of which consumes fossil fuels (in some cases, coal), which increases the emission of th...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

387

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- General Electric Co - Shelbyville - IN  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Electric Co - Shelbyville - Electric Co - Shelbyville - IN 07 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: General Electric Co - Shelbyville (IN.07 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: General Electric Plant IN.07-1 Location: Shelbyville , Indiana IN.07-1 Evaluation Year: 1994 IN.07-2 Site Operations: Compacted approximately 500 pounds of thorium (small pieces) into electrodes on 25 and 26 June, 1956. IN.07-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote due to limited scope of activities conducted at the site IN.07-1 IN.07-2 IN.07-3 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Thorium IN.07-1 Radiological Survey(s): Yes IN.07-1 Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP

388

U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 2000  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Savings for the 516 large electric utilities increased to 53.7 billion kilowatthours (kWh), 3.1 billion kWh more than in 1999. These energy savings

389

U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Managment 1996  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Savings as a Percentage of Retail Sales by U.S. Electric Utilities with DSM Energy Savings Programs and Sales to Ultimate Consumers by Class of Ownership, 1996

390

Managing Wind-based Electricity Generation and Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on renewable energy, and to develop efficient electricity storage. Renewable energy--such as wind energy. However, most renewable energy is inh, who is extremely instrumental in guiding my research on energy. His insights have significantly

391

Electric Generating and Transmission Facilities Emissions Management (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section details responsibilities of the Iowa Utility Board, including the policies for electricity rate-making for the state of Iowa, certification of natural gas providers, and other policies...

392

Managing Electricity Sourcing in Europe's Energy Intensive Industry: A Methodology to Develop an Electricity Sourcing Strategy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Several regulatory changes in Europe's electricity sector have stimulated competition in the market. National power companies, with monopolistic structures, have evolved into competitive entities, creating (more)

Trevio Villarreal, Luis

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Nuclear economics 2000: Deterministic and probabilistic projections of nuclear and coal electric power generation costs for the year 2000  

SciTech Connect

The total busbar electric generating costs were estimated for locations in ten regions of the United States for base-load nuclear and coal-fired power plants with a startup date of January 2000. For the Midwest region a complete data set that specifies each parameter used to obtain the comparative results is supplied. When based on the reference set of input variables, the comparison of power generation costs is found to favor nuclear in most regions of the country. Nuclear power is most favored in the northeast and western regions where coal must be transported over long distances; however, coal-fired generation is most competitive in the north central region where large reserves of cheaply mineable coal exist. In several regions small changes in the reference variables could cause either option to be preferred. The reference data set reflects the better of recent electric utility construction cost experience (BE) for nuclear plants. This study assumes as its reference case a stable regulatory environment and improved planning and construction practices, resulting in nuclear plants typically built at the present BE costs. Today's BE nuclear-plant capital investment cost model is then being used as a surrogate for projected costs for the next generation of light-water reactor plants. An alternative analysis based on today's median experience (ME) nuclear-plant construction cost experience is also included. In this case, coal is favored in all ten regions, implying that typical nuclear capital investment costs must improve for nuclear to be competitive.

Williams, K.A.; Delene, J.G.; Fuller, L.C.; Bowers, H.I.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Price risk management: Electric power vs. natural gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As deregulation continues, will electricity resemble gas as a commodity, when it comes to futures markets and forward deals? Overall, yes; the signs are there. But differences will remain-in volatility, the prominence of regional factors, and the importance of shortrun engineering fundamentals. This article examines these differences and concludes that engineering and economic analyses will prove more important in the future in assessing risk in the electric power commodity market than in the gas industry.

Rose, J.; Mann, C. [ICF Kaiser International, Inc., Fairfax, VA (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Information Management and Business Strategy in Electricity Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric utilities are the latest in a line of deregulated industries to become competitive. One of the most profound lessons learned from other deregulated and competitive industries is that competitive advantage increasingly comes from knowledge and not solely from tangible assets. As knowledge becomes an increasingly important part of the strategic mix for electric utilities, executives will need to focus on information technologies and systems as well as physical and financial assets in their search ...

1998-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

396

Electric and Gasoline Vehicle Lifecycle Cost and Energy-Use Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as the product of the cost per kWh and the total number ofmethod assumes that the cost per kWh does not vary with theper kg (rather than the cost per kWh) as a function of the

Delucchi, Mark; Burke, Andy; Lipman, Timothy; Miller, Marshall

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

An Analysis of the Retail and Lifecycle Cost of Battery-Powered Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

product of an assumed cost per kWh and the total number ofmethod assumes that the cost per kWh does not vary with thethis battery has a low cost per kWh, and relatively few kWh

Delucchi, Mark; Lipman, Timothy

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Reducing Electricity Cost Through Virtual Machine Placement in High Performance Computing Clouds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the data centers' energy consumptions, energy prices, and peak power prices, it becomes clear that we can two components: (1) the cost of energy consumed (energy price: $ per KWh), and (2) the cost. Unfortunately, these works did not consider energy prices, peak power costs, or any cooling issues

Bianchini, Ricardo

399

Electrical load management in smart homes using evolutionary algorithms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we focus on a real world scenario of energy management of a smart home. External variable signals, reflecting the low voltage grid's state, are used to address the challenge of balancing energy demand and supply. The problem is formulated ... Keywords: energy management, evolutionary algorithms, nonlinear integer program

Florian Allerding; Marc Premm; Pradyumn Kumar Shukla; Hartmut Schmeck

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Replacement energy costs for nuclear electricity-generating units in the United States: 1997--2001. Volume 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report updates previous estimates of replacement energy costs for potential short-term shutdowns of 109 US nuclear electricity-generating units. This information was developed to assist the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in its regulatory impact analyses, specifically those that examine the impacts of proposed regulations requiring retrofitting of or safety modifications to nuclear reactors. Such actions might necessitate shutdowns of nuclear power plants while these changes are being implemented. The change in energy cost represents one factor that the NRC must consider when deciding to require a particular modification. Cost estimates were derived from probabilistic production cost simulations of pooled utility system operations. Factors affecting replacement energy costs, such as random unit failures, maintenance and refueling requirements, and load variations, are treated in the analysis. This report describes an abbreviated analytical approach as it was adopted to update the cost estimates published in NUREG/CR-4012, Vol. 3. The updates were made to extend the time frame of cost estimates and to account for recent changes in utility system conditions, such as change in fuel prices, construction and retirement schedules, and system demand projects.

VanKuiken, J.C.; Guziel, K.A.; Tompkins, M.M.; Buehring, W.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manage electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Native American Technical Assistance and Training for Renewable Energy Resource Development and Electrical Generation Facilities Management  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Council of Energy Resource Tribes (CERT) will facilitate technical expertise and training of Native Americans in renewable energy resource development for electrical generation facilities, and distributed generation options contributing to feasibility studies, strategic planning and visioning. CERT will also provide information to Tribes on energy efficiency and energy management techniques.This project will provide facilitation and coordination of expertise from government agencies and private industries to interact with Native Americans in ways that will result in renewable energy resource development, energy efficiency program development, and electrical generation facilities management by Tribal entities. The intent of this cooperative agreement is to help build capacity within the Tribes to manage these important resources.

A. David Lester

2008-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

402

Cost-effectiveness of plug-in hybrid electric vehicle battery capacity and charging infrastructure investment for reducing US gasoline consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost-effectiveness of plug-in hybrid electric vehicle battery capacity and charging infrastructure online 22 October 2012 Keywords: Plug-in hybrid electric vehicle Charging infrastructure Battery size a b for plug-in hybrid electric vehicles as alternate methods to reduce gasoline consumption for cars, trucks

McGaughey, Alan

403

Real-time energy management control for hybrid electric powertrains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper focuses on embedded control of a hybrid powertrain concepts for mobile vehicle applications. Optimal robust control approach is used to develop a real-time energy management strategy. The main idea is to store the normally wasted mechanical ...

Mohamed Zaher, Sabri Cetinkunt

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Tree Growth Regulators for Management of Trees in Electric Utility Rights-of-Way: A Literature and Current Application Status Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical growth regulators -- initially developed for horticultural and field crops -- provide a promising, cost-effective tool for management of trees under electric transmission and distribution lines in utility rights-of-way (ROWs). Paclobutrazol (commercial product Profile 2SC) and flurprimidol (commercial product Cutless tree implants) are potent tree growth regulators for a broad range of herbaceous and woody gymnosperm and angiosperm species. This review summarizes the published literatu...

2000-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

405

A Review of Recent RTO Benefit-Cost Studies: Toward More Comprehensive...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

management, generation and transmission investment and operation, and wholesale electricity market operation. This report: 1) Describes the history of benefit-cost...

406

A Review of Recent RTO Benefit-Cost Studies: Toward More Comprehensive...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

management, generation and transmission investment and operation, and wholesale electricity market operation. This report: Describes the history of benefit-cost analysis...

407

Electrical Demand Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Almost every building owner or manager is interested in controlling electrical costs. Since the HVAC system is a large user of electricity, this article will discuss what can be done in the HVAC system to influence parts of the utility bill.

Eppelheimer, D. M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Transmission Management in the Aftermath of Electricity Restructuring in Turkey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In moving toward restructuring, transmission expansion planning is a major challenge. The authors offer a general perspective on TEP issues, then address the specific challenges in Turkey and propose several strategies toward managing physical and financial risks in that country. (author)

Tor, Osman Bulent; Shahidehpour, Mohammad

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

409

Scope for Cost Minimization in Public Debt Management: the Case of the UK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

constant. This formulation is a mirror image of the familiar efficient portfolio problem in finance. The risk parameter ? captures the relative weight attached by the debt manager to the interest cost volatility, and has a similar status as the risk... Metric estimator given by ?t|t?1 = 1? ? 1? ?n nX j=1 ?j?1et?je0t?j , where et is the 21 vector of recursive forecast errors, ? is a decay coefficient and n is the size of the observation window. This estimator is used extensively in the professional finance...

Coe, Patrick J; Pesaran, M Hashem

2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

410

F-Class Life Management: General Electric MS7001 Model FA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report reviews the known durability issues that have affected the General Electric 7FA gas turbine. An overview of the approach, technology, and specific issues in the durability analysis of each hot section component is followed by the results of the hot section life management program studies focused on the durability of the three stages of buckets and the first stage nozzle of the General Electric Frame 7FA gas turbines.

2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

411

Electricity transmission pricing : how much does it cost to get it wrong?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economists know how to calculate optimal prices for electricity transmission. These are rarely applied in practice. This paper develops a thirteen node model of the transmission system in England and Wales, incorporating ...

Green, Richard

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies for Electrical Energy Storage  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report presents the results of an analysis evaluating the economic viability of hydrogen for medium- to large-scale electrical energy storage applications compared with three other storage techno

413

Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies for Electrical Energy Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of an analysis evaluating the economic viability of hydrogen for medium- to large-scale electrical energy storage applications compared with three other storage technologies: batteries, pumped hydro, and compressed air energy storage (CAES).

Steward, D.; Saur, G.; Penev, M.; Ramsden, T.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Human Health Risk Assessment of Chemicals Encountered in Vegetation Management on Electric Utility Rights-of-Way  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses the human health risk assessment of chemicals encountered in vegetation management on electric utility rights-of-way (ROWs).

2003-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

415

Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Highlights Hydrogen's Potential for Electrical Energy Storage (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in analyzing life-cycle costs for hydrogen storage in comparison with other energy storage technologies. Work was performed by the Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center.

Not Available

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Demand-side management programs change along with the electric utility industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

They heyday of demand-side management may be over as far as utilities are concerned. The future path of utility demand-side management programs is obscured in a haze of important questions, especially questions regarding potential legislation and retail wheeling. Until recently, utility after utility was announcing new DSM programs, seemingly almost daily. But, as pointed out in our November issue by Robert Smock, Electric Light & Power`s editorial director, {open_quotes}Survivors of ruthless competition will not be doing much to reduce electricity sales. They`ll be doing their best to sell more of their product.

Stein, H. [ed.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Chapter 3 Appendices 1 Appendix 3A: Levelized Cost of Electricity and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the costs of coal, capital, and labor in Table 3A.1, natural gas with CCS becomes economic at the prices of higher than 100$/ tCO2 for a range $2­6$/MMBtu natural gas prices. At the higher natural gas prices, coal-Cost Generation Technology Zones for Coal and Natural Gas with and without CCS for Different Natural Gas Prices

Reuter, Martin

418

Wind Power Impacts on Electric Power System Operating Costs: Summary and Perspective on Work to Date; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Electric utility system planners and operators are concerned that variations in wind plant output may increase the operating costs of the system. This concern arises because the system must maintain an instantaneous balance between the aggregate demand for electric power and the total power generated by all power plants feeding the system. This is a highly sophisticated task that utility operators and automatic controls perform routinely, based on well-known operating characteristics for conventional power plants and a great deal of experience accumulated over many years. System operators are concerned that variations in wind plant output will force the conventional power plants to provide compensating variations to maintain system balance, thus causing the conventional power plants to deviate from operating points chosen to minimize the total cost of operating the system. The operators' concerns are compounded by the fact that conventional power plants are generally under their control and thus are dispatchable, whereas wind plants are controlled instead by nature. Although these are valid concerns, the key issue is not whether a system with a significant amount of wind capacity can be operated reliably, but rather to what extent the system operating costs are increased by the variability of the wind.

Smith, J. C.; DeMeo, E. A.; Parsons, B.; Milligan, M.

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Aging Management Guidelines for Commercial Nuclear Power Plants -- Electrical and Mechanical Penetrations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the application process for license renewal, nuclear utilities must perform an evaluation to confirm that they have appropriately considered aging effects on plant components within the scope of the License Renewal Rule. This report provides guidelines for managing relevant degradation mechanisms applicable to electrical and mechanical penetrations in nuclear power plants. Use of these guidelines will provide utilities with a basis for verifying that effective methods for managing age-related ...

2002-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

420

Cost Benefit Analysis Modeling Tool for Electric vs. ICE Airport Ground Support Equipment Development and Results  

SciTech Connect

This report documents efforts to develop a computer tool for modeling the economic payback for comparative airport ground support equipment (GSE) that are propelled by either electric motors or gasoline and diesel engines. The types of GSE modeled are pushback tractors, baggage tractors, and belt loaders. The GSE modeling tool includes an emissions module that estimates the amount of tailpipe emissions saved by replacing internal combustion engine GSE with electric GSE. This report contains modeling assumptions, methodology, a users manual, and modeling results. The model was developed based on the operations of two airlines at four United States airports.

James Francfort; Kevin Morrow; Dimitri Hochard

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manage electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Planning electricity transmission to accommodate renewables: Using two-stage programming to evaluate flexibility and the cost of disregarding uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

uncertainty,ECIU),andthevalueofbeingableto postpone decisions until some uncertainty is resolved (the expected cost of ignoring optionality, ECIO). These indices quantify, in different ways, the benefits of considering Thirdly,concernaboutclimate... thetotalgenerationcapacityateachbusor ineachzone.Thiscapacity isoften taken to be a function of uncertain electricity demand, or simply presumed to have an exogenousprobabilitydistribution.Otherrisksthathavebeenconsideredbysomeofthese models are...

van der Weijde, Adriaan Hendrik; Hobbs, Benjamin F.

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

422

Electric Power Interruption Cost Estimates for Individual Industries, Sectors, and U.S. Economy  

SciTech Connect

During the last 20 years, utilities and researchers have begun to understand the value in the collection and analysis of interruption cost data. The continued investigation of the monetary impact of power outages will facilitate the advancement of the analytical methods used to measure the costs and benefits from the perspective of the energy consumer. More in-depth analysis may be warranted because of the privatization and deregulation of power utilities, price instability in certain regions of the U.S. and the continued evolution of alternative auxiliary power systems.

Balducci, Patrick J.; Roop, Joseph M.; Schienbein, Lawrence A.; DeSteese, John G.; Weimar, Mark R.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

423

CARBON MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES FOR U.S. ELECTRICITY GENERATION CAPACITY: A VINTAGE-BASED APPROACH  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines the stock of fossil-fired power generation capacity in the United States within the context of climate change. At present, there are over 1,337 fossil-fired power generating units of at least 100 MW in capacity, that began operating between the early 1940s and today. Together these units provide some 453 GW of electric power. Launching a national program to accelerate the early retirement of this stock or tearing them down and undertaking near-term brownfield redevelopment with advanced power cycle technologies as a means of addressing their greenhouse gas emissions will not be a sensible option for all of these units. Considering a conservative 40-year operating life, there are over 667 existing fossil-fired power plants, representing a capacity of over 291 GW, that have at least a decades worth of productive life remaining. This paper draws upon specialized tools developed by Battelle to analyze the characteristics of this subset of U.S. power generation assets and explore the relationships between plant type, location, emissions, and vintage. It examines the use of retrofit carbon capture technologies, considering criteria such as the proximity of these power plants to geologic reservoirs, to assess the potential that geologic sequestration of CO2 offers these plants for managing their emissions. The average costs for retrofitting these plants and sequestering their CO2 into nearby geologic reservoirs are presented. A discussion of a set of planned U.S. fossil-fired power projects within this context is also included.

Dahowski, Robert T.; Dooley, James J.

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Charges, Costs and Market Power in the Deregulated UK Electricity Retail Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7 July 2010 For Immediate Release: UC Berkeley Study Touts Economic Benefits of a Feed-In Tariff examining the economic benefits of a comprehensive Feed-In Tariff (FIT). The analysis shows that enacting price, long-term contract for a utility to buy electricity produced by renewable energy generators

Feigon, Brooke

425

Analysis of FERC's Final EIS for Electricity Open Access & Recovery of Stranded Costs  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Reviews the Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) prepared by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission for its electricity transmission system open access prepared in April 1996 and uses the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) to analyze the open access rule (Orders 888 and 889).

Robert T. Eynon

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Reducing Electricity and Network Cost for Online Service Providers in Geographically Located Internet Data Centers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Online service providers(OSPs) have Internet data centers (IDCs) in multiple geographical locations in order to satisfy global user demand. Increased data centers consume a large amount of energy, and at the same time cause increased heat dissipation, ... Keywords: Internet data centers, green computing, electricity market, load dispatching, energy proportional

Xinying Zheng; Yu Cai

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Energy Management Framework Designed for Autonomous Electric Vehicle with Sensor Networks Navigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cyber-physical systems (CPS) have emerged as a cutting edge technology for next-generation industrial applications, and are undergoing rapid development and inspiring numerous application domains. This article presents an innovative CPS application for ... Keywords: cyber-physical systems, wireless sensor networks, energy management, energy-efficient design, autonomous electric vehicle

Hui Suo, Jiafu Wan, Di Li, Caifeng Zou

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Implementation of relaxed ACID properties for distributed load management in the electrical power industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The consistency of data in central databases is normally implemented by using the ACID (Atomicity, Consistency, Isolation and Durability) properties of a DBMS (Data Base Management System). Distributed databases with high performance and availability ... Keywords: ACID properties, automatic process control, distributed systems, electrical power industry, relaxed atomicity property, smart grid conceptual model

Lars Frank; Rasmus Ulslev Pedersen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Derivatives and Risk Management in the Petroleum, Natural Gas, and Electricity Industries  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

In February 2002 the Secretary of Energy directed the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to prepare a report on the nature and use of derivative contracts in the petroleum, natural gas, and electricity industries. Derivatives are contracts ('financial instruments') that are used to manage risk, especially price risk.

Information Center

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Power management of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles using neural network based trip modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV), utilizing more battery power, has become a next-generation HEV with great promise of higher fuel economy. Global optimization charge-depletion power management would be desirable. This has so far been hampered ...

Qiuming Gong; Yaoyu Li; Zhongren Peng

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Gas turbine electric plant construction cost and annual production expenses. First annual publication, 1972  

SciTech Connect

By the end of 1972, gas turbine power plants owned and operated by U.S. utilities had a capacity of 27,918 MW. Data from the 1972 annual reports filed with the Federal Power Commission by utility systems are presented which show the plant cost, generating expenses, capacity and generation, and plant and equipment characteristics of 299 gas turbine plants. (LCL)

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Bulk Electricity Generating Technologies This appendix describes the technical characteristics and cost and performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

foundations complete Start of boiler steel erection to commercial operation Time to complete (single unit factor of 1.10. May 2005 I-10 #12;petrochemical industry for processing of coal and petroleum residues the North American power generation industry. This is attributable to the availability of low- cost natural

433

Modeling the performance and cost of lithium-ion batteries for electric-drive vehicles.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report details the Battery Performance and Cost model (BatPaC) developed at Argonne National Laboratory for lithium-ion battery packs used in automotive transportation. The model designs the battery for a specified power, energy, and type of vehicle battery. The cost of the designed battery is then calculated by accounting for every step in the lithium-ion battery manufacturing process. The assumed annual production level directly affects each process step. The total cost to the original equipment manufacturer calculated by the model includes the materials, manufacturing, and warranty costs for a battery produced in the year 2020 (in 2010 US$). At the time this report is written, this calculation is the only publically available model that performs a bottom-up lithium-ion battery design and cost calculation. Both the model and the report have been publically peer-reviewed by battery experts assembled by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. This report and accompanying model include changes made in response to the comments received during the peer-review. The purpose of the report is to document the equations and assumptions from which the model has been created. A user of the model will be able to recreate the calculations and perhaps more importantly, understand the driving forces for the results. Instructions for use and an illustration of model results are also presented. Almost every variable in the calculation may be changed by the user to represent a system different from the default values pre-entered into the program. The distinct advantage of using a bottom-up cost and design model is that the entire power-to-energy space may be traversed to examine the correlation between performance and cost. The BatPaC model accounts for the physical limitations of the electrochemical processes within the battery. Thus, unrealistic designs are penalized in energy density and cost, unlike cost models based on linear extrapolations. Additionally, the consequences on cost and energy density from changes in cell capacity, parallel cell groups, and manufacturing capabilities are easily assessed with the model. New proposed materials may also be examined to translate bench-scale values to the design of full-scale battery packs providing realistic energy densities and prices to the original equipment manufacturer. The model will be openly distributed to the public in the year 2011. Currently, the calculations are based in a Microsoft{reg_sign} Office Excel spreadsheet. Instructions are provided for use; however, the format is admittedly not user-friendly. A parallel development effort has created an alternate version based on a graphical user-interface that will be more intuitive to some users. The version that is more user-friendly should allow for wider adoption of the model.

Nelson, P. A.

2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

434

Life-cycle cost comparisons of advanced storage batteries and fuel cells for utility, stand-alone, and electric vehicle applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents a comparison of battery and fuel cell economics for ten different technologies. To develop an equitable economic comparison, the technologies were evaluated on a life-cycle cost (LCC) basis. The LCC comparison involved normalizing source estimates to a standard set of assumptions and preparing a lifetime cost scenario for each technology, including the initial capital cost, replacement costs, operating and maintenance (O M) costs, auxiliary energy costs, costs due to system inefficiencies, the cost of energy stored, and salvage costs or credits. By considering all the costs associated with each technology over its respective lifetime, the technology that is most economical to operate over any given period of time can be determined. An analysis of this type indicates whether paying a high initial capital cost for a technology with low O M costs is more or less economical on a lifetime basis than purchasing a technology with a low initial capital cost and high O M costs. It is important to realize that while minimizing cost is important, the customer will not always purchase the least expensive technology. The customer may identify benefits associated with a more expensive option that make it the more attractive over all (e.g., reduced construction lead times, modularity, environmental benefits, spinning reserve, etc.). The LCC estimates presented in this report represent three end-use applications: utility load-leveling, stand-alone power systems, and electric vehicles.

Humphreys, K.K.; Brown, D.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

16.2 - Performance Evaluation and Measurement Plans for Cost-Reimbursement, Non-Management and Operating Contracts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chapter 16.2 (July 2012) Chapter 16.2 (July 2012) 1 Performance Evaluation and Measurement Plans for Cost-Reimbursement, Non- Management and Operating Contracts [Reference: FAR 6, FAR 16, FAR 22, FAR 32, FAR 46, DEAR 915.404-4-72, DEAR 916.405-2, DEAR 970.1504-1, and Acquisition Guide Chapter 16.1] Overview The policy of the DOE is to maximize contractor performance and to align costs with performance through the use of performance-based management as a strategic contract management tool to plan for, manage, and evaluate contractor performance. An important function of contract administration is the ability, or the opportunity, to manage the environment within which the contracted effort is proceeding and, most importantly, to facilitate adjustments to that effort to meet the demand and changes as

436

Impact on the steam electric power industry of deleting Section 316(a) of the Clean Water Act: Capital costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many power plants discharge large volumes of cooling water. In some cases, the temperature of the discharge exceeds state thermal requirements. Section 316(a) of the Clean Water Act (CWA) allows a thermal discharger to demonstrate that less stringent thermal effluent limitations would still protect aquatic life. About 32% of total US steam electric generating capacity operates under Section 316(a) variances. In 1991, the US Senate proposed legislation that would delete Section 316(a) from the CWA. This study, presented in two companion reports, examines how this legislation would affect the steam electric power industry. This report describes alternatives available to nuclear and coal-fired plants currently operating under variances. Data from 38 plants representing 14 companies are used to estimate the national cost of implementing such alternatives. Although there are other alternatives, most affected plants would be retrofitted with cooling towers. Assuming that all plants currently operating under variances would install cooling towers, the national capital cost estimate for these retrofits ranges from $22.7 billion to $24.4 billion (in 1992 dollars). The second report quantitatively and qualitatively evaluates the energy and environmental impacts of deleting the variance. Little justification has been found for removing the Section 316(a) variance from the CWA.

Veil, J.A.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Modelling Dynamic Constraints in Electricity Markets and the Costs of Uncertain Wind Output  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

III that we sub- sume supply technologies in different groups. To be more precise, we distinguish 16 supply technology groups (nuclear, three lignite, four hard coal, two combined cycle gas turbine, three open cycle gas turbine, two oil... shifts between periods. Finally, higher variable costs, incurred if power stations are operated below their optimal rating, are allocated to the locally lowest de- mand. For inflexible power stations like nuclear, combined cycle gas turbines or coal...

Musgens, Felix; Neuhoff, Karsten

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

438

Public agency cost savings from standardizing energy management temperature control systems  

SciTech Connect

In 1992, the city of Phoenix, AZ, standardized its energy management temperature control systems (EMTCS) in the construction of a 5-year series of projects that included a new library, city hall, renovated art museum, a museum of science and technology, a parking garage, and a rebuilt municipal building. This article presents an evaluation of the city`s philosophy for the standardization of EMTCS equipment, the issue of interconnectibility, and development and procurement guidance. Our research indicates that the perception that front-end costs increase when EMTCS work is not bid competitively is exaggerated. We also found that it is easier for private businesses to make sole source procurement decisions than it is for governments, because businesses are not constrained by laws that require awarding contracts to the lowest bidder. 1 tab.

Mayo, R.E.; Badger, W.W.; Bashford, H.H.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Comparison of costs for solar electric sources with diesel generators in remote locations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-6900, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. E-mail: robock@envsci.rutgers.edu Published by AAAS onJanuary30,2010www cannot be confined to one location. Furthermore, weather and climate variability preclude observation production on a large scale. We use the term "geoengineering" to refer to solar radiation management (SRM

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

440

Electric power monthly, April 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Monthly is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

Not Available

1993-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manage electricity costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Electric power monthly, May 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

Not Available

1993-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

442

Risk information in support of cost estimates for the Baseline Environmental Management Report (BEMR). Section 1  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL)(1) effort on the overall Baseline Environmental Management Report (BEMR) project consists of four installation-specific work components performed in succession. These components include (1) development of source terms, 92) collection of data and preparation of environmental settings reports, (3) calculation of unit risk factors, and (4) utilization of the unit risk factors in Automated Remedial Action Methodology (ARAM) for computation of target concentrations and cost estimates. This report documents work completed for the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, for components 2 and 3. The product of this phase of the BEMR project is the development of unit factors (i.e., unit transport factors, unit exposure factors, and unit risk factors). Thousands of these unit factors are gene rated and fill approximately one megabyte of computer information per installation. The final unit risk factors (URF) are transmitted electronically to BEMR-Cost task personnel as input to a computer program (ARAM). Abstracted files and exhibits of the URF information are included in this report. These visual formats are intended to provide a sample of the final task deliverable (the URF files) which can be easily read without a computer.

Gelston, G.M.; Jarvis, M.F.; Warren, B.R. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Von Berg, R. [ICF Kaiser Engineers, Inc., Oakland, CA (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

paper CO2 Regulations and Electricity Prices: Cost Estimates for Coal-Fired Power Plants. We thank  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For fossil fuel power plants to be built in the future, carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies offer the potential for significant reductions in CO2 emissions. We examine the break-even value for CCS adoptions, that is, the critical value in the charge for CO2 emissions that would justify investment in CCS capabilities. Our analysis takes explicitly into account that the supply of electricity at the wholesale level (generation) is organized competitively in some U.S. jurisdictions, while in others a regulated utility provides integrated generation and distribution services. For either market structure, we find that emissions charges in the range of $25-$30 per tonne of CO2 would be the break-even value for adopting CCS capabilities at new coal-fired power plants. The corresponding break-even values for natural gas plants are substantially higher, near $60 per tonne. Our break-even estimates serve as a basis for projecting the change in electricity prices once carbon emissions become costly. CCS capabilities effectively put an upper bound on the rise in electricity prices. We estimate this bound to be near 30 % at the retail level for both coal and natural gas plants. In contrast to the competitive power supply scenario, however, these price increases materialize only gradually for a regulated utility. The delay in price adjustments reflects that for regulated

Stefan Reichelstein; Erica Plambeck

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Safe, Cost Effective Management of Inactive Facilities at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site is part of the U.S. Department of Energy complex. It was constructed during the early 1950s to produce basic materials (such as plutonium-239 and tritium) used in the production of nuclear weapons. The 310-square-mile site is located in South Carolina, about 12 miles south of Aiken, South Carolina, and about 15 miles southeast of Augusta, Georgia. Savannah River Site (SRS) has approximately 200 facilities identified as inactive. These facilities range in size and complexity from large nuclear reactors to small storage buildings. These facilities are located throughout the site including three reactor areas, the heavy water plant area, the manufacturing area, and other research and support areas. Unlike DOE Closure Sites such as Hanford and Rocky Flats, SRS is a Project Completion Site with continuing missions. As facilities complete their defined mission, they are shutdown and transferred from operations to the facility disposition program. At the SRS, Facilities Decontamination and Decommissioning (FDD) personnel manage the disposition phase of a inactive facility's life cycle in a manner that minimizes life cycle cost without compromising (1) the health or safety of workers and the public or (2) the quality of the environment. The disposition phase begins upon completion of operations shutdown and extends through establishing the final end-state. FDD has developed innovative programs to manage their responsibilities within a constrained budget.

Austin, W. E.; Yannitell, D. M.; Freeman, D. W.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

445

The mixed waste management facility: Cost-benefit for the Mixed Waste Management Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Mixed Waste Management Facility, or MWMF, has been proposed as a national testbed facility for the demonstration and evaluation of technologies that are alternatives to incineration for the treatment of mixed low-level waste. The facility design will enable evaluation of technologies at pilot scale, including all aspects of the processes, from receiving and feed preparation to the preparation of final forms for disposal. The MWMF will reduce the risk of deploying such technologies by addressing the following: (1) Engineering development and scale-up. (2) Process integration and activation of the treatment systems. (3) Permitting and stakeholder issues. In light of the severe financial constraints imposed on the DOE and federal programs, DOE/HQ requested a study to assess the cost benefit for the MWMF given other potential alternatives to meet waste treatment needs. The MVVMF Project was asked to consider alternatives specifically associated with commercialization and privatization of the DOE site waste treatment operations and the acceptability (or lack of acceptability) of incineration as a waste treatment process. The result of this study will be one of the key elements for a DOE decision on proceeding with the MWMF into Final Design (KD-2) vs. proceeding with other options.

Brinker, S.D.; Streit, R.D.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

A Review of Recent RTO Benefit-Cost Studies: Toward More Comprehensive Assessments of FERC Electricity Restructuring Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

assessment of the electricity industrys evolution. To aidsome aspects of electricity industry restructuring throughbegan restructuring the U.S. electricity industry in 1996 by

Eto, Joseph H.; Lesieutre, Bernard C.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Vehicle Assembly Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

management system, using sub- metering, achieved over a 5%Ross, 1989). Although sub-metering is usually very costly towith metering in mind, sub-metering costs very little. The

Galitsky, Christina

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy is the most important cost factor in the U.S petrochemical industry, defined in this guide as the chemical industry sectors producing large volume basic and intermediate organic chemicals as well as large volume plastics. The sector spent about $10 billion on fuels and electricity in 2004. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. petrochemical industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, facility, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the petrochemical industry is provided along with a description of the major process technologies used within the industry. Next, a wide variety of energy efficiency measures are described. Many measure descriptions include expected savings in energy and energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-world applications in the petrochemical and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. petrochemical industry reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of all measures--and on their applicability to different production practices--is needed to assess their cost effectiveness at individual plants.

Neelis, Maarten; Worrell, Ernst; Masanet, Eric

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Electric power monthly  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Monthly is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, cost of fuel, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fuel are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Additionally, statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, new generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fuel.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Advanced Batteries for Electric-Drive Vehicles: A Technology and Cost-Effectiveness Assessment for Battery Electric Vehicles, Power Assist Hybrid Electric Vehicles, and Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Availability of affordable advanced battery technology is a crucial challenge to the growth of the electric-drive vehicle (EDV) market. This study assesses the state of advanced battery technology for EDVs, which include battery electric vehicles (BEVs), power assist hybrid electric vehicles (HEV 0s -- hybrids without electric driving range), plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), and fuel cell vehicles. The first part of this study presents assessments of current battery performance and cycle life ca...

2004-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

451

PAFC Cost Challenges  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PAFC Cost Challenges Sridhar Kanuri Manager, PAFC Technology *Sridhar.Kanuri@utcpower.com 2 AGENDA Purecell 400 cost challenge Cost reduction opportunities Summary 3 PURECELL ...

452

Management of Riparian Areas on Electric Transmission Line Rights-of-Way  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric transmission line rights-of-way (ROWs) commonly cross streams, rivers, ponds, and lakes. Plant communities along the edges of these water resources are important because of their role in soil conservation and habitat diversity as well as the influence they have on fauna and aquatic ecosystems. The area of vegetation affected by the water-based habitatand that in turn affects the wateris the riparian area. This report provides guidance on the definition and management considerations for riparian ...

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

453

Cost-effectiveness of multidisciplinary management of Tinnitus at a specialized Tinnitus centre  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) will be quantified using the cost-effectiveness acceptability curve. Sensitivity analyses will be used to show the impact of variation in non-stochastic input parameters on the incremental cost- utility ratio, such as discount rate, unit prices, and design issues... using integral cost calcu- lations. Costs from productivity loss will be quantified using the friction cost method, as recommended in the Netherlands [28]. Ethical considerations Patients will be informed verbally and in written format about the research...

Cima, Rilana; Joore, Manuela; Maes, Iris; Scheyen, Dyon; El Refaie, Amr El; Baguley, David M; Vlaeyen, Johan W S; Anteunis, Lucien

2009-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

454

Cost Effective, High Efficiency Integrated Systems Approach to Auxilliary Electric Motors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The CARAT program, carried out by Kinetic Art & Technology Corporation (KAT), has been one of the most commercially successful KAT R&D programs to date. Based on previous development of its technology, KAT designed, constructed and tested a highly efficient motor and controller system under this CARAT program with supplemental commercial funding. Throughout this CARAT effort, the technical objectives have been refined and refocused. Some objectives have been greatly expanded, while others have been minimized. The determining factor in all decisions to refocus the objectives was the commercial need, primarily the needs of KAT manufacturing partners. Several companies are employing the resulting CARAT motor and controller designs in prototypes for commercial products. Two of these companies have committed to providing cost share in order to facilitate the development. One of these companies is a major manufacturing company developing a revolutionary new family of products requiring the ultra-high system efficiency achievable by the KAT motor and controller technologies (known as Segmented ElectroMagnetic Array, or SEMA technology). Another company requires the high efficiency, quiet operation, and control characteristics afforded by the same basic motor and controller for an advanced air filtration product. The combined annual production requirement projected by these two companies exceeds one million units by 2005.

Roy Kessinger Jr.; Keith Seymour; Kanchan Angal; Jason Wolf; Steve Brewer; Leonard Schrank

2003-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

455

Hybrid electrical energy storage systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrical energy is a high quality form of energy that can be easily converted to other forms of energy with high efficiency and, even more importantly, it can be used to control lower grades of energy quality with ease. However, building a cost-effective ... Keywords: charge, electrical storage, energy, energy storage, hybrid storage, management

Massoud Pedram; Naehyuck Chang; Younghyun Kim; Yanzhi Wang

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Electric  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Average Retail Price of Electricity to ... Period Residential Commercial Industrial ... or usage falling within specified limits by rate ...

457

Electric and Hybrid Vehicle System Research and Development Project: Hybrid Vehicle Potential Assessment. Volume VI. Cost analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the cost analysis is to determine the economic feasibility of a variety of hybrid vehicles with respect to conventional vehicles specifically designed for the same duty cycle defined by the mission analysis. Several different hybrid configurations including parallel, parallel-flywheel, and series vehicles were evaluated. The ramifications of incorporating examples of advanced batteries, these being the advanced lead-acid, nickel-zinc, and sodium sulfur were also investigated. Vehicles were specifically designed with these batteries and for the driving cycles specified by the mission. Simulated operation on the missions yielded the energy consumption (petroleum and/or electricity) over the driving cycles. It was concluded that: in the event that gasoline prices reach $2.50 to $3.00/gal, hybrid vehicles in many applications will become economically competitive with conventional vehicles without subsidization; in some commercial applications hybrid vehicles could be economically competitive, when the gasoline price ranges from $1.20 to $1.50/gal. The cost per kWh per cycle of the advanced batteries is much more important economically than the specific energy; the series hybrid vehicles were found to be more expensive in comparison to the parallel or parallel-flywheel hybrids when designed as passenger vehicles; and hybrid vehicles designed for private use could become economically competitive and displace up to 50% of the fuel normally used on that mission if subsidies of $500 to $2000 were supplied to the owner/operator. (LCL)

Hardy, K.S.

1979-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

458

Use of SNMP in the Management of Electrical Energy Measuring Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The conventional measuring systems face imprecision and inefficient problems. Imprecision because measurements done by a human being can be imperfect. Inefficient because it's difficult to control a whole complex net like the electrical energy distribution only with a large group of people. The automatic measuring systems are an alternative to the conventional systems as a way to provide a better quality of service. So it's necessary an effective management on the measuring net components. Aspects like prevention of failures in devices until consumption readings are considered in the choice of a management protocol. SNMP is an efficient and simple alternative and its use in SALAME system (Electrical Energy Remote Measuring System) validates this subject. We show the facility of the information treatment like polling of the devices, control of communication errors, remote control of the devices and information to the consumers in the management station of SALAME system with the use of SNMP. In this article we accentuate the facility and importance of this subject to the remote measuring system management and its implementation in a real system.

Gustavo Wagner Diniz; Gustavo Wagner; Diniz Mendes; Hugo Raniere; Di Assuno Brasilino; Pedro Sergio Nicoletti; Luis Reyes Rosales

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Minimizing Energy Costs Through Water Management in the Pulp and Paper Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The quantity of steam required by a pulp and paper mill, as well as the quantity of power generated can effectively be optimized by managing the water cycles in the mill. This approach addresses the process systems within the mill and investigates the unit operations associated with the systems to optimize them. A byproduct of any water reduction program is a reduction in the steam use of the mill. Invariably, this results in an imbalance in the steam distribution, which can require rebalancing the turbogenerators. Process simulation is used to execute the heat and mass balances required at all stages of the analysis. The result is a rapid analysis that pinpoints deficient unit operations and offers a capital spending plan that outlines the necessary process changes. The usual result is a better process with less waste and pollution, improved yield, increased capacity, lower operating costs and reduced energy demands. A case study is presented: a 1990 study that significantly decreases waster usage and allowed additional pulp production while reducing total stream generation and increasing power production.

Wilson, P. H.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry--defined in this Energy Guide as facilities engaged in the canning, freezing, and drying or dehydrating of fruits and vegetables--consumes over $800 million worth of purchased fuels and electricity per year. Energy efficiency improvement isan important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, facility, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry is provided along with a description of the major process technologies used within the industry. Next, a wide variety of energy efficiency measures applicable to fruit and vegetable processing plants are described. Many measure descriptions include expected savings in energy and energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-world applications in fruit and vegetable processing facilities and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. Given the importance of water in fruit and vegetable processing, a summary of basic, proven measures for improving plant-level water efficiency are also provided. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry reduce energy and water consumption in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of all measures--as well as on their applicability to different production practices--is needed to assess their cost effectiveness at individual plants.

Masanet, Eric; Masanet, Eric; Worrell, Ernst; Graus, Wina; Galitsky, Christina

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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461

Cost Effectiveness of Cleaning Techniques for Controlling Human-based Transport of Invasive Exotic Plants on Electric Transmission Line Rights-of-Way  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technical Update provides a broad overview of accomplishments over the first full year of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) project to investigate the cost effectiveness of cleaning techniques to control human-based transport of invasive exotic plants on electric transmission line rights-of-way. One-half of the intended field work for the whole project (2012-2015) was completed, with attendant greenhouse and office work ongoing. EPRI expects the project to be completed in ...

2013-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

462

Cost Effectiveness of Cleaning Techniques for Controlling Human-based Transport of Invasive Exotic Plants on Electric Transmission L ine Rights-of-Way  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a broad overview of accomplishments over the first 3 months of a project to define the cost effectiveness of cleaning techniques on electric transmission rights of way aimed at controlling the spread of invasive exotic (IE) vegetation. It includes the results of a brief literature search of cleaning techniques.BackgroundA science basis for process and procedure to cost effectively clean personnel and equipment so as to reduce the ...

2012-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

463

How green was my electricity? : designing incentives to co-optimize waste management and energy development in New England  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste management is a complex issue, often out of sight and mind, but with the potential for significant negative environmental, social, and economic impacts. Electricity resource planning is equally complex and can ...

Larsen, Walker (Walker Andrew)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Electricity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Electricity is an essential part of modern life. The Energy Department is working to create technology solutions that will reduce our energy use and save Americans money.

465

A Review of Recent RTO Benefit-Cost Studies: Toward More Comprehensive Assessments of FERC Electricity Restructuring Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

flow of electricity, possibly restricting desired trade. (freedom to trade, consumers would want more electricity, andelectricity industry restructuring, short-term wholesale trades

Eto, Joseph H.; Lesieutre, Bernard C.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

A Review of Recent RTO Benefit-Cost Studies: Toward More Comprehensive Assessments of FERC Electricity Restructuring Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

efficiency and availability, and transmission capability).O&C costs) and availability. Transmission capability,O&C costs) and availability. Transmission capability,

Eto, Joseph H.; Lesieutre, Bernard C.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z