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1

Epimorphin Functions as a Key Morphoregulator for Mammary Epithelial Cells  

SciTech Connect

Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and EGF have been reported to promote branching morphogenesis of mammary epithelial cells. We now show that it is epimorphin that is primarily responsible for this phenomenon. In vivo, epimorphin was detected in the stromal compartment but not in lumenal epithelial cells of the mammary gland; in culture, however, a subpopulation of mammary epithelial cells produced significant amounts of epimorphin. When epimorphin-expressing epithelial cell clones were cultured in collagen gels they displayed branching morphogenesis in the presence of HGF, EGF, keratinocyte growth factor, or fibroblast growth factor, a process that was inhibited by anti-epimorphin but not anti-HGF antibodies. The branch length, however, was roughly proportional to the ability of the factors to induce growth. Accordingly, epimorphin-negative epithelial cells simply grew in a cluster in response to the growth factors and failed to branch. When recombinant epimorphin was added to these collagen gels, epimorphin-negative cells underwent branching morphogenesis. The mode of action of epimorphin on morphogenesis of the gland, however, was dependent on how it was presented to the mammary cells. If epimorphin was overexpressed in epimorphin-negative epithelial cells under regulation of an inducible promoter or was allowed to coat the surface of each epithelial cell in a nonpolar fashion, the cells formed globular, alveoli-like structures with a large central lumen instead of branching ducts. This process was enhanced also by addition of HGF, EGF, or other growth factors and was inhibited by epimorphin antibodies. These results suggest that epimorphin is the primary morphogen in the mammary gland but that growth factors are necessary to achieve the appropriate cell numbers for the resulting morphogenesis to be visualized.

Hirai, H.; Lochter, A.; Galosy, S.; Koshida, S.; Niwa, S.; Bissell, M.J.

1997-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

2

The interplay of matrix metalloproteinases, morphogens and growth factors is necessary for branching of mammary epithelial cells  

SciTech Connect

The mammary gland develops its adult form by a process referred to as branching morphogenesis. Many factors have been reported to affect this process. We have used cultured primary mammary epithelial organoids and mammary epithelial cell lines in three-dimensional collagen gels to elucidate which growth factors, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and mammary morphogens interact in branching morphogenesis. Branching stimulated by stromal fibroblasts, epidermal growth factor, fibroblast growth factor 7, fibroblast growth factor 2 and hepatocyte growth factor was strongly reduced by inhibitors of MMPs, indicating the requirement of MMPs for three-dimensional growth involved in morphogenesis. Recombinant stromelysin 1/MMP-3 alone was sufficient to drive branching in the absence of growth factors in the organoids. Plasmin also stimulated branching; however, plasmin-dependent branching was abolished by both inhibitors of plasmin and MMPs, suggesting that plasmin activates MMPs. To differentiate between signals for proliferation and morphogenesis, we used a cloned mammary epithelial cell line that lacks epimorphin, an essential mammary morphogen. Both epimorphin and MMPs were required for morphogenesis, but neither was required for epithelial cell proliferation. These results provide direct evidence for a critical role of MMPs in branching in mammary epithelium and suggest that, in addition to epimorphin, MMP activity is a minimum requirement for branching morphogenesis in the mammary gland.

Simian, M.; Harail, Y.; Navre, M.; Werb, Z.; Lochter, A.; Bissell, M.J.

2002-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

3

Suppression of ICE and Apoptosis in Mammary Epithelial Cells by Extracellular Matrix  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Suppression of ICE and Apoptosis in Mammary Epithelial Cellsmodulate the expression of ICE remain to be elucidated, asdo the in vivo substrates for ICE or related enzymes and the

Boudreau, Nancy

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Proliferation of Estrogen Receptor alpha Positive Mammary Epithelial Cells is Restrained by TGFbeta1 in Adult Mice  

SciTech Connect

Transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF{beta}1) is a potent inhibitor of mammary epithelial proliferation. In human breast, estrogen receptor {alpha} (ER{alpha}) cells rarely co-localize with markers of proliferation, but their increased frequency correlates with breast cancer risk. To determine whether TGF{beta}1 is necessary for the quiescence of ER{alpha}-positive population, we examined mouse mammary epithelial gland at estrus. Approximately 35% of cells showed TGF{beta}1 activation, which co-localized with nuclear receptor-phosphorylated Smad 2/3, indicating that TGF{beta} signaling is autocrine. Furthermore, nuclear Smad co-localized with nuclear ER{alpha}. To test whether TGF{beta} was functional, we examined genetically engineered mice with different levels of TGF{beta}1. ER{alpha} co-localization with markers of proliferation (i.e. Ki-67 or BrdU) at estrus was significantly increased in the mammary glands of Tgf{beta}1 C57/bl/129SV heterozygote mice. This relationship was maintained following pregnancy, but was absent at puberty. Conversely, mammary epithelial expression of constitutively active TGF{beta}1 via the MMTV promoter suppressed proliferation of ER{alpha} positive cells. Thus, TGF{beta}1 activation functionally restrains ER{alpha} positive cells from proliferating in adult mammary gland. Accordingly, we propose that TGF{beta}1 dysregulation may promote proliferation of ER{alpha} positive cells associated with breast cancer risk in humans.

Ewan, Kenneth B.R.; Oketch-Rabah, Hellen A.; Ravani, Shraddha A.; Shyamala, G.; Moses, Harold L.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

2005-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

5

GLUCOSE METABOLITE PATTERNS AS MARKERS OF FUNCTIONAL DIFFERENTIATION IN FRESHLY ISOLATED AND CULTURED MOUSE MAMMARY EPITHELIAL CELLS  

SciTech Connect

In the mammary gland of nonruminant animals, glucose is utilized in a characteristic and unique way during lactation. We have measured the incorporation of glucose carbon from [U-{sup 14}C] glucose into intermediary metabolites and metabolic products in mammary epithelial cells from virgin, pregnant, and lactating mice and demonstrate that glucose metabolite patterns can be used to recognize stages of differentiated function. For these cells, the rates of synthesis of glycogen and lactose, the ratio of lactate to alanine, and the ratio of citrate to malate were important parameters in identifying the degree of expression of differentiation. We further show that these patterns can be used as markers to determine the differentiated state of cultured mammary epithelial cells. Cells maintained on plastic substrates lose their distinctive glucose metabolite patterns while those on floating collagen gels do not. Cells from pregnant mice have a pattern similar to freshly isolated cells from pregnant mice. The pattern of cells from lactating mice is different from that of the cells of origin, and resembles that of the cells from pregnant mice. Our findings suggest that the floating collagen gels under the culture conditions used in these experiments provide an environment for the functional expression of the pregnant state, while additional factors are needed for the expression of the lactating state.

Emerman, J.T.; Bartley, J.C.; Bissell, M.J.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Stepwise DNA Methylation Changes Are Linked to Escape from Defined Proliferation Barriers and Mammary Epithelial Cell Immortalization  

SciTech Connect

The timing and progression of DNA methylation changes during carcinogenesis are not completely understood. To develop a timeline of aberrant DNA methylation events during malignant transformation, we analyzed genome-wide DNA methylation patterns in an isogenic human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) culture model of transformation. To acquire immortality and malignancy, the cultured finite lifespan HMEC must overcome two distinct proliferation barriers. The first barrier, stasis, is mediated by the retinoblastoma protein and can be overcome by loss of p16(INK4A) expression. HMEC that escape stasis and continue to proliferate become genomically unstable before encountering a second more stringent proliferation barrier, telomere dysfunction due to telomere attrition. Rare cells that acquire telomerase expression may escape this barrier, become immortal, and develop further malignant properties. Our analysis of HMEC transitioning from finite lifespan to malignantly transformed showed that aberrant DNA methylation changes occur in a stepwise fashion early in the transformation process. The first aberrant DNA methylation step coincides with overcoming stasis, and results in few to hundreds of changes, depending on how stasis was overcome. A second step coincides with immortalization and results in hundreds of additional DNA methylation changes regardless of the immortalization pathway. A majority of these DNA methylation changes are also found in malignant breast cancer cells. These results show that large-scale epigenetic remodeling occurs in the earliest steps of mammary carcinogenesis, temporally links DNA methylation changes and overcoming cellular proliferation barriers, and provides a bank of potential epigenetic biomarkers that mayprove useful in breast cancer risk assessment.

Novak, Petr; Jensen, Taylor J.; Garbe, James C.; Stampfer, Martha R.; Futscher, Bernard W.

2009-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

7

EGF-Receptor-Mediated Mammary Epithelial Cell Migration is Driven by Sustained ERK Signaling from Autocrine Stimulation  

SciTech Connect

Aberrant expression of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor family ligands, as well as the receptors themselves, has been implicated in various types of cancers. EGF family ligands are synthesized as membrane-anchored proteins requiring proteolytic release to form the mature soluble factor. Despite the pathophysiological importance of autocrine systems, how the rate of protease-mediated ligand release quantitatively influences receptor-mediated signaling and consequent cell behavior is poorly understood. Therefore, we explored the relationship between autocrine EGF release rates and receptor-mediated ERK activation and migration in human mammary epithelial cells. A quantitative spectrum of EGF release rates was achieved using a set of chimeric transmembrane EGF ligand precursors modulated by the addition of the metalloprotease inhibitor batimastat. We found that ERK activation increased with increasing ligand release rates despite concomitant EGF receptor downregulation. Cell migration speed depended linearly on the steady-state phospho-ERK level obtained from either autocrine or exogenous ligand, but was much greater at any given phospho-ERK level for autocrine compared to exogenous stimulation. In contrast, cell proliferation rates were relatively constant across the various treatment conditions. Thus, in these cells, ERK-mediated migration stimulated by EGF receptor signaling is most sensitively regulated by autocrine ligand control mechanisms.

Joslin, Elizabeth J.; Opresko, Lee; Wells, Alan; Wiley, H. S.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

8

4-Hydroxyestradiol induces oxidative stress and apoptosis in human mammary epithelial cells: possible protection by NF-{kappa}B and ERK/MAPK  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Catechol estrogens, the hydroxylated metabolites of 17{beta}-estradiol (E{sub 2}), have been considered to be implicated in estrogen-induced carcinogenesis. 4-Hydroxyestradiol (4-OHE{sub 2}), an oxidized metabolite of E{sub 2} formed preferentially by cytochrome P450 1B1, reacts with DNA to form depurinating adducts thereby exerting genotoxicity and carcinogenicity. 4-OHE{sub 2} undergoes 2-electron oxidation to quinone via semiquinone, and during this process, reactive oxygen species (ROS) can be generated to cause DNA damage and cell death. In the present study, 4-OHE{sub 2} was found to elicit cytotoxicity in cultured human mammary epithelial (MCF-10A) cells, which was blocked by the antioxidant trolox. MCF-10A cells treated with 4-OHE{sub 2} exhibited increased intracellular ROS accumulation and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine formation, and underwent apoptosis as determined by poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase cleavage and disruption of mitochondrial transmembrane potential. The redox-sensitive transcription factor nuclear factor {kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) was transiently activated by 4-OHE{sub 2} treatment. Cotreatment of MCF-10A cells with the NF-{kappa}B inhibitor, L-1-tosylamido-2-phenylethyl chloromethyl ketone, exacerbated 4-OHE{sub 2}-induced cell death. 4-OHE{sub 2} also caused transient activation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases (ERK) involved in transmitting cell survival or death signals. A pharmacological inhibitor of ERK aggravated the 4-OHE{sub 2}-induced cytotoxicity, supporting the pivotal role of ERK in protecting against catechol estrogen-induced oxidative cell death.

Chen Zhihua [National Research Laboratory of Molecular Carcinogenesis and Chemoprevention, College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, Shinlim-dong, Kwanak-ku, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Na, Hye-Kyung [National Research Laboratory of Molecular Carcinogenesis and Chemoprevention, College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, Shinlim-dong, Kwanak-ku, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Hurh, Yeon-Jin [National Research Laboratory of Molecular Carcinogenesis and Chemoprevention, College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, Shinlim-dong, Kwanak-ku, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Surh, Young-Joon [National Research Laboratory of Molecular Carcinogenesis and Chemoprevention, College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, Shinlim-dong, Kwanak-ku, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: surh@plaza.snu.ac.kr

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Matrix Metalloproteinase Stromelysin-1 Triggers a Cascade of Molecular Alterations that leads to stable epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Conversion and a Premalignant Phenotype in Mammary Epithelial Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FIGURE 1 Effects of SL-1 on cell scattering, lactogenicgood candidates for mediating SL-1 effects, because laminin-that KGF is upregulated after SL-1 induction. KGF belongs to

Lochter, A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Persistence of gamma-H2AX and 53BP1 foci in proliferating and nonproliferating human mammary epithelial cells after exposure to gamma-rays or iron ions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To investigate {gamma}-H2AX (phosphorylated histone H2AX) and 53BP1 (tumour protein 53 binding protein No. 1) foci formation and removal in proliferating and non-proliferating human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) after exposure to sparsely and densely ionizing radiation under different cell culture conditions. HMEC cells were grown either as monolayers (2D) or in extracellular matrix to allow the formation of acinar structures in vitro (3D). Foci numbers were quantified by image analysis at various time points after exposure. Our results reveal that in non-proliferating cells under 2D and 3D cell culture conditions, iron-ion induced {gamma}-H2AX foci were still present at 72 h after exposure, although 53BP1 foci returned to control levels at 48 h. In contrast in proliferating HMEC, both {gamma}-H2AX and 53BP1 foci decreased to control levels during the 24-48 h time interval after irradiation under 2D conditions. Foci numbers decreased faster after {gamma}-ray irradiation and returned to control levels by 12 h regardless of marker, cell proliferation status, and cell culture condition. Conclusions: The disappearance of radiation induced {gamma}-H2AX and 53BP1 foci in HMEC have different dynamics that depend on radiation quality and proliferation status. Notably, the general patterns do not depend on the cell culture condition (2D versus 3D). We speculate that the persistent {gamma}-H2AX foci in iron-ion irradiated non-proliferating cells could be due to limited availability of double strand break (DSB) repair pathways in G0/G1-phase, or that repair of complex DSB requires replication or chromatin remodeling.

Groesser, Torsten; Chang, Hang; Fontenay, Gerald; Chen, James; Costes, Sylvain V.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Parvin, Bahram; Rydberg, Bjorn

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

11

Of Microenvironments and Mammary Stem Cells  

SciTech Connect

In most adult tissues there reside pools of stem and progenitor cells inside specialized microenvironments referred to as niches. The niche protects the stem cells from inappropriate expansion and directs their critical functions. Thus guided, stem cells are able to maintain tissue homeostasis throughout the ebb and flow of metabolic and physical demands encountered over a lifetime. Indeed, a pool of stem cells maintains mammary gland structure throughout development, and responds to the physiological demands associated with pregnancy. This review discusses how stem cells were identified in both human and mouse mammary glands; each requiring different techniques that were determined by differing biological needs and ethical constraints. These studies together create a robust portrait of mammary gland biology and identify the location of the stem cell niche, elucidate a developmental hierarchy, and suggest how the niche might be manipulated for therapeutic benefit.

LaBarge, Mark A; Petersen, Ole W; Bissell, Mina J

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

1 Integrin Deletion from the Basal Compartment of the Mammary Epithelium Affects Stem Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- 1386 (2002). 24. Matulka, L. A., Triplett, A. A., and Wagner, K. U. Parity-induced mammary epithelial

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

13

Misregulation of Stromelysin-1 in Mouse Mammary Tumor Cells Accompanies Acquisition of Stromelysin-1 dependent Invasive Properties  

SciTech Connect

Stromelysin-1 is a member of the metalloproteinase family of extracellular matrix-degrading enzymes that regulates tissue remodeling. We previously established a transgenic mouse model in which rat stromelysin-1 targeted to the mammary gland augmented expression of endogenous stromelysin-1, disrupted functional differentiation, and induced mammary tumors. A cell line generated from an adenocarcinoma in one of these animals and a previously described mammary tumor cell line generated in culture readily invaded both a reconstituted basement membrane and type I collagen gels, whereas a nonmalignant, functionally normal epithelial cell line did not. Invasion of Matrigel by tumor cells was largely abolished by metalloproteinase inhibitors, but not by inhibitors of other proteinase families. Inhibition experiments with antisense oligodeoxynucleotides revealed that Matrigel invasion of both cell lines was critically dependent on stromelysin-1 expression. Invasion of collagen, on the other hand, was reduced by only 40-50%. Stromelysin-1 was expressed in both malignant and nonmalignant cells grown on plastic substrata. Its expression was completely inhibited in nonmalignant cells, but up-regulated in tumor cells, in response to Matrigel. Thus misregulation of stromelysin-1 expression appears to be an important aspect of mammary tumor cell progression to an invasive phenotype. The matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of extracellular matrix (ECM)-degrading enzymes that have been implicated in a variety of normal developmental and pathological processes, including tumorigenesis. The MMP family comprises at least 15 members with different, albeit overlapping, substrate specificities. During activation of latent MMPs, their propeptides are cleaved and they are converted to a lower molecular weight form by other enzymes, including serine proteinases, and by autocatalytic cleavage. Among the MMPs, stromelysin-1 (SL1) possesses the broadest substrate specificity. Despite increasing knowledge about its enzymatic properties and the regulation of its expression, little is known about its function. We have generated transgenic animals that express an autoactivating mutant of rat SL1 targeted to the epithelial compartment of the mammary gland. Phenotypically, SL1 transgenic mice display increased branching morphogenesis and lactogenic differentiation at prepubertal stages and premature involution during late pregnancy. Branching morphogenesis requires the invasion of epithelial cells into the adipose tissue, a process reminiscent of invasion of stromal compartments by tumor cells. Strikingly, a large number of SL1 transgenic animals also develop mammary tumors of various histotypes, including invasive adenocarcinomas. Because tumor development is a late response of SL1 transgenic mice to overexpression of the transgene, it remains unclear whether SL1 plays a direct role in tumor growth and/or invasion or whether the observed tumors are a consequence of other molecular alterations in the microenvironment of the mammary gland before the onset of tumor growth. Studies performed with synthetic inhibitors of MMP activity and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) have shown that suppression of MMP activity also suppresses tumor growth and metastasis. In many cases, the level of SL1 expression in tumors of the mammary gland and other tissues is positively correlated with the degree of malignancy. However, the only direct evidence for the nature of the MMPs involved was provided by the demonstration that function-blocking antibodies against gelatinase A and antisense inhibition of matrilysin expression decreased the invasiveness of tumor cells in a reconstituted basement membrane assay. These studies encouraged us to investigate whether SL1 plays a direct role in invasion of ECM. We used two carcinoma cell lines, TCL1 and SCg6 that formed rapidly growing, invasive tumors in vivo and migrated through Matrigel and collagen gels in culture. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) against SL1 inhibited Matrigel invasion by TCL1 and SCg

Lochter, A.; Srebrow, A.; Sympson, C.J.; Terracio, N.; Werb, Z.; Bissell, M.J.

1997-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

14

Disrupted epithelial morphogenesis and aberrant lineage commitment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Disrupted epithelial morphogenesis and aberrant lineage commitment Disrupted epithelial morphogenesis and aberrant lineage commitment following radiation and TGFβ I. Fernandez-Garcia New York University School of Medicine Abstract In the present study, we evaluated cell lineage plasticity and its phenotypic effects in the non-malignant human mammary epithelial cell line MCF10A in response to ionizing radiation and TGFΒ. We have recently shown that the molecular profiles of mammary tumors and normal mammary gland from irradiated mice are distinct from those arising in unirradiated mice by virtue of enriched stem cell and progenitor markers. Consistent with this, we found that radiation (10-100 cGy) increases the mammary repopulation capacity in a functional and marker assays (Nguyen et al. Cancer Cell 2011). Some studies have shown that epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)

15

Analysis of mammary specific gene locus regulation in differentiated cells derived by somatic cell fusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The transcriptional regulation of a gene is best analysed in the context of its normal chromatin surroundings. However, most somatic cells, in contrast to embryonic stem cells, are refractory to accurate modification by homologous recombination. We show here that it is possible to introduce precise genomic modifications in ES cells and to analyse the phenotypic consequences in differentiated cells by using a combination of gene targeting, site-specific recombination and somatic cell fusion. To provide a proof of principle, we have analysed the regulation of the casein gene locus in mammary gland cells derived from modified murine ES cells by somatic cell fusion. A {beta}-galactosidase reporter gene was inserted in place of the {beta}-casein gene and the modified ES cells, which do not express the reporter gene, were fused with the mouse mammary gland cell line HC11. The resulting cell clones expressed the {beta}-galactosidase gene to a similar extent and with similar hormone responsiveness as the endogenous gene. However, a reporter gene under the control of a minimal {beta}-casein promoter (encompassing the two consensus STAT5 binding sites which mediate the hormone response of the casein genes) was unable to replicate expression levels or hormone responsiveness of the endogenous gene when inserted into the same site of the casein locus. As expected, these results implicate sequences other than the STAT5 sites in the regulation of the {beta}-casein gene.

Robinson, Claire [Molecular Recognition Group, Hannah Research Institute, Ayr KA6 5HL (United Kingdom); Kolb, Andreas F. [Molecular Recognition Group, Hannah Research Institute, Ayr KA6 5HL (United Kingdom)], E-mail: a.kolb@rowett.ac.uk

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: The Progeny of Irradiated Mammary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Progeny of Irradiated Mammary Epithelial Cells Exhibit a Phenotype Progeny of Irradiated Mammary Epithelial Cells Exhibit a Phenotype Characteristic of Malignancy Mary H. Barcellos-Hoff, R.L. Henshall-Powell, M.J. Bissell, and B. Parvin Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Life Sciences Division We have proposed that the ability of radiation to induce altered microenvironments affects the frequency and features of neoplastic progression. Thus, we have sought to characterize the irradiated microenvironment and determine how these events contribute to mammary carcinogenesis. By using imaging bioinformatics to analyze mouse and human models of breast cancer we have now examined cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) critical for tissue-specific organization and function. We found that 1) radiation-induced microenvironments can contribute to neoplastic potential

17

Human mammary progenitor cell fate decisions are products of interactions with combinatorial microenvironments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In adult tissues, multi-potent progenitor cells are some of the most primitive members of the developmental hierarchies that maintain homeostasis. That progenitors and their more mature progeny share identical genomes, suggests that fate decisions are directed by interactions with extrinsic soluble factors, ECM, and other cells, as well as physical properties of the ECM. To understand regulation of fate decisions, therefore, would require a means of understanding carefully choreographed combinatorial interactions. Here we used microenvironment protein microarrays to functionally identify combinations of cell-extrinsic mammary gland proteins and ECM molecules that imposed specific cell fates on bipotent human mammary progenitor cells. Micropatterned cell culture surfaces were fabricated to distinguish between the instructive effects of cell-cell versus cell-ECM interactions, as well as constellations of signaling molecules; and these were used in conjunction with physiologically relevant 3 dimensional human breast cultures. Both immortalized and primary human breast progenitors were analyzed. We report on the functional ability of those proteins of the mammary gland that maintain quiescence, maintain the progenitor state, and guide progenitor differentiation towards myoepithelial and luminal lineages.

LaBarge, Mark A; Nelson, Celeste M; Villadsen, Rene; Fridriksdottir, Agla; Ruth, Jason R; Stampfer, Martha R; Petersen, Ole W; Bissell, Mina J

2008-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

18

Disrupted epithelial morphogenesis and aberrant lineage commitment following radiation and TGFβ  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Disrupted epithelial morphogenesis and aberrant lineage Disrupted epithelial morphogenesis and aberrant lineage commitment following radiation and TGFβ I. Fernandez-Garcia and M.H. Barcellos-Hoff Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, NY. In the present study, we evaluated cell lineage plasticity and its phenotypic effects in the non-malignant human mammary epithelial cell line MCF10A in response to ionizing radiation and TGFβ. We have recently shown that the molecular profiles of mammary tumors and normal mammary gland from irradiated mice are distinct from those arising in unirradiated mice by virtue of enriched stem cell and progenitor markers. Consistent with this, we found that radiation (10-100 cGy) increases the mammary repopulation capacity in a functional and marker assays (Nguyen et al. Cancer Cell

19

The low dose damage response pathways in the mouse mammary glands depends  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

low dose damage response pathways in the mouse mammary glands depends low dose damage response pathways in the mouse mammary glands depends on genotype, tissue compartment, exposure regimen, and sampling times Joe Gray & Andrew Wyrobek Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract The objectives of this research are to characterize the early and persistent low-dose and adaptive response (AR) damage surveillance networks in mammary glands of radiation sensitive and resistant strains of mice to identify the molecular signatures/mechanisms associated with nonlinear modifications of risk for mammary gland cancer. Our approach uses low-dose exposure regimens that have been reported to induce mammary gland cancer in sensitive strains to determine whether low-dose induced pathways are differentially expressed in epithelial or stromal cells and to determine

20

A tool for the quantitative spatial analysis of mammary gland epithelium  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we present a method for the spatial analysis of complex cellular systems based on a multiscale study of neighborhood relationships. A function to measure those relationships, M, is introduced. The refined Relative Neighborhood Graph is then presented as a method to establish vicinity relationships within layered cellular structures, and particularized to epithelial cell nuclei in the mammary gland. Finally, the method is illustrated with two examples that show interactions within one population of epithelial cells and between two different populations.

Ortiz de Solorzano, Carlos; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo

2004-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammary epithelial cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Regulation of Mammary Lactogenic Differentiation by Singleminded-2s  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sim2s is a basic helix-loop-helix Per-Arnt-Sim (bHLH-PAS) transcription factor. In Drosophila, the Sim2 homolog, sim, is necessary for cell fate determination during central nervous system (CNS) development. In mammals, both Sim2 isoforms are involved in development of various tissues, including muscle, cartilage, and mammary gland. Loss-of-function studies revealed a role for Sim2s in specifying epithelial cell fate during mammary development and inhibiting growth and invasion of aggressive breast cancer cells. This study determined the role of Sim2s in mammary epithelial cell differentiation. Our hypothesis is that Sim2s is sufficient to promote lactogenic differentiation in vivo, characterized by expression of lactation-specific genes. Two models were used to test this hypothesis: (1) a transgenic mouse, expressing Sim2s under control of the MMTV-LTR, and (2) the mouse mammary epithelial cell line HC11. Together, these models allow analysis of the effect of Sim2s on global mammary gland differentiation and the mechanism through which it accomplishes this in a relatively homogenous population of cells. We determined that precocious expression of Sim2s in vivo is associated with upregulation of a subset of milk protein genes in nulliparous females. During early pregnancy, Sim2s regulation of lactogenic differentiation extended to a larger group of genes. Following pup removal, Sim2s appears to promote survival of alveolar epithelial cells. In vitro, Sim2s expression is necessary for maximal Csn2 expression, as determined by loss-of-function studies. Overexpression of Sim2s is sufficient to enhance prolactin-mediated Csn2 expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays performed in HC11 cells revealed enhanced recruitment of Stat5a and RNA Polymerase II (RNAPII) to the regulatory region of Csn2 in the presence of Sim2s. In addition, Sim2s and RNAPII were found in a complex that was localized to both the promoter and coding region of the Csn2 gene. These studies support the idea that Sim2s is upregulated in a developmental stage-specific manner in the mouse mammary gland to promote the survival and differentiation of alveolar epithelial cells expressing high levels of milk protein genes. Further, Sim2s may regulate the function of a specific subset of alveolar cells by targeting the RNAPII holoenzyme complex to genes expressed during lactogenic differentiation.

Wellberg, Elizabeth

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Nidogen-1 regulates laminin-1-dependent mammary-specific gene expression  

SciTech Connect

Nidogen-1 (entactin) acts as a bridge between the extracellular matrix molecules laminin-1 and type IV collagen, and thus participates in the assembly of basement membranes. To investigate the role of nidogen-1 in regulating cell-type-specific gene expression in mammary epithelium, we designed a culture microecosystem in which each component, including epithelial cells, mesenchymal cells, lactogenic hormones and extracellular matrix, could be controlled. We found that primary and established mesenchymal and myoepithelial cells synthesized and secreted nidogen-1, whereas expression was absent in primary and established epithelial cells. In an epithelial cell line containing mesenchymal cells, nidogen-1 was produced by the mesenchymal cells but deposited between the epithelial cells. In this mixed culture, mammary epithelial cells express b-casein in the presence of lactogenic hormones. Addition of either laminin-1 plus nidogen-1, or laminin-1 alone to mammary epithelial cells induced b- casein production. We asked whether recombinant nidogen-1 alone could signal directly for b-casein. Nidogen-1 did not induce b-casein synthesis in epithelial cells, but it augmented the inductive capacity of laminin-1. These data suggest that nidogen-1 can cooperate with laminin-1 to regulate b-casein expression. Addition of full length nidogen-1 to the mixed cultures had no effect on b-casein gene expression; however, a nidogen-1 fragment containing the laminin-1 binding domain, but lacking the type IV collagen-binding domain, had a dominant negative effect on b-casein expression. These data point to a physiological role for nidogen-1 in the basement membrane-induced gene expression by epithelial cells.

Pujuguet, Philippe; Simian, Marina; Liaw, Jane; Timpl, Rupert; Werb, Zena; Bissell, Mina J..

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Optimizing dual detection of epithelial cell markers and EGFP...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mammary explants from transgenic mice that contain an expression cassette with two disabled EGFP genes will be transplanted in this protocol, and these tissue fragments include...

24

TBX3 over-expression causes mammary gland hyperplasia and increases mammary stem-like cells in an inducible transgenic mouse model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

study, we created doxycycline inducible double transgenicexpression of TBX3 in our doxycycline inducible mouse modelthe mammary glands of doxycycline induced double transgenic

Liu, Jing; Esmailpour, Taraneh; Shang, Xiying; Gulsen, Gultekin; Liu, Andy; Huang, Taosheng

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Involvement of RNA binding proteins AUF1 in mammary gland differentiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The expression of many genes, such as {beta}-casein, c-myc, and cyclin D1, is altered by lactogenic hormone stimulation during mammary epithelial cell differentiation. Here, we demonstrate that post-transcriptional regulation plays an important role to establish gene expression required to initiate milk production as well as transcriptional control. AUF1 protein, a member of the AU-rich element (ARE)-binding protein family, plays a role in ARE-mRNA turnover by regulating mRNA stability and/or translational control. Cytoplasmic localization of AUF1 protein is critically linked to function. We show that as the mammary gland differentiates, AUF1 protein moves from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Moreover, in mammary gland epithelial cells (HC11), stimulation by lactogenic hormone decreased cytoplasmic and increased nuclear AUF1 levels. Direct binding of AUF1 protein was observed on c-myc mRNA, but not {beta}-casein or cyclin D1 mRNA. AUF1 downregulation in HC11 cells increased the expression of {beta}-casein mRNA and decreased the expression of c-myc mRNA by lactogenic hormone. Conversely, overexpression of AUF1 inhibited these effects of lactogenic hormone stimulation in HC11 cells. These results suggest that AUF1 participates in mammary gland differentiation processes under the control of lactogenic hormone signals.

Nagaoka, Kentaro [Laboratory of Animal Breeding, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan)]. E-mail: akenaga@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Tanaka, Tetsuya [Laboratory of Animal Breeding, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan); Imakawa, Kazuhiko [Laboratory of Animal Breeding, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan); Sakai, Senkiti [Laboratory of Animal Breeding, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan)

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Laminin and biomimetic extracellular elasticity enhance functional differentiation in mammary epithelia  

SciTech Connect

In the mammary gland, epithelial cells are embedded in a 'soft' environment and become functionally differentiated in culture when exposed to a laminin-rich extracellular matrix gel. Here, we define the processes by which mammary epithelial cells integrate biochemical and mechanical extracellular cues to maintain their differentiated phenotype. We used single cells cultured on top of gels in conditions permissive for {beta}-casein expression using atomic force microscopy to measure the elasticity of the cells and their underlying substrata. We found that maintenance of {beta}-casein expression required both laminin signalling and a 'soft' extracellular matrix, as is the case in normal tissues in vivo, and biomimetic intracellular elasticity, as is the case in primary mammary epithelial organoids. Conversely, two hallmarks of breast cancer development, stiffening of the extracellular matrix and loss of laminin signalling, led to the loss of {beta}-casein expression and non-biomimetic intracellular elasticity. Our data indicate that tissue-specific gene expression is controlled by both the tissues unique biochemical milieu and mechanical properties, processes involved in maintenance of tissue integrity and protection against tumorigenesis.

Alcaraz, Jordi; Xu, Ren; Mori, Hidetoshi; Nelson, Celeste M.; Mroue, Rana; Spencer, Virginia A.; Brownfield, Doug; Radisky, Derek C.; Bustamante, Carlos; Bissell, Mina J.

2008-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

27

Laminin and biomimetic extracellular elasticity enhance functional differentiation in mammary epithelia  

SciTech Connect

In the mammary gland, epithelial cells are embedded in a 'soft' environment and become functionally differentiated in culture when exposed to a laminin-rich extracellular matrix gel. Here, we define the processes by which mammary epithelial cells integrate biochemical and mechanical extracellular cues to maintain their differentiated phenotype. We used single cells cultured on top of gels in conditions permissive for {beta}-casein expression using atomic force microscopy to measure the elasticity of the cells and their underlying substrata. We found that maintenance of {beta}-casein expression required both laminin signalling and a 'soft' extracellular matrix, as is the case in normal tissues in vivo, and biomimetic intracellular elasticity, as is the case in primary mammary epithelial organoids. Conversely, two hallmarks of breast cancer development, stiffening of the extracellular matrix and loss of laminin signalling, led to the loss of {beta}-casein expression and non-biomimetic intracellular elasticity. Our data indicate that tissue-specific gene expression is controlled by both the tissues unique biochemical milieu and mechanical properties, processes involved in maintenance of tissue integrity and protection against tumorigenesis.

Alcaraz, Jordi; Xu, Ren; Mori, Hidetoshi; Nelson, Celeste M.; Mroue, Rana; Spencer, Virginia A.; Brownfield, Doug; Radisky, Derek C.; Bustamante, Carlos; Bissell, Mina J.

2008-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

28

Mammary gland tumor formation in transgenic mice overexpressing stromelysin-1  

SciTech Connect

An intact basement membrane (BM) is essential for the proper function, differentiation and morphology of many epithelial cells. The disruption or loss of this BM occurs during normal development as well as in the disease state. To examine the importance of BM during mammary gland development in vivo, we generated transgenic mice that inappropriately express autoactivating isoforms of the matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin-1. The mammary glands from these mice are both functionally and morphologically altered throughout development. We have now documented a dramatic incidence of breast tumors in several independent lines of these mice. These data suggest that overexpression of stromelysin-1 and disruption of the BM may be a key step in the multi-step process of breast cancer.

Sympson, Carolyn J; Bissell, Mina J; Werb, Zena

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Two distinct phases of apoptosis in mammary gland involution: proteinase-independent and -dependent pathways  

SciTech Connect

Postlactational involution of the mammary gland is characterized by two distinct physiological events: apoptosis of the secretory, epithelial cells undergoing programmed cell death, and proteolytic degradation of the mammary gland basement membrane. We examined the spatial and temporal patterns of apoptotic cells in relation to those of proteinases during involution of the BALB/c mouse mammary gland. Apoptosis was almost absent during lactation but became evident at day 2 of involution, when {beta}-casein gene expression was still high. Apoptotic cells were then seen at least up to day 8 of involution, when {beta}-casein gene expression was being extinguished. Expression of sulfated glycoprotein-2 (SGP-2), interleukin-1{beta} converting enzyme (ICE) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 was upregulated at day 2, when apoptotic cells were seen initially. Expression of the matrix metalloproteinases gelatinase A and stromelysin-1 and the serine proteinase urokinase-type plasminogen activator, which was low during lactation, was strongly upregulated in parallel starting at day 4 after weaning, coinciding with start of the collapse of the lobulo-alveolar structures and the intensive tissue remodeling in involution. The major sites of mRNA synthesis for these proteinases were fibroblast-like cells in the periductal stroma and stromal cells surrounding the collapsed alveoli, suggesting that the degradative phase of involution is due to a specialized mesenchymal-epithelial interaction. To elucidate the functional role of these proteinases during involution, at the onset of weaning we treated mice systemically with the glucocorticoid hydrocortisone, which is known to inhibit mammary gland involution. Although the initial wave of apoptotic cells appeared in the lumina of the gland, the dramatic regression and tissue remodeling usually evident by day 5 was substantially inhibited by systemic treatment with hydrocortisone. mRNA and protein for gelatinase A, stromelysin-1 and uPA were weakly induced, if at all, in hydrocortisonetreated mice. Furthermore, mRNA for membrane-type matrix metalloproteinase decreased after hydrocortisone treatment and paralleled the almost complete inhibition of activation of latent gelatinase A. Concomitantly, the gland filled with an overabundance of milk. Our data support the hypothesis that there are at least two distinct phases of involution: an initial phase, characterized by induction of the apoptosis-associated genes SGP-2 and ICE and apoptosis of fully differentiated mammary epithelial cells without visible degradation of the extracellular matrix, and a second phase, characterized by extracellular matrix remodeling and altered mesenchymal-epithelial interactions, followed by apoptosis of cells that are losing differentiated functions.

Lund, Leif R; Romer, John; Thomasset, Nicole; Solberg, Helene; Pyke, Charles; Bissell, Mina J; Dano, Keld; Werb, Zena

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Alpha1 and Alpha2 Integrins Mediate Invasive Activity of Mouse Mammary Carcinoma Cells through Regulation of Stromelysin-1 Expression  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tumor cell invasion relies on cell migration and extracellular matrix proteolysis. We investigated the contribution of different integrins to the invasive activity of mouse mammary carcinoma cells. Antibodies against integrin subunits {alpha}6 and {beta}1, but not against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, inhibited cell locomotion on a reconstituted basement membrane in two-dimensional cell migration assays, whereas antibodies against {beta}1, but not against a6 or {alpha}2, interfered with cell adhesion to basement membrane constituents. Blocking antibodies against {alpha}1 integrins impaired only cell adhesion to type IV collagen. Antibodies against {alpha}1, {alpha}2, {alpha}6, and {beta}1, but not {alpha}5, integrin subunits reduced invasion of a reconstituted basement membrane. Integrins {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, which contributed only marginally to motility and adhesion, regulated proteinase production. Antibodies against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, but not {alpha}6 and {beta}1, integrin subunits inhibited both transcription and protein expression of the matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin-1. Inhibition of tumor cell invasion by antibodies against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2 was reversed by addition of recombinant stromelysin-1. In contrast, stromelysin-1 could not rescue invasion inhibited by anti-{alpha}6 antibodies. Our data indicate that {alpha}1 and {alpha}2 integrins confer invasive behavior by regulating stromelysin-1 expression, whereas {alpha}6 integrins regulate cell motility. These results provide new insights into the specific functions of integrins during tumor cell invasion.

Lochter, Andre; Navre, Marc; Werb, Zena; Bissell, Mina J

1998-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

31

Epimorphin mediates mammary luminal morphogenesis through control of C/EBPbeta  

SciTech Connect

We have previously shown that epimorphin, a protein expressed on the surface of myoepithelial and fibroblast cells of the mammary gland, acts as a multifunctional morphogen of mammary epithelial cells. Here, we present the molecular mechanism by which epimorphin mediates luminal morphogenesis. Treatment of cells with epimorphin to induce lumen formation greatly increases the overall expression of transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer binding protein beta (C/EBPbeta) and alters the relative expression of its two principal isoforms, LIP and LAP. These alterations were shown to be essential for the morphogenetic activities, as constitutive expression of LIP was sufficient to produce lumen formation, while constitutive expression of LAP blocked epimorphin-mediated luminal morphogenesis. Furthermore, in a transgenic mouse model in which epimorphin expression was expressed in an apolar fashion on the surface of mammary epithelial cells, we found increased expression of C/EBPbeta, increased relative expression of LIP to LAP, and enlarged ductal lumina. Together, our studies demonstrate a role for epimorphin in luminal morphogenesis through control of C/EBPbeta expression.

Hirai, Yohei; Radisky, Derek; Boudreau, Rosanne; Simian, Marina; Stevens, Mary E.; Oka, Yumiko; Takebe, Kyoko; Niwa, Shinichiro; Bissell, Mina J.

2002-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

32

Functional differentiation and alveolar morphogenesis of primary mammary cultures on reconstituted basement membrane  

SciTech Connect

An essential feature of mammary gland differentiation during pregnancy is the formation of alveoli composed of polarized epithelial cells, which, under the influence of lactogenic hormones, secrete vectorially and sequester milk proteins. Previous culture studies have described either organization of cells polarized towards lumina containing little or no demonstrable tissue-specific protein, or establishment of functional secretory cells exhibiting little or no glandular architecture. In this paper, we report that tissue-specific vectorial secretion coincides with the formation of functional alveoli-like structures by primary mammary epithelial cells cultured on a reconstituted basement membrane matrix (derived from Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm murine tumour). Morphogenesis of these unique three-dimensional structures was initiated by cell-directed remodelling of the exogenous matrix leading to reorganization of cells into matrixensheathed aggregates by 24 h after plating. The aggregates subsequently cavitated, so that by day 6 the cells were organized into hollow spheres in which apical cell surfaces faced lumina sealed by tight junctions and basal surfaces were surrounded by a distinct basal lamina. The profiles of proteins secreted into the apical (luminal) and basal (medium) compartments indicated that these alveoli-like structures were capable of an appreciable amount of vectorial secretion. Immunoprecipitation with a broad spectrum milk antiserum showed that more than 80% of caseins were secreted into the lumina, whereas iron-binding proteins (both lactoferrin and transferrin) were present in comparable amounts in each compartment. Thus, these mammary cells established protein targeting pathways directing milk-specific proteins to the luminal compartment. A time course monitoring secretory activity demonstrated that establishment of tissue-specific vectorial secretion and increased total and milk protein secretion coincided with functional alveolar-like multicellular architecture. This culture system is unique among models of epithelial cell polarity in that it demonstrates several aspects of epithelial cell polarization: vectorial secretion, apical junctions, a sequestered compartment and formation of a basal lamina. These lumina-containing structures therefore reproduce the dual role of mammary epithelia to secrete vectorially and to sequester milk proteins. Thus, in addition to maintaining tissue-specific cytodifferentiation and function, a basement membrane promotes the expression of tissue-like morphogenesis.

BARCELLOS-HOFF, M. H; AGGELER, J.; RAM, T. G; BISSELL, M. J

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Epigenetic influences of low-dose bisphenol A in primary human breast epithelial cells  

SciTech Connect

Substantial evidence indicates that exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) during early development may increase breast cancer risk later in life. The changes may persist into puberty and adulthood, suggesting an epigenetic process being imposed in differentiated breast epithelial cells. The molecular mechanisms by which early memory of BPA exposure is imprinted in breast progenitor cells and then passed onto their epithelial progeny are not well understood. The aim of this study was to examine epigenetic changes in breast epithelial cells treated with low-dose BPA. We also investigated the effect of BPA on the ER{alpha} signaling pathway and global gene expression profiles. Compared to control cells, nuclear internalization of ER{alpha} was observed in epithelial cells preexposed to BPA. We identified 170 genes with similar expression changes in response to BPA. Functional analysis confirms that gene suppression was mediated in part through an ER{alpha}-dependent pathway. As a result of exposure to BPA or other estrogen-like chemicals, the expression of lysosomal-associated membrane protein 3 (LAMP3) became epigenetically silenced in breast epithelial cells. Furthermore, increased DNA methylation in the LAMP3 CpG island was this repressive mark preferentially occurred in ER{alpha}-positive breast tumors. These results suggest that the in vitro system developed in our laboratory is a valuable tool for exposure studies of BPA and other xenoestrogens in human cells. Individual and geographical differences may contribute to altered patterns of gene expression and DNA methylation in susceptible loci. Combination of our exposure model with epigenetic analysis and other biochemical assays can give insight into the heritable effect of low-dose BPA in human cells.

Weng, Yu-I; Hsu, Pei-Yin; Liyanarachchi, Sandya; Liu, Joseph; Deatherage, Daniel E.; Huang Yiwen; Zuo Tao; Rodriguez, Benjamin [Human Cancer Genetics Program, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Lin, Ching-Hung; Cheng, Ann-Lii [Department of Internal Medicine and Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Huang, Tim H.-M., E-mail: Tim.Huang@osumc.ed [Human Cancer Genetics Program, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

34

Expression of Autoactivated Stromelysin-1 in Mammary Glands of Transgenic Mice Leads to a Reactive Stroma During Early Development  

SciTech Connect

Extracellular matrix and extracellular matrix-degrading matrix metalloproteinases play a key role in interactions between the epithelium and the mesenchyme during mammary gland development and disease. In patients with breast cancer, the mammary mesenchyme undergoes a stromal reaction, the etiology of which is unknown. We previously showed that targeting of an autoactivating mutant of the matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin-1 to mammary epithelia of transgenic mice resulted in reduced mammary function during pregnancy and development of preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions. Here we examine the cascade of alterations before breast tumor formation in the mammary gland stroma once the expression of the stromelysin-1 transgene commences. Beginning in postpubertal virgin animals, low levels of transgene expression in mammary epithelia led to increased expression of endogenous stromelysin-1 in stromal fibroblasts and up-regulation of other matrix metalloproteinases, without basement membrane disruption. These changes were accompanied by the progressive development of a compensatory reactive stroma, characterized by increased collagen content and vascularization in glands from virgin mice. This remodeling of the gland affected epithelial-mesenchymal communication as indicated by inappropriate expression of tenascin-C starting by day 6 of pregnancy. This, together with increased transgene expression, led to basement membrane disruption starting by day 15 of pregnancy. We propose that the highly reactive stroma provides a prelude to breast epithelial tumors observed in these animals. Epithelial development depends on an exquisite series of inductive and instructive interactions between the differentiating epithelium and the mesenchymal (stromal) compartment. The epithelium, which consists of luminal and myoepithelial cells, is separated from the stroma by a basement membrane (BM), which plays a central role in mammary gland homeostasis and gene expression. In vivo, stromal cells produce fibronectin, collagens, proteoglycans, and some components of the BM, as well as a number of proteinases that can effectively degrade BM constituents. Stromal and epithelial cells of the mammary gland interact to regulate BM synthesis and degradation and, thus, mammary function. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are extracellular matrix (ECM)-degrading enzymes involved in mammary gland morphogenesis and involution. During late pregnancy and lactation, when the gland becomes fully functional, the expression of MMPs is low however, during involution, when the gland loses function and is remodeled, synthesis of ECM-degrading proteinases increases dramatically.11 Disturbance of the balance between MMPs and MMP inhibitors leads to either unscheduled involution or prolonged lactation. Mammary glands of virgin mice expressing an autoactivating stromelysin-1 (SL-1) transgene display supernumerary branches and precocious alveolar development, accompanied by the synthesis of {beta}-casein at levels found normally only during early pregnancy. During late pregnancy, increased expression of the SL-1 transgene leads to a reduction in expression of pregnancy-specific genes. Later in life, some SL-1 transgenic mice develop hyperplastic, dysplastic, and ductal carcinoma in situ-like lesions, as well as malignant tumors. Little is known about the sequence of changes that occurs before formation of an overt reactive stroma in breast cancer. In the present study, we address the question of whether and how the stromal compartment is altered as a consequence of inappropriate SL-1 transgene expression in the epithelium.

Thomasset, N.; Lochter, A.; Sympson, C.J.; Lund, L.R.; Williams, D.R.; Behrendtsen, O.; Werb, Z.; Bissell, M.J.

1998-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

35

Reprogramming stem cells is a microenvironmental task  

SciTech Connect

That tumor cells for all practical purposes are unstable and plastic could be expected. However, the astonishing ability of the nuclei from cells of normal adult tissues to be reprogrammed - given the right embryonic context - found its final truth even for mammals in the experiments that allowed engineering Dolly (1). The landmark experiments showed that nuclei originating from cells of frozen mammary tissues were capable of being reprogrammed by the embryonic cytoplasm and its microenvironment to produce a normal sheep. The rest is history. However, whether microenvironments other than those of the embryos can also reprogram adult cells of different tissue origins still containing their cytoplasm is of obvious interest. In this issue of PNAS, the laboratory of Gilbert Smith (2) reports on how the mammary gland microenvironment can reprogram both embryonic and adult stem neuronal cells. The work is a follow-up to their previous report on testis stem cells that were reprogrammed by the mammary microenvironment (3). They demonstrated that cells isolated from the seminiferous tubules of the mature testis, mixed with normal mammary epithelial cells, contributed a sizable number of epithelial progeny to normal mammary outgrowths in transplanted mammary fat pads. However, in those experiments they were unable to distinguish which subpopulation of the testis cells contributed progeny to the mammary epithelial tree. The current work adds new, compelling, and provocative information to our understanding of stem cell plasticity. Booth et al. (2) use neuronal stem cells (NSCs) isolated from WAP-cre/R26R mice combined with unlabeled mammary epithelial cells that subsequently are implanted in cleared mammary fat pads. In this new microenvironment, the NSCs that are incorporated into the branching mammary tree make chimeric glands (Fig. 1) that remarkably can also express the milk protein {beta}-casein, progesterone receptor, and estrogen receptor {alpha}. Remarkably, the primary transplants are capable of maintaining chimerism through serial transplantation. When the chimeric glands are explanted back into NSC growth media, cells with NSC markers were present only in explants from the first transplant and not from explants in the subsequent serial transplants, suggesting that there is a window of time and an unknown but specific context for becoming NSC again.

Bissell, Mina J; Inman, Jamie

2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

36

In vitro models for airway epithelial cell culture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work is about the development of a physiologically relevant model of the human airway. Various factors such as the cell model, physiochemical factors such as the cell substrate properties including its stiffness, shear ...

Sivathanu, Vivek

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Targeted Expression of Stromelysin-1 in Mammary Gland Provides Evidence for a Role of Proteinases in Branching Morphogenesis and the Requirement for an Intact Basement Membrane for Tissue-specific Gene Expression  

SciTech Connect

The extracellular matrix (ECM) is an important regulator of the differentiated phenotype of mammary epithelial cells in culture. Despite the fact that ECM-degrading enzymes have been implicated in morphogenesis and tissue remodeling, there is little evidence for a direct role for such regulation in vivo. We generated transgenic mice that express autoactivated isoforms of the matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin-1, under the control of the whey acidic protein gene promoter, to examine the effect of inappropriate expression of this enzyme. Stromelysin-1 is implicated as the primary player in the loss of basement membrane and loss of function in the mammary gland during involution. The transgene was expressed at low levels in mammary glands of virgin female mice, leading to an unexpected phenotype: The primary ducts had supernumerary branches and showed precocious development of alveoli that expressed beta-casein at levels similar to that of an early- to mid-pregnant gland. Lactating glands showed high levels of transgene expression, with accumulation at the basement membrane, and a decrease in laminin and collagen IV, resulting in a loss of basement membrane integrity; this was accompanied by a dramatic alteration of alveolar morphology, with decreased size and shrunken lumina containing little beta-casein. During pregnancy, expression of endogenous whey acidic protein and beta-casein was reduced in transgenic glands, confirming the observed dependence of milk protein transcription of ECM in mammary epithelial cells in culture. These data provide direct evidence that stromelysin-1 activity can be morphogenic for mammary epithelial cells, inducing hyperproliferation and differentiation in virgin animals, and that its lytic activity can, indeed, disrupt membrane integrity and reduce mammary-specific function. We conclude that the balance of ECM-degrading enzymes with their inhibitors, and the associated regulation of ECM structure, is crucial for tissue-specific gene expression and morphogenesis in vivo.

Sympson, Carolyn J; Talhouk, Rabih S; Alexander, Caroline M; Chin, Jennie R; Cliff, Shirley M; Bissell, Mina J; Werb, Zena

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Recurrent exposure to nicotine differentiates human bronchial epithelial cells via epidermal growth factor receptor activation  

SciTech Connect

Cigarette smoking is the major preventable cause of lung cancer in developed countries. Nicotine (3-(1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)-pyridine) is one of the major alkaloids present in tobacco. Besides its addictive properties, its effects have been described in panoply of cell types. In fact, recent studies have shown that nicotine behaves as a tumor promoter in transformed epithelial cells. This research focuses on the effects of acute repetitive nicotine exposure on normal human bronchial epithelial cells (NHBE cells). Here we show that treatment of NHBE cells with recurrent doses of nicotine up to 500 {mu}M triggered cell differentiation towards a neuronal-like phenotype: cells emitted filopodia and expressed neuronal markers such as neuronal cell adhesion molecule, neurofilament-M and the transcription factors neuronal N and Pax-3. We also demonstrate that nicotine treatment induced NF-kB translocation to the nucleus, phosphorylation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and accumulation of heparin binding-EGF in the extracellular medium. Moreover, addition of AG1478, an inhibitor of EGFR tyrosine phosphorylation, or cetuximab, a monoclonal antibody that precludes ligand binding to the same receptor, prevented cell differentiation by nicotine. Lastly, we show that differentiated cells increased their adhesion to the extracellular matrix and their protease activity. Given that several lung pathologies are strongly related to tobacco consumption, these results may help to better understand the damaging consequences of nicotine exposure.

Martinez-Garcia, Eva; Irigoyen, Marta [Centre for Applied Medical Research, School of Medicine, University of Navarra, Avenida Pio XII, 55, 31008 Pamplona (Spain); Anso, Elena; Martinez-Irujo, Juan Jose [Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, University of Navarra, Avenida Pio XII, 55, 31008 Pamplona (Spain); Rouzaut, Ana [Centre for Applied Medical Research, School of Medicine, University of Navarra, Avenida Pio XII, 55, 31008 Pamplona (Spain); Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, University of Navarra, Avenida Pio XII, 55, 31008 Pamplona (Spain)], E-mail: arouzaut@unav.es

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Gordon Research Conference on Mammary Gland Biology  

SciTech Connect

The 1989 conference was the tenth in the series of biennial Gordon Research Conferences on Mammary Gland Biology. Traditionally this conference brings together scientists from diverse backgrounds and experience but with a common interest in the biology of the mammary gland. Investigators from agricultural and medical schools, biochemists, cell and molecular biologists, endocrinologists, immunologists, and representatives from the emerging biotechnology industries met to discuss current concepts and results on the function and regulation of the normal and neoplastic mammary gland in a variety of species. Of the participants, approximately three-fourths were engaged in studying the normal mammary gland function, whereas the other quarter were engaged in studying the neoplastic gland. The interactions between scientists, clinicians, veterinarians examining both normal and neoplastic cell function serves to foster the multi-disciplinary goals of the conference and has stimulated many cooperative projects among participants in previous years.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

A novel cell culture model for studying differentiation and apoptosis in the mouse mammary gland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for approxi- mately 20 passages. No change in phenotype is observed with careful handling. Immunocytochemistry Cells were grown subconfluently on collagen-coated glass coverslips in four-well plates or on plastic slide flasks (Nunc/Nalge Europe, Hereford, UK... ). The cells were fixed in methanol:acetone for 10 min, washed with Tris-buffered saline (TBS) pH 7.6, blocked in TBS + 20% goat serum for 1 h, and then immunostained with a panel of primary antibodies. Monoclonal antibodies to cytokeratin 18 and 19 were from...

Gordon, Katrina E; Binas, Bert; Chapman, Rachel S; Kurian, Kathreena M; Clarkson, Richard W E; Clark, A John; Birgitte Lane, E; Watson, Christine J

2000-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammary epithelial cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Secretory pathway Ca2+/Mn2+-ATPase isoform 2 and lactation: specific localization of plasmalemmal and secretory pathway Ca2+ pump isoforms in the mammary gland  

SciTech Connect

The supply of calcium to the developing neonate via milk is an important physiological process. Until recently the mechanism for the enrichment of milk with calcium was thought to be almost entirely mediated via the secretory pathway. However, recent studies suggest that a specific isoform of the plasma membrane calcium ATPase, PMCA2, is the primary mechanism for calcium transport into milk, highlighting a major role for apical calcium transport. We compared the expression of the recently identified secretory calcium ATPase, SPCA2, and SPCA1, in the mouse mammary gland during different stages of development. SPCA2 levels increased over 35 fold during lactation, while SPCA1 increased only a modest two fold. The potential importance of SPCA2 in lactation was also highlighted by its localization to luminal secretory cells of the mammary gland during lactation, while SPCA1 was expressed throughout the cells of the mammary gland. We also observed major differences in the localization of PMCA2 and PMCA1 during lactation. Using the SCp2 mouse mammary epithelial cell 3D culture model, differences in the sub-cellular distribution of PMCA2 and PMCA1 were clear. These studies highlight the likely specific roles of PMCA2 and SPCA2 in lactation, and link the recently characterized SPCA2 calcium pump to the supply of calcium into milk and the regulation of Golgi resident enzymes important in lactation. They also indicate that calcium transport into milk is a complex interplay between apical and secretory pathways.

Faddy, Helen M.; Smart, Chanel E.; Xu, Ren; Lee, Genee Y.; Kenny, Paraic A.; Feng, Mingye; Rao, Rajini; Brown, Melissa A.; Bissell, Mina J.; Roberts-Thomson, Sarah J.; Monteith, Gregory R.

2008-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

42

Biological Basis for Radiation Adaptive Responses that Protect Against Bronchial Epithelial Cell Transformation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basis for Radiation Adaptive Responses that Protect Against Bronchial Basis for Radiation Adaptive Responses that Protect Against Bronchial Epithelial Cell Transformation Wenshu Chen, Xiuling Xu, Lang Bai, Mabel T. Padilla, Carmen Tellez, Katherine M. Gott, Shuguang Leng, Julie A. Wilder, Steven A. Belinsky, Bobby R. Scott and Yong Lin, Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, 2425 Ridgecrest Drive SE, Albuquerque, NM 87108 The major hypothesis in this project is that low-dose, low linear-energy-transfer (LET) radiation stimulates an adaptive response that protects cells from neoplastic transformation involving modulation of paracrine factors (e.g., cytokines), cell survival/death signaling pathways, and reprogramming of the epigenome. To test this hypothesis, a validated, sensitive in vitro transformation model and a media transfer

43

Unraveling the microenvironmental influences on the normal mammary gland and induction and progression of breast cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The normal mammary gland and invasive breast cancer are both complex 'organs' composed of multiple cell types as well as extracellular matrix (ECM) in three-dimensional (3D) space. Conventionally, both normal and malignant breast cells are studied in vitro as two-dimensional (2D) monolayers of epithelial cells, which results in the loss of structure and tissue function. Many laboratories are now investigating regulation of signaling function in normal mammary gland using 3D cultures. However, it is important also to assay malignant breast cells ex vivo in a physiologically relevant environment to more closely mimic tumor architecture, signal transduction regulation and tumor behavior in vivo. Here we present the potential of these 3D models for drug testing, target validation and guidance of patient selection for clinical trials. We argue also that in order to get full insight into the biology of the normal and malignant breast, and to create in vivo-like models for therapeutic approaches in humans, we need to continue to create more complex heterotypic models to approach the full context the cells encounter in the human body.

Weigelt, Britta; Bissell, Mina J.

2008-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

44

Continuous human cell lines and method of making same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Substantially genetically stable continuous human cell lines derived from normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) and processes for making and using the same. In a preferred embodiment, the cell lines are derived by treating normal human mammary epithelial tissue with a chemical carcinogen such as benzo[a]pyrene. The novel cell lines serve as useful substrates for elucidating the potential effects of a number of toxins, carcinogens and mutagens as well as of the addition of exogenous genetic material. The autogenic parent cells from which the cell lines are derived serve as convenient control samples for testing. The cell lines are not neoplastically transformed, although they have acquired several properties which distinguish them from their normal progenitors.

Stampfer, Martha R. (Oakland, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Do myoepithelial cells hold the key for breast tumorprogression?  

SciTech Connect

Mammary myoepithelial cells have been the foster child of breast cancer biology and have been largely ignored since they were considered to be less important for tumorigenesis than luminal epithelial cells from which most of breast carcinomas are thought to arise. In recent years as our knowledge in stem cell biology and the cellular microenvironment has been increasing myoepithelial cells are slowly starting to gain more attention. Emerging data raise the hypothesis if myoepithelial cells play a key role in breast tumor progression by regulating the in situ to invasive carcinoma transition and if myoepithelial cells are part of the mammary stem cell niche. Paracrine interactions between myoepithelial and luminal epithelial cells are known to be important for cell cycle arrest, establishing epithelial cell polarity, and inhibiting migration and invasion. Based on these functions normal mammary myoepithelial cells have been called ''natural tumor suppressors''. However, during tumor progression myoepithelial cells seem to loose these properties and eventually they themselves diminish as tumors become invasive. Better understanding of myoepithelial cell function and their role in tumor progression may lead to their exploitation for cancer therapeutic and preventative measures.

Polyak, Kornelia; Hu, Min

2005-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

46

Do myoepithelial cells hold the key for breast tumorprogression?  

SciTech Connect

Mammary myoepithelial cells have been the foster child of breast cancer biology and have been largely ignored since they were considered to be less important for tumorigenesis than luminal epithelial cells from which most of breast carcinomas are thought to arise. In recent years as our knowledge in stem cell biology and the cellular microenvironment has been increasing myoepithelial cells are slowly starting to gain more attention. Emerging data raise the hypothesis if myoepithelial cells play a key role in breast tumor progression by regulating the in situ to invasive carcinoma transition and if myoepithelial cells are part of the mammary stem cell niche. Paracrine interactions between myoepithelial and luminal epithelial cells are known to be important for cell cycle arrest, establishing epithelial cell polarity, and inhibiting migration and invasion. Based on these functions normal mammary myoepithelial cells have been called ''natural tumor suppressors''. However, during tumor progression myoepithelial cells seem to loose these properties and eventually they themselves diminish as tumors become invasive. Better understanding of myoepithelial cell function and their role in tumor progression may lead to their exploitation for cancer therapeutic and preventative measures.

Polyak, Kornelia; Hu, Min

2005-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

47

Biomolecular interactions and responses of human epithelial and macrophage cells to engineered nanomaterials.  

SciTech Connect

Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) are increasingly being used in commercial products, particularly in the biomedical, cosmetic, and clothing industries. For example, pants and shirts are routinely manufactured with silver nanoparticles to render them 'wrinkle-free.' Despite the growing applications, the associated environmental health and safety (EHS) impacts are completely unknown. The significance of this problem became pervasive within the general public when Prince Charles authored an article in 2004 warning of the potential social, ethical, health, and environmental issues connected to nanotechnology. The EHS concerns, however, continued to receive relatively little consideration from federal agencies as compared with large investments in basic nanoscience R&D. The mounting literature regarding the toxicology of ENMs (e.g., the ability of inhaled nanoparticles to cross the blood-brain barrier; Kwon et al., 2008, J. Occup. Health 50, 1) has spurred a recent realization within the NNI and other federal agencies that the EHS impacts related to nanotechnology must be addressed now. In our study we proposed to address critical aspects of this problem by developing primary correlations between nanoparticle properties and their effects on cell health and toxicity. A critical challenge embodied within this problem arises from the ability to synthesize nanoparticles with a wide array of physical properties (e.g., size, shape, composition, surface chemistry, etc.), which in turn creates an immense, multidimensional problem in assessing toxicological effects. In this work we first investigated varying sizes of quantum dots (Qdots) and their ability to cross cell membranes based on their aspect ratio utilizing hyperspectral confocal fluorescence microscopy. We then studied toxicity of epithelial cell lines that were exposed to different sized gold and silver nanoparticles using advanced imaging techniques, biochemical analyses, and optical and mass spectrometry methods. Finally we evaluated a new assay to measure transglutaminase (TG) activity; a potential marker for cell toxicity.

Kotula, Paul Gabriel; Brozik, Susan Marie; Achyuthan, Komandoor E.; Greene, Adrienne Celeste; Timlin, Jerilyn Ann; Bachand, George David; Bachand, Marlene; Aaron, Jesse S.; Allen, Amy; Seagrave, Jean-Clare

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Differential transcriptional regulation of IL-8 expression by human airway epithelial cells exposed to diesel exhaust particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) induces inflammatory signaling characterized by MAP kinase-mediated activation of NFkB and AP-1 in vitro and in bronchial biopsies obtained from human subjects exposed to DEP. NFkB and AP-1 activation results in the upregulation of genes involved in promoting inflammation in airway epithelial cells, a principal target of inhaled DEP. IL-8 is a proinflammatory chemokine expressed by the airway epithelium in response to environmental pollutants. The mechanism by which DEP exposure induces IL-8 expression is not well understood. In the current study, we sought to determine whether DEP with varying organic content induces IL-8 expression in lung epithelial cells, as well as, to develop a method to rapidly evaluate the upstream mechanism(s) by which DEP induces IL-8 expression. Exposure to DEP with varying organic content differentially induced IL-8 expression and IL-8 promoter activity human airway epithelial cells. Mutational analysis of the IL-8 promoter was also performed using recombinant human cell lines expressing reporters linked to the mutated promoters. Treatment with a low organic-containing DEP stimulated IL-8 expression by a mechanism that is predominantly NFkB-dependent. In contrast, exposure to high organic-containing DEP induced IL-8 expression independently of NFkB through a mechanism that requires AP-1 activity. Our study reveals that exposure to DEP of varying organic content induces proinflammatory gene expression through multiple specific mechanisms in human airway epithelial cells. The approaches used in the present study demonstrate the utility of a promoter-reporter assay ensemble for identifying transcriptional pathways activated by pollutant exposure.

Tal, Tamara L. [Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (United States); Simmons, Steven O. [Integrated Systems Toxicology, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA (United States); Silbajoris, Robert; Dailey, Lisa [Environmental and Public Health, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA (United States); Cho, Seung-Hyun [Air Pollution Prevention Control Division, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA (United States); Research Participation Program, Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge (United States); Ramabhadran, Ram [Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (United States); Integrated Systems Toxicology, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA (United States); Linak, William [Air Pollution Prevention Control Division, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA (United States); Reed, William; Bromberg, Philip A. [Center for Environmental Medicine, Asthma, and Lung Biology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (United States); Samet, James M., E-mail: samet.james@epa.go [Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (United States); Environmental and Public Health, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA (United States)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

49

Sustained activation of STAT5 is essential for chromatin remodeling and maintenance of mammary-specific function  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Epithelial cells, once dissociated and placed in two-dimensional (2D) cultures, rapidly lose tissue-specific functions. We showed previously that in addition to prolactin, signaling by laminin-111 was necessary to restore functional differentiation of mammary epithelia. Here, we elucidate two additional aspects of laminin-111 action. We show that in 2D cultures, the prolactin receptor is basolaterally localized and physically segregated from its apically placed ligand. Detachment of the cells exposes the receptor to ligation by prolactin leading to signal transducers and activators of transcription protein 5 (STAT5) activation, but only transiently and not sufficiently for induction of milk protein expression. We show that laminin-111 reorganizes mammary cells into polarized acini, allowing both the exposure of the prolactin receptor and sustained activation of STAT5. The use of constitutively active STAT5 constructs showed that the latter is necessary and sufficient for chromatin reorganization and {beta}-casein transcription. These results underscore the crucial role of continuous laminin signaling and polarized tissue architecture in maintenance of transcription factor activation, chromatin organization, and tissue-specific gene expression.

Xu, Ren; Nelson, Celeste M.; Muschler, John L.; Veiseh, Mandana; Vonderhaar, Barbara K.; Bissell, Mina J.

2009-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

50

Automatic segmentation of histological structures in mammary gland tissue sections  

SciTech Connect

Real-time three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of epithelial structures in human mammary gland tissue blocks mapped with selected markers would be an extremely helpful tool for breast cancer diagnosis and treatment planning. Besides its clear clinical application, this tool could also shed a great deal of light on the molecular basis of breast cancer initiation and progression. In this paper we present a framework for real-time segmentation of epithelial structures in two-dimensional (2D) images of sections of normal and neoplastic mammary gland tissue blocks. Complete 3D rendering of the tissue can then be done by surface rendering of the structures detected in consecutive sections of the blocks. Paraffin embedded or frozen tissue blocks are first sliced, and sections are stained with Hematoxylin and Eosin. The sections are then imaged using conventional bright field microscopy and their background is corrected using a phantom image. We then use the Fast-Marching algorithm to roughly extract the contours of the different morphological structures in the images. The result is then refined with the Level-Set method which converges to an accurate (sub-pixel) solution for the segmentation problem. Finally, our system stacks together the 2D results obtained in order to reconstruct a 3D representation of the entire tissue block under study. Our method is illustrated with results from the segmentation of human and mouse mammary gland tissue samples.

Fernandez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Deschamps, Thomas; Idica, Adam K.; Malladi, Ravikanth; Ortiz de Solorzano, Carlos

2004-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

51

Higher order nuclear organization in growth arrest of human mammary epithelial cells: A novel role for telomere-associated protein TIN2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Defense Breast Cancer Research Program ( DAMD17-02-1-0438California Breast Cancer Research Program (7FB0018 toJoyce Fox Jordan Cancer Research Program at the Purdue

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

The hemopexin domain of MMP3 is responsible for mammary ...  

During this process, epithelial cells have to mobilize the necessary machinery for invasion of the growing ... heat and other stresses on the proteome (Taipale et al.

53

A link between stem cells and the EMT phenotype induced by IR and TGFβ  

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link between stem cells and the EMT phenotype induced by IR and TGFβ link between stem cells and the EMT phenotype induced by IR and TGFβ Ignacio Fernandez-Garcia New York University School of Medicine Abstract Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) occurs as key developmental program but is also often activated during cancer progression. EMT is characterized by loss of epithelial cell polarity, loss of cell-cell contacts, and acquisition of mesenchymal markers and phenotypic traits that include increased cell motility1. Approximately 18% of breast cancers exhibit evidence of EMT. We have shown that the progeny of irradiated human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) undergo EMT when exposed to transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ). Additionally, recent publication from Weinberg and colleagues showed that induction of EMT through engineered expression of

54

Gene expression analysis of human primary prostate epithelial and fibroblast cell cultures to an acute dose of 10cGy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

26, 2011 26, 2011 Gene expression analysis of human primary prostate epithelial and fibroblast cell cultures to an acute dose of 10cGy J. Tyson McDonald, Julia Fox, Heather Szelag, Annie Kang, Heiko Enderling, Peter Nowd, Douglas Scheinder, Giannoula Lakka Klement, Ingolf Tuerk, and Lynn Hlatky Center of Cancer Systems Biology, Steward St. Elizabeth's Medical Center, 736 Cambridge Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02135. Primary tissue represents a better model for studies than immortalized cell lines that are adapted

55

Influence of transmembrane potential differences of renal tubular epithelial cell on ANG II binding  

SciTech Connect

Previous studies from this laboratory demonstrated specific high-affinity binding sites of rat renal brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMV). The time course of angiotensin II ((/sup 125/I) ANG II) binding in the presence of a NaCl gradient demonstrated an overshoot characteristic of electrogenic sodium-dependent d-(/sup 14/C) glucose uptake. The time course of ANG II binding to membrane vesicles equilibrated with NaCl did not exhibit such overshoot and was lower in magnitude. Therefore, studies were designed to test the hypothesis that ANG II binding to BBMV was enhanced by a transmembrane potential difference in a manner similar to sodium-dependent D-glucose uptake. The effects of sodium salts with differing rates of anion equilibration were compared on ANG II binding. ANG II binding in the presence of a KCl gradient was similar to NaCl. The overshoot was abolished in the presence of an inwardly directed KCl gradient plus valinomycin. Magnesium salts with differing rates of anion permeabilities had similar effects on binding, as did sodium salts. Scatchard analysis revealed that the receptor density was fourfold higher in the presence of an electrochemical gradient compared with nongradient conditions. These data are consistent with the conclusion that ANG II binding to BBMV is enhanced by a transmembrane potential difference, and suggest that this may be an important modulator of tubular epithelial responses to ANG II in vivo.

Brown, G.P.; Douglas, J.G.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Interaction of Epithelial Cells with Surfaces and Surfaces Decorated by Molecules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A detailed understanding of the interface between living cells and substrate materials is of rising importance in many fields of medicine, biology and biotechnology. Cells at interfaces often form epithelia. The physical barrier that they form is one of their main functions. It is governed by the properties of the networks forming the cytoskeleton systems and by cell-to-cell contacts. Different substrates with varying surface properties modify the migration velocity of the cells. On the one hand one can change the materials composition. Organic and inorganic materials induce differing migration velocities in the same cell system. Within the same class of materials, a change of the surface stiffness or of the surface energy modifies the migration velocity, too. For our cell adhesion studies a variety of different, homogeneous substrates were used (polymers, bio-polymers, metals, oxides). In addition, an effective lithographic method, Polymer Blend Lithography (PBL), is reported, to produce patterned Self-Assembled Monolayers (SAM) on solid substrates featuring two or three different chemical functionalities. This we achieve without the use of conventional lithography like e-beam or UV lithography, only by using self-organization. These surfaces are decorated with a Teflon-like and with an amino-functionalized molecular layer. The resulting pattern is a copy of a previously created self-organized polymer pattern, featuring a scalable lateral domain size in the sub-micron range down below 100 nanometers. The resulting monolayer pattern features a high chemical and biofunctional contrast with feature sizes in the range of cell adhesion complexes like e.g. focal adhesion points.

Daniele Martini; Othmar Marti; Michael Beil; T. Paust; C. Huang; M. Moosmann; J. Jin; T. Heiler; R. Grger; Thomas Schimmel; Stefan Walheim

2013-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

57

Investigation of non-targeted effects of low dose ionizing radiation on the mammary gland  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

non-targeted effects of low dose ionizing radiation on the mammary gland non-targeted effects of low dose ionizing radiation on the mammary gland utilizing three-dimensional culture models of mammary cells derived from mouse strains that differ in susceptibility to tumorigenesis Joni D. Mott, Antoine M. Snijders, Alvin Lo, Dinah Levy-Groesser, Bahram Parvin, Andrew J. Wyrobek, Jian-Hua Mao, and Mina J. Bissell Life Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley CA 94720 Goal: Within the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's SFA, Project 2, our studies focus on utilizing three dimensional (3D) cell culture models as surrogates for in vivo studies to determine how low doses of ionizing radiation influence mammary gland tissue architecture and how this may relate both to tumor progression and/or adaptive response.

58

Concurrent expression of heme oxygenase-1 and p53 in human retinal pigment epithelial cell line  

SciTech Connect

Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a stress-responsive protein that is known to regulate cellular functions such as cell proliferation, inflammation, and apoptosis. Here, we investigated the effects of HO activity on the expression of p53 in the human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cell line ARPE-19. Cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP) induced the expression of both HO-1 and p53 without significant toxicity to the cells. In addition, the blockage of HO activity with the iron chelator DFO or with HO-1 siRNA inhibited the CoPP-induced expression of p53. Similarly, zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP), an inhibitor of HO, suppressed p53 expression in ARPE-19 cells, although ZnPP increased the level of HO-1 protein while inhibiting HO activity. Also, CoPP-induced p53 expression was not affected by the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Based on these results, we conclude that HO activity is involved in the regulation of p53 expression in a ROS-independent mechanism, and also suggest that the expression of p53 in ARPE-19 cells is associated with heme metabolites such as biliverdin/bilirubin, carbon monoxide, and iron produced by the activity of HO.

Lee, Sang Yull [Department of Biochemistry, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Busan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of); Jo, Hong Jae [Department of General Surgery, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Busan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kang Mi; Song, Ju Dong [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, 1-10 Ami-Dong, Seo-Gu, Busan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Hun Taeg [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Wonkwang University School of Medicine, Iksan, Chonbuk 570-749 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Young Chul [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, 1-10 Ami-Dong, Seo-Gu, Busan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: ycpark@pusan.ac.kr

2008-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

59

Using Three Dimensional Cell Culture and Tissue Architecture to Monitor an  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Three Dimensional Cell Culture and Tissue Architecture to Monitor an Three Dimensional Cell Culture and Tissue Architecture to Monitor an Adaptive Response in Mammary Epithelial Cells Mina Bissell Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract Exposure of tissues to ionizing radiation results in targeted effect on cells as well as non-targeted effects on tissues. Although, targeted effects such as the DNA damage response have been studied extensively, non-targeted effects leading to modification in tissue architecture and tumor progression have been less studied and are not well understood. The mammary gland is a tissue that has been shown to be susceptible to tumor formation and cancer progression following exposure to ionizing radiation. In conjunction with the laboratories of Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff and Catherine Park we showed previously that in the presence of TGF-β,

60

Differential response of nontumorigenic and tumorigenic human papillomavirus type 16-positive epithelial cells to transforming growth factor beta 1. Cancer Res  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The transforming growth factor (TGF) ßsare multifunctional polypeptide growth factors with diverse biological effects, including inhibition of epithelial cell proliferation both in vitro and in vivo. To investigate the possible role of 1<,!•/<, in the regulation of papillomavirus infection and papillomavirus-associated transformation, we compared the response to TGF/SI of normal keratinocytes, human papillomavirus, type 16 (HPV 16)-positive-immortalized keratinocytes (nontumorigenic), and HPV 16positive cervical carcinoma cells (tumorigenic) with respect to DNA synthesis and protooncogene expression. All HPV 16-immortalized cell lines were nearly as inhibited by TGF/3, as normal keratinocytes, whereas two cervical carcinoma cell lines (Cask! and Siha) were refractory to growth inhibition by TGF/9]. Cell surface receptors for TGF/9, were present on both normal and carcinoma cell lines. In all cases, growth

L. Braun; M. Drst; R. Mikumo; Et Al; Cancer Res; Contact The Aacr Publications; L. Braun; M. Durst; R. Mikumo

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammary epithelial cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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61

Mammary gland tumor formation in transgenic mice overexpressing stromelysin-1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

metalloproteinase stromelysin-1 (SL-1) in the mammary gland.the mammary glands from SL-1 transgenic mice, which expressThe mechanism by which SL-1 acts as a morphogen, leading to

Sympson, Carolyn J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Of Microenvironments and Mammary Stem Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of female C3H mice. Cancer Research, 19, 515520. 2. Kordon,for breast carcinogenesis. Cancer Research, 56, 402404. 4.breast tissue. Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, 67, 93

LaBarge, Mark A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Human papillomavirus type 16 E6 and E 7 proteins alter NF-kB in cultured cervical epithelial cells and inhibition of NF-kB promotes cell growth and immortalization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NF-kB family of transcription factors regulates important biological functions including cell growth, survival and the immune response. We found that Human Papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) E7 and E6/E7 proteins inhibited basal and TNF-alpha-inducible NF-kB activity in human epithelial cells cultured from the cervical transformation zone, the anatomic region where most cervical cancers develop. In contrast, HPV-16 E6 regulated NF-kB in a cell type- and cell growth-dependent manner. NF-kB influenced immortalization of cervical cells by HPV16. Inhibition of NF-kB by an IkB alpha repressor mutant increased colony formation and immortalization by HPV-16. In contrast, activation of NF-kB by constitutive expression of p65 inhibited proliferation and immortalization. Our results suggest that inhibition of NF-kB by HPV-16 E6/E7 contributes to immortalization of cells from the cervical transformation zone.

Vandermark, Erik R.; Deluca, Krysta A.; Gardner, Courtney R.; Marker, Daniel F.; Schreiner, Cynthia N.; Strickland, David A.; Wilton, Katelynn M. [Department of Biology, Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY 13699-5805 (United States)] [Department of Biology, Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY 13699-5805 (United States); Mondal, Sumona [Department of Mathematics, Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY 13699-5805 (United States)] [Department of Mathematics, Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY 13699-5805 (United States); Woodworth, Craig D., E-mail: woodworth@clarkson.edu [Department of Biology, Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY 13699-5805 (United States)

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

64

Normal Tissue Injury Responses in Mammary Glands After Low Doses...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

we take advantage of the variation in sensitivity to radiation induced mammary gland cancer in three genetically defined inbred strains of mice (BALBc: sensitive; C57BL6...

65

Regulation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition and DNA damage responses by singleminded-2s  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Virtually all signaling pathways that play key roles in development such as the transfroming growth factor (TGF)-beta, notch, and wnt pathways also influence tumor formation, implying that cancer is in a sense development gone awry. Therefore, identification and elucidation of developmental pathways has great potential for generating new diagnostic tools and molecular therapy targets. Singleminded-2s (SIM2s), a splice variant of the basic helilx-loop-helix / PER-ARNT-SIM (bHLH/PAS) transcriptional repressor Singleminded-2, is lost or repressed in approximately 70% of human breast tumors and has a profound influence on normal mammary development. In order to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms by which SIM2s restricts malignant transformation and progression in breast cancer, we depleted SIM2 RNA in MCF-7 cells using a retroviral shRNA system and examined gene expression and functional abilities of the SIM2-depleted MCF-7 cells (SIM2i) relative to a control MCF line expressing a non-specific scrambled shRNA (SCR). Depletion of SIM2 resulted in an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-like effect characterized by increased migration and invasion, altered morphology, and loss of epithelial markers concomitant with gain of mesenchymal markers. The root of this effect may be loss of SIM2- mediated repression of the E-cadherin repressor slug, as SIM2 is able to bind and repress transcription from the slug promoter, and slug expression is dramatically elevated in SIM2i MCF-7 cells. Consistent with the previously established role of slug in resistance to various cancer therapies, SIM2i cells are resistant to the radiomimetic doxorubicin and appear to have elevated self-renewal capacity under certain conditions. Intriguingly, SIM2 protein levels are elevated by treatment with DNA damaging agents, and SIM2 interacts with the p53 complex via co-regulation of specific p53- target gene such as p21/WAF1/CIP1. These results provide a plausible mechanism for the tumor suppressor activity of SIM2, and provide insight into a novel tumor suppressive transcriptional circuit that may have utility as a therapeutic target.

Laffin, Brian Edward

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Pulmonary macrophage and epithelial cells  

SciTech Connect

Separate abstracts were prepared for the 41 papers presented at the conference. Abstracts of two papers have appeared in previous issues of Energy Research Abstracts. (HLW)

Sanders, C.L.; Schneider, R.P.; Dagle, G.E.; Ragan, H.A. (eds.)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Extracellular matrix control of mammary gland morphogenesis and tumorigenesis: insights from imaging  

SciTech Connect

The extracellular matrix (ECM), once thought to solely provide physical support to a tissue, is a key component of a cell's microenvironment responsible for directing cell fate and maintaining tissue specificity. It stands to reason, then, that changes in the ECM itself or in how signals from the ECM are presented to or interpreted by cells can disrupt tissue organization; the latter is a necessary step for malignant progression. In this review, we elaborate on this concept using the mammary gland as an example. We describe how the ECM directs mammary gland formation and function, and discuss how a cell's inability to interpret these signals - whether as a result of genetic insults or physicochemical alterations in the ECM - disorganizes the gland and promotes malignancy. By restoring context and forcing cells to properly interpret these native signals, aberrant behavior can be quelled and organization re-established. Traditional imaging approaches have been a key complement to the standard biochemical, molecular, and cell biology approaches used in these studies. Utilizing imaging modalities with enhanced spatial resolution in live tissues may uncover additional means by which the ECM regulates tissue structure, on different length scales, through its pericellular organization (short-scale) and by biasing morphogenic and morphostatic gradients (long-scale).

Ghajar, Cyrus M; Bissell, Mina J

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

68

Lack of Radiation Dose or Quality Dependence of Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) Mediated by Transforming Growth Factor {beta}  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a phenotype that alters cell morphology, disrupts morphogenesis, and increases motility. Our prior studies have shown that the progeny of human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs) irradiated with 2 Gy undergoes transforming growth factor {beta} (TGF-{beta})-mediated EMT. In this study we determined whether radiation dose or quality affected TGF-{beta}-mediated EMT. Methods and Materials: HMECs were cultured on tissue culture plastic or in Matrigel (BD Biosciences, San Jose, CA) and exposed to low or high linear energy transfer (LET) and TGF-{beta} (400 pg/mL). Image analysis was used to measure membrane-associated E-cadherin, a marker of functional epithelia, or fibronectin, a product of mesenchymal cells, as a function of radiation dose and quality. Results: E-cadherin was reduced in TGF-{beta}-treated cells irradiated with low-LET radiation doses between 0.03 and 2 Gy compared with untreated, unirradiated cells or TGF-{beta} treatment alone. The radiation quality dependence of TGF-{beta}-mediated EMT was determined by use of 1 GeV/amu (gigaelectron volt / atomic mass unit) {sup 56}Fe ion particles at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Space Radiation Laboratory. On the basis of the relative biological effectiveness of 2 for {sup 56}Fe ion particles' clonogenic survival, TGF-{beta}-treated HMECs were irradiated with equitoxic 1-Gy {sup 56}Fe ion or 2-Gy {sup 137}Cs radiation in monolayer. Furthermore, TGF-{beta}-treated HMECs irradiated with either high- or low-LET radiation exhibited similar loss of E-cadherin and gain of fibronectin and resulted in similar large, poorly organized colonies when embedded in Matrigel. Moreover, the progeny of HMECs exposed to different fluences of {sup 56}Fe ion underwent TGF-{beta}-mediated EMT even when only one-third of the cells were directly traversed by the particle. Conclusions: Thus TGF-{beta}-mediated EMT, like other non-targeted radiation effects, is neither radiation dose nor quality dependent at the doses examined.

Andarawewa, Kumari L.; Costes, Sylvain V. [Life Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Fernandez-Garcia, Ignacio [Department of Radiation Oncology, NYU Langone School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Chou, William S. [Life Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, NYU Langone School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Ravani, Shraddha A.; Park, Howard [Life Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen, E-mail: mhbarcellos-hoff@nyumc.or [Life Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, NYU Langone School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

A Role for Id-1 in the Aggressive Phenotype and Steroid ...  

Desprez, P. Y., Hara E., Bissell, M. J., and Campisi, J. Suppression of mammary epithelial cell differentiation by the helix-loop-helix protein Id-1. Mol. Cell.

70

Gene expression analysis of human primary prostate epithelial and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

expression analysis of human primary prostate epithelial and expression analysis of human primary prostate epithelial and fibroblast cell cultures to an acute dose of 10cGy J. Tyson McDonald Steward St. Elizabeth’s Medical Center Abstract Primary tissue represents a better model for studies than immortalized cell lines that are adapted to culture conditions and may no longer reflect a realistic biological state. In this study, normal tissues from clinically indicated robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy were grossly identified, sectioned into frozen or formalin fixed samples, and processed as primary cultures. Normal epithelial and fibroblast primary cell cultures were derived from regions of normal tissue, as confirmed by analysis on adjacent tissue by hematoxylin and eosin staining, were exposed to acute

71

The Role of single minded 2 short in mammary gland development and breast cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Single minded 2 (Sim2) is a member of the basic helix-loop-helix Per-ARNT-Sim (Period-Arylhydrocarbon Nuclear Translocator-Single minded) family. Human SIM2 is involved in the etiology of the Downs phenotype. In addition to the physical and mental deficiencies associated with DS, it has become apparent that women with DS are 10-25 times less likely to develop breast cancer in comparison to age-matched normal populations. Such significant effects on breast cancer susceptibility are thought to result from gene dosage effects of one or more tumor suppressor genes on chromosome 21. Here we report the identification and transcriptional characterization of mouse Sim2s, a splice variant of Sim2, which is missing the carboxyl Pro/Ala-rich repressive domain. Similar to full-length Sim2, Sim2s interacts with ARNT and to a lesser extent, ARNT2. The effects of Sim2s on transcriptional regulation through hypoxia-, dioxin- and central midline response elements are different than that of full length Sim2. Specifically, Sim2s exerts a less repressive effect on hypoxia-induced gene expression than full length Sim2, but is just as effective as Sim2 at repressing TCDD-induced gene expression from a dioxin response element. Interestingly, Sim2s binds to and activates expression from a central midline response element-controlled reporter through an ARNT transactivation domain-dependent mechanism. Forced expression of SIM2s in MDA-MB-435 breast cancer cells significantly inhibited proliferation, reduced anchorage-independent growth, and decreased invasive potential. SIM2s directly decreased expression of matrix metalloprotease-3, a known mediator of breast cancer metastasis. In addition, loss of Sim2 in the mouse mammary gland increased ductal branching, accelerated lobuloalveolar-like precocious hyperplasia, and decreased cell apoptosis, suggesting that SIM2s is a mammary tumor suppressor. Sim2-/- mammary glands lose E-cadherin expression, suggesting that Sim2s plays a role in regulating E-cadherin/beta-catenin signaling. Loss of Sim2 in the mammary glands also resulted in dramatically increased MMP3 expression. The mechanism of SIM2smediated repression of MMP3 was found to be due to its ability to inhibit AP-1 binding to the MMP3 promoter. These results suggest that SIM2s contributes to the breast cancer protective effects observed in DS individuals.

Kwak, Hyeong-il

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

The MAPKERK-1,2 pathway integrates distinct and antagonistic signals from TGF alpha and FGF7 in morphogenesis of mouse mammary epithelium  

SciTech Connect

Transforming growth factor-{alpha} (TGF{alpha}) and fibroblast growth factor-7 (FGF7) exhibit distinct expression patterns in the mammary gland. Both factors signal through mitogen-activated kinase/extracellular regulated kinase-1,2 (MAPK{sup ERK1,2}); however, their unique and/or combined contributions to mammary morphogenesis have not been examined. In ex vivo mammary explants, we show that a sustained activation of MAPK{sup ERK1,2} for 1 h, induced by TGF{alpha}, was necessary and sufficient to initiate branching morphogenesis, whereas a transient activation (15 min) of MAPK{sup ERK1,2}, induced by FGF7, led to growth without branching. Unlike TGF{alpha}, FGF7 promoted sustained proliferation as well as ectopic localization of, and increase in, keratin-6 expressing cells. The response of the explants to FGF10 was similar to that to FGF7. Simultaneous stimulation by FGF7 and TGF{alpha} indicated that the FGF7-induced MAPK{sup ERK1,2} signaling and associated phenotypes were dominant: FGF7 may prevent branching by suppression of two necessary TGF{alpha}-induced morphogenetic effectors, matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3/stromelysin-1), and fibronectin. Our findings indicate that expression of morphogenetic effectors, proliferation, and cell-type decisions during mammary organoid morphogenesis are intimately dependent on the duration of activation of MAPK{sup ERK1,2} activation.

Fata, Jimmie E; Mori, Hidetoshi; Ewald, Andrew J; Zhang, Hui; Yao, Evelyn; Werb, Zena; Bissell, Mina J

2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

73

Numeric Definition of the Clinical Performance of the Nested Reverse Transcription-PCR for Detection of Hematogenous Epithelial Cells and Correction for Specific mRNA of Non-Target Cell Origin as Evaluated for Prostate Cancer Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: Inappropriate quality management of reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) assays for the detection of blood-borne prostate cancer (PCa) cells hampers clinical conclusions. Improvement of the RT-PCR methodology for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) mRNA should focus on an appropriate numeric definition of the performance of the assay and correction for PSA mRNA that is not associated with PCa cells. Methods and Results: Repeated (RT-)PCR tests for PSA mRNA in single blood specimens from PCa patients and PCa-free controls, performed by four international institutions, showed a large percentage (?50%) of divergent test results. The best estimates of the mean, ? (SD), of the expected Poisson frequency distributions of the number of positive tests among five replicate assays of

Genetics; Denis Schamhart; Johannes Swinnen; Karl-heinz Kurth; Alex Westerhof; Ron Kusters; Holger Borchers; Cora Sternberg; Nl Den

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Radiation Alters Epithelial...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

digital fluorescence microscopy. Typical integrin immunolocalization in mouse mammary gland is shown in Figure 2. text needed Figure 3 Relative immunoreactivity of a6 integrin...

75

Genetic susceptibility to low-dose ionizing radiation in the mouse mammary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Genetic susceptibility to low-dose ionizing radiation in the mouse mammary Genetic susceptibility to low-dose ionizing radiation in the mouse mammary gland as a means of understanding human risk for breast cancer Antoine M. Snijders Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract Goal: Our goal is to develop an in vivo mechanistic model of genetic variation in the low-dose damage responses of mammary glands using inbred mice known to vary in their sensitivity to low-dose induced mammary gland cancer, and to develop molecular predictors for susceptibility or resistance to low-dose induced breast cancer. Background and Significance: It is increasingly believed that individuals differ in their genetic susceptibilities to environmental insults for diseases such as cancer. This concern is especially important for the large numbers of individuals receiving low-dose exposures in the nuclear energy

76

A Cytogenetic Footprint for Mammary Carcinomas Induced by PhIP in Rats  

SciTech Connect

PhIP (2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo [4,5-b] pyridine), a mutagen/carcinogen belonging to the class of heterocyclic amines (HCAs) found in cooked meats, is a mammary gland carcinogen in rats and has been implicated in the etiology of certain human cancers including breast cancer. To gain insight into the genomic alterations associated with PhIP-induced mammary gland carcinogenesis, we used comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) to examine chromosomal abnormalities in rat mammary carcinomas induced by PhIP, and for comparison, by DMBA (7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene), a potent experimental mammary carcinogen. There was a consistent and characteristic pattern of chromosome-region loss in PhIP-induced carcinomas that clearly distinguished them from carcinomas induced by DMBA.

Christian, A T

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Putting Tumors in Context  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cells 49 . Stromelysin-1 (SL-1, also known as MMP-3), is anof mammary epithelial cells to SL-1 treatment: when grown intreatment of these cells with SL-1 causes apoptosis 52 .

Bissell, Mina

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Tissue architecture: the ultimate regulator of breast epithelial function  

SciTech Connect

A problem in developmental biology that continues to take center stage is how higher organisms generate diverse tissues and organs given the same cellular genotype. In cell and tumor biology, the key question is not the production of form, but its preservation: how do tissues and organs maintain homeostasis, and how do cells within tissues lose or overcome these controls in cancer? Undoubtedly, mechanisms that maintain tissue specificity should share features with those employed to drive formation of the tissues. However, they are unlikely to be identical. At a simplistic level, developmental pathways may be thought of as a series of extremely rapid short-term events. Each new step depends on what came before, and the outcome is the organism itself at birth. All organs, with a few notable exceptions, such as the mammary gland and the brain, 'arrive' together and are complete when the organism is born. In mice and humans, these events occur in a mere 21 days and 9 months respectively. The stability of the differentiated state and the homeostasis of the organism, on the other hand, will last 40-110 times longer. How does the organism achieve this feat? How are tissues maintained? These questions also relate fundamentally to how tissues become malignant and, although not discussed here, to aging. While there is much literature on differentiation - loosely defined as the gain of a single or a series of functions - we know much less about the forces and the pathways that maintain organ morphology and function as a unit. This may be partly because it is difficult to study a tissue as a unit in vivo and there are few techniques that allow maintenance of organs in vitro long enough and in such a way as to make cell and molecular biology experiments possible. Techniques for culturing cells in three-dimensional gels (3D) as a surrogate for tissues, however, have been steadily improving and the method is now used by several laboratories. In this commentary we discuss the following: first, how our laboratory came to develop a model of the mammary gland acinus; second, what this model has told us about mechanisms that govern tissue specificity and malignancy; and third, possible directions for future studies. We summarize the evidence for the central role of ECM signaling in the maintenance of mammary function in culture and (more briefly) its role in tumorigenesis. This is followed by a discussion of the role that tissue architecture and tissue polarity (as opposed to cell polarity) may play in these processes. In an elegantly written and reasoned essay, Kirschner et al. coined the new science of developmental biology 'molecular vitalism'. They framed new concepts for self-organization as well as schemes for information flow in biological organization. Rao et al. reviewed and elaborated on differential-equation-based models of biochemical reaction networks and intracellular noise, with emphasis on bacteria and phage. Similarly, Hartwell et al. discussed the synergy between experiment and theory in elucidating 'modules' - collections of interacting molecules - and in unraveling how these modules collaborate to perform cellular functions such as signal transduction. We believe that many of these ideas will also be applicable to the maintenance of tissue specificity. As much as we agree with Kirschner et al. regarding the limitations of the machine analogy to biological systems, we conclude with thoughts on how we may proceed to model the complex tissue networks that govern breast tissue architecture. We suggest that our understanding of the structure and function of breast tissue would benefit from examining recent techniques for modeling large complex networks such as the World Wide Web and the Internet backbone among others.

Bissell, Mina J; Rizki, Aylin; Mian, Saira

2003-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

79

MicroRNA expression in canine mammary cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play a vital role in differentiation, proliferation and tumorigenesis by binding to messenger RNAs (mRNA) and inhibiting translation. To initiate an investigation into the identification of miRNAs in the domestic dog, an emerging model for human disease, a comparison of the human and canine genetic databases was conducted. The bioinformatics work revealed significant conservation of miRNA genes between the two species. Proof of principle experiments, including serial dilutions and sequencing, were performed to verify that primers made to amplify human mature miRNAs can be used to amplify canine miRNAs, providing that the mature sequences are conserved. TaqMan Real-time RT-PCR, a sensitive and specific method, was used to isolate the first miRNA mature products from canine tissues. The expression levels of miR-17-3p, miR-17-5p, miR-18, miR-19a, miR-19b, miR-20, and miR-92 were evaluated in five canine tissues (heart, lung, brain, kidney, and liver). Because miRNAs have been found to act as both tumor suppressors and oncogenes in several different cancers, expression patterns of ten miRNAs (miR-15a, miR-16, miR-17-5p, miR-21, miR-29b, miR-125b, miR-145, miR-155, miR-181b, let-7f) known to be associated with human breast cancer were compared between malignant canine mammary tumors (n=6) and normal canine mammary tissue (n=10). Resulting data revealed miR-29b and miR-21 to have a statistically significant (p<0.05) up-regulation in cancerous samples. Overall expression patterns showed nine of the ten miRNAs follow the same pattern of expression in the domestic dog as the human, while the miR-145 expression does not show a difference between the normal and cancerous samples.

Boggs, Rene' Michelle

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

[CANCER RESEARCH 64, 31713178, May 1, 2004] Activation of Akt-1 (PKB-) Can Accelerate ErbB-2-Mediated Mammary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[CANCER RESEARCH 64, 3171­3178, May 1, 2004] Activation of Akt-1 (PKB- ) Can Accelerate ErbB-2 is associated with activation of Akt-1. To directly assess the importance of Akt-1 activation in ErbB-2 mammary tumor progression, we interbred separate strains of transgenic mice carrying mouse mammary tumor virus/activated

Woodgett, Jim

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammary epithelial cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Annexin A9 (ANXA9) biomarker and therapeutic target in epithelial cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Amplification of the ANXA9 gene in human chromosomal region 1q21 in epithelial cancers indicates a likelihood of both in vivo drug resistance and metastasis, and serves as a biomarker indicating these aspects of the disease. ANXA9 can also serve as a therapeutic target. Interfering RNAs (iRNAs) (such as siRNA and miRNA) and shRNA adapted to inhibit ANXA9 expression, when formulated in a therapeutic composition, and delivered to cells of the tumor, function to treat the epithelial cancer.

Hu, Zhi (El Cerrito, CA); Kuo, Wen-Lin (San Ramon, CA); Neve, Richard M. (San Mateo, CA); Gray, Joe W. (San Francisco, CA)

2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

82

Breast and other cancer dormancy as a therapeutic endpoint: speculative recombinant T cell receptor ligand (RTL) adjuvant therapy worth considering?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

regulation of tumours can be tested in a tri-transgenic mice model engineered to express potent oncogenes in a doxycycline-dependent manner. We suggest seeding dissociated, untransformed mammary cells from doxycycline nave mice into the lungs of two...

Bakacs, Tibor; Mehrishi, Jitendra N

2010-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

83

Original article RT-PCR detection of lentiviruses in milk or mammary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Original article RT-PCR detection of lentiviruses in milk or mammary secretions of sheep or goats ― In this study we evaluated a reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technique on seven goats infected with cloned caprine arthritis- encephalitis virus (CAEV) showed that RT-PCR on milk

Recanati, Catherine

84

Store-Independent Activation of Orai1 by SPCA2 in Mammary Tumors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Store-Independent Activation of Orai1 by SPCA2 in Mammary Tumors Mingye Feng,1 Desma M. Grice,3 in cytosolic Ca2+ trigger events critical for tumorigenesis, such as cellular motility, proliferation activity of SPCA2. Binding of the SPCA2 amino terminus to Orai1 enabled access of its carboxyl terminus

Kenny, Paraic

85

Mechanotransduction via airway epithelial cells : the effect of compressive stress  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A classic finding in asthma is a change in the structural organization of the airway epithelium. This complex process known as airway remodeling is not fully understood, and we believe that the forces accompanying airway ...

Koji?, Nikola, 1978-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Apical polarity in three-dimensional culture systems: where to now?  

SciTech Connect

Delineation of the mechanisms that establish and maintain the polarity of epithelial tissues is essential to understanding morphogenesis, tissue specificity and cancer. Three-dimensional culture assays provide a useful platform for dissecting these processes but, as discussed in a recent study in BMC Biology on the culture of mammary gland epithelial cells, multiple parameters that influence the model must be taken into account.

Inman, J.L.; Bissell, Mina

2010-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

87

Abstract Differentiation of body column epithelial cells in-to tentacle epithelial cells in Hydra is accompanied by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Universität (Biozentrum), Am Botanischen Garten 9, 24098 Kiel, Germany T.C.G. Bosch, Zoologisches Institut der Universität (Biozentrum), Am Botanischen Garten 9, 24098 Kiel, Germany Dev Genes Evol (2000) 210

Bosch, Thomas C. G.

88

Beta1 integrin deletion from the basal compartment of the mammary epithelium affects stem cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

adaptation and tissue renewal. Development. 129: 1377- 1386 2002; 24. Matulka LA , Triplett AA , Wagner KU

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

89

Genetic susceptibility to low-dose ionizing radiation in the mouse mammary glandas a means of understanding human risk for breast cancer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

susceptibility to low-dose ionizing radiation in the mouse mammary gland susceptibility to low-dose ionizing radiation in the mouse mammary gland as a means of understanding human risk for breast cancer Antoine M. Snijders 1 , Francesco Marchetti 1 , Ju Han 1 , Sandhya Bhatnagar 1 , Nadire Duru 1 , Zhi Hu 1 , Jian-Hua Mao 1 , Mina Bissell 1 , Joe Gray 1,2 , Gary H. Karpen 1 , Priscilla K. Cooper 1 and Andrew J. Wyrobek 1 1 Life Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 2 Current affiliation: Biomedical Engineering, Oregon Health Science Univ, Portland, OR Goal: Our goal is to develop an in vivo mechanistic model of genetic variation in the low-dose damage responses of mammary glands using inbred mice known to vary in their sensitivity to low-dose induced mammary gland cancer, and to develop molecular predictors for susceptibility or resistance to low-dose induced breast cancer.

90

Gene Expression in the Third Dimension: The ECM-nucleus Connection  

SciTech Connect

Decades ago, we and others proposed that the dynamic interplay between a cell and its surrounding environment dictates cell phenotype and tissue structure. Whereas much has been discovered about the effects of extracellular matrix molecules on cell growth and tissue specific gene expression, the nuclear mechanisms through which these molecules promote these physiological events remain unknown. Using mammary epithelial cells as a model, the purpose of this review is to discuss how the extracellular matrix influences nuclear structure and function in a three-dimensional context to promote epithelial morphogenesis and function in the mammary gland.

Spencer, Virginia A; Xu, Ren; Bissell, Mina

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Quantitative Analysis of Connexin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quantitative Analysis of Connexin Expression in Cultured Colonies Quantitative Analysis of Connexin Expression in Cultured Colonies Authors: B. Parvin, Q. Yang, R. L. Henshall-Powell and M.H. Barcellos Hoff We are studying the effects of ionizing radiation on the signaling between human mammary epithelial cells and the extracellular microenvironment. To do so we use an assay based on the ability of the cells to organize into three-dimensional acini when embedded into an extracellular matrix. Although tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic mammary epithelial cells are nearly indistinguishable when cultured as monolayers, their biological character readily diverge when tissue-specific morphogenesis is analyzed. Non-malignant human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) cultured within a reconstituted basement membrane organize into acinar-like structures with

92

Internal Mammary Lymph Node Irradiation Contributes to Heart Dose in Breast Cancer  

SciTech Connect

We assessed the impact of internal mammary chain radiotherapy (IMC RT) to the radiation dose received by the heart in terms of heart dose-volume histogram (DVH). Thirty-six consecutive breast cancer patients presenting with indications for IMC RT were enrolled in a prospective study. The IMC was treated by a standard conformal RT technique (50 Gy). For each patient, a cardiac DVH was generated by taking into account the sole contribution of IMC RT. Cardiac HDV were compared according to breast cancer laterality and the type of previous surgical procedure, simple mastectomy or breast conservative therapy (BCT). The contribution of IMC RT to the heart dose was significantly greater for patients with left-sided versus right-sided tumors (13.8% and 12.8% for left-sided tumors versus 3.9% and 4.2% for right-sided tumors in the BCT group and the mastectomy group, respectively; p < 0.0001). There was no statistically significant difference in IMC contribution depending on the initial surgical procedure. IMC RT contributes to cardiac dose for both left-sided and right-sided breast cancers, although the relative contribution is greater in patients with left-sided tumors.

Chargari, Cyrus [Department of Radiotherapy, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Department of Radiotherapy and Medical Oncology, Hopital d'Instruction des Armees du Val-de-Grace, Paris (France); Castadot, Pierre [Department of Radio-Oncology, Institut Jules Bordet, Brussels (Belgium); MacDermed, Dhara [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Vandekerkhove, Christophe [Department of Medical Physics, Institut Jules Bordet, Brussels (Belgium); Bourgois, Nicolas; Van Houtte, Paul [Department of Radio-Oncology, Institut Jules Bordet, Brussels (Belgium); Magne, Nicolas, E-mail: nicolas.magne@igr.f [Department of Radiotherapy, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Department of Radio-Oncology, Institut Jules Bordet, Brussels (Belgium)

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Lymphoscintigraphy Can Select Breast Cancer Patients for Internal Mammary Chain Radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Given the risk of undesired toxicity, prophylactic internal mammary (IM) chain irradiation should be offered only to patients at high risk of occult involvement. Lymphoscintigraphy for axillary sentinel node biopsy might help in selecting these patients. Methods and Materials: We reviewed published studies with the following selection criteria: {>=}300 breast cancer patients referred for axilla sentinel node biopsy; scintigraphy performed after peritumoral or intratumoral tracer injection; IM biopsy in the case of IM drainage; and axilla staged routinely independent of IM status. Results: Six prospective studies, for a total of 3,876 patients, fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Parasternal drainage was present in 792 patients (20.4%). IM biopsy was performed in 644 patients and was positive in 111 (17.2%). Of the positive IM biopsies, 40% were associated with tumors in the lateral breast quadrants. A major difference in the IM positivity rate was found according to the axilla sentinel node status. In patients with negative axilla, the IM biopsy was positive in 7.8% of cases. In patients with positive axilla, however, the IM biopsy was positive in 41% (p < .00001). Because biopsy of multiple IM hot nodes is difficult, the true risk could be even greater, probably close to 50%. Conclusions: Patients with IM drainage on lymphoscintigraphy and a positive axilla sentinel node have a high risk of occult IM involvement. These women should be considered for IM radiotherapy.

Hindie, Elif, E-mail: elif.hindie@sls.aphp.fr [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris 7 University, Paris (France); Department of Nuclear Medicine, CHU de Bordeaux, University of Bordeaux-Segalen, Bordeaux (France); Groheux, David [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris 7 University, Paris (France); Hennequin, Christophe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris (France); Zanotti-Fregonara, Paolo; Vercellino, Laetitia; Berenger, Nathalie; Toubert, Marie-Elisabeth [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris 7 University, Paris (France); Maylin, Claude [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris (France); Vilcoq, Jacques-Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hartmann Hospital, Neuilly sur Seine (France); Espie, Marc [Breast Diseases Unit, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris (France)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

94

Automatic segmentation of histological structures in normal and neoplastic mammary gland tissue sections  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we present a scheme for real time segmentation of histological structures in microscopic images of normal and neoplastic mammary gland sections. Paraffin embedded or frozen tissue blocks are sliced, and sections are stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E). The sections are then imaged using conventional bright field microscopy. The background of the images is corrected by arithmetic manipulation using a ''phantom.'' Then we use the fast marching method with a speed function that depends on the brightness gradient of the image to obtain a preliminary approximation to the boundaries of the structures of interest within a region of interest (ROI) of the entire section manually selected by the user. We use the result of the fast marching method as the initial condition for the level set motion equation. We run this last method for a few steps and obtain the final result of the segmentation. These results can be connected from section to section to build a three-dimensional reconstruction of the entire tissue block that we are studying.

Fernandez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Deschamps, Thomas; Idica, Adam K.; Malladi, Ravi; Ortiz de Solorzano, Carlos

2003-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

95

Restoration of normal phenotype in cancer cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for reversing expression of malignant phenotype in cancer cells is described. The method comprises applying .beta..sub.1 integrin function-blocking antibody to the cells. The method can be used to assess the progress of cancer therapy. Human breast epithelial cells were shown to be particularly responsive.

Bissell, Mina J. (Berkeley, CA); Weaver, Valerie M. (Oakland, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Restoration of normal phenotype in cancer cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for reversing expression of malignant phenotype in cancer cells is described. The method comprises applying {beta}{sub 1} integrin function-blocking antibody to the cells. The method can be used to assess the progress of cancer therapy. Human breast epithelial cells were shown to be particularly responsive. 14 figs.

Bissell, M.J.; Weaver, V.M.

1998-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

97

Determination of the functional size of oxytocin receptors in plasma membranes from mammary gland and uterine myometrium of the rat by radiation inactivation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gel filtration of detergent-solubilized oxytocin (OT) receptors in plasma membrane fractions from both regressed mammary gland and labor myometrium of the rat, showed that specific (/sup 3/H)OT binding was associated with a heterogeneously sized population of macromolecules. As radiation inactivation is the only method available to measure the apparent molecular weights of membrane proteins in situ, we used this approach to define the functional sizes of OT receptors. The results indicate that both mammary and myometrial receptors are uniform in size and of similar molecular mass. Mammary and myometrial receptors were estimated to be 57.5 +/- 3.8 (SD) and 58.8 +/- 1.6 kilodaltons, respectively. Knowledge of the functional size of OT receptors will be useful in studies involving the purification and characterization of the receptor and associated membrane components.

Soloff, M.S.; Beauregard, G.; Potier, M.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff - 2003  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Low Dose Radiation Program Workshop IV DOE Low Dose Radiation Program Workshop IV Abstract Title: TGF-β Protects Human Mammary Epithelial Cells from Radiation-Induced Centrosome Amplification Authors: Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff, Bahram Parvin, Anna C. Erickson and Rishi Gupta Institutions: Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Life Sciences Division, Ernest Orlando Lawrence, Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California In recent studies we have shown that ionizing radiation (IR), a known carcinogen of human and murine mammary gland, compromises human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) polarity and multicellular organization in a manner characteristic of neoplastic progression through a heritable, non-mutational mechanism (1). Thus, when all cells are irradiated with a significant dose (2 Gy), the daughters of irradiated cells lose their

99

Inflammation and Proliferation Act Together to Mediate Intestinal Cell Fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cell fusion between circulating bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs) and non-hematopoietic cells is well documented in various tissues and has recently been suggested to occur in response to injury. Here we illustrate that inflammation within the intestine enhanced the level of BMDC fusion with intestinal progenitors. To identify important microenvironmental factors mediating intestinal epithelial cell fusion, we performed bone marrow transplantation into mouse models of inflammation and stimulated epithelial proliferation. Interestingly, in a non-injury model or in instances where inflammation was suppressed, an appreciable baseline level of fusion persisted. This suggests that additional mediators of cell fusion exist. A rigorous temporal analysis of early post-transplantation cellular dynamics revealed that GFP-expressing donor cells first trafficked to the intestine coincident with a striking increase in epithelial proliferation, advocating for a required fusogenic state of the host partner. Directly supporting this hypothesis, induction of augmented epithelial proliferation resulted in a significant increase in intestinal cell fusion. Here we report that intestinal inflammation and epithelial proliferation act together to promote cell fusion. While the physiologic impact of cell fusion is not yet known, the increased incidence in an inflammatory and proliferative microenvironment suggests a potential role for cell fusion in mediating the progression of

Paige S. Davies; Anne E. Powell; John R. Swain; Melissa H. Wong

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Epithelial Membrane Protein-2 Promotes Endometrial Tumor Formation through Activation of FAK and Src  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Endometrial cancer is the most common gynecologic malignancy diagnosed among women in developed countries. One recent biomarker strongly associated with disease progression and survival is epithelial membrane protein-2 (EMP2), a tetraspan protein known to associate with and modify surface expression of certain integrin isoforms. In this study, we show using a xenograft model system that EMP2 expression is necessary for efficient endometrial tumor formation, and we have started to characterize the mechanism by which EMP2 contributes to this malignant phenotype. In endometrial cancer cells, the focal adhesion kinase (FAK)/Src pathway appears to regulate migration as measured through wound healing assays. Manipulation of EMP2 levels in endometrial cancer cells regulates the phosphorylation of FAK and Src, and promotes their distribution into lipid raft domains. Notably, cells with low levels of EMP2 fail to migrate and poorly form tumors in vivo. These findings reveal the pivotal role of EMP2 in endometrial cancer carcinogenesis, and suggest that the association of elevated EMP2 levels with endometrial cancer prognosis may be causally linked to its effect on integrin-mediated signaling.

Maoyong Fu; Rajiv Rao; Deepthi Sudhakar; Claire P. Hogue; Zach Rutta; Shawn Morales; Lynn K; Jonathan Braun; Lee Goodglick; Madhuri Wadehra

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammary epithelial cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Mucin granule-associated proteins in human bronchial epithelial cells: the airway goblet cell "granulome"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of cysteine string protein (CSP) in regulated exocytosis.Cysteine string protein [CSP]) and cytoskeletal (actin,that MARCKS, HSP70, CSP and hCLCA1 were present on the

Raiford, Kimberly L; Park, Joungjoa; Lin, Ko-Wei; Fang, Shijing; Crews, Anne L; Adler, Kenneth B

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

The matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin-1 acts as a natural mammary tumor promoter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rise to a tumor cell line (TCL-1) (Lochter et al. , 1997b)d -f) The tumor cell line (TCL-1) established from the tumorand DAPI counterstaining (f). (g -i) TCL-1-derived tumors in

Sternlicht, Mark D

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Tension, Free Space, and Cell Damage in a Microfluidic Wound Healing Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use a novel, microfluidics-based technique to deconstruct the classical wound healing scratch assay, decoupling the contribution of free space and cell damage on the migratory dynamics of an epithelial sheet. This method ...

Murrell, Michael

104

Self-organization of engineered epithelial tubules by ...  

Tracking individual cells within engi-neered tissues in both YFP and CFP channels demonstrated that MMP14hi cells moved significantly faster (50% increase) and with

105

Alpha1 and Alpha2 Integrins Mediate Invasive Activity of Mouse Mammary Carcinoma Cells through Regulation of Stromelysin-1 Expression  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

recombinant stromelysin-1 (SL-1) on invasion and migration?2, ?6, or ?1 integrin subunits with (+ SL-1, black bars)or without (- SL-1, white bars) the addition of recombinant

Lochter, Andre

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Effect of dietary fat on uptake of lysine, phenylalanine, leucine and methionine by bovine mammary tissue slices in vitro  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four mature Holstein cows in late lactation were blocked in two groups based on milk production, in a 2x2 reversal with 21-day periods, and fed: (A) control diet; (B) A plus 1 kg/day tallow. Cows were fed sorghum silage ad libitum. Blood samples were collected from the jugular vein on day 15, 17, and 19 of each period. Fat did not effect DM intake or milk yield, however milk CP yield was 20% lower. Plasma lipids increased 33.6%, glucose decreased 9% and insulin/glucagon ratio decreased 21.2% in cow fed fat. After period two, cows were slaughtered and mammary tissue sampled for incubation in Krebs Ringer bicarbonate buffer containing 22 AA at arterial concentration and .225 {mu}Ci/ml of {sup 14}C-labelled L-Leu, L-Phe, L-Lys or D/L Met. Dietary fat decreased tissue AA uptake rate by 21.2%. Uptake was 4.8, 10.3, 17.8 and 2.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} {mu}M/min/gm of tissue DM for Phe, Lys, Leu and Met, respectively. Results suggest that dietary fat may decrease milk protein synthesis by lowering the rate of AA uptake.

Nianogo, A.J.; Amos, H.E.; Dean, R.; Froetschel, A. (Univ. of Georgia, Athens (USA)); Fernandez, J.M. (Langston Univ., OK (USA))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Using ex vivo organ culture models as surrogates to investigate morphological and functional differences of mammary glands derived from mouse strains that differ in cancer susceptibility to understand the underlying mechanisms of radiation sensitivity or resistance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ex vivo organ culture models as surrogates to investigate morphological and functional ex vivo organ culture models as surrogates to investigate morphological and functional differences of mammary glands derived from mouse strains that differ in cancer susceptibility to understand the underlying mechanisms of radiation sensitivity or resistance Alvin Lo, Joni D. Mott, Jian-Hua Mao, and Mina J. Bissell Life Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley CA 94720 Goal: Within the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Low Dose SFA, as part of Project 2, we are using a systems genetics approach to determine the contribution of non-targeted and targeted radiation effects for risk of mammary carcinogenesis. The goal of this work is to characterize the mammary gland of the parental mouse strains, and the F1 and F2 generations used in these studies with respect to tissue

108

Senescence-Associated Secretory Phenotypes Reveal Cell-Nonautonomous Functions of Oncogenic RAS and the p53 Tumor Suppressor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cellular senescence suppresses cancer by arresting cell proliferation, essentially permanently, in response to oncogenic stimuli, including genotoxic stress. We modified the use of antibody arrays to provide a quantitative assessment of factors secreted by senescent cells. We show that human cells induced to senesce by genotoxic stress secrete myriad factors associated with inflammation and malignancy. This senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) developed slowly over several days and only after DNA damage of sufficient magnitude to induce senescence. Remarkably similar SASPs developed in normal fibroblasts, normal epithelial cells, and epithelial tumor cells after genotoxic stress in culture, and in epithelial tumor cells in vivo after treatment of prostate cancer patients with DNA-damaging chemotherapy. In cultured premalignant epithelial cells, SASPs induced an epithelial-mesenchyme transition and invasiveness, hallmarks of malignancy, by a paracrine mechanism that depended largely on the SASP factors interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8. Strikingly, two manipulations markedly amplified, and accelerated development of, the SASPs: oncogenic RAS expression, which causes genotoxic stress and senescence in normal cells, and functional loss of the p53 tumor suppressor protein. Both loss of p53 and gain of oncogenic RAS also exacerbated the promalignant paracrine activities of the SASPs. Our findings define a central feature of genotoxic stress-induced senescence. Moreover, they suggest a cell-nonautonomous mechanism by which p53 can restrain, and oncogenic RAS can promote, the development of age-related cancer by altering the tissue microenvironment.

Copp, Jean-Philippe; Patil, Christopher; Rodier, Francis; Sun, Yu; Munoz, Denise; Goldstein, Joshua; Nelson, Peter; Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Campisi, Judith

2008-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

109

Resistance to Cry toxins and epithelial healing Anas Castagnola, Juan Luis Jurat-Fuentes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Resistance to Cry toxins and epithelial healing Anaïs Castagnola, Juan Luis Jurat: Resistance to Cry toxins can develop by alterations in any of the steps in the Cry toxin mode of action. Most characterized mechanisms of resistance to Cry toxins involve alterations in enzymatic toxin processing or toxin

Jurat-Fuentes, Juan Luis

110

The plasticity of human breast carcinoma cells is more than epithelial to mesenchymal conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to mesenchymal conversion Ole William Petersen * , Helgaalso become clear that conversions towards the mesenchymalconsequences of such a conversion. It is clear that defining

Petersen, Ole William

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Differences in the regulation of Thrombospondin-1 expression between epithelial cells and fibroblasts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Induction of angiogenesis is a critical and rate-limiting step in the progression of cancer. It is widely acknowledged that this induction requires the concomitant stimulation of pro-angiogenic and repression of anti-angiogenic ...

Rodriguez, Roberto Karlo

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Multi-cellular Crosstalk in Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About this Project About this Project Multi-cellular Crosstalk in Radiation Damage Technical Abstracts 2006 Workshop: Low-LET Bystander Effects in Cells In Vitro Are Significantly Less Than Published For High-LET Radiation Blakely, E.A., Thompson, A.C., Chang, P., Schwarz, R.I., Bjornstad, K., Rosen, C., Wisnewski, C., and Mocherla, D. 2005 Workshop: X-ray Microbeam Bystander Studies with Human Mammary Epithelial Cells and Fibroblasts Blakely, E.A., Schwarz, R.I., Thompson, A.C., Bjornstad, K.A., Chang, P.Y., Rosen, C.J., Sudar, D., Romano, R., and Parvin, B. 2003 Workshop: 12.5 keV X-ray Microbeam Bystander Studies with Human Mammary Epithelial Cells and Fibroblasts Blakely, E.A., Schwarz, R.I., Thompson, A.C., Bjornstad, K.A., Chang, P.Y., Rosen, C.J., and Sudar, D. 2001 Workshop:

113

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Low Dose Response of Respiratory Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Response of Respiratory Cells in Intact Tissues and Reconstituted Response of Respiratory Cells in Intact Tissues and Reconstituted Tissue John Ford Department of Nuclear Engineering Texas A & M University Why this Project? Using the well-established rat trachea model to test the hypothesis that normal respiratory epithelial cells transmit signals to neighboring cells in response to very low dose radiation exposure. Project Goals By comparing the responses shown by cells in these normal rodent respiratory tissues to those seen for human respiratory epithelial cells in reconstituted tissue constructs, it will be possible to better understand the responds in human respiratory cells in vivo. These studies will characterize responses after exposure to a variety of radiation types and dose distributions. Experimental Approach

114

Evaluation of Common Angling-Induced Sources of Epithelial Damage for Popular Freshwater Sport Fish using Fluorescein  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Angling is a popular recreational activity across the globe and a large proportion of fish captured by anglers are released due to voluntary or mandatory catch-and-release practices. The handling associated with hook removal and return of the fish to their environment can cause physical damage to the epidermal layer of the fish which may affect the condition and survival of released fish. This study investigated possible sources of epithelial damage associated with several different handling methods (i.e. landing net types, interactions with different boat floor surfaces, tournament procedures) commonly used in recreational angling for two popular freshwater sport fish species, largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) and northern pike (Esox lucius). Epithelial damage was examined using fluorescein, a non-toxic dye, which has been shown to detect latent epithelial damage. Northern pike exhibited extensive epithelial damage after exposure to several of the induced treatments (i.e., interaction with a carpeted surface, knotted nylon net, and line rolling) but relatively little epithelial damage when exposed to others (i.e., knotless rubber nets, smooth boat surfaces, or lip gripping devices). Largemouth bass did not show significant epithelial damage for any of the treatments, with the exception of fish caught in a semi-professional live release tournament. The detection of latent injuries using fluorescein can be an important management tool as it provides visual examples of potential damage that can be caused by different handling methods. Such visualizations can be used to encourage fish friendly angler behaviour and enhance the survival and welfare of released fish. It can also be used to test new products that are intended to or claim to reduce injury to fish that are to be released. Future research should evaluate the relationship between different levels of epithelial damage and mortality across a range of environmental conditions.

Colotelo, Alison HA; Cooke, Steven J.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Investigation of non-targeted effects of low dose ionizing radiation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investigation of non-targeted effects of low dose ionizing radiation on the mammary gland utilizing three-dimensional culture models of mammary cells derived from mouse strains...

116

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: 2011 Current Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investigation of non-targeted effects of low dose ionizing radiation on the mammary gland utilizing three-dimensional culture models of mammary cells derived from mouse strains...

117

Synergistic Effects of Ultrasound-Activated Microbubbles and Doxorubicin on Short-Term Survival of Mouse Mammary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Synergistic Effects of Ultrasound-Activated Microbubbles and Doxorubicin on Short-Term Survival and incubated for 24 hours at 37 °C, 100% humidity and 5% CO2 . The efficacies of the drug only and ultrasound-activated 24 hoursof treat- ment using the MTT Cell Proliferation Assay. The combined therapy resulted in 60

Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

118

Inhibitory actions of Ah receptor agonists and indole-containing compounds in breast cancer cell lines and mouse models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) binds synthetic and chemoprotective phytochemicals, and research in this laboratory has developed selective AhR modulators (SAhRMs) for treatment of breast cancer. Activation of the AhR through agonists such as TCDD inhibits hormone activation of several E2-responsive genes in breast cancer cell lines. In this study, inhibition of E2-induced proliferation and gene expression by TCDD has been investigated in the uterus of wildtype, ERKO and AhRKO mice. Cyclin D1, DNA polymerase ?, and VEGF mRNA levels are induced by E2 through ER? in the uterus as determined by in situ hybridization studies. TCDD down-regulated E2-induced cyclin D1 and DNA polymerase ? expression, but not E2-induced VEGF expression, in wild-type mice, but not AhRKO mice, confirming the role of the AhR. Furthermore, protein synthesis was not necessary for induction of cyclin D1 or DNA polymerase ?gene expression by E2 or inhibition of these responses by TCDD. Therefore, AhR-ER? crosstalk directly regulates the expression of genes involved in cell proliferation in vivo. AhR agonists induce down-regulation of ErbB family receptors in multiple tissues/organs suggesting possible inhibitory interactions with chemotherapeutic potential. Recently, it has been reported that the SAhRM 1,1??,2,2??-tetramethyldiindolylmethane inhibited DMBA-induced mammary tumor growth in rats and also inhibited MAPK and PI3-K pathways in human breast cancer cells. BT-474 and MDA-MB-453 cell lines are ErbB2-overexpressing breast cancer cells that express functional AhR and exhibit constitutive activation of MAPK and PI3-K pathways. Therefore, 1,1??,2,2??-tetramethyldiindolylmethane-induced inhibition of ErbB2 signaling was investigated in these cells lines and in the MMTV-c-neu mouse mammary tumor model, which overexpresses ErbB2 in the mammary gland. The growth of ErbB2 overexpressing cell lines and mammary tumors was inhibited by 1,1??,2,2??-tetramethyldiindolylmethane; however, modulation of MAPK or PI3-K pathways and cell cycle proteins nor induction of apoptosis by 1,1',2,2'-tetramethyldiindolylmethane was observed in the ErbB2overexpressing cell lines. Current studies are investigating mitochondrial effects of 1,1??,2,2??-tetramethyldiindolylmethane in the ErbB2-overexpressing cell lines, as well as continuing studies on gene expression profiles in the mammary glands of MMTV-c-neu mice to better understand and identify critical genes that are responsible for ErbB2-mediated transformation and growth of cancer cells/tumors.

Walker, Kelcey Manae Becker

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Parity induces differentiation and reduces Wnt/Notch signaling ratio and proliferation potential of basal stem/progenitor cells isolated from mouse mammary epithelium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Meier-Abt et al. Breast Cancer Research 2013, 15:R36 http://Meier-Abt et al. Breast Cancer Research 2013, 15:R36 http://epithelium. Breast Cancer Research 2013 15:R36. Submit your

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Discovery of a Novel Mode of Protein Kinase Inhibition Characterized by the Mesenchymal-epithelial Transition Factor (c-Met) Protein Autophosphorylation by ARQ 197  

SciTech Connect

A number of human malignancies exhibit sustained stimulation, mutation, or gene amplification of the receptor tyrosine kinase human mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor (c-Met). ARQ 197 is a clinically advanced, selective, orally bioavailable, and well tolerated c-Met inhibitor, currently in Phase 3 clinical testing in non-small cell lung cancer patients. Herein, we describe the molecular and structural basis by which ARQ 197 selectively targets c-Met. Through our analysis we reveal a previously undisclosed, novel inhibitory mechanism that utilizes distinct regulatory elements of the c-Met kinase. The structure of ARQ 197 in complex with the c-Met kinase domain shows that the inhibitor binds a conformation that is distinct from published kinase structures. ARQ 197 inhibits c-Met autophosphorylation and is highly selective for the inactive or unphosphorylated form of c-Met. Through our analysis of the interplay between the regulatory and catalytic residues of c-Met, and by comparison between the autoinhibited canonical conformation of c-Met bound by ARQ 197 to previously described kinase domains of type III receptor tyrosine kinases, we believe this to be the basis of a powerful new in silico approach for the design of similar inhibitors for other protein kinases of therapeutic interest.

S Eathiraj; R Palma; E Volckova; M Hirschi; D France; M Ashwell; T Chan

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammary epithelial cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Inflammatory response of lung cells exposed to whole, filtered, and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Inflammatory response of lung cells exposed to whole, filtered, and Inflammatory response of lung cells exposed to whole, filtered, and hydrocarbon denuded diesel exhaust Title Inflammatory response of lung cells exposed to whole, filtered, and hydrocarbon denuded diesel exhaust Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2007 Authors Holder, Amara L., Donald Lucas, Regine Goth-Goldstein, and Catherine P. Koshland Journal Chemosphere Volume 70 Pagination 13-19 Date Published 09/2007 Keywords air-liquid interface, combustion particle, human bronchial epithelial cells, interleukin-8 Abstract In vitro studies with the organic extracts of diesel particles have suggested that hydrocarbons such as PAH may play a role in an inflammatory response, but these have been limited by the possible artifacts introduced in the particle collection and processing. In this study, we avoid these artifacts and use an activated carbon denuder to remove hydrocarbons from the exhaust stream to investigate their role in the inflammatory response. Human bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE140) were exposed at the air-cell interface to diluted and aged exhaust from a diesel generator operated at partial and no load conditions. When particles were removed with a filter before cell exposure, exhaust gases accounted for almost half of the response compared to the whole exhaust. Removal of gas phase and a portion of the particle phase hydrocarbons with the denuder decreased the interleukin-8 (IL-8) secretion to unexposed levels

122

Does the Intent to Irradiate the Internal Mammary Nodes Impact Survival in Women With Breast Cancer? A Population-Based Analysis in British Columbia  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine the value of the intent to include internal mammary nodes (IMNs) in the radiation therapy (RT) volume for patients receiving adjuvant locoregional (breast or chest wall plus axillary and supraclavicular fossa) RT for breast cancer. Methods and Materials: 2413 women with node-positive or T3/4N0 invasive breast cancer, treated with locoregional RT from 2001 to 2006, were identified in a prospectively maintained, population-based database. Intent to include IMNs in RT volume was determined through review of patient charts and RT plans. Distant relapse free survival (D-RFS), breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS), and overall survival (OS) were compared between the two groups. Prespecified pN1 subgroup analyses were performed. Results: The median follow-up time was 6.2 years. Forty-one percent of study participants received IMN RT. The 5-year D-RFS for IMN inclusion and exclusion groups were 82% vs. 82% (p = 0.82), BCSS was 87% vs. 87% (p = 0.81), and OS was 85% vs. 83% (p = 0.06). In the pN1 subgroup, D-RFS was 90% vs. 88% (p = 0.31), BCSS was 94% vs. 92% (p = 0.18), and OS was 91% vs. 88% (p = 0.01). After potential confounding variables were controlled for, women who received IMN RT did not have significantly different D-RFS (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.02 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.84-1.24; p = 0.85), BCSS (HR = 0.98 (95% CI, 0.79-1.22; p = 0.88), or OS (HR = 0.95; 95% CI, 0.78-1.15; p = 0.57). In the pN1 subgroup, IMN RT was associated with trends for improved survival that were not statistically significant: D-RFS (HR = 0.87; 95% CI, 0.63-1.22; p = 0.42), BCSS (HR = 0.85; 95% CI, 0.57-1.25; p = 0.39), and OS (HR = 0.78; 95% CI, 0.56-1.09; p = 0.14). Conclusions: After a median follow-up time of 6.2 years, although intentional IMN RT was not associated with a significant improvement in survival, this population-based study suggests that IMN RT may contribute to improved outcomes in selected patients with N1 disease.

Olson, Robert A., E-mail: rolson2@bccancer.bc.ca [BC Cancer Agency, Radiation Therapy Program, BC (Canada); University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Woods, Ryan; Speers, Caroline [BC Cancer Agency, Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Lau, Jeffrey [University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Lo, Andrea; Truong, Pauline T. [BC Cancer Agency, Radiation Therapy Program, BC (Canada); University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Tyldesley, Scott; Olivotto, Ivo A. [BC Cancer Agency, Radiation Therapy Program, BC (Canada); University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); BC Cancer Agency, Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Weir, Lorna [BC Cancer Agency, Radiation Therapy Program, BC (Canada); University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Low Dose Response of Respiratory Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Low Dose Response of Respiratory Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Low Dose Response of Respiratory Cells in Intact Tissues and Reconstituted Tissue Constructs Authors: John Ford, Amy Maslowski, Alex Redd and Les Braby Institutions: Texas A&M University, College Station, TX We are developing a model of respiratory tissue using a perfusion culture system. We are using this system to quantify the effects of normal tissue architecture, and the interaction of epithelial cells with other cell types, on radiation-induced bystander effects. Tracheal tissue taken from young adult Fischer 344 rats is imbedded in a growth factor enriched agarose matrix. The chamber is designed to allow growth medium to periodically wash the epithelial surface of the tracheal lumen while maintaining the air-interface that is necessary for the normal

124

doi:10.5402/2011/617082 Research Article Epithelial Ovarian Cancer and the Occurrence of Skin Cancer in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Copyright 2011 Catharina C. van Niekerk et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Background. Patients with epithelial ovarian cancer have a high risk of (non-)melanoma skin cancer. The association between histological variants of primary ovarian cancer and skin cancer is poorly documented. Objectives. To further evaluate the risk of skin cancer based on the histology of the epithelial ovarian cancer. Methods. A cross-sectional study within a large populationbased dataset. Results. Skin cancer was found in 2.7 % (95 % CI: 2.33.1) of the 5366 individuals forming our dataset. The odds ratio (OR) for endometrioid cancer in the ovary to skin cancer in the under 50 age group was 8.9 (95 % CI: 3.225.0). The OR decreased in older patients to 1.2. Conclusions. Patients with epithelial ovarian malignancies show an increased risk of skin cancer. A significantly increased risk (4.3%) for endometrioid ovarian cancer was found in the group aged under 50. 1.

Isrn Obstetrics; Catharina C. Van Niekerk; Johan Bulten; Andrl. M. Verbeek

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: 12.5 keV Xray Microbeam Bystander  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

12.5 keV Xray Microbeam Bystander Studies With Human Mammary 12.5 keV Xray Microbeam Bystander Studies With Human Mammary Epithelial Cells and Fibroblasts Authors: E. A. Blakely1, R. I. Schwarz1, A. C. Thompson2, K. A. Bjornstad1, P. Y. Chang1,3 C.J. Rosen1, and D. Sudar1 Institutions: Divisions of 1Life Sciences and 2Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA. and 3SRI International, Menlo Park, CA. We are using a novel x-ray Microprobe Beamline at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at LBNL to investigate bystander effects of low doses in well characterized human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) and human skin fibroblasts (HSF). The ALS facility is capable of producing a beam of 12.5 keV x-rays with a focussed spot size of __m_ and a wide range of doses and dose-rates. Unlike normal x-ray sources, this beam has a very small background of either low-

126

A Critical Examination of the Adaptive Response for Cytogenetic Damagein Human Cells, and Insights into the Adaptive Response Mechanism  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Critical Examination of the Adaptive Response for Cytogenetic Damage Critical Examination of the Adaptive Response for Cytogenetic Damage in Human Cells, and Insights into the Adaptive Response Mechanism Björn E. Rydberg, Torsten Groesser, Antoine Snijders, Kelly Trego, Ju Han, Do Yup Lee, Bahram Parvin, Trent Northen, Andrew J. Wyrobek, and Priscilla K. Cooper Berkeley Lab SFA P.I.: Gary Karpen Life Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 Goal: Task 1 of the Berkeley Lab SFA is designed to identify adaptive response (AR) mechanisms that may affect risk of developing radiation-induced cancer and to assess the linearity with dose of processes that influence mammary gland carcinogenesis. We use both in vitro and in vivo experimental systems in a parallelogram strategy. Our human cell culture

127

Shaojin You,2 Zheng-Jin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) has been shown to reduce the incidence of carcinogen-induced rat mammary tumors. Because connexin 26 (Cx26), a tumor suppressor gene candidate, can be up-regulated in mammary epithelial cells during lactation, we examined the in vivo and ex vivo effects of hCG on Cx26 expression in rat mammary tissues and used its effect on the expressions of ß-caseinand Cx43 as controls. The Cx26 mRNA and protein expressions were up-regulated by daily administra tions of 100 units of hCG, starting on day 5 and reaching a 14-fold maximum increment on days 16 through 21. It remained elevated above the basal level even 20 days after hCG withdrawal. The changes in ß-caseinexpression ran parallel to that of Cx26, whereas the expression of Cx43 was down-regulated. There was no correlation between steroidal hormone levels and Cx26 expression, except for the first 5 days of hCG treatment. In the ex vivo organ culture system, exposure of mammary

Shaojin You; Zheng-jin Tu; David T. Kiang; Contact The Aacr Publications; Gonadotropin Rat; Mammary Glands; David T. Kiang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

High LET radiatSpace Radiation Can Enhance the TGFβ InducedEpithelial-Mesenchymal Transitionion can enhance TGFβ induced EMT and cross-talk with ATM pathways  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Can Enhance the TGFβ Induced Radiation Can Enhance the TGFβ Induced Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition Minli Wang 1 , Megumi Hada 1 , Janice Huff 1 , Janice M. Pluth 2 , Jennifer Anderson 3 , Peter O'Neill 3 and Francis A. Cucinotta 4 1 USRA Division of Life Sciences, Houston TX USA; 2 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley CA, USA, 3 Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology & Biology, University of Oxford, UK, 4 NASA, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, Houston TX, USA TGFβ is a key modulator of the Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT), important in cancer progression and metastasis, which involve classic Smad or non-Smad signaling pathways, leading to the suppression of epithelial genes and promoted expression of mesenchymal proteins. Ionizing radiation was found to specifically induce expression of

129

Berkeley Lab A to Z Index: M  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Macintosh Computer Backups Macintosh Computer Backups Macintosh User Group (LBNL-MUG) Mac support/MPSG (formerly known as the workstation group) Macromolecular Crystallography Facility (MCF) Mailing Addresses for Lab Mail (electronic); Email Support, Documentation, etc. Mail Services (Facilities Dep't.) malware (computer virus) protection and "How to Handle Suspected Malware" Mammary: Human Mammary Epithelial Cell (HMEC) Map: Berkeley Lab Global Talent Map Maps: Directions and Maps on How to Get to the Lab Maps: Berkeley Lab Interactive Site Map Maps: Berkeley Lab Printable Site Map Maps: Offsite Lab Shuttle Bus Map Maps: Onsite Lab Shuttle Bus Map Massage, Onsite Chair Mass Storage System (MSS) Material Safety Data Sheets: MSDS Materials Sciences Division (MSD) Materials Science: Technology Transfer

130

Id-1 and Id-2 genes and products as markers of epithelial cancer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for detection and prognosis of breast cancer and other types of cancer. The method comprises detecting expression, if any, for both an Id-1 and an Id-2 genes, or the ratio thereof, of gene products in samples of breast tissue obtained from a patient. When expressed, Id-1 gene is a prognostic indicator that breast cancer cells are invasive and metastatic, whereas Id-2 gene is a prognostic indicator that breast cancer cells are localized and noninvasive in the breast tissue.

Desprez, Pierre-Yves (El Cerrito, CA); Campisi, Judith (Berkeley, CA)

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

131

Cell separator and cell  

SciTech Connect

There is disclosed a novel cell separator made of a grafted membrane comprising a polyethylene film which is graft copolymerized with a monomer having an ion exchange group, characterized in that said membrane has an area which is not grafted at all or an area of low degree grafting. By making use of this membrane, a small size and thin cell having excellent performance as well as satisfactory mechanical strength can be produced at low cost with great advantages.

Ishigaki, I.; Machi, S.; Murata, K.; Okada, T.; Senoo, K.; Sugo, T.; Tanso, S.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

USA 92:1332-1336. 10. Barcellos-Hoff, M.H., and Ravani, S.A. 2000. Irradiated mammary gland stroma promotes the expression of tumorigenic potential by unirradiated epithelial...

133

Biological Response to Radiation Mediated through the Microenvironment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

USA 92:1332-1336. 10. Barcellos-Hoff, M.H., and Ravani, S.A. 2000. Irradiated mammary gland stroma promotes the expression of tumorigenic potential by unirradiated epithelial...

134

Photovoltaic Cells  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Photovoltaic (PV) cells, or solar cells, take advantage of the photoelectric effect to produce electricity. PV cells are the building blocks of all PV systems because they are the devices that...

135

Regulation of spindle orientation and neural stem cell fate in the Drosophilaoptic lobe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

symmetric divisions (the single con- focal section shows three epithelial cells). The clone located at the medial edge of the optic lobe contains neuroblasts with attached strings of progeny cells (the single confocal section shows one neuroblast and three... of larvae and clone induction Freshly hatched larvae were collected in a 4 to 6 hour time window and staged on cornmeal medium to late first/ early second instar (21 to 27 hours ALH; after hatching), late second/early third instar (45 to 51 hours ALH), mid...

Egger, Boris; Boone, Jason Q; Stevens, Naomi R; Brand, Andrea H; Doe, Chris Q

2007-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

136

cell tree  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST. cell tree. (data structure). ... Concave objects are decomposed into convex pieces. Each convex piece is indexed in every cell which it overlaps. ...

2013-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

137

High-throughput analysis of chromosome translocations and other genome rearrangements in epithelial cancers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 448:561-566. 5. Stephens PJ, McBride DJ, Lin ML, Varela I, Pleasance ED, Simpson JT, Stebbings LA, Leroy C, Edkins S, Mudie LJ, Greenman CD, Jia M, Latimer C, Teague JW, Lau KW, Burton J, Quail MA, Swerdlow H, Churcher C, Natrajan R, Sieuwerts AM... . Howarth KD, Blood KA, Ng BL, Beavis JC, Chua Y, Cooke SL, Raby S, Ichimura K, Collins VP, Carter NP, Edwards PA: Array painting reveals a high frequency of balanced translocations in breast cancer cell lines that break in cancer- relevant genes. Oncogene...

Newman, Scott; Edwards, Paul A W

2010-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

138

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cells Search Search Help Fuel Cells EERE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Fuel Cells Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel...

139

Flow cytometric analysis of respiratory tract cells exposed to oil shale and silica particulates. [Hamsters  

SciTech Connect

Flow cytometric techniques were used to measure the cytological and biochemical damage to respiratory tract cells in animals exposed to particulates. Hamsters were exposed to raw and spent oil shale particulates and silica by intratracheal instillation. Exfoliated lung cells were obtained by sacrificing the animals and lavaging the respiratory tract posterior to the trachea with saline. Cell samples were fixed in ethanol and stained with mithramycin for fluorescence analysis of DNA content. DNA content distributions from hamsters exposed to spent oil shale and silica particulates showed atypical changes 28 to 35 days later. Cell counts and total numbers of macrophages, leukocytes, and epithelial cells in the lavage fluid also showed marked changes related to time after exposure.

Steinkamp, J.A.; Wilson, J.S.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cells  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Fuel Cells Search Search Help Fuel Cells EERE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Fuel Cells...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammary epithelial cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cells Fuel Cells Converting chemical energy of hydrogenated fuels into electricity Project Description Invented in 1839, fuels cells powered the Gemini and Apollo space missions, as well as the space shuttle. Although fuel cells have been successfully used in such applications, they have proven difficult to make more cost-effective and durable for commercial applications, particularly for the rigors of daily transportation. Since the 1970s, scientists at Los Alamos have managed to make various scientific breakthroughs that have contributed to the development of modern fuel cell systems. Specific efforts include the following: * Finding alternative and more cost-effective catalysts than platinum. * Enhancing the durability of fuel cells by developing advanced materials and

142

Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cells Fuel Cells The Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) program is responsible for coordinating Federal efforts to facilitate development of a commercially relevant and robust solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system. Specific objectives include achieving an efficiency of greater than 60 percent, meeting a stack cost target of $175 per kW, and demonstrating lifetime performance degradation of less than 0.2 percent per

143

Fuel Cells  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Fuel cells are an emerging technology that can provide heat and electricity for buildings and electrical power for vehicles and electronic devices.

144

Electrochemical cell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An electrochemical cell is disclosed that has a lithium anode, a thionyl chloride depolarizer and a sulphur dioxide passivation control agent which further includes having the pressure relieved to substantially reduce the internal pressure of the cell. The internal cell pressure is relieved by venting for sufficient time at an elevated temperature to reduce the internal cell pressure to less than five psi at room temperature, preferably by a plurality of venting cycles and a temperature ranging from room temperature to the elevated temperature. Normally, the elevated temperature ranges from at least 100/sup 0/ to greater than 150/sup 0/ F.

Chua, D.L.; Garoutte, K.F.; Levy, L.L.

1982-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

145

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Animation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell Animation to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Animation on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Animation on...

146

IL-27 inhibits epithelial-mesenchymal transition and angiogenic factor production in a STAT1-dominant pathway in human non-small cell lung cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experimental & Clinical Cancer Research 2013, 32:97 http://Experimental & Clinical Cancer Research 2013 32:97. SubmitExperimental & Clinical Cancer Research 2013, 32:97 http://

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Genetic, cell-type, and tissue variation in low-dose and adaptive...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

goals are to understand the low-dose and adaptive response mechanisms of the mammary gland in order to build a mechanistic model for predicting an individuals risk for...

148

Genetic, cell-type, and tissue variation in low-dose and adaptive...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

goals are to understand the low-dose and adaptive response mechanisms of the mammary gland in order to build a mechanistic model for predicting an individual's risk for breast...

149

Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Science » Materials Science » Fuel Cells Fuel Cells Research into alternative forms of energy, especially energy security, is one of the major national security imperatives of this century. Get Expertise Melissa Fox Applied Energy Email Catherine Padro Sensors & Electrochemical Devices Email Fernando Garzon Sensors & Electrochemical Devices Email Piotr Zelenay Sensors & Electrochemical Devices Email Rod Borup Sensors & Electrochemical Devices Email Karen E. Kippen Experimental Physical Sciences Email Like a battery, a fuel cell consists of two electrodes separated by an electrolyte-in polymer electrolyte fuel cells, the separator is made of a thin polymeric membrane. Unlike a battery, a fuel cell does not need recharging-it continues to produce electricity as long as fuel flows

150

The effect of ascetic acid on mammalian cells  

SciTech Connect

Effects of the contrast agent, acetic acid, on mammalian cells are studied using light scattering measurements, viability and fluorescence pH assays. Results depend on whether cells are in PBS or are live and metabolizing. Acetic acid is a contrast agent used to aid the detection of cancerous and precancerous lesions of the uterine cervix. Typically 3% or 5% acetic acid is applied to the swface of the cervix and areas of the tissue that turn 'acetowhite' are considered more likely to be precancerous. The mechanism of action of acetic acid has never been understood in detail, although there are several hypotheses. One is that a decrease in pH causes cytokeratins in epithelial cells to polymerize. We will present data demonstrating that this is not the sole mechanism of acetowhitening. Another hypothesis is that a decrease in pH in the nucleus causes deacetylation of the histones which in turn results in a dense chromatin structure. Relevant to this hypothesis we have measured the internal pH of cells. Additional goals of this work are to understand what physical changes result in acetowhitening, to understand why there is variation in how cells respond to acetic acid, and to investigate how acetowhitening affects the light scatter properties measured by a fiber-optic probe we have developed for cervical cancer diagnostics.

Mariana, Oana C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Trujillo, Antoinette [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sanders, Claire K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Burnett, Kassidy S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Freyer, James P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mourant, Judith R [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Chromosome aberrations and loss of some cell functions following in vitro exposure to retorted oil shale. [Cultured cells were exposed to processes oil shale particles (spent shales)  

SciTech Connect

An investigation of cellular level effects of processed oil shale from a simulation of modified in situ retorting was undertaken as part of an assessment of the toxicity and mutagenicity of oil shale. Complete assessment of the health hazards associated with physical contact, inhalation, or ingestion of oil shale has not been examined in humans and until it becomes practical to assess these hazards in man, we must rely upon well established in vitro detection procedures in addition to whole animal testing. CHO cells and L-2 rat lung epithelial cell lines were exposed in vitro to processed oil shale particles at different intervals following exposure. Cells were analyzed for chromosome alterations, cell colony forming ability, DNA synthesis, and cell transformation. The results of these studies demonstrate that retorted oil shale, under these experimental conditions, does modify cells in vitro. Chromosome aberrations increased with dose, cell colony forming ability decreased exponentially with dose, and the rate of DNA synthesis was affected, however cell transformation was not demonstrated after 3 months.

Stroud, A.N.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Cell Image Visualization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Biological cell image analysis projects include methods to measure cell segmentation accuracy and new segmentation methods to track live cells. ...

2011-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

153

Cell mitosis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the nuclear membrane in each of the daughter cells would conclude the cycle. Chromatin needs to uncoil and key genes become active again via transcription of mRNA. Lou...

154

Electrochemical cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical cell is described having a bimodal positive electrode, a negative electrode of an alkali metal, and a compatible electrolyte including an alkali metal salt molten at the cell operating temperature. The positive electrode has an electrochemically active layer of at least one transition metal chloride at least partially present as a charging product, and additives of bromide and/or iodide and sulfur in the positive electrode or the electrolyte. Electrode volumetric capacity is in excess of 400 Ah/cm{sup 3}; the cell can be 90% recharged in three hours and can operate at temperatures below 160 C. There is also disclosed a method of reducing the operating temperature and improving the overall volumetric capacity of an electrochemical cell and for producing a positive electrode having a BET area greater than 6{times}10{sup 4}cm{sup 2}/g of Ni. 6 figs.

Redey, L.I.; Vissers, D.R.; Prakash, J.

1996-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

155

Electrochemical cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical cell having a bimodal positive electrode, a negative electrode of an alkali metal, and a compatible electrolyte including an alkali metal salt molten at the cell operating temperature. The positive electrode has an electrochemically active layer of at least one transition metal chloride at least partially present as a charging product, and additives of bromide and/or iodide and sulfur in the positive electrode or the electrolyte. Electrode volumetric capacity is in excess of 400 Ah/cm.sup.3 ; the cell can be 90% recharged in three hours and can operate at temperatures below 160.degree. C. There is also disclosed a method of reducing the operating temperature and improving the overall volumetric capacity of an electrochemical cell and for producing a positive electrode having a BET area greater than 6.times.10.sup.4 cm.sup.2 /g of Ni.

Redey, Laszlo I. (Downers Grove, IL); Vissers, Donald R. (Naperville, IL); Prakash, Jai (Downers Grove, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Electrochemical cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical cell having a bimodal positive electrode, a negative electrode of an alkali metal, and a compatible electrolyte including an alkali metal salt molten at the cell operating temperature. The positive electrode has an electrochemically active layer of at least one transition metal chloride at least partially present as a charging product, and additives of bromide and/or iodide and sulfur in the positive electrode or the electrolyte. Electrode volumetric capacity is in excess of 400 Ah/cm.sup.3 ; the cell can be 90% recharged in three hours and can operate at temperatures below 160.degree. C. There is also disclosed a method of reducing the operating temperature and improving the overall volumetric capacity of an electrochemical cell and for producing a positive electrode having a BET area greater than 6.times.10.sup.4 cm.sup.2 /g of Ni.

Redey, Laszlo I. (6851 Carpenter St., Downers Grove, IL 60516); Vissers, Donald R. (611 Clover Ct., Naperville, IL 60540); Prakash, Jai (2205 Arbor Cir. 8, Downers Grove, IL 60515)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Load cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A load cell combines the outputs of a plurality of strain gauges to measure components of an applied load. Combination of strain gauge outputs allows measurement of any of six load components without requiring complex machining or mechanical linkages to isolate load components. An example six axis load cell produces six independent analog outputs, each directly proportional to one of the six general load components. 16 figs.

Spletzer, B.L.

1998-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

158

Load cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A load cell combines the outputs of a plurality of strain gauges to measure components of an applied load. Combination of strain gauge outputs allows measurement of any of six load components without requiring complex machining or mechanical linkages to isolate load components. An example six axis load cell produces six independent analog outputs which can be combined to determine any one of the six general load components.

Spletzer, Barry L. (Albuquerque, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Load cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A load cell combines the outputs of a plurality of strain gauges to measure components of an applied load. Combination of strain gauge outputs allows measurement of any of six load components without requiring complex machining or mechanical linkages to isolate load components. An example six axis load cell produces six independent analog outputs, each directly proportional to one of the six general load components.

Spletzer, Barry L. (Albuquerque, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Electrochemical cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical cell having an alkali metal negative electrode such as sodium and a positive electrode including Ni or transition metals, separated by a .beta." alumina electrolyte and NaAlCl.sub.4 or other compatible material. Various concentrations of a bromine, iodine and/or sulfur containing additive and pore formers are disclosed, which enhance cell capacity and power. The pore formers may be the ammonium salts of carbonic acid or a weak organic acid or oxamide or methylcellulose.

Redey, Laszlo I. (Downers Grove, IL); Vissers, Donald R. (Naperville, IL); Prakash, Jai (Downers Grove, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammary epithelial cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Automatic registration of serial mammary gland sections  

SciTech Connect

We present two new methods for automatic registration of microscope images of consecutive tissue sections. They represent two possibilities for the first step in the 3-D reconstruction of histological structures from serially sectioned tissue blocks. The goal is to accurately align the sections in order to place every relevant shape contained in each image in front of its corresponding shape in the following section before detecting the structures of interest and rendering them in 3D. This is accomplished by finding the best rigid body transformation (translation and rotation) of the image being registered by maximizing a matching function based on the image content correlation. The first method makes use of the entire image information, whereas the second one uses only the information located at specific sites, as determined by the segmentation of the most relevant tissue structures. To reduce computing time, we use a multiresolution pyramidal approach that reaches the best registration transformation in increasing resolution steps. In each step, a subsampled version of the images is used. Both methods rely on a binary image which is a thresholded version of the Sobel gradients of the image (first method) or a set of boundaries manually or automatically obtained that define important histological structures of the sections. Then distance-transform of the binary image is computed. A proximity function is then calculated between the distance image of the image being registered and that of the reference image. The transformation providing a maximum of the proximity function is then used as the starting point of the following step. This is iterated until the registration error lies below a minimum value.

Arganda-Carreras, Ignacio; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Ortiz-de-Solorzano, Carlos

2004-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

162

Electrochemical cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of an electrochemical cell has a layer-type or sandwich configuration with a Teflon center section that houses working, reference and counter electrodes and defines a relatively narrow electrolyte cavity. The center section is surrounded on both sides with thin Teflon membranes. The membranes are pressed in place by a pair of Teflon inner frames which are in turn supported by a pair of outer metal frames. The pair of inner and outer frames are provided with corresponding, appropriately shaped slits that are in plane generally transverse to the plane of the working electrode and permit X-ray beams to enter and exit the cell through the Teflon membranes that cover the slits so that the interface between the working electrode and the electrolyte within the cell may be analyzed by transmission geometry. In one embodiment, the center section consists of two parts, one on top of the other. Alternatively, the center section of the electrochemical cell may consist of two intersliding pieces or may be made of a single piece of Teflon sheet material. The electrolyte cavity is shaped so that the electrochemical cell can be rotated 900 in either direction while maintaining the working-and counter electrodes submerged in the electrolyte.

Nagy, Z.; Yonco, R.M.; You, Hoydoo; Melendres, C.A.

1991-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

163

Electrochemical cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical cell has a layer-type or sandwich configuration with a Teflon center section that houses working, reference and counter electrodes and defines a relatively narrow electrolyte cavity. The center section is surrounded on both sides with thin Teflon membranes. The membranes are pressed in place by a pair of Teflon inner frames which are in turn supported by a pair of outer metal frames. The pair of inner and outer frames are provided with corresponding, appropriately shaped slits that are in plane generally transverse to the plane of the working electrode and permit X-ray beams to enter and exit the cell through the Teflon membranes that cover the slits so that the interface between the working electrode and the electrolyte within the cell may be analyzed by transmission geometry. In one embodiment, the center section consists of two parts, one on top of the other. Alternatively, the center section of the electrochemical cell may consist of two intersliding pieces or may be made of a single piece of Teflon sheet material. The electrolyte cavity is shaped so that the electrochemical cell can be rotated 90[degree] in either direction while maintaining the working and counter electrodes submerged in the electrolyte. 5 figs.

Nagy, Z.; Yonco, R.M.; You, H.; Melendres, C.A.

1992-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

164

Electrochemical cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical cell is described having an alkali metal negative electrode such as sodium and a positive electrode including Ni or transition metals, separated by a [beta] alumina electrolyte and NaAlCl[sub 4] or other compatible material. Various concentrations of a bromine, iodine and/or sulfur containing additive and pore formers are disclosed, which enhance cell capacity and power. The pore formers may be the ammonium salts of carbonic acid or a weak organic acid or oxamide or methylcellulose. 6 figs.

Redey, L.I.; Vissers, D.R.; Prakash, J.

1994-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

165

Cellular morphometry and cycling cell populations of human and dog bronchi. Annual progress report, April 1, 1994--March 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

Quantitative data of the human bronchial epithelial cells at possible risk for malignant transformation in lung cancer is crucial for accurate radon dosimetry and risk analysis. The nuclei of these cells may be targets for damage by {alpha} particles. Then it is important to determine the locations and other parameters of these nuclei in different airway generations, among smokers, non-smokers and ex-smokers, between men and women and in people of different ages. This proposal includes extended morphometric studies on electron micrographs of human bronchial epithelium of defined airway generations. The second part of this proposal describes the continuation of studies to quantitate the cycling tracheo-bronchial epithelial population(s) using proliferation markers and immunocytochemistry on paraffin sections. The proliferative potential of the airway mucosa of smokers, non-smokers, and ex-smokers, men and women, as well as individuals of different ages are being compared. Normal human bronchial linings are also being compared with normal adult dog bronchi and metaplastic and repairing human airways. Since cycling cells can be more sensitive to damage from carcinogens and radioactivity, the quantitative data from this project will allow the development of more accurate radon risk analysis.

Robbins, E.S.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Photovoltaic cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a photovoltaic cell structure containing a visibly transparent, electrically conductive first layer of metal oxide, and a light-absorbing semiconductive photovoltaic second layer, the improvement comprising a thin layer of transition metal nitride, carbide or boride interposed between said first and second layers.

Gordon, Roy G. (Cambridge, MA); Kurtz, Sarah (Somerville, MA)

1984-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

167

Photoelectrodialytic cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multicompartment photoelectrodialytic demineralization cell is provided with a buffer compartment interposed between the product compartment and a compartment containing an electrolyte solution. Semipermeable membranes separate the buffer compartment from the product and electrolyte compartments. The buffer compartment is flushed to prevent leakage of the electrolyte compartment from entering the product compartment.

Murphy, George W. (2328 Ashwood, Norman, OK 73069)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Origins and consequences of radiation–induced centrosome aberrations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Origins and consequences of radiation–induced centrosome aberrations Origins and consequences of radiation–induced centrosome aberrations Sangeetha Vijayakumar New York University School of Medicine Abstract Centrosome aberrations are frequently observed in pre-neoplastic breast lesions and are known to drive chromosomal instability (Lingle et al., 2002). Previous studies from our lab have shown that human mammary epithelial cells exposed to low doses of radiation exhibit centrosome aberrations (CAs) in a dose dependent manner from 10-200 cGy (Maxwell et al., 2008). These data demonstrated that radiation-induced CAs actually precede and generate genomic instability and that TGFβ is a key mediator of genomic surveillance by eliminating genomically unstable cells through p53-dependent apoptosis. While high dose radiation has been shown to cause centrosome aberrations

169

Breast cancer by proxy: Can the microenvironment be both the cause and consequence?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Breast cancer is one of the most clear-cut examples of a solid tumor in which systemic cues play a decisive part in its development. The breast tissue is constantly subjected to changes in hormone levels and modifications in the microenvironment. This scenario is even more striking during tumor development because of the dramatic loss or aberration of basement membrane (BM) and myoepithelial cells and the gain of peritumoral myofibroblasts. We suggest that the microenvironment, defined here as all components of the mammary gland other than luminal and/or tumor epithelial cells, might be instrumental in maintaining organ integrity and in promoting, and at times even initiating, breast cancer development. As such, the tumor microenvironment and its constituents, alone or in combination, might serve as promising targets for therapy.

Ronnov-Jessen, Lone; Bissell, Mina J

2008-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

170

Tissue- and cell-specific expression of metallothionein genes in cadmium- and copper-exposed mussels analyzed by in situ hybridization and RT-PCR  

SciTech Connect

Metallothioneins (MTs) are metal-inducible proteins that can be used as biomarkers of metal exposure. In mussels two families of MT isoforms (MT10 and MT20) have been characterized. In this study, mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) were exposed to 200 ppb Cd and 40 ppb Cu for 2 and 9 days to characterize the tissue and isoform specificity of metal-induced MT expression. Non-radioactive in situ hybridization demonstrated that both MT isoforms were mainly transcribed in digestive tubule epithelial cells, especially in basophilic cells. Weaker MT expression was detected in non-ciliated duct cells, stomach and gill epithelial cells, haemocytes, adipogranular cells, spermatic follicles and oocytes. RT-PCR resulted in cloning of a novel M. galloprovincialis isoform homologous to recently cloned Mytilus edulis intron-less MT10B isoform. In gills, Cd only affected MT10 gene expression after 2 days of exposure while increases in MT protein levels occurred at day 9. In the digestive gland, a marked increase of both isoforms, but especially of MT20, was accompanied by increased levels of MT proteins and basophilic cell volume density (Vv{sub BAS}) after 2 and 9 days and of intralysosomal metal accumulation in digestive cells after 9 days. Conversely, although metal was accumulated in digestive cells lysosomes and the Vv{sub BAS} increased in Cu-exposed mussels, Cu exposure did not produce an increase of MT gene expression or MT protein levels. These data suggest that MTs are expressed in a tissue-, cell- and isoform-specific way in response to different metals.

Zorita, I. [Lab. Cell Biology and Histology, Dept. Zoology and Animal Cell Biology, University of the Basque Country, PO Box 644, E-48080 Bilbao, Basque Country (Spain); Bilbao, E. [Lab. Cell Biology and Histology, Dept. Zoology and Animal Cell Biology, University of the Basque Country, PO Box 644, E-48080 Bilbao, Basque Country (Spain); Schad, A. [Institute of Pathology, Johannes Gutenberg University, 55101, Mainz (Germany); Cancio, I. [Lab. Cell Biology and Histology, Dept. Zoology and Animal Cell Biology, University of the Basque Country, PO Box 644, E-48080 Bilbao, Basque Country (Spain); Soto, M. [Lab. Cell Biology and Histology, Dept. Zoology and Animal Cell Biology, University of the Basque Country, PO Box 644, E-48080 Bilbao, Basque Country (Spain); Cajaraville, M.P. [Lab. Cell Biology and Histology, Dept. Zoology and Animal Cell Biology, University of the Basque Country, PO Box 644, E-48080 Bilbao, Basque Country (Spain)]. E-mail: mirenp.cajaraville@ehu.es

2007-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

171

Nanocrystal Solar Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

research on organic photovoltaic cells since small molecule10 years prior (4). Photovoltaic cells with an active layerof the associated photovoltaic cells. 2.4 Charge transport

Gur, Ilan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Animation  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Fuel Cell Technologies Office Search Search Help Fuel Cell Technologies Office HOME ABOUT...

173

Corrosion and Electrochemical Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Cell conditions for commercial and industrial electrode processes...fuel cells Electrolytic e cell > e cell,rev I ? 0 (impressed current

174

Electrorefining cell evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Operational characteristics of the LANL electrorefining cell, a modified LANL electrorefining cell, and an advanced electrorefining cell (known as the CRAC cell) were determined. Average process yields achieved were: 75% for the LANL cell, 82% for the modified LANL cell, and 86% for the CRAC cell. All product metal from the LANL and modified LANL cells was within foundry specifications. Metal from one run in the CRAC cell exceeded foundry specifications for tantalum. The LANL and modified LANL cells were simple in design and operation, but product separation was more labor intensive than with the CRAC cell. The CRAC cell was more complicated in design but remained relatively simple in operation. A decision analysis concluded that the modified LANL cell was the preferred cell. It was recommended that the modified LANL cell be implemented by the Plutonium Recovery Project at Rocky Flats and that development of the CRAC cell continue. 8 refs., 22 figs., 12 tabs.

Bronson, M.C.; Thomas, R.L. (ed.)

1989-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

175

A Systems Genetics Approach to Analyze the Metabolic Responses...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

identified using metabolite profiling. These data are being extended to the mammary gland of mice as well as human breast cells in 3D cutlures. Together, this comprehensive...

176

MECHANISTIC STUDY OF LOW DOSE RADIATION INDUCED PROTEOLYTIC CASCADES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cells organize into tissue-like structures which recapitulate the intact human mammary gland morphology (Figure 1) enabling molecular level study of how normal tissues respond...

177

D7S820 Variants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... ATCC. Re-extracted and Re-amplified. primary metaplastic carcinoma (mammary gland), ATCC cell line. CRL-2330; name: HCC1569. 8.3 [2]. 270.34 ...

2013-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

178

Mechanisms of Low-Dose and Adaptive Responses in Radiation Sensitive...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of mice. We have demonstrated that neighboring component cell types within the mammary gland can differ markedly in their molecular responses depending on the genetic background...

179

Microfluidic Cell Culture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... microfluidic device with access to optical imaging, electrochemical interrogation, controlled lysis of desired cells, and collection of cell contents for ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Photoelectrochemical cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photoelectrochemical cell comprising a sealed container having a light-transmitting window for admitting light into the container across a light-admitting plane, an electrolyte in the container, a photoelectrode in the container having a light-absorbing surface arranged to receive light from the window and in contact with the electrolyte, the surface having a plurality of spaced portions oblique to the plane, each portion having dimensions at least an order of magnitude larger than the maximum wavelength of incident sunlight, the total surface area of the surface being larger than the area of the plane bounded by the container, and a counter electrode in the container in contact with the electrolyte.

Rauh, R. David (Newton, MA); Boudreau, Robert A. (Norton, MA)

1983-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammary epithelial cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Radiosensitizing Effects of Ectopic miR-101 on Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Cells Depend on the Endogenous miR-101 Level  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Previously, we showed that ectopic miR-101 could sensitize human tumor cells to radiation by targeting ATM and DNA-PK catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) to inhibit DNA repair, as the endogenous miR-101 levels are low in tumors in general. However, the heterogeneity of human cancers may result in an exception. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that a few tumor cell lines with a high level of endogenous miR-101 would prove less response to ectopic miR-101. Methods and Materials: Fourteeen non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines and one immortalized non-malignant lung epithelial cell line (NL20) were used for comparing endogenous miR-101 levels by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Based on the different miR-101 levels, four cell lines with different miR-101 levels were chosen for transfection with a green fluorescent protein-lentiviral plasmid encoding miR-101. The target protein levels were measured by using Western blotting. The radiosensitizing effects of ectopic miR-101 on these NSCLC cell lines were determined by a clonogenic assay and xenograft mouse model. Results: The endogenous miR-101 level was similar or lower in 13 NSCLC cell lines but was 11-fold higher in one cell line (H157) than in NL20 cells. Although ectopic miR-101 efficiently decreased the ATM and DNA-PKcs levels and increased the radiosensitization level in H1299, H1975, and A549 cells, it did not change the levels of the miR-101 targets or radiosensitivity in H157 cells. Similar results were observed in xenograft mice. Conclusions: A small number of NSCLC cell lines could have a high level of endogenous miR-101. The ectopic miR-101 was able to radiosensitize most NSCLC cells, except for the NSCLC cell lines that had a much higher endogenous miR-101 level. These results suggest that when we choose one miRNA as a therapeutic tool, the endogenous level of the miRNA in each tumor should be considered.

Chen, Susie; Wang Hongyan; Ng, Wooi Loon; Curran, Walter J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine and the Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Wang Ya, E-mail: ywang94@emory.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine and the Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

The first cell sorter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The first cell sorter The first cell sorter 1663 Los Alamos science and technology magazine Latest Issue:November 2013 All Issues » submit The first cell sorter About fifty years ago, a Los Alamos scientist invented a method-still important in cellular biology labs today-to separate out particular types of cells. November 25, 2013 The first cell sorter Flow cytometry (cell measurement) uses cell sorting to divert cells of a chosen type out of a mixed stream of cells, like the blood cells shown here, for collection and study. Los Alamos invented, and has regularly improved upon, the technology to isolate different kinds of cells. In the early-mid 1960s, Los Alamos physicist Mack Fulwyler invented a device to isolate different types of cells. His invention, still a vital aspect of flow cytometry (cell measurement) in biological laboratories

183

Fuel cell arrangement  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell arrangement is provided wherein cylindrical cells of the solid oxide electrolyte type are arranged in planar arrays where the cells within a plane are parallel. Planes of cells are stacked with cells of adjacent planes perpendicular to one another. Air is provided to the interior of the cells through feed tubes which pass through a preheat chamber. Fuel is provided to the fuel cells through a channel in the center of the cell stack; the fuel then passes the exterior of the cells and combines with the oxygen-depleted air in the preheat chamber.

Isenberg, Arnold O. (Forest Hills Boro, PA)

1987-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

184

Fuel cell arrangement  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell arrangement is provided wherein cylindrical cells of the solid oxide electrolyte type are arranged in planar arrays where the cells within a plane are parallel. Planes of cells are stacked with cells of adjacent planes perpendicular to one another. Air is provided to the interior of the cells through feed tubes which pass through a preheat chamber. Fuel is provided to the fuel cells through a channel in the center of the cell stack; the fuel then passes the exterior of the cells and combines with the oxygen-depleted air in the preheat chamber. 3 figs.

Isenberg, A.O.

1987-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

185

Tiny Conspiracies: cell-to-cell communication in bacteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tiny Conspiracies: cell-to-cell communication in bacteria. Purpose: Bacteria, primitive single-celled organisms, communicate ...

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

186

Origins and consequences of radiation…induced centrosome aberrations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Origins and consequences of radiation-induced centrosome aberrations Origins and consequences of radiation-induced centrosome aberrations Sangeetha Vijayakumar, Nisarg Shah, Ignacio Fernandez-Garcia, Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, NY, NY. Centrosome aberrations are frequently observed in pre-neoplastic breast lesions and are known to drive chromosomal instability (Lingle et al., 2002). Previous studies from our lab have shown that human mammary epithelial cells exposed to low doses of radiation exhibit centrosome aberrations (CAs) in a dose dependent manner from 10-200 cGy (Maxwell et al., 2008). These data demonstrated that radiation-induced CAs actually precede and generate genomic instability and that TGFβ is a key mediator

187

Fuel Cell Links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell Links Fuel Cell Links The links below are provided as additional resources for fuel-cell-related information. Most of the linked sites are not part of, nor affiliated with, fueleconomy.gov. We do not endorse or vouch for the accuracy of the information found on such sites. Fuel Cell Vehicles and Manufacturers Chevrolet General Motors press release about the Chevrolet Fuel Cell Equinox Ford Ford overview of their hydrogen fuel cell vehicles Honda FCX Clarity official site Hyundai Hyundai press release announcing the upcoming Tucson Fuel Cell Mercedes-Benz Ener-G-Force Fuel-cell-powered concept SUV Nissan Nissan TeRRA concept SUV Toyota Overview of Toyota fuel cell technology Hydrogen- and Fuel-Cell-Related Information and Tools Fuel Cell Vehicles Brief overview of fuel cell vehicles provided by DOE's Alternative Fuels Data Center (AFDC)

188

NETL: Fuel Cells - Contacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel CellsSolid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Contacts For information on the Fuel CellsSECA program, contact: Fuel Cells Technology Manager: Shailesh Vora 412-386-7515...

189

Energy Basics: Fuel Cells  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Fuel Cells Photo of two hydrogen fuel cells. Fuel cells are an emerging technology that can provide heat and electricity for buildings and electrical power for...

190

Nanocrystal Solar Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nov, 2005). Chapter 4 Hybrid solar cells with 3-dimensional5 All-inorganic nanocrystal solar cells 5.1 Introduction Inoperation of organic based solar cells and distinguish them

Gur, Ilan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Operation of a Solid Polymer Fuel Cell: A Parametric Model,"1991). G. Bronoel, "Hydrogen-Air Fuel Cells Without PreciousG. Abens, "Development of a Fuel Cell Power Source for Bus,"

Delucchi, Mark

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Energy Basics: Fuel Cells  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydrogen Fuel Fuel Cells Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Fuel Cells Photo of...

193

Parabolic cell analyzer  

SciTech Connect

The disclosure is directed to a cell analysis apparatus incorporating a paraboloidal cavity for maximum utilization for improved cell characteristic monitoring.

Salzman, Gary C. (Los Alamos, NM); Skogen Hagenson, Mary J. (Los Alamos, NM)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Photovoltaic Cell Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Although crystalline silicon cells are the most common type, photovoltaic (PV), or solar cells, can be made of many semiconductor materials. Each material has unique strengths and characteristics...

195

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technical Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cell Technical Cell Technical Publications to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technical Publications on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technical Publications on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technical Publications on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technical Publications on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technical Publications on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technical Publications on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Hydrogen Fuel Cells Safety, Codes & Standards Market Analysis Educational Publications Newsletter Program Presentations Multimedia Conferences & Meetings

196

Endothelial Cell Migration and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Expression Are the Result of Loss of Breast Tissue Polarity  

SciTech Connect

Recruiting a new blood supply is a rate-limiting step in tumor progression. In a three-dimensional model of breast carcinogenesis, disorganized, proliferative transformed breast epithelial cells express significantly higher expression of angiogenic genes compared with their polarized, growth-arrested nonmalignant counterparts. Elevated vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion by malignant cells enhanced recruitment of endothelial cells (EC) in heterotypic cocultures. Significantly, phenotypic reversion of malignant cells via reexpression of HoxD10, which is lost in malignant progression, significantly attenuated VEGF expression in a hypoxia-inducible factor 1{alpha}-independent fashion and reduced EC migration. This was due primarily to restoring polarity: forced proliferation of polarized, nonmalignant cells did not induce VEGF expression and EC recruitment, whereas disrupting the architecture of growth-arrested, reverted cells did. These data show that disrupting cytostructure activates the angiogenic switch even in the absence of proliferation and/or hypoxia and restoring organization of malignant clusters reduces VEGF expression and EC activation to levels found in quiescent nonmalignant epithelium. These data confirm the importance of tissue architecture and polarity in malignant progression.

Chen, Amy; Cuevas, Ileana; Kenny, Paraic A; Miyake, Hiroshi; Mace, Kimberley; Ghajar, Cyrus; Boudreau, Aaron; Bissell, Mina; Boudreau, Nancy

2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

197

A fuel cell overview  

SciTech Connect

This paper is an overview of the fuel cell as an efficient and environmentally benign energy conversion technology. The topics of the paper include their physical arrangement, types of fuel cells, status of commercial development, applications of the fuel cell power plants and comparison with existing alternatives, and good design practice for fuel cell safety.

Krumpelt, M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Reiser, C.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Single Cell Mechanics BIOMATERIALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Single Cell Mechanics BIOMATERIALS Our goal is to develop fundamental tools to measure the response of live cells to mechanical stimulation. The mechanisms by which cells convert mechanical forces evaluate the underlying mechanisms of cell mechanics. Objective Impact and Customers · Cancer, heart

199

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reversible Fuel Cells Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter Program Presentations Multimedia Conferences & Meetings Annual Merit Review Proceedings Workshop & Meeting Proceedings

200

FCT Fuel Cells: Fuel Cell R&D Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell R&D Activities to someone by E-mail Share FCT Fuel Cells: Fuel Cell R&D Activities on Facebook Tweet about FCT Fuel Cells: Fuel Cell R&D Activities on Twitter Bookmark...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammary epithelial cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Molten carbonate fuel cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A molten electrolyte fuel cell with an array of stacked cells and cell enclosures isolating each cell except for access to gas manifolds for the supply of fuel or oxidant gas or the removal of waste gas, the cell enclosures collectively providing an enclosure for the array and effectively avoiding the problems of electrolyte migration and the previous need for compression of stack components, the fuel cell further including an inner housing about and in cooperation with the array enclosure to provide a manifold system with isolated chambers for the supply and removal of gases. An external insulated housing about the inner housing provides thermal isolation to the cell components.

Kaun, Thomas D. (New Lenox, IL); Smith, James L. (Lemont, IL)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Molten carbonate fuel cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A molten electrolyte fuel cell is disclosed with an array of stacked cells and cell enclosures isolating each cell except for access to gas manifolds for the supply of fuel or oxidant gas or the removal of waste gas. The cell enclosures collectively provide an enclosure for the array and effectively avoid the problems of electrolyte migration and the previous need for compression of stack components. The fuel cell further includes an inner housing about and in cooperation with the array enclosure to provide a manifold system with isolated chambers for the supply and removal of gases. An external insulated housing about the inner housing provides thermal isolation to the cell components.

Kaun, T.D.; Smith, J.L.

1986-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

203

Fuel cells seminar  

SciTech Connect

This year`s meeting highlights the fact that fuel cells for both stationary and transportation applications have reached the dawn of commercialization. Sales of stationary fuel cells have grown steadily over the past 2 years. Phosphoric acid fuel cell buses have been demonstrated in urban areas. Proton-exchange membrane fuel cells are on the verge of revolutionizing the transportation industry. These activities and many more are discussed during this seminar, which provides a forum for people from the international fuel cell community engaged in a wide spectrum of fuel cell activities. Discussions addressing R&D of fuel cell technologies, manufacturing and marketing of fuel cells, and experiences of fuel cell users took place through oral and poster presentations. For the first time, the seminar included commercial exhibits, further evidence that commercial fuel cell technology has arrived. A total of 205 papers is included in this volume.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

offering cleaner, more-efficient alternatives to the combustion of gasoline and other fossil fuels. Fuel cells have the potential to replace the internal-combustion engine in...

205

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells - Fuel Cell - Solid Oxide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrolyzer Research and Development Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Solid oxide diagram In an SOFC, oxygen from air is reduced to ions at the cathode, which diffuse through the...

206

FCT Fuel Cells: Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics to someone by E-mail Basics to someone by E-mail Share FCT Fuel Cells: Basics on Facebook Tweet about FCT Fuel Cells: Basics on Twitter Bookmark FCT Fuel Cells: Basics on Google Bookmark FCT Fuel Cells: Basics on Delicious Rank FCT Fuel Cells: Basics on Digg Find More places to share FCT Fuel Cells: Basics on AddThis.com... Home Basics Current Technology DOE R&D Activities Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems Analysis Contacts Basics Photo of a fuel cell stack A fuel cell uses the chemical energy of hydrogen to cleanly and efficiently produce electricity with water and heat as byproducts. (How much water?) Fuel cells are unique in terms of the variety of their potential applications; they can provide energy for systems as large as a utility

207

Collective migration of epithelial sheets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The varied movements of the epithelium play vital roles in the development and renewal of complex tissues, from the separation of tissues in the early embryo, to homeostasis in the adult. Their movement is intricately ...

Murrell, Michael Peter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

November 2012 to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: November 2012 on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies...

209

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Newsletter Archives to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter Archives on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies...

210

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Subscribe to the Fuel Cell Technologies...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Subscribe to the Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Subscribe to the Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter on...

211

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cells for Portable Power...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Portable Power Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cells for Portable Power Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies...

212

Fuel Cell Technologies Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4/3/2012 4/3/2012 eere.energy.gov Fuel Cell Technologies Overview Flow Cell Workshop Washington, DC Dr. Sunita Satyapal & Dr. Dimitrios Papageorgopoulos U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program 3/7/2011 Flow Cells for Energy Storage Workshop Purpose To understand the applied research and development needs and the grand challenges for the use of flow cells as energy-storage devices. Objectives 1. Understand the needs for applied research from stakeholders. 2. Gather input for future development of roadmaps and technical targets for flow cells for various applications. 3. Identify grand challenges and prioritize R&D needs. Flow cells combine the unique advantages of batteries and fuel cells and can offer benefits for multiple energy storage applications.

213

California Fuel Cell Partnership  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Speaker(s): Bob Knight Date: October 19, 2000 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 The California Fuel Cell Partnership is a current collaboration among major automakers, fuel cell...

214

Photovoltaic Cell Structures  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The actual structural design of a photovoltaic (PV), or solar cell, depends on the limitations of the material used in the PV cell. The four basic device designs are:

215

Crystalline Silicon Photovolatic Cells  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Crystalline silicon cells are made of silicon atoms connected to one another to form a crystal lattice. This lattice comprises the solid material that forms the photovoltaic (PV) cell's...

216

Photovoltaic Cell Conversion Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The conversion efficiency of a photovoltaic (PV) cell, or solar cell, is the percentage of the solar energy shining on a PV device that is converted into electrical energy, or electricity....

217

Silicon solar cell assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A silicon solar cell assembly comprising a large, thin silicon solar cell bonded to a metal mount for use when there exists a mismatch in the thermal expansivities of the device and the mount.

Burgess, Edward L. (Albuquerque, NM); Nasby, Robert D. (Albuquerque, NM); Schueler, Donald G. (Albuquerque, NM)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Photovoltaic Cell Quantum Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Quantum efficiency (QE) is the ratio of the number of charge carriers collected by a photovoltaic (PV) cell to the number of photonsor packets of lightof a given energy shining on the solar cell....

219

Energy Basics: Photovoltaic Cells  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Photovoltaics Cells Systems Concentrating Solar...

220

cell probe model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST. cell probe model. (definition). Definition: A model of computation where the cost of a computation is measured by the ...

2013-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammary epithelial cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Electroluminescence in photovoltaic cell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Here we propose two methods to get electroluminescence images from photovoltaic cells in a school or home lab.

Petraglia, Antonio; 10.1088/0031-9120/46/5/F01

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Solar Cell Silicon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 31, 2011 ... About this Symposium. Meeting, 2012 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium, Solar Cell Silicon. Sponsorship, The Minerals, Metals...

223

Irreversible Cell Potential  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 2   Cell conditions for commercial and industrial electrode processes...electrochemical machining,

224

Sodium arsenite alters cell cycle and MTHFR, MT1/2, and c-Myc protein levels in MCF-7 cells  

SciTech Connect

There is limited available information on the effects of arsenic on enzymes participating in the folate cycle. Therefore, our aim was to evaluate the effects of sodium arsenite on the protein levels of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) and dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) and its further relationship with the expression MT1/2 and c-myc in MCF-7 cells. Arsenite treatment (0-10 muM) for 4 h decreased MTHFR levels in a concentration-dependent fashion without significant effects on DHFR. The effects on MTHFR were observed at arsenite concentrations not significantly affecting cell viability. We also observed an increase in S-phase recruitment at all concentrations probed. Lower concentrations (< 5 muM) induced cell proliferation, showing a high proportion of BrdU-stained cells, indicating a higher DNA synthesis rate. However, higher concentrations (>= 5 muM) or longer treatment periods induced apoptosis. Arsenite also induced dose-dependent increases in MT1/2 and c-Myc protein levels. The levels of MTHFR were inversely correlated to MT1/2 and c-Myc overexpression and increased S-phase recruitment. Our findings indicate that breast epithelial cells are responsive to arsenite and suggest that exposure may pose a risk for breast cancer. The reductions in MTHFR protein levels contribute to understand the mechanisms underlying the induction of genes influencing growth regulation, such as c-myc and MT1/2. However, further research is needed to ascertain if the effects here reported following short-time and high-dose exposure are relevant for human populations chronically exposed to low arsenic concentrations.

Ruiz-Ramos, Ruben [Centro de Investigacion en Salud Poblacional, INSP, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Departamento de Toxicologia, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politecnico Nacional, 07360 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Lopez-Carrillo, Lizbeth [Centro de Investigacion en Salud Poblacional, INSP, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Albores, Arnulfo [Departamento de Toxicologia, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politecnico Nacional, 07360 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Hernandez-Ramirez, Raul U. [Centro de Investigacion en Salud Poblacional, INSP, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Cebrian, Mariano E., E-mail: mcebrian@cinvestav.m [Departamento de Toxicologia, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politecnico Nacional, 07360 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

225

Biomarkers of cell senescence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a biomarker system for the in vivo and in vitro assessment of cell senescence. In the method of the present invention, .beta.-galactosidase activity is utilized as a means by which cell senescence may be assessed either in in vitro cell cultures or in vivo.

Dirmi, Goberdhan P. (Simli U.P., IN); Campisi, Judith (Berkeley, CA); Peacocke, Monica (Newton, MA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Rapidly refuelable fuel cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is directed to a metal-air fuel cell where the consumable metal anode is movably positioned in the cell and an expandable enclosure, or bladder, is used to press the anode into contact with separating spacers between the cell electrodes. The bladder may be depressurized to allow replacement of the anode when consumed.

Joy, Richard W. (Santa Clara, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Biomarkers of cell senescence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a biomarker system for the in vivo and in vitro assessment of cell senescence. In the method of the present invention, .beta.-galactosidase activity is utilized as a means by which cell senescence may be assessed either in vitro cell cultures or in vivo.

Dimri, Goberdhan P. (Simli U.P., IN); Campisi, Judith (Berkeley, CA); Peacocke, Monica (Newton, MA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Biomarkers of cell senescence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a biomarker system for the in vivo and in vitro assessment of cell senescence. In the method of the present invention, {beta}-galactosidase activity is utilized as a means by which cell senescence may be assessed either in in vitro cell cultures or in vivo. 1 fig.

Dirmi, G.P.; Campisi, J.; Peacocke, M.

1996-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

229

Biomarkers of cell senescence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a biomarker system for the in vivo and in vitro assessment of cell senescence. In the method of the present invention, {beta}-galactosidase activity is utilized as a means by which cell senescence may be assessed either in vitro cell cultures or in vivo. 1 fig.

Dimri, G.P.; Campisi, J.; Peacocke, M.

1998-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

230

NANOCOMPOSITE ENABLED SENSITIZED SOLAR CELL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by Dye-Sensitized Photovoltaic cells. Inorganic Chemistry,by Dye-Sensitized Photovoltaic Cells. Inorganic ChemistryThe characteristics of a photovoltaic cell. Generally,

Phuyal, Dibya

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies Office: News on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: News on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: News on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies...

232

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Webinars  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Webinars to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Webinars on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Webinars on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell...

233

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Adoption of Fuel Cell Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Market Transformation Market Transformation Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Adoption of Fuel Cell Technologies to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Adoption of Fuel Cell Technologies on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Adoption of Fuel Cell Technologies on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Adoption of Fuel Cell Technologies on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Adoption of Fuel Cell Technologies on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Adoption of Fuel Cell Technologies on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Adoption of Fuel Cell Technologies on AddThis.com... Early Adoption of Fuel Cells Early Market Applications for Fuel Cells

234

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: DOE Fuel Cell Pre-Solicitation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Fuel Cell Pre-Solicitation Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: DOE Fuel Cell Pre-Solicitation Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell...

235

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: January 2012 on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell...

236

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2010 New Fuel Cell Projects Meeting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2010 New Fuel Cell Projects Meeting to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2010 New Fuel Cell Projects Meeting on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies...

237

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: January 2013 on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell...

238

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2009 New Fuel Cell Projects Meeting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

09 New Fuel Cell Projects Meeting to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2009 New Fuel Cell Projects Meeting on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies...

239

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office:...

240

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cells for Buildings Roadmap...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cells for Buildings Roadmap Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cells for Buildings Roadmap Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammary epithelial cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Fuel Cell Handbook update  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this work was to update the 1988 version of DOE`s Fuel Cell Handbook. Significant developments in the various fuel cell technologies required revisions to reflect state-of-the-art configurations and performance. The theoretical presentation was refined in order to make the handbook more useful to both the casual reader and fuel cell or systems analyst. In order to further emphasize the practical application of fuel cell technologies, the system integration information was expanded. In addition, practical elements, such as suggestions and guidelines to approximate fuel cell performance, were provided.

Owens, W.R.; Hirschenhofer, J.H.; Engleman, R.R. Jr.; Stauffer, D.B.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Fuel Cells Team  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Judith Valerio at one of our 31 single-cell test stands Fuel Cell Team The FC team focus is R&D on polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells for commercial and military applications. Our program has had ongoing funding in the area of polymer electrolyte fuel cells since 1977 and has been responsible for enabling breakthroughs in the areas of thin film electrodes and air bleed for CO tolerance. For more information on the history of fuel cell research at Los Alamos, please click here. Fuel cells are an important enabling technology for the Hydrogen Economy and have the potential to revolutionize the way we power the nation and the world. The FC team is exploring the potential of fuel cells as energy-efficient, clean, and fuel-flexible alternatives that will

243

Graduate Program in Cancer Cell Biology CELL SHEDDING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Graduate Program in Cancer Cell Biology CELL SHEDDING ANOIKIS CELL SHEDDING METASTASIS NORMAL CELLS) To the Cancer Cell Biology Program: As a Graduate Student in the Cancer Cell Biology Program, I acknowledge account of my laboratory work, commit to ethics before science and devote my full and undivided time

Mohaghegh, Shahab

244

Power from the Fuel Cell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power for Buildings Using Fuel-Cell Cars, Proceedings ofwell as to drive down fuel-cell system costs through productis most likely to be the fuel-cell vehicle. Fuel cells are

Lipman, Timothy E.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Fuel Cell Technologies Program Overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cell TypesFuel Cell Types Note: ITSOFC is intermediate temperature SOFC and TSOFC is tubular SOFC #12

246

Using Geodesics in Cell Cytometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Several steps are involved in going from cells to geodesics. The process starts with fluorescence microscope images of cell populations. ...

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

247

Cell Dynamics and Process Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ALUMINIUM REDUCTION TECHNOLOGY VII: Cell Dynamics And Process ... WITH RELEVANS TO POINT FEEDING ALUMINIUM CELL: Ove Kobbeltvedt,...

248

Fuel Cells Information at NIST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Fuel Cells Information at NIST. Fuel Cells Information at NIST. (the links below are a compilation of programs ...

2010-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

249

How Fuel Cells Work  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How Fuel Cells Work How Fuel Cells Work Diagram: How a PEM fuel cell works. 1. Hydrogen fuel is channeled through field flow plates to the anode on one side of the fuel cell, while oxygen from the air is channeled to the cathode on the other side of the cell. 2. At the anode, a platinum catalyst causes the hydrogen to split into positive hydrogen ions (protons) and negatively charged electrons. 3. The Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) allows only the positively charged ions to pass through it to the cathode. The negatively charged electrons must travel along an external circuit to the cathode, creating an electrical current. 4. At the cathode, the electrons and positively charged hydrogen ions combine with oxygen to form water, which flows out of the cell.

250

Fuel Cells publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Science » Materials Science » Fuel Cells » Fuel Cells Publications Fuel Cells publications Research into alternative forms of energy, especially energy security, is one of the major national security imperatives of this century. Get Expertise Melissa Fox Applied Energy Email Catherine Padro Sensors & Electorchemical Devices Email Fernando Garzon Sensors & Electorchemical Devices Email Piotr Zelenay Sensors & Electorchemical Devices Email Rod Borup Sensors & Electorchemical Devices Email Karen E. Kippen Chemistry Communications Email Like a battery, a fuel cell consists of two electrodes separated by an electrolyte-in polymer electrolyte fuel cells, the separator is made of a thin polymeric membrane. Unlike a battery, a fuel cell does not need recharging-it continues to produce electricity as long as fuel flows

251

Fuel Cells Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage DELIVERY FUEL CELLS STORAGE PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGY VALIDATION CODES & STANDARDS SYSTEMS INTEGRATION / ANALYSES SAFETY EDUCATION RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT Economy Pat Davis 2 Fuel Cells Technical Goals & Objectives Goal : Develop and demonstrate fuel cell power system technologies for transportation, stationary, and portable applications. 3 Fuel Cells Technical Goals & Objectives Objectives * Develop a 60% efficient, durable, direct hydrogen fuel cell power system for transportation at a cost of $45/kW (including hydrogen storage) by 2010. * Develop a 45% efficient reformer-based fuel cell power system for transportation operating on clean hydrocarbon or alcohol based fuel that meets emissions standards, a start-up time of 30 seconds, and a projected manufactured cost of $45/kW by

252

Distributed Energy Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Fuel Cells Energy Fuel Cells DOE Hydrogen DOE Hydrogen and and Fuel Cells Fuel Cells Coordination Meeting Fuel Cell Coordination Meeting June 2-3, 2003 Electricity Users Kathi Epping Kathi Epping Objectives & Barriers Distributed Energy OBJECTIVES * Develop a distributed generation PEM fuel cell system operating on natural gas or propane that achieves 40% electrical efficiency and 40,000 hours durability at $400-750/kW by 2010. BARRIERS * Durability * Heat Utilization * Power Electronics * Start-Up Time Targets and Status Integrated Stationary PEMFC Power Systems Operating on Natural Gas or Propane Containing 6 ppm Sulfur 40,000 30,000 15,000 Hours Durability 750 1,250 2,500 $/kWe Cost 40 32 30 % Electrical Efficiency Large (50-250 kW) Systems 40,000 30,000 >6,000 Hours Durability 1,000 1,500 3,000

253

Concentrator silicon cell research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project continued the developments of high-efficiency silicon concentrator solar cells with the goal of achieving a cell efficiency in the 26 to 27 percent range at a concentration level of 150 suns of greater. The target efficiency was achieved with the new PERL (passivated emitter, rear locally diffused) cell structure, but only at low concentration levels around 20 suns. The PERL structure combines oxide passivation of both top and rear surfaces of the cells with small area contact to heavily doped regions on the top and rear surfaces. Efficiency in the 22 to 23 percent range was also demonstrated for large-area concentrator cells fabricated with the buried contact solar cell processing sequence, either when combined with prismatic covers or with other innovative approaches to reduce top contact shadowing. 19 refs.

Green, M.A.; Wenham, S.R.; Zhang, F.; Zhao, J.; Wang, A. [New South Wales Univ., Kensington (Australia). Solar Photovoltaic Lab.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Amorphous silicon solar cells  

SciTech Connect

The fabrication, performance, and applications of a-Si solar cells are discussed, summarizing the results of recent experimental investigations and trial installations. Topics examined include the fundamental principles and design strategies of solar power installations; the characteristics of monocrystalline-Si solar cells; techniques for reducing the cost of solar cells; independent, linked, and hybrid solar power systems; proposed satellite solar power systems; and the use of solar cells in consumer appliances. Consideration is given to the history of a-Si, a-Si fabrication techniques, quality criteria for a-Si films, solar cells based on a-Si, and techniques for increasing the efficiency and lowering the cost of a-Si solar cells. Graphs, diagrams, drawings, and black-and-white and color photographs are provided. 136 references.

Takahashi, K.; Konagai, M.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Flow Cells for Energy Storage Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Flow Cells for Energy Flow Cells for Energy Storage Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Flow Cells for Energy Storage Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Flow Cells for Energy Storage Workshop on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Flow Cells for Energy Storage Workshop on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Flow Cells for Energy Storage Workshop on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Flow Cells for Energy Storage Workshop on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Flow Cells for Energy Storage Workshop on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter Program Presentations Multimedia Conferences & Meetings Annual Merit Review Proceedings

256

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Market Applications for Fuel Cell  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Market Transformation Market Transformation Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Market Applications for Fuel Cell Technologies to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Market Applications for Fuel Cell Technologies on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Market Applications for Fuel Cell Technologies on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Market Applications for Fuel Cell Technologies on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Market Applications for Fuel Cell Technologies on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Market Applications for Fuel Cell Technologies on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Market Applications for Fuel Cell Technologies on AddThis.com...

257

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Joint Fuel Cell Bus Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter Program Presentations Multimedia Conferences & Meetings Annual Merit Review Proceedings Workshop & Meeting Proceedings Webinars

258

Nickel-induced down-regulation of {Delta}Np63 and its role in the proliferation of keratinocytes  

SciTech Connect

Epidemiological, animal, and cell studies have demonstrated that nickel compounds are human carcinogens. The mechanisms of their carcinogenic actions remain to be investigated. p63, a close homologue of the p53 tumor suppressor protein, has been linked to cell fate determination and/or maintenance of self-renewing populations in several epithelial tissues, including skin, mammary gland, and prostate. {Delta}Np63, a dominant negative isoform of p63, is amplified in a variety of epithelial tumors including squamous cell carcinomas and carcinomas of the prostate and mammary glands. The present study shows that nickel suppressed {Delta}Np63 expression in a short-time treatment (up to 48 h). Nickel treatment caused activation of NF-{kappa}B. Blockage of NF-{kappa}B partially reversed nickel-induced {Delta}Np63 suppression. Nickel decreased interferon regulatory factor (IRF) 3 and IRF7, IKK{epsilon}, and Sp100. Over-expression of IRF3 increased {Delta}Np63 expression suppressed by nickel. Nickel was able to activate p21, and its activation was offset by the over-expression of {Delta}Np63. In turn, elevated p63 expression counteracted the ability of nickel to restrict cell growth. The present study demonstrated that nickel decreased interferon regulatory proteins IRF3 and IRF7, and activated NF-{kappa}B, resulting in {Delta}Np63 suppression and then p21 up-regulation. {Delta}Np63 plays an important role in nickel-induced cell proliferation. - Highlights: > Ni suppressed {Delta}Np63 expression in HaCat cells. > Ni activated NF-{kappa}B, decreased expressions of IRF3 and IRF7, IKK{epsilon}, and Sp100. > Over-expression of IRF3 increased {Delta}Np63 expression suppressed by Ni. > Ni activated p21, and its activation was offset by over-expression of {Delta}Np63. > Elevated p63 expression counteracted the ability of nickel to restrict cell growth.

Zhang Zhuo, E-mail: zhuo.zhang@uky.edu [Department of Preventive Medicine and Environmental Health, University of Kentucky, 121 Washington Avenue, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Li Wenqi [Department of Preventive Medicine and Environmental Health, University of Kentucky, 121 Washington Avenue, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Cheng Senping [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Yao Hua [Department of Stomatology, The First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310003 (China); Zhang Fan; Chang Qingshan [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Ke Zunji [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kentucky, 800 Rose Street, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Wang Xin; Son, Young-Ok [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Luo Jia [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kentucky, 800 Rose Street, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Shi Xianglin [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

259

Heterojunction solar cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high-efficiency single heterojunction solar cell is described wherein a thin emitter layer (preferably Ga[sub 0.52]In[sub 0.48]P) forms a heterojunction with a GaAs absorber layer. The conversion efficiency of the solar cell is at least 25.7%. The solar cell preferably includes a passivating layer between the substrate and the absorber layer. An anti-reflection coating is preferably disposed over the emitter layer. 1 fig.

Olson, J.M.

1994-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

260

Heterojunction solar cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high-efficiency single heterojunction solar cell wherein a thin emitter layer (preferably Ga.sub.0.52 In.sub.0.48 P) forms a heterojunction with a GaAs absorber layer. The conversion effiency of the solar cell is at least 25.7%. The solar cell preferably includes a passivating layer between the substrate and the absorber layer. An anti-reflection coating is preferably disposed over the emitter layer.

Olson, Jerry M. (Lakewood, CO)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammary epithelial cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Heterojunction solar cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A qualitative description of semiconductor/semiconductor heterojunction solar cells is given. The two groups of heterojunctions of greatest economic potential, very highly efficient cells for concentrator applications and moderately efficient thin film cells for flat plates, are described with examples. These examples illustrate the role of heterojunctions in surface passivation, monolithic multijunction devices, devices with semiconductors of only one conductivity type, and low-temperature fabrication techniques.

Wagner, S.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Molten salt lithium cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and is operated in the temperature range of about 400 to 500/sup 0/C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems and a substantial amount of energy is lost through heat transfer. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell which may be operated at temperatures between about 100 to 170/sup 0/C. The cell is comprised of an electrolyte, which preferably includes lithium nitrate, and a lithium or lithium alloy electrode.

Raistrick, I.D.; Poris, J.; Huggins, R.A.

1980-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

263

Cell Design and Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 4, 2013 ... In Depth Analysis of Energy-Saving and Current Efficiency Improvement of Aluminum Reduction Cells: Jianfei Zhou1; Marc Dupuis2; Feiya...

264

Test Cell Location  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2012 Fiat 500 Test Cell Location 2WD Vehicle Setup Information Downloadable Dynamometer Database (D 3 )- Test Summary Sheet Vehicle Architecture Conventional Vehicle Dynamometer...

265

Test Cell Location  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2013 Nissan Altima Test Cell Location 2WD Vehicle Setup Information Downloadable Dynamometer Database (D 3 )- Test Summary Sheet Vehicle Architecture Conventional Vehicle...

266

Aluminum Smelter Cell Dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

He has become an acclaimed world leader in cell diagnostics and operations as well as being a regular contributor to TMS Light Metals. He teaches in the TMS...

267

Solar Cell Silicon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... continued and costs have been cut dramatically along the production value chain. The most important feedstock for crystalline solar cells is high purity silicon .

268

Modeling & Simulation - Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GCTool Computer Model Helps Focus Fuel Cell Vehicle Research Somewhere near Detroit, an automotive engineer stares at the ceiling, wondering how to squeeze 1% more efficiency out...

269

Ceramic Fuel Cells (SOFC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in hot box included Anode Electrolyte Key cost drivers identified for tubular designs * Cell * Current Collectors * Seals BOP in hot box: * Insulation (thermal) * Recuperator *...

270

Molten salt lithium cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and is operated in the temperature range of about 400.degree.-500.degree. C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems and a substantial amount of energy is lost through heat transfer. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell (10) which may be operated at temperatures between about 100.degree.-170.degree. C. Cell (10) comprises an electrolyte (16), which preferably includes lithium nitrate, and a lithium or lithium alloy electrode (12).

Raistrick, Ian D. (Menlo Park, CA); Poris, Jaime (Portola Valley, CA); Huggins, Robert A. (Stanford, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Molten salt lithium cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and is operated in the temperature range of about 400.degree.-500.degree. C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems and a substantial amount of energy is lost through heat transfer. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell (10) which may be operated at temperatures between about 100.degree.-170.degree. C. Cell (10) comprises an electrolyte (16), which preferably includes lithium nitrate, and a lithium or lithium alloy electrode (12).

Raistrick, Ian D. (Menlo Park, CA); Poris, Jaime (Portola Valley, CA); Huggins, Robert A. (Stanford, CA)

1982-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

272

Opportunities with Fuel Cells  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The concept for fuel cells was discovered in the nineteenth century. Today, units incorporating this technology are becoming commercially available for cogeneration applications.

Information Center

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Hydrogen Fuel Cells  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

The fuel cell an energy conversion device that can efficiently capture and use the power of hydrogen is the key to making it happen.

274

Test Cell Location  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Focus Test Cell Location 2WD Vehicle Setup Information Downloadable Dynamometer Database (D 3 )- Test Summary Sheet Vehicle Architecture Conventional Vehicle Dynamometer Input...

275

Test Cell Location  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chrysler 300 Test Cell Location 2WD Vehicle Setup Information Downloadable Dynamometer Database (D 3 )- Test Summary Sheet Vehicle Architecture Conventional Vehicle Dynamometer...

276

Test Cell Location  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mazda 3 i-Stop Test Cell Location APRF- 4WD Vehicle Setup Information Downloadable Dynamometer Database (D 3 )- Test Summary Sheet Vehicle Architecture Conventional- Start Stop...

277

Micro fuel cell  

SciTech Connect

An ambient temperature, liquid feed, direct methanol fuel cell device is under development. A metal barrier layer was used to block methanol crossover from the anode to the cathode side while still allowing for the transport of protons from the anode to the cathode. A direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is an electrochemical engine that converts chemical energy into clean electrical power by the direct oxidation of methanol at the fuel cell anode. This direct use of a liquid fuel eliminates the need for a reformer to convert the fuel to hydrogen before it is fed into the fuel cell.

Zook, L.A.; Vanderborgh, N.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Hockaday, R. [Energy Related Devices Inc., Los Alamos, NM (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

278

Mechanisms of growth inhibition induced by methylene-substituted and ring-substituted dims in breast cancer cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One in 8 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer in the United States and estrogen receptor (ER) status largely influences the type and subsequent success of treatment employed. Although ER-positive breast cancer can be treated with endocrine therapy, the more invasive ER-negative breast cancer is non-responsive to this therapy and cytotoxic agents are often utilized which are associated with many adverse side effects. Consequently, there is a genuine need to develop more effective, less toxic treatments for invasive breast cancer. Indole-3-carbinol is a phytochemical found in cruciferous vegetables and one of its major metabolites, 3,3-diindolylmethane (DIM), exhibits a broad range of anticancer and antitumorigenic activities. ER-negative MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-453 breast cancer cell growth was inhibited after treatment with a novel series of methylenesubstituted DIMs (C-DIMs), namely 1,1-bis(3-indolyl)-1-(p-substitutedphenyl) methanes containing trifluoromethyl (DIM-C-pPhCF3), t-butyl (DIM-C-pPhtBu) and phenyl (DIM-C-pPhC6H5) groups. In addition, DIM-C-pPhC6H5 (40 mg/kg/d) inhibited tumor growth in nude mice bearing MDA-MB-231 cells as xenografts. Treatment of breast cancer cells with C-DIMs lead to downregulation of cyclin D1 and induction of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug-activated gene 1. Detection of necrosis, caspasedependent or caspase-independent apoptosis were not observed in breast cancer cells treated with C-DIMs, however autophagic cell death was induced by C-DIMs. DIM and ring-substituted DIMs have exhibited antitumorigenic activity in tumor murine mammary models. An investigation into the mechanism of cell death induced by DIM and 5,5-dibromoDIM (5,5-diBrDIM) in both ER-positive (MCF-7) and ERnegative (MDA-MB-231) breast cancer cells revealed modulation of several key signaling pathways involved in growth control. Both DIM and 5,5-diBrDIM downregulated cyclin D1, although only 5,5-diBrDIM induced a depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane. In addition, apoptosis was observed in MCF-7 cells treated with 5,5-diBrDIM but not MDA-MB-231 cells. In summary, C-DIMs may represent new mechanism-based agents for treatment of breast cancer through induction of autophagic cell death. The ring-substituted DIMs correspond to a novel class of uncharged mitochondrial poisons that are also highly effective in inhibiting breast cancer cell growth. Results of this research provide evidence for the potential role of two new series of DIM analogs for the treatment of highly aggressive breast cancer.

Vanderlaag, Kathryn Elisabeth

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Fuel Cell Demonstration Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In an effort to promote clean energy projects and aid in the commercialization of new fuel cell technologies the Long Island Power Authority (LIPA) initiated a Fuel Cell Demonstration Program in 1999 with six month deployments of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) non-commercial Beta model systems at partnering sites throughout Long Island. These projects facilitated significant developments in the technology, providing operating experience that allowed the manufacturer to produce fuel cells that were half the size of the Beta units and suitable for outdoor installations. In 2001, LIPA embarked on a large-scale effort to identify and develop measures that could improve the reliability and performance of future fuel cell technologies for electric utility applications and the concept to establish a fuel cell farm (Farm) of 75 units was developed. By the end of October of 2001, 75 Lorax 2.0 fuel cells had been installed at the West Babylon substation on Long Island, making it the first fuel cell demonstration of its kind and size anywhere in the world at the time. Designed to help LIPA study the feasibility of using fuel cells to operate in parallel with LIPA's electric grid system, the Farm operated 120 fuel cells over its lifetime of over 3 years including 3 generations of Plug Power fuel cells (Lorax 2.0, Lorax 3.0, Lorax 4.5). Of these 120 fuel cells, 20 Lorax 3.0 units operated under this Award from June 2002 to September 2004. In parallel with the operation of the Farm, LIPA recruited government and commercial/industrial customers to demonstrate fuel cells as on-site distributed generation. From December 2002 to February 2005, 17 fuel cells were tested and monitored at various customer sites throughout Long Island. The 37 fuel cells operated under this Award produced a total of 712,635 kWh. As fuel cell technology became more mature, performance improvements included a 1% increase in system efficiency. Including equipment, design, fuel, maintenance, installation, and decommissioning the total project budget was approximately $3.7 million.

Gerald Brun

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

280

Effect of dietary fat levels on the susceptibility of colonic cells to nuclear-damaging agents  

SciTech Connect

The effect of two levels and types of dietary fats on the susceptibility of colonic cells to the nuclear-damaging effect of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (DMH), 2-amino-3,4-dimethylimidazo(4,5-f)quinoline (MeIQ), and gamma-radiation was investigated. Corn oil and beef tallow were added to the semisynthetic diet at 5% and 20% levels (weight/weight). A diet-related effect was not evident until after two weeks of feeding. Animals (C57BL/6J female mice) that were given the 20% corn oil or beef tallow diets had significantly (p less than 0.05) more nuclear aberrations in their colons 24 hours following treatment with DMH (5 mg or 10 mg/kg body wt or MeIQ (100 mg/kg body weight) than did those given low-fat diets (5% corn oil or beef tallow). The nuclear-damaging effect of gamma radiation was unaffected by dietary treatments. A high-fat diet had the most pronounced effect on DMH-treated animals, and maximum nuclear aberrations were observed 24 hours following the treatment. Thus, we concluded that increased levels of dietary fats elevate the toxicity of DMH and MeIQ to colonic epithelial cells.

Bird, R.P.; Bruce, W.R.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammary epithelial cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Cell Stem Cell, Volume 12 Supplemental Information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E. Jacobsen, Matteo Pellegrini and Amander T. Clark #12;Figure S1. DNA Methylation in PGCs and iPGCs somatic cells from e10.5 embryos (D) and iPGCs (E). The xaxis denotes individual CpG dinucleotides of differentiation, showing gating strategy for SSEA1+/cKitbright iPGCs (green). G: Metaplot of methylation

Jacobsen, Steve

282

Metal halogen electrochemical cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

It has now been discovered that reduction in the coulombic efficiency of metal halogen cells can be minimized if the microporous separator employed in such cells is selected from one which is preferably wet by the aqueous electrolyte and is not wet substantially by the cathodic halogen.

Bellows, Richard J. (Hampton, NJ); Kantner, Edward (E. Brunswick, NJ)

1988-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

283

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the batteries, and to power accessories like the air condi- tioner and heater. Hybrid electric cars can exceed#12;#12;Hydrogen Fuel Cell Engines MODULE 8: FUEL CELL HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLES CONTENTS 8.1 HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLES .................................................................................. 8-1 8

284

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;#12;Hydrogen Fuel Cell Engines MODULE 11:GLOSSARY AND CONVERSIONS CONTENTS 11.1 GLOSSARY Cell Engines MODULE 11:GLOSSARY AND CONVERSIONS OBJECTIVES This module is for reference only. Hydrogen MODULE 11: GLOSSARY AND CONVERSIONS PAGE 11-1 11.1 Glossary This glossary covers words, phrases

285

Molecular Cell Short Article  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular Cell Short Article Nucleosome Organization Affects the Sensitivity of Gene Expression to Promoter Mutations Gil Hornung,1 Moshe Oren,2 and Naama Barkai1,* 1Department of Molecular Genetics 2Department of Molecular Cell Biology Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel *Correspondence: naama

Barkai, Naama

286

Fuel cell market applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is a review of the US (and international) fuel cell development for the stationary power generation market. Besides DOE, GRI, and EPRI sponsorship, the US fuel cell program has over 40% cost-sharing from the private sector. Support is provided by user groups with over 75 utility and other end-user members. Objectives are to develop and demonstrate cost-effective fuel cell power generation which can initially be commercialized into various market applications using natural gas fuel by the year 2000. Types of fuel cells being developed include PAFC (phosphoric acid), MCFC (molten carbonate), and SOFC (solid oxide); status of each is reported. Potential international applications are reviewed also. Fuel cells are viewed as a force in dispersed power generation, distributed power, cogeneration, and deregulated industry. Specific fuel cell attributes are discussed: Fuel cells promise to be one of the most reliable power sources; they are now being used in critical uninterruptible power systems. They need hydrogen which can be generated internally from natural gas, coal gas, methanol landfill gas, or other fuels containing hydrocarbons. Finally, fuel cell development and market applications in Japan are reviewed briefly.

Williams, M.C.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

287

Fuel cell generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High temperature solid oxide electrolyte fuel cell generators which allow controlled leakage among plural chambers in a sealed housing. Depleted oxidant and fuel are directly reacted in one chamber to combust remaining fuel and preheat incoming reactants. The cells are preferably electrically arranged in a series-parallel configuration.

Isenberg, Arnold O. (Forest Hills, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

NREL: Learning - Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cells Fuel Cells Fuel cells and their ability to cleanly produce electricity from hydrogen and oxygen are what make hydrogen attractive as a "fuel" for transportation use particularly, but also as a general energy carrier for homes and other uses, and for storing and transporting otherwise intermittent renewable energy. Fuel cells function somewhat like a battery-with external fuel being supplied rather than stored electricity-to generate power by chemical reaction rather than combustion. Hydrogen fuel cells, for instance, feed hydrogen gas into an electrode that contains a catalyst, such as platinum, which helps to break up the hydrogen molecules into positively charged hydrogen ions and negatively charged electrons. The electrons flow from the electrode to a terminal that

289

NETL: Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cells Fuel Cells Coal and Power Systems Fuel Cells SECA Logo Welcome to NETL's Fuel Cells Webpage. In partnership with private industry, educational institutions and national laboratories, we are leading the research, development, and demonstration of high efficiency, fuel flexible solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) and coal-based SOFC power generation systems for stationary market large central power plants under the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA). The SECA cost reduction goal is to have SOFC systems capable of being manufactured at $400 per kilowatt by 2010. Concurrently, the scale-up, aggregation, and integration of the technology will progress in parallel leading to prototype validation of megawatt (MW)-class fuel flexible products by 2012 and 2015. The SECA coal-based systems goal is the development of large

290

Fuel Cell Development Status  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development Status Michael Short Systems Engineering Manager United Technologies Corporation Research Center Hamilton Sundstrand UTC Power UTC Fire & Security Fortune 50 corporation $52.9B in annual sales in 2009 ~60% of Sales are in building technologies Transportation Stationary Fuel Cells Space & Defense * Fuel cell technology leader since 1958 * ~ 550 employees * 768+ Active U.S. patents, more than 300 additional U.S. patents pending * Global leader in efficient, reliable, and sustainable fuel cell solutions UTC Power About Us PureCell ® Model 400 Solution Process Overview Power Conditioner Converts DC power to high-quality AC power 3 Fuel Cell Stack Generates DC power from hydrogen and air 2 Fuel Processor Converts natural gas fuel to hydrogen

291

Fuel Cell 101  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell 101 Fuel Cell 101 Don Hoffman Don Hoffman Ship Systems & Engineering Research Division March 2011 Distribution Statement A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Fuel Cell Operation * A Fuel Cell is an electrochemical power source * It supplies electricity by combining hydrogen and oxygen electrochemically without combustion. * It is configured like a battery with anode and cathode. * Unlike a battery, it does not run down or require recharging and will produce electricity and will produce electricity, heat and water as long as fuel is supplied. 2H + + 2e - O 2 + 2H + + 2e - 2H 2 O H 2 Distribution Statement A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. 2 FUEL FUEL CONTROLS Fuel Cell System HEAT & WATER CLEAN CLEAN EXHAUST EXHAUST

292

Physics of adherent cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the most unique physical features of cell adhesion to external surfaces is the active generation of mechanical force at the cell-material interface. This includes pulling forces generated by contractile polymer bundles and networks, and pushing forces generated by the polymerization of polymer networks. These forces are transmitted to the substrate mainly by focal adhesions, which are large, yet highly dynamic adhesion clusters. Tissue cells use these forces to sense the physical properties of their environment and to communicate with each other. The effect of forces is intricately linked to the material properties of cells and their physical environment. Here a review is given of recent progress in our understanding of the role of forces in cell adhesion from the viewpoint of theoretical soft matter physics and in close relation to the relevant experiments.

Schwarz, Ulrich S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Solid oxide fuel cell generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid oxide fuel cell generator has a plenum containing at least two rows of spaced apart, annular, axially elongated fuel cells. An electrical conductor extending between adjacent rows of fuel cells connects the fuel cells of one row in parallel with each other and in series with the fuel cells of the adjacent row. 5 figures.

Di Croce, A.M.; Draper, R.

1993-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

294

Solid oxide fuel cell generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid oxide fuel cell generator has a plenum containing at least two rows of spaced apart, annular, axially elongated fuel cells. An electrical conductor extending between adjacent rows of fuel cells connects the fuel cells of one row in parallel with each other and in series with the fuel cells of the adjacent row.

Di Croce, A. Michael (Murrysville, PA); Draper, Robert (Churchill Boro, PA)

1993-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

295

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 to someone by E-mail 2 to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: March 2012 on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: March 2012 on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: March 2012 on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: March 2012 on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: March 2012 on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: March 2012 on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter Archives Subscribe

296

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 to someone by E-mail 3 to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: February 2013 on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: February 2013 on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: February 2013 on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: February 2013 on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: February 2013 on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: February 2013 on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter

297

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

September 2012 to someone by E-mail September 2012 to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: September 2012 on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: September 2012 on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: September 2012 on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: September 2012 on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: September 2012 on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: September 2012 on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications

298

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fuel cell devices to charge electronics such as cell phones and audio players. EERE funding for hydrogen and fuel cells has led to more than 450 patents, 60 commercial...

299

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 to someone by E-mail 2 to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: May 2012 on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: May 2012 on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: May 2012 on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: May 2012 on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: May 2012 on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: May 2012 on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter Archives Subscribe Program Presentations

300

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

August 2013 to someone by E-mail August 2013 to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: August 2013 on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: August 2013 on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: August 2013 on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: August 2013 on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: August 2013 on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: August 2013 on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammary epithelial cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

October 2012 to someone by E-mail October 2012 to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: October 2012 on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: October 2012 on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: October 2012 on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: October 2012 on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: October 2012 on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: October 2012 on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications

302

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

April 2012 to someone by E-mail April 2012 to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: April 2012 on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: April 2012 on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: April 2012 on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: April 2012 on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: April 2012 on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: April 2012 on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter Archives

303

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 to someone by E-mail 3 to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: May 2013 on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: May 2013 on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: May 2013 on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: May 2013 on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: May 2013 on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: May 2013 on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter Archives Subscribe Program Presentations

304

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 to someone by E-mail 2 to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: June 2012 on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: June 2012 on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: June 2012 on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: June 2012 on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: June 2012 on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: June 2012 on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter Archives Subscribe

305

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

September/October 2013 to someone by E-mail September/October 2013 to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: September/October 2013 on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: September/October 2013 on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: September/October 2013 on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: September/October 2013 on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: September/October 2013 on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: September/October 2013 on AddThis.com... Publications

306

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

August 2012 to someone by E-mail August 2012 to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: August 2012 on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: August 2012 on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: August 2012 on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: August 2012 on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: August 2012 on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: August 2012 on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter

307

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Manufacturing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Manufacturing R&D Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Manufacturing R&D Workshop on Facebook Tweet...

308

Cochlear hair cell regeneration from neonatal mouse supporting cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unlike lower vertebrates, capable of spontaneous hair cell regeneration, mammals experience permanent sensorineural hearing loss following hair cell damage. Although low levels of hair cell regeneration have been demonstrated ...

Bramhall, Naomi F

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Coordinatio...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Coordination Meeting to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Coordination Meeting on Facebook Tweet about...

310

Fuel Cells Vehicle Systems Analysis (Fuel Cell Freeze Investigation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation on Fuel Cells Vehicle Systems Analysis (Fuel Cell Freeze Investigation) for the 2005 Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program Annual Review held in Arlington, Virginia on May 23-26, 2005.

Pesaran, A.; Kim, G.; Markel, T.; Wipke, K.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Ellipsoidal cell flow system  

SciTech Connect

The disclosure relates to a system incorporating an ellipsoidal flow chamber having light reflective walls for low level light detection in practicing cellular analysis. The system increases signal-to-noise ratio by a factor of ten over prior art systems. In operation, laser light passes through the primary focus of the ellipsoid. A controlled flow of cells simultaneously passes through this focus so that the laser light impinges on the cells and is modulated by the cells. The reflective walls of the ellipsoid reflect the cell-modulated light to the secondary focus of the ellipsoid. A tapered light guide at the secondary focus picks up a substantial portion of modulated reflective light and directs it onto a light detector to produce a signal. The signal is processed to obtain the intensity distribution of the modulated light and hence sought after characteristics of the cells. In addition, cells may be dyed so as to fluoresce in response to the laser light and their fluorescence may be processed as cell-modulated light above described. A light discriminating filter would be used to distinguish reflected modulated laser light from reflected fluorescent light.

Salzman, Gary C. (Los Alamos, NM); Mullaney, Paul F. (Los Alamos, NM)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Office, finds DOE funding has led to more than 360 hydrogen and fuel cell patents, 36 commercial...

313

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Fuel Cell System Contaminants...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell System Contaminants Material Screening Data NREL designed this interactive material selector tool to help fuel cell developers and material suppliers explore the results...

314

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Reversible Fuel Cell Systems at Proton Energy, Mr. Everett Anderson, PROTON ON SITE Regenerative Fuel Cells for Energy Storage, Mr. Corky Mittelsteadt, Giner Electrochemical...

315

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information Resources Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter to someone by E-mail Share Fuel...

316

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research, Development and Demonstration Plan* to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development and...

317

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Adoption of Fuel Cell Technologie...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Adoption of Fuel Cell Technologies Federal Facilities Guide Read Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for Federal Facility Decision Makers for step-by-step guidance...

318

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Fuel Cell Technologies Office Search Search Help Fuel Cell Technologies Office HOME...

319

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

offices, including Fuel Cell Technologies. Funding Opportunities SBIRSTTR Phase I Release 1 Technical Topics Announced for FY14-Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Topics Include...

320

Lateral superlattice solar cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A novel structure which comprises of a lateral superlattice as the active layer of a solar cell is proposed. If the alternating regions A and B of a lateral superlattice ABABAB... are chosen to have a Type-II band offset, it is shown that the performance of the active absorbing region of the solar cell is optimized. In essence, the Type-II lateral superlattice region can satisfy the material requirements for an ideal solar cells active absorbing region, i.e. simultaneously having a very high transition probability for photogeneration and a very long minority carrier recombination lifetime.

Mascarenhas, A.; Zhang, Y. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Millunchick, J.M.; Twesten, R.D.; Jones, E.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammary epithelial cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Battery cell soldering apparatus  

SciTech Connect

A battery cell soldering apparatus for coupling a plurality of battery cells within a battery casing comprises a support platform and a battery casing holder. The support platform operatively supports a soldering block including a plurality of soldering elements coupled to an electrical source together with a cooling means and control panel to control selectively the heating and cooling of the soldering block when the battery cells within the battery casing are held inverted in operative engagement with the plurality of soldering elements by the battery casing holder.

Alvarez, O.E.

1979-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

322

PLUTONIUM ELECTROREFINING CELLS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrorefining cells for obtaining 99.98% plutonium are described. The cells consist of an impure liquid plutonium anode, a molten PuCl/sub 3/-- alkali or alkaline earth metal chloanode, a molten PuCl/sub 3/-alkali or alkaline earth metal chloride electrolyte, and a nonreactive cathode, all being contained in nonreactive ceramic containers which separate anode from cathode by a short distance and define a gap for the collection of the purified liquid plutonium deposited on the cathode. Important features of these cells are the addition of stirrer blades on the anode lead and a large cathode surface to insure a low current density. (AEC)

Mullins, L.J. Jr.; Leary, J.A.; Bjorklund, C.W.; Maraman, W.J.

1963-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

323

Fuel Cells & Renewable Portfolio Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.....................................................12 SOFC Battery Range Extender Auxiliary Power Unit (SOFC) as Military APU Replacements" (presentation, DOD-DOE Workshop on Fuel Cells in Aviation cell plasma lighting demonstration, a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) battery range extender APU

324

Energy Basics: Photovoltaic Cell Structures  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

the middle, is Eg2; and Cell 3, at the bottom, is Eg3. The top cell captures the high-energy photons and passes the rest of the photons on to be absorbed by lower-bandgap cells. A...

325

RECHARGEABLE MOLTEN-SALT CELLS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

KC! /FeS 2 cell lithium-silicon magnesium oxide molten-saltmolten-salt cells Na/Na glass/Na:z.Sn-S cell Na/NazOxA!Symposium on Molten Salts, Physical Electrochemistry

Cairns, Elton J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Modeling Stem Cell Induction Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technology for converting human cells to pluripotent stem cell using induction processes has the potential to revolutionize regenerative medicine. However, the production of these so called iPS cells is still quite inefficient ...

Grcio, Filipe

327

The Pathology of EMT in Mouse Mammary Tumorigenesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

study of experimental cancer research. A review. New York:London: Imperial Cancer Research Fund; 1911. 17. Jensen CO.of The Imperial Cancer Research Fund. London: Taylor and

Cardiff, Robert Darrell

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Corrosion Test Cell For Bipolar Plates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Corrosion Test Cell For Bipolar Plates Corrosion Test Cell For Bipolar Plates A corrosion test cell for evaluating corrosion resistance in fuel cell bipolar plates is described....

329

Solar Cells Hellas SA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cells Hellas SA Jump to: navigation, search Name Solar Cells Hellas SA Place Athens, Greece Product Greek manufacturer of PV wafers, cells and modules. References Solar Cells...

330

DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

500 2007 2013 Cumulative Number of Patents Fuel Cells ProductionDelivery Storage * DOE funding has led to 40 commercial hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and 65 emerging...

331

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Multimedia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Fuel Cell Technologies Office Search Search Help Fuel Cell Technologies Office HOME...

332

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Budget  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Fuel Cell Technologies Office Search Search Help Fuel Cell Technologies Office HOME...

333

NIST: NIF - PEM Fuel Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Fuel cells are operationally equivalent to a battery. The reactants or fuel in a fuel cell can be replaced unlike a standard disposable or rechargeable ...

334

Fuel Cells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Fuel Cells Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Fuel Cells Incentives...

335

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& Local Governments For Early Adopters For Students & Educators Careers in Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells...

336

Fuel Cell Technologies Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

States Energy Advisory Board (STEAB) States Energy Advisory Board (STEAB) Washington, DC Dr. Sunita Satyapal U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program Program Manager 3/14/2012 2 | Fuel Cell Technologies Program Source: US DOE 3/19/2013 eere.energy.gov * Introduction - Technology and Market Overview * DOE Program Overview - Mission & Structure - R&D Progress - Demonstration & Deployments * State Activities - Examples of potential opportunities Outline 3 | Fuel Cell Technologies Program Source: US DOE 3/19/2013 eere.energy.gov Fuel cells - convert chemical energy directly into electrical energy, bypassing inefficiencies associated with thermal energy conversion. Available energy is equal to the Gibbs free energy. Combustion Engines - convert chemical energy into thermal energy and

337

Batteries and Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collage of electric cars, plug, battery research lab Collage of electric cars, plug, battery research lab Batteries and Fuel Cells EETD researchers study the basic science and development of advanced batteries and fuel cells for transportation, electric grid storage, and other stationary applications. This research is aimed at developing more environmentally friendly technologies for generating and storing energy, including better batteries and fuel cells. Li-Ion and Other Advanced Battery Technologies Research conducted here on battery technology is aimed at developing low-cost rechargeable advanced electrochemical batteries for both automotive and stationary applications. The goal of fuel cell research is to provide the technologies for the successful commercialization of polymer-electrolyte and solid oxide fuel

338

Solar cell array interconnects  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrical interconnects are disclosed for solar cells or other electronic components using a silver-silicone paste or a lead-tin (Pb-Sn) no-clean fluxless solder cream, whereby the high breakage of thin (<6 mil thick) solar cells using conventional solder interconnect is eliminated. The interconnects of this invention employs copper strips which are secured to the solar cells by a silver-silicone conductive paste which can be used at room temperature, or by a Pb-Sn solder cream which eliminates undesired residue on the active surfaces of the solar cells. Electrical testing using the interconnects of this invention has shown that no degradation of the interconnects developed under high current testing, while providing a very low contact resistance value. 4 figs.

Carey, P.G.; Thompson, J.B.; Colella, N.J.; Williams, K.A.

1995-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

339

T Plant Cell Investigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Waste Management Project within Fluor Hanford performed an initial investigation of the current and historical contents of 221-T (T Plant Canyon) process cells. This Phase I report is intended to be followed by a final, more detailed, Phase II report. This information has been gathered in order to help reduce uncertainties and future surprises regarding cell contents during future work in and around T Plant process cells. The information was obtained from available documentation and was compiled into a database that is included in the report. Resolution of any apparently conflicting information was not a part of the Phase I effort. No information has been found to date that would indicate there could be a significant unexpected hazard in any of the process cells.

HLADEK, K.L.

2001-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

340

Microbubble cell actuator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The field of microsystems technology is rapidly growing, and expanding its horizons to applications in bioengineering. Currently, there are no cell analysis systems that facilitate the collection of dynamic responses for ...

Braff, Rebecca A. (Rebecca Alice)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammary epithelial cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Microbial Capacitive Desalination Cell  

A research team led by Dr. Jason Ren of the University of Colorado has developed novel microbial capacitive desalination cell (MCDC) technology for sustainable desalination, renewable energy production, and wastewater treatment solution.

342

HIV entering the cell  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NA Question: How does the HIV virus enter the cell, is it through active transport or passive? Could it be endocytosis? Replies: None of these, usually. Many viruses, T4 for...

343

Photovoltaic Cell Performance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Photovoltaic (PV), or solar cells use the energy in sunlight to produce electricity. However, the amount of electricity produced depends on the quality of the light available and the performance of...

344

Photovoltaic solar cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photovoltaic solar cell for generating electricity from sunlight is disclosed. The photovoltaic solar cell comprises a plurality of spaced-apart point contact junctions formed in a semiconductor body to receive the sunlight and generate the electicity therefrom, the plurality of spaced-apart point contact junctions having a first plurality of regions having a first doping type and a second plurality of regions having a second doping type. In addition, the photovoltaic solar cell comprises a first electrical contact electrically connected to each of the first plurality of regions and a second electrical contact electrically connected to each of the second plurality of regions, as well as a passivation layer covering major surfaces and sidewalls of the photovoltaic solar cell.

Nielson, Gregory N; Okandan, Murat; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Resnick, Paul J

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

345

Energy Basics: Photovoltaic Cells  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

mounting hardware, power-conditioning equipment, and batteries that store solar energy for use when the sun is not shining. When light shines on a PV cell, it may be...

346

Solar cell array interconnects  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrical interconnects for solar cells or other electronic components using a silver-silicone paste or a lead-tin (Pb-Sn) no-clean fluxless solder cream, whereby the high breakage of thin (<6 mil thick) solar cells using conventional solder interconnect is eliminated. The interconnects of this invention employs copper strips which are secured to the solar cells by a silver-silicone conductive paste which can be used at room temperature, or by a Pb-Sn solder cream which eliminates undesired residue on the active surfaces of the solar cells. Electrical testing using the interconnects of this invention has shown that no degradation of the interconnects developed under high current testing, while providing a very low contact resistance value.

Carey, Paul G. (Mountain View, CA); Thompson, Jesse B. (Brentwood, CA); Colella, Nicolas J. (Livermore, CA); Williams, Kenneth A. (Livermore, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the lead federal agency for applied research and development (R&D) of cutting edge hydrogen and fuel cell technologies. DOE supports R&D that makes it...

348

Thin film photovoltaic cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solar cell has as its transparent electrical contact a grid made from a non-noble metal by providing a layer of copper oxide between the transparent electrical contact and the absorber-generator.

Rothwarf, Allen (Philadelphia, PA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Teaching cell respiration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

I am tearing my hair out trying to teach the subject of Cell Respiration and photosynthesis to students that are in some cases on a basic skills level of understanding. How...

350

Hydrogen and Fuel Cells  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the lead federal agency for applied research and development (R&D) of cutting edge hydrogen and fuel cell technologies. DOE supports R&D that makes it...

351

Composite fuel cell membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A bilayer or trilayer composite ion exchange membrane is described suitable for use in a fuel cell. The composite membrane has a high equivalent weight thick layer in order to provide sufficient strength and low equivalent weight surface layers for improved electrical performance in a fuel cell. In use, the composite membrane is provided with electrode surface layers. The composite membrane can be composed of a sulfonic fluoropolymer in both core and surface layers.

Plowman, K.R.; Rehg, T.J.; Davis, L.W.; Carl, W.P.; Cisar, A.J.; Eastland, C.S.

1997-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

352

Ice electrode electrolytic cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a method and apparatus for removing heavy metals from waste water, soils, or process streams by electrolytic cell means. The method includes cooling a cell cathode to form an ice layer over the cathode and then applying an electric current to deposit a layer of the heavy metal over the ice. The metal is then easily removed after melting the ice. In a second embodiment, the same ice-covered electrode can be employed to form powdered metals.

Glenn, David F. (Idaho Falls, ID); Suciu, Dan F. (Idaho Falls, ID); Harris, Taryl L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ingram, Jani C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Ice electrode electrolytic cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a method and apparatus for removing heavy metals from waste water, soils, or process streams by electrolytic cell means. The method includes cooling a cell cathode to form an ice layer over the cathode and then applying an electric current to deposit a layer of the heavy metal over the ice. The metal is then easily removed after melting the ice. In a second embodiment, the same ice-covered electrode can be employed to form powdered metals.

Glenn, D.F.; Suciu, D.F.; Harris, T.L.; Ingram, J.C.

1993-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

354

Aluminum reduction cell electrode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is directed to cathode modules comprised of refractory hard metal materials, such as TiB[sub 2], for an electrolytic cell for the reduction of alumina wherein the modules may be installed and replaced during operation of the cell and wherein the structure of the cathode modules is such that the refractory hard metal materials are not subjected to externally applied forces or rigid constraints. 9 figs.

Goodnow, W.H.; Payne, J.R.

1982-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

355

Ice electrode electrolytic cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a method and apparatus for removing heavy metals from waste water, soils, or process streams by electrolytic cell means. The method includes cooling a cell cathode to form an ice layer over the cathode and then applying an electric current to deposit a layer of the heavy metal over the ice. The metal is then easily removed after melting the ice. In a second embodiment, the same ice-covered electrode can be employed to form powdered metals.

Glenn, D.F.; Suciu, D.F.; Harris, T.L.; Ingram, J.C.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

356

Monolithic tandem solar cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

It is an object of the invention to provide a monolithic tandem photovoltaic solar cell which is highly radiation resistant and efficient; in which the energy bandgap of the lower subcell can be tailored for specific applications; solar cell comprising layers of InP and GaInAsP (or GaInAs), where said photovoltaic cell is useful, for example, in space power applications; having an improved power-to-mass ratio; in which subcells are lattice-matches; and are both two terminal and three terminal monolithic tandem photovoltaic solar cells. To achieve the foregoing and other objects and in accordance with the purpose of the present invention, as embodied and broadly described herein, the monolithic tandem photovoltaic solar cell may comprise; (a) an InP substrate having an upper surface; (b) a first photoactive subcell on the upper surface of the InP substrate; wherein the first subcell comprises GaInAs (which could include GaInAsP) and includes a homojunction; and (c) a second photoactive subcell on the first subcell; wherein the second subcell comprises InP and includes a homojunction. The cell is described in detail. 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Wanlass, M.W.

1989-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

357

Fuel cell system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell system is comprised of a fuel cell module including sub-stacks of series-connected fuel cells, the sub-stacks being held together in a stacked arrangement with cold plates of a cooling means located between the sub-stacks to function as electrical terminals. The anode and cathode terminals of the sub-stacks are connected in parallel by means of the coolant manifolds which electrically connect selected cold plates. The system may comprise a plurality of the fuel cell modules connected in series. The sub-stacks are designed to provide a voltage output equivalent to the desired voltage demand of a low voltage, high current DC load such as an electrolytic cell to be driven by the fuel cell system. This arrangement in conjunction with switching means can be used to drive a DC electrical load with a total voltage output selected to match that of the load being driven. This arrangement eliminates the need for expensive voltage regulation equipment.

Early, Jack (Perth Amboy, NJ); Kaufman, Arthur (West Orange, NJ); Stawsky, Alfred (Teaneck, NJ)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Hydrogen and fuel cells offer great  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and electricity for fuel cell and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles while using proven stationary fuel cell technol vehicles with its own fuel cell technology. Currently, advanced vehicle technologies are being evalu- ated in addition to hydrogen fuel for local demonstration fuel cell vehicles. As advanced vehicles begin to enter

359

Mechanisms of hormonal regulation of CAD gene expression and inhibition by Aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonist in human breast cancer cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The CAD gene is trifunctional and expresses carbamoylphosphate synthetase/aspartate carbamyltransferase/dihydroorotase, which are required for pyrimidine biosynthesis. CAD gene activities are induced in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells, and treatment of MCF-7 or ZR-75 cells with 17b-estradiol (E2) resulted in a 3-5 fold increase in CAD mRNA levels in both cell lines. E2 induced reporter gene activity in MCF-7 and ZR-75 cells transfected with a construct containing the growth-responsive -90/+115 (pCAD1) region of the CAD gene promoter, which contains three upstream GC-rich and two downstream E-box motifs. Deletion and mutation analysis of the CAD gene promoter demonstrated that only the GC boxes that bind Sp1 protein were required for E2-responsiveness. Results of gel shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation (CHIP) assays show that both Sp1 and estrogen receptor a (ERa) interact with the GC-rich region of the CAD gene promoter. Moreover, hormone-induced transactivation of pCAD1 was inhibited by cotransfection with dominant-negative Sp1 expression plasmid and small inhibitory RNA for Sp1. These results demonstrate that, in common with many other genes involved in E2-induced cell proliferation, the CAD gene is also regulated by a nonclassical ERa/Sp1-mediated pathway. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and other aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligands suppress several E2-induced responses in the rodent uterus and mammary tumors and in human breast cancer cells. TCDD inhibited hormone-induced activation of CAD mRNA levels and reporter gene activity in MCF-7 and ZR-75 cells transfected with E2-responsive pCAD promoter constructs. E2-mediated transactivation of pCAD constructs with a mutant inhibitory dioxin responsive element DRE (iDRE) were also inhibited by TCDD suggesting that inhibitory AhR-ERa/Sp1 crosstalk was iDRE-independent. It was not possible to determine whether the levels of ERa in cells cotreated with E2 plus TCDD were limiting since the proteasome inhibitor MG132 itself directly decreased CAD mRNA levels. Using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), it was shown that both E2 and TCDD enhanced AhR-ERa interactions. E2 also induced interactions between ERa and Sp1. However cotreatment with TCDD abrogated this effect. Results of this study demonstrate a unique model of AhR-ERa crosstalk where the liganded AhR inhibits ERa-Sp1 interactions and also recruits ERa to Ahresponsive gene promoters such as CYP1A1.

Khan, Shaheen Munawar Ali

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Seventh Edition Fuel Cell Handbook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Provides an overview of fuel cell technology and research projects. Discusses the basic workings of fuel cells and their system components, main fuel cell types, their characteristics, and their development status, as well as a discussion of potential fuel cell applications.

NETL

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammary epithelial cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Breakthrough Vehicle Development - Fuel Cells  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

Document describing research and development program for fuel cell power systems for transportation applications.

362

FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.eere.energy.gov/informationcenter hydrogen and electricity for fuel cell and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles while using proven stationary vehicles with its own fuel cell technology. Currently, advanced vehicle technologies are being evalu- ated and fuel cells offer great promise for our energy future. Fuel cell vehicles are not yet commercially

363

Argonne TDC: Fuel Cell Technologies  

Emergency Response. Engineering. Environmental Research. Fuel Cells. Imaging Technology. Material Science. Nanotechnology. Physical Sciences. Sensor ...

364

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Presentations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Presentations to Presentations to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Presentations on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Presentations on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Presentations on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Presentations on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Presentations on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Presentations on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter Program Presentations Multimedia Conferences & Meetings Annual Merit Review Proceedings Workshop & Meeting Proceedings Webinars Data Records Databases Glossary Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells

365

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Glossary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glossary to someone by Glossary to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Glossary on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Glossary on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Glossary on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Glossary on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Glossary on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Glossary on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter Program Presentations Multimedia Conferences & Meetings Webinars Data Records Databases Glossary Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems Analysis Contacts Glossary

366

Electrochemical cell operation and system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Thermal control in fuel cell operation is affected through sensible heat of process gas by providing common input manifolding of the cell gas flow passage in communication with the cell electrolyte and an additional gas flow passage which is isolated from the cell electrolyte and in thermal communication with a heat-generating surface of the cell. Flow level in the cell gas flow passage is selected based on desired output electrical energy and flow level in the additional gas flow passage is selected in accordance with desired cell operating temperature.

Maru, Hansraj C. (Brookfield Center, CT)

1980-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

367

Device for monitoring cell voltage  

SciTech Connect

A device for monitoring a rechargeable battery having a number of electrically connected cells includes at least one current interruption switch for interrupting current flowing through at least one associated cell and a plurality of monitoring units for detecting cell voltage. Each monitoring unit is associated with a single cell and includes a reference voltage unit for producing a defined reference threshold voltage and a voltage comparison unit for comparing the reference threshold voltage with a partial cell voltage of the associated cell. The reference voltage unit is electrically supplied from the cell voltage of the associated cell. The voltage comparison unit is coupled to the at least one current interruption switch for interrupting the current of at least the current flowing through the associated cell, with a defined minimum difference between the reference threshold voltage and the partial cell voltage.

Doepke, Matthias (Garbsen, DE); Eisermann, Henning (Edermissen, DE)

2012-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

368

Cell Phone Detection Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A team composed of Rick Pratt, Dave Puczyki, Kyle Bunch, Ryan Slaugh, Morris Good, and Doug McMakin teamed together to attempt to exploit cellular telephone features and detect if a person was carrying a cellular telephone into a Limited Area. The cell phones electromagnetic properties were measured, analyzed, and tested in over 10 different ways to determine if an exploitable signature exists. The method that appears to have the most potential for success without adding an external tag is to measure the RF spectrum, not in the cell phone band, but between 240 and 400MHz. Figures 1- 7 show the detected signal levels from cell phones from three different manufacturers.

Pratt, Richard M.; Bunch, Kyle J.; Puzycki, David J.; Slaugh, Ryan W.; Good, Morris S.; McMakin, Douglas L.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

PEM FUEL CELL TURBOCOMPRESSOR  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective is to assist the Department of Energy in the development of a low cost, reliable and high performance air compressor/expander. Technical Objective 1: Perform a turbocompressor systems PEM fuel cell trade study to determine the enhanced turbocompressor approach. Technical Objective 2: Using the results from technical objective 1, an enhanced turbocompressor will be fabricated. The design may be modified to match the flow requirements of a selected fuel cell system developer. Technical Objective 3: Design a cost and performance enhanced compact motor and motor controller. Technical Objective 4: Turbocompressor/motor controller development.

Mark K. Gee

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Monolithic tandem solar cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A single-crystal, monolithic, tandem, photovoltaic solar cell is described which includes (a) an InP substrate having upper and lower surfaces, (b) a first photoactive subcell on the upper surface of the InP substrate, and (c) a second photoactive subcell on the first subcell. The first photoactive subcell is GaInAsP of defined composition. The second subcell is InP. The two subcells are lattice matched. The solar cell can be provided as a two-terminal device or a three-terminal device.

Wanlass, Mark W. (Golden, CO)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Fuel cell stack arrangements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Arrangements of stacks of fuel cells and ducts, for fuel cells operating with separate fuel, oxidant and coolant streams. An even number of stacks are arranged generally end-to-end in a loop. Ducts located at the juncture of consecutive stacks of the loop feed oxidant or fuel to or from the two consecutive stacks, each individual duct communicating with two stacks. A coolant fluid flows from outside the loop, into and through cooling channels of the stack, and is discharged into an enclosure duct formed within the loop by the stacks and seals at the junctures at the stacks.

Kothmann, Richard E. (Churchill Boro, PA); Somers, Edward V. (Murrysville, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Amorphous semiconductor solar cell  

SciTech Connect

A solar cell comprising a back electrical contact, amorphous silicon semiconductor base and junction layers and a top electrical contact includes in its manufacture the step of heat treating the physical junction between the base layer and junction layer to diffuse the dopant species at the physical junction into the base layer.

Dalal, Vikram L. (Newark, DE)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Integrated photovoltaic electrolytic cell  

SciTech Connect

A photovoltaic-electrolytic unit is provided to produce an electric current from solar energy and utilize the current to produce hydrogen by the electrolysis of water. The unit floats in an aqueous medium so that photoelectric cells are exposed to solar radiation, and electrodes submerged in the medium produce oxygen which is vented and hydrogen which is collected in the unit.

Ohkawa, T.

1982-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

374

Improved photoelectrodialytic cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multicompartment photoelectrodialytic demineralization cell is provided with a buffer compartment interposed between the product compartment and a compartment containing an electrolyte solution. Semipermeable membranes separate the buffer compartment from the product and electrolyte compartments. The buffer compartment is flushed to prevent leakage of the electrolyte compartment from entering the product compartment.

Murphy, G.W.

1981-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

375

Thin film photovoltaic cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thin film photovoltaic cell having a transparent electrical contact and an opaque electrical contact with a pair of semiconductors therebetween includes utilizing one of the electrical contacts as a substrate and wherein the inner surface thereof is modified by microroughening while being macro-planar.

Meakin, John D. (Newark, DE); Bragagnolo, Julio (Newark, DE)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Glycans in host-pathogen interactions : an integrated biochemical investigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The epithelial cell-extracellular matrix interface primarily comprises of complex glycans and glycoconjugates. The widespread distribution of these glycans on the epithelial cell surface makes them ideal targets for ...

Chandrasekaran, Aarthi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Fuel Cell Handbook, Fourth Edition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

sections have been updated from the previous edition. New information indicates that manufacturers have stayed with proven cell designs, focusing instead on advancing the system surrounding the fuel cell to lower life cycle costs. Section 7, Fuel Cell Systems, has been significantly revised to characterize near-term and next-generation fuel cell power plant systems at a conceptual level of detail. Section 8 provides examples of practical fuel cell system calculations. A list of fuel cell URLs is included in the Appendix. A new index assists the reader in locating specific information quickly.

Stauffer, D.B; Hirschenhofer, J.H.; Klett, M.G.; Engleman, R.R.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Solar Cells: Spin-Cast Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells: A Dynamical...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solar Cells: Spin-Cast Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells: A Dynamical Investigation Solar Cells: Spin-Cast Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells: A Dynamical Investigation Print Wednesday,...

379

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell Bus Workshop Fuel Cell Bus Workshop The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) held a Fuel Cell Bus Workshop on June 7, 2010 in Washington, D.C. in conjunction with the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Program Annual Merit Review. The workshop plenary and breakout session brought together technical experts from industry, end users, academia, DOE national laboratories, and other government agencies to address the status and technology needs of fuel cell powered buses. Meeting Summary Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop Summary Report Presentations Fuel Cell Bus Workshop Overview & Purpose, Dimitrios Papageorgopoulos, DOE Users Perspective on Advanced Fuel Cell Bus Technology, Nico Bouwkamp, CaFCP and Leslie Eudy, NREL Progress and Challenges for PEM Transit Fleet Applications, Tom Madden, UTC Power, LLC

380

Stationary Fuel Cells: Overview of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

& & Renewable Energy Stationary Fuel Cells: Overview of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities Pete Devlin Fuel Cell Technologies Program United States Department of Energy Federal Utility Partnership Working Group April 14 th , 2010 2 * DOE Fuel Cell Market Transformation Overview * Overview of CHP Concept * Stationary Fuel Cells for CHP Applications * Partnering and Financing (Sam Logan) * Example Project Outline 3 Fuel Cells: Addressing Energy Challenges Energy Efficiency and Resource Diversity  Fuel cells offer a highly efficient way to use diverse fuels and energy sources. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Air Pollution:  Fuel cells can be powered by emissions-free fuels that are produced from clean, domestic resources. Stationary Power (including CHP & backup power)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammary epithelial cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: Fuel Cell Technologies Office...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell Technologies Office FY2014 Budget Request Briefing on April 12 Apr 9, 2013 The Fuel Cell Technologies Office will hold a budget briefing for stakeholders on Friday, April...

382

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Manufacturing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Fuel Cell Manufacturing R&D Workshop The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) hosted a Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Manufacturing R&D Workshop August 11-12, 2011, in...

383

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) held a Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop June 11-13, 2012, in...

384

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Flow Cells for Energy Storage...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Flow Cells for Energy Storage Workshop The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) held a Flow Cells for Energy Storage Workshop on March...

385

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: New Fuel Cell Projects Meeting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agenda (PDF 83 KB) New Fuel Cell Projects Overview (PDF 1.2 MB), P. Davis, DOE New Fuel Cell Projects Overview (PDF 609 KB), N. Garland, DOE Membranes Membranes and MEAs for Dry,...

386

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the cost and increasing the performance of fuel cell propulsion systems, and most major vehicle manufacturers are geared to launch fuel cell electric vehicles in the U.S. market...

387

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Presents Annual Merit Review Awards May 21, 2013 The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program presented its annual awards...

388

Fuel Cell Handbook, Fourth Edition  

SciTech Connect

Robust progress has been made in fuel cell technology since the previous edition of the Fuel Cell Handbook was published in January 1994. This Handbook provides a foundation in fuel cells for persons wanting a better understanding of the technology, its benefits, and the systems issues that influence its application. Trends in technology are discussed, including next-generation concepts that promise ultra high efficiency and low cost, while providing exceptionally clean power plant systems. Section 1 summarizes fuel cell progress since the last edition and includes existing power plant nameplate data. Section 2 addresses the thermodynamics of fuel cells to provide an understanding of fuel cell operation at two levels (basic and advanced). Sections 3 through 6 describe the four major fuel cell types and their performance based on cell operating conditions. The section on polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells has been added to reflect their emergence as a significant fuel cell technology. Phosphoric acid, molten carbonate, and solid oxide fuel cell technology description sections have been updated from the previous edition. New information indicates that manufacturers have stayed with proven cell designs, focusing instead on advancing the system surrounding the fuel cell to lower life cycle costs. Section 7, Fuel Cell Systems, has been significantly revised to characterize near-term and next-generation fuel cell power plant systems at a conceptual level of detail. Section 8 provides examples of practical fuel cell system calculations. A list of fuel cell URLs is included in the Appendix. A new index assists the reader in locating specific information quickly.

Stauffer, D.B; Hirschenhofer, J.H.; Klett, M.G.; Engleman, R.R.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Restriction of Receptor Movement Alters Cellular Response: Physical Force Sensing by EphA2  

SciTech Connect

Activation of the EphA2 receptor tyrosine kinase by ephrin-A1 ligands presented on apposed cell surfaces plays important roles in development and exhibits poorly understood functional alterations in cancer. We reconstituted this intermembrane signaling geometry between live EphA2-expressing human breast cancer cells and supported membranes displaying laterally mobile ephrin-A1. Receptor-ligand binding, clustering, and subsequent lateral transport within this junction were observed. EphA2 transport can be blocked by physical barriers nanofabricated onto the underlying substrate. This physical reorganization of EphA2 alters the cellular response to ephrin-A1, as observed by changes in cytoskeleton morphology and recruitment of a disintegrin and metalloprotease 10. Quantitative analysis of receptor-ligand spatial organization across a library of 26 mammary epithelial cell lines reveals characteristic differences that strongly correlate with invasion potential. These observations reveal a mechanism for spatio-mechanical regulation of EphA2 signaling pathways.

Salaita, Khalid; Nair, Pradeep M; Petit, Rebecca S; Neve, Richard M; Das, Debopriya; Gray, Joe W; Groves, Jay T

2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

390

Inhibition of cell-cell binding by lipid assemblies  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates generally to the field of therapeutic compounds designed to interfere between the binding of ligands and their receptors on cell surface. More specifically, it provides products and methods for inhibiting cell migration and activation using lipid assemblies with surface recognition elements that are specific for the receptors involved in cell migration and activation.

Nagy, Jon O. (Rodeo, CA); Bargatze, Robert F. (Bozeman, MT)

2001-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

391

EE580 Solar Cells Todd J. Kaiser  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7/21/2010 1 EE580 ­ Solar Cells Todd J. Kaiser · Lecture 06 · Solar Cell Materials & Structures 1Montana State University: Solar Cells Lecture 6: Solar Cells Solar Cell Technologies · A) Crystalline Silicon · B) Thin Film · C) Group III-IV Cells 2Montana State University: Solar Cells Lecture 6: Solar

Kaiser, Todd J.

392

Available Technologies: Microenvironment Arrays for Tissue ...  

Tracking and Quantifying Organization of Epithelial Cells, IB-2903. REFERENCE NUMBER: IB-3237. See More Biotech & Medicine Technologies. Contact Us.

393

Actin remodeling in motile cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-muscle cell shape change and motility depend primarily on the dynamics and distributions of cytoplasmic actin. In cells, actin cycles between monomeric and polymeric phases tightly regulated by actin binding proteins ...

Osborn, Eric A. (Eric Alan), 1975-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Multimedia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

uses of fuel cell technologies. MotorWeek H2 on the Horizon Video Learn how car makers, energy suppliers, and the government are bringing fuel cell electric vehicles and hydrogen...

395

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Databases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Efficiency and Renewable Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office Databases The Fuel Cell Technologies Office is developing databases to make it easier for users to find up-to-date...

396

Energy Basics: Fuel Cell Vehicles  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Fuel Cell Vehicles Photo of a blue car with 'The Road to Hydrogen' written on it, filling up at a hydrogen fueling station. Fuel cell vehicles, powered by...

397

Fuel Cell Projects Kickoff Meeting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Cost-Competitive Fuel Cell Stacks James Cross, Nuvera 4:30 Fuel Cell Fundamentals at Low and Subzero Temperatures Adam Weber, LBNL 4:50 Development and Validation of...

398

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Events  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Events Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Events to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Events on Facebook Tweet...

399

DOE Fuel Cell Subprogram (Presentation)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* By 2010, develop a fuel cell system for consumer electronics (<50 W) with an energy density of 1,000 WhL. * By 2010, develop a fuel cell system for auxiliary power units (3-30...

400

2009 Fuel Cell Market Report  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

Fuel cells are electrochemical devices that combine hydrogen and oxygen to produce electricity, water, and heat. Unlike batteries, fuel cells continuously generate electricity, as long as a source of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammary epithelial cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Thermal Management of Solar Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nanostructured Silicon- Based Solar Cells, 2013. X. C. Tong,compact heat exchangers, and solar cells," Sci-Tech News,2011. C. J. Chen, Physics of Solar Energy: Wiley, 2011. M.

Saadah, Mohammed Ahmed

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Broad spectrum solar cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An alloy having a large band gap range is used in a multijunction solar cell to enhance utilization of the solar energy spectrum. In one embodiment, the alloy is In.sub.1-xGa.sub.xN having an energy bandgap range of approximately 0.7 eV to 3.4 eV, providing a good match to the solar energy spectrum. Multiple junctions having different bandgaps are stacked to form a solar cell. Each junction may have different bandgaps (realized by varying the alloy composition), and therefore be responsive to different parts of the spectrum. The junctions are stacked in such a manner that some bands of light pass through upper junctions to lower junctions that are responsive to such bands.

Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw (Kensington, CA); Yu, Kin Man (Lafayette, CA); Wu, Junqiao (Richmond, CA); Schaff, William J. (Ithaca, NY)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

403

Aluminum reduction cell electrode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is directed to an anode-cathode structure for an electrolytic cell for the reduction of alumina wherein the structure is comprised of a carbon anode assembly which straddles a wedge-shaped refractory hard metal cathode assembly having steeply sloped cathodic surfaces, each cathodic surface being paired in essentially parallel planar relationship with an anode surface. The anode-cathode structure not only takes into account the structural weakness of refractory hard metal materials but also permits the changing of the RHM assembly during operation of the cell. Further, the anode-cathode structure enhances the removal of anode gas from the interpolar gap between the anode and cathode surfaces. 10 figs.

Payne, J.R.

1983-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

404

Compact fuel cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel electrochemical cell which may be a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is disclosed where the cathodes (144, 140) may be exposed to the air and open to the ambient atmosphere without further housing. Current collector (145) extends through a first cathode on one side of a unit and over the unit through the cathode on the other side of the unit and is in electrical contact via lead (146) with housing unit (122 and 124). Electrical insulator (170) prevents electrical contact between two units. Fuel inlet manifold (134) allows fuel to communicate with internal space (138) between the anodes (154 and 156). Electrically insulating members (164 and 166) prevent the current collector from being in electrical contact with the anode.

Jacobson, Craig (Moraga, CA); DeJonghe, Lutgard C. (Lafayette, CA); Lu, Chun (Richland, WA)

2010-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

405

Cell Systems Science Group Staff  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Members of the Cell Systems Science Group. Dr. John T. Elliott (Group Leader). Dr. Donald H. Atha ...

2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

406

Energy Basics: Photovoltaic Cell Structures  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Photovoltaics Cells Systems Concentrating Solar...

407

Energy Basics: Photovoltaic Cell Performance  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Photovoltaics Cells Systems Concentrating Solar...

408

Energy Basics: Photovoltaic Cell Materials  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Photovoltaics Cells Systems Concentrating Solar...

409

Cell Operations and Process Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 5, 2013 ... Aluminum Reduction Technology: Cell Operations and Process Control Sponsored by: TMS Light Metals Division, TMS: Aluminum Committee

410

Energy Conversion/Fuel Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Symposium. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2011. Symposium, Energy Conversion/Fuel Cells. Sponsorship, MS&T Organization.

411

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Webinars  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Databases Glossary Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems...

412

Available Technologies: Electrochemical Environmental Cell ...  

Electrochemical Environmental Cell with Vertical, Aligned Electrodes for TEM IB-3330. ... Energy storage device / battery research and development;

413

Basal cell carcinoma does metastasize  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Basal cell carcinoma does metastasize Doruk Ozgediz MD 1 ,illustrates that, in fact, BCC does metastasize and if left

Ozgediz, Doruk; Smith, EB; Zheng, Jie; Otero, Jose; Tabatabai, Z Laura; Corvera, Carlos U

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Miniature ceramic fuel cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A miniature power source assembly capable of providing portable electricity is provided. A preferred embodiment of the power source assembly employing a fuel tank, fuel pump and control, air pump, heat management system, power chamber, power conditioning and power storage. The power chamber utilizes a ceramic fuel cell to produce the electricity. Incoming hydro carbon fuel is automatically reformed within the power chamber. Electrochemical combustion of hydrogen then produces electricity.

Lessing, Paul A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Zuppero, Anthony C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1997-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

415

Fuel cell system combustor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell system including a fuel reformer heated by a catalytic combustor fired by anode and cathode effluents. The combustor includes a turbulator section at its input end for intimately mixing the anode and cathode effluents before they contact the combustors primary catalyst bed. The turbulator comprises at least one porous bed of mixing media that provides a tortuous path therethrough for creating turbulent flow and intimate mixing of the anode and cathode effluents therein.

Pettit, William Henry (Rochester, NY)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Carbonate fuel cell matrix  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A carbonate fuel cell matrix is described comprising support particles and crack attenuator particles which are made platelet in shape to increase the resistance of the matrix to through cracking. Also disclosed is a matrix having porous crack attenuator particles and a matrix whose crack attenuator particles have a thermal coefficient of expansion which is significantly different from that of the support particles, and a method of making platelet-shaped crack attenuator particles. 8 figs.

Farooque, M.; Yuh, C.Y.

1996-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

417

Carbonate fuel cell matrix  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A carbonate fuel cell matrix comprising support particles and crack attenuator particles which are made platelet in shape to increase the resistance of the matrix to through cracking. Also disclosed is a matrix having porous crack attenuator particles and a matrix whose crack attenuator particles have a thermal coefficient of expansion which is significantly different from that of the support particles, and a method of making platelet-shaped crack attenuator particles.

Farooque, Mohammad (Huntington, CT); Yuh, Chao-Yi (New Milford, CT)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Securing Cell Relay Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A cellular relay or cell relay (CR) is a device used to relay information from one point in a network to another through a wireless medium using spectrum from the cellular band. One common use of CRs in the United States is to provide wireless devices with access to higher bandwidth or broadband access points. Examples include advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) mesh networks that use meter-based transmitters and receivers to provide communications between meters and from ...

2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

419

Fuel cell oxygen electrode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An oxygen electrode for a fuel cell utilizing an acid electrolyte has a substrate of an alkali metal tungsten bronze of the formula: A.sub.x WO.sub.3 where A is an alkali metal and x is at least 0.2, which is covered with a thin layer of platinum tungsten bronze of the formula: Pt.sub.y WO.sub.3 where y is at least 0.8.

Shanks, Howard R. (Ames, IA); Bevolo, Albert J. (Ames, IA); Danielson, Gordon C. (Ames, IA); Weber, Michael F. (Wichita, KS)

1980-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

420

Fuel cell generator energy dissipator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method are disclosed for eliminating the chemical energy of fuel remaining in a fuel cell generator when the electrical power output of the fuel cell generator is terminated. During a generator shut down condition, electrically resistive elements are automatically connected across the fuel cell generator terminals in order to draw current, thereby depleting the fuel

Veyo, Stephen Emery (Murrysville, PA); Dederer, Jeffrey Todd (Valencia, PA); Gordon, John Thomas (Ambridge, PA); Shockling, Larry Anthony (Pittsburgh, PA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammary epithelial cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Fuel cell sub-assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell sub-assembly comprising a plurality of fuel cells, a first section of a cooling means disposed at an end of the assembly and means for connecting the fuel cells and first section together to form a unitary structure.

Chi, Chang V. (Brookfield, CT)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Nanostructured plasmonics silicon solar cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report a plasmonics silicon solar cell design, with the possibility of lower cost and higher efficiency. The proposed solar cell consists of a radial p-n junction silicon nanopillar arrays in combination with metallic nanoparticles resolved at the ... Keywords: Antireflection coating, Optical absorption, Power conversion efficiency, Solar cells

Pushpa Raj Pudasaini, Arturo A. Ayon

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Method for fabricating silicon cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for making high-efficiency solar cells. This is accomplished by forming a diffusion junction and a passivating oxide layer in a single high-temperature process step. The invention includes the class of solar cells made using this process, including high-efficiency solar cells made using Czochralski-grown silicon. 9 figs.

Ruby, D.S.; Basore, P.A.; Schubert, W.K.

1998-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

424

Method for fabricating silicon cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for making high-efficiency solar cells. This is accomplished by forming a diffusion junction and a passivating oxide layer in a single high-temperature process step. The invention includes the class of solar cells made using this process, including high-efficiency solar cells made using Czochralski-grown silicon.

Ruby, Douglas S. (Albuquerque, NM); Basore, Paul A. (Albuquerque, NM); Schubert, W. Kent (Albuquerque, NM)

1998-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

425

Commercialization of fuel-cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is an abbreviated version of the ''Report of the DOE Advanced Fuel Cell Commercialization Working Group (AFC2WG),'' released January 1995. We describe fuel-cell commercialization for stationary power applications of phosphoric acid, molten carbonate, solid oxide, and polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells.

Penner, S.S.; Appleby, A.J.; Baker, B.S.; Bates, J.L.; Buss, L.B.; Dollard, W.J.; Farris, P.J.; Gillis, E.A.; Gunsher, J.A.; Khandkar, A.; Krumpelt, M.; O'Sullivan, J.B.; Runte, G.; Savinell, R.F.; Selman, J.R.; Shores, D.A.; Tarman, P.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Enabling Thin Silicon Solar Cell Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enabling Thin Silicon Solar Cell Technology Enabling Thin Silicon Solar Cell Technology Print Friday, 21 June 2013 10:49 Generic silicon solar cells showing +45, -45, and...

427

Engineering secondary cell wall deposition in plants  

loop, biofuels, cell wall, lignin, sacchari?cation, synthetic biology. Summary ... target speci?c cell types such as ?bre and pith cells. It is well

428

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Technology Validation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Technology Validation to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Technology Validation on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies...

429

Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, & Infrastructure - Program Areas - Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fuel cell Welcome> Program Areas> Program Areas Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Production & Delivery | Storage | Fuel Cell R&D | Systems Integration & Analysis | Safety...

430

Photovoltaic Electrical Contacts and Cell Coatings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The outermost layers of photovoltaic (PV) cell, or solar cell, are the electrical contacts and anti-reflective coating. These layers provide essential functions to the cell's operation.

431

Fabrication and Characterization of Organic Solar Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

processablepolymerphotovoltaiccellsbyself?organizationPhotodiodes, and Photovoltaic Cells. AppliedPhysicsF, Heeger AJ. Polymer Photovoltaic Cells ? Enhanced

Yengel, Emre

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Study: Cells Selectively Absorb Short Nanotubes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... cells, while shorter lengths are able to penetrate the cell interior (dark ... Eyed for uses ranging from electronic displays to fuel cells to water filtration ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

433

Microfluidic Microbial Fuel Cells for Microstructure Interrogations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sediment microbial fuel cells demonstrating marine (left)Model of hydrogen fuel cell kinetic losses including5 FutureWork 5.1 Microfluidic Microbial Fuel Cell Continued

Parra, Erika Andrea

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Canadian Fuel Cell Commercialization Roadmap Update: Progress...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fuel Cell Commercialization Roadmap Update: Progress of Canada's Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Industry Jump to: navigation, search Name Canadian Fuel Cell Commercialization Roadmap...

435

Fuel Cell Handbook, Fifth Edition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress continues in fuel cell technology since the previous edition of the Fuel Cell Handbook was published in November 1998. Uppermost, polymer electrolyte fuel cells, molten carbonate fuel cells, and solid oxide fuel cells have been demonstrated at commercial size in power plants. The previously demonstrated phosphoric acid fuel cells have entered the marketplace with more than 220 power plants delivered. Highlighting this commercial entry, the phosphoric acid power plant fleet has demonstrated 95+% availability and several units have passed 40,000 hours of operation. One unit has operated over 49,000 hours. Early expectations of very low emissions and relatively high efficiencies have been met in power plants with each type of fuel cell. Fuel flexibility has been demonstrated using natural gas, propane, landfill gas, anaerobic digester gas, military logistic fuels, and coal gas, greatly expanding market opportunities. Transportation markets worldwide have shown remarkable interest in fuel cells; nearly every major vehicle manufacturer in the U.S., Europe, and the Far East is supporting development. This Handbook provides a foundation in fuel cells for persons wanting a better understanding of the technology, its benefits, and the systems issues that influence its application. Trends in technology are discussed, including next-generation concepts that promise ultrahigh efficiency and low cost, while providing exceptionally clean power plant systems. Section 1 summarizes fuel cell progress since the last edition and includes existing power plant nameplate data. Section 2 addresses the thermodynamics of fuel cells to provide an understanding of fuel cell operation at two levels (basic and advanced). Sections 3 through 8 describe the six major fuel cell types and their performance based on cell operating conditions. Alkaline and intermediate solid state fuel cells were added to this edition of the Handbook. New information indicates that manufacturers have stayed with proven cell designs, focusing instead on advancing the system surrounding the fuel cell to lower life cycle costs. Section 9, Fuel Cell Systems, has been significantly revised to characterize near-term and next-generation fuel cell power plant systems at a conceptual level of detail. Section 10 provides examples of practical fuel cell system calculations. A list of fuel cell URLs is included in the Appendix. A new index assists the reader in locating specific information quickly.

Energy and Environmental Solutions

2000-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

436

Cell Component Accelerated Stress Test Protocols for PEM Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

USCAR FUEL CELL TECH TEAM USCAR FUEL CELL TECH TEAM CELL COMPONENT ACCELERATED STRESS TEST PROTOCOLS FOR PEM FUEL CELLS (Electrocatalysts, Supports, Membranes, and Membrane Electrode Assemblies) Revised May 26, 2010 Fuel cells, especially for automotive propulsion, must operate over a wide range of operating and cyclic conditions. The desired operating range encompasses temperatures from below the freezing point to well above the boiling point of water, humidity from ambient to saturated, and half-cell potentials from 0 to >1.5 volts. Furthermore, the anode side of the cell may be exposed to hydrogen and air during different parts of the driving and startup/shutdown cycles. The severity in operating conditions is greatly exacerbated by the transient and cyclic nature of

437

Handbook of fuel cell performance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The intent of this document is to provide a description of fuel cells, their performances and operating conditions, and the relationship between fuel processors and fuel cells. This information will enable fuel cell engineers to know which fuel processing schemes are most compatible with which fuel cells and to predict the performance of a fuel cell integrated with any fuel processor. The data and estimates presented are for the phosphoric acid and molten carbonate fuel cells because they are closer to commercialization than other types of fuel cells. Performance of the cells is shown as a function of operating temperature, pressure, fuel conversion (utilization), and oxidant utilization. The effect of oxidant composition (for example, air versus O/sub 2/) as well as fuel composition is examined because fuels provided by some of the more advanced fuel processing schemes such as coal conversion will contain varying amounts of H/sub 2/, CO, CO/sub 2/, CH/sub 4/, H/sub 2/O, and sulfur and nitrogen compounds. A brief description of fuel cells and their application to industrial, commercial, and residential power generation is given. The electrochemical aspects of fuel cells are reviewed. The phosphoric acid fuel cell is discussed, including how it is affected by operating conditions; and the molten carbonate fuel cell is discussed. The equations developed will help systems engineers to evaluate the application of the phosphoric acid and molten carbonate fuel cells to commercial, utility, and industrial power generation and waste heat utilization. A detailed discussion of fuel cell efficiency, and examples of fuel cell systems are given.

Benjamin, T.G.; Camara, E.H.; Marianowski, L.G.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Double interconnection fuel cell array  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell array (10) is made, containing number of tubular, elongated fuel cells (12) which are placed next to each other in rows (A, B, C, D), where each cell contains inner electrodes (14) and outer electrodes (18 and 18'), with solid electrolyte (16 and 16') between the electrodes, where the electrolyte and outer electrode are discontinuous, having two portions, and providing at least two opposed discontinuities which contain at least two oppositely opposed interconnections (20 and 20') contacting the inner electrode (14), each cell (12) having only three metallic felt electrical connectors (22) which contact surrounding cells, where each row is electrically connected to the other.

Draper, Robert (Churchill Boro, PA); Zymboly, Gregory E. (Murrysville, PA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

IAP Antagonists Promote Cell Death  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IAP Antagonists Promote Cell Death IAP Antagonists Promote Cell Death IAP Antagonists Promote Cell Death Print Thursday, 02 August 2012 11:19 Apoptosis, or programmed cell death, is a normal process for most cells in multicellular organisms. Inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins suppress apoptosis and are over-expressed in human cancer cells, causing resistance to cytotoxic therapies. An IAP antagonist can mitigate the anti-apoptotic functions of IAPs, spurring trials on IAP-targeting therapeutics that mimic endogenous IAP antagonists. To understand the mechanisms at work here, Genentech researchers investigated the structure of cellular IAP1 (cIAP1) BIR3-RING (B3R). When IAP antagonists bind to the BIR3 domain of cIAP1, a RING-based dimer forms, stimulating the addition of ubiquitin to the target protein substrate, thus marking it for degradation by the cell's proteasome.

440

Silicon Cells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cells Cells Jump to: navigation, search Name Silicon Cells Place United Kingdom Product Technology developer based upon a low cost method of processing silicon to produce a new generation of high energy density batteries. References Silicon Cells[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Silicon Cells is a company located in United Kingdom . References ↑ "Silicon Cells" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Silicon_Cells&oldid=351081" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties About us Disclaimers Energy blogs

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammary epithelial cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: About  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About the Fuel Cell Technologies Office About the Fuel Cell Technologies Office The Fuel Cell Technologies Office conducts comprehensive efforts to overcome the technological, economic, and institutional barriers to the widespread commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cells. The office is aligned with the strategic vision and goals of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The office's efforts will help secure U.S. leadership in clean energy technologies and advance U.S. economic competitiveness and scientific innovation. What We Do DOE is the lead federal agency for directing and integrating activities in hydrogen and fuel cell R&D as authorized in the Energy Policy Act of 2005. The Fuel Cell Technologies Office is responsible for coordinating the R&D activities for DOE's Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, which includes activities within four DOE offices (Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy [EERE], Office of Fossil Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, and Office of Science).

442

Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8/5/2011 eere.energy.gov 8/5/2011 eere.energy.gov 5 th International Conference on Polymer Batteries & Fuel Cells Argonne, Illinois Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities Dr. Sunita Satyapal U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program Program Manager August 4, 2011 2 | Fuel Cell Technologies Program Source: US DOE 8/5/2011 eere.energy.gov Fuel Cells: Benefits & Market Potential The Role of Fuel Cells Key Benefits Very High Efficiency Reduced CO 2 Emissions * 35-50%+ reductions for CHP systems (>80% with biogas) * 55-90% reductions for light- duty vehicles * up to 60% (electrical) * up to 70% (electrical, hybrid fuel cell / turbine) * up to 85% (with CHP) Reduced Oil Use * >95% reduction for FCEVs (vs. today's gasoline ICEVs)

443

Fuel Cell Technologies Program Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IEA HIA Hydrogen Safety Stakeholder IEA HIA Hydrogen Safety Stakeholder Workshop Bethesda, Maryland Fuel Cell Technologies Program Overview Dr. Sunita Satyapal U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program Program Manager 10/2/2012 2 | Fuel Cell Technologies Program eere.energy.gov Overview Fuel Cells - An Emerging Global Industry Clean Energy Patent Growth Index [1] shows that fuel cell patents lead in the clean energy field with over 950 fuel cell patents issued in 2011. * Nearly double the second place holder, solar, which has ~540 patents. [1] http://cepgi.typepad.com/files/cepgi-4th-quarter-2011-1.pdf United States 46% Germany 7% Korea 7% Canada 3% Taiwan 1% Great Britain 1% France 1% Other 3% Japan 31% Fuel Cell Patents Geographic Distribution 2002-2011 Top 10 companies: GM, Honda, Samsung,

444

Quantifying Cell-to-Cell Variations in Lithium Ion Batteries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lithium ion batteries have conventionally been manufactured in small capacities but large volumes for consumer electronics applications. More recently, the industry has seen a surge in the individual cell capacities, as well as the number of cells used to build modules and packs. Reducing cell-to-cell and lot-to-lot variations has been identified as one of the major means to reduce the rejection rate when building the packs as well as to improve pack durability. The tight quality control measures have been passed on from the pack manufactures to the companies building the individual cells and in turn to the components. This paper identifies a quantitative procedure utilizing impedance spectroscopy, a commonly used tool, to determine the effects of material variability on the cell performance, to compare the relative importance of uncertainties in the component properties, and to suggest a rational procedure to set quality control specifications for the various components of a cell, that will reduce cell-to-cell variability, while preventing undue requirements on uniformity that often result in excessive cost of manufacturing but have a limited impact on the cells performance.

Santhanagopalan, S.; White, R. E.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Photovoltaic Cell Basics | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cell Basics Photovoltaic Cell Basics August 16, 2013 - 4:53pm Addthis Photovoltaic (PV) cells, or solar cells, take advantage of the photoelectric effect to produce electricity. PV...

446

Point-Contact Silicon Solar Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new type of silicon photovoltaic cell called the point-contact cell is under development. This report describes the cell and an analytic model developed for use in design optimization. Necessary future cell development work is discussed.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Monolithic tandem solar cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A single-crystal, monolithic, tandem, photovoltaic solar cell is described which includes (a) an InP substrate having upper and lower surfaces, (b) a first photoactive subcell on the upper surface of the InP substrate, (c) a second photoactive subcell on the first subcell; and (d) an optically transparent prismatic cover layer over the second subcell. The first photoactive subcell is GaInAsP of defined composition. The second subcell is InP. The two subcells are lattice matched. 9 figs.

Wanlass, M.W.

1994-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

448

Monolithic tandem solar cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A single-crystal, monolithic, tandem, photovoltaic solar cell is described which includes (a) an InP substrate having upper and lower surfaces, (b) a first photoactive subcell on the upper surface of the InP substrate, (c) a second photoactive subcell on the first subcell; and (d) an optically transparent prismatic cover layer over the second subcell. The first photoactive subcell is GaInAsP of defined composition. The second subcell is InP. The two subcells are lattice matched.

Wanlass, Mark W. (Golden, CO)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Some Statistical Techniques for Comparing Cell Colonies ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Using fluorescence microscopy, cell shapes can be imaged. A population of identical cells exhibits a distribution of shape responses. ...

2010-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

450

Computational Biology: Comparison of Cell Image ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The cells were image by fluorescent microscopy. ... The image data was processed to differentiate between the 2 cell lines. ...

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

451

Laboratory Equipment - Milipore Stirred Ultrafiltration Cell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Milipore Stirred Ultrafiltration Cell. Description: Location: E136. Specifications / Capabilities: Stirred Cell, Model 8003, Model 8010, Model 8050. ...

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

452

Molecular Cell, Volume 50 Supplemental Information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by growing the cells for five days in the presence of 10 ug/ml of Doxycycline. For immunoprecipitation, cells

Ares Jr., Manny

453

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - National Fuel Cell Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Fuel Cell Technology Evaluation Center National Fuel Cell Technology Evaluation Center The National Fuel Cell Technology Evaluation Center (NFCTEC) at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) plays a crucial role in NREL's independent, third-party analysis of hydrogen fuel cell technologies in real-world operation. The NFCTEC is designed for secure management, storage, and processing of proprietary data from industry. Access to the off-network NFCTEC is limited to NREL's Technology Validation Team, which analyzes detailed data and reports on fuel cell technology status, progress, and technical challenges. Graphic representing NREL's Hydrogen Secure Data Center and the variety of applications from which it gathers data, including fuel cell (FC) stacks, FC backup power, FC forklifts, FC cars, FC buses, and FC prime power, and hydrogen infrastructure.

454

Transitioning from Fuel Cells to Redox Flow Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transitioning From Fuel Cells to Redox Transitioning From Fuel Cells to Redox Flow Cells T. Zawodzinski and Matt Mench University of Tennessee and ORNL Managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy 2 Acknowledgments $$ DOE-OE EPRI GCEP NSF EPSCOR (TN SCORE) UTK Governor's Chair Fund Partner in Crime Matt Mench Managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy 'Peeling the Onion' Personalized History of PEM Fuel Cells We May Recapitulate This for RFBs Catalysis Test System * Small Single Cell * Large Single Cell * Stack * System Layers of the Onion Hot Topic du Jour * Water Management, Membranes * Late '80's, early '90's * Reformate Tolerance, DMFC's * Mid '90's * High Temp Membranes * Late '90's * Durability * Early '00's Modeling * Membrane/ Water * Cathode * Impedance

455

Inappropriate Use of Cell Phones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

School counselors face the ongoing complexity of trying to inform students and educators about the appropriate use of cell phones at school. With almost 75 percent of all school age students having cell phones, the use of them in and outside of school is increasing. Situations regarding the misuse of cell phones continue to appear in the news, as part of school sexting scandals, and also harassment to the point of suicides by students are examples of how students have misused cell phones and the internet to intimidate and bully to the point of death. This literature review examined the different ways in which students use cell phones and ultimately the implications this use has for students. Cell phone history and their technological state of affairs, as well as moral, ethical and legal complications of the inappropriate use of cell phones, students misuse of cell phones, students misuse of the internet on phones regarding3 School related tasks, and the implications that inappropriate use of cell phones has on students are included. The review concludes with suggestions and recommendations for practitioners in the field of school counseling to help inform, intervene, and prevent the inappropriate use of cell phones by students. 4

Jami Mcauley; Jami L

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

EE580 Solar Cells Todd J. Kaiser  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7/21/2010 1 EE580 ­ Solar Cells Todd J. Kaiser · Lecture 08 · Solar Cell Characterization 1Montana State University: Solar Cells Lecture 8: Characterization Solar Cell Operation n Emitter p Base Rear completing the circuit 2Montana State University: Solar Cells Lecture 8: Characterization Solar Cell

Kaiser, Todd J.

457

Ion cyclotron resonance cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion cyclotron resonance cell is disclosed having two adjacent sections separated by a center trapping plate. The first section is defined by the center trapping plate, a first end trapping plate, and excitation and detector electrodes. The second section includes a second end trapping plate spaced apart from the center plate, a mirror, and an analyzer. The analyzer includes a wavelength-selective light detector, such as a detector incorporating an acousto-optical device (AOD) and a photodetector. One or more ion guides, grounded plates with holes for the ion beam, are positioned within the vacuum chamber of the mass spectrometer between the ion source and the cell. After ions are trapped and analyzed by ion cyclotron resonance techniques in the first section, the ions of interest are selected according to their mass and passed into the second section for optical spectroscopic studies. The trapped ions are excited by light from a laser and caused thereby to fluoresce. The fluorescent light emitted by the excited ions is reflected by the mirror and directed onto the detector. The AOD is scanned, and the photodetector output is recorded and analyzed. The ions remain in the second section for an extended period, enabling multiple studies to be carried out on the same ensemble of ions. 5 figs.

Weller, R.R.

1995-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

458

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan* The Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration (MYRD&D) Plan* describes the goals,...

459

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Fuel Cell Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with a focus on improving the performance and durability and reducing the cost of fuel cell components and systems. Research efforts involve: Developing advanced catalysts,...

460

Biomass Fuel Cell Systems - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utilize ceramic microchannel reactor technology for * reforming of natural gas and biogas fuels for subsequent electrochemical oxidation within a solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC)....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammary epithelial cells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

portable power and auxiliary power applications in a limited fashion where earlier market entry would assist in the development of a fuel cell manufacturing base. This DOE...

462

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cell Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renewable Energy Laboratory Anion Exchange Membranes for Fuel Cells, Prof. Andrew Herring, Colorado School of Mines Electrocatalysis in Alkaline Electrolytes, Prof. Sanjeev...

463

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

high conductivity) for this application include tin oxide, indium tin oxide, and zinc oxide. Contact: Bryan Pivovar 303-275-3809 Printable Version Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Research...

464

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Newsletter: August 2013 The August 2013 issue of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office newsletter includes stories in these categories: In the News Funding Opportunities Webinars and...

465

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

hydrogen and fuel cells. This information is provided in documents such as technical and project reports, conference proceedings and journal articles, technical presentations, and...

466

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cells for Portable Power...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Session - Fuel Cell Portable Power Perspectives End User Perspective - Industry Consumer Electronics Power (PDF 1.51 MB) Jerry Hallmark, Motorola Portable Power Sources (above...

467

Flexible method for monitoring fuel cell voltage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for equalizing the measured voltage of each cluster in a fuel cell stack wherein at least one of the clusters has a different number of cells than the identical number of cells in the remaining clusters by creating a pseudo voltage for the different cell numbered cluster. The average cell voltage of the all of the cells in the fuel cell stack is calculated and multiplied by a constant equal to the difference in the number of cells in the identical cell clusters and the number of cells in the different numbered cell cluster. The resultant product is added to the actual voltage measured across the different numbered cell cluster to create a pseudo voltage which is equivalent in cell number to the number of cells in the other identical numbered cell clusters.

Mowery, Kenneth D. (Noblesville, IN); Ripley, Eugene V. (Russiaville, IN)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Phenotypic transition maps of 3D breast acini obtained by imaging-guided agent-based modeling  

SciTech Connect

We introduce an agent-based model of epithelial cell morphogenesis to explore the complex interplay between apoptosis, proliferation, and polarization. By varying the activity levels of these mechanisms we derived phenotypic transition maps of normal and aberrant morphogenesis. These maps identify homeostatic ranges and morphologic stability conditions. The agent-based model was parameterized and validated using novel high-content image analysis of mammary acini morphogenesis in vitro with focus on time-dependent cell densities, proliferation and death rates, as well as acini morphologies. Model simulations reveal apoptosis being necessary and sufficient for initiating lumen formation, but cell polarization being the pivotal mechanism for maintaining physiological epithelium morphology and acini sphericity. Furthermore, simulations highlight that acinus growth arrest in normal acini can be achieved by controlling the fraction of proliferating cells. Interestingly, our simulations reveal a synergism between polarization and apoptosis in enhancing growth arrest. After validating the model with experimental data from a normal human breast line (MCF10A), the system was challenged to predict the growth of MCF10A where AKT-1 was overexpressed, leading to reduced apoptosis. As previously reported, this led to non growth-arrested acini, with very large sizes and partially filled lumen. However, surprisingly, image analysis revealed a much lower nuclear density than observed for normal acini. The growth kinetics indicates that these acini grew faster than the cells comprising it. The in silico model could not replicate this behavior, contradicting the classic paradigm that ductal carcinoma in situ is only the result of high proliferation and low apoptosis. Our simulations suggest that overexpression of AKT-1 must also perturb cell-cell and cell-ECM communication, reminding us that extracellular context can dictate cellular behavior.

Tang, Jonathan; Enderling, Heiko; Becker-Weimann, Sabine; Pham, Christopher; Polyzos, Aris; Chen, Chen-Yi; Costes, Sylvain V

2011-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

469

fuel cells | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

cells cells Dataset Summary Description Developed for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fuel Cell Technologies by Argonne National Laboratory and RCF Economic and Financial Consulting, Inc., JOBS and economic impacts of Fuel Cells (JOBS FC) is a spreadsheet model that estimates economic impacts from the manufacture and use of select types of fuel cells. Source Argonne Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords fuel cells Job Creation Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon File without Macros. Full version at official link. (xlsx, 2.8 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Open Data Commons Attribution License Comment From Argonne National Lab

470

Silicon concentrator solar cell research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes work conducted between December 1990 and May 1992 continuing research on silicon concentrator solar cells. The objectives of the work were to improve the performance of high-efficiency cells upon p-type substrates, to investigate the ultraviolet stability of such cells, to develop concentrator cells based on n-type substrates, and to transfer technology to appropriate commercial environments. Key results include the identification of contact resistance between boron-defused areas and rear aluminum as the source of anomalously large series resistance in both p- and n-type cells. A major achievement of the present project was the successful transfer of cell technology to both Applied Solar Energy Corporation and Solarex Corporation.

Green, M.A.; Zhao, J.; Wang, A.; Dai, X.; Milne, A.; Cai, S.; Aberle, A.; Wenham, S.R. [Univ. of New South Wales, Kensington, NSW (AU). Centre for Photovoltaic Devices and Systems

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Corrugated Membrane Fuel Cell Structures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

By corrugating the fuel cell membrane electrode structure, Ion Power?s goal is to realize both the Pt utilization targets as well as the power density targets of the DOE. This will be achieved by demonstrating a fuel cell single cell (50 cm2) with a twofold increase in the membrane active area over the geometric area of the cell by corrugating the MEA structure. The corrugating structure must be able to demonstrate the target properties of < 10 mOhm-cm2 electrical resistance at > 20 psi compressive strength over the active area, in combination with offering at least 80% of power density that can be achieved by using the same MEA in a flat plate structure. Corrugated membrane fuel cell structures also have the potential to meet DOE power density targets by essentially packaging more membrane area into the same fuel cell volume as compared to conventional stack constructions.

Grot, Stephen [President, Ion Power Inc.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

472

Hybrid Fuel Cell Technology Overview  

SciTech Connect

For the purpose of this STI product and unless otherwise stated, hybrid fuel cell systems are power generation systems in which a high temperature fuel cell is combined with another power generating technology. The resulting system exhibits a synergism in which the combination performs with an efficiency far greater than can be provided by either system alone. Hybrid fuel cell designs under development include fuel cell with gas turbine, fuel cell with reciprocating (piston) engine, and designs that combine different fuel cell technologies. Hybrid systems have been extensively analyzed and studied over the past five years by the Department of Energy (DOE), industry, and others. These efforts have revealed that this combination is capable of providing remarkably high efficiencies. This attribute, combined with an inherent low level of pollutant emission, suggests that hybrid systems are likely to serve as the next generation of advanced power generation systems.

None available

2001-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

473

Solar cell module lamination process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solar cell module lamination process using fluoropolymers to provide protection from adverse environmental conditions and thus enable more extended use of solar cells, particularly in space applications. A laminate of fluoropolymer material provides a hermetically sealed solar cell module structure that is flexible and very durable. The laminate is virtually chemically inert, highly transmissive in the visible spectrum, dimensionally stable at temperatures up to about 200.degree. C. highly abrasion resistant, and exhibits very little ultra-violet degradation.

Carey, Paul G. (Mountain View, CA); Thompson, Jesse B. (Brentwood, CA); Aceves, Randy C. (Tracy, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Fuel cell gas management system  

SciTech Connect

A fuel cell gas management system including a cathode humidification system for transferring latent and sensible heat from an exhaust stream to the cathode inlet stream of the fuel cell; an anode humidity retention system for maintaining the total enthalpy of the anode stream exiting the fuel cell equal to the total enthalpy of the anode inlet stream; and a cooling water management system having segregated deionized water and cooling water loops interconnected by means of a brazed plate heat exchanger.

DuBose, Ronald Arthur (Marietta, GA)

2000-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

475

Improved electrolytes for fuel cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Present day fuel cells based upon hydrogen and oxygen have limited performance due to the use of phosphoric acid as an electrolyte. Improved performance is desirable in electrolyte conductivity, electrolyte management, oxygen solubility, and the kinetics of the reduction of oxygen. Attention has turned to fluorosulfonic acids as additives or substitute electrolytes to improve fuel cell performance. The purpose of this project is to synthesize and electrochemically evaluate new fluorosulfonic acids as superior alternatives to phosphoric acid in fuel cells. (VC)

Gard, G.L.; Roe, D.K.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Molten carbonate fuel cell separator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a stacked array of molten carbonate fuel cells, a fuel cell separator is positioned between adjacent fuel cells to provide isolation as well as a conductive path therebetween. The center portion of the fuel cell separator includes a generally rectangular, flat, electrical conductor. Around the periphery of the flat portion of the separator are positioned a plurality of elongated resilient flanges which form a gas-tight seal around the edges of the fuel cell. With one elongated flange resiliently engaging a respective edge of the center portion of the separator, the sealing flanges, which are preferably comprised of a noncorrosive material such as an alloy of yttrium, iron, aluminum or chromium, form a tight-fitting wet seal for confining the corrosive elements of the fuel cell therein. This arrangement permits a good conductive material which may be highly subject to corrosion and dissolution to be used in combination with a corrosion-resistant material in the fuel cell separator of a molten carbonate fuel cell for improved fuel cell conductivity and a gas-tight wet seal.

Nickols, Richard C. (East Hartford, CT)

1986-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

477

Molten carbonate fuel cell separator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a stacked array of molten carbonate fuel cells, a fuel cell separator is positioned between adjacent fuel cells to provide isolation as well as a conductive path therebetween. The center portion of the fuel cell separator includes a generally rectangular, flat, electrical conductor. Around the periphery of the flat portion of the separator are positioned a plurality of elongated resilient flanges which form a gas-tight seal around the edges of the fuel cell. With one elongated flange resiliently engaging a respective edge of the center portion of the separator, the sealing flanges, which are preferably comprised of a noncorrosive material such as an alloy of yttrium, iron, aluminum or chromium, form a tight-fitting wet seal for confining the corrosive elements of the fuel cell therein. This arrangement permits a good conductive material which may be highly subject to corrosion and dissolution to be used in combination with a corrosion-resistant material in the fuel cell separator of a molten carbonate fuel cell for improved fuel cell conductivity and a gas-tight wet seal.

Nickols, R.C.

1984-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

478

Thermal Management of Solar Cells.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The focus on solar cells as a source of photovoltaic energy is rapidly increasing nowadays. The amount of sun's energy entering earth surface in one (more)

Saadah, Mohammed Ahmed

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

LADWP FUEL CELL DEMONSTRATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP) is currently one of the most active power utility companies in researching fuel cell technology. Fuel cells offer many benefits and are now used as an alternative to traditional internal combustion engines in power generation. In continuing it's role as the leader in fuel cell research, LADWP has installed a pre-commercial molten carbonate fuel cell on August 2001 at its headquarter, the John Ferraro Building (JFB). The goal of this project is to learn more about the actual behavior of the fuel cell running under real world conditions. The fuel cell ran smoothly through the first year of operation with very high efficiency, but with some minor setbacks. The JFB fuel cell project is funded by the City of Los Angeles Department of Water and Power with partial grant funding from the Department of Defense's Climate Change Fuel Cell Buydown Program. The technical evaluation and the benefit-cost evaluation of the JFB fuel cell are both examined in this report.

Thai Ta

2003-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

480

Fuel Cells | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

as high as 90% is achievable. This high efficiency operation saves money, saves energy, and reduces greenhouse gas emissions. Regenerative or Reversible Fuel Cells This...

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481

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: About  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

variety of other fuels, including natural gas and renewable fuels such as methanol or biogas. Hydrogen and fuel cells can provide these benefits and address critical challenges in...