Sample records for mammary epithelial cells

  1. Epimorphin Functions as a Key Morphoregulator for Mammary Epithelial Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirai, H.; Lochter, A.; Galosy, S.; Koshida, S.; Niwa, S.; Bissell, M.J.

    1997-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and EGF have been reported to promote branching morphogenesis of mammary epithelial cells. We now show that it is epimorphin that is primarily responsible for this phenomenon. In vivo, epimorphin was detected in the stromal compartment but not in lumenal epithelial cells of the mammary gland; in culture, however, a subpopulation of mammary epithelial cells produced significant amounts of epimorphin. When epimorphin-expressing epithelial cell clones were cultured in collagen gels they displayed branching morphogenesis in the presence of HGF, EGF, keratinocyte growth factor, or fibroblast growth factor, a process that was inhibited by anti-epimorphin but not anti-HGF antibodies. The branch length, however, was roughly proportional to the ability of the factors to induce growth. Accordingly, epimorphin-negative epithelial cells simply grew in a cluster in response to the growth factors and failed to branch. When recombinant epimorphin was added to these collagen gels, epimorphin-negative cells underwent branching morphogenesis. The mode of action of epimorphin on morphogenesis of the gland, however, was dependent on how it was presented to the mammary cells. If epimorphin was overexpressed in epimorphin-negative epithelial cells under regulation of an inducible promoter or was allowed to coat the surface of each epithelial cell in a nonpolar fashion, the cells formed globular, alveoli-like structures with a large central lumen instead of branching ducts. This process was enhanced also by addition of HGF, EGF, or other growth factors and was inhibited by epimorphin antibodies. These results suggest that epimorphin is the primary morphogen in the mammary gland but that growth factors are necessary to achieve the appropriate cell numbers for the resulting morphogenesis to be visualized.

  2. Trichostatin A inhibits beta-casein expression in mammary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pujuguet, Philippe; Radisky, Derek; Levy, Dinah; Lacza, Charlemagne; Bissell, Mina J.

    2002-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Many aspects of cellular behavior are affected by information derived from association of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and with cell membrane receptors. When cultured in the presence of laminin-containing ECM and prolactin (Prl), normal mammary epithelial cells express the milk protein beta-casein. Previously, we defined the minimal ECM- and Prl-responsive enhancer element BCE-1 from the upstream region of the beta-casein gene. We also found that BCE-1 was only active when stably integrated into chromatin, and that trichostatin A (TSA), a reagent that leads to alterations in chromatin structure, was able to activate the integrated enhancer element. We now show that endogenous b-casein gene, which is controlled by a genetic assembly that is highly similar to that of BCE-1 and which is also activated by incubation in ECM and Prl, is instead inhibited by TSA. We provide evidence that the differing response of b-casein and BCE-1 to TSA is neither due to an unusual effect of TSA on mammary epithelial cells, nor to secondary consequences from the expression of a separate gene, nor to a particular property of the BCE-1 construct. As a component of this investigation, we also showed that ECM could mediate rapid histone deacetylation in mammary epithelial cells. These results are discussed in combination with previous work showing that TSA mediates the differentiation of many types of cancer cells but inhibits differentiation of some nonmalignant cell types.

  3. Multiple Mechanisms are Responsible for Transactivation of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor in Mammary Epithelial Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodland, Karin D.; Bollinger, Nikki; Ippolito, Danielle L.; Opresko, Lee; Coffey, Robert J.; Zangar, Richard C.; Wiley, H. S.

    2008-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    REVIEW ENTIRE DOCUMENT AT: https://pnlweb.pnl.gov/projects/bsd/ERICA%20Manuscripts%20for%20Review/KD%20Rodland%20D7E80/HMEC_transactivation_ms01_15+Figs.pdf ABSTRACT: Using a single nontransformed strain of human mammary epithelial cells, we found that the ability of multiple growth factors and cytokines to induce ERK phosphorylation was dependent on EGFR activity. These included lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), uridine triphosphate, growth hormone, vascular endothelial growth factor, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and tumor necrosis factoralpha. In contrast, hepatocyte growth factor could stimulate ERK phosphorylation independent of EGFR activity...

  4. Enhanced growth medium and method for culturing human mammary epithelial cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stampfer, Martha R. (7290 Sayre Dr., Oakland, CA 94611); Smith, Helene S. (5693 Cabot Dr., Oakland, CA 94611); Hackett, Adeline J. (82 Evergreen Dr., Orinda, CA 94563)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods are disclosed for isolating and culturing human mammary epithelial cells of both normal and malignant origin. Tissue samples are digested with a mixture including the enzymes collagenase and hyaluronidase to produce clumps of cells substantially free from stroma and other undesired cellular material. Growing the clumps of cells in mass culture in an enriched medium containing particular growth factors allows for active cell proliferation and subculture. Clonal culture having plating efficiencies of up to 40% or greater may be obtained using individual cells derived from the mass culture by plating the cells on appropriate substrates in the enriched media. The clonal growth of cells so obtained is suitable for a quantitative assessment of the cytotoxicity of particular treatment. An exemplary assay for assessing the cytotoxicity of the drug adriamycin is presented.

  5. Proliferation of Estrogen Receptor alpha Positive Mammary Epithelial Cells is Restrained by TGFbeta1 in Adult Mice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ewan, Kenneth B.R.; Oketch-Rabah, Hellen A.; Ravani, Shraddha A.; Shyamala, G.; Moses, Harold L.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2005-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF{beta}1) is a potent inhibitor of mammary epithelial proliferation. In human breast, estrogen receptor {alpha} (ER{alpha}) cells rarely co-localize with markers of proliferation, but their increased frequency correlates with breast cancer risk. To determine whether TGF{beta}1 is necessary for the quiescence of ER{alpha}-positive population, we examined mouse mammary epithelial gland at estrus. Approximately 35% of cells showed TGF{beta}1 activation, which co-localized with nuclear receptor-phosphorylated Smad 2/3, indicating that TGF{beta} signaling is autocrine. Furthermore, nuclear Smad co-localized with nuclear ER{alpha}. To test whether TGF{beta} was functional, we examined genetically engineered mice with different levels of TGF{beta}1. ER{alpha} co-localization with markers of proliferation (i.e. Ki-67 or BrdU) at estrus was significantly increased in the mammary glands of Tgf{beta}1 C57/bl/129SV heterozygote mice. This relationship was maintained following pregnancy, but was absent at puberty. Conversely, mammary epithelial expression of constitutively active TGF{beta}1 via the MMTV promoter suppressed proliferation of ER{alpha} positive cells. Thus, TGF{beta}1 activation functionally restrains ER{alpha} positive cells from proliferating in adult mammary gland. Accordingly, we propose that TGF{beta}1 dysregulation may promote proliferation of ER{alpha} positive cells associated with breast cancer risk in humans.

  6. HER/ErbB Receptor Interactions and Signaling Patterns in Human Mammary Epithelial Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yi; Opresko, Lee K.; Shankaran, Harish; Chrisler, William B.; Wiley, H. S.; Resat, Haluk

    2009-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Knowledge about signaling pathways is typically compiled based on data gathered using different cell lines. This approach implicitly assumes that cell line dependence is not important, which can be misleading because different cell lines do not always respond to a particular stimulus in the same way. The lack of coherent data collected from closely related cellular systems can be detrimental to the efforts to understand the regulation of biological processes. In this study, we report the development of a library of human mammary epithelial (HME) cell lines which express endogenous levels of the cell surface receptor EGFR/HER1, and different levels of HER2 and HER3. Using our clone library, we have quantified the interactions among the HER1-3 receptors and systematically investigated the existing hypotheses about their interaction patterns. Contrary to earlier suggestions, we find that lateral interactions with HER2 do not lead to strong transactivation between EGFR and HER3. Our study identified HER2 as the dominant dimerization partner for both EGFR and HER3, and revealed that EGFR and HER3 activations are only weakly linked in HME cells. We have also quantified the time-dependent activation patterns of the downstream effectors Erk and Akt. We found that HER3 signaling makes the strongest contribution to Akt activation and that, stimulation of either EGFR or HER3 pathways activate Erk at significant levels. Our study shows that cell libraries formed from closely related clones can be a powerful resource for pursuing the quantitative investigations that are necessary for developing a systems level understanding of cell signaling.

  7. Matrix Metalloproteinase Stromelysin-1 Triggers a Cascade of Molecular Alterations that leads to stable epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Conversion and a Premalignant Phenotype in Mammary Epithelial Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lochter, A.; Galosy, S.; Muschler, J.; Freedman, N.; Werb, Z.; Bissell, M.J.

    1997-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) regulate ductal morphogenesis, apoptosis, and neoplastic progression in mammary epithelial cells. To elucidate the direct effects of MMPs on mammary epithelium, we generated functionally normal cells expressing an inducible autoactivating stromelysin-1 (SL-1) transgene. Induction of SL-1 expression resulted in cleavage of E-cadherin, and triggered progressive phenotypic conversion characterized by disappearance of E-cadherin and catenins from cell-cell contacts, downregulation of cytokeratins, upregulation of vimentin, induction of keratinocyte growth factor expression and activation, and upregulation of endogenous MMPs. Cells expressing SL-1 were unable to undergo lactogenic differentiation and became invasive. Once initiated, this phenotypic conversion was essentially stable, and progressed even in the absence of continued SL-1 expression. These observations demonstrate that inappropriate expression of SL-1 initiates a cascade of events that may represent a coordinated program leading to loss of the differentiated epithelial phenotype and gain of some characteristics of tumor cells. Our data provide novel insights into how MMPs function in development and neoplastic conversion.

  8. EGF-Receptor-Mediated Mammary Epithelial Cell Migration is Driven by Sustained ERK Signaling from Autocrine Stimulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joslin, Elizabeth J.; Opresko, Lee; Wells, Alan; Wiley, H. S.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Aberrant expression of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor family ligands, as well as the receptors themselves, has been implicated in various types of cancers. EGF family ligands are synthesized as membrane-anchored proteins requiring proteolytic release to form the mature soluble factor. Despite the pathophysiological importance of autocrine systems, how the rate of protease-mediated ligand release quantitatively influences receptor-mediated signaling and consequent cell behavior is poorly understood. Therefore, we explored the relationship between autocrine EGF release rates and receptor-mediated ERK activation and migration in human mammary epithelial cells. A quantitative spectrum of EGF release rates was achieved using a set of chimeric transmembrane EGF ligand precursors modulated by the addition of the metalloprotease inhibitor batimastat. We found that ERK activation increased with increasing ligand release rates despite concomitant EGF receptor downregulation. Cell migration speed depended linearly on the steady-state phospho-ERK level obtained from either autocrine or exogenous ligand, but was much greater at any given phospho-ERK level for autocrine compared to exogenous stimulation. In contrast, cell proliferation rates were relatively constant across the various treatment conditions. Thus, in these cells, ERK-mediated migration stimulated by EGF receptor signaling is most sensitively regulated by autocrine ligand control mechanisms.

  9. ERK and PI3K regulate different aspects of the epithelial to mesenchymal transition of mammary tumor cells induced by truncated MUC1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horn, Galit; Gaziel, Avital [Department of Cell Research and Immunology, George S. Wise Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel) [Department of Cell Research and Immunology, George S. Wise Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); The Alec and Myra Marmot Hybridoma Unit, George S. Wise Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Wreschner, Daniel H. [Department of Cell Research and Immunology, George S. Wise Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel) [Department of Cell Research and Immunology, George S. Wise Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Biomodifying LLC, San Diego, CA 92122 (United States); Smorodinsky, Nechama I., E-mail: nechama@post.tau.ac.il [Department of Cell Research and Immunology, George S. Wise Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); The Alec and Myra Marmot Hybridoma Unit, George S. Wise Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Ehrlich, Marcelo [Department of Cell Research and Immunology, George S. Wise Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)] [Department of Cell Research and Immunology, George S. Wise Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) integrates changes to cell morphology and signaling pathways resulting from modifications to the cell's transcriptional response. Different combinations of stimuli ignite this process in the contexts of development or tumor progression. The human MUC1 gene encodes multiple alternatively spliced forms of a polymorphic oncoprotein that is aberrantly expressed in epithelial malignancies. MUC1 is endowed with various signaling modules and has the potential to mediate proliferative and morphological changes characteristic of the progression of epithelial tumors. The tyrosine-rich cytoplasmic domain and the heavily glycosylated extracellular domain both play a role in MUC1-mediated signal transduction. However, the attribution of function to specific domains of MUC1 is difficult due to the concomitant presence of multiple forms of the protein, which stem from alternative splicing and proteolytic cleavage. Here we show that DA3 mouse mammary tumor cells stably transfected with a truncated genomic fragment of human MUC1 undergo EMT. In their EMT, these cells demonstrate altered [i] morphology, [ii] signaling pathways and [iii] expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers. Similarly to well characterized human breast cancer cell lines, cells transfected with truncated MUC1 show an ERK-dependent increased spreading on fibronectin, and a PI3K-dependent enhancement of their proliferative rate.

  10. 4-Hydroxyestradiol induces oxidative stress and apoptosis in human mammary epithelial cells: possible protection by NF-{kappa}B and ERK/MAPK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Zhihua [National Research Laboratory of Molecular Carcinogenesis and Chemoprevention, College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, Shinlim-dong, Kwanak-ku, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Na, Hye-Kyung [National Research Laboratory of Molecular Carcinogenesis and Chemoprevention, College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, Shinlim-dong, Kwanak-ku, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Hurh, Yeon-Jin [National Research Laboratory of Molecular Carcinogenesis and Chemoprevention, College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, Shinlim-dong, Kwanak-ku, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Surh, Young-Joon [National Research Laboratory of Molecular Carcinogenesis and Chemoprevention, College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, Shinlim-dong, Kwanak-ku, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: surh@plaza.snu.ac.kr

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Catechol estrogens, the hydroxylated metabolites of 17{beta}-estradiol (E{sub 2}), have been considered to be implicated in estrogen-induced carcinogenesis. 4-Hydroxyestradiol (4-OHE{sub 2}), an oxidized metabolite of E{sub 2} formed preferentially by cytochrome P450 1B1, reacts with DNA to form depurinating adducts thereby exerting genotoxicity and carcinogenicity. 4-OHE{sub 2} undergoes 2-electron oxidation to quinone via semiquinone, and during this process, reactive oxygen species (ROS) can be generated to cause DNA damage and cell death. In the present study, 4-OHE{sub 2} was found to elicit cytotoxicity in cultured human mammary epithelial (MCF-10A) cells, which was blocked by the antioxidant trolox. MCF-10A cells treated with 4-OHE{sub 2} exhibited increased intracellular ROS accumulation and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine formation, and underwent apoptosis as determined by poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase cleavage and disruption of mitochondrial transmembrane potential. The redox-sensitive transcription factor nuclear factor {kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) was transiently activated by 4-OHE{sub 2} treatment. Cotreatment of MCF-10A cells with the NF-{kappa}B inhibitor, L-1-tosylamido-2-phenylethyl chloromethyl ketone, exacerbated 4-OHE{sub 2}-induced cell death. 4-OHE{sub 2} also caused transient activation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases (ERK) involved in transmitting cell survival or death signals. A pharmacological inhibitor of ERK aggravated the 4-OHE{sub 2}-induced cytotoxicity, supporting the pivotal role of ERK in protecting against catechol estrogen-induced oxidative cell death.

  11. Integrated analysis reveals that STAT3 is central to the crosstalk between HER/ErbB receptor signaling pathways in human mammary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gong, Chunhong; Zhang, Yi; Shankaran, Harish; Resat, Haluk

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Human epidermal growth factor receptors (HER, also known as ErbB) drive cellular proliferation, pro-survival and stress responses by activating several downstream kinases, in particular ERK, p38, JNK (SAPK), the PI3K/AKT, as well as various transcriptional regulators such as STAT3. When co-expressed, first three members of HER family (HER1-3) can form homo- and hetero-dimers. Based on the considerable evidence which suggest that every receptor dimer activates intracellular signaling pathways differentially, we hypothesized that the HER dimerization pattern is a better predictor of downstream signaling than the total receptor activation levels. We validated our hypothesis using a combination of model-based analysis to quantify the HER dimerization patterns and multi-factorial experiments where HER dimerization patterns and signaling crosstalk were rationally perturbed. We have measured the activation of HER1-3 receptors and of the sentinel signaling proteins ERK, AKT, p38, JNK, STAT3 as a function of time in a panel of human mammary epithelial (HME) cells expressing different levels of HER1-3 stimulated with various ligand combinations. Our analysis using multiple ways of clustering the activation data has confirmed that the HER receptor dimer is a better predictor of the signaling through p38, ERK and AKT pathways than the total HER receptor expression and activation levels. Targeted inhibition studies to identify the causal effects allowed us to obtain a consensus regulatory interaction model, which revealed that STAT3 occupies a central role in the crosstalk between the studied pathways.

  12. Heterocellular interaction enhances recruitment of {alpha} and {beta}-catenins and ZO-2 into functional gap-junction complexes and induces gap junction-dependant differentiation of mammary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talhouk, Rabih S. [Department of Biology, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, American University of Beirut, Beirut (Lebanon)], E-mail: rtalhouk@aub.edu.lb; Mroue, Rana; Mokalled, Mayssa; Abi-Mosleh, Lina; Nehme, Ralda; Ismail, Ayman; Khalil, Antoine [Department of Biology, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, American University of Beirut, Beirut (Lebanon); Zaatari, Mira [Department of Human Morphology, Faculty of Medicine, American University of Beirut, Beirut (Lebanon); El-Sabban, Marwan E. [Department of Human Morphology, Faculty of Medicine, American University of Beirut, Beirut (Lebanon)], E-mail: me00@aub.edu.lb

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gap junctions (GJ) are required for mammary epithelial differentiation. Using epithelial (SCp2) and myoepithelial-like (SCg6) mouse-derived mammary cells, the role of heterocellular interaction in assembly of GJ complexes and functional differentiation ({beta}-casein expression) was evaluated. Heterocellular interaction is critical for {beta}-casein expression, independent of exogenous basement membrane or cell anchoring substrata. Functional differentiation of SCp2, co-cultured with SCg6, is more sensitive to GJ inhibition relative to homocellular SCp2 cultures differentiated by exogenous basement membrane. Connexin (Cx)32 and Cx43 levels were not regulated across culture conditions; however, GJ functionality was enhanced under differentiation-permissive conditions. Immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated association of junctional complex components ({alpha}-catenin, {beta}-catenin and ZO-2) with Cx32 and Cx43, in differentiation conditions, and additionally with Cx30 in heterocellular cultures. Although {beta}-catenin did not shuttle between cadherin and GJ complexes, increased association between connexins and {beta}-catenin in heterocellular cultures was observed. This was concomitant with reduced nuclear {beta}-catenin, suggesting that differentiation in heterocellular cultures involves sequestration of {beta}-catenin in GJ complexes.

  13. Parsing ERK Activation Reveals Quantitatively Equivalent Contributions From Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and HER2 In Human Mammary Epithelial Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendriks, Bart S.; Orr, Galya; Wells, Alan H.; Wiley, H. S.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2005-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    HER2, a member of the EGFR tyrosine kinase family, functions as an accessory EGFR signaling component and alters EGFR trafficking by heterodimerization. HER2 overexpression leads to aberrant cell behavior including enhanced proliferation and motility. Here we apply a combination of computational modeling and quantitative experimental studies of the dynamic interactions between EGFR and HER2, and their downstream activation of extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) to understand this complex signaling system. Using cells expressing different levels of HER2 relative to the EGFR, we can separate relative contributions of EGFR and HER2 to signaling amplitude and duration. Based on our model calculations, we demonstrate that, in contrast with previous suggestions in the literature, the intrinsic capabilities of EGFR and HER2 to activated ERK are quantitatively equivalent . We find that HER2-mediated effects on EGFR dimerization and trafficking are sufficient to explain the detected HER2-mediated amplification of EGF-induced ERK signaling. Our model suggests that transient amplification of ERK activity by HER2 arises predominantly from the 2-to-1 stoichiometry of receptor kinase to bound ligand in EGFR/HER2 heterodimers compared to the 1-to-1 stoichiometry of the EGFR homodimer, but alterations in receptor trafficking, with resultant EGFR sparing, cause the sustained HER2-mediated enhancement of ERK signaling.

  14. Of Microenvironments and Mammary Stem Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaBarge, Mark A; Petersen, Ole W; Bissell, Mina J

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In most adult tissues there reside pools of stem and progenitor cells inside specialized microenvironments referred to as niches. The niche protects the stem cells from inappropriate expansion and directs their critical functions. Thus guided, stem cells are able to maintain tissue homeostasis throughout the ebb and flow of metabolic and physical demands encountered over a lifetime. Indeed, a pool of stem cells maintains mammary gland structure throughout development, and responds to the physiological demands associated with pregnancy. This review discusses how stem cells were identified in both human and mouse mammary glands; each requiring different techniques that were determined by differing biological needs and ethical constraints. These studies together create a robust portrait of mammary gland biology and identify the location of the stem cell niche, elucidate a developmental hierarchy, and suggest how the niche might be manipulated for therapeutic benefit.

  15. Adhesion gene regulation in mammary cell proliferation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lau, Eric HonYui

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sciences, C.L.  Corning Ultra?Low Attachment Surface cells per well into ultra-low attachment 6 well plates (cells were grown in either ultra-low attachment plates or

  16. Mechanisms of lead transport in two intestinal epithelial cell lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dekaney, Christopher Matthew

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    through the intestinal epithelium. Using two established intestinal epithelial cell lines, IEC-6 and Caco-2, we studied the effects of temperature, metabolic inhibitors, sulfhydryl group modifiers, blocking of integrins with the tripeptide Arginine...

  17. Epithelial cell polarity and cell junctions in drosophila

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tepass, Ulrich; Tanentzapf­ , Guy; Ward, Robert; Fehon, Richard

    2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    18 Oct 2001 10:14 AR AR144-24.tex AR144-24.sgm ARv2(2001/05/10) P1: GJB Annu. Rev. Genet. 2001. 35:747?84 Copyright c 2001 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved EPITHELIAL CELL POLARITY AND CELL JUNCTIONS IN DROSOPHILA Ulrich Tepass and Guy....35:747-784. Downloaded from arjournals.annualreviews.org by University of Kanas-Lawrence & Edwards on 09/26/05. For personal use only. 18 Oct 2001 10:14 AR AR144-24.tex AR144-24.sgm ARv2(2001/05/10) P1: GJB 748 TEPASS ET AL. THE SEPTATE JUNCTION...

  18. Bile Salts and Nuclear Receptors in Biliary Epithelial Cell Pathophysiology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Bile Salts and Nuclear Receptors in Biliary Epithelial Cell Pathophysiology by Dr. Nicolas Chignard shaped the way I perform my work today. Among many other examples, she showed me how to simply performed by students that I had the pleasure to supervise. I'm grateful to all of them. I especially would

  19. Compressive stress enhances coordinated migration of mammary carcinoma cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tse, Janet M. (Janet Man-Yu)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cancer research has traditionally focused on genetic and biochemical changes during tumor progression. Uncontrolled cell proliferation of a solid tumor in a confined space not only creates well-studied oxidative stress ...

  20. Developmental Cell Three-Dimensional Epithelial Morphogenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shvartsman, Stanislav "Stas"

    @princeton.edu http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devcel.2013.01.017 SUMMARY Morphogenesis of the respiratory appendages on eggshells of Drosophila species provides a powerful experimental system for studying how cell sheets give changes in morphology. Computational modeling shows that this mechanism could explain the main features

  1. Laminin and biomimetic extracellular elasticity enhance functional differentiation in mammary epithelia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alcaraz, Jordi; Xu, Ren; Mori, Hidetoshi; Nelson, Celeste M.; Mroue, Rana; Spencer, Virginia A.; Brownfield, Doug; Radisky, Derek C.; Bustamante, Carlos; Bissell, Mina J.

    2008-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In the mammary gland, epithelial cells are embedded in a 'soft' environment and become functionally differentiated in culture when exposed to a laminin-rich extracellular matrix gel. Here, we define the processes by which mammary epithelial cells integrate biochemical and mechanical extracellular cues to maintain their differentiated phenotype. We used single cells cultured on top of gels in conditions permissive for {beta}-casein expression using atomic force microscopy to measure the elasticity of the cells and their underlying substrata. We found that maintenance of {beta}-casein expression required both laminin signalling and a 'soft' extracellular matrix, as is the case in normal tissues in vivo, and biomimetic intracellular elasticity, as is the case in primary mammary epithelial organoids. Conversely, two hallmarks of breast cancer development, stiffening of the extracellular matrix and loss of laminin signalling, led to the loss of {beta}-casein expression and non-biomimetic intracellular elasticity. Our data indicate that tissue-specific gene expression is controlled by both the tissues unique biochemical milieu and mechanical properties, processes involved in maintenance of tissue integrity and protection against tumorigenesis.

  2. The stimulus-dependent co-localization of serum- and glucocorticoid-regulated protein kinase (Sgk) and Erk/MAPK in mammary tumor cells involves the mutual interaction with the importin-alpha nuclear import protein

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buse, Patricia; Maiyar, Anita C.; Failor, Kim L.; Tran, Susan; Leong, Meredith L.L. [Department of Molecular and Cell Biology and The Cancer Research Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-3200 (United States); Firestone, Gary L. [Department of Molecular and Cell Biology and The Cancer Research Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-3200 (United States)], E-mail: glfire@berkeley.edu

    2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In Con8 rat mammary epithelial tumor cells, indirect immunofluorescence revealed that Sgk (serum- and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase) and Erk/MAPK (extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase/mitogen activated protein kinase) co-localized to the nucleus in serum-treated cells and to the cytoplasmic compartment in cells treated with the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone. Moreover, the subcellular distribution of the importin-alpha nuclear transport protein was similarly regulated in a signal-dependent manner. In vitro GST-pull down assays revealed the direct interaction of importin-alpha with either Sgk or Erk/MAPK, while RNA interference knockdown of importin-alpha expression disrupted the localization of both Sgk and Erk into the nucleus of serum-treated cells. Wild type or kinase dead forms of Sgk co-immunoprecipitated with Erk/MAPK from either serum- or dexamethasone-treated mammary tumor cells, suggesting the existence of a protein complex containing both kinases. In serum-treated cells, nucleus residing Sgk and Erk/MAPK were both hyperphosphorylated, indicative of their active states, whereas, in dexamethasone-treated cells Erk/MAPK, but not Sgk, was in its inactive hypophosphorylated state. Treatment with a MEK inhibitor, which inactivates Erk/MAPK, caused the relocalization of both Sgk and ERK to the cytoplasm. We therefore propose that the signal-dependent co-localization of Sgk and Erk/MAPK mediated by importin-alpha represents a new pathway of signal integration between steroid and serum/growth factor-regulated pathways.

  3. Gap junction intercellular communication: a microinjection investigation of fibroblast and epithelial cell lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pahlka, Raymond Benton

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this research were threefold. The first objective was to develop a protocol for unbiased microinjection of the fluorescent dye Lucifer Yellow to normal fibroblast and epithelial cell lines. I determined the optimal equipment...

  4. Lumican induces human corneal epithelial cell migration and integrin expression via ERK 1/2 signaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seomun, Young [Laboratory of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Korean Eye Tissue and Gene Bank related to Blindness, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, 505 Banpo-dong, Seocho-ku, Seoul 137-040 (Korea, Republic of); Joo, Choun-Ki [Laboratory of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Korean Eye Tissue and Gene Bank related to Blindness, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, 505 Banpo-dong, Seocho-ku, Seoul 137-040 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: ckjoo@catholic.ac.kr

    2008-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Lumican is a major proteoglycans of the human cornea. Lumican knock-out mice have been shown to lose corneal transparency and to display delayed wound healing. The purpose of this study was to define the role of lumican in corneal epithelial cell migration. Over-expression of lumican in human corneal epithelial (HCE-T) cells increased both cell migration and proliferation, and increased levels of integrins {alpha}2 and {beta}1. ERK 1/2 was also activated in lumican over-expressed cells. When we treated HCE-T cells with the ERK-specific inhibitor U0126, cell migration and the expression of integrin {beta}1 were completely blocked. These data provide evidence that lumican stimulates cell migration in the corneal epithelium by activating ERK 1/2, and point to a novel signaling pathway implicated in corneal epithelial cell migration.

  5. The plasticity of human breast carcinoma cells is more than epithelial to mesenchymal conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petersen, Ole William; Nielsen, Helga Lind; Gudjonsson, Thorarinn; Villadsen, Ren& #233; Ronnov-Jessen, Lone; Bissell, Mina J.

    2001-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The human breast comprises three lineages: the luminal epithelial lineage, the myoepithelial lineage, and the mesenchymal lineage. It has been widely accepted that human breast neoplasia pertains only to the luminal epithelial lineage. In recent years, however, evidence has accumulated that neoplastic breast epithelial cells may be substantially more plastic in their differentiation repertoire than previously anticipated. Thus, along with an increasing availability of markers for the myoepithelial lineage, at least a partial differentiation towards this lineage is being revealed frequently. It has also become clear that conversions towards the mesenchymal lineage actually occur, referred to as epithelial to mesenchymal transitions. Indeed, some of the so-called myofibroblasts surrounding the tumor may indeed have an epithelial origin rather than a mesenchymal origin. Because myoepithelial cells, epithelial to mesenchymal transition-derived cells, genuine stromal cells and myofibroblasts share common markers, we now need to define a more ambitious set of markers to distinguish these cell types in the microenvironment of the tumors. This is necessary because the different microenvironments may confer different clinical outcomes. The aim of this commentary is to describe some of the inherent complexities in defining cellular phenotypes in the microenvironment of breast cancer and to expand wherever possible on the implications for tumor suppression and progression.

  6. Epimorphin mediates mammary luminal morphogenesis through control of C/EBPbeta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirai, Yohei; Radisky, Derek; Boudreau, Rosanne; Simian, Marina; Stevens, Mary E.; Oka, Yumiko; Takebe, Kyoko; Niwa, Shinichiro; Bissell, Mina J.

    2002-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We have previously shown that epimorphin, a protein expressed on the surface of myoepithelial and fibroblast cells of the mammary gland, acts as a multifunctional morphogen of mammary epithelial cells. Here, we present the molecular mechanism by which epimorphin mediates luminal morphogenesis. Treatment of cells with epimorphin to induce lumen formation greatly increases the overall expression of transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer binding protein beta (C/EBPbeta) and alters the relative expression of its two principal isoforms, LIP and LAP. These alterations were shown to be essential for the morphogenetic activities, as constitutive expression of LIP was sufficient to produce lumen formation, while constitutive expression of LAP blocked epimorphin-mediated luminal morphogenesis. Furthermore, in a transgenic mouse model in which epimorphin expression was expressed in an apolar fashion on the surface of mammary epithelial cells, we found increased expression of C/EBPbeta, increased relative expression of LIP to LAP, and enlarged ductal lumina. Together, our studies demonstrate a role for epimorphin in luminal morphogenesis through control of C/EBPbeta expression.

  7. Antioxidant and Anti-Inflamatory Effects and Mechanisms of Green Tea in Vitro in Vascular Epithelial Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasan, Abida

    2011-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    ANTIOXIDANT AND ANTI-INFLAMATORY EFFECTS AND MECHANISMS OF GREEN TEA IN VITRO IN VASCULAR EPITHELIAL CELLS Major: Nutritional Sciences April 2009 Submitted to the Office of Undergraduate Research Texas A&M University... EPITHELIAL CELLS Approved by: Research Advisor: Susanne Talcott Associate Dean for Undergraduate Research: Robert C. Webb Major: Nutritional Sciences April 2009 Submitted to the Office of Undergraduate Research Texas A&M University in partial...

  8. Effect of taurine on advanced glycation end products-induced hypertrophy in renal tubular epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, J.-S. [Department of Biological Science and Technology, Chung Hwa University of Medical Technology, Tainan 717, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: jaushyang12@hotmail.com; Chuang, L.-Y. [Department of Biochemistry, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Guh, J.-Y. [Department of Internal Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Yang, Y.-L.; Hsu, M.-S. [Department of Biological Science and Technology, Chung Hwa University of Medical Technology, Tainan 717, Taiwan (China)

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mounting evidence indicates that advanced glycation end products (AGE) play a major role in the development of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Taurine is a well documented antioxidant agent. To explore whether taurine was linked to altered AGE-mediated renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis in DN, we examined the molecular mechanisms of taurine responsible for inhibition of AGE-induced hypertrophy in renal tubular epithelial cells. We found that AGE (but not non-glycated BSA) caused inhibition of cellular mitogenesis rather than cell death by either necrosis or apoptosis. There were no changes in caspase 3 activity, bcl-2 protein expression, and mitochondrial cytochrome c release in BSA, AGE, or the antioxidant taurine treatments in these cells. AGE-induced the Raf-1/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation was markedly blocked by taurine. Furthermore, taurine, the Raf-1 kinase inhibitor GW5074, and the ERK kinase inhibitor PD98059 may have the ability to induce cellular proliferation and cell cycle progression from AGE-treated cells. The ability of taurine, GW5074, or PD98059 to inhibit AGE-induced hypertrophy was verified by the observation that it significantly decreased cell size, cellular hypertrophy index, and protein levels of RAGE, p27{sup Kip1}, collagen IV, and fibronectin. The results obtained in this study suggest that taurine may serve as the potential anti-fibrotic activity in DN through mechanism dependent of its Raf-1/ERK inactivation in AGE-induced hypertrophy in renal tubular epithelial cells.

  9. Phosphatidylinositol 4-Phosphate 5-Kinase Reduces Cell Surface Expression of the Epithelial Sodium Channel (ENaC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weisz, Ora A.

    Phosphatidylinositol 4-Phosphate 5-Kinase Reduces Cell Surface Expression of the Epithelial Sodium levels and reduced apical surface expression of ENaC in CCD cells, down-regulating amiloride- sensitive Channel (ENaC) in Cultured Collecting Duct Cells* Received for publication,May 14, 2007, and in revised

  10. alveolar epithelial type-1: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the role of oral immunity in this disease. Outi Vaarala 34 Epithelial-Specific and Stage-Specific Functions of Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I during Postnatal Mammary...

  11. Uptake and cytotoxic effects of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in human bronchial epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirano, Seishiro, E-mail: seishiro@nies.go.j [Environmental Nanotoxicology Section, RCER, National Institute for Environmental Studies (Japan); Fujitani, Yuji; Furuyama, Akiko [Environmental Nanotoxicology Section, RCER, National Institute for Environmental Studies (Japan); Kanno, Sanae [Photon Medical Research Center, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine (Japan)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are cytotoxic to several cell types. However, the mechanism of CNT toxicity has not been fully studied, and dosimetric analyses of CNT in the cell culture system are lacking. Here, we describe a novel, high throughput method to measure cellular uptake of CNT using turbimetry. BEAS-2B, a human bronchial epithelial cell line, was used to investigate cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, and inflammatory effects of multi-walled CNT (MWCNT). The cytotoxicity of MWCNT was higher than that of crocidolite asbestos in BEAS-2B cells. The IC{sub 50} of MWCNT was 12 {mu}g/ml, whereas that of asbestos (crocidolite) was 678 {mu}g/ml. Over the course of 5 to 8 h, BEAS-2B cells took up 17-18% of the MWCNT when they were added to the culture medium at a concentration of 10 {mu}g/ml. BEAS-2B cells were exposed to 2, 5, or 10 {mu}g/ml of MWCNT, and total RNA was extracted for cytokine cDNA primer array assays. The culture supernatant was collected for cytokine antibody array assays. Cytokines IL-6 and IL-8 increased in a dose dependent manner at both the mRNA and protein levels. Migration inhibitory factor (MIF) also increased in the culture supernatant in response to MWCNT. A phosphokinase array study using lysates from BEAS-2B cells exposed to MWCNT indicated that phosphorylation of p38, ERK1, and HSP27 increased significantly in response to MWCNT. Results from a reporter gene assays using the NF-{kappa}B or AP-1 promoter linked to the luciferase gene in transiently transfected CHO-KI cells revealed that NF-{kappa}B was activated following MWCNT exposure, while AP-1 was not changed. Collectively, MWCNT activated NF-{kappa}B, enhanced phosphorylation of MAP kinase pathway components, and increased production of proinflammatory cytokines in human bronchial epithelial cells.

  12. Chlorobenzene induces oxidative stress in human lung epithelial cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feltens, Ralph, E-mail: ralph.feltens@ufz.d [UFZ- Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Environmental Immunology, Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); UFZ- Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Proteomics, Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Moegel, Iljana, E-mail: iljana.moegel@ufz.d [UFZ- Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Environmental Immunology, Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Roeder-Stolinski, Carmen, E-mail: carmen.roeder-stolinski@ufz.d [UFZ- Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Environmental Immunology, Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Simon, Jan-Christoph, E-mail: Jan-Christoph.Simon@medizin.uni-leipzig.d [Leipzig University Medical Center, Clinic of Dermatology, Venerology and Allergology, Philipp-Rosenthal-Str. 23-25, D-4103 Leipzig (Germany); Herberth, Gunda, E-mail: gunda.herberth@ufz.d [UFZ- Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Environmental Immunology, Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Lehmann, Irina, E-mail: irina.lehmann@ufz.d [UFZ- Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Environmental Immunology, Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chlorobenzene is a volatile organic compound (VOC) that is widely used as a solvent, degreasing agent and chemical intermediate in many industrial settings. Occupational studies have shown that acute and chronic exposure to chlorobenzene can cause irritation of the mucosa of the upper respiratory tract and eyes. Using in vitro assays, we have shown in a previous study that human bronchial epithelial cells release inflammatory mediators such as the cytokine monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in response to chlorobenzene. This response is mediated through the NF-kappaB signaling pathway. Here, we investigated the effects of monochlorobenzene on human lung cells, with emphasis on potential alterations of the redox equilibrium to clarify whether the chlorobenzene-induced inflammatory response in lung epithelial cells is caused via an oxidative stress-dependent mechanism. We found that expression of cellular markers for oxidative stress, such as heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1), glutathione S-transferase pi1 (GSTP1), superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2) and dual specificity phosphatase 1 (DUSP1), were elevated in the presence of monochlorobenzene. Likewise, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were increased in response to exposure. However, in the presence of the antioxidants N-(2-mercaptopropionyl)-glycine (MPG) or bucillamine, chlorobenzene-induced upregulation of marker proteins and release of the inflammatory mediator MCP-1 are suppressed. These results complement our previous findings and point to an oxidative stress-mediated inflammatory response following chlorobenzene exposure.

  13. Intestinal-fatty acid binding protein and lipid transport in human intestinal epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montoudis, Alain [Department of Nutrition, Universite de Montreal and Research Center, CHU Sainte Justine, 3175 Cote Ste-Catherine, Montreal, Que., H3T 1C5 (Canada); Delvin, Edgard [Department of Biochemistry, Universite de Montreal and Research Center, CHU Sainte Justine, 3175 Cote Ste-Catherine, Montreal, Que., H3T 1C5 (Canada); Canadian Institute of Health Research, Group of the Functional Development and Physiopathology of the Digestive Tract, and Department of Anatomy and Cellular Biology, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Que., Canada J1H 5N4 (Canada); Menard, Daniel [Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, Universite de Montreal and Research Center, CHU Sainte Justine, 3175 Cote Ste-Catherine, Montreal, Que., H3T 1C5 (Canada); Canadian Institute of Health Research, Group of the Functional Development and Physiopathology of the Digestive Tract, and Department of Anatomy and Cellular Biology, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Que., J1H 5N4 (Canada)] (and others)

    2006-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Intestinal-fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP) is a 14-15 kDa cytoplasmic molecule highly expressed in the enterocyte. Although different functions have been proposed for various FABP family members, the specific function of I-FABP in human intestine remains unclear. Here, we studied the role of I-FABP in molecularly modified normal human intestinal epithelial cells (HIEC-6). cDNA transfection resulted in 90-fold I-FABP overexpression compared to cells treated with empty pQCXIP vector. The high-resolution immunogold technique revealed labeling mainly in the cytosol and confirmed the marked phenotype abundance of I-FABP in cDNA transfected cells. I-FABP overexpression was not associated with alterations in cell proliferation and viability. Studies using these transfected cells cultured with [{sup 14}C]oleic acid did not reveal higher efficiency in de novo synthesis or secretion of triglycerides, phospholipids, and cholesteryl esters compared to cells treated with empty pQCXIP vector only. Similarly, the incubation with [{sup 35}S]methionine did not disclose a superiority in the biogenesis of apolipoproteins (apo) A-I, A-IV, B-48, and B-100. Finally, cells transfected with I-FABP did not exhibit an increased production of chylomicrons, VLDL, LDL, and HDL. Our observations establish that I-FABP overexpression in normal HIEC-6 is not related to cell proliferation, lipid esterification, apo synthesis, and lipoprotein assembly, and, therefore, exclude its role in intestinal fat transport.

  14. Secretory pathway Ca2+/Mn2+-ATPase isoform 2 and lactation: specific localization of plasmalemmal and secretory pathway Ca2+ pump isoforms in the mammary gland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faddy, Helen M.; Smart, Chanel E.; Xu, Ren; Lee, Genee Y.; Kenny, Paraic A.; Feng, Mingye; Rao, Rajini; Brown, Melissa A.; Bissell, Mina J.; Roberts-Thomson, Sarah J.; Monteith, Gregory R.

    2008-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The supply of calcium to the developing neonate via milk is an important physiological process. Until recently the mechanism for the enrichment of milk with calcium was thought to be almost entirely mediated via the secretory pathway. However, recent studies suggest that a specific isoform of the plasma membrane calcium ATPase, PMCA2, is the primary mechanism for calcium transport into milk, highlighting a major role for apical calcium transport. We compared the expression of the recently identified secretory calcium ATPase, SPCA2, and SPCA1, in the mouse mammary gland during different stages of development. SPCA2 levels increased over 35 fold during lactation, while SPCA1 increased only a modest two fold. The potential importance of SPCA2 in lactation was also highlighted by its localization to luminal secretory cells of the mammary gland during lactation, while SPCA1 was expressed throughout the cells of the mammary gland. We also observed major differences in the localization of PMCA2 and PMCA1 during lactation. Using the SCp2 mouse mammary epithelial cell 3D culture model, differences in the sub-cellular distribution of PMCA2 and PMCA1 were clear. These studies highlight the likely specific roles of PMCA2 and SPCA2 in lactation, and link the recently characterized SPCA2 calcium pump to the supply of calcium into milk and the regulation of Golgi resident enzymes important in lactation. They also indicate that calcium transport into milk is a complex interplay between apical and secretory pathways.

  15. Involvement of HIF-2?-mediated inflammation in arsenite-induced transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Yuan; Zhao, Yue; Xu, Wenchao; Luo, Fei; Wang, Bairu; Li, Yuan; Pang, Ying; Liu, Qizhan, E-mail: drqzliu@hotmail.com

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Arsenic is a well established human carcinogen that causes diseases of the lung. Some studies have suggested a link between inflammation and lung cancer; however, it is unknown if arsenite-induced inflammation causally contributes to arsenite-caused malignant transformation of cells. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying inflammation during neoplastic transformation induced in human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells by chronic exposure to arsenite. The results showed that, on acute or chronic exposure to arsenite, HBE cells over-expressed the pro-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8), and interleukin-1? (IL-1?). The data also indicated that HIF-2? was involved in arsenite-induced inflammation. Moreover, IL-6 and IL-8 were essential for the malignant progression of arsenite-transformed HBE cells. Thus, these experiments show that HIF-2? mediates arsenite-induced inflammation and that such inflammation is involved in arsenite-induced malignant transformation of HBE cells. The results provide a link between the inflammatory response and the acquisition of a malignant transformed phenotype by cells chronically exposed to arsenite and thus establish a previously unknown mechanism for arsenite-induced carcinogenesis. - Highlights: • Arsenite induces inflammation. • Arsenite-induced the increases of IL-6 and IL-8 via HIF-2?. • Inflammation is involved in arsenite-induced carcinogenesis.

  16. IL1{beta}-mediated Stromal COX-2 signaling mediates proliferation and invasiveness of colonic epithelial cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Yingting, E-mail: yitizhu@yahoo.com [University of Arizona Arizona Cancer Center Tissue Tech Inc, 7000 SW 97th Avenue Suite 212, Miami, FL 33173 (United States) [University of Arizona Arizona Cancer Center Tissue Tech Inc, 7000 SW 97th Avenue Suite 212, Miami, FL 33173 (United States); Tissue Tech Inc, Miami, FL 33173 (United States); Zhu, Min; Lance, Peter [University of Arizona Arizona Cancer Center Tissue Tech Inc, 7000 SW 97th Avenue Suite 212, Miami, FL 33173 (United States)] [University of Arizona Arizona Cancer Center Tissue Tech Inc, 7000 SW 97th Avenue Suite 212, Miami, FL 33173 (United States)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    COX-2 is a major inflammatory mediator implicated in colorectal inflammation and cancer. However, the exact origin and role of COX-2 on colorectal inflammation and carcinogenesis are still not well defined. Recently, we reported that COX-2 and iNOS signalings interact in colonic CCD18Co fibroblasts. In this article, we investigated whether activation of COX-2 signaling by IL1{beta} in primary colonic fibroblasts obtained from normal and cancer patients play a critical role in regulation of proliferation and invasiveness of human colonic epithelial cancer cells. Our results demonstrated that COX-2 level was significantly higher in cancer associated fibroblasts than that in normal fibroblasts with or without stimulation of IL-1{beta}, a powerful stimulator of COX-2. Using in vitro assays for estimating proliferative and invasive potential, we discovered that the proliferation and invasiveness of the epithelial cancer cells were much greater when the cells were co-cultured with cancer associated fibroblasts than with normal fibroblasts, with or without stimulation of IL1{beta}. Further analysis indicated that the major COX-2 product, prostaglandin E{sub 2}, directly enhanced proliferation and invasiveness of the epithelial cancer cells in the absence of fibroblasts. Moreover, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, NS-398, blocked the proliferative and invasive effect of both normal and cancer associate fibroblasts on the epithelial cancer cells, with or without stimulation of IL-1{beta}. Those results indicate that activation of COX-2 signaling in the fibroblasts plays a major role in promoting proliferation and invasiveness of the epithelial cancer cells. In this process, PKC is involved in the activation of COX-2 signaling induced by IL-1{beta} in the fibroblasts.

  17. Suppression of renal fibrosis by galectin-1 in high glucose-treated renal epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okano, Kazuhiro, E-mail: kaokano@kc.twmu.ac.jp; Tsuruta, Yuki; Yamashita, Tetsuri; Takano, Mari; Echida, Yoshihisa; Nitta, Kosaku

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Diabetic nephropathy is the most common cause of chronic kidney disease. We investigated the ability of intracellular galectin-1 (Gal-1), a prototype of endogenous lectin, to prevent renal fibrosis by regulating cell signaling under a high glucose (HG) condition. We demonstrated that overexpression of Gal-1 reduces type I collagen (COL1) expression and transcription in human renal epithelial cells under HG conditions and transforming growth factor-{beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) stimulation. Matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP1) is stimulated by Gal-1. HG conditions and TGF-{beta}1 treatment augment expression and nuclear translocation of Gal-1. In contrast, targeted inhibition of Gal-1 expression reduces COL1 expression and increases MMP1 expression. The Smad3 signaling pathway is inhibited, whereas two mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), are activated by Gal-1, indicating that Gal-1 regulates these signaling pathways in COL1 production. Using specific inhibitors of Smad3, ERK, and p38 MAPK, we showed that ERK MAPK activated by Gal-1 plays an inhibitory role in COL1 transcription and that activation of the p38 MAPK pathway by Gal-1 plays a negative role in MMP1 production. Taken together, two MAPK pathways are stimulated by increasing levels of Gal-1 in the HG condition, leading to suppression of COL1 expression and increase of MMP1 expression.

  18. Biomolecular interactions and responses of human epithelial and macrophage cells to engineered nanomaterials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kotula, Paul Gabriel; Brozik, Susan Marie; Achyuthan, Komandoor E.; Greene, Adrienne Celeste; Timlin, Jerilyn Ann; Bachand, George David; Bachand, Marlene; Aaron, Jesse S.; Allen, Amy; Seagrave, Jean-Clare

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) are increasingly being used in commercial products, particularly in the biomedical, cosmetic, and clothing industries. For example, pants and shirts are routinely manufactured with silver nanoparticles to render them 'wrinkle-free.' Despite the growing applications, the associated environmental health and safety (EHS) impacts are completely unknown. The significance of this problem became pervasive within the general public when Prince Charles authored an article in 2004 warning of the potential social, ethical, health, and environmental issues connected to nanotechnology. The EHS concerns, however, continued to receive relatively little consideration from federal agencies as compared with large investments in basic nanoscience R&D. The mounting literature regarding the toxicology of ENMs (e.g., the ability of inhaled nanoparticles to cross the blood-brain barrier; Kwon et al., 2008, J. Occup. Health 50, 1) has spurred a recent realization within the NNI and other federal agencies that the EHS impacts related to nanotechnology must be addressed now. In our study we proposed to address critical aspects of this problem by developing primary correlations between nanoparticle properties and their effects on cell health and toxicity. A critical challenge embodied within this problem arises from the ability to synthesize nanoparticles with a wide array of physical properties (e.g., size, shape, composition, surface chemistry, etc.), which in turn creates an immense, multidimensional problem in assessing toxicological effects. In this work we first investigated varying sizes of quantum dots (Qdots) and their ability to cross cell membranes based on their aspect ratio utilizing hyperspectral confocal fluorescence microscopy. We then studied toxicity of epithelial cell lines that were exposed to different sized gold and silver nanoparticles using advanced imaging techniques, biochemical analyses, and optical and mass spectrometry methods. Finally we evaluated a new assay to measure transglutaminase (TG) activity; a potential marker for cell toxicity.

  19. Differential transcriptional regulation of IL-8 expression by human airway epithelial cells exposed to diesel exhaust particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tal, Tamara L. [Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (United States); Simmons, Steven O. [Integrated Systems Toxicology, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA (United States); Silbajoris, Robert; Dailey, Lisa [Environmental and Public Health, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA (United States); Cho, Seung-Hyun [Air Pollution Prevention Control Division, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA (United States); Research Participation Program, Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge (United States); Ramabhadran, Ram [Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (United States); Integrated Systems Toxicology, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA (United States); Linak, William [Air Pollution Prevention Control Division, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA (United States); Reed, William; Bromberg, Philip A. [Center for Environmental Medicine, Asthma, and Lung Biology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (United States); Samet, James M., E-mail: samet.james@epa.go [Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (United States); Environmental and Public Health, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA (United States)

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) induces inflammatory signaling characterized by MAP kinase-mediated activation of NFkB and AP-1 in vitro and in bronchial biopsies obtained from human subjects exposed to DEP. NFkB and AP-1 activation results in the upregulation of genes involved in promoting inflammation in airway epithelial cells, a principal target of inhaled DEP. IL-8 is a proinflammatory chemokine expressed by the airway epithelium in response to environmental pollutants. The mechanism by which DEP exposure induces IL-8 expression is not well understood. In the current study, we sought to determine whether DEP with varying organic content induces IL-8 expression in lung epithelial cells, as well as, to develop a method to rapidly evaluate the upstream mechanism(s) by which DEP induces IL-8 expression. Exposure to DEP with varying organic content differentially induced IL-8 expression and IL-8 promoter activity human airway epithelial cells. Mutational analysis of the IL-8 promoter was also performed using recombinant human cell lines expressing reporters linked to the mutated promoters. Treatment with a low organic-containing DEP stimulated IL-8 expression by a mechanism that is predominantly NFkB-dependent. In contrast, exposure to high organic-containing DEP induced IL-8 expression independently of NFkB through a mechanism that requires AP-1 activity. Our study reveals that exposure to DEP of varying organic content induces proinflammatory gene expression through multiple specific mechanisms in human airway epithelial cells. The approaches used in the present study demonstrate the utility of a promoter-reporter assay ensemble for identifying transcriptional pathways activated by pollutant exposure.

  20. Stromal COX-2 signaling activated by deoxycholic acid mediates proliferation and invasiveness of colorectal epithelial cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Yingting, E-mail: yitizhu@yahoo.com [Arizona Cancer Center, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States) [Arizona Cancer Center, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States); Tissue Tech Inc., Miami, FL 33173 (United States); Zhu, Min; Lance, Peter [Arizona Cancer Center, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States)] [Arizona Cancer Center, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States)

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Human colonic cancer associated fibroblasts are major sources of COX-2 and PGE{sub 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fibroblasts interact with human colonic epithelial cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activation of COX-2 signaling in the fibroblasts affects behavior of the epithelia. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Protein Kinase C controls the activation of COX-2 signaling. -- Abstract: COX-2 is a major regulator implicated in colonic cancer. However, how COX-2 signaling affects colonic carcinogenesis at cellular level is not clear. In this article, we investigated whether activation of COX-2 signaling by deoxycholic acid (DCA) in primary human normal and cancer associated fibroblasts play a significant role in regulation of proliferation and invasiveness of colonic epithelial cancer cells. Our results demonstrated while COX-2 signaling can be activated by DCA in both normal and cancer associated fibroblasts, the level of activation of COX-2 signaling is significantly greater in cancer associated fibroblasts than that in normal fibroblasts. In addition, we discovered that the proliferative and invasive potential of colonic epithelial cancer cells were much greater when the cells were co-cultured with cancer associated fibroblasts pre-treated with DCA than with normal fibroblasts pre-treated with DCA. Moreover, COX-2 siRNA attenuated the proliferative and invasive effect of both normal and cancer associate fibroblasts pre-treated with DCA on the colonic cancer cells. Further studies indicated that the activation of COX-2 signaling by DCA is through protein kinase C signaling. We speculate that activation of COX-2 signaling especially in cancer associated fibroblasts promotes progression of colonic cancer.

  1. The transcription factor LEF-1 induces an epithelial–mesenchymal transition in MDCK cells independent of ?-catenin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kobayashi, Wakako; Ozawa, Masayuki, E-mail: mozawa@m.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp

    2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: •The transcription factor LEF-1 induces an EMT in MDCK cells. •A mutant LEF-1 that cannot interact with ?-catenin retained the ability. •The nuclear function of ?-catenin was not necessary for the LEF-1-induced EMT. •The mRNA levels of Slug, ZEB1, and ZEB2 increased significantly in these cells. -- Abstract: The epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT), a key process in the tumor metastatic cascade, is characterized by the loss of cell–cell junctions and cell polarity, as well as the acquisition of migratory and invasive properties. LEF-1 is a member of the lymphoid enhancer-binding factor/T-cell factor (LEF/TCF) family of DNA-binding transcription factors, which interact with nuclear ?-catenin and act as central transcriptional mediators of Wnt signaling. To investigate the role of LEF-1 in EMT, we generated stable LEF-1 transfectants using MDCK cells. The transfectants had a spindle-shaped mesenchymal morphology, and enhanced migration and invasiveness relative to control cells. These EMT changes were accompanied by the downregulation of an epithelial marker protein, E-cadherin, and the upregulation of mesenchymal marker proteins, vimentin and N-cadherin. Consistent with these observations, the mRNA levels of Slug, ZEB1, and ZEB2—EMT-related transcription factors—increased significantly. Although the N-terminally deleted mutant LEF-1 cannot interact with ?-catenin, it retained the ability to induce EMT. Consistent with these observations, neither the expression of a dominant negative ?-catenin/engrailed chimera, nor the expression of a cytoplasmic domain of E-cadherin that sequesters ?-catenin from binding to LEF/TCF, reversed LEF-1-induced EMT. Together, these data indicated that the nuclear function of ?-catenin was not necessary for the induction of Slug, ZEB1, and ZEB2 expression leading to EMT.

  2. Sustained activation of STAT5 is essential for chromatin remodeling and maintenance of mammary-specific function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Ren; Nelson, Celeste M.; Muschler, John L.; Veiseh, Mandana; Vonderhaar, Barbara K.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2009-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Epithelial cells, once dissociated and placed in two-dimensional (2D) cultures, rapidly lose tissue-specific functions. We showed previously that in addition to prolactin, signaling by laminin-111 was necessary to restore functional differentiation of mammary epithelia. Here, we elucidate two additional aspects of laminin-111 action. We show that in 2D cultures, the prolactin receptor is basolaterally localized and physically segregated from its apically placed ligand. Detachment of the cells exposes the receptor to ligation by prolactin leading to signal transducers and activators of transcription protein 5 (STAT5) activation, but only transiently and not sufficiently for induction of milk protein expression. We show that laminin-111 reorganizes mammary cells into polarized acini, allowing both the exposure of the prolactin receptor and sustained activation of STAT5. The use of constitutively active STAT5 constructs showed that the latter is necessary and sufficient for chromatin reorganization and {beta}-casein transcription. These results underscore the crucial role of continuous laminin signaling and polarized tissue architecture in maintenance of transcription factor activation, chromatin organization, and tissue-specific gene expression.

  3. CX3CR1 Is Expressed by Prostate Epithelial Cells and Androgens Regulate the Levels of CX3CL1/Fractalkine in the Bone Marrow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fatatis, Alessandro

    CX3CR1 Is Expressed by Prostate Epithelial Cells and Androgens Regulate the Levels of CX3CL1 human osteoblasts in vitro. Thus, the interaction of fractalkine with its receptor CX3CR1 could play a crucial role in vivo by directing circulating prostate cancer cells to the bone. We found that although CX

  4. Decoupling Internalization, Acidification and Phagosmal-Endosomal/Iysosomal Phagocytosis of Internalin A coated Beads in epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanchette, C D; Woo, Y; Thomas, C; Shen, N; Sulchek, T A; Hiddessen, A L

    2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Phagocytosis has been extensively examined in 'professional' phagocytic cells using pH sensitive dyes. However, in many of the previous studies, a separation between the end of internalization, beginning of acidification and completion of phagosomal-endosomal/lysosomal fusion was not clearly established, and in several cases, it was treated as a one-step process. In addition, very little work has been done to systematically examine phagosomal maturation in 'non-professional' phagocytic cells, such as epithelial cells. Therefore, in this study, we developed a simple and novel method to decouple and accurately measure particle internalization, phagosomal acidification and phagosomal-endosomal/lysosomal fusion in Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) and Caco-2 epithelial cells. Our method was developed using a pathogen mimetic system consisting of polystyrene beads coated with Internalin A (InlA), a membrane surface protein from Listeria monocytogenes known to trigger receptor-mediated internalization. We achieved independent measurements of the rates of internalization, phagosomal acidification and phagosomal-endosomal/lysosomal fusion in epithelial cells by combining the InlA-coated beads (InlA-beads) with antibody quenching, pH sensitive dyes and endosomal/lysosomal dyes, as follows: the rate of InlA bead internalization was measured via antibody quenching of a pH independent dye (Alexa488) conjugated to InlA-beads, the rate at which phagosomes containing internalized InlA beads became acidified was measured using a pH dependent dye (FITC) conjugated to the beads and the rate of phagosomal-endosomal/lysosomal fusion was measured using a combination of unlabeled InlA-beads and an endosomal/lysosomal dye. By performing these independent measurements under identical experimental conditions, we were able to decouple the three processes and establish time scales for each. In a separate set of experiments, we also exploited the phagosomal acidification process to demonstrate an additional, real31 time method for tracking bead binding, internalization and phagosomal acidification in both MDCK and Caco-2 cells, as well as 1 NIH 3T3 fibroblast cells, using FITC conjugated to InlA-beads or fibronectin-coated beads. Using this method, we found that the time scales for internalization, phagosomal acidification and phagosomal-endosomal/lysosomal fusion were 23-32 min, 3-4 min and 74-120 min, respectively, for epithelial cells, MDCK and Caco-2, which are slower than the kinetics observed in professional phagocytes such as macrophages. Both the static and real-time methods developed here are expected to be readily and broadly applicable, as they simply require conjugation of a fluorophore to a pathogen or mimetic of interest in combination with common cell labeling dyes, and are not limited to the InlA ligand or cell types used here. As such, these methods hold promise for future measurements of receptor-mediated internalization in other cell systems, e.g. other pathogen-host systems.

  5. Chronic occupational exposure to arsenic induces carcinogenic gene signaling networks and neoplastic transformation in human lung epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stueckle, Todd A., E-mail: tstueckle@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Lu, Yongju, E-mail: yongju6@hotmail.com [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)] [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Davis, Mary E., E-mail: mdavis@wvu.edu [Department of Physiology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Wang, Liying, E-mail: lmw6@cdc.gov [Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States)] [Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Jiang, Bing-Hua, E-mail: bhjiang@jefferson.edu [Department of Pathology, Anatomy and Cell Biology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States)] [Department of Pathology, Anatomy and Cell Biology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States); Holaskova, Ida, E-mail: iholaskova@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)] [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Schafer, Rosana, E-mail: rschafer@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)] [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Barnett, John B., E-mail: jbarnett@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Rojanasakul, Yon, E-mail: yrojan@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)] [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chronic arsenic exposure remains a human health risk; however a clear mode of action to understand gene signaling-driven arsenic carcinogenesis is currently lacking. This study chronically exposed human lung epithelial BEAS-2B cells to low-dose arsenic trioxide to elucidate cancer promoting gene signaling networks associated with arsenic-transformed (B-As) cells. Following a 6 month exposure, exposed cells were assessed for enhanced cell proliferation, colony formation, invasion ability and in vivo tumor formation compared to control cell lines. Collected mRNA was subjected to whole genome expression microarray profiling followed by in silico Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) to identify lung carcinogenesis modes of action. B-As cells displayed significant increases in proliferation, colony formation and invasion ability compared to BEAS-2B cells. B-As injections into nude mice resulted in development of primary and secondary metastatic tumors. Arsenic exposure resulted in widespread up-regulation of genes associated with mitochondrial metabolism and increased reactive oxygen species protection suggesting mitochondrial dysfunction. Carcinogenic initiation via reactive oxygen species and epigenetic mechanisms was further supported by altered DNA repair, histone, and ROS-sensitive signaling. NF-?B, MAPK and NCOR1 signaling disrupted PPAR?/?-mediated lipid homeostasis. A ‘pro-cancer’ gene signaling network identified increased survival, proliferation, inflammation, metabolism, anti-apoptosis and mobility signaling. IPA-ranked signaling networks identified altered p21, EF1?, Akt, MAPK, and NF-?B signaling networks promoting genetic disorder, altered cell cycle, cancer and changes in nucleic acid and energy metabolism. In conclusion, transformed B-As cells with their whole genome expression profile provide an in vitro arsenic model for future lung cancer signaling research and data for chronic arsenic exposure risk assessment. Highlights: ? Chronic As{sub 2}O{sub 3} exposure to lung epithelial cells resulted in a cancer-like phenotype. ? Mice injected with arsenic transformed (B-As) cells displayed metastatic tumors. ? Microarray profiling revealed changes in mitochondrial metabolism and ROS response. ? p21, EF1?, Akt, MAPK, PPAR? and NF-?B networks promoted pro-cancer signaling. ? B-As cells represent a lung cancer model to explore As-associated carcinogenesis.

  6. Mangiferin exerts antitumor activity in breast cancer cells by regulating matrix metalloproteinases, epithelial to mesenchymal transition, and ?-catenin signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Hongzhong; Huang, Jing; Yang, Bing; Xiang, Tingxiu; Yin, Xuedong; Peng, Weiyan; Cheng, Wei [Molecular Oncology and Epigenetics Laboratory, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Wan, Jingyuan; Luo, Fuling [Department of Pharmacology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Li, Hongyuan [Molecular Oncology and Epigenetics Laboratory, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Ren, Guosheng, E-mail: rgs726@163.com [Molecular Oncology and Epigenetics Laboratory, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China)

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although mangiferin which is a naturally occurring glucosylxanthone has exhibited promising anticancer activities, the detailed molecular mechanism of mangiferin on cancers still remains enigmatic. In this study, the anticancer activity of mangiferin was evaluated in breast cancer cell line-based in vitro and in vivo models. We showed that mangiferin treatment resulted in decreased cell viability and suppression of metastatic potential in breast cancer cells. Further mechanistic investigation revealed that mangiferin induced decreased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-7 and -9, and reversal of epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT). Moreover, it was demonstrated that mangiferin significantly inhibited the activation of ?-catenin pathway. Subsequent experiments showed that inhibiting ?-catenin pathway might play a central role in mangiferin-induced anticancer activity through modulation of MMP-7 and -9, and EMT. Consistent with these findings in vitro, the antitumor potential was also verified in mangiferin-treated MDA-MB-231 xenograft mice where significantly decreased tumor volume, weight and proliferation, and increased apoptosis were obtained, with lower expression of MMP-7 and -9, vimentin and active ?-catenin, and higher expression of E-cadherin. Taken together, our study suggests that mangiferin might be used as an effective chemopreventive agent against breast cancer. - Highlights: • Mangiferin inhibits growth and metastatic potential in breast cancer cells. • Mangiferin down-regulates MMP-7 and -9 in breast cancer cells. • Mangiferin induces the reversal of EMT in metastatic breast cancer cells. • Mangiferin inhibits the activation of ?-catenin pathway in breast cancer cells. • Inhibiting ?-catenin is responsible for the antitumor activity of mangiferin.

  7. Stat3 controls cell death during mammary gland involution by regulating uptake of milk fat globules and lysosomal membrane permeabilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sargeant, Timothy J.; Lloyd-Lewis, Bethan; Resemann, Henrike K.; Ramos-Montoya, Antonio; Skepper, Jeremy; Watson, Christine J.

    2014-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    of milk-induced cytotoxicity (Fig. 4c,d), suggesting that lysosomal lipid accumulation induces cell death. The toxicity of milk could be due to several components as it contains protein, triglyceride, carbohydrates, minerals and antibodies. Triglycerides... .5). The homogenate was spun at 750 g (3,500 r.p.m., 4°C, 10 min) to remove nuclei and debri, followed by a second 750 g spin to ensure complete removal of contaminating heavy membranes. The resulting supernatant (pns; post nuclear supernatant) is transferred into a...

  8. Musashi proteins are post-transcriptional regulators of the epithelial-luminal cell state

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katz, Yarden

    The conserved Musashi (Msi) family of RNA binding proteins are expressed in stem/progenitor and cancer cells, but generally absent from differentiated cells, consistent with a role in cell state regulation. We found that ...

  9. Gap junction intercellular communication: a microinjection investigation of fibroblast and epithelial cell lines 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pahlka, Raymond Benton

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    parameters as well as optimal cell conditions for effective, repeatable studies using the microinjection protocol. The second objective was to determine whether or not the AG1522 cell line exhibited gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) through...

  10. miR-122 targets NOD2 to decrease intestinal epithelial cell injury in Crohn’s disease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yu; Wang, Chengxiao; Liu, Ying; Tang, Liwei; Zheng, Mingxia [Department of Pediatrics, Jiangwan Hospital of Shanghai, Shanghai 200434 (China)] [Department of Pediatrics, Jiangwan Hospital of Shanghai, Shanghai 200434 (China); Xu, Chundi [Department of Pediatrics, Ruijin affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 200025 (China)] [Department of Pediatrics, Ruijin affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 200025 (China); Song, Jian, E-mail: jiansongkxy@126.com [Department of Gastroenterology, Jiangwan Hospital of Shanghai, Shanghai 200434 (China)] [Department of Gastroenterology, Jiangwan Hospital of Shanghai, Shanghai 200434 (China); Meng, Xiaochun [Department of Pediatrics, Jiangwan Hospital of Shanghai, Shanghai 200434 (China)] [Department of Pediatrics, Jiangwan Hospital of Shanghai, Shanghai 200434 (China)

    2013-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: •NOD2 is a target gene of miR-122. •miR-122 inhibits LPS-induced apoptosis by suppressing NOD2 in HT-29 cells. •miR-122 reduces the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-? and IFN-?). •miR-122 promotes the release of anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10). •NF-?B signaling pathway is involved in inflammatory response induced by LPS. -- Abstract: Crohn’s disease (CD) is one of the two major types of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) thought to be caused by genetic and environmental factors. Recently, miR-122 was found to be deregulated in association with CD progression. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, the gene nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2/CARD15), which is strongly associated with susceptibility to CD, was identified as a functional target of miR-122. MiR-122 inhibited LPS-induced apoptosis by suppressing NOD2 in HT-29 cells. NOD2 interaction with LPS initiates signal transduction mechanisms resulting in the activation of nuclear factor ?B (NF-?B) and the stimulation of downstream pro-inflammatory events. The activation of NF-?B was inhibited in LPS-stimulated HT-29 cells pretreated with miR-122 precursor or NOD2 shRNA. The expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-? and IFN-? was significantly decreased, whereas therelease of the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-10 was increased in LPS-stimulated HT-29 cells pretreated with miR-122 precursor, NOD2 shRNA or the NF-?B inhibitor QNZ. Taken together, these results indicate that miR-122 and its target gene NOD2 may play an important role in the injury of intestinal epithelial cells induced by LPS.

  11. Macrophage-stimulating protein attenuates gentamicin-induced inflammation and apoptosis in human renal proximal tubular epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Ko Eun [Department of Internal Medicine, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju 501-757 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Internal Medicine, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju 501-757 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eun Young [Department of Physiology, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju 501-757 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Physiology, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju 501-757 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chang Seong; Choi, Joon Seok; Bae, Eun Hui; Ma, Seong Kwon [Department of Internal Medicine, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju 501-757 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Internal Medicine, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju 501-757 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyung Keun [Department of Pharmacology, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju 501-757 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Pharmacology, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju 501-757 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Un [Department of Physiology, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju 501-757 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Physiology, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju 501-757 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Soo Wan, E-mail: skimw@chonnam.ac.kr [Department of Internal Medicine, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju 501-757 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: •MSP/RON system is activated in rat kidney damaged by gentamicin. •MSP inhibits GM-induced cellular apoptosis and inflammation in HK-2 cells. •MSP attenuates GM-induced activation of MAPKs and NF-?B pathways in HK-2 cells. -- Abstract: The present study aimed to investigate whether macrophage-stimulating protein (MSP) treatment attenuates renal apoptosis and inflammation in gentamicin (GM)-induced tubule injury and its underlying molecular mechanisms. To examine changes in MSP and its receptor, recepteur d’origine nantais (RON) in GM-induced nephropathy, rats were injected with GM for 7 days. Human renal proximal tubular epithelial (HK-2) cells were incubated with GM for 24 h in the presence of different concentrations of MSP and cell viability was measured by MTT assay. Apoptosis was determined by flow cytometry of cells stained with fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated annexin V protein and propidium iodide. Expression of Bcl-2, Bax, caspase-3, cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-?B), I?B-?, and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) was analyzed by semiquantitative immunoblotting. MSP and RON expression was significantly greater in GM-treated rats, than in untreated controls. GM-treatment reduced HK-2 cell viability, an effect that was counteracted by MSP. Flow cytometry and DAPI staining revealed GM-induced apoptosis was prevented by MSP. GM reduced expression of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and induced expression of Bax and cleaved caspase 3; these effects and GM-induced expression of COX-2 and iNOS were also attenuated by MSP. GM caused MSP-reversible induction of phospho-ERK, phospho-JNK, and phospho-p38. GM induced NF-?B activation and degradation of I?B-?; the increase in nuclear NF-?B was blocked by inhibitors of ERK, JNK, p-38, or MSP pretreatment. These findings suggest that MSP attenuates GM-induced inflammation and apoptosis by inhibition of the MAPKs/NF-?B signaling pathways.

  12. Aberrant, ectopic expression of VEGF and VEGF receptors 1 and 2 in malignant colonic epithelial cells. Implications for these cells growth via an autocrine mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahluwalia, Amrita [Veterans Affairs Long Beach Healthcare System, Long Beach, CA (United States)] [Veterans Affairs Long Beach Healthcare System, Long Beach, CA (United States); Jones, Michael K. [Veterans Affairs Long Beach Healthcare System, Long Beach, CA (United States) [Veterans Affairs Long Beach Healthcare System, Long Beach, CA (United States); Department of Medicine, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Szabo, Sandor [Veterans Affairs Long Beach Healthcare System, Long Beach, CA (United States) [Veterans Affairs Long Beach Healthcare System, Long Beach, CA (United States); Department of Pathology, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Tarnawski, Andrzej S., E-mail: amrita.ahluwalia@va.gov [Veterans Affairs Long Beach Healthcare System, Long Beach, CA (United States); Department of Medicine, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2013-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: •Malignant colonic epithelial cells express VEGF and its receptors. •Cultured colon cancer cells secrete VEGF into the medium. •Inhibition of VEGF receptor significantly decreases colon cancer cell proliferation. •VEGF is critical for colon cancer cell growth. -- Abstract: Vascular endothelial growth factor A (referred to as VEGF) is implicated in colon cancer growth. Currently, the main accepted mechanism by which VEGF promotes colon cancer growth is via the stimulation of angiogenesis, which was originally postulated by late Judah Folkman. However, the cellular source of VEGF in colon cancer tissue; and, the expression of VEGF and its receptors VEGF-R1 and VEGF-R2 in colon cancer cells are not fully known and are subjects of controversy. Material and methods: We examined and quantified expression of VEGF, VEGF-R1 and VEGF-R2 in three different human colonic tissue arrays containing sections of adenocarcinoma (n = 43) and normal mucosa (n = 41). In human colon cancer cell lines HCT116 and HT29 and normal colon cell lines NCM356 and NCM460, we examined expression of VEGF, VEGF-R1 and VEGF-R2 mRNA and protein, VEGF production and secretion into the culture medium; and, the effect of a potent, selective inhibitor of VEGF receptors, AL-993, on cell proliferation. Results: Human colorectal cancer specimens had strong expression of VEGF in cancer cells and also expressed VEGF-R1 and VEGF-R2.In vitro studies showed that human colon cancer cell lines, HCT116 and HT29, but not normal colonic cell lines, express VEGF, VEGF-R1 and VEGF-R2 and secrete VEGF into the medium up to a concentration 2000 pg/ml within 48 h. Furthermore, we showed that inhibition of VEGF receptors using a specific VEGF-R inhibitor significantly reduced proliferation (by >50%) of cultured colon cancer cell lines. Conclusions: Our findings support the contention that VEGF generated by colon cancer cells stimulates their growth directly through an autocrine mechanism that is independent of its primary function in the induction of angiogenesis.

  13. Effects of prolactin on lipid biosynthesis and protein kinase C in mouse mammary gland and NB sub 2 node lymphoma cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waters, S.B.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In cultured mouse mammary gland explants derived from 12-14 day pregnant mice, prolactin (PRL) stimulates an increased rate of incorporation of ({sup 14}C)acetate and ({sup 3}H)glucose into triglycerides. The effect is significant between 4-6 hours after addition of PRL. Enzymes likely to be rate-limiting to this process include acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACC), fatty acid synthetase, acetyl CoA synthetase, and/or pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH). It is possible that early perturbations of phospholipid (PL) metabolism may represent the initial cellular effects of PRL. Consequently the effect of PRL on the incorporation of several precursors into PLs was determined. Employing ({sup 14}C)acetate as a substrate, PRL stimulates its incorporation into phosphatidylcholine, as early as 1-2 hours, and phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine by 2-4 hours. ({sup 3}H)Glycerol incorporation into triglycerides was significantly enhanced by PRL between 4-6 hours, but not into PLs until after 16 hours. Similarly, PRL did not enhance incorporation of ({sup 32}P)O{sub 4}, ({sup 3}H)choline, ({sup 3}H)inositol or ({sup 3}H)seine into PLs until 14-16 hours after addition to culture. 12-O-tetradeconyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) was found to increase ({sup 3}H)uridine incorporation into RNA, and ({sup 3}H)leucine incorporation into caseins in a PRL-like manner. In addition, PRL stimulates a transient, time-dependent translocation of PKC to the particulate fraction of mammary gland explants.

  14. Lgr4 in Breast Cancer Stem Cells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, Li

    2014-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    signals. Consequently, a large proportion of modern drugs target these receptors. Lgr4 is a GPCR implicated in the development of multiple organs; in the mammary gland, it is expressed in the basal epithelial subpopulation and controls organ development...

  15. Post Treatment With an FGF Chimeric Growth Factor Enhances Epithelial Cell Proliferation to Improve Recovery From Radiation-Induced Intestinal Damage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakayama, Fumiaki, E-mail: f_naka@nirs.go.j [Department of Radiation Emergency Medicine, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Hagiwara, Akiko; Umeda, Sachiko [Department of Radiation Emergency Medicine, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Asada, Masahiro; Goto, Megumi; Oki, Junko; Suzuki, Masashi; Imamura, Toru [Signaling Molecules Research Group, Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba (Japan); Akashi, Makoto [Department of Radiation Emergency Medicine, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: A fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 1-FGF2 chimera (FGFC) was created previously and showed greater structural stability than FGF1. This chimera was capable of stimulating epithelial cell proliferation much more strongly than FGF1 or FGF2 even without heparin. Therefore FGFC was expected to have greater biologic activity in vivo. This study evaluated and compared the protective activity of FGFC and FGF1 against radiation-induced intestinal injuries. Methods and Materials: We administered FGFC and FGF1 intraperitoneally to BALB/c mice 24 h before or after total-body irradiation (TBI). The numbers of surviving crypts were determined 3.5 days after TBI with gamma rays at doses ranging from 8 to 12 Gy. Results: The effect of FGFC was equal to or slightly superior to FGF1 with heparin. However, FGFC was significantly more effective in promoting crypt survival than FGF1 (p < 0.01) when 10 {mu}g of each FGF was administered without heparin before irradiation. In addition, FGFC was significantly more effective at promoting crypt survival (p < 0.05) than FGF1 even when administered without heparin at 24 h after TBI at 10, 11, or 12 Gy. We found that FGFC post treatment significantly promoted 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation into crypts and increased crypt depth, resulting in more epithelial differentiation. However, the number of apoptotic cells in FGFC-treated mice decreased to almost the same level as that in FGF1-treated mice. Conclusions: These findings suggest that FGFC strongly enhanced radioprotection with the induction of epithelial proliferation without exogenous heparin after irradiation and is useful in clinical applications for both the prevention and post treatment of radiation injuries.

  16. Id-1 is induced in MDCK epithelial cells by activated Erk/MAPK pathway in response to expression of the Snail and E47 transcription factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jorda, Mireia [IDIBELL-Institut de Recerca Oncologica, Centre d'Oncologia Molecular, Barcelona (Spain); Vinyals, Antonia [IDIBELL-Institut de Recerca Oncologica, Centre d'Oncologia Molecular, Barcelona (Spain); Marazuela, Anna [IDIBELL-Institut de Recerca Oncologica, Centre d'Oncologia Molecular, Barcelona (Spain); Cubillo, Eva [Instituto de Investigaciones Biomedicas 'Alberto Sols' (CSIC-UAM) and Departamento de Bioquimica (UAM), Madrid (Spain); Olmeda, David [Instituto de Investigaciones Biomedicas 'Alberto Sols' (CSIC-UAM) and Departamento de Bioquimica (UAM), Madrid (Spain); Valero, Eva [IDIBELL-Institut de Recerca Oncologica, Centre d'Oncologia Molecular, Barcelona (Spain); Cano, Amparo [Instituto de Investigaciones Biomedicas 'Alberto Sols' (CSIC-UAM) and Departamento de Bioquimica (UAM), Madrid (Spain); Fabra, Angels [IDIBELL-Institut de Recerca Oncologica, Centre d'Oncologia Molecular, Barcelona (Spain)]. E-mail: afabra@idibell.org

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Id-1, a member of the helix-loop-helix transcription factor family has been shown to be involved in cell proliferation, angiogenesis and invasion of many types of human cancers. We have previously shown that stable expression of E47 and Snail repressors of the E-cadherin promoter in MDCK epithelial cell line triggers epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) concomitantly with changes in gene expression. We show here that both factors activate the Id-1 gene promoter and induce Id-1 mRNA and protein. The upregulation of the Id-1 gene occurs through the transactivation of the promoter by the Erk/MAPK signaling pathway. Moreover, oncogenic Ras is also able to activate Id-1 promoter in MDCK cells in the absence of both E47 and Snail transcription factors. Several transcriptionally active regulatory elements have been identified in the proximal promoter, including AP-1, Sp1 and four putative E-boxes. By EMSA, we only detected an increased binding to Sp1 and AP-1 elements in E47- and Snail-expressing cells. Binding is affected by the treatment of cells with PD 98059 MEK inhibitor, suggesting that MAPK/Erk contributes to the recruitment or assembly of proteins to Id-1 promoter. Small interfering RNA directed against Sp1 reduced Id-1 expression and the upregulation of the promoter, indicating that Sp1 is required for Id-1 induction in E47- and Snail-expressing cells. Our results provide new insights into how some target genes are activated during and/or as a consequence of the EMT triggered by both E47 and Snail transcription factors.

  17. The effect of DDT and its metabolite (DDE) on prostaglandin secretion from epithelial cells and on contractions of the smooth muscle of the bovine oviduct in vitro

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wrobel, Michal H.; Mlynarczuk, Jaroslaw; Kotwica, Jan, E-mail: janko@pan.olsztyn.pl

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The insecticide DDT and its metabolite (DDE), due to their lipolytic nature and resistance to biodegradation, are accumulated in the living tissues. In cows, DDT and DDE were found to affect prostaglandin (PG) secretion from the endometrium and contractions of the myometrium. In this study, the impact of both xenobiotics (0.1, 1, 10 or 100 ng/ml) on the function of epithelial cells and muscle strips of bovine oviducts from 1 to 5 day of the oestrous cycle was examined. Therefore the concentration of PGE2 and PGFM (a metabolite of PGF2?) in culture media, mRNA expression of genes involved in PGs synthesis in epithelial cells and the force and amplitude of strips contractions were measured after 2 and 24 or 48 h of incubation. Neither DDT nor DDE affected the viability of cells after 48 h (P > 0.05). Both DDT and DDE increased the concentrations of PGFM in culture medium and secretion of PGE2 after only 2 h of cell culture (P < 0.05). Similar effects were seen for the influence of DDE on amount of PGFM after 48 h, while DDT decreased secretion of PGE2 (P < 0.05). DDT after 2 h increased (P < 0.05) mRNA expression of PGF2? synthase (PGFS), while both xenobiotics decreased (P < 0.05) mRNA expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) after 24 h. DTT also increased the force of isthmus contractions after 2 h, as did both xenobiotics after 48 h (P < 0.05). Moreover, after 2 and 48 h, DDE stimulated the amplitude of contractions of the isthmus as well as the ampulla, (P < 0.05). The effect of both compounds on oviduct contractions was diminished by indomethacin, which blocks PG synthesis. We conclude that oviductal secretion of prostaglandins is affected, by DDT and DDE. The influence of these xenobiotics on PGF2? and PGE2 secretion and ratio may be part of the mechanism by which both DDT and its metabolite disturb the contractions of oviductal muscle. -- Highlights: ? DDT and its metabolite – DDE are accumulated in the living tissues. ? The insecticides affected PGF2? and PGE2 release from epithelial cells of oviduct. ? They also stimulated markedly the contractions of oviductal strips. ? Prostaglandins were involved in the effect of insecticides on oviduct function.

  18. Nickel compounds induce apoptosis in human bronchial epithelial Beas-2B cells by activation of c-Myc through ERK pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Qin; Suen, T.-C.; Sun Hong; Arita, Adriana [New York University School of Medicine, Nelson Institute of Environmental Medicine, 57 Old Forge Road, NY 10987 (United States); Costa, Max [New York University School of Medicine, Nelson Institute of Environmental Medicine, 57 Old Forge Road, NY 10987 (United States)], E-mail: max.costa@nyumc.org

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nickel compounds are carcinogenic to humans and have been shown to alter epigenetic homeostasis. The c-Myc protein controls 15% of human genes and it has been shown that fluctuations of c-Myc protein alter global epigenetic marks. Therefore, the regulation of c-Myc by nickel ions in immortalized but not tumorigenic human bronchial epithelial Beas-2B cells was examined in this study. It was found that c-Myc protein expression was increased by nickel ions in non-tumorigenic Beas-2B and human keratinocyte HaCaT cells. The results also indicated that nickel ions induced apoptosis in Beas-2B cells. Knockout of c-Myc and its restoration in a rat cell system confirmed the essential role of c-Myc in nickel ion-induced apoptosis. Further studies in Beas-2B cells showed that nickel ion increased the c-Myc mRNA level and c-Myc promoter activity, but did not increase c-Myc mRNA and protein stability. Moreover, nickel ion upregulated c-Myc in Beas-2B cells through the MEK/ERK pathway. Collectively, the results demonstrate that c-Myc induction by nickel ions occurs via an ERK-dependent pathway and plays a crucial role in nickel-induced apoptosis in Beas-2B cells.

  19. TGF-{beta}-stimulated aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin via the ERK signaling pathway in cultured retinal pigment epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, Eun Jee [Department of Ophthalmology, National Health Insurance Corporation Ilsan Hospital, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Ophthalmology, National Health Insurance Corporation Ilsan Hospital, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Chun, Ji Na; Jung, Sun-Ah [Konyang University Myunggok Medical Research Institute, Kim's Eye Hospital, Konyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Konyang University Myunggok Medical Research Institute, Kim's Eye Hospital, Konyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jin Won [Department of Biology, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Biology, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Joon H., E-mail: joonhlee@konyang.ac.kr [Konyang University Myunggok Medical Research Institute, Kim's Eye Hospital, Konyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGF-{beta} induces aberrant expression of {beta}III in RPE cells via the ERK pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGF-{beta} increases O-GlcNAc modification of {beta}III in RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mature RPE cells have the capacity to express a neuron-associated gene by TGF-{beta}. -- Abstract: The class III {beta}-tubulin isotype ({beta}{sub III}) is expressed exclusively by neurons within the normal human retina and is not present in normal retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in situ or in the early phase of primary cultures. However, aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin has been observed in passaged RPE cells and RPE cells with dedifferentiated morphology in pathologic epiretinal membranes from idiopathic macular pucker, proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). Transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF-{beta}) has been implicated in dedifferentiation of RPE cells and has a critical role in the development of proliferative vitreoretinal diseases. Here, we investigated the potential effects of TGF-{beta} on the aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin and the intracellular signaling pathway mediating these changes. TGF-{beta}-induced aberrant expression and O-linked-{beta}-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNac) modification of class III {beta}-tubulin in cultured RPE cells as determined using Western blotting, RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry. TGF-{beta} also stimulated phosphorylation of ERK. TGF-{beta}-induced aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin was significantly reduced by pretreatment with U0126, an inhibitor of ERK phosphorylation. Our findings indicate that TGF-{beta} stimulated aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin via activation of the ERK signaling pathway. These data demonstrate that mature RPE cells have the capacity to express a neuron-associated gene in response to TGF-{beta} stimulation and provide useful information towards understanding the pathogenesis of proliferative vitreoretinal diseases.

  20. The accumulations of HIF-1? and HIF-2? by JNK and ERK are involved in biphasic effects induced by different levels of arsenite in human bronchial epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Yuan; Li, Yuan [Institute of Toxicology, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu (China) [Institute of Toxicology, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu (China); The Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology, Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu (China); Li, Huiqiao [Qujing Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Qujing 655000, Yunnan (China)] [Qujing Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Qujing 655000, Yunnan (China); Pang, Ying; Zhao, Yue; Jiang, Rongrong; Shen, Lu [Institute of Toxicology, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu (China) [Institute of Toxicology, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu (China); The Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology, Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu (China); Zhou, Jianwei; Wang, Xinru [The Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology, Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu (China)] [The Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology, Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu (China); Liu, Qizhan, E-mail: drqzliu@hotmail.com [Institute of Toxicology, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu (China) [Institute of Toxicology, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu (China); The Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology, Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu (China)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The biphasic effects of arsenite, in which low levels of arsenite induce cell proliferation and high levels of arsenite induce DNA damage and apoptosis, apparently contribute to arsenite-induced carcinogenesis. However, the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are not well understood. In this study, we investigated the effects of different levels of arsenite on cell proliferation, DNA damage and apoptosis as well as on signal transduction pathways in human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells. Our results show that a low level of arsenite activates extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), which probably mediate arsenite-inhibited degradation of ubiquitinated hypoxia-inducible factor-2? (HIF-2?) in HBE cells. ERK inhibition blocks cell proliferation induced by a low level of arsenite, in part via HIF-2?. In contrast, a high level of arsenite activates c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK), which provoke a response to suppress ubiquitinated HIF-1? degradation. Down-regulation of HIF-1? by inhibiting JNK, however, increases the DNA damage but decreases the apoptosis induced by a high level of arsenite. Thus, data in the present study suggest that the accumulations of HIF-1? and HIF-2? by JNK and ERK are involved in different levels of arsenite-induced biphasic effects, with low levels of arsenite inducing cell proliferation and high levels of arsenite inducing DNA damage and apoptosis in HBE cells. -- Highlights: ? Biphasic effects induced by different concentrations of arsenite. ? Different regulation of ERK or JNK signal pathway by arsenite. ? Different regulation of HIF1? or HIF 2? by arsenite.

  1. BMP4 sufficiency to induce choroid plexus epithelial fate from embryonic stem cell-derived neuroepithelial progenitors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    incubated with 8 uM Vybrant CFDA-SE Cell Tracker dye (LifeRiver) followed by Vybrant CFDA-SE dye labeling as describedonly those cells that were CFDA-SE/Hoechst colabelled and

  2. accelerates mammary tumorprogression: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the mammary gland is well known. However, it is not well established. To determine where PRL could exert its effects within the mammary gland, we investigated the levels Kihara,...

  3. accelerates mammary oncogenesis: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the mammary gland is well known. However, it is not well established. To determine where PRL could exert its effects within the mammary gland, we investigated the levels Kihara,...

  4. alpha positive mammary: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the mammary gland is well known. However, it is not well established. To determine where PRL could exert its effects within the mammary gland, we investigated the levels Kihara,...

  5. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 overexpression induces gastric dysplasia through expansion of stromal myofibroblasts and epithelial progenitors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shibata, Wataru

    Objective: Stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1/CXCL12), the main ligand for CXCR4, is overexpressed in human cancer. This study addressed the precise contribution of SDF-1 to gastric carcinogenesis.

  6. The recruitment of stromal cells to the site of tumor formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saelzler, Matthew P. (Matthew Paul)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Myofibroblasts are an alpha-smooth muscle actin ([alpha]-SMA)-expressing cell type found within human mammary carcinomas, but not in the normal mammary gland. Myofibroblasts can enhance tumor formation by promoting ...

  7. Spleen tyrosine kinase mediates high glucose-induced transforming growth factor-{beta}1 up-regulation in proximal tubular epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Won Seok; Chang, Jai Won [Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, Asan Medical Center, College of Medicine, University of Ulsan, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, Asan Medical Center, College of Medicine, University of Ulsan, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Nam Jeong [Department of Cell Biology, Asan Institute for Life Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Cell Biology, Asan Institute for Life Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Koo [Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, Asan Medical Center, College of Medicine, University of Ulsan, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, Asan Medical Center, College of Medicine, University of Ulsan, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Su-Kil, E-mail: skpark@amc.seoul.kr [Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, Asan Medical Center, College of Medicine, University of Ulsan, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, Asan Medical Center, College of Medicine, University of Ulsan, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The role of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) in high glucose-induced intracellular signal transduction has yet to be elucidated. We investigated whether Syk is implicated in high glucose-induced transforming growth factor-{beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) up-regulation in cultured human proximal tubular epithelial cells (HK-2 cell). High glucose increased TGF-{beta}1 gene expression through Syk, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), AP-1 and NF-{kappa}B. High glucose-induced AP-1 DNA binding activity was decreased by Syk inhibitors and U0126 (an ERK inhibitor). Syk inhibitors suppressed high glucose-induced ERK activation, whereas U0126 had no effect on Syk activation. High glucose-induced NF-{kappa}B DNA binding activity was also decreased by Syk inhibitors. High glucose increased nuclear translocation of p65 without serine phosphorylation of I{kappa}B{alpha} and without degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha}, but with an increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of I{kappa}B{alpha} that may account for the activation of NF-{kappa}B. Both Syk inhibitors and Syk-siRNA attenuated high glucose-induced I{kappa}B{alpha} tyrosine phosphorylation and p65 nuclear translocation. Depletion of p21-activated kinase 2 (Pak2) by transfection of Pak2-siRNA abolished high glucose-induced Syk activation. In summary, high glucose-induced TGF-{beta}1 gene transcription occurred through Pak2, Syk and subsequent ERK/AP-1 and NF-{kappa}B pathways. This suggests that Syk might be implicated in the diabetic kidney disease.

  8. Use of human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) to study immunological markers resulting from exposure to PM{sub 2.5} organic extract from Puerto Rico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuentes-Mattei, Enrique, E-mail: enrique.fuentes@upr.ed [Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Medical Sciences Campus, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan (Puerto Rico); Center for Environmental and Toxicological Research, School of Medicine, Medical Sciences Campus, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan (Puerto Rico); Rivera, Evasomary [Department of Biology, Rio Piedras Campus, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan (Puerto Rico); Center for Environmental and Toxicological Research, School of Medicine, Medical Sciences Campus, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan (Puerto Rico); Gioda, Adriana [Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Medical Sciences Campus, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan (Puerto Rico); Center for Environmental and Toxicological Research, School of Medicine, Medical Sciences Campus, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan (Puerto Rico); Department of Chemistry, Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), Marques de Sao Vicente street, 225, Gavea, 22453-900, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Sanchez-Rivera, Diana; Roman-Velazquez, Felix R. [Department of Chemistry, Mayaguez Campus, University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez (Puerto Rico); Jimenez-Velez, Braulio D., E-mail: braulio.jimenez@upr.ed [Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Medical Sciences Campus, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan (Puerto Rico); Center for Environmental and Toxicological Research, School of Medicine, Medical Sciences Campus, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan (Puerto Rico)

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Fine particulate air pollutants, mainly their organic fraction, have been demonstrated to be associated with cardiovascular and respiratory health problems. Puerto Rico has been reported to have the highest prevalence of pulmonary diseases (e.g., asthma) in the United States. The aim of this study was to assess, for the first time, the immunological response of human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) to organic extracts isolated from airborne particulate matter (PM{sub 2.5}) in Puerto Rico. Organic extracts from PM{sub 2.5} collected throughout an 8-month period (2000-2001) were pooled (composite) in order to perform chemical analysis and biological activity testing. BEAS-2B cells were exposed to PM{sub 2.5} organic extract to assess cytotoxicity, levels of cytokines and relative gene expression of MHC-II, hPXR and CYP3A5. Our findings show that organic PM{sub 2.5} consist of toxic as well as bioactive components that can regulate the secretion of cytokines in BEAS-2B, which could modulate inflammatory response in the lung. Trace element analyses confirmed the presence of metals in organic extracts highlighting the relative high abundance of Cu and Zn in polar organic extracts. Polar organic extracts exhibited dose-dependant toxicity and were found to significantly induce the release of interleukin 6 (IL-6), IL-1beta and IL-7 while significantly inhibiting the secretion of IL-8, G-CSF and MCP-1. Moreover, MHC-II transcriptional activity was up-regulated after 24 h of exposure, whereas PXR and CYP3A5 were down-regulated. This research provides a new insight into the effects of PM{sub 2.5} organic fractions on specific effectors and their possible role in the development of respiratory inflammatory diseases in Puerto Rico.

  9. Intracellular trafficking and plasma membrane microdomain distribution of the NSP4 enterotoxin during rotavirus infection in epithelial cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Storey, Stephen Michael

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ). Elevated levels of prostaglandin induced by RV infection and calcium (Ca2+)-mediated sodium secretion induced by NSP4 provide potential clues about the mechanism of RV secretory diarrhea. 2 At the molecular level, RV is composed of an 11 double...104 and HT-29 cells (Zhang et al., 2000). The nocodazole-sensitivity and brefeldin A-insensitivity of this secretion suggests that NSP4 ER to PM transport during infection is microtubule-dependent and Golgi- bypassing, respectively. The ability...

  10. Temporal-spatial analysis of U.S.-Mexico border environmental fine and coarse PM air sample extract activity in human bronchial epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lauer, Fredine T.; Mitchell, Leah A. [University of New Mexico Center for Environmental Health Sciences, Albuquerque, NM (United States); College of Pharmacy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bedrick, Edward [University of New Mexico Center for Environmental Health Sciences, Albuquerque, NM (United States); School of Medicine, Dept. of Internal Medicine - Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); McDonald, Jacob D. [University of New Mexico Center for Environmental Health Sciences, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lee, Wen-Yee [University of Texas at El Paso Center for Environmental Resource Management, El Paso, TX (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX (United States); Li, Wen-Whai; Olvera, Hector [University of Texas at El Paso Center for Environmental Resource Management, El Paso, TX (United States); Department of Civil Engineering, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX (United States); Amaya, Maria A. [University of Texas at El Paso Center for Environmental Resource Management, El Paso, TX (United States); School of Nursing, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX (United States); Berwick, Marianne; Gonzales, Melissa [University of New Mexico Center for Environmental Health Sciences, Albuquerque, NM (United States); School of Medicine, Dept. of Internal Medicine - Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Currey, Robert [University of Texas at El Paso Center for Environmental Resource Management, El Paso, TX (United States); Pingitore, Nicholas E. [University of Texas at El Paso Center for Environmental Resource Management, El Paso, TX (United States); Department of Geological Sciences, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX (United States)] (and others)

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Particulate matter less than 10 {mu}m (PM10) has been shown to be associated with aggravation of asthma and respiratory and cardiopulmonary morbidity. There is also great interest in the potential health effects of PM2.5. Particulate matter (PM) varies in composition both spatially and temporally depending on the source, location and seasonal condition. El Paso County which lies in the Paso del Norte airshed is a unique location to study ambient air pollution due to three major points: the geological land formation, the relatively large population and the various sources of PM. In this study, dichotomous filters were collected from various sites in El Paso County every 7 days for a period of 1 year. The sampling sites were both distant and near border crossings, which are near heavily populated areas with high traffic volume. Fine (PM2.5) and Coarse (PM10-2.5) PM filter samples were extracted using dichloromethane and were assessed for biologic activity and polycyclic aromatic (PAH) content. Three sets of marker genes human BEAS2B bronchial epithelial cells were utilized to assess the effects of airborne PAHs on biologic activities associated with specific biological pathways associated with airway diseases. These pathways included in inflammatory cytokine production (IL-6, IL-8), oxidative stress (HMOX-1, NQO-1, ALDH3A1, AKR1C1), and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-dependent signaling (CYP1A1). Results demonstrated interesting temporal and spatial patterns of gene induction for all pathways, particularly those associated with oxidative stress, and significant differences in the PAHs detected in the PM10-2.5 and PM2.5 fractions. Temporally, the greatest effects on gene induction were observed in winter months, which appeared to correlate with inversions that are common in the air basin. Spatially, the greatest gene expression increases were seen in extracts collected from the central most areas of El Paso which are also closest to highways and border crossings.

  11. 3,5,4?-Trimethoxystilbene, a natural methoxylated analog of resveratrol, inhibits breast cancer cell invasiveness by downregulation of PI3K/Akt and Wnt/?-catenin signaling cascades and reversal of epithelial–mesenchymal transition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsai, Jie-Heng [Institute of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan, ROC (China); Hsu, Li-Sung [Institute of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan, ROC (China); Clinical Laboratory, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung 402, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lin, Chih-Li [Institute of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Medical Research, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung 402, Taiwan, ROC (China); Hong, Hui-Mei [Department of Medical Research, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung 402, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Biomedical Sciences, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan, ROC (China); Pan, Min-Hsiung [Department of Seafood Science, National Kaohsiung Marine University, Kaohsiung 811, Taiwan, ROC (China); Way, Tzong-Der [Department of Biological Science and Technology, College of Life Sciences, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chen, Wei-Jen, E-mail: cwj519@csmu.edu.tw [Department of Medical Research, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung 402, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Biomedical Sciences, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The molecular basis of epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) functions as a potential therapeutic target for breast cancer because EMT may endow breast tumor-initiating cells with stem-like characteristics and enable the dissemination of breast cancer cells. We have recently verified the antitumor activity of 3,5,4?-trimethoxystilbene (MR-3), a naturally methoxylated derivative of resveratrol, in colorectal cancer xenografts via an induction of apoptosis. The effect of MR-3 on EMT and the invasiveness of human MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma cell line were also explored. We found that MR-3 significantly increased epithelial marker E-cadherin expression and triggered a cobblestone-like morphology of MCF-7 cells, while reciprocally decreasing the expression of mesenchymal markers, such as snail, slug, and vimentin. In parallel with EMT reversal, MR-3 downregulated the invasion and migration of MCF-7 cells. Exploring the action mechanism of MR-3 on the suppression of EMT and invasion indicates that MR-3 markedly reduced the expression and nuclear translocation of ?-catenin, accompanied with the downregulation of ?-catenin target genes and the increment of membrane-bound ?-catenin. These results suggest the involvement of Wnt/?-catenin signaling in the MR-3-induced EMT reversion of MCF-7 cells. Notably, MR-3 restored glycogen synthase kinase-3? activity by inhibiting the phosphorylation of Akt, the event required for ?-catenin destruction via a proteasome-mediated system. Overall, these findings indicate that the anti-invasive activity of MR-3 on MCF-7 cells may result from the suppression of EMT via down-regulating phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT signaling, and consequently, ?-catenin nuclear translocation. These occurrences ultimately lead to the blockage of EMT and the invasion of breast cancer cells. - Highlights: • MR-3 blocked MCF-7 cell invasion by inducing a reversal of EMT. • Wnt/?-catenin signaling is involved in MR-3-induced EMT reversion of MCF-7 cells. • Knockdown of ?-catenin was sufficient to restore epithelial marker E-cadherin levels. • MR-3 recovered the function of GSK-3? that inhibits ?-catenin nuclear translocation.

  12. The Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition Factor SNAIL Paradoxically Enhances Reprogramming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unternaehrer, Juli J.

    Reprogramming of fibroblasts to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) entails a mesenchymal to epithelial transition (MET). While attempting to dissect the mechanism of MET during reprogramming, we observed that knockdown ...

  13. Inhibition of ICAM-1/LFA-1-mediated Heterotypic T-cell Adhesion to Epithelial Cells: Design of ICAM-1 Cyclic Peptides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Meagan E.; Yakovleva, Tatyana; Yongbo, Hu; Siahaan, Teruna J.

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we have designed cyclic peptides (cIBL, cIBR, cIBC, CH4 and CH7) derived from the parent IB peptide (ICAM-11–21) that are inhibitors of ICAM-1/LFA-1-mediated T-cell adhesion to Caco-2 cell monolayers. Cyclic peptide cIBR has the best...

  14. Differentiation and functional maturation of bone marrow-derived intestinal epithelial T cells expressing membrane T cell receptor in athymic radiation chimeras

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosley, R.L.; Styre, D.; Klein, J.R. (Univ. of Tulsa, OK (USA))

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thymus dependency of murine intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL) was studied in an athymic F1----parent radiation chimera model. IEL, although not splenic or lymph node lymphocytes, from athymic chimeras displayed normal levels of cells bearing the class-specific T cell Ag, CD4 and CD8; the TCR-associated molecule, CD3; and the Thy-1 Ag. Moreover, two-color flow cytometric analyses of IEL from athymic mice demonstrated regulated expression of T cell Ag characteristic of IEL subset populations from thymus-bearing mice. In immunoprecipitation experiments, surface TCR-alpha beta or TCR-gamma delta were expressed on IEL, although not on splenic lymphocytes, from athymic chimeras. That IEL from athymic chimeras constituted a population of functionally mature effector cells activated in situ, similar to IEL from thymus-bearing mice, was demonstrated by the presence of CD3-mediated lytic activity of athymic lethally irradiated bone marrow reconstituted IEL. These data provide compelling evidence that intestinal T cells do not require thymic influence for maturation and development, and demonstrate that the microenvironment of the intestinal epithelium is uniquely adapted to regulate IEL differentiation.

  15. IL-27 inhibits epithelial-mesenchymal transition and angiogenic factor production in a STAT1-dominant pathway in human non-small cell lung cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IL-27 directly restrains lung tumorigenicity by suppressingof human non-small cell lung cancer in SCID mice. J Clinfactor in non-small cell lung cancer. J Clin Invest 1998,

  16. Increased differentiation properties in two- and three-dimensional coculture of hepatocytes and liver epithelial cells by a novel quantitative functional liver assay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moritz, Joseph M. (Joseph Michael)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hepatic stem cells in adult rats are activated by chemical injury to the liver, causing hepatic progenitor cells to proliferate, integrate into the hepatic plates, and differentiate into hepatocytes. In an attempt to model ...

  17. antigen-driven mammary carcinoma: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the mammary gland is well known. However, it is not well established. To determine where PRL could exert its effects within the mammary gland, we investigated the levels Kihara,...

  18. Original article Sensitization of the bovine mammary gland to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    (ReceivedI October I )96; accepted 4 February 1997) Summary ― The effect of repeated infusions intramammary infusions of E cnli endotoxin (33 pg) 24 h apart in the same mammary quarter. Along with the second infusion, the cows received one dose of endotoxin in the contralateral quarter. Milk was collected

  19. Core epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition interactome gene-expression signature is associated with claudin-low and metaplastic breast cancer subtypes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Alicia Y.

    The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) produces cancer cells that are invasive, migratory, and exhibit stem cell characteristics, hallmarks of cells that have the potential to generate metastases. Inducers of the ...

  20. Mammary stem and progenitor cells: Tumour precursors? Amy Paguirigana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beebe, David J.

    .01.048 * Corresponding author: Tel.: +1 608 265 5182; fax: +1 608 262 2824. E-mail address: alexander

  1. Characterisation of microRNA expression in post-natal mouse mammary gland development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avril-Sassen, Stefanie; Goldstein, Leonard D; Stingl, John; Blenkiron, Cherie; Le Quesne, John; Spiteri, Inmaculada; Karagavriilidou, Konstantina; Watson, Christine J; Tavare, Simon; Miska, Eric A; Caldas, Carlos

    2009-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    . For example during puberty and gestation, proliferation and associated processes of cell division and mitosis were highly represented, cal- cium/sodium ion transport, translation and intracellular protein transport were prominent during lactation, apop- tosis... and miR-429. There is increasing evidence that this miRNA family plays a crucial role in the regulation of epithelial to mesenchy- mal transition (EMT). All five members of the miR-200 family were markedly down-regulated in cells that had undergone EMT...

  2. Effect of Intravenous Amino Acid Infusion on Leucine Oxidation Across the Mammary Gland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bequette, Brian J.

    Effect of Intravenous Amino Acid Infusion on Leucine Oxidation Across the Mammary Gland) and the AA infusion periods. Although blood flow to the mammary gland and the arterial concen- tration of most AA other than leucine were increased by the AA infusion, milk and protein yields did not change

  3. The Open Breast Cancer Journal, 2011, 3, 31-44 31 1876-8172/11 2011 Bentham Open

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Jong-Sang

    in breast normal cells. The breast cancer cell lines HCC1419, MCF7, MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468, SKBR3, the normal mammary epithelial cell line HME 50 HT and the normal mammary fibroblast cell line CCD-1074sk were of the chemotherapeutics on the normal cells and tissues. Trastuzumab, the newest anticancer treatment, targets cancer

  4. Response of an experimental mammary carcinoma to fractionated x-irradiation with misonidazole and microwave hyperthermia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldfeder, A.; Brown, D.M.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X/Gf mice bearing the MT2 mammary adenocarcinoma were subjected to 4000 rad of x rays given either as a single dose, or five daily fractions of 800 rad. Additional experimental groups were treated with either short term localized microwave hyperthermia (LMH), or the hypoxic cell radiosensitizer misonidazole (MISO), or both hyperthermia plus MISO with x rays. The combined use of MISO plus 42.5/sup 0/C with x rays was superior to the other treatment regimens as assessed by tumor regrowth delay and mean survival time. However, for the five fraction schedule, the addition of MISO plus hyperthermia was not as effective as observed for the single dose treatment. This may be attributed to reoxygenation of the hypoxic tumor cells between treatment fractions. MISO retention in tumor tissue under ambient and hyperthermic conditions was studied. The application of heat locally to the tumors caused a significant increase in MISO tumor concentration. However, after four x ray fractions the influence on MISO concentration by hyperthermia in the tumors could not be demonstrated.

  5. Extracellular matrix signatures of human mammary carcinoma identify novel metastasis promoters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naba, Alexandra

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a major component of tumors and a significant contributor to cancer progression. In this study, we use proteomics to investigate the ECM of human mammary carcinoma xenografts and show that ...

  6. Model-based Analysis of HER Activation in Cells Co-Expressing EGFR, HER2 and HER3.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shankaran, Harish; Zhang, Yi; Tan, Yunbing; Resat, Haluk

    2013-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The HER/ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases drive critical responses in normal physiology and cancer, and the expression levels of the various HER receptors are critical determinants of clinical outcomes. HER activation is driven by the formation of various dimer complexes between members of this receptor family. The HER dimer types can have differential effects on downstream signaling and phenotypic outcomes. We constructed an integrated mathematical model of HER activation and trafficking to quantitatively link receptor expression levels to dimerization and activation. We parameterized the model with a comprehensive set of HER phosphorylation and abundance data collected in a panel of human mammary epithelial cells expressing varying levels of EGFR, HER2 and HER3. Although parameter estimation yielded multiple solutions, predictions for dimer phosphorylation were in agreement with each other. We validated the model using experiments where pertuzumab was used to block HER2 dimerization. We used the model to predict HER dimerization and activation patterns in a panel of epithelial cells lines with known HER expression levels. Simulations over the range of expression levels seen in various cell lines indicate that: i) EGFR phosphorylation is driven by HER1/1 and HER1/2 dimers, and not HER1/3 dimers, ii) HER1/2 and HER2/3 dimers both contribute significantly to HER2 activation with the EGFR expression level determining the relative importance of these species, and iii) the HER2/3 dimer is largely responsible for HER3 activation. The model can be used to predict phosphorylated dimer levels for any given HER expression profile. This information in turn can be used to quantify the potencies of the various HER dimers, and can potentially inform personalized therapeutic approaches.

  7. Annexin A9 (ANXA9) biomarker and therapeutic target in epithelial cancer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hu, Zhi (El Cerrito, CA); Kuo, Wen-Lin (San Ramon, CA); Neve, Richard M. (San Mateo, CA); Gray, Joe W. (San Francisco, CA)

    2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Amplification of the ANXA9 gene in human chromosomal region 1q21 in epithelial cancers indicates a likelihood of both in vivo drug resistance and metastasis, and serves as a biomarker indicating these aspects of the disease. ANXA9 can also serve as a therapeutic target. Interfering RNAs (iRNAs) (such as siRNA and miRNA) and shRNA adapted to inhibit ANXA9 expression, when formulated in a therapeutic composition, and delivered to cells of the tumor, function to treat the epithelial cancer.

  8. Sustained activation of STAT5 is essential for chromatin remodeling and maintenance of mammary-specific function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Ren

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Impaired alveologenesis and maintenance of secretory mammaryfor chromatin remodeling and maintenance of mammary-specifictissue architecture in maintenance of transcription factor

  9. Identification of genetic loci that control mammary tumor susceptibility through the host microenvironment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Pengju; Lo, Alvin; Huang, Yurong; Huang, Ge; Liang, Guozhou; Mott, Joni; Karpen, Gary H.; Blakely, Eleanor A.; Bissell, Mina J.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; et al

    2015-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The interplay between host genetics, tumor microenvironment and environmental exposure in cancer susceptibility remains poorly understood. Here we assessed the genetic control of stromal mediation of mammary tumor susceptibility to low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) using backcrossed F1 into BALB/c (F1Bx) between cancer susceptible (BALB/c) and resistant (SPRET/EiJ) mouse strains. Tumor formation was evaluated after transplantation of non-irradiated Trp53-/- BALB/c mammary gland fragments into cleared fat pads of F1Bx hosts. Genome-wide linkage analysis revealed 2 genetic loci that constitute the baseline susceptibility via host microenvironment. However, once challenged with LDIR, we discovered 13 additional loci that were enriched for genesmore »involved in cytokines, including TGF?1 signaling. Surprisingly, LDIR-treated F1Bx cohort significantly reduced incidence of mammary tumors from Trp53-/- fragments as well as prolonged tumor latency, compared to sham-treated controls. We demonstrated further that plasma levels of specific cytokines were significantly correlated with tumor latency. Using an ex vivo 3-D assay, we confirmed TGF?1 as a strong candidate for reduced mammary invasion in SPRET/EiJ, which could explain resistance of this strain to mammary cancer risk following LDIR. Our results open possible new avenues to understand mechanisms of genes operating via the stroma that affect cancer risk from external environmental exposures.« less

  10. Structure of the EGF receptor transactivation circuit integrates multiple signals with cell context

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joslin, Elizabeth J.; Shankaran, Harish; Opresko, Lee K.; Bollinger, Nikki; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Wiley, H. S.

    2010-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Transactivation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been proposed to be a mechanism by which a variety of cellular inputs can be integrated into a single signaling pathway, but the regulatory topology of this important system is unclear. To understand the transactivation circuit, we first created a “non-binding” reporter for ligand shedding. We then quantitatively defined how signals from multiple agonists were integrated both upstream and downstream of the EGFR into the extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) cascade in human mammary epithelial cells. We found that transactivation is mediated by a recursive autocrine circuit where ligand shedding drives EGFR-stimulated ERK that in turn drives further ligand shedding. The time from shedding to ERK activation is fast (<5 min) whereas the recursive feedback is slow (>15 min). Simulations showed that this delay in positive feedback greatly enhanced system stability and robustness. Our results indicate that the transactivation circuit is constructed so that the magnitude of ERK signaling is governed by the sum of multiple direct inputs, while recursive, autocrine ligand shedding controls signal duration.

  11. Treatment of an Iatrogenic Left Internal Mammary Artery to Pulmonary Artery Fistula with a Bovine Pericardium Covered Stent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heper, Gulumser [SSK Ihtisas Hospital, Department of Cardiology (Turkey)], E-mail: heperg@hotmail.com; Barcin, Cem; Iyisoy, Atila; Tore, Hasan F. [Gulhane Military Medical Academy, Department of Cardiology (Turkey)

    2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a case with an acquired fistula between the left internal mammary artery and the pulmonary artery following coronary bypass surgery treated with a bovine pericardium covered stent. We also reviewed similar cases reported previously.

  12. Purification of PRL receptors from toad kidney: Comparisons with rabbit mammary PRL receptors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunand, M.; Kraehenbuhl, J.P.; Rossier, B.C.; Aubert, M.L. (Univ. of Geneva School of Medicine (Switzerland) Univ. of Lausanne School of Medicine (Switzerland))

    1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The binding characteristics of the prolactin (PRL) receptors present in toad (Bufo marinus) kidneys were investigated and compared to those of PRL receptors present in rabbit mammary glands. The molecular characteristics of the Triton X-100 solubilized renal and mammary PRL receptors were assessed by gel filtration and by migration analysis on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) after affinity labeling of the binding sites with {sup 125}I-human growth hormone. Similar results were obtained for both receptors. Partial purification of the toad PRL receptor could be achieved by affinity chromatography. The molecular weight of this purified receptor could be determined by analysis of SDS-PAGE. With the use of a polyclonal antiserum raised against a purified preparation of rabbit mammary PRL receptor, one or several antigenic epitope(s) could be identified on the core of the toad renal PRL receptor. In conclusion, although the structure and the biological role(s) of PRL have substantially changed during evolution, the receptor for this hormone has retained many of its structural features as could be assessed between an amphibian and a mammalian species on functionally different target tissues.

  13. Apical polarity in three-dimensional culture systems: where to now?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Inman, J.L.; Bissell, Mina

    2010-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Delineation of the mechanisms that establish and maintain the polarity of epithelial tissues is essential to understanding morphogenesis, tissue specificity and cancer. Three-dimensional culture assays provide a useful platform for dissecting these processes but, as discussed in a recent study in BMC Biology on the culture of mammary gland epithelial cells, multiple parameters that influence the model must be taken into account.

  14. Epithelial cell polarity and proliferation control in Drosophila melanogaster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrison, Holly Ann

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    discs expressing the avl-IR G8+B3 transgenes under controlexpressed in en>avl-IR G8+B3 wing discs. Actin staining (of wild-type or en>avl-IR G8+B3 imaginal wing discs probed

  15. Epithelial cell polarity and proliferation control in Drosophila melanogaster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrison, Holly Ann

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    divergence led to its adoption into the recycling pathway,led to more complete models of apicobasal protein sorting in the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and recycling

  16. Oestrogen metabolism and action in epithelial ovarian cancer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ren, Xia

    2011-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Ovarian cancer is the most fatal of all gynecological malignancies. Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) accounts for about 90% of malignant ovarian tumours and is thought to originate mostly from ovarian surface epithelium ...

  17. Role of Ceacam1 in VEGF induced vasculogenesis of murine embryonic stem cell-derived embryoid bodies in 3D culture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu, Angel [Department of Immunology, Beckman Research Institute of the City of Hope, 1500 East Duarte Road, Duarte, CA 91010 (United States)] [Department of Immunology, Beckman Research Institute of the City of Hope, 1500 East Duarte Road, Duarte, CA 91010 (United States); Tsark, Walter [Department of Biology, Beckman Research Institute of the City of Hope, Duarte, CA 91010 (United States)] [Department of Biology, Beckman Research Institute of the City of Hope, Duarte, CA 91010 (United States); Holmes, Kathryn V. [Department of Microbiology, University of Colorado Health Sciences, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States)] [Department of Microbiology, University of Colorado Health Sciences, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Shively, John E., E-mail: jshively@coh.org [Department of Immunology, Beckman Research Institute of the City of Hope, 1500 East Duarte Road, Duarte, CA 91010 (United States)

    2009-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    CEACAM1 (carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1), a type I transmembrane glycoprotein involved in cell-cell adhesion has been shown to act as an angiogenic factor for mouse and human endothelial cells. Based on the ability of CEACAM1 to initiate lumen formation in human mammary epithelial cells grown in 3D culture (Matrigel), we hypothesized that murine CEACAM1 may play a similar role in vasculogenesis. In order to test this hypothesis, murine embryonic stem (ES) cells stimulated with VEGF were differentiated into embryoid bodies (EB) for 8 days (- 8-0 d) and transferred to Matrigel in the presence or absence of anti-CEACAM1 antibody for an additional 12 days (0-12 d). In the absence of anti-CEACAM1 antibody or in the presence of an isotype control antibody, the EB in Matrigel underwent extensive sprouting, generating lengthy vascular structures with well-defined lumina as demonstrated by confocal microscopy, electron microscopy, and immunohistochemical analysis. Both the length and architecture of the vascular tubes were inhibited by anti-CEACAM1 mAb CC1, a mAb that blocks the cell-cell adhesion functions of CEACAM1, thus demonstrating a critical role for this cell-cell adhesion molecule in generating and maintaining vasculogenesis. QRT-PCR analysis of the VEGF treated ES cells grown under conditions that convert them to EB revealed expression of Ceacam1 as early as - 5 to - 3 d reaching a maximum at day 0 at which time EBs were transferred to Matrigel, thereafter levels at first declined and then increased over time. Other markers of vasculogenesis including Pecam1, VE-Cad, and Tie-1 were not detected until day 0 when EBs were transferred to Matrigel followed by a steady increase in levels, indicating later roles in vasculogenesis. In contrast, Tie-2 and Flk-1 (VEGFR2) were detected on day five of EB formation reaching a maximum at day 0 on transfer to Matrigel, similar to Ceacam1, but after which Tie-2 declined over time, while Flk-1 increased over time. QRT-PCR analysis of the anti-CEACAM1 treated ES cells revealed a significant decrease in the expression of Ceacam1, Pecam1, Tie-1, and Flk-1, while VE-Cad and Tie-2 expression were unaffected. These results suggest that the expression and signaling of CEACAM1 may affect the expression of other factors known to play critical roles in vasculogenesis. Furthermore this 3D model of vasculogenesis in an environment of extracellular matrix may be a useful model for comparison to existing models of angiogenesis.

  18. Partial proteolytic digestion of the mammary prolactin receptor: Identification of smaller prolactin binding fragments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dusanter-Fourt, I.; Kelly, P.A.; Djiane, J. (Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, Jouy-en-Josas (France))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Partial proteolytic digestion of the mammary prolactin (PRL) receptor was used to generate receptor fragments and analyze their immunoreactivity and PRL binding properties. Tryptic digestion of the PRL receptor produced two immunoreactive fragments (Mr approximately 30,000 and approximately 15,000) that reacted with a monoclonal anti-PRL receptor antibody and still specifically bound PRL, while the complete immunoreactive PRL binding unit (Mr approximately 42,000) disappeared. Neither chymotrypsin nor V8 protease were able to generate any immunoreactive receptor fragments. These receptor fragments may represent smaller PRL binding receptor form(s) of biological significance.

  19. Inhibitory actions of Ah receptor agonists and indole-containing compounds in breast cancer cell lines and mouse models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Kelcey Manae Becker

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    . Recently, it has been reported that the SAhRM 1,1??,2,2??-tetramethyldiindolylmethane inhibited DMBA-induced mammary tumor growth in rats and also inhibited MAPK and PI3-K pathways in human breast cancer cells. BT-474 and MDA-MB-453 cell lines are ErbB2...

  20. Prolactin and aging: X-irradiated and estrogen-induced rat mammary tumorigenesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ito, A.; Naito, M.; Watanabe, H.; Yokoro, K.

    1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Both sexes of inbred WF rats at either 8 or 28-60 weeks of age were exposed to 200 rad whole-body radiation, 2.5 or 5.0 mg 17 beta-estradiol (E2), or both agents The female rats treated with E2 alone or with both X-rays and E2 at 8 weeks of age showed a high incidence of mammary carcinomas (MCA), a large increase in pituitary weight, and a rise in serum prolactin (PRL) levels. However, the same treatments to males did not induce MCA despite a moderate increase in both pituitary weight and serum PRL. Ovariectomy prior to E2 treatment failed to modify the occurrence of MCA or pituitary tumors. When X-rays and E2 were given to female rats at 28-60 weeks of age, pituitary weight, serum PRL levels, and the incidence of MCA were unaffected. When the E2 pellet was kept for the first 24 weeks and withdrawn during the last 12 weeks, the incidence of MCA, pituitary weight, and serum PRL was low. It was concluded that: 1) the pituitary glands of young female rats were susceptible to E2 treatment but were insensitive in older females, and 2) the occurrence of MCA in female rats appeared to be promoted by elevated PRL levels secreted by E2-induced pituitary tumors. Mammary tissue of male rats was less sensitive to PRL levels in the development of MCA.

  1. Biological activities of binding site specific monoclonal antibodies to prolactin receptors of rabbit mammary gland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Djiane, J.; Dusanter-Fourt, I.; Katoh, M.; Kelly, P.A.

    1985-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The biological activity of three monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against the rabbit mammary prolactin (PRL) receptor (M110, A82, and A917) were investigated using explants of rabbit mammary gland. The three mAbs which were all able to inhibit the binding of SVI-ovine prolactin to its receptor had different biological activities. Two mAbs (M110 and A82) were able to prevent the stimulating effect of PRL on casein synthesis when the molar ratio between the mAb and PRL was 100. One mAb (A917) was able to mimic the action of PRL on both casein and DNA ((TH)thymidine incorporation) synthesis, whereas the other two mAbs were without any stimulatory effect. For this stimulatory effect to be observed, bivalency of the antibody was essential, since monovalent fragments, which were able to inhibit PRL binding, had no agonistic activity. The ability of the mAbs to induce a down-regulation of receptors was also studied. These studies suggest that the binding domain of the receptor might be relatively complex, since only a part of this domain recognized by the antibody with PRL-like activity was able to induce hormonal action. Alternatively, only those antibodies able to microaggregate the receptors may possess PRL-like activity.

  2. Concentration of PCBs,HCB,DDT, and HCH isomers in the ovaries, mammary gland, and liver of cows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sitarska, E.; Klucinski, W.; Faundez, R. [Agricultural Univ. of Warsaw (Poland)]|[National Inst. of Hygiene, Warsaw (Poland)] [and others

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Persistent organic chlorine compounds such as DDT and its metabolites, hexachlorobenzene (HCB) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) play an important role in chronic poisoning and take part in a number of pathological processes. This study estimates the degree of accumulation of organic Chlorine compounds and polychlorinated biphynyls in the liver, ovaries, and mammary gland tissues of cows.12 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  3. Regulation of Mammary cell Differentiation and Metabolism by Singleminded-2s

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scribner, Kelly C

    2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    progression are poorly understood. Therefore, determining the mechanisms by which some DCIS progress is critical for future breast cancer diagnostics and treatment. Singleminded-2s (SIM2s) is a member of the bHLH/PAS family of transcription factors and a key...

  4. A novel cell culture model for studying differentiation and apoptosis in the mouse mammary gland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon, Katrina E; Binas, Bert; Chapman, Rachel S; Kurian, Kathreena M; Clarkson, Richard W E; Clark, A John; Birgitte Lane, E; Watson, Christine J

    2000-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    % glutaraldehyde in 0.1 mol/l sodium cacodylate/HCl buffer of pH 7.2–7.4 at 4°C for 48 h. After washing with distilled water (dH2O) for 20 min, the samples underwent secondary fixation in 1% osmium tetroxide in dH2O for 45 min at room temperature. Samples were... electrophoresis sample buffer (0.125 mol/l Tris HCl pH 6.8, 2% sodium dodecyl sul- phate, 2% ?-2-mercaptoethanol, 10% glycerol), shearing the DNA by repetitive pipetting, boiled for 10 min and stored at –20°C. The protein concentrations of the samples were...

  5. Regulation of Mammary cell Differentiation and Metabolism by Singleminded-2s 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scribner, Kelly C

    2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) has been shown to be a precursor to invasive ductal cancer (IDC). Though the progression of DCIS to IDC is believed to be an important aspect of tumor aggressiveness, prognosis and molecular ...

  6. Restoration of normal phenotype in cancer cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bissell, M.J.; Weaver, V.M.

    1998-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for reversing expression of malignant phenotype in cancer cells is described. The method comprises applying {beta}{sub 1} integrin function-blocking antibody to the cells. The method can be used to assess the progress of cancer therapy. Human breast epithelial cells were shown to be particularly responsive. 14 figs.

  7. Restoration of normal phenotype in cancer cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bissell, Mina J. (Berkeley, CA); Weaver, Valerie M. (Oakland, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for reversing expression of malignant phenotype in cancer cells is described. The method comprises applying .beta..sub.1 integrin function-blocking antibody to the cells. The method can be used to assess the progress of cancer therapy. Human breast epithelial cells were shown to be particularly responsive.

  8. affects host cell: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Figure S1, related to Figure 2. M1T15448 GAS replicate efficiently in the cytosol of epithelial cells replication of GAS. (A)...

  9. Quantitative studies of EGFR autocrine induced cell signaling and migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joslin, Elizabeth Jane

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor autocrine and/or paracrine signaling plays an important role in normal epithelial cell proliferation, survival, adhesion and migration. Aberrant expression of the EGF receptor and its ...

  10. Mechanisms of hormonal regulation of CAD gene expression and inhibition by Aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonist in human breast cancer cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Shaheen Munawar Ali

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    -mediated pathway. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and other aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligands suppress several E2-induced responses in the rodent uterus and mammary tumors and in human breast cancer cells. TCDD inhibited hormone...

  11. Progesterone receptor isoforms PRA and PRB differentially contribute to breast cancer cell migration through interaction with focal adhesion kinase complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 TITLE PAGE Progesterone receptor isoforms PRA and PRB differentially contribute to breast cancer A; PRB, progesterone receptor isoform B; ER, estrogen receptor ; P4, progesterone; R5020 (17 to impact mammary tumorigenesis, however the relative contribution of PRA and PRB isoforms in cancer cell

  12. 10.1101/gr.108217.110Access the most recent version at doi: 2010 20: 1730-1739 originally published online November 2, 2010Genome Res.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Xiaole Shirley

    and neoplastic mammary epithelial cell transcriptomes. We develop data analysis pipelines that allow the mapping is significantly higher than that of normal cells. Our analysis indicates that transcript discovery plateaus at 10. Comparison of SAGE-Seq and traditional SAGE on normal and cancerous breast tissues reveals higher sensitivity

  13. Effect of prolactin on enzymes of lipid biosynthesis in mammary gland explants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waters, S.B.; Rillema, J.A. (Wayne State Univ. School of Medicine, Detroit, MI (USA))

    1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prolactin (PRL) stimulates an increased rate of incorporation of ({sup 14}C)acetate and ({sup 3}H)glucose into lipids in cultured mammary gland explants from 10-to 14-day-pregnant mice. This response is biphasic with an early increase occurring from 6 through 12 h, and an additional increase from 16 to 24 h. Enzymes likely to be rate limiting to this process include acetyl CoA carboxylase, fatty acid synthetase, acetyl CoA synthetase, and/or pyruvate dehydrogenase. Of these enzymes only pyruvate dehydrogenase activity was elevated at 6 h, suggesting that this enzymatic activity is important in stimulating early increases in lipogenesis after PRL treatment. In addition, the PRL stimulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase may also indirectly stimulate acetyl CoA carboxylase through the generation of citrate; this may explain the early (6-12 h) effect of PRL on ({sup 14}C)acetate incorporation. After 16 h of PRL treatment, the activities of all the lipogenic enzymes were enhanced. The second phase of PRLs stimulation of lipogenesis thus likely involves the enhanced activities of more than one of the lipogenic enzymes.

  14. Method for restoration of normal phenotype in cancer cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bissell, Mina J. (Berkeley, CA); Weaver, Valerie M. (Oakland, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for reversing expression of malignant phenotype in cancer cells is described. The method comprises applying .beta..sub.1 integrin function-blocking antibody to the cells. The method can be used to assess the progress of cancer therapy. Human breast epithelial cells were shown to be particularly responsive.

  15. Sensitive Targeted Quantification of ERK Phosphorylation Dynamics and Stoichiometry in Human Cells without Affinity Enrichment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Tujin; Gao, Yuqian; Gaffrey, Matthew J.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Chrisler, William B.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Wu, Chaochao; He, Jintang; Bloodsworth, Kent J.; Zhao, Rui; Camp, David G.; Liu, Tao; Rodland, Karin D.; Smith, Richard D.; Wiley, H. S.; Qian, Weijun

    2014-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Mass spectrometry-based targeted quantification is a promising technology for site-specific quantification of posttranslational modifications (PTMs). However, a major constraint of most targeted MS approaches is the limited sensitivity for quantifying low-abundance PTMs, requiring the use of affinity reagents to enrich specific PTMs. Herein, we demonstrate the direct site-specific quantification of ERK phosphorylation isoforms (pT, pY, pTpY) and their relative stoichiometries using a highly sensitive targeted MS approach termed high-pressure, high-resolution separations with intelligent selection and multiplexing (PRISM). PRISM provides effective enrichment of target peptides within a given fraction from complex biological matrix with minimal sample losses, followed by selected reaction monitoring (SRM) quantification. The PRISM-SRM approach enabled direct quantification of ERK phosphorylation in human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from as little as 25 µg tryptic peptides from whole cell lysates. Compared to immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography, PRISM provided >10-fold improvement in signal intensities, presumably due to the better peptide recovery of PRISM for handling small size samples. This approach was applied to quantify ERK phosphorylation dynamics in HMEC treated by different doses of EGF at both the peak activation (10 min) and steady state (2 h). At 10 min, the maximal ERK activation was observed with 0.3 ng/mL dose, whereas the maximal steady state level of ERK activation at 2 h was at 3 ng/ml dose, corresponding to 1200 and 9000 occupied receptors, respectively. At 10 min, the maximally activated pTpY isoform represented ~40% of total ERK, falling to less than 10% at 2 h. The time course and dose-response profiles of individual phosphorylated ERK isoforms indicated that singly phosphorylated pT-ERK never increases significantly, while the increase of pY-ERK paralleled that of pTpY-ERK. This data supports for a processive, rather than distributed, model of ERK phosphorylation. The PRISM-SRM quantification of protein phosphorylation illustrates the potential for simultaneous quantification of multiple PTMs.

  16. Modulation of P-glycoprotein activity in Calu-3 cells using steroids and ?-ligands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, Karen O.; Yazdanian, Mehran; Audus, Kenneth L.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work was to investigate if P-glycoprotein (Pgp) efflux pump activity could be inhibited in the sub-bronchial epithelial cell line, Calu-3, by glucocorticosteroids and ?-ligands. The Pgp modulation ...

  17. PRECLINICAL STUDY Prolonged mammosphere culture of MCF-7 cells induces an EMT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terasaki, Mark

    mammosphere culture conditions per se induced EMT in the epithelial MCF-7 breast cancer cell line. MCF- 7PRECLINICAL STUDY Prolonged mammosphere culture of MCF-7 cells induces an EMT and repression conditions in serum-supplemented media generated a cell population (called MCF-7M cells), which displays

  18. Interferon-? inhibits gastric carcinogenesis by inducing epithelial cell autophagy and T cell apoptosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tu, Shui Ping

    IFN-? mediates responses to bacterial infection and autoimmune disease, but it is also an important tumor suppressor. It is upregulated in the gastric mucosa by chronic Helicobacter infection; however, whether it plays a ...

  19. A 3-D in vitro co-culture model of mammary gland involution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Jonathan J.; Botos, Laur-Alexandru; Sargeant, Timothy J.; Davidenko, Natalia; Cameron, Ruth E.; Watson, Christine J.

    2014-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    cells were allowed to establish in co-culture supplemented in maintenance media (+EGF 10ng/mL) for a further 3 days prior to lactogenic hormone differentiation with PRL, dexamethasone and insulin, for 2 weeks. At this stage KIM-2 cells formed... phenotype exploits the dependency of differentiated KIM-2 cells for prolactin (PRL) mediated survival signalling. Firstly we confirmed whether KIM-2 organoids regulate Stat3 and Stat5 phosphorylation in the same manner as the native gland, namely...

  20. NON-INVASIVE OPTICAL DETECTION OF EPITHELIAL CANCER USING OBLIQUE INCIDENCE DIFFUSE REFLECTANCE SPECTROSCOPY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia-Uribe, Alejandro

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation describes the design, fabrication and testing of an oblique incidence diffuse reflectance spectrometry (OIDRS) system for in-vivo and noninvasive detection of epithelial cancer. Two probes were fabricated using micromachining...

  1. Biomarkers of lung epithelial injury and inflammation distinguish severe sepsis patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    as: Ware et al. : Biomarkers of lung epithelial injury andN, Ware LB: Biomarkers in acute lung injury–marking forwardMA, May AK, Ware LB: Acute lung injury in patients with

  2. NON-INVASIVE OPTICAL DETECTION OF EPITHELIAL CANCER USING OBLIQUE INCIDENCE DIFFUSE REFLECTANCE SPECTROSCOPY 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia-Uribe, Alejandro

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation describes the design, fabrication and testing of an oblique incidence diffuse reflectance spectrometry (OIDRS) system for in-vivo and noninvasive detection of epithelial cancer. Two probes were fabricated using micromachining...

  3. Myosin VI is required for structural integrity of the apical surface of sensory hair cells in zebrafish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avraham, Karen

    Myosin VI is required for structural integrity of the apical surface of sensory hair cells deafness in humans and deafness in Snell's waltzer mice associated with abnormal fusion of hair cell and epithelial morphogenesis, the role of this protein in the sensory hair cells remains unclear. To investigate

  4. Cell Prolif. 2007, 40, 106124 2007 The Authors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beebe, David J.

    , Madison 53706. Tel.: +608 265 5182; E-mail: Alexander@oncology.wisc.edu #12;Simulating mouse mammary gland

  5. tion. Human or mouse intestinal epithelial cells that express the poly-Ig receptor were

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    . Antibodies specific for Clostrid- ium difficile toxin A and Helicobacter pylori urease have been generated, Glauser M et al (1995) Oral immunization with Helicobacter pylori urease as a treatment against Helicobacter infection. Gas- troenterology (in press) Haneberg B, Kendall D, Amerongen HM, Apter FM

  6. The metabolism of butyrate, glucose and glutamine in colonic epithelial cell lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shipley, Susan Grable

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to delay the onset and advancement of cancer, this research focused on inspecting the utilization, interaction, and fate of metabolic substrates normally obtained either from colonic bacteria, i.e. short chain fatty acids such as butyrate...

  7. Differences in the regulation of Thrombospondin-1 expression between epithelial cells and fibroblasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez, Roberto Karlo

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Induction of angiogenesis is a critical and rate-limiting step in the progression of cancer. It is widely acknowledged that this induction requires the concomitant stimulation of pro-angiogenic and repression of anti-angiogenic ...

  8. Phenotype Clustering of Breast Epithelial Cells in Confocal Images based on Nuclear Protein Distribution Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Fuhui; Peng, Hanchuan; Sudar, Damir; Levievre, Sophie A.; Knowles, David W.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    as shown in Figure 1. GM_S Fuzzy Hier Kmeans Spectral GMFuzzy Hier Kmeans Spectral Finding consensus LBF clusters

  9. The Ets Transcription Factor EHF as a Regulator of Cornea Epithelial Cell Identity*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Denise N.; Klein, Rachel Herndon; Salmans, Michael L.; Gordon, William; Ho, Hsiang; Andersen, Bogi

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    hierarchical clustering, and k-means analyses. Probe setsfor hierarchical clustering and k-means clustering (k = 7).developmental time course. k-Means clustering grouped the

  10. Mesenchymal Nuclear factor I B regulates cell proliferation and epithelial differentiation during lung maturation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gronostajski, Richard M.

    lung maturation Yu-Chih Hsu a , Jason Osinski a , Christine E. Campbell a , E. David Litwack b , Dan 2011 Accepted 6 April 2011 Available online 13 April 2011 Keywords: NFI-B Lung development Mesenchymal is expressed in both lung mesenchyme and epithelium and mice lacking Nfib have severe lung maturation defects

  11. Airway epithelial gene expression in the diagnostic evaluation of smokers with suspect lung cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    Airway epithelial gene expression in the diagnostic evaluation of smokers with suspect lung cancer, Timothy Anderson6, Norman Gerry7, Joseph Keane4, Marc E Lenburg7 & Jerome S Brody1 Lung cancer smokers with suspicion of lung cancer could be used as a lung cancer biomarker. Using a training set (n

  12. Flow induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition, cellular heterogeneity and biomarker modulation in 3D ovarian cancer nodules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirci, Utkan

    Seventy-five percent of patients with epithelial ovarian cancer present with advanced-stage disease that is extensively disseminated intraperitoneally and prognosticates the poorest outcomes. Primarily metastatic within ...

  13. The Rockefeller University Press, 0021-9525/99/12/1481/12 $5.00 The Journal of Cell Biology, Volume 147, Number 7, December 27, 1999 14811492

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, John D.

    - pressed in HEK-293 cells, while AKAP18 is cytosolic. When expressed in epithelial cells,AKAP18 is tar- geted to lateral membranes, whereas AKAP18 is accu- mulated at the apical membrane.A 23-amino acid in, compart- mentalization of PKA in close proximity to specific tar- gets may be crucial for controlling

  14. Evaluation of Common Angling-Induced Sources of Epithelial Damage for Popular Freshwater Sport Fish using Fluorescein

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colotelo, Alison HA; Cooke, Steven J.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Angling is a popular recreational activity across the globe and a large proportion of fish captured by anglers are released due to voluntary or mandatory catch-and-release practices. The handling associated with hook removal and return of the fish to their environment can cause physical damage to the epidermal layer of the fish which may affect the condition and survival of released fish. This study investigated possible sources of epithelial damage associated with several different handling methods (i.e. landing net types, interactions with different boat floor surfaces, tournament procedures) commonly used in recreational angling for two popular freshwater sport fish species, largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) and northern pike (Esox lucius). Epithelial damage was examined using fluorescein, a non-toxic dye, which has been shown to detect latent epithelial damage. Northern pike exhibited extensive epithelial damage after exposure to several of the induced treatments (i.e., interaction with a carpeted surface, knotted nylon net, and line rolling) but relatively little epithelial damage when exposed to others (i.e., knotless rubber nets, smooth boat surfaces, or lip gripping devices). Largemouth bass did not show significant epithelial damage for any of the treatments, with the exception of fish caught in a semi-professional live release tournament. The detection of latent injuries using fluorescein can be an important management tool as it provides visual examples of potential damage that can be caused by different handling methods. Such visualizations can be used to encourage fish friendly angler behaviour and enhance the survival and welfare of released fish. It can also be used to test new products that are intended to or claim to reduce injury to fish that are to be released. Future research should evaluate the relationship between different levels of epithelial damage and mortality across a range of environmental conditions.

  15. Sustained activation of STAT5 is essential for chromatin remodeling and maintenance of mammary-specific function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Ren

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    figures Fig S4 relative ?-casein levels Prl (ug/ml)images of Cy5.5-labeled Prl incubated EpH4 cells. EpH4 cellsgrowth factor receptor; Prl, prolactin; lrECM, laminin-rich

  16. Abstract. Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. Transformation of a normal cell to a malignant one

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abstract. Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. Transformation of a normal regulators of growth. Biomarkers associated with cancer were examined in human breast epithelial cells transformed by high-LET radiation in the presence of 17Ã?-estradiol. An established cancer model was used

  17. Rapid and Sustained Nuclear-Cytoplasmic ERK Oscillations Induced by Epidermal Growth Factor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shankaran, Harish; Ippolito, Danielle L.; Chrisler, William B.; Resat, Haluk; Bollinger, Nikki; Opresko, Lee K.; Wiley, H. S.

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mathematical modeling has predicted that ERK activity should oscillate in response to cell stimulation, but this has never been observed. To explore this inconsistency, we expressed an ERK1-GFP fusion protein in mammary epithelial cells. Following EGF stimulation, we observed rapid and continuous ERK oscillations between the nucleus and cytoplasm with a periodicity of approximately 15 minutes. These oscillations were remarkably persistent (>45 cycles), displayed an asymmetric waveform, and were highly dependent on cell density, essentially disappearing at confluency. We conclude that the ERK pathway is an intrinsic oscillator. Although the functional implications of the observed oscillations are uncertain, this property can be used to continuously monitor ERK activity in single cells.

  18. Low Dose IR Creates an Oncogenic Microenvironment by Inducing Premature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuan, Zhi-Min [Harvard School of Public Health

    2013-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Introduction Much of the work addressing ionizing radiation-induced cellular response has been carried out mainly with the traditional cell culture technique involving only one cell type, how cellular response to IR is influenced by the tissue microenvironment remains elusive. By use of a three-dimensional (3D) co-culture system to model critical interactions of different cell types with their neighbors and with their environment, we recently showed that low-dose IR-induced extracellular signaling via the tissue environment affects profoundly cellular responses. This proposal aims at determining the response of mammary epithelial cells in a tissue-like setting.

  19. Autocrine TGF-beta and stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) signaling drives the evolution of tumor-promoting mammary stromal myofibroblasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kojima, Yasushi

    Much interest is currently focused on the emerging role of tumor-stroma interactions essential for supporting tumor progression. Carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), frequently present in the stroma of human breast ...

  20. PI3K, Erk Signaling in BMP7-Induced Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) of PC-3 Prostate Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chuong, Cheng-Ming

    PI3K, Erk Signaling in BMP7-Induced Epithelial- Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) of PC-3 Prostate kinase and Erk were found to suppress BMP-induced morphological changes both in 2D and 3D conditions. These results suggest that, besides the Smad signaling pathways, BMP-induced activation of PI3K and Erk

  1. Chronic cadmium exposure in vitro induces cancer cell characteristics in human lung cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Person, Rachel J.; Tokar, Erik J.; Xu, Yuanyuan; Orihuela, Ruben; Ngalame, Ntube N. Olive; Waalkes, Michael P., E-mail: waalkes@niehs.nih.gov

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cadmium is a known human lung carcinogen. Here, we attempt to develop an in vitro model of cadmium-induced human lung carcinogenesis by chronically exposing the peripheral lung epithelia cell line, HPL-1D, to a low level of cadmium. Cells were chronically exposed to 5 ?M cadmium, a noncytotoxic level, and monitored for acquired cancer characteristics. By 20 weeks of continuous cadmium exposure, these chronic cadmium treated lung (CCT-LC) cells showed marked increases in secreted MMP-2 activity (3.5-fold), invasion (3.4-fold), and colony formation in soft agar (2-fold). CCT-LC cells were hyperproliferative, grew well in serum-free media, and overexpressed cyclin D1. The CCT-LC cells also showed decreased expression of the tumor suppressor genes p16 and SLC38A3 at the protein levels. Also consistent with an acquired cancer cell phenotype, CCT-LC cells showed increased expression of the oncoproteins K-RAS and N-RAS as well as the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition marker protein Vimentin. Metallothionein (MT) expression is increased by cadmium, and is typically overexpressed in human lung cancers. The major MT isoforms, MT-1A and MT-2A were elevated in CCT-LC cells. Oxidant adaptive response genes HO-1 and HIF-1A were also activated in CCT-LC cells. Expression of the metal transport genes ZNT-1, ZNT-5, and ZIP-8 increased in CCT-LC cells culminating in reduced cadmium accumulation, suggesting adaptation to the metal. Overall, these data suggest that exposure of human lung epithelial cells to cadmium causes acquisition of cancer cell characteristics. Furthermore, transformation occurs despite the cell's ability to adapt to chronic cadmium exposure. - Highlights: • Chronic cadmium exposure induces cancer cell characteristics in human lung cells. • This provides an in vitro model of cadmium-induced human lung cell transformation. • This occurred with general and lung specific changes typical for cancer cells. • These findings add insight to the relationship between cadmium and lung cancer.

  2. The epithelial-mesenchymal transition induced by keratinocyte growth conditions is overcome by E6 and E7 from HPV16, but not HPV8 and HPV38: Characterization of global transcription profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azzimonti, Barbara; Dell'Oste, Valentina; Borgogna, Cinzia; Mondini, Michele [Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical School of Novara, via Solaroli 17, 28100 Novara (Italy); Gugliesi, Francesca [Department of Public Health and Microbiology, Medical School of Turin, via Santena 9, 10126 Torino (Italy); De Andrea, Marco [Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical School of Novara, via Solaroli 17, 28100 Novara (Italy); Department of Public Health and Microbiology, Medical School of Turin, via Santena 9, 10126 Torino (Italy); Chiorino, Giovanna; Scatolini, Maria; Ghimenti, Chiara [Cancer Genomics Lab Fondo Edo Tempia, via Malta 3, 13900 Biella (Italy); Landolfo, Santo [Department of Public Health and Microbiology, Medical School of Turin, via Santena 9, 10126 Torino (Italy); Gariglio, Marisa, E-mail: gariglio@med.unipmn.i [Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical School of Novara, via Solaroli 17, 28100 Novara (Italy)

    2009-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the growth properties of primary human keratinocytes expressing E6 and E7 proteins, which are from either the beta- or alpha-genotypes, under different culture conditions. We demonstrated that keratinocytes expressing E6 and E7, from both HPV8 and 38, irreversibly underwent the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) when grown on plastic with FAD medium (F12/DMEM/5%FBS). Expression of E6/E7 from HPV16 was capable of fully overcoming the FAD-induced EMT. Immortalization was only observed in HPV16-transduced cell lines, while the more proliferating phenotype of both KerHPV8 and 38 was mainly related to FAD-induced EMT. Microarray analysis of exponentially growing cells identified 146 cellular genes that were differentially regulated in HPV16 compared to HPV8- and 38-transduced cells. A large accumulation of transcripts associated with epidermal development and differentiation was observed in HPV16-transduced cells, whereas transcripts of genes involved in the extracellular matrix, multicellular organismal processes, and inflammatory response were affected in HPV8 and 38-transduced cells.

  3. Evidence for a positive role of PtdIns5P in T cell signal transduction pathways. Geoffrey Guittard a,b,c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    lymphomas (ALCLs) [6]. In blood platelets, thrombin stimulation can also increase PtdIns5P production [7 messenger [2-3]. Indeed, enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation induced by pervanadate treatment reveals detectable cellular PtdIns5P levels in epithelial cells [4]. Moreover, stimulation of some receptor tyrosine

  4. Long-term Survival Outcomes Following Internal Mammary Node Irradiation in Stage II-III Breast Cancer: Results of a Large Retrospective Study With 12-Year Follow-up

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Jee Suk [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Won [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Bae; Lee, Ik Jae; Keum, Ki Chang; Lee, Chang Geol [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Doo Ho [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Chang-Ok, E-mail: cosuh317@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Huh, Seung Jae, E-mail: sjhuh@smc.samsung.co.kr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To examine the effect of internal mammary node irradiation (IMNI) on disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) in breast cancer patients treated with modified radical mastectomy and postoperative radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1994 and 2002, 396 patients with stage II-III breast cancer were treated with postmastectomy radiation therapy with (n=197) or without (n=199) IMNI. Patients who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy were excluded. IMNI was administered at the clinical discretion of the treating physician. Median RT dose was 50.4 Gy (range, 45.0-59.4 Gy) in 28 fractions, with inclusion of the supraclavicular fossa in 96% of patients. Adjuvant chemotherapy was administered to 99.7% of the patients and endocrine therapy to 53%. Results: The median follow-up was 149 months (range, 124-202). IMNI patients had more advanced nodal stage and non-high grade tumors than those without IMNI (P<.001). Otherwise, disease and treatment characteristics were well balanced. The 10-year DFS with and without IMNI was 65% and 57%, respectively (P=.05). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that IMNI was an independent, positive predictor of DFS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.70; P=.02). Benefits of IMNI in DFS were seen most apparently in N2 patients (HR, 0.44; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.26-0.74) and inner/central tumors (HR, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.34-0.90). The 10-year OS with and without IMNI was 72% and 66%, respectively (P=.62). The 10-year DFS and OS were 61%, and 69%, respectively. Conclusions: Internal mammary node irradiation significantly improved DFS in postmastectomy breast cancer patients. Pending long-term results from randomized trials, treatment of internal mammary nodes should be considered in postmastectomy radiation therapy.

  5. Copyright @ 200 by the Shock Society. Unauthorized reproduction of this article is prohibited.8 TRANSCRIPTIONAL PROFILES OF HUMAN EPITHELIAL CELLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stormo, Gary

    into the regulatory pathways that control gene expression in response to stress and potentially identify novel heat involved during the stress response. KEYWORDS--Heat shock, heat shock proteins, stress response, hep2, gene The heat shock, or stress, response was discovered in 1962 with the description of a set of genes whose

  6. Purinergic receptors responsible for ATP-dependent ROS production and activation of inflammasomes in gingival epithelial cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, Marcus

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and G. Dahl, Probenecid, a gout remedy, inhibits pannexin-1Martinon F et al. (2006) Gout-associated uric acid crystalsincluding type I diabetes, gout, and many autoinflammatory

  7. Micropatterned co-cultures of T-lymphocytes and epithelial cells as a model of mucosal immune system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Revzin, Alexander

    for Biotechnology of the Republic of Kazakhstan, Astana 010000, Kazakhstan a r t i c l e i n f o Article history

  8. The chitinase-like protein YKL-40 increases mucin5AC production in human bronchial epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Chunyi; Li, Qi [Division of Respiratory Medicine, Second Affiliated Hospital, Chongqing Medical University, No. 74, Linjiang Road, Yuzhong District, Chongqing 400010 (China); Zhou, Xiangdong, E-mail: zxd999@263.net [Division of Respiratory Medicine, Second Affiliated Hospital, Chongqing Medical University, No. 74, Linjiang Road, Yuzhong District, Chongqing 400010 (China); Kolosov, Victor P.; Perelman, Juliy M. [Far Eastern Scientific Center of Physiology and Pathology of Respiration, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Blagoveshchensk (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mucus overproduction is an important feature in patients with chronic inflammatory airway diseases. However, the regulatory mechanisms that mediate excessive mucin production remain elusive. Recently, the level of YKL-40, a chitinase-like protein, has been found to be significantly increased in chronic inflammatory airway diseases and has been shown to be associated with the severity of these diseases. In this study, we sought to explore the effect of YKL-40 on mucin5AC (MUC5AC) production in chronic inflammatory airway diseases and the potential signaling pathways involved in this process. We found that elevated YKL-40 levels increased the mRNA and protein expression of MUC5AC in a dose- and time-dependent manner, in association with the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and nuclear factor ?B (NF-?B), reflecting their activation. These responses were significantly suppressed by the knockdown of protease-activating receptor 2 (PAR2) with specific small interfering RNA or the inhibitors of ERK and NF-?B. YKL-40-induced MUC5AC overproduction was also effectively attenuated by the inhibitor of focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Taken together, these results imply that YKL-40 can stimulate excessive MUC5AC production through PAR2- and FAK-mediated mechanisms. - Highlights: • MUC5AC is the major secreted mucin in chronic inflammatory airway diseases. • YKL-40 is a prototype of the chitinase-like protein in mammals. • YKL-40 is an active player in chronic inflammatory airway diseases. • YKL-40 can increase MUC5AC production via PAR2-mediated pathway. • FAK is another candidate to mediate YKL-40-induced MUC5AC overexpression.

  9. TGFb-Dependent Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition Is Required to Generate Cardiospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and CSp-derived cells grown in a monolayer. EMT and CSps formation is enhanced in the presence, indicating that TGFb-dependent EMT is essential for the formation of these niche-like 3D in vitro a niche-like microtissue [5]. CSp-de- rived cells (CDCs) can be expanded in monolayers [6

  10. Regulation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition and DNA damage responses by singleminded-2s

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laffin, Brian Edward

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    and progression in breast cancer, we depleted SIM2 RNA in MCF-7 cells using a retroviral shRNA system and examined gene expression and functional abilities of the SIM2-depleted MCF-7 cells (SIM2i) relative to a control MCF line expressing a non-specific “scrambled...

  11. Response to fission neutron irradiation of spermatogonial stem cells in different stages of the cycle of the siminiferous epithelium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Beek, M.E.A.B.; Davids, J.A.G.; van de Kant, H.J.G.; Rooij, D.G.

    1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mice were irradiated with 1 Gy of fission neutrons. At intervals up to 15 days after irradiation undifferentiated spermatogonia were counted in whole mounts of seminiferous tubules in up to eight stages of the epithelial cycle. From Day 6 onward lower numbers of spermatogonia were found in the area which were in stages IV-VII during irradiation than in those which were in stages IX-II. Minimal numbers in the former area were two to six times lower than those in the latter one. Areas whch were in stage III or VIII gave intermediate values. It is concluded that the epithelial cycle can be divided into two parts with a different response to irradiation, that begin or end in stages III and VIII. Part III-VIII and part VIII-III comprise 45 and 55% of the epithelial cycle, respectively. In part VIII-III control levels were found again at Day 15, while in part III-VIII spermatogonial numbers were still very low. In controls it was found that part VIII-III corresponds to a period of high proliferative activity of the stem cells, while in part III-VIII the proliferative activity is very low. This may affect their radiosensitivity and/or their proliferative behavior after irradiation, resulting in different spermatogonial numbers in the two parts of the epithelial cycle.

  12. Fuel Cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fuel Cells Converting chemical energy of hydrogenated fuels into electricity Project Description Invented in 1839, fuels cells powered the Gemini and Apollo space missions, as well...

  13. Differential effects on cell motility, embryonic stem cell self-renewal and senescence by diverse Src kinase family inhibitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tamm, Christoffer, E-mail: christoffer.tamm@imbim.uu.se; Galito, Sara Pijuan, E-mail: sara.pijuan@imbim.uu.se; Anneren, Cecilia, E-mail: cecilia.anneren@imbim.uu.se

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Src family of non-receptor tyrosine kinases (SFKs) has been shown to play an intricate role in embryonic stem (ES) cell maintenance. In the present study we have focused on the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for the vastly different effects induced by various commonly used SFK inhibitors. We show that several diverse cell types, including fibroblasts completely lacking SFKs, cannot undergo mitosis in response to SU6656 and that this is caused by an unselective inhibition of Aurora kinases. In contrast, PP2 and PD173952 block motility immediately upon exposure and forces cells to grow in dense colonies. The subsequent halt in proliferation of fibroblast and epithelial cells in the center of the colonies approximately 24 h post-treatment appears to be caused by cell-to-cell contact inhibition rather than a direct effect of SFK kinase inhibition. Interestingly, in addition to generating more homogenous and dense ES cell cultures, without any diverse effect on proliferation, PP2 and PD173652 also promote ES cell self-renewal by reducing the small amount of spontaneous differentiation typically observed under standard ES cell culture conditions. These effects could not be mirrored by the use of Gleevec, a potent inhibitor of c-Abl and PDGFR kinases that are also inhibited by PP2. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SFK inhibitor SU6656 induces senescence in mouse ES cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SU6656 inhibits mitosis in a SFK-independent manner via cross-selectivity for Aurora kinases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SFK inhibitor PP2 impairs cell motility in various cell lines, including mouse ES cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ensuing impeded motility, PP2 inhibits proliferation of various cells lines except for mouse ES cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SFK inhibitors PP2 and PD173952 impede spontaneous differentiation in standard mouse ES culture maintenance.

  14. Cell Stem Cell Clinical Progress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zandstra, Peter W.

    Cell Stem Cell Clinical Progress Rapid Expansion of Human Hematopoietic Stem Cells by Automated of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5G 1L7, Canada 6McEwen Centre for Regenerative Medicine, University Health Network

  15. Id-1 and Id-2 genes and products as markers of epithelial cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desprez, Pierre-Yves (El Cerrito, CA); Campisi, Judith (Berkeley, CA)

    2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for detection and prognosis of breast cancer and other types of cancer. The method comprises detecting expression, if any, for both an Id-1 and an Id-2 genes, or the ratio thereof, of gene products in samples of breast tissue obtained from a patient. When expressed, Id-1 gene is a prognostic indicator that breast cancer cells are invasive and metastatic, whereas Id-2 gene is a prognostic indicator that breast cancer cells are localized and noninvasive in the breast tissue.

  16. Id-1 and Id-2 genes and products as markers of epithelial cancer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Desprez, Pierre-Yves (El Cerrito, CA); Campisi, Judith (Berkeley, CA)

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for detection and prognosis of breast cancer and other types of cancer. The method comprises detecting expression, if any, for both an Id-1 and an Id-2 genes, or the ratio thereof, of gene products in samples of breast tissue obtained from a patient. When expressed, Id-1 gene is a prognostic indicator that breast cancer cells are invasive and metastatic, whereas Id-2 gene is a prognostic indicator that breast cancer cells are localized and noninvasive in the breast tissue.

  17. Digitoxin and a synthetic monosaccharide analog inhibit cell viability in lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elbaz, Hosam A. [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)] [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Stueckle, Todd A. [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States) [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV26506 (United States); Wang, Hua-Yu Leo; O'Doherty, George A. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Lowry, David T.; Sargent, Linda M.; Wang, Liying [National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV26506 (United States)] [National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV26506 (United States); Dinu, Cerasela Zoica, E-mail: cerasela-zoica.dinu@mail.wvu.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Rojanasakul, Yon, E-mail: yrojan@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)] [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mechanisms of digitoxin-inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis in human non-small cell lung cancer (NCI-H460) cells remain unclear. Understanding how digitoxin or derivate analogs induce their cytotoxic effect below therapeutically relevant concentrations will help in designing and developing novel, safer and more effective anti-cancer drugs. In this study, NCI-H460 cells were treated with digitoxin and a synthetic analog D6-MA to determine their anti-cancer activity. Different concentrations of digitoxin and D6-MA were used and the subsequent changes in cell morphology, viability, cell cycle, and protein expressions were determined. Digitoxin and D6-MA induced dose-dependent apoptotic morphologic changes in NCI-H460 cells via caspase-9 cleavage, with D6-MA possessing 5-fold greater potency than digitoxin. In comparison, non-tumorigenic immortalized bronchial and small airway epithelial cells displayed significantly less apoptotic sensitivity compared to NCI-H460 cells suggesting that both digitoxin and D6-MA were selective for NSCLC. Furthermore, NCI-H460 cells arrested in G(2)/M phase following digitoxin and D6-MA treatment. Post-treatment evaluation of key G2/M checkpoint regulatory proteins identified down-regulation of cyclin B1/cdc2 complex and survivin. Additionally, Chk1/2 and p53 related proteins experienced down-regulation suggesting a p53-independent cell cycle arrest mechanism. In summary, digitoxin and D6-MA exert anti-cancer effects on NCI-H460 cells through apoptosis or cell cycle arrest, with D6-MA showing at least 5-fold greater potency relative to digitoxin. -- Highlights: ? Digitoxin and synthetic analog D6-MA induced apoptotic morphologic changes in NCI-H460 cells in a dose-dependent manner. ? Apoptotic cell death induced by analog was 5-fold more potent when compared to digitoxin. ? NCI-H460 cells arrested in G(2)/M phase following digitoxin (? 5 nM) and analog (? 1 nM) treatment. ? Digitoxin inhibited the expression of cyclin B1/cdc2 complex and survivin at sub-therapeutic concentrations. ? D6-MA was 4-fold more potent than digitoxin.

  18. Context dependent reversion of tumor phenotype by connexin-43 expression in MDA-MB231 cells and MCF-7 cells: Role of ?-catenin/connexin43 association

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talhouk, Rabih S., E-mail: rtalhouk@aub.edu.lb [Department of Biology, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, American University of Beirut, P.O. Box 11-0236, Beirut (Lebanon); Fares, Mohamed-Bilal; Rahme, Gilbert J.; Hariri, Hanaa H.; Rayess, Tina; Dbouk, Hashem A.; Bazzoun, Dana; Al-Labban, Dania [Department of Biology, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, American University of Beirut, P.O. Box 11-0236, Beirut (Lebanon); El-Sabban, Marwan E., E-mail: me00@aub.edu.lb [Department of Anatomy, Cell Biology and Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, American University of Beirut, P.O. Box 11-0236, Beirut (Lebanon)

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Connexins (Cx), gap junction (GJ) proteins, are regarded as tumor suppressors, and Cx43 expression is often down regulated in breast tumors. We assessed the effect of Cx43 over-expression in 2D and 3D cultures of two breast adenocarcinoma cell lines: MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231. While Cx43 over-expression decreased proliferation of 2D and 3D cultures of MCF-7 by 56% and 80% respectively, MDA-MB-231 growth was not altered in 2D cultures, but exhibited 35% reduction in 3D cultures. C-terminus truncated Cx43 did not alter proliferation. Untransfected MCF-7 cells formed spherical aggregates in 3D cultures, and MDA-MB-231 cells formed stellar aggregates. However, MCF-7 cells over-expressing Cx43 formed smaller sized clusters and Cx43 expressing MDA-MB-231 cells lost their stellar morphology. Extravasation ability of both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells was reduced by 60% and 30% respectively. On the other hand, silencing Cx43 in MCF10A cells, nonneoplastic human mammary cell line, increased proliferation in both 2D and 3D cultures, and disrupted acinar morphology. Although Cx43 over-expression did not affect total levels of ?-catenin, ?-catenin and ZO-2, it decreased nuclear levels of ?-catenin in 2D and 3D cultures of MCF-7 cells, and in 3D cultures of MDA-MB-231 cells. Cx43 associated at the membrane with ?-catenin, ?-catenin and ZO-2 in 2D and 3D cultures of MCF-7 cells, and only in 3D conditions in MDA-MB-231 cells. This study suggests that Cx43 exerts tumor suppressive effects in a context-dependent manner where GJ assembly with ?-catenin, ?-catenin and ZO-2 may be implicated in reducing growth rate, invasiveness, and, malignant phenotype of 2D and 3D cultures of MCF-7 cells, and 3D cultures of MDA-MB-231 cells, by sequestering ?-catenin away from nucleus. - Highlights: • Cx43 over-expressing MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 were grown in 2D and 3D cultures. • Proliferation and growth morphology were affected in a context dependent manner. • Extravasation ability of both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells was reduced. • Cx43-mediated gap junction complex assembly correlated with observed changes. • We propose that membranous Cx43 sequesters ?-catenin away from the nucleus.

  19. Wnt interaction and extracellular release of prominin-1/CD133 in human malignant melanoma cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rappa, Germana [Cancer Research Program, Roseman University of Health Sciences, 10530 Discovery Drive. Las Vegas, NV 89135 (United States); College of Pharmacy, Roseman University of Health Sciences, Henderson, NV 89104 (United States); Mercapide, Javier; Anzanello, Fabio [Cancer Research Program, Roseman University of Health Sciences, 10530 Discovery Drive. Las Vegas, NV 89135 (United States); Le, Thuc T. [Nevada Cancer Institute, Las Vegas, NV 89135 (United States); Johlfs, Mary G. [Cancer Research Program, Roseman University of Health Sciences, 10530 Discovery Drive. Las Vegas, NV 89135 (United States); Center for Diabetes and Obesity Prevention, Treatment, Research and Education, Roseman University of Health Sciences, Henderson, NV 89104 (United States); Fiscus, Ronald R. [Cancer Research Program, Roseman University of Health Sciences, 10530 Discovery Drive. Las Vegas, NV 89135 (United States); College of Pharmacy, Roseman University of Health Sciences, Henderson, NV 89104 (United States); Center for Diabetes and Obesity Prevention, Treatment, Research and Education, Roseman University of Health Sciences, Henderson, NV 89104 (United States); Wilsch-Bräuninger, Michaela [Max-Planck-Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Pfotenhauerstr. 108, 01307 Dresden (Germany); Corbeil, Denis [Tissue Engineering Laboratories (BIOTEC) and DFG Research Center and Cluster of Excellence for Regenerative Therapies Dresden (CRTD), Technische Universität Dresden, Tatzberg 47–49, 01307 Dresden, Germany Technische Universitat Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Lorico, Aurelio, E-mail: alorico@roseman.edu [Cancer Research Program, Roseman University of Health Sciences, 10530 Discovery Drive. Las Vegas, NV 89135 (United States); College of Pharmacy, Roseman University of Health Sciences, Henderson, NV 89104 (United States)

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prominin-1 (CD133) is the first identified gene of a novel class of pentaspan membrane glycoproteins. It is expressed by various epithelial and non-epithelial cells, and notably by stem and cancer stem cells. In non-cancerous cells such as neuro-epithelial and hematopoietic stem cells, prominin-1 is selectively concentrated in plasma membrane protrusions, and released into the extracellular milieu in association with small vesicles. Previously, we demonstrated that prominin-1 contributes to melanoma cells pro-metastatic properties and suggested that it may constitute a molecular target to prevent prominin-1-expressing melanomas from colonizing and growing in lymph nodes and distant organs. Here, we report that three distinct pools of prominin-1 co-exist in cultures of human FEMX-I metastatic melanoma. Morphologically, in addition to the plasma membrane localization, prominin-1 is found within the intracellular compartments, (e.g., Golgi apparatus) and in association with extracellular membrane vesicles. The latter prominin-1–positive structures appeared in three sizes (small, ?40 nm; intermediates ?40–80 nm, and large, >80 nm). Functionally, the down-regulation of prominin-1 in FEMX-I cells resulted in a significant reduction of number of lipid droplets as observed by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering image analysis and Oil red O staining, and surprisingly in a decrease in the nuclear localization of beta-catenin, a surrogate marker of Wnt activation. Moreover, the T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor (TCF/LEF) promoter activity was 2 to 4 times higher in parental than in prominin-1-knockdown cells. Collectively, our results point to Wnt signaling and/or release of prominin-1–containing membrane vesicles as mediators of the pro-metastatic activity of prominin-1 in FEMX-I melanoma. - Highlights: ? First report of release of prominin-1–containing microvesicles from cancer cells. ? Pro-metastatic role of prominin-1–containing microvesicles in FEMX-I melanoma. ? Down-regulation of prominin-1 results in decreased nuclear localization of ?-catenin. ? Wnt signaling as mediator of the pro-metastatic activity of prominin-1.

  20. Fuel Cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the major national security imperatives of this century. Get Expertise Rod Borup MPA-11, Fuel Cell Program Manager Email Andrew Dattelbaum MPA-11 Group Leader Email Melissa Fox...

  1. Variation in the sensitivity of the mouse spermatogonial stem cell population to fission neutron irradiation during the cycle of the seminiferous epithelium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Beek, M.E.; Davids, J.A.; de Rooij, D.G.

    1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dose-response studies of the radiosensitivity of spermatogonial stem cells in various epithelial stages after irradiation with graded doses of fission neutrons of 1 MeV mean energy were carried out in the Cpb-N mouse. These studies on the stem cell population in stages IX-XI yielded simple exponential lines characterized by an average D0 value of 0.76 +/- 0.02 Gy. In the subsequent epithelial stages XII-III, a significantly lower D0 value of 0.55 +/- 0.02 Gy was found. In contrast to the curves obtained for stem cells in stages IX-III, the curves obtained in stages IV-VIII indicated the presence of a mixture of radioresistant and radiosensitive stem cells. In stage VII, almost no radioresistant stem cells appeared to be present and a D0 value for the radiosensitive stem cells of 0.22 +/- 0.01 Gy was derived. Previously, data were obtained on the size of colonies (in number of spermatogonia) derived from surviving stem cells. Combining these data with data from the newly obtained dose-response curves yielded the number of stem cells, per stage and with the specific radiosensitivities, present in the control epithelium. In stages IX-XI, there are approximately 6 stem cells per 1000 Sertoli cells with a radiosensitivity characterized by a D0 of 0.76 Gy, which corresponds to one-third of the As population in these stages. (The As spermatogonia are presumed to be the stem cells of spermatogenesis.) IN stages XII-III, there are approximately 12 stem cells per 1000 Sertoli cells with a radiosensitivity characterized by a D0 of 0.55 Gy, which roughly equals the number of A single spermatogonia in these stages. These calculations could not be made for stages IV-VIII since no simple exponential lines were obtained for these stages.

  2. An acoustically-driven biochip - Impact of flow on the cell-association of targeted drug carriers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fillafer, Christian; Neumann, Jürgen; Guttenberg, Zeno; Dissauer, Silke; Lichtscheidl, Irene; Wirth, Michael; Gabor, Franz; Schneider, Matthias; 10.1039/B906006E

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The interaction of targeted drug carriers with epithelial and endothelial barriers in vivo is largely determined by the dynamics of the body fluids. To simulate these conditions in binding assays, a fully biocompatible in vitro model was developed which can accurately mimic a wide range of physiological flow conditions on a thumbnail-format cell-chip. This acoustically-driven microfluidic system was used to study the interaction characteristics of protein-coated particles with cells. Poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microparticles (2.86 {\\pm} 0.95 {\\mu}m) were conjugated with wheat germ agglutinin (WGA-MP, cytoadhesive protein) or bovine serum albumin (BSA-MP, nonspecific protein) and their binding to epithelial cell monolayers was investigated under stationary and flow conditions. While mean numbers of 1500 {\\pm} 307 mm-2 WGA-MP and 94 {\\pm} 64 mm-2 BSA-MP respectively were detected to be cell-bound in the stationary setup, incubation at increasing flow velocities increasingly antagonized the attachment...

  3. Regional Differences in Stem and Transit Cell Proliferation and Apoptosis in the Terminal Ileum and Colon of Mice After 12 Gy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gandara, Ricardo M.C. [Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, Queens Medical Centre, University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Mahida, Yashwant R., E-mail: yash.mahida@nottingham.ac.uk [Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, Queens Medical Centre, University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Potten, Christopher S. [Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, Queens Medical Centre, University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The intestinal epithelium has a high rate of cell turnover, which is regulated by stem cells located near the base of crypts. We aimed to investigate stem cell-dependent characteristics of cell proliferation, apoptosis, and crypt size in terminal ileum and different regions of the colon. Methods and Materials: Mice were studied under steady-state conditions and after radiation-induced stem cell apoptosis. Percentage of proliferating or apoptotic cells at a particular cell position (cp) along the crypt axis was expressed as labeling or apoptotic index. Results: Under steady-state conditions: crypt size was smallest in the ascending colon. In contrast to other regions of the colon, the distribution profile of proliferating cells in ascending colon showed some similarity to that in the terminal ileum. Postirradiation: apoptotic cells were prominent at the bottom of the crypt of mid- and descending colon but in the ascending colon, they were seen with similar frequency from cp 1 to 4. During regeneration, a constant proliferative capacity was seen above Paneth cells in the terminal ileum. In the ascending (but not mid- or descending) colon, the profile of proliferating cells over the first 4 days after irradiation showed a similarity to that in the terminal ileum. Conclusions: Profiles of proliferating epithelial cells (under steady-state conditions and postirradiation) and apoptotic cells (postirradiation) suggest similarities in the location of stem cells in the ascending colon and terminal ileum.

  4. Electrochemical cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Redey, Laszlo I. (Downers Grove, IL); Vissers, Donald R. (Naperville, IL); Prakash, Jai (Downers Grove, IL)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrochemical cell having a bimodal positive electrode, a negative electrode of an alkali metal, and a compatible electrolyte including an alkali metal salt molten at the cell operating temperature. The positive electrode has an electrochemically active layer of at least one transition metal chloride at least partially present as a charging product, and additives of bromide and/or iodide and sulfur in the positive electrode or the electrolyte. Electrode volumetric capacity is in excess of 400 Ah/cm.sup.3 ; the cell can be 90% recharged in three hours and can operate at temperatures below 160.degree. C. There is also disclosed a method of reducing the operating temperature and improving the overall volumetric capacity of an electrochemical cell and for producing a positive electrode having a BET area greater than 6.times.10.sup.4 cm.sup.2 /g of Ni.

  5. Electrochemical cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Redey, Laszlo I. (6851 Carpenter St., Downers Grove, IL 60516); Vissers, Donald R. (611 Clover Ct., Naperville, IL 60540); Prakash, Jai (2205 Arbor Cir. 8, Downers Grove, IL 60515)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrochemical cell having a bimodal positive electrode, a negative electrode of an alkali metal, and a compatible electrolyte including an alkali metal salt molten at the cell operating temperature. The positive electrode has an electrochemically active layer of at least one transition metal chloride at least partially present as a charging product, and additives of bromide and/or iodide and sulfur in the positive electrode or the electrolyte. Electrode volumetric capacity is in excess of 400 Ah/cm.sup.3 ; the cell can be 90% recharged in three hours and can operate at temperatures below 160.degree. C. There is also disclosed a method of reducing the operating temperature and improving the overall volumetric capacity of an electrochemical cell and for producing a positive electrode having a BET area greater than 6.times.10.sup.4 cm.sup.2 /g of Ni.

  6. Electrochemical cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Redey, L.I.; Vissers, D.R.; Prakash, J.

    1996-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrochemical cell is described having a bimodal positive electrode, a negative electrode of an alkali metal, and a compatible electrolyte including an alkali metal salt molten at the cell operating temperature. The positive electrode has an electrochemically active layer of at least one transition metal chloride at least partially present as a charging product, and additives of bromide and/or iodide and sulfur in the positive electrode or the electrolyte. Electrode volumetric capacity is in excess of 400 Ah/cm{sup 3}; the cell can be 90% recharged in three hours and can operate at temperatures below 160 C. There is also disclosed a method of reducing the operating temperature and improving the overall volumetric capacity of an electrochemical cell and for producing a positive electrode having a BET area greater than 6{times}10{sup 4}cm{sup 2}/g of Ni. 6 figs.

  7. Electrochemical cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Redey, L.I.; Vissers, D.R.; Prakash, J.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrochemical cell is described having a bimodal positive electrode, a negative electrode of an alkali metal, and a compatible electrolyte including an alkali metal salt molten at the cell operating temperature. The positive electrode has an electrochemically active layer of at least one transition metal chloride at least partially present as a charging product, and additives of bromide and/or iodide and sulfur in the positive electrode or the electrolyte. Electrode volumetric capacity is in excess of 400 Ah/cm[sup 3]; the cell can be 90% recharged in three hours and can operate at temperatures below 160 C. There is also disclosed a method of reducing the operating temperature and improving the overall volumetric capacity of an electrochemical cell and for producing a positive electrode having a BET area greater than 6[times]10[sup 4] cm[sup 2]/g of Ni. 8 figures.

  8. Cell Stem Cell The Systematic Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zandstra, Peter W.

    Cell Stem Cell Review The Systematic Production of Cells for Cell Therapies Daniel C. Kirouac1 to guide the development of next-generation technologies capable of producing cell-based products in a safe will enhance cell therapy product quality and safety, expediting clinical development. Breakthroughs

  9. Micro Fuel Cells Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Micro Fuel Cells TM Direct Methanol Fuel Cells for Portable Power A Fuel Cell System Developer-17, 2002 Phoenix, Arizona #12;Micro Fuel Cells Direct Methanol Fuel Cells for Portable Power Outline (1 Energy Content (Wh) Volume(cm^3) Li-Ion Battery DMFC #12;Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Technology

  10. Ectopic ERK Expression Induces Phenotypic Conversion of C10 Cells and Alters DNA Methyltransferase Expression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sontag, Ryan L.; Weber, Thomas J.

    2012-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In some model systems constitutive extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) activation is sufficient to promote an oncogenic phenotype. Here we investigate whether constitutive ERK expression influences phenotypic conversion in murine C10 type II alveolar epithelial cells. C10 cells were stably transduced with an ERK1-green fluorescent protein (ERK1-GFP) chimera or empty vector and ectopic ERK expression was associated with the acquisition of soft agar focus-forming potential in late passage, but not early passage cells. Late passage ERK1-GFP cells exhibited a significant increase in the expression of DNA methyl transferases (DNMT1 and 3b) and a marked increase in sensitivity to 5-azacytidine (5-azaC)-mediated toxicity, relative to early passage ERK1-GFP cells and vector controls. The expression of xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A (XPA) and DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) were significantly increased in late passage cells, suggesting enhanced DNA damage recognition and repair activity which we interpret as a reflection of genomic instability. Phospho-ERK levels were dramatically decreased in late passage ERK1-GFP cells, relative to early passage and vector controls, and phospho-ERK levels were restored by treatment with sodium orthovanadate, indicating a role for phosphatase activity in this response. Collectively these observations suggest that ectopic ERK expression promotes phenotypic conversion of C10 cells that is associated with latent effects on epigenetic programming and phosphatase activities.

  11. Nonrandom distribution of mouse spermatogonial stem cells surviving fission neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Beek, M.E.; Davids, J.A.; de Rooij, D.G.

    1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Colony formation by surviving spermatogonial stem cells was investigated by mapping pieces of whole mounted tubuli at intervals of 6 and 10 days after doses of 0.75 and 1.50 Gy of fission neutron irradiation. Colony sizes, expressed in numbers of spermatogonia per colony, varied greatly. The mean colony size found in different animals was relatively constant. The mitotic indices in large and small colonies and in colonies in different epithelial stages did not differ significantly. Size differences in these spermatogenic colonies are not caused by differences in growth rate. Surviving stem cells start to form colonies at variable times after irradiation. The number of colonies per unit area varied with the epithelial stages. Many more colonies were found in areas that during irradiation were in stages IX-III (IX-IIIirr) than in those that were in stages IV-VII (IV-VIIirr). After a dose of 1.50 Gy, 90% of all colonies were found in areas IX-IIIirr. In conclusion, the previously found difference in repopulation after irradiation between areas VIII-IIIirr and III-VIIIirr can be explained not by differences in colony sizes and/or growth rates of the colonies in these areas but by a difference in the number of surviving stem cells in both areas. In area XII-IIIirr three times more colonies were found after a dose of 0.75 Gy than after a dose of 1.50 Gy. In area IV-VIIirr the numbers of colonies differed by a factor of six after both doses. This finding indicates that spermatogonial stem cells are more sensitive to irradiation in epithelial stages IV-VII than in stages XII-III. In control material, spermatogonia with a nuclear area of 70-110 micron2 are rare. However, especially 6 days after irradiation, single cells of these dimensions are rather common. These cells were found to lie at random over the tubular basement membrane with no preference for areas with colonies.

  12. Electrochemical cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Redey, Laszlo I. (Downers Grove, IL); Myles, Kevin M. (Downers Grove, IL); Vissers, Donald R. (Naperville, IL); Prakash, Jai (Downers Grove, IL)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrochemical cell with a positive electrode having an electrochemically active layer of at least one transition metal chloride. A negative electrode of an alkali metal and a compatible electrolyte including an alkali metal salt molten at cell operating temperature is included in the cell. The electrolyte is present at least partially as a corrugated .beta." alumina tube surrounding the negative electrode interior to the positive electrode. The ratio of the volume of liquid electrolyte to the volume of the positive electrode is in the range of from about 0.1 to about 3. A plurality of stacked electrochemical cells is disclosed each having a positive electrode, a negative electrode of an alkali metal molten at cell operating temperature, and a compatible electrolyte. The electrolyte is at least partially present as a corrugated .beta." alumina sheet separating the negative electrode and interior to the positive electrodes. The alkali metal is retained in a porous electrically conductive ceramic, and seals for sealing the junctures of the electrolyte and the adjacent electrodes at the peripheries thereof.

  13. Activatable cell penetrating peptides and their use in clinical contrast agent and therapeutic development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aguilera, Todd Anthony

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    further decreases uptake of ACPP into MDA-MB-231 3D28 Table 2.2 Summary of ACPP uptake in MDA-231 3DHT1080 human fibrosarcoma (ATCC), MDA-MB-231 human mammary

  14. The effects of contact lenses and hypoxia on the upregulation of surfactant protein D by corneal epithelial cells in response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wooten, Darcy

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume 63; pp.3497-3501. 36 Esco, MA. Pseudomonas aeruginosaVolume 25; pp. 73-78. 38 Esco, MA. Potential role of lamininbinding in normal conditions. Esco et al. propose that the

  15. Development of a combined model of tissue kinetics and radiation response of human bronchiolar epithelium with single cell resolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ostrovskaya, Natela Grigoryevna

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    cells of the airways due to internal exposure to alpha-particle emitters, e.g. radon. Inhalation of radon, a colorless and odorless gas, one of the products of the decay of uranium which occurs naturally in the earth?s crust, is the second major cause... epithelial tissue plays an important role in normal lung physiology. square4 lung epithelia are target tissues for occupational internal exposures and for radon exposure (26); square4 the epithelium of bronchioles appears to be the origin...

  16. Electrochemical cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Redey, L.I.; Vissers, D.R.; Prakash, J.

    1994-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrochemical cell is described having an alkali metal negative electrode such as sodium and a positive electrode including Ni or transition metals, separated by a [beta] alumina electrolyte and NaAlCl[sub 4] or other compatible material. Various concentrations of a bromine, iodine and/or sulfur containing additive and pore formers are disclosed, which enhance cell capacity and power. The pore formers may be the ammonium salts of carbonic acid or a weak organic acid or oxamide or methylcellulose. 6 figs.

  17. Photovoltaic cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gordon, Roy G. (Cambridge, MA); Kurtz, Sarah (Somerville, MA)

    1984-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In a photovoltaic cell structure containing a visibly transparent, electrically conductive first layer of metal oxide, and a light-absorbing semiconductive photovoltaic second layer, the improvement comprising a thin layer of transition metal nitride, carbide or boride interposed between said first and second layers.

  18. Nanocrystal Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gur, Ilan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    research on organic photovoltaic cells since small molecule10 years prior (4). Photovoltaic cells with an active layerof the associated photovoltaic cells. 2.4 Charge transport

  19. Nanocrystal Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gur, Ilan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nov, 2005). Chapter 4 Hybrid solar cells with 3-dimensionalinorganic nanocrystal solar cells 5.1 Introduction In recentoperation of organic based solar cells and distinguish them

  20. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research Institute 1990 Fuel Cell Status," Proceedings ofMiller, "Introduction: Fuel-Cell-Powered Vehicle DevelopmentPrograms," presented at Fuel Cells for Transportation,

  1. Fuel Cell Technologies Overview: 2011 Fuel Cell Seminar | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Fuel Cell Technologies Overview: 2011 Fuel Cell Seminar Fuel Cell Technologies Overview: 2011 Fuel Cell Seminar Presentation by Sunita Satyapal at the Fuel Cell Seminar on November...

  2. Diagnostic Studies on Lithium Battery Cells and Cell Components...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Studies on Lithium Battery Cells and Cell Components Diagnostic Studies on Lithium Battery Cells and Cell Components 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle...

  3. Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Program: Fuel Cells Fact...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Program: Fuel Cells Fact Sheet Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Program: Fuel Cells Fact Sheet Fact sheet produced by the Fuel Cell...

  4. Stationary Fuel Cells: Overview of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Stationary Fuel Cells: Overview of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities Stationary Fuel Cells: Overview of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities Presentation covers stationary fuel cells...

  5. Keratin 8/18 regulation of glucose metabolism in normal versus cancerous hepatic cells through differential modulation of hexokinase status and insulin signaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathew, Jasmin; Loranger, Anne; Gilbert, Stéphane [Centre de recherche en cancérologie de l'Université Laval and Centre de recherche du CHUQ (L'Hôtel-Dieu de Québec), 9 McMahon, Québec, Qc, Canada G1R 2J6 (Canada); Faure, Robert [Département de Pédiatrie, Université Laval and Centre de recherche du CHUQ (Centre Mère-Enfant), Québec, Qc, Canada G1V 4G2 (Canada); Marceau, Normand, E-mail: normand.marceau@crhdq.ulaval.ca [Centre de recherche en cancérologie de l'Université Laval and Centre de recherche du CHUQ (L'Hôtel-Dieu de Québec), 9 McMahon, Québec, Qc, Canada G1R 2J6 (Canada)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    As differentiated cells, hepatocytes primarily metabolize glucose for ATP production through oxidative phosphorylation of glycolytic pyruvate, whereas proliferative hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells undergo a metabolic shift to aerobic glycolysis despite oxygen availability. Keratins, the intermediate filament (IF) proteins of epithelial cells, are expressed as pairs in a lineage/differentiation manner. Hepatocyte and HCC (hepatoma) cell IFs are made solely of keratins 8/18 (K8/K18), thus providing models of choice to address K8/K18 IF functions in normal and cancerous epithelial cells. Here, we demonstrate distinctive increases in glucose uptake, glucose-6-phosphate formation, lactate release, and glycogen formation in K8/K18 IF-lacking hepatocytes and/or hepatoma cells versus their respective IF-containing counterparts. We also show that the K8/K18-dependent glucose uptake/G6P formation is linked to alterations in hexokinase I/II/IV content and localization at mitochondria, with little effect on GLUT1 status. In addition, we find that the insulin-stimulated glycogen formation in normal hepatocytes involves the main PI-3 kinase-dependent signaling pathway and that the K8/K18 IF loss makes them more efficient glycogen producers. In comparison, the higher insulin-dependent glycogen formation in K8/K18 IF-lacking hepatoma cells is associated with a signaling occurring through a mTOR-dependent pathway, along with an augmentation in cell proliferative activity. Together, the results uncover a key K8/K18 regulation of glucose metabolism in normal and cancerous hepatic cells through differential modulations of mitochondrial HK status and insulin-mediated signaling.

  6. Knockdown of dual specificity phosphatase 4 enhances the chemosensitivity of MCF-7 and MCF-7/ADR breast cancer cells to doxorubicin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Yu; Du, Feiya; Chen, Wei; Yao, Minya; Lv, Kezhen; Fu, Peifen, E-mail: fupeifendoczju@163.com

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: Breast cancer is the major cause of cancer-related deaths in females world-wide. Doxorubicin-based therapy has limited efficacy in breast cancer due to drug resistance, which has been shown to be associated with the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). However, the molecular mechanisms linking the EMT and drug resistance in breast cancer cells remain unclear. Dual specificity phosphatase 4 (DUSP4), a member of the dual specificity phosphatase family, is associated with cellular proliferation and differentiation; however, its role in breast cancer progression is controversial. Methods: We used cell viability assays, Western blotting and immunofluorescent staining, combined with siRNA interference, to evaluate chemoresistance and the EMT in MCF-7 and adriamycin-resistant MCF-7/ADR breast cancer cells, and investigate the underlying mechanisms. Results: Knockdown of DUSP4 significantly increased the chemosensitivity of MCF-7 and MCF-7/ADR breast cancer cells to doxorubicin, and MCF-7/ADR cells which expressed high levels of DUSP4 had a mesenchymal phenotype. Furthermore, knockdown of DUSP4 reversed the EMT in MCF-7/ADR cells, as demonstrated by upregulation of epithelial biomarkers and downregulation of mesenchymal biomarkers, and also increased the chemosensitivity of MCF-7/ADR cells to doxorubicin. Conclusions: DUSP4 might represent a potential drug target for inhibiting drug resistance and regulating the process of the EMT during the treatment of breast cancer. - Highlights: • We used different technologies to prove our conclusion. • DUSP4 knockdown increased doxorubicin chemosensitivity in breast cancer cells. • DUSP4 is a potential target for combating drug resistance in breast cancer. • DUSP4 is a potential target for regulating the EMT in breast cancer.

  7. Cell Stem Cell Induction of Multipotential Hematopoietic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, James J.

    patients with hematologic diseases, including Fanconi anemia (Mu¨ ller et al., 2012), sickle cell anemia

  8. Fuel Cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.Newof Energy ForrestalPrinceton PlasmaEnergyFuel Cell

  9. Photoelectrochemical cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rauh, R. David (Newton, MA); Boudreau, Robert A. (Norton, MA)

    1983-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A photoelectrochemical cell comprising a sealed container having a light-transmitting window for admitting light into the container across a light-admitting plane, an electrolyte in the container, a photoelectrode in the container having a light-absorbing surface arranged to receive light from the window and in contact with the electrolyte, the surface having a plurality of spaced portions oblique to the plane, each portion having dimensions at least an order of magnitude larger than the maximum wavelength of incident sunlight, the total surface area of the surface being larger than the area of the plane bounded by the container, and a counter electrode in the container in contact with the electrolyte.

  10. G1 cell cycle arrest due to the inhibition of erbB family receptor tyrosine kinases does not require the retinoblastoma protein

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzales, Andrea J. [Cancer Pharmacology, Pfizer Global Research and Development, Ann Arbor, MI 48105 (United States)]. E-mail: Andrea.Gonzales@pfizer.com; Fry, David W. [Cancer Pharmacology, Pfizer Global Research and Development, Ann Arbor, MI 48105 (United States)

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The erbB receptor family (EGFr, erbB-2, erbB-3, and erbB-4) consists of transmembrane glycoproteins that transduce extracellular signals to the nucleus when activated. erbB family members are widely expressed in epithelial, mesenchymal, and neuronal cells and contribute to the proliferation, differentiation, migration, and survival of these cell types. The present study evaluates the effects of erbB family signaling on cell cycle progression and the role that pRB plays in regulating this process. ErbB family RTK activity was inhibited by PD 158780 in the breast epithelial cell line MCF10A. PD 158780 (0.5 {mu}M) inhibited EGF-stimulated and heregulin-stimulated autophosphorylation and caused a G1 cell cycle arrest within 24 h, which correlated with hypophosporylation of pRB. MCF10A cells lacking functional pRB retained the ability to arrest in G1 when treated with PD 158780. Both cell lines showed induction of p27{sup KIP1} protein when treated with PD 158780 and increased association of p27{sup KIP1} with cyclin E-CDK2. Furthermore, CDK2 kinase activity was dramatically inhibited with drug treatment. Changes in other pRB family members were noted with drug treatment, namely a decrease in p107 and an increase in p130. These findings show that the G1 arrest induced through inhibition of erbB family RTK activity does not require functional pRB.

  11. Fuel cell arrangement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Isenberg, A.O.

    1987-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A fuel cell arrangement is provided wherein cylindrical cells of the solid oxide electrolyte type are arranged in planar arrays where the cells within a plane are parallel. Planes of cells are stacked with cells of adjacent planes perpendicular to one another. Air is provided to the interior of the cells through feed tubes which pass through a preheat chamber. Fuel is provided to the fuel cells through a channel in the center of the cell stack; the fuel then passes the exterior of the cells and combines with the oxygen-depleted air in the preheat chamber. 3 figs.

  12. DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2013 Fuel Cell Seminar and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2013 Fuel Cell Seminar and Energy Exposition DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2013 Fuel Cell Seminar and Energy Exposition Overview of DOE's...

  13. DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 13012: Fuel Cell System...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 13012: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2013 DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 13012: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2013 This program record from the...

  14. Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Update: 2010 Fuel Cell Seminar...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Update: 2010 Fuel Cell Seminar and Exposition Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Update: 2010 Fuel Cell Seminar and Exposition Presentation by...

  15. Thermal Management of Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saadah, Mohammed Ahmed

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    D. Mills, "Cooling of photovoltaic cells under concentratedelectric performance of a photovoltaic cells by cooling andSolar Cell A photovoltaic cell is a semiconductor that

  16. Fuel cell-fuel cell hybrid system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Geisbrecht, Rodney A.; Williams, Mark C.

    2003-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for converting chemical energy to electricity is provided, the device comprising a high temperature fuel cell with the ability for partially oxidizing and completely reforming fuel, and a low temperature fuel cell juxtaposed to said high temperature fuel cell so as to utilize remaining reformed fuel from the high temperature fuel cell. Also provided is a method for producing electricity comprising directing fuel to a first fuel cell, completely oxidizing a first portion of the fuel and partially oxidizing a second portion of the fuel, directing the second fuel portion to a second fuel cell, allowing the first fuel cell to utilize the first portion of the fuel to produce electricity; and allowing the second fuel cell to utilize the second portion of the fuel to produce electricity.

  17. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles UCD-ITS-RR-92-14 September bycost than both. Solar-hydrogen fuel- cell vehicles would becost than both. Solar-hydrogen fuel- cell vehicles would be

  18. Nanocrystal Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gur, Ilan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of organic based solar cells and distinguish them from theirof nanocrystal-based solar cells. No one approach orNov, 2005). Chapter 4 Hybrid solar cells with 3-dimensional

  19. Nanocrystal Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gur, Ilan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nov, 2005). Chapter 4 Hybrid solar cells with 3-dimensional5 All-inorganic nanocrystal solar cells 5.1 Introduction Inoperation of organic based solar cells and distinguish them

  20. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    vehicles except the methanol/fuel cell vehicle and the BPEVe estimates for the methanol/fuel cell vehicle are based onbiomass-derived methanol used in fuel cell vehicles. Several

  1. Snail/beta-catenin signaling protects breast cancer cells from hypoxia attack

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scherbakov, Alexander M., E-mail: alex.scherbakov@gmail.com [Laboratory of Clinical Biochemistry, Institute of Clinical Oncology, N.N. Blokhin Cancer Research Centre, Kashirskoye sh. 24, Moscow 115478 (Russian Federation); Stefanova, Lidia B.; Sorokin, Danila V.; Semina, Svetlana E. [Laboratory of Molecular Endocrinology, Institute of Carcinogenesis, N.N. Blokhin Cancer Research Centre, Kashirskoye sh. 24, Moscow 115478 (Russian Federation); Berstein, Lev M. [Laboratory of Oncoendocrinology, N.N. Petrov Research Institute of Oncology, St. Petersburg 197758 (Russian Federation); Krasil’nikov, Mikhail A. [Laboratory of Molecular Endocrinology, Institute of Carcinogenesis, N.N. Blokhin Cancer Research Centre, Kashirskoye sh. 24, Moscow 115478 (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The tolerance of cancer cells to hypoxia depends on the combination of different factors – from increase of glycolysis (Warburg Effect) to activation of intracellular growth/apoptotic pathways. Less is known about the influence of epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) and EMT-associated pathways on the cell sensitivity to hypoxia. The aim of this study was to explore the role of Snail signaling, one of the key EMT pathways, in the mediating of hypoxia response and regulation of cell sensitivity to hypoxia, using as a model in vitro cultured breast cancer cells. Earlier we have shown that estrogen-independent HBL-100 breast cancer cells differ from estrogen-dependent MCF-7 cells with increased expression of Snail1, and demonstrated Snail1 involvement into formation of hormone-resistant phenotype. Because Snail1 belongs to hypoxia-activated proteins, here we studied the influence of Snail1 signaling on the cell tolerance to hypoxia. We found that Snail1-enriched HBL-100 cells were less sensitive to hypoxia-induced growth suppression if compared with MCF-7 line (31% MCF-7 vs. 71% HBL-100 cell viability after 1% O{sub 2} atmosphere for 3 days). Snail1 knock-down enhanced the hypoxia-induced inhibition of cell proliferation giving the direct evidence of Snail1 involvement into cell protection from hypoxia attack. The protective effect of Snail1 was shown to be mediated, at least in a part, via beta-catenin which positively regulated expression of HIF-1-dependent genes. Finally, we found that cell tolerance to hypoxia was accompanied with the failure in the phosphorylation of AMPK – the key energy sensor, and demonstrated an inverse relationship between AMPK and Snail/beta-catenin signaling. Totally, our data show that Snail1 and beta-catenin, besides association with loss of hormone dependence, protect cancer cells from hypoxia and may serve as an important target in the treatment of breast cancer. Moreover, we suggest that the level of these proteins as well the level of AMPK phosphorylation may be considered as predictors of the tumor sensitivity to anti-angiogenic drugs. - Highlights: • Snail1 protects breast cancer cells from hypoxia. • Protective effect of Snail1 is mediated via ?-catenin/HIF-1 pathway. • Snail/?-catenin signaling is negatively controlled by the energy sensor – AMPK. • The failure in AMPK phosphorylation drives cells to the hypoxia-tolerant state.

  2. Mixed lineage kinase 3 is required for matrix metalloproteinase expression and invasion in ovarian cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhan, Yu; Abi Saab, Widian F.; Modi, Nidhi; Stewart, Amanda M. [Department of Biological Sciences, The University of Toledo, 2801 W. Bancroft, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States)] [Department of Biological Sciences, The University of Toledo, 2801 W. Bancroft, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Liu, Jinsong [Department of Pathology, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)] [Department of Pathology, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Chadee, Deborah N., E-mail: deborah.chadee@utoledo.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, The University of Toledo, 2801 W. Bancroft, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixed lineage kinase 3 (MLK3) is a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAP3K) that activates MAPK signaling pathways and regulates cellular responses such as proliferation, migration and apoptosis. Here we report high levels of total and phospho-MLK3 in ovarian cancer cell lines in comparison to immortalized nontumorigenic ovarian epithelial cell lines. Using small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated gene silencing, we determined that MLK3 is required for the invasion of SKOV3 and HEY1B ovarian cancer cells. Furthermore, mlk3 silencing substantially reduced matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, -2, -9 and -12 gene expression and MMP-2 and -9 activities in SKOV3 and HEY1B ovarian cancer cells. MMP-1, -2, -9 and-12 expression, and MLK3-induced activation of MMP-2 and MMP-9 requires both extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activities. In addition, inhibition of activator protein-1 (AP-1) reduced MMP-1, MMP-9 and MMP-12 gene expression. Collectively, these findings establish MLK3 as an important regulator of MMP expression and invasion in ovarian cancer cells. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ovarian cancer cell lines have high levels of total and phosphorylated MLK3. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MLK3 is required for MMP expression and activity in ovarian cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MLK3 is required for invasion of SKOV3 and HEY1B ovarian cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MLK3-dependent regulation of MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities requires ERK and JNK.

  3. Thermal Management of Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saadah, Mohammed Ahmed

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cells by cooling and concentration techniques," inheat. Different techniques of cooling solar cells have been

  4. POLYMER ELECTROLYTE FUEL CELLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    POLYMER ELECTROLYTE FUEL CELLS: The Gas Diffusion Layer Johannah Itescu Princeton University PRISM REU #12;PEM FUEL CELLS: A little background information I. What do fuel cells do? Generate electricity through chemical reaction #12;PEM FUEL CELLS: A little background information -+ + eHH 442 2 0244 22 He

  5. Molten carbonate fuel cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaun, T.D.; Smith, J.L.

    1986-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A molten electrolyte fuel cell is disclosed with an array of stacked cells and cell enclosures isolating each cell except for access to gas manifolds for the supply of fuel or oxidant gas or the removal of waste gas. The cell enclosures collectively provide an enclosure for the array and effectively avoid the problems of electrolyte migration and the previous need for compression of stack components. The fuel cell further includes an inner housing about and in cooperation with the array enclosure to provide a manifold system with isolated chambers for the supply and removal of gases. An external insulated housing about the inner housing provides thermal isolation to the cell components.

  6. Induction of human breast cell carcinogenesis by triclocarban and intervention by curcumin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sood, Shilpa; Choudhary, Shambhunath; Wang, Hwa-Chain Robert, E-mail: hcrwang@utk.edu

    2013-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: •Triclocarban exposure induces breast epithelial cell carcinogenesis. •Triclocarban induces the Erk–Nox pathway, ROS elevation, and DNA damage. •Physiological doses of triclocarban induce cellular carcinogenesis. •Non-cytotoxic curcumin blocks triclocarban-induced carcinogenesis and pathways. -- Abstract: More than 85% of breast cancers are sporadic and attributable to long-term exposure to environmental carcinogens and co-carcinogens. To identify co-carcinogens with abilities to induce cellular pre-malignancy, we studied the activity of triclocarban (TCC), an antimicrobial agent commonly used in household and personal care products. Here, we demonstrated, for the first time, that chronic exposure to TCC at physiologically-achievable nanomolar concentrations resulted in progressive carcinogenesis of human breast cells from non-cancerous to pre-malignant. Pre-malignant carcinogenesis was measured by increasingly-acquired cancer-associated properties of reduced dependence on growth factors, anchorage-independent growth and increased cell proliferation, without acquisition of cellular tumorigenicity. Long-term TCC exposure also induced constitutive activation of the Erk–Nox pathway and increases of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cells. A single TCC exposure induced transient induction of the Erk–Nox pathway, ROS elevation, increased cell proliferation, and DNA damage in not only non-cancerous breast cells but also breast cancer cells. Using these constitutively- and transiently-induced changes as endpoints, we revealed that non-cytotoxic curcumin was effective in intervention of TCC-induced cellular pre-malignancy. Our results lead us to suggest that the co-carcinogenic potential of TCC should be seriously considered in epidemiological studies to reveal the significance of TCC in the development of sporadic breast cancer. Using TCC-induced transient and constitutive endpoints as targets will likely help identify non-cytotoxic preventive agents, such as curcumin, effective in suppressing TCC-induced cellular pre-malignancy.

  7. Fuel Cells for Supermarkets: Cleaner Energy with Fuel Cell Combined...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    smith.pdf More Documents & Publications Fuel Cells at Supermarkets: NYSERDA's Perspective Fuel Cell Case Study Hydrogen Production and Storage for Fuel Cells: Current Status...

  8. Stationary Fuel Cells: Overview of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Stationary Fuel Cells: Overview of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities Pete Devlin Fuel Cell Technologies Program United States Department of Energy Federal Utility Partnership...

  9. Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Update: 2010 Fuel Cell Seminar...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Update: 2010 Fuel Cell Seminar and Exposition Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Update: 2010 Fuel Cell Seminar and Exposition Presentation by Sunita Satyapal at the 2010 Fuel...

  10. Cell Stem Cell Highly Efficient Reprogramming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, James J.

    Alexander Meissner,4,5,14 George Q. Daley,2,3,4,5,8,15,16 Andrew S. Brack,5,6 James J. Collins,11,12,15 Chad Children's Hospital Boston, Boston, MA 02115, USA 4Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology 5Harvard Stem Cell Institute Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA 6Center of Regenerative Medicine

  11. NANOCOMPOSITE ENABLED SENSITIZED SOLAR CELL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phuyal, Dibya

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    efficiency in dye-sensitized solar cells based on Tio2Conversion by Dye-Sensitized Photovoltaic cells. InorganicConversion by Dye-Sensitized Photovoltaic Cells. Inorganic

  12. NANOCOMPOSITE ENABLED SENSITIZED SOLAR CELL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phuyal, Dibya

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by Dye-Sensitized Photovoltaic cells. Inorganic Chemistry,by Dye-Sensitized Photovoltaic Cells. Inorganic ChemistryThe characteristics of a photovoltaic cell. Generally,

  13. Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Fuel Cell Activities Mr. Pete Devlin U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program Market Transformation Manager Stationary Fuel Cell Applications First National...

  14. Matrigel Basement Membrane Matrix influences expression of microRNAs in cancer cell lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Karina J. [Laboratory for Cancer Medicine, Western Australian Institute for Medical Research and University of Western Australia Centre for Medical Research, Perth, WA 6000 (Australia) [Laboratory for Cancer Medicine, Western Australian Institute for Medical Research and University of Western Australia Centre for Medical Research, Perth, WA 6000 (Australia); School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA 6008 (Australia); Tsykin, Anna [Centre for Cancer Biology, SA Pathology, Adelaide, SA 5000 (Australia) [Centre for Cancer Biology, SA Pathology, Adelaide, SA 5000 (Australia); School of Molecular and Biomedical Science, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Giles, Keith M. [Laboratory for Cancer Medicine, Western Australian Institute for Medical Research and University of Western Australia Centre for Medical Research, Perth, WA 6000 (Australia)] [Laboratory for Cancer Medicine, Western Australian Institute for Medical Research and University of Western Australia Centre for Medical Research, Perth, WA 6000 (Australia); Sladic, Rosemary T. [Centre for Cancer Biology, SA Pathology, Adelaide, SA 5000 (Australia)] [Centre for Cancer Biology, SA Pathology, Adelaide, SA 5000 (Australia); Epis, Michael R. [Laboratory for Cancer Medicine, Western Australian Institute for Medical Research and University of Western Australia Centre for Medical Research, Perth, WA 6000 (Australia)] [Laboratory for Cancer Medicine, Western Australian Institute for Medical Research and University of Western Australia Centre for Medical Research, Perth, WA 6000 (Australia); Ganss, Ruth [Laboratory for Cancer Medicine Angiogenesis Unit, Western Australian Institute for Medical Research and University of Western Australia Centre for Medical Research, Perth, WA 6000 (Australia)] [Laboratory for Cancer Medicine Angiogenesis Unit, Western Australian Institute for Medical Research and University of Western Australia Centre for Medical Research, Perth, WA 6000 (Australia); Goodall, Gregory J. [Centre for Cancer Biology, SA Pathology, Adelaide, SA 5000 (Australia) [Centre for Cancer Biology, SA Pathology, Adelaide, SA 5000 (Australia); School of Molecular and Biomedical Science, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Department of Medicine, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Leedman, Peter J., E-mail: peter.leedman@waimr.uwa.edu.au [Laboratory for Cancer Medicine, Western Australian Institute for Medical Research and University of Western Australia Centre for Medical Research, Perth, WA 6000 (Australia); School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA 6008 (Australia)

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Matrigel alters cancer cell line miRNA expression relative to culture on plastic. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Many identified Matrigel-regulated miRNAs are implicated in cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-1290, -210, -32 and -29b represent a Matrigel-induced miRNA signature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-32 down-regulates Integrin alpha 5 (ITGA5) mRNA. -- Abstract: Matrigel is a medium rich in extracellular matrix (ECM) components used for three-dimensional cell culture and is known to alter cellular phenotypes and gene expression. microRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression and have roles in cancer. While miRNA profiles of numerous cell lines cultured on plastic have been reported, the influence of Matrigel-based culture on cancer cell miRNA expression is largely unknown. This study investigated the influence of Matrigel on the expression of miRNAs that might facilitate ECM-associated cancer cell growth. We performed miRNA profiling by microarray using two colon cancer cell lines (SW480 and SW620), identifying significant differential expression of miRNAs between cells cultured in Matrigel and on plastic. Many of these miRNAs have previously been implicated in cancer-related processes. A common Matrigel-induced miRNA signature comprised of up-regulated miR-1290 and miR-210 and down-regulated miR-29b and miR-32 was identified using RT-qPCR across five epithelial cancer cell lines (SW480, SW620, HT-29, A549 and MDA-MB-231). Experimental modulation of these miRNAs altered expression of their known target mRNAs involved in cell adhesion, proliferation and invasion, in colon cancer cell lines. Furthermore, ITGA5 was identified as a novel putative target of miR-32 that may facilitate cancer cell interactions with the ECM. We propose that culture of cancer cell lines in Matrigel more accurately recapitulates miRNA expression and function in cancer than culture on plastic and thus is a valuable approach to the in vitro study of miRNAs.

  15. Cell-cell and cell-medium interactions in the growth of mouse embryonic stem cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mittal, Nikhil, 1979-

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Embryonic stem cells serve as powerful models for the study of development and disease and hold enormous potential for future therapeutics. Due to the potential for embryonic stem cells (ESCs) to provide a variety of tissues ...

  16. Fuel Cells Team

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    test stands Fuel Cell Team The FC team focus is R&D on polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells for commercial and military applications. Our program has had ongoing funding...

  17. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    California, June (1986). General Electric, Direct Energy Conversion Programs, Feasibility Study ofSPE Fuel Cell Power Plants

  18. Webinar: Fuel Cell Buses

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video recording and text version of the webinar titled, Fuel Cell Buses, originally presented on September 12, 2013.

  19. Electroluminescence in photovoltaic cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petraglia, Antonio; 10.1088/0031-9120/46/5/F01

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we propose two methods to get electroluminescence images from photovoltaic cells in a school or home lab.

  20. DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 14012: Fuel Cell System...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2013 DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 14012: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2013 This program record from the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell...

  1. Rapidly refuelable fuel cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Joy, Richard W. (Santa Clara, CA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is directed to a metal-air fuel cell where the consumable metal anode is movably positioned in the cell and an expandable enclosure, or bladder, is used to press the anode into contact with separating spacers between the cell electrodes. The bladder may be depressurized to allow replacement of the anode when consumed.

  2. Biomarkers of cell senescence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dimri, G.P.; Campisi, J.; Peacocke, M.

    1998-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a biomarker system for the in vivo and in vitro assessment of cell senescence. In the method of the present invention, {beta}-galactosidase activity is utilized as a means by which cell senescence may be assessed either in vitro cell cultures or in vivo. 1 fig.

  3. The eukaryotic translation elongation factor eEF1A2 induces neoplastic properties and mediates tumorigenic effects of ZNF217 in precursor cells of human ovarian carcinomas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Yu; Wong, Nicholas; Guan, Yinghui; Salamanca, Clara M.; Cheng, Jung Chien; Lee, Jonathan M.; Gray, Joe W.; Auersperg, Nelly

    2008-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Ovarian epithelial carcinomas (OEC) frequently exhibit amplifications at the 20q13 locus which is the site of several oncogenes, including the eukaryotic elongation factor EEF1A2 and the transcription factor ZNF217. We reported previously that overexpressed ZNF217 induces neoplastic characteristics in precursor cells of OEC. Unexpectedly, ZNF217, which is a transcriptional repressor, enhanced expression of eEF1A2. In this study, array comparative genomic hybridization, single nucleotide polymorphism and Affymetrix analysis of ZNF217-overexpressing cell lines confirmed consistently increased expression of eEF1A2 but not of other oncogenes, and revealed early changes in EEF1A2 gene copy numbers and increased expression at crisis during immortalization. We defined the influence of eEF1A2 overexpression on immortalized ovarian surface epithelial cells, and investigated interrelationships between effects of ZNF217 and eEF1A2 on cellular phenotypes. Lentivirally induced eEF1A2 overexpression caused delayed crisis, apoptosis resistance and increases in serum-independence, saturation densities, and anchorage independence. siRNA to eEF1A2 reversed apoptosis resistance and reduced anchorage independence in eEF1A2-overexpressing lines. Remarkably, siRNA to eEF1A2 was equally efficient in inhibiting both anchorage independence and resistance to apoptosis conferred by ZNF217 overexpression. Our data define neoplastic properties that are caused by eEF1A2 in nontumorigenic ovarian cancer precursor cells, and suggest that eEF1A2 plays a role in mediating ZNF217-induced neoplastic progression.

  4. a bStomach Lung cell zone Clara cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krasnow, Mark A.

    a bStomach Lung Chief-cell zone Stem-cell zone Mucus- cell zone Clara cell Tracheal airway Basal independent studies show that, if push comes to shove, differentiated cells of the stomach and lung can act and the other by Stange et al.2 published in Cell, find that followingdepletionofstemcellsinthestomach or lung

  5. Timing Matters: The Role of Circadian Clock Genes In Development and Toxin Responses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qu, Xiaoyu

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    mammary primary cultures of mammary cells derived from from Per1ldc, Per2ldc and Per1ldc/Per2ldc mutant mice and Hepa1c1c7 cells subjected to siRNA-mediated inhibition of Per1 or Per2. These discoveries suggest that the clock gene Per1 may modulate toxin...

  6. Webinar: Fuel Cell Mobile Lighting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video recording of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar, Fuel Cell Mobile Lighting, originally presented on November 13, 2012.

  7. Module 4: Fuel Cell Technology

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This course covers advantages and disadvantages of fuel cells, principles on which fuel cells work, operating principles and chemical reactions

  8. Cell Stem Cell A Two-Step Mechanism for Stem Cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greco, Valentina

    findings suggest a model where HG cells fuel initial steps in hair regeneration, while the bulgeCell Stem Cell Article A Two-Step Mechanism for Stem Cell Activation during Hair Regeneration papilla (DP). Here we show that HG cells are derived from bulge stem cells (SCs) but become responsive

  9. Heterojunction solar cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olson, J.M.

    1994-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-efficiency single heterojunction solar cell is described wherein a thin emitter layer (preferably Ga[sub 0.52]In[sub 0.48]P) forms a heterojunction with a GaAs absorber layer. The conversion efficiency of the solar cell is at least 25.7%. The solar cell preferably includes a passivating layer between the substrate and the absorber layer. An anti-reflection coating is preferably disposed over the emitter layer. 1 fig.

  10. Direct hydrocarbon fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barnett, Scott A.; Lai, Tammy; Liu, Jiang

    2010-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The direct electrochemical oxidation of hydrocarbons in solid oxide fuel cells, to generate greater power densities at lower temperatures without carbon deposition. The performance obtained is comparable to that of fuel cells used for hydrogen, and is achieved by using novel anode composites at low operating temperatures. Such solid oxide fuel cells, regardless of fuel source or operation, can be configured advantageously using the structural geometries of this invention.

  11. Heterojunction solar cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olson, Jerry M. (Lakewood, CO)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-efficiency single heterojunction solar cell wherein a thin emitter layer (preferably Ga.sub.0.52 In.sub.0.48 P) forms a heterojunction with a GaAs absorber layer. The conversion effiency of the solar cell is at least 25.7%. The solar cell preferably includes a passivating layer between the substrate and the absorber layer. An anti-reflection coating is preferably disposed over the emitter layer.

  12. Automotive Fuel Cell Corporation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Automotive Fuel Cell Corporation n SNL researcher Cy Fujimoto demonstrates his new flexible hydrocarbon polymer electrolyte mem- brane, which could be a key factor in realizing a...

  13. Micro fuel cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zook, L.A.; Vanderborgh, N.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Hockaday, R. [Energy Related Devices Inc., Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An ambient temperature, liquid feed, direct methanol fuel cell device is under development. A metal barrier layer was used to block methanol crossover from the anode to the cathode side while still allowing for the transport of protons from the anode to the cathode. A direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is an electrochemical engine that converts chemical energy into clean electrical power by the direct oxidation of methanol at the fuel cell anode. This direct use of a liquid fuel eliminates the need for a reformer to convert the fuel to hydrogen before it is fed into the fuel cell.

  14. Microcomposite Fuel Cell Membranes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Summary of microcomposite fuel cell membrane work presented to the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting, Orlando FL, October 17, 2003

  15. Mammalian Cell Culture | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from Cells to Cognition in Autism Pathophysiology: Biological Pathways to Defective Brain Function and Plasticity. We review evidence to support the model that autism may begin...

  16. Molten salt lithium cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raistrick, I.D.; Poris, J.; Huggins, R.A.

    1980-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and is operated in the temperature range of about 400 to 500/sup 0/C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems and a substantial amount of energy is lost through heat transfer. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell which may be operated at temperatures between about 100 to 170/sup 0/C. The cell is comprised of an electrolyte, which preferably includes lithium nitrate, and a lithium or lithium alloy electrode.

  17. Molten salt lithium cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raistrick, Ian D. (Menlo Park, CA); Poris, Jaime (Portola Valley, CA); Huggins, Robert A. (Stanford, CA)

    1982-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and is operated in the temperature range of about 400.degree.-500.degree. C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems and a substantial amount of energy is lost through heat transfer. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell (10) which may be operated at temperatures between about 100.degree.-170.degree. C. Cell (10) comprises an electrolyte (16), which preferably includes lithium nitrate, and a lithium or lithium alloy electrode (12).

  18. Molten salt lithium cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raistrick, Ian D. (Menlo Park, CA); Poris, Jaime (Portola Valley, CA); Huggins, Robert A. (Stanford, CA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and is operated in the temperature range of about 400.degree.-500.degree. C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems and a substantial amount of energy is lost through heat transfer. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell (10) which may be operated at temperatures between about 100.degree.-170.degree. C. Cell (10) comprises an electrolyte (16), which preferably includes lithium nitrate, and a lithium or lithium alloy electrode (12).

  19. Hydrogen Fuel Cells

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    The fuel cell — an energy conversion device that can efficiently capture and use the power of hydrogen — is the key to making it happen.

  20. Nanocrystal Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gur, Ilan

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation presents the results of a research agenda aimed at improving integration and stability in nanocrystal-based solar cells through advances in active materials and device architectures. The introduction of 3-dimensional nanocrystals illustrates the potential for improving transport and percolation in hybrid solar cells and enables novel fabrication methods for optimizing integration in these systems. Fabricating cells by sequential deposition allows for solution-based assembly of hybrid composites with controlled and well-characterized dispersion and electrode contact. Hyperbranched nanocrystals emerge as a nearly ideal building block for hybrid cells, allowing the controlled morphologies targeted by templated approaches to be achieved in an easily fabricated solution-cast device. In addition to offering practical benefits to device processing, these approaches offer fundamental insight into the operation of hybrid solar cells, shedding light on key phenomena such as the roles of electrode-contact and percolation behavior in these cells. Finally, all-inorganic nanocrystal solar cells are presented as a wholly new cell concept, illustrating that donor-acceptor charge transfer and directed carrier diffusion can be utilized in a system with no organic components, and that nanocrystals may act as building blocks for efficient, stable, and low-cost thin-film solar cells.

  1. Fuel Cell Technologies Overview

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Cells Key Benefits Very High Efficiency Reduced CO 2 Emissions Reduced Oil Use Reduced Air Pollution Fuel Flexibility * 40 - 60% (electrical) * > 70% (electrical, hybrid fuel...

  2. Hexavalent chromium at low concentration alters Sertoli cell barrier and connexin 43 gap junction but not claudin-11 and N-cadherin in the rat seminiferous tubule culture model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carette, Diane [INSERM U 1065, Team 5 “Physiopathology of Germ Cell Control: Genomic and Non Genomic Mechanisms” C3M, University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, Nice (France); UMR S775, University Paris Descartes, 45 rue des Saints Pères, 75006, Paris (France); Perrard, Marie-Hélène, E-mail: marie-helene.durand@ens-lyon.fr [Institut de Génomique Fonctionnelle de Lyon, Université de Lyon, Université Lyon I, CNRS, INRA, Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, Lyon (France); Prisant, Nadia [University of Versailles/St Quentin-en-Yvelines (France); UMR S775, University Paris Descartes, 45 rue des Saints Pères, 75006, Paris (France); Gilleron, Jérome; Pointis, Georges [INSERM U 1065, Team 5 “Physiopathology of Germ Cell Control: Genomic and Non Genomic Mechanisms” C3M, University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, Nice (France); Segretain, Dominique [University of Versailles/St Quentin-en-Yvelines (France); UMR S775, University Paris Descartes, 45 rue des Saints Pères, 75006, Paris (France); Durand, Philippe [Institut de Génomique Fonctionnelle de Lyon, Université de Lyon, Université Lyon I, CNRS, INRA, Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, Lyon (France); Kallistem SAS Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, Lyon (France)

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exposure to toxic metals, specifically those belonging to the nonessential group leads to human health defects and among them reprotoxic effects. The mechanisms by which these metals produce their negative effects on spermatogenesis have not been fully elucidated. By using the Durand's validated seminiferous tubule culture model, which mimics the in vivo situation, we recently reported that concentrations of hexavalent chromium, reported in the literature to be closed to that found in the blood circulation of men, increase the number of germ cell cytogenetic abnormalities. Since this metal is also known to affect cellular junctions, we investigated, in the present study, its potential influence on the Sertoli cell barrier and on junctional proteins present at this level such as connexin 43, claudin-11 and N-cadherin. Cultured seminiferous tubules in bicameral chambers expressed the three junctional proteins and ZO-1 for at least 12 days. Exposure to low concentrations of chromium (10 ?g/l) increased the trans-epithelial resistance without major changes of claudin-11 and N-cadherin expressions but strongly delocalized the gap junction protein connexin 43 from the membrane to the cytoplasm of Sertoli cells. The possibility that the hexavalent chromium-induced alteration of connexin 43 indirectly mediates the effect of the toxic metal on the blood–testis barrier dynamic is postulated. - Highlights: ? Influence of Cr(VI) on the Sertoli cell barrier and on junctional proteins ? Use of cultured seminiferous tubules in bicameral chambers ? Low concentrations of Cr(VI) (10 ?g/l) altered the trans-epithelial resistance. ? Cr(VI) did not alter claudin-11 and N-cadherin. ? Cr(VI) delocalized connexin 43 from the membrane to the cytoplasm of Sertoli cells.

  3. Fuel Cell Demonstration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerald Brun

    2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In an effort to promote clean energy projects and aid in the commercialization of new fuel cell technologies the Long Island Power Authority (LIPA) initiated a Fuel Cell Demonstration Program in 1999 with six month deployments of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) non-commercial Beta model systems at partnering sites throughout Long Island. These projects facilitated significant developments in the technology, providing operating experience that allowed the manufacturer to produce fuel cells that were half the size of the Beta units and suitable for outdoor installations. In 2001, LIPA embarked on a large-scale effort to identify and develop measures that could improve the reliability and performance of future fuel cell technologies for electric utility applications and the concept to establish a fuel cell farm (Farm) of 75 units was developed. By the end of October of 2001, 75 Lorax 2.0 fuel cells had been installed at the West Babylon substation on Long Island, making it the first fuel cell demonstration of its kind and size anywhere in the world at the time. Designed to help LIPA study the feasibility of using fuel cells to operate in parallel with LIPA's electric grid system, the Farm operated 120 fuel cells over its lifetime of over 3 years including 3 generations of Plug Power fuel cells (Lorax 2.0, Lorax 3.0, Lorax 4.5). Of these 120 fuel cells, 20 Lorax 3.0 units operated under this Award from June 2002 to September 2004. In parallel with the operation of the Farm, LIPA recruited government and commercial/industrial customers to demonstrate fuel cells as on-site distributed generation. From December 2002 to February 2005, 17 fuel cells were tested and monitored at various customer sites throughout Long Island. The 37 fuel cells operated under this Award produced a total of 712,635 kWh. As fuel cell technology became more mature, performance improvements included a 1% increase in system efficiency. Including equipment, design, fuel, maintenance, installation, and decommissioning the total project budget was approximately $3.7 million.

  4. Solid oxide fuel cell generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Di Croce, A. Michael (Murrysville, PA); Draper, Robert (Churchill Boro, PA)

    1993-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid oxide fuel cell generator has a plenum containing at least two rows of spaced apart, annular, axially elongated fuel cells. An electrical conductor extending between adjacent rows of fuel cells connects the fuel cells of one row in parallel with each other and in series with the fuel cells of the adjacent row.

  5. Solid oxide fuel cell generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Di Croce, A.M.; Draper, R.

    1993-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid oxide fuel cell generator has a plenum containing at least two rows of spaced apart, annular, axially elongated fuel cells. An electrical conductor extending between adjacent rows of fuel cells connects the fuel cells of one row in parallel with each other and in series with the fuel cells of the adjacent row. 5 figures.

  6. Fuel cell market applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, M.C.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a review of the US (and international) fuel cell development for the stationary power generation market. Besides DOE, GRI, and EPRI sponsorship, the US fuel cell program has over 40% cost-sharing from the private sector. Support is provided by user groups with over 75 utility and other end-user members. Objectives are to develop and demonstrate cost-effective fuel cell power generation which can initially be commercialized into various market applications using natural gas fuel by the year 2000. Types of fuel cells being developed include PAFC (phosphoric acid), MCFC (molten carbonate), and SOFC (solid oxide); status of each is reported. Potential international applications are reviewed also. Fuel cells are viewed as a force in dispersed power generation, distributed power, cogeneration, and deregulated industry. Specific fuel cell attributes are discussed: Fuel cells promise to be one of the most reliable power sources; they are now being used in critical uninterruptible power systems. They need hydrogen which can be generated internally from natural gas, coal gas, methanol landfill gas, or other fuels containing hydrocarbons. Finally, fuel cell development and market applications in Japan are reviewed briefly.

  7. Mesangial cell biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abboud, Hanna E., E-mail: Abboud@uthscsa.edu

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Mesangial cells originate from the metanephric mesenchyme and maintain structural integrity of the glomerular microvascular bed and mesangial matrix homeostasis. In response to metabolic, immunologic or hemodynamic injury, these cells undergo apoptosis or acquire an activated phenotype and undergo hypertrophy, proliferation with excessive production of matrix proteins, growth factors, chemokines and cytokines. These soluble factors exert autocrine and paracrine effects on the cells or on other glomerular cells, respectively. MCs are primary targets of immune-mediated glomerular diseases such as IGA nephropathy or metabolic diseases such as diabetes. MCs may also respond to injury that primarily involves podocytes and endothelial cells or to structural and genetic abnormalities of the glomerular basement membrane. Signal transduction and oxidant stress pathways are activated in MCs and likely represent integrated input from multiple mediators. Such responses are convenient targets for therapeutic intervention. Studies in cultured MCs should be supplemented with in vivo studies as well as examination of freshly isolated cells from normal and diseases glomeruli. In addition to ex vivo morphologic studies in kidney cortex, cells should be studied in their natural environment, isolated glomeruli or even tissue slices. Identification of a specific marker of MCs should help genetic manipulation as well as selective therapeutic targeting of these cells. Identification of biological responses of MCs that are not mediated by the renin–angiotensin system should help development of novel and effective therapeutic strategies to treat diseases characterized by MC pathology.

  8. Electrochemical cell stack assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Craig P.; Visco, Steven J.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Multiple stacks of tubular electrochemical cells having a dense electrolyte disposed between an anode and a cathode preferably deposited as thin films arranged in parallel on stamped conductive interconnect sheets or ferrules. The stack allows one or more electrochemical cell to malfunction without disabling the entire stack. Stack efficiency is enhanced through simplified gas manifolding, gas recycling, reduced operating temperature and improved heat distribution.

  9. Programmed cell death

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this conference to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on the role programmed cell death plays in normal development and homeostasis of many organisms. This volume contains abstracts of papers in the following areas: invertebrate development; immunology/neurology; bcl-2 family; biochemistry; programmed cell death in viruses; oncogenesis; vertebrate development; and diseases.

  10. Fuel Cells Vehicle Systems Analysis (Fuel Cell Freeze Investigation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pesaran, A.; Kim, G.; Markel, T.; Wipke, K.

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presentation on Fuel Cells Vehicle Systems Analysis (Fuel Cell Freeze Investigation) for the 2005 Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program Annual Review held in Arlington, Virginia on May 23-26, 2005.

  11. Single-cell technologies for monitoring interactions between immune cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamanaka, Yvonne J. (Yvonne Joy)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Immune cells participate in dynamic cellular interactions that play a critical role in the defense against pathogens and the destruction of malignant cells. The vast heterogeneity of immune cells motivates the study of ...

  12. Cochlear hair cell regeneration from neonatal mouse supporting cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bramhall, Naomi F

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Unlike lower vertebrates, capable of spontaneous hair cell regeneration, mammals experience permanent sensorineural hearing loss following hair cell damage. Although low levels of hair cell regeneration have been demonstrated ...

  13. Fuel cells and fuel cell catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Masel, Richard I.; Rice, Cynthia A.; Waszczuk, Piotr; Wieckowski, Andrzej

    2006-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A direct organic fuel cell includes a formic acid fuel solution having between about 10% and about 95% formic acid. The formic acid is oxidized at an anode. The anode may include a Pt/Pd catalyst that promotes the direct oxidation of the formic acid via a direct reaction path that does not include formation of a CO intermediate.

  14. Collective migration of epithelial sheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murrell, Michael Peter

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The varied movements of the epithelium play vital roles in the development and renewal of complex tissues, from the separation of tissues in the early embryo, to homeostasis in the adult. Their movement is intricately ...

  15. Diagnostic studies on Li-battery cells and cell components

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    cells Disassembly of New and Aged Cells Electrode Surface & Bulk Analyses (ANL, BNL, LBNL) Electrolyte & Separator study (ANL, LBNL) Electrochemistry (ANL) Reference Electrode...

  16. Developmental Cell, Vol. 2, 159170, February, 2002, Copyright 2002 by Cell Press Regulation of Cell Number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steller, Hermann

    of these proteins in mammalian cells theory of cell survival provides a conceptual framework and a Xenopus cell of Cell Number by MAPK-Dependent Control of Apoptosis: A Mechanism for Trophic Survival Signaling proper control" (Raff, 1992) of cell survival ensures the func- tional integrity of a given tissue or organ

  17. Imposed currents in galvanic cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biesheuvel, P. M.

    We analyze the steady-state behavior of a general mathematical model for reversible galvanic cells, such as redox flow cells, reversible solid oxide fuel cells, and rechargeable batteries. We consider not only operation ...

  18. Cell Patterning with Mucin Biopolymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crouzier, T.

    The precise spatial control of cell adhesion to surfaces is an endeavor that has enabled discoveries in cell biology and new possibilities in tissue engineering. The generation of cell-repellent surfaces currently requires ...

  19. Thermal Management of Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saadah, Mohammed Ahmed

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    heat exchangers, and solar cells," Sci-Tech News, vol. 65,Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells, vol. 86, pp. 451-Nanostructured Silicon- Based Solar Cells, 2013. X. C. Tong,

  20. NANOCOMPOSITE ENABLED SENSITIZED SOLAR CELL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phuyal, Dibya

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells 93(10): 1728-1723,Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells 92(8) 39. Sima, C.Y. , Warta, W. , Dunlop, E.D. Solar Cell efficiency tables (

  1. RECHARGEABLE MOLTEN-SALT CELLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cairns, Elton J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    KC! /FeS 2 cell lithium-silicon magnesium oxide molten-saltmolten-salt cells Na/Na glass/Na:z.Sn-S cell Na/NazO•xA!Symposium on Molten Salts, Physical Electrochemistry

  2. DOE Hydrogen & Fuel Cell Overview

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    t t 1 | Fuel Cell Technologies Program eere.energy.gov Fuel Cell Technologies Program DOE Hydrogen & Fuel Cell Overview Dr. Sunita Satyapal Program Manager U S D f E Overview U.S....

  3. NANOCOMPOSITE ENABLED SENSITIZED SOLAR CELL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phuyal, Dibya

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Y. , Warta, W. , Dunlop, E.D. Solar Cell efficiency tables (in dye-sensitized solar cells based on Tio2 nanocrystal/R. J. ; Nozik, A. J. Schottky Solar Cells Based on Colloidal

  4. Thermal Management of Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saadah, Mohammed Ahmed

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanostructured Silicon- Based Solar Cells, 2013. X. C. Tong,heat exchangers, and solar cells," Sci-Tech News, vol. 65,in crystalline silicon solar cells," Renewable Energy, vol.

  5. Thermal Management of Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saadah, Mohammed Ahmed

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    output electricity. Solar cells panels that employ opticalsurfaces such as the solar cell back panel and a heat panelbe shaped as a flat panel below a solar cells array with fin

  6. Power from the Fuel Cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipman, Timothy E.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Power for Buildings Using Fuel-Cell Cars,” Proceedings ofwell as to drive down fuel-cell system costs through productthe potential advantages of fuel cells as clean and reliable

  7. Thermal Management of Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saadah, Mohammed Ahmed

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is the ratio of the solar cell output power to the incidentmaximum power output at: The fill factor of a solar cell FFsolar cell temperature by about 15°C, which increases the output power

  8. Internet Fuel Cells Forum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sudhoff, Frederick A.

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The rapid development and integration of the Internet into the mainstream of professional life provides the fuel cell industry with the opportunity to share new ideas with unprecedented capabilities. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) has undertaken the task to maintain a Fuel Cell Forum on the Internet. Here, members can exchange ideas and information pertaining to fuel cell technologies. The purpose of this forum is to promote a better understanding of fuel cell concepts, terminology, processes, and issues relating to commercialization of fuel cell power technology. The Forum was developed by METC to provide those interested with fuel cell conference information for its current concept of exchanging ideas and information pertaining to fuel cells. Last August, the Forum expanded to an on-line and world-wide network. There are 250 members, and membership is growing at a rate of several new subscribers per week. The forum currently provides updated conference information and interactive information exchange. Forum membership is encouraged from utilities, industry, universities, and government. Because of the public nature of the internet, business sensitive, confidential, or proprietary information should not be placed on this system. The Forum is unmoderated; therefore, the views and opinions of authors expressed in the forum do not necessarily state or reflect those of the U.S. government or METC.

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: Fuel Cell

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fuel Cell ECIS, Boeing, Caltrans, and Others: Fuel-Cell-Powered Mobile Lighting Applications On March 29, 2013, in Capabilities, CRF, Energy, Energy Efficiency, Facilities,...

  10. Air Liquide - Biogas & Fuel Cells

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Concept Landfill WWTP digester Biogas membrane Pipeline quality methane CH4 Pipeline Hydrogen Production To Fuel Cell Vehicles Stationary Fuel Cells With H2...

  11. Fuel Cell Technologies Program Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CSD Workshop Washington, DC Fuel Cell Technologies Program Overview Dr. Sunita Satyapal Director, Fuel Cell Technologies Office Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S....

  12. Fuel Cell Technologies Program Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Non-Metallic Materials Meeting Washington, DC Fuel Cell Technologies Program Overview Dr. Sunita Satyapal U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program Program Manager...

  13. Cell Cycle Related Differentiation of Bone Marrow Cells into Lung Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aliotta, Jason M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bone marrow production of lung cells: the impact of G-CSF,bone marrow to reconstitute lung epithelium. Am. J. Respirof Bone Marrow Cells into Lung Cells Mark S. Dooner 1 *,

  14. Microbubble cell actuator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braff, Rebecca A. (Rebecca Alice)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The field of microsystems technology is rapidly growing, and expanding its horizons to applications in bioengineering. Currently, there are no cell analysis systems that facilitate the collection of dynamic responses for ...

  15. Fuel cell water transport

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vanderborgh, Nicholas E. (Los Alamos, NM); Hedstrom, James C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The moisture content and temperature of hydrogen and oxygen gases is regulated throughout traverse of the gases in a fuel cell incorporating a solid polymer membrane. At least one of the gases traverses a first flow field adjacent the solid polymer membrane, where chemical reactions occur to generate an electrical current. A second flow field is located sequential with the first flow field and incorporates a membrane for effective water transport. A control fluid is then circulated adjacent the second membrane on the face opposite the fuel cell gas wherein moisture is either transported from the control fluid to humidify a fuel gas, e.g., hydrogen, or to the control fluid to prevent excess water buildup in the oxidizer gas, e.g., oxygen. Evaporation of water into the control gas and the control gas temperature act to control the fuel cell gas temperatures throughout the traverse of the fuel cell by the gases.

  16. What determines cell size?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mechanism for nuclear positioning in fission yeast based onboth budding and fission yeast that nuclear volume increasesFR, Nurse P: Nuclear size control in fission yeast. J Cell

  17. Bioreactors Stem Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schüler, Axel

    Keywords Bioreactors Stem Cells Regenerative Medicine Tissue Engineering Pharmacology » Prof. bioreactors, hy- brid systems, e. g. bioartificial liver, fully biological implants, e. g. car- diovascular- opments in regenerative medicine is tissue and organ regeneration rather than reparation. Bioreactor

  18. Introgression & mapping Fiber cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Germplasm Introgression Genomics & mapping Fiber cell initiation Radiation hybrid (RH) mapping and breeding. Research activities commonly include plant breeding, genetics, genomics, cytogenetics, molecular methods. (C, S) · Contribute uniquely to genomics and its relevance to genetic improvement (C,S) · Harness

  19. Photovoltaic solar cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nielson, Gregory N; Okandan, Murat; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Resnick, Paul J

    2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A photovoltaic solar cell for generating electricity from sunlight is disclosed. The photovoltaic solar cell comprises a plurality of spaced-apart point contact junctions formed in a semiconductor body to receive the sunlight and generate the electicity therefrom, the plurality of spaced-apart point contact junctions having a first plurality of regions having a first doping type and a second plurality of regions having a second doping type. In addition, the photovoltaic solar cell comprises a first electrical contact electrically connected to each of the first plurality of regions and a second electrical contact electrically connected to each of the second plurality of regions, as well as a passivation layer covering major surfaces and sidewalls of the photovoltaic solar cell.

  20. Photovoltaic solar cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nielson, Gregory N; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Okandan, Murat; Resnick, Paul J

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A photovoltaic solar cell for generating electricity from sunlight is disclosed. The photovoltaic solar cell comprises a plurality of spaced-apart point contact junctions formed in a semiconductor body to receive the sunlight and generate the electricity therefrom, the plurality of spaced-apart point contact junctions having a first plurality of regions having a first doping type and a second plurality of regions having a second doping type. In addition, the photovoltaic solar cell comprises a first electrical contact electrically connected to each of the first plurality of regions and a second electrical contact electrically connected to each of the second plurality of regions, as well as a passivation layer covering major surfaces and sidewalls of the photovoltaic solar cell.

  1. Solar cell array interconnects

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carey, P.G.; Thompson, J.B.; Colella, N.J.; Williams, K.A.

    1995-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrical interconnects are disclosed for solar cells or other electronic components using a silver-silicone paste or a lead-tin (Pb-Sn) no-clean fluxless solder cream, whereby the high breakage of thin (<6 mil thick) solar cells using conventional solder interconnect is eliminated. The interconnects of this invention employs copper strips which are secured to the solar cells by a silver-silicone conductive paste which can be used at room temperature, or by a Pb-Sn solder cream which eliminates undesired residue on the active surfaces of the solar cells. Electrical testing using the interconnects of this invention has shown that no degradation of the interconnects developed under high current testing, while providing a very low contact resistance value. 4 figs.

  2. Thin film photovoltaic cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rothwarf, Allen (Philadelphia, PA)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A solar cell has as its transparent electrical contact a grid made from a non-noble metal by providing a layer of copper oxide between the transparent electrical contact and the absorber-generator.

  3. Solar cell array interconnects

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carey, Paul G. (Mountain View, CA); Thompson, Jesse B. (Brentwood, CA); Colella, Nicolas J. (Livermore, CA); Williams, Kenneth A. (Livermore, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrical interconnects for solar cells or other electronic components using a silver-silicone paste or a lead-tin (Pb-Sn) no-clean fluxless solder cream, whereby the high breakage of thin (<6 mil thick) solar cells using conventional solder interconnect is eliminated. The interconnects of this invention employs copper strips which are secured to the solar cells by a silver-silicone conductive paste which can be used at room temperature, or by a Pb-Sn solder cream which eliminates undesired residue on the active surfaces of the solar cells. Electrical testing using the interconnects of this invention has shown that no degradation of the interconnects developed under high current testing, while providing a very low contact resistance value.

  4. CELL CLINICS FOR BLOELECTRONIC INTERFACE WITH SINGLE CELLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryland at College Park, University of

    CELL CLINICS FOR BLOELECTRONIC INTERFACE WITH SINGLE CELLS P. Abshiret, J.-M Lauensteid Y.L i d E for capture and characterization of large numbers of individual cells. Each of these "cell clinics" consists microactuators linking rigid plates to the substrate. These clinics are fabricated on integrated circuit

  5. What do grid cells contribute to place cell firing?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgess, Neil

    What do grid cells contribute to place cell firing? Daniel Bush1,2 , Caswell Barry3 , and Neil to be generated by input from entorhinal grid cell modules with differing spatial scales. Here, we review recent and direction to environmental boundaries, while grid cells provide a complementary self-motion related input

  6. Compliant fuel cell system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bourgeois, Richard Scott (Albany, NY); Gudlavalleti, Sauri (Albany, NY)

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A fuel cell assembly comprising at least one metallic component, at least one ceramic component and a structure disposed between the metallic component and the ceramic component. The structure is configured to have a lower stiffness compared to at least one of the metallic component and the ceramic component, to accommodate a difference in strain between the metallic component and the ceramic component of the fuel cell assembly.

  7. Ice electrode electrolytic cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glenn, David F. (Idaho Falls, ID); Suciu, Dan F. (Idaho Falls, ID); Harris, Taryl L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ingram, Jani C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a method and apparatus for removing heavy metals from waste water, soils, or process streams by electrolytic cell means. The method includes cooling a cell cathode to form an ice layer over the cathode and then applying an electric current to deposit a layer of the heavy metal over the ice. The metal is then easily removed after melting the ice. In a second embodiment, the same ice-covered electrode can be employed to form powdered metals.

  8. Aluminum reduction cell electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goodnow, W.H.; Payne, J.R.

    1982-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is directed to cathode modules comprised of refractory hard metal materials, such as TiB[sub 2], for an electrolytic cell for the reduction of alumina wherein the modules may be installed and replaced during operation of the cell and wherein the structure of the cathode modules is such that the refractory hard metal materials are not subjected to externally applied forces or rigid constraints. 9 figs.

  9. Ice electrode electrolytic cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glenn, D.F.; Suciu, D.F.; Harris, T.L.; Ingram, J.C.

    1993-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a method and apparatus for removing heavy metals from waste water, soils, or process streams by electrolytic cell means. The method includes cooling a cell cathode to form an ice layer over the cathode and then applying an electric current to deposit a layer of the heavy metal over the ice. The metal is then easily removed after melting the ice. In a second embodiment, the same ice-covered electrode can be employed to form powdered metals.

  10. Composite fuel cell membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plowman, Keith R. (Lake Jackson, TX); Rehg, Timothy J. (Lake Jackson, TX); Davis, Larry W. (West Columbia, TX); Carl, William P. (Marble Falls, TX); Cisar, Alan J. (Cypress, TX); Eastland, Charles S. (West Columbia, TX)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A bilayer or trilayer composite ion exchange membrane suitable for use in a fuel cell. The composite membrane has a high equivalent weight thick layer in order to provide sufficient strength and low equivalent weight surface layers for improved electrical performance in a fuel cell. In use, the composite membrane is provided with electrode surface layers. The composite membrane can be composed of a sulfonic fluoropolymer in both core and surface layers.

  11. Cytoskeleton and Cell Motility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Risler

    2011-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The present article is an invited contribution to the Encyclopedia of Complexity and System Science, Robert A. Meyers Ed., Springer New York (2009). It is a review of the biophysical mechanisms that underly cell motility. It mainly focuses on the eukaryotic cytoskeleton and cell-motility mechanisms. Bacterial motility as well as the composition of the prokaryotic cytoskeleton is only briefly mentioned. The article is organized as follows. In Section III, I first present an overview of the diversity of cellular motility mechanisms, which might at first glance be categorized into two different types of behaviors, namely "swimming" and "crawling". Intracellular transport, mitosis - or cell division - as well as other extensions of cell motility that rely on the same essential machinery are briefly sketched. In Section IV, I introduce the molecular machinery that underlies cell motility - the cytoskeleton - as well as its interactions with the external environment of the cell and its main regulatory pathways. Sections IV D to IV F are more detailed in their biochemical presentations; readers primarily interested in the theoretical modeling of cell motility might want to skip these sections in a first reading. I then describe the motility mechanisms that rely essentially on polymerization-depolymerization dynamics of cytoskeleton filaments in Section V, and the ones that rely essentially on the activity of motor proteins in Section VI. Finally, Section VII is devoted to the description of the integrated approaches that have been developed recently to try to understand the cooperative phenomena that underly self-organization of the cell cytoskeleton as a whole.

  12. Composite fuel cell membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Plowman, K.R.; Rehg, T.J.; Davis, L.W.; Carl, W.P.; Cisar, A.J.; Eastland, C.S.

    1997-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A bilayer or trilayer composite ion exchange membrane is described suitable for use in a fuel cell. The composite membrane has a high equivalent weight thick layer in order to provide sufficient strength and low equivalent weight surface layers for improved electrical performance in a fuel cell. In use, the composite membrane is provided with electrode surface layers. The composite membrane can be composed of a sulfonic fluoropolymer in both core and surface layers.

  13. Monolithic tandem solar cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wanlass, M.W.

    1989-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    It is an object of the invention to provide a monolithic tandem photovoltaic solar cell which is highly radiation resistant and efficient; in which the energy bandgap of the lower subcell can be tailored for specific applications; solar cell comprising layers of InP and GaInAsP (or GaInAs), where said photovoltaic cell is useful, for example, in space power applications; having an improved power-to-mass ratio; in which subcells are lattice-matches; and are both two terminal and three terminal monolithic tandem photovoltaic solar cells. To achieve the foregoing and other objects and in accordance with the purpose of the present invention, as embodied and broadly described herein, the monolithic tandem photovoltaic solar cell may comprise; (a) an InP substrate having an upper surface; (b) a first photoactive subcell on the upper surface of the InP substrate; wherein the first subcell comprises GaInAs (which could include GaInAsP) and includes a homojunction; and (c) a second photoactive subcell on the first subcell; wherein the second subcell comprises InP and includes a homojunction. The cell is described in detail. 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Nighttime solar cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parise, R.J.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently photovoltaic (PV) cells convert solar energy into electrical energy at an efficiency of about 18%, with the maximum conversion rate taking place around noon on a cloudless day. In many applications, the PV cells are utilized to recharge a stand-by battery pack that provides electrical energy at night or on cloudy days. Increasing the utilization of the panel array area by producing electrical power at night will reduce the amount of required electrical energy storage for a given array size and increase system reliability. Thermoelectric generators (TEG) are solid state devices that convert thermal energy into electrical energy. Using the nighttime sky, or deep space, with an effective temperature of 3.5 K as a cold sink, the TEG presented here can produce electrical power at night. The hot junction is supplied energy by the ambient air temperature or some other warm temperature source. The cold junction of the TEG is insulated from the surroundings by a vacuum cell, improving its overall effectiveness. Combining the TEG with the PV cell, a unique solid state device is developed that converts electromagnetic radiant energy into usable electrical energy. The thermoelectric-photovoltaic (TEPV) cell, or the Nighttime Solar Cell, is a direct energy conversion device that produces electrical energy both at night and during the day.

  15. Fuel cell system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Early, Jack (Perth Amboy, NJ); Kaufman, Arthur (West Orange, NJ); Stawsky, Alfred (Teaneck, NJ)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fuel cell system is comprised of a fuel cell module including sub-stacks of series-connected fuel cells, the sub-stacks being held together in a stacked arrangement with cold plates of a cooling means located between the sub-stacks to function as electrical terminals. The anode and cathode terminals of the sub-stacks are connected in parallel by means of the coolant manifolds which electrically connect selected cold plates. The system may comprise a plurality of the fuel cell modules connected in series. The sub-stacks are designed to provide a voltage output equivalent to the desired voltage demand of a low voltage, high current DC load such as an electrolytic cell to be driven by the fuel cell system. This arrangement in conjunction with switching means can be used to drive a DC electrical load with a total voltage output selected to match that of the load being driven. This arrangement eliminates the need for expensive voltage regulation equipment.

  16. Quantitative Analysis of Biological Effects on 18F-FDG Uptake in Tumors: from In-vitro to In-vivo Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sha, Wei

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ability of human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cell line to growuptake in mammary cell line MDA-MB-231 is not affected asTwo tumor types, U87 and MDA-MB-231, were implanted in SCID

  17. Seventh Edition Fuel Cell Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NETL

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Provides an overview of fuel cell technology and research projects. Discusses the basic workings of fuel cells and their system components, main fuel cell types, their characteristics, and their development status, as well as a discussion of potential fuel cell applications.

  18. Breakthrough Vehicle Development - Fuel Cells

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    Document describing research and development program for fuel cell power systems for transportation applications.

  19. FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and fuel cells offer great promise for our energy future. Fuel cell vehicles are not yet commercially, such as a hydrogen fueling station or hydrogen fuel cell vehicle. Technology validation does not certify, and the Federal Government to evaluate hydrogen fuel cell vehicle and infrastructure technologies together in real

  20. National Fuel Cell Research Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mease, Kenneth D.

    the optimal conditions to operate a molten carbonate fuel cell, can be used to garner fundamental insightNational Fuel Cell Research Center www.nfcrc.uci.edu MOLTEN CARBONATE FUEL CELLS STEADY STATE MODELING OF MOLTEN CARBONATE FUEL CELLS FOR SYSTEM PERFORMANCE ANALYSES OVERVIEW Development of steady

  1. Electrochemical cell operation and system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maru, Hansraj C. (Brookfield Center, CT)

    1980-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal control in fuel cell operation is affected through sensible heat of process gas by providing common input manifolding of the cell gas flow passage in communication with the cell electrolyte and an additional gas flow passage which is isolated from the cell electrolyte and in thermal communication with a heat-generating surface of the cell. Flow level in the cell gas flow passage is selected based on desired output electrical energy and flow level in the additional gas flow passage is selected in accordance with desired cell operating temperature.

  2. Sulphoraphane, a naturally occurring isothiocyanate induces apoptosis in breast cancer cells by targeting heat shock proteins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarkar, Ruma; Mukherjee, Sutapa [Department of Environmental Carcinogenesis and Toxicology, Chittaranjan National Cancer Institute, 37, SP Mukherjee Road, Kolkata 700 026 (India)] [Department of Environmental Carcinogenesis and Toxicology, Chittaranjan National Cancer Institute, 37, SP Mukherjee Road, Kolkata 700 026 (India); Biswas, Jaydip [Chittaranjan National Cancer Institute, 37, SP Mukherjee Road, Kolkata 700 026 (India)] [Chittaranjan National Cancer Institute, 37, SP Mukherjee Road, Kolkata 700 026 (India); Roy, Madhumita, E-mail: mitacnci@yahoo.co.in [Department of Environmental Carcinogenesis and Toxicology, Chittaranjan National Cancer Institute, 37, SP Mukherjee Road, Kolkata 700 026 (India)] [Department of Environmental Carcinogenesis and Toxicology, Chittaranjan National Cancer Institute, 37, SP Mukherjee Road, Kolkata 700 026 (India)

    2012-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HSPs (27, 70 and 90) and HSF1 are overexpressed in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sulphoraphane, a natural isothiocyanate inhibited HSPs and HSF1 expressions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of HSPs and HSF1 lead to regulation of apoptotic proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alteration of apoptotic proteins activate of caspases particularly caspase 3 and 9 leading to induction of apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alteration of apoptotic proteins induce caspases leading to induction of apoptosis. -- Abstract: Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are involved in protein folding, aggregation, transport and/or stabilization by acting as a molecular chaperone, leading to inhibition of apoptosis by both caspase dependent and/or independent pathways. HSPs are overexpressed in a wide range of human cancers and are implicated in tumor cell proliferation, differentiation, invasion and metastasis. HSPs particularly 27, 70, 90 and the transcription factor heat shock factor1 (HSF1) play key roles in the etiology of breast cancer and can be considered as potential therapeutic target. The present study was designed to investigate the role of sulphoraphane, a natural isothiocyanate on HSPs (27, 70, 90) and HSF1 in two different breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells expressing wild type and mutated p53 respectively, vis-a-vis in normal breast epithelial cell line MCF-12F. It was furthermore investigated whether modulation of HSPs and HSF1 could induce apoptosis in these cells by altering the expressions of p53, p21 and some apoptotic proteins like Bcl-2, Bax, Bid, Bad, Apaf-1 and AIF. Sulphoraphane was found to down-regulate the expressions of HSP70, 90 and HSF1, though the effect on HSP27 was not pronounced. Consequences of HSP inhibition was upregulation of p21 irrespective of p53 status. Bax, Bad, Apaf-1, AIF were upregulated followed by down-regulation of Bcl-2 and this effect was prominent in MCF-7 than in MDA-MB-231. However, very little change in the expression of Bid was observed. Alteration in Bcl-2 Bax ratio resulted in the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria and activation of caspases 3 and 9 which are in agreement with apoptotic index values. Sulphoraphane therefore can be regarded as a potent inducer of apoptosis due to HSP modulation in breast cancer cells.

  3. Fuel Cells - Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cells Fuel Cells - Basics Fuel Cells - Basics Photo of a fuel cell stack A fuel cell uses the chemical energy of hydrogen to cleanly and efficiently produce electricity with...

  4. Cell Cycle Related Differentiation of Bone Marrow Cells into Lung Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dooner, Mark; Aliotta, Jason M.; Pimental, Jeffrey; Dooner, Gerri J.; Abedi, Mehrdad; Colvin, Gerald; Liu, Qin; Weier, Heinz-Ulli; Dooner, Mark S.; Quesenberry, Peter J.

    2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Green-fluorescent protein (GFP) labeled marrow cells transplanted into lethally irradiated mice can be detected in the lungs of transplanted mice and have been shown to express lung specific proteins while lacking the expression of hematopoietic markers. We have studied marrow cells induced to transit cell cycle by exposure to IL-3, IL-6, IL-11 and steel factor at different times of culture corresponding to different phases of cell cycle. We have found that marrow cells at the G1/S interface have a 3-fold increase in cells which assume a lung phenotype and that this increase is no longer seen in late S/G2. These cells have been characterized as GFP{sup +} CD45{sup -} and GFP{sup +} cytokeratin{sup +}. Thus marrow cells with the capacity to convert into cells with a lung phenotype after transplantation show a reversible increase with cytokine induced cell cycle transit. Previous studies have shown the phenotype of bone marrow stem cells fluctuates reversibly as these cells traverse cell cycle, leading to a continuum model of stem cell regulation. The present studies indicate that marrow stem cell production of nonhematopoietic cells also fluctuates on a continuum.

  5. Cell Phone Detection Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratt, Richard M.; Bunch, Kyle J.; Puzycki, David J.; Slaugh, Ryan W.; Good, Morris S.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A team composed of Rick Pratt, Dave Puczyki, Kyle Bunch, Ryan Slaugh, Morris Good, and Doug McMakin teamed together to attempt to exploit cellular telephone features and detect if a person was carrying a cellular telephone into a Limited Area. The cell phone’s electromagnetic properties were measured, analyzed, and tested in over 10 different ways to determine if an exploitable signature exists. The method that appears to have the most potential for success without adding an external tag is to measure the RF spectrum, not in the cell phone band, but between 240 and 400MHz. Figures 1- 7 show the detected signal levels from cell phones from three different manufacturers.

  6. Solar Cells: Spin-Cast Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells: A Dynamical...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Cells: Spin-Cast Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells: A Dynamical Investigation Solar Cells: Spin-Cast Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells: A Dynamical Investigation Print Wednesday,...

  7. Generation of Cardiomyocytes from Human Endogenous and Pluripotent Stem-Cell Derived Endothelial Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Truong, Raymond

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    through a 70 micron cell strainer to dissociate cellthrough a 45 micron cell strainer-capped FACS tube (Fisherthrough a 70 micron cell strainer to dissociate cell

  8. Superlattice cascade solar cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wanlass, M.W.; Blakeslee, A.E.

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports progress toward realization of a new cascade solar cell structure whose chief advantages over other present concepts are: use of silicon for the substrate and low bandgap cell; avoidance of the necessity of lattice matching; and incorporation of a GaAs/GaP superlattice to enhance efficiency and provide a low-resistance connecting junction. Details of the design and operation of an OMCVD system for growing this structure are presented. Results of experiments to optimize layer thickness, compositional uniformity, and surface morphology are described.

  9. Monolithic tandem solar cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wanlass, M.W.

    1991-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a single-crystal, monolithic, tandem, photovoltaic solar cell which includes an InP substrate having an upper and lower surfaces, a first photoactive subcell on the upper surface of the InP substrate, and a second photoactive subcell on the first subcell. The first photovoltaic subcell is GaInAsP of defined composition. The second subcell is InP. The two subcells are lattice matched. The solar cell can be provided as a two- terminal device or a three-terminal device.

  10. Fuel cell stack arrangements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kothmann, Richard E. (Churchill Boro, PA); Somers, Edward V. (Murrysville, PA)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Arrangements of stacks of fuel cells and ducts, for fuel cells operating with separate fuel, oxidant and coolant streams. An even number of stacks are arranged generally end-to-end in a loop. Ducts located at the juncture of consecutive stacks of the loop feed oxidant or fuel to or from the two consecutive stacks, each individual duct communicating with two stacks. A coolant fluid flows from outside the loop, into and through cooling channels of the stack, and is discharged into an enclosure duct formed within the loop by the stacks and seals at the junctures at the stacks.

  11. Monolithic tandem solar cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wanlass, Mark W. (Golden, CO)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A single-crystal, monolithic, tandem, photovoltaic solar cell is described which includes (a) an InP substrate having upper and lower surfaces, (b) a first photoactive subcell on the upper surface of the InP substrate, and (c) a second photoactive subcell on the first subcell. The first photoactive subcell is GaInAsP of defined composition. The second subcell is InP. The two subcells are lattice matched. The solar cell can be provided as a two-terminal device or a three-terminal device.

  12. Separators for electrochemical cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlson, Steven Allen; Anakor, Ifenna Kingsley

    2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Provided are separators for use in an electrochemical cell comprising (a) an inorganic oxide and (b) an organic polymer, wherein the inorganic oxide comprises organic substituents. Preferably, the inorganic oxide comprises an hydrated aluminum oxide of the formula Al.sub.2O.sub.3.xH.sub.2O, wherein x is less than 1.0, and wherein the hydrated aluminum oxide comprises organic substituents, preferably comprising a reaction product of a multifunctional monomer and/or organic carbonate with an aluminum oxide, such as pseudo-boehmite and an aluminum oxide. Also provided are electrochemical cells comprising such separators.

  13. Fuel Cell Technologies Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdfTechnologies Program (FCTP)Overview Fuel CellFuel Cell Seminar

  14. Fuel Cell Technologies Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdfTechnologies Program (FCTP)Overview Fuel CellFuel Cell

  15. Pancreatic stellate cells enhance stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamada, Shin [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)] [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Masamune, Atsushi, E-mail: amasamune@med.tohoku.ac.jp [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)] [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Takikawa, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Noriaki; Kikuta, Kazuhiro; Hirota, Morihisa [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)] [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Hamada, Hirofumi [Laboratory of Oncology, Department of Life Sciences, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, Hachioji (Japan)] [Laboratory of Oncology, Department of Life Sciences, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, Hachioji (Japan); Kobune, Masayoshi [Fourth Department of Internal Medicine, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan)] [Fourth Department of Internal Medicine, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Satoh, Kennichi [Division of Cancer Stem Cell, Miyagi Cancer Center Research Institute, Natori (Japan)] [Division of Cancer Stem Cell, Miyagi Cancer Center Research Institute, Natori (Japan); Shimosegawa, Tooru [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)] [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)

    2012-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) promote the progression of pancreatic cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs showed enhanced spheroid formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of stem cell-related genes ABCG2, Nestin and LIN28 was increased. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-injection of PSCs enhanced tumorigenicity of pancreatic cancer cells in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study suggested a novel role of PSCs as a part of the cancer stem cell niche. -- Abstract: The interaction between pancreatic cancer cells and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs), a major profibrogenic cell type in the pancreas, is receiving increasing attention. There is accumulating evidence that PSCs promote the progression of pancreatic cancer by increasing cancer cell proliferation and invasion as well as by protecting them from radiation- and gemcitabine-induced apoptosis. Recent studies have identified that a portion of cancer cells, called 'cancer stem cells', within the entire cancer tissue harbor highly tumorigenic and chemo-resistant phenotypes, which lead to the recurrence after surgery or re-growth of the tumor. The mechanisms that maintain the 'stemness' of these cells remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that PSCs might enhance the cancer stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells. Indirect co-culture of pancreatic cancer cells with PSCs enhanced the spheroid-forming ability of cancer cells and induced the expression of cancer stem cell-related genes ABCG2, Nestin and LIN28. In addition, co-injection of PSCs enhanced tumorigenicity of pancreatic cancer cells in vivo. These results suggested a novel role of PSCs as a part of the cancer stem cell niche.

  16. A novel synthetic analog of militarin, MA-1 induces mitochondrial dependent apoptosis by ROS generation in human lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, Deok Hyo; Lim, Mi-Hee [Department of Biochemistry, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yu Ran [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 301-747 (Korea, Republic of); Sung, Gi-Ho [Mushroom Research Division, National Institute of Horticultural and Herbal Science, Rural Development Administration, Suwon 404-707 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Tae-Ho [R and D Center, Dong-A Pharmaceutical Co, Ltd, Yongin 446-905 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Byeong Hwa [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 301-747 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jae Youl [Department of Genetic Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Won O. [Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Park, Haeil [College of Pharmacy, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Sunga, E-mail: sachoi@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 301-747 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Woong, E-mail: tawkim@kangwon.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A synthetic Militarin analog-1[(2R,3R,4R,5R)-1,6-bis(4-(2,4,4-trimethylpentan-2-yl)phenoxy) hexane-2,3,4,5-tetraol] is a novel derivative of constituents from Cordyceps militaris, which has been used to treat a variety of chronic diseases including inflammation, diabetes, hyperglycemia and cancers. Here, we report for the first time the synthesis of Militarin analog-1 (MA-1) and the apoptotic mechanism of MA-1 against human lung cancer cell lines. Treatment with MA-1 significantly inhibited the viability of 3 human lung cancer cell lines. The inhibition of viability and growth in MA-1-treated A549 cells with an IC{sub 50} of 5 ?M were mediated through apoptosis induction, as demonstrated by an increase in DNA fragmentation, sub-G{sub 0}/G{sub 1}-DNA fraction, nuclear condensation, and phosphatidylserine exposure. The apoptotic cell death caused mitochondrial membrane permeabilization through regulation of expression of the Bcl-2 family proteins, leading to cytochrome c release in a time-dependent manner. Subsequently, the final stage of apoptosis, activation of caspase-9/-3 and cleavage of poly (ADP ribose) polymerase, was induced. Furthermore, A549 lung cancer cells were more responsive to MA-1 than a bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B), involving the rapid generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation. The pharmacological inhibition of ROS generation and JNK/p38 MAPK exhibited attenuated DNA fragmentation in MA-1-induced apoptosis. Oral administration of MA-1 also retarded growth of A549 orthotopic xenografts. In conclusion, the present study indicates that the new synthetic derivative MA-1 triggers mitochondrial apoptosis through ROS generation and regulation of MAPKs and may be a potent therapeutic agent against human lung cancer. - Highlights: • We report a novel synthesized derivative, militarin analog-1 (MA-1). • MA-1-induced cancer cell death was triggered by the ROS generation through MAPKs. • The MA-1-induced cell death was also modulated by the mitochondria-mediated pathway. • The apoptotic cancer cell death by MA-1 was also exhibited in orthotopic xenografts. • Our findings suggest MA-1 as a clinically useful agent for human lung cancer.

  17. Cell patterning technology for controlling the stem cell microenvironment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenthal, Adam D. (Adam David), 1978-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Embryonic stem cells serve as powerful models for the study of development and disease and hold enormous potential for future therapeutics. Yet, over two decades after mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) were first isolated, ...

  18. Correlation of cell membrane dynamics and cell motility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veronika, Merlin

    Abstract Background Essential events of cell development and homeostasis are revealed by the associated changes of cell morphology and therefore have been widely used as a key indicator of physiological states and molecular ...

  19. EE580 Solar Cells Todd J. Kaiser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiser, Todd J.

    7/21/2010 1 EE580 ­ Solar Cells Todd J. Kaiser · Lecture 06 · Solar Cell Materials & Structures 1Montana State University: Solar Cells Lecture 6: Solar Cells Solar Cell Technologies · A) Crystalline Silicon · B) Thin Film · C) Group III-IV Cells 2Montana State University: Solar Cells Lecture 6: Solar

  20. Thin film photovoltaic cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meakin, John D. (Newark, DE); Bragagnolo, Julio (Newark, DE)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thin film photovoltaic cell having a transparent electrical contact and an opaque electrical contact with a pair of semiconductors therebetween includes utilizing one of the electrical contacts as a substrate and wherein the inner surface thereof is modified by microroughening while being macro-planar.

  1. Jaagsiekte Sheep Retrovirus Biology and Oncogenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hofacre, Andrew; Fan, Hung

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    epithelial cells of the lungs. J. Virol. Viruses 2010, 2 22.Epithelial tumour cells in the lungs of sheep with pulmonaryby fluid build up in the lungs, resulting from the

  2. airway permeability role: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    present in epithelial cells from individuals without asthma a central role in allergic of individuals with asthma, this two-step process for IL-16 production by epithelial cells...

  3. ameliorates interleukin 2-induced: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    present in epithelial cells from individuals without asthma a central role in allergic of individuals with asthma, this two-step process for IL-16 production by epithelial cells...

  4. Fuel Cell Handbook, Fourth Edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stauffer, D.B; Hirschenhofer, J.H.; Klett, M.G.; Engleman, R.R.

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Robust progress has been made in fuel cell technology since the previous edition of the Fuel Cell Handbook was published in January 1994. This Handbook provides a foundation in fuel cells for persons wanting a better understanding of the technology, its benefits, and the systems issues that influence its application. Trends in technology are discussed, including next-generation concepts that promise ultra high efficiency and low cost, while providing exceptionally clean power plant systems. Section 1 summarizes fuel cell progress since the last edition and includes existing power plant nameplate data. Section 2 addresses the thermodynamics of fuel cells to provide an understanding of fuel cell operation at two levels (basic and advanced). Sections 3 through 6 describe the four major fuel cell types and their performance based on cell operating conditions. The section on polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells has been added to reflect their emergence as a significant fuel cell technology. Phosphoric acid, molten carbonate, and solid oxide fuel cell technology description sections have been updated from the previous edition. New information indicates that manufacturers have stayed with proven cell designs, focusing instead on advancing the system surrounding the fuel cell to lower life cycle costs. Section 7, Fuel Cell Systems, has been significantly revised to characterize near-term and next-generation fuel cell power plant systems at a conceptual level of detail. Section 8 provides examples of practical fuel cell system calculations. A list of fuel cell URLs is included in the Appendix. A new index assists the reader in locating specific information quickly.

  5. Cell Stem Cell Generation of Multipotent Lung and Airway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mootha, Vamsi K.

    Cell Stem Cell Article Generation of Multipotent Lung and Airway Progenitors from Mouse ESCs.01.018 SUMMARY Deriving lung progenitors from patient-specific pluripotent cells is a key step in producing differenti- ated lung epithelium for disease modeling and trans- plantation. By mimicking the signaling

  6. Microfluidic Microbial Fuel Cells for Microstructure Interrogations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parra, Erika Andrea

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Applications of Microscale Microbial Fuel Cell SystemsApplications of Microscale Microbial Fuel Cell Systems Infrom the use of microscale microbial fuel cells is that of

  7. Microfluidic Microbial Fuel Cells for Microstructure Interrogations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parra, Erika Andrea

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Model of hydrogen fuel cell kinetic losses includingschematic of typical hydrogen fuel cell performancephase factors on hydrogen fuel cell theoretical efficiency,

  8. Market Transformation: Fuel Cell Early Adoption (Presentation...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Transformation: Fuel Cell Early Adoption (Presentation) Market Transformation: Fuel Cell Early Adoption (Presentation) Presented at the DOE Fuel Cell Pre-Solicitation Workshop held...

  9. Fabrication and Characterization of Organic Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yengel, Emre

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    electrodes  for  dye? sensitized solar cells.  Nano solar cells and dye-sensitized solar cells. Figure 1-3 The

  10. Fabrication and Characterization of Organic Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yengel, Emre

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    processable polymer photovoltaic cells by self?organization Photodiodes,  and  Photovoltaic  Cells.   Applied Physics F,  Heeger  AJ.   Polymer  Photovoltaic  Cells  ?  Enhanced 

  11. Fuel Cells - Current Technology | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Cells - Current Technology Fuel Cells - Current Technology Today, fuel cells are being developed to power passenger vehicles, commercial buildings, homes, and even small...

  12. Microfluidic Microbial Fuel Cells for Microstructure Interrogations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parra, Erika Andrea

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sediment microbial fuel cells demonstrating marine (left)Model of hydrogen fuel cell kinetic losses including5 FutureWork 5.1 Microfluidic Microbial Fuel Cell Continued

  13. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Accomplishments and Progress |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Fuel Cell Technologies Office Fuel Cell Technologies Office Accomplishments and Progress Fuel Cell Technologies Office Accomplishments and Progress The U.S. Department of...

  14. An advanced fuel cell simulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acharya, Prabha Ramchandra

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fuel cell power generation systems provide a clean alternative to the conventional fossil fuel based systems. Fuel cell systems have a high e?ciency and use easily available hydrocarbons like methane. Moreover, since the by-product is water...

  15. NANOCOMPOSITE ENABLED SENSITIZED SOLAR CELL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phuyal, Dibya

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    551, 2005. 2. Graztel, M. Solar Energy Conversion by Dye-Y. , Warta, W. , Dunlop, E.D. Solar Cell efficiency tables (efficiency in dye-sensitized solar cells based on Tio2

  16. An advanced fuel cell simulator 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acharya, Prabha Ramchandra

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fuel cell power generation systems provide a clean alternative to the conventional fossil fuel based systems. Fuel cell systems have a high e?ciency and use easily available hydrocarbons like methane. Moreover, since ...

  17. 2009 Fuel Cell Market Report

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    Fuel cells are electrochemical devices that combine hydrogen and oxygen to produce electricity, water, and heat. Unlike batteries, fuel cells continuously generate electricity, as long as a source of

  18. Fuel Cell Systems Air Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Air Management Honeywell TIAX UTC Mechanology, LLC · Turbocompressor for PEM Fuel Cells · Hybrid-Machined Thin Film H2 Gas Sensors - ATMI · Sensor Development for PEM Fuel Cell Systems ­ Honeywell · Gallium

  19. HYDROGEN FUEL CELL BUS EVALUATION

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This paper describes the prototype fuel cell bus, fueling infrastructure, and maintenance facility for an early technology adopter.

  20. Shipboard Fuel Cell Biofuel Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Update FuelCell Energy (Frank Wolak) 1230 PNNL SOFC Power Systems Update PNNL (Larry Chick) 1300 PEM

  1. Microfluidic Fuel Cells Erik Kjeang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    Microfluidic Fuel Cells by Erik Kjeang M.Sc., Umeå University, 2004 A Dissertation Submitted Supervisory Committee Microfluidic Fuel Cells by Erik Kjeang M.Sc., Umeå University, 2004 Supervisory University External Examiner Microfluidic fuel cell architectures are presented in this thesis. This work

  2. National Fuel Cell Research Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mease, Kenneth D.

    National Fuel Cell Research Center www.nfcrc.uci.edu SOFC AND PEMFC COMPARISON Efficiency ­ Higher FOR OPTIMIZATION · Fuel Cell · Compressor · Combustor · Turbine · Storage Tank · Heat Exchanger·Battery · Motor of the system. · Operating characteristics of fuel cells at pressures less than 1 atm are largely unknown

  3. Fuel cell generator energy dissipator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veyo, Stephen Emery (Murrysville, PA); Dederer, Jeffrey Todd (Valencia, PA); Gordon, John Thomas (Ambridge, PA); Shockling, Larry Anthony (Pittsburgh, PA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for eliminating the chemical energy of fuel remaining in a fuel cell generator when the electrical power output of the fuel cell generator is terminated. During a generator shut down condition, electrically resistive elements are automatically connected across the fuel cell generator terminals in order to draw current, thereby depleting the fuel

  4. Method for fabricating silicon cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruby, D.S.; Basore, P.A.; Schubert, W.K.

    1998-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for making high-efficiency solar cells. This is accomplished by forming a diffusion junction and a passivating oxide layer in a single high-temperature process step. The invention includes the class of solar cells made using this process, including high-efficiency solar cells made using Czochralski-grown silicon. 9 figs.

  5. National Fuel Cell Research Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mease, Kenneth D.

    National Fuel Cell Research Center www.nfcrc.uci.edu CONTROLS RESIDENTIAL FUEL CELL PHOTOVOLTAIC and efficiency, (3) RFC produces hydrogen, a flexible fuel that may be used for electricity, vehicles, heating fuel cells (RFC), we gain access to a new energy storage device that is both analogous to rechargeable

  6. Method for fabricating silicon cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruby, Douglas S. (Albuquerque, NM); Basore, Paul A. (Albuquerque, NM); Schubert, W. Kent (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for making high-efficiency solar cells. This is accomplished by forming a diffusion junction and a passivating oxide layer in a single high-temperature process step. The invention includes the class of solar cells made using this process, including high-efficiency solar cells made using Czochralski-grown silicon.

  7. Commercialization of fuel-cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Penner, S.S.; Appleby, A.J.; Baker, B.S.; Bates, J.L.; Buss, L.B.; Dollard, W.J.; Farris, P.J.; Gillis, E.A.; Gunsher, J.A.; Khandkar, A.; Krumpelt, M.; O'Sullivan, J.B.; Runte, G.; Savinell, R.F.; Selman, J.R.; Shores, D.A.; Tarman, P.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is an abbreviated version of the ''Report of the DOE Advanced Fuel Cell Commercialization Working Group (AFC2WG),'' released January 1995. We describe fuel-cell commercialization for stationary power applications of phosphoric acid, molten carbonate, solid oxide, and polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells.

  8. Massively Parallel Microfluidic Cell-Pairing Platform for the Statistical Study of Immunological Cell-Cell Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoehl, Melanie Margarete

    Variability in cell-cell interactions is ubiquitous and particularly relevant for the immune system, where the reliability of cell-cell interactions is critical for the prevention of disease. This variability is poorly ...

  9. Vorinostat, an HDAC inhibitor attenuates epidermoid squamous cell carcinoma growth by dampening mTOR signaling pathway in a human xenograft murine model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurundkar, Deepali; Srivastava, Ritesh K.; Chaudhary, Sandeep C. [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1530 3rd Avenue South, VH 509, Birmingham, AL 35294-0019 (United States)] [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1530 3rd Avenue South, VH 509, Birmingham, AL 35294-0019 (United States); Ballestas, Mary E. [Department of Pediatrics Infectious Disease, Children's of Alabama, School of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, AL (United States)] [Department of Pediatrics Infectious Disease, Children's of Alabama, School of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, AL (United States); Kopelovich, Levy [Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute, 6130 Executive Blvd., Suite 2114, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)] [Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute, 6130 Executive Blvd., Suite 2114, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Elmets, Craig A. [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1530 3rd Avenue South, VH 509, Birmingham, AL 35294-0019 (United States)] [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1530 3rd Avenue South, VH 509, Birmingham, AL 35294-0019 (United States); Athar, Mohammad, E-mail: mathar@uab.edu [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1530 3rd Avenue South, VH 509, Birmingham, AL 35294-0019 (United States)] [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1530 3rd Avenue South, VH 509, Birmingham, AL 35294-0019 (United States)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are potent anticancer agents and show efficacy against various human neoplasms. Vorinostat is a potent HDAC inhibitor and has shown potential to inhibit growth of human xenograft tumors. However, its effect on the growth of skin neoplasm remains undefined. In this study, we show that vorinostat (2 ?M) reduced expression of HDAC1, 2, 3, and 7 in epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Consistently, it increased acetylation of histone H3 and p53. Vorinostat (100 mg/kg body weight, IP) treatment reduced human xenograft tumor growth in highly immunosuppressed nu/nu mice. Histologically, the vorinostat-treated tumor showed features of well-differentiation with large necrotic areas. Based on proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) staining and expression of cyclins D1, D2, E, and A, vorinostat seems to impair proliferation by down-regulating the expression of these proteins. However, it also induced apoptosis. The mechanism by which vorinostat blocks proliferation and makes tumor cells prone to apoptosis, involved inhibition of mTOR signaling which was accompanied by reduction in cell survival AKT and extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways. Our data provide a novel mechanism-based therapeutic intervention for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Vorinostat may be utilized to cure skin neoplasms in organ transplant recipient (OTR). These patients have high morbidity and surgical removal of these lesions which frequently develop in these patients, is difficult. -- Highlights: ? Vorinostat reduces SCC growth in a xenograft murine model. ? Vorinostat dampens proliferation and induces apoptosis in tumor cells. ? Diminution in mTOR, Akt and ERK signaling underlies inhibition in proliferation. ? Vorinostat by inhibiting HDACs inhibits epithelial–mesenchymal transition.

  10. Fuel Cell Handbook, Fifth Edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Energy and Environmental Solutions

    2000-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress continues in fuel cell technology since the previous edition of the Fuel Cell Handbook was published in November 1998. Uppermost, polymer electrolyte fuel cells, molten carbonate fuel cells, and solid oxide fuel cells have been demonstrated at commercial size in power plants. The previously demonstrated phosphoric acid fuel cells have entered the marketplace with more than 220 power plants delivered. Highlighting this commercial entry, the phosphoric acid power plant fleet has demonstrated 95+% availability and several units have passed 40,000 hours of operation. One unit has operated over 49,000 hours. Early expectations of very low emissions and relatively high efficiencies have been met in power plants with each type of fuel cell. Fuel flexibility has been demonstrated using natural gas, propane, landfill gas, anaerobic digester gas, military logistic fuels, and coal gas, greatly expanding market opportunities. Transportation markets worldwide have shown remarkable interest in fuel cells; nearly every major vehicle manufacturer in the U.S., Europe, and the Far East is supporting development. This Handbook provides a foundation in fuel cells for persons wanting a better understanding of the technology, its benefits, and the systems issues that influence its application. Trends in technology are discussed, including next-generation concepts that promise ultrahigh efficiency and low cost, while providing exceptionally clean power plant systems. Section 1 summarizes fuel cell progress since the last edition and includes existing power plant nameplate data. Section 2 addresses the thermodynamics of fuel cells to provide an understanding of fuel cell operation at two levels (basic and advanced). Sections 3 through 8 describe the six major fuel cell types and their performance based on cell operating conditions. Alkaline and intermediate solid state fuel cells were added to this edition of the Handbook. New information indicates that manufacturers have stayed with proven cell designs, focusing instead on advancing the system surrounding the fuel cell to lower life cycle costs. Section 9, Fuel Cell Systems, has been significantly revised to characterize near-term and next-generation fuel cell power plant systems at a conceptual level of detail. Section 10 provides examples of practical fuel cell system calculations. A list of fuel cell URLs is included in the Appendix. A new index assists the reader in locating specific information quickly.

  11. Development of High Energy Density Lithium-Sulfur Cells

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    mechanism analysis, and 4 Ah prismatic cell design and testing - Cell modeling and optimization MILESTONES 4 * 1st set (NCM Baseline Cells): Cell size: 1Ah pouch cells....

  12. area solar cells: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cells Lecture 6: Solar Cells Solar Cell Technologies A) Crystalline Silicon B) Thin Film C) Group III-IV Cells 2Montana State University: Solar Cells Lecture 6:...

  13. aluminium arsenide solar cells: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cells Lecture 6: Solar Cells Solar Cell Technologies A) Crystalline Silicon B) Thin Film C) Group III-IV Cells 2Montana State University: Solar Cells Lecture 6:...

  14. Compact fuel cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Craig (Moraga, CA); DeJonghe, Lutgard C. (Lafayette, CA); Lu, Chun (Richland, WA)

    2010-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel electrochemical cell which may be a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is disclosed where the cathodes (144, 140) may be exposed to the air and open to the ambient atmosphere without further housing. Current collector (145) extends through a first cathode on one side of a unit and over the unit through the cathode on the other side of the unit and is in electrical contact via lead (146) with housing unit (122 and 124). Electrical insulator (170) prevents electrical contact between two units. Fuel inlet manifold (134) allows fuel to communicate with internal space (138) between the anodes (154 and 156). Electrically insulating members (164 and 166) prevent the current collector from being in electrical contact with the anode.

  15. Aluminum reduction cell electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Payne, J.R.

    1983-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is directed to an anode-cathode structure for an electrolytic cell for the reduction of alumina wherein the structure is comprised of a carbon anode assembly which straddles a wedge-shaped refractory hard metal cathode assembly having steeply sloped cathodic surfaces, each cathodic surface being paired in essentially parallel planar relationship with an anode surface. The anode-cathode structure not only takes into account the structural weakness of refractory hard metal materials but also permits the changing of the RHM assembly during operation of the cell. Further, the anode-cathode structure enhances the removal of anode gas from the interpolar gap between the anode and cathode surfaces. 10 figs.

  16. Broad spectrum solar cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw (Kensington, CA); Yu, Kin Man (Lafayette, CA); Wu, Junqiao (Richmond, CA); Schaff, William J. (Ithaca, NY)

    2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An alloy having a large band gap range is used in a multijunction solar cell to enhance utilization of the solar energy spectrum. In one embodiment, the alloy is In.sub.1-xGa.sub.xN having an energy bandgap range of approximately 0.7 eV to 3.4 eV, providing a good match to the solar energy spectrum. Multiple junctions having different bandgaps are stacked to form a solar cell. Each junction may have different bandgaps (realized by varying the alloy composition), and therefore be responsive to different parts of the spectrum. The junctions are stacked in such a manner that some bands of light pass through upper junctions to lower junctions that are responsive to such bands.

  17. Fuel cell system combustor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pettit, William Henry (Rochester, NY)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fuel cell system including a fuel reformer heated by a catalytic combustor fired by anode and cathode effluents. The combustor includes a turbulator section at its input end for intimately mixing the anode and cathode effluents before they contact the combustors primary catalyst bed. The turbulator comprises at least one porous bed of mixing media that provides a tortuous path therethrough for creating turbulent flow and intimate mixing of the anode and cathode effluents therein.

  18. Cell culture compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yiao, Jian

    2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl6 (SEQ ID NO:1 encodes the full length endoglucanase; SEQ ID NO:4 encodes the mature form), and the corresponding endoglucanase VI amino acid sequence ("EGVI"; SEQ ID NO:3 is the signal sequence; SEQ ID NO:2 is the mature sequence). The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVI, recombinant EGVI proteins and methods for producing the same.

  19. Yeast Immunofluorescence Prepare Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aris, John P.

    H2O. Wash once with SPC buffer. 8. Digest yeast cell wall. Resuspend yeast with 0.5 ml SPC buffer. Add 20 µl of freshly made 10 mg/ml Zymolyase 100T in SPC buffer. Or, add 20 µl of 50 mg/ml freshly made Zymolyase 20T in SPC buffer. Incubate at room temperature on rotator for 10 minutes. SPC buffer

  20. Rapidly refuelable fuel cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Joy, R.W.

    1982-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A rapidly refuelable dual cell of an electrochemical type is described wherein a single anode cooperates with two cathodes and wherein the anode has a fixed position and the cathodes are urged toward opposite faces of the anodes at constant and uniform force. The associated cathodes are automatically retractable to permit the consumed anode remains to be removed from the housing and a new anode inserted between the two cathodes.

  1. Miniature ceramic fuel cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lessing, Paul A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Zuppero, Anthony C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1997-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A miniature power source assembly capable of providing portable electricity is provided. A preferred embodiment of the power source assembly employing a fuel tank, fuel pump and control, air pump, heat management system, power chamber, power conditioning and power storage. The power chamber utilizes a ceramic fuel cell to produce the electricity. Incoming hydro carbon fuel is automatically reformed within the power chamber. Electrochemical combustion of hydrogen then produces electricity.

  2. Coordination of cell growth with cell division: G1 cyclin regulation of nitrogen metabolism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan, Brad Allen

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    How cell growth and metabolism are coupled with cell division is largely unknown. We examined budding yeast cells growing under continuous culture conditions, and found that cell growth requirements were not limited to the G1 phase of the cell...

  3. Role of Nck adaptors in the regulation of endothelial cell-cell adhesion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bray, Kristyn

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The establishment of endothelial cell-cell contacts is critical for the development and maintenance of the vascular network. Endothelial cell adherens junctions (AJ) are cell-cell adhesion complexes consisting of clusters of vascular endothelial (VE...

  4. Cell Clinics Technology Platform for Cell-Based Sensing Abstract--The cell clinics microsystem is a platform for long-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryland at College Park, University of

    Cell Clinics Technology Platform for Cell-Based Sensing Abstract--The cell clinics microsystem individual cells into the vials. I. INTRODUCTION The cell clinics system is designed to house individual, and the presence of CMOS/MEMS, which limits integration of other methods. Figure 1. The cell clinics array

  5. Nickel coated aluminum battery cell tabs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bucchi, Robert S.; Casoli, Daniel J.; Campbell, Kathleen M.; Nicotina, Joseph

    2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A battery cell tab is described. The battery cell tab is anodized on one end and has a metal coating on the other end. Battery cells and methods of making battery cell tabs are also described.

  6. Fabrication and Characterization of Organic Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yengel, Emre

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells. 2005;86(2):197-205.in LEDs [18-20] and solar cells [ 20, 21]. What makes thesesolar cells, hybrid solar cells and dye-sensitized solar

  7. Double interconnection fuel cell array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Draper, R.; Zymboly, G.E.

    1993-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A fuel cell array is made, containing number of tubular, elongated fuel cells which are placed next to each other in rows (A, B, C, D), where each cell contains inner electrodes and outer electrodes, with solid electrolyte between the electrodes, where the electrolyte and outer electrode are discontinuous, having two portions, and providing at least two opposed discontinuities which contain at least two oppositely opposed interconnections contacting the inner electrode, each cell having only three metallic felt electrical connectors which contact surrounding cells, where each row is electrically connected to the other. 5 figures.

  8. Self-humidified proton exchange membrane fuel cells: Operation of larger cells and fuel cell stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dhar, H.P.; Lee, J.H.; Lewinski, K.A. [BCS Technology, Inc., Bryan, TX (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The PEM fuel cell is promising as the power source for use in mobile and stationary applications primarily because of its high power density, all solid components, and simplicity of operation. For wide acceptability of this power source, its cost has to be competitive with the presently available energy sources. The fuel cell requires continuous humidification during operation as a power source. The humidification unit however, increases fuel cell volume, weight, and therefore decreases its overall power density. Great advantages in terms of further fuel cell simplification can be achieved if the humidification process can be eliminated or minimized. In addition, cost reductions are associated with the case of manufacturing and operation. At BCS Technology we have developed a technology of self-humidified operation of PEM fuel cells based on the mass balance of the reactants and products and the ability of membrane electrode assembly (MEA) to retain water necessary for humidification under the cell operating conditions. The reactants enter the fuel cell chambers without carrying any form of water, whether in liquid or vapor form. Basic principles of self-humidified operation of fuel cells as practiced by BCS Technology, Inc. have been presented previously in literature. Here, we report the operation of larger self-humidified single cells and fuel cell stacks. Fuel cells of areas Up to 100 cm{sup 2} have been operated. We also show the self-humidified operation of fuel cell stacks of 50 and 100 cm{sup 2} electrode areas.

  9. Fabrication and Characterization of Organic Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yengel, Emre

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AJ. Polymer Photovoltaic Cells - Enhanced Efficiencies Via afor high-efficiency polymer photovoltaic cells usingfactors. The photovoltaic power conversion efficiency (?) [

  10. EE580 Solar Cells Todd J. Kaiser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiser, Todd J.

    7/21/2010 1 EE580 ­ Solar Cells Todd J. Kaiser · Lecture 08 · Solar Cell Characterization 1Montana State University: Solar Cells Lecture 8: Characterization Solar Cell Operation n Emitter p Base Rear completing the circuit 2Montana State University: Solar Cells Lecture 8: Characterization Solar Cell

  11. Restriction of Receptor Movement Alters Cellular Response: Physical Force Sensing by EphA2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salaita, Khalid; Nair, Pradeep M; Petit, Rebecca S; Neve, Richard M; Das, Debopriya; Gray, Joe W; Groves, Jay T

    2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Activation of the EphA2 receptor tyrosine kinase by ephrin-A1 ligands presented on apposed cell surfaces plays important roles in development and exhibits poorly understood functional alterations in cancer. We reconstituted this intermembrane signaling geometry between live EphA2-expressing human breast cancer cells and supported membranes displaying laterally mobile ephrin-A1. Receptor-ligand binding, clustering, and subsequent lateral transport within this junction were observed. EphA2 transport can be blocked by physical barriers nanofabricated onto the underlying substrate. This physical reorganization of EphA2 alters the cellular response to ephrin-A1, as observed by changes in cytoskeleton morphology and recruitment of a disintegrin and metalloprotease 10. Quantitative analysis of receptor-ligand spatial organization across a library of 26 mammary epithelial cell lines reveals characteristic differences that strongly correlate with invasion potential. These observations reveal a mechanism for spatio-mechanical regulation of EphA2 signaling pathways.

  12. Flexible method for monitoring fuel cell voltage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mowery, Kenneth D. (Noblesville, IN); Ripley, Eugene V. (Russiaville, IN)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for equalizing the measured voltage of each cluster in a fuel cell stack wherein at least one of the clusters has a different number of cells than the identical number of cells in the remaining clusters by creating a pseudo voltage for the different cell numbered cluster. The average cell voltage of the all of the cells in the fuel cell stack is calculated and multiplied by a constant equal to the difference in the number of cells in the identical cell clusters and the number of cells in the different numbered cell cluster. The resultant product is added to the actual voltage measured across the different numbered cell cluster to create a pseudo voltage which is equivalent in cell number to the number of cells in the other identical numbered cell clusters.

  13. MicroRNA expression in canine mammary cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boggs, Rene' Michelle

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    to act as both tumor suppressors and oncogenes in several different cancers, expression patterns of ten miRNAs (miR-15a, miR-16, miR-17-5p, miR-21, miR-29b, miR-125b, miR-145, miR-155, miR-181b, let-7f) known to be associated with human breast cancer were...

  14. Laminin and biomimetic extracellular elasticity enhance functional differentiation in mammary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Celeste M.

    Brownfield1 , Derek C Radisky1,6 , Carlos Bustamante2,3,4 and Mina J Bissell1, * 1 Life Sciences Division

  15. Laminin Mediates Tissue-specific Gene Expression in Mammary Epithelia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Streuli, Charles H

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    417. Aumailley, M. , C. Battaglia, U. Mayer, D. Reinhardt,S. Conzelmann, P. Ekblom, C. Battaglia, M. Aumailley, and R.

  16. Monolithic tandem solar cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wanlass, Mark W. (Golden, CO)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A single-crystal, monolithic, tandem, photovoltaic solar cell is described which includes (a) an InP substrate having upper and lower surfaces, (b) a first photoactive subcell on the upper surface of the InP substrate, (c) a second photoactive subcell on the first subcell; and (d) an optically transparent prismatic cover layer over the second subcell. The first photoactive subcell is GaInAsP of defined composition. The second subcell is InP. The two subcells are lattice matched.

  17. Monolithic tandem solar cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wanlass, M.W.

    1994-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A single-crystal, monolithic, tandem, photovoltaic solar cell is described which includes (a) an InP substrate having upper and lower surfaces, (b) a first photoactive subcell on the upper surface of the InP substrate, (c) a second photoactive subcell on the first subcell; and (d) an optically transparent prismatic cover layer over the second subcell. The first photoactive subcell is GaInAsP of defined composition. The second subcell is InP. The two subcells are lattice matched. 9 figs.

  18. Carbonate fuel cell anodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Donado, Rafael A. (Chicago, IL); Hrdina, Kenneth E. (Glenview, IL); Remick, Robert J. (Bolingbrook, IL)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A molten alkali metal carbonates fuel cell porous anode of lithium ferrite and a metal or metal alloy of nickel, cobalt, nickel/iron, cobalt/iron, nickel/iron/aluminum, cobalt/iron/aluminum and mixtures thereof wherein the total iron content including ferrite and iron of the composite is about 25 to about 80 percent, based upon the total anode, provided aluminum when present is less than about 5 weight percent of the anode. A process for production of the lithium ferrite containing anode by slipcasting.

  19. Carbonate fuel cell anodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Donado, R.A.; Hrdina, K.E.; Remick, R.J.

    1993-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A molten alkali metal carbonates fuel cell porous anode of lithium ferrite and a metal or metal alloy of nickel, cobalt, nickel/iron, cobalt/iron, nickel/iron/aluminum, cobalt/iron/aluminum and mixtures thereof wherein the total iron content including ferrite and iron of the composite is about 25 to about 80 percent, based upon the total anode, provided aluminum when present is less than about 5 weight percent of the anode. A process is described for production of the lithium ferrite containing anode by slipcasting.

  20. Automotive Fuel Cell Corporation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternativeOperationalAugust August 2015 Events2-7148Automotive Fuel Cell

  1. Sandia Energy - Fuel Cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Press ReleasesInAppliedEnergy Storage ComponentsFuel Cells

  2. Stationary Fuel Cells: Overview of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers stationary fuel cells and is given at the Spring 2010 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting in Providence, Rhode Island.

  3. The Business Case for Fuel Cells 2012 America's Partner in Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ................................................................................................................... 5 Fuel Cells + Biogas...

  4. Hybrid Fuel Cell Technology Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None available

    2001-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    For the purpose of this STI product and unless otherwise stated, hybrid fuel cell systems are power generation systems in which a high temperature fuel cell is combined with another power generating technology. The resulting system exhibits a synergism in which the combination performs with an efficiency far greater than can be provided by either system alone. Hybrid fuel cell designs under development include fuel cell with gas turbine, fuel cell with reciprocating (piston) engine, and designs that combine different fuel cell technologies. Hybrid systems have been extensively analyzed and studied over the past five years by the Department of Energy (DOE), industry, and others. These efforts have revealed that this combination is capable of providing remarkably high efficiencies. This attribute, combined with an inherent low level of pollutant emission, suggests that hybrid systems are likely to serve as the next generation of advanced power generation systems.

  5. DNDO Analysis Cell Concept

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pagh, Richard T.; Dimmerling, Paul J.; Guillen, Zoe C.; Hoyt, Joel R.; Jarman, Kenneth D.; Kernan, Warnick J.; Reichmuth, Barbara A.; Rohlfing, Kerrie S.; Schweppe, John E.; Sego, Landon H.; Shergur, Jason M.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Woodring, Mitchell L.

    2014-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO) has a mission of implementing rad/nuc interdiction capabilities for a managed and coordinated response to threats, integration of federal nuclear forensics programs, and coordinating the development of the global nuclear detection and reporting architecture. In the process of executing this mission, DNDO has generated substantial information, data, technical results, operational workflows and analytical tools. The effective utilization of these resources is an overarching goal of the organization. After nearly a decade of performing work, DNDO faces a challenge in capitalizing on the large amount of data, reports, processes, tools, and people. As new work is being planned, managers and researchers need to have an understating of what information has been collected, what tools are available, the collaborations which can be utilized to propel the work forward, processes to plan and execute, and how to present conclusions and results that can assist the government in making decisions. This type of challenge can be met through the use of a series of organized and connected elements which form a broader structure (cell) that promotes cross utilization of elements such that they can be tailored (analyzed) to fit the context of the problem to be solved. The development of an analysis cell for DNDO will address the challenges of utilizing existing elements, identifying gaps, annually reporting the performance of rad/nuc interdiction instrumentation, and planning the execution of future work.

  6. Ion cyclotron resonance cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weller, R.R.

    1995-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion cyclotron resonance cell is disclosed having two adjacent sections separated by a center trapping plate. The first section is defined by the center trapping plate, a first end trapping plate, and excitation and detector electrodes. The second section includes a second end trapping plate spaced apart from the center plate, a mirror, and an analyzer. The analyzer includes a wavelength-selective light detector, such as a detector incorporating an acousto-optical device (AOD) and a photodetector. One or more ion guides, grounded plates with holes for the ion beam, are positioned within the vacuum chamber of the mass spectrometer between the ion source and the cell. After ions are trapped and analyzed by ion cyclotron resonance techniques in the first section, the ions of interest are selected according to their mass and passed into the second section for optical spectroscopic studies. The trapped ions are excited by light from a laser and caused thereby to fluoresce. The fluorescent light emitted by the excited ions is reflected by the mirror and directed onto the detector. The AOD is scanned, and the photodetector output is recorded and analyzed. The ions remain in the second section for an extended period, enabling multiple studies to be carried out on the same ensemble of ions. 5 figs.

  7. Ion cyclotron resonance cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weller, Robert R. (Aiken, SC)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion cyclotron resonance cell having two adjacent sections separated by a center trapping plate. The first section is defined by the center trapping plate, a first end trapping plate, and excitation and detector electrodes. The second section includes a second end trapping plate spaced apart from the center plate, a mirror, and an analyzer. The analyzer includes a wavelength-selective light detector, such as a detector incorporating an acousto-optical device (AOD) and a photodetector. One or more ion guides, grounded plates with holes for the ion beam, are positioned within the vacuum chamber of the mass spectrometer between the ion source and the cell. After ions are trapped and analyzed by ion cyclotron resonance techniques in the first section, the ions of interest are selected according to their mass and passed into the second section for optical spectroscopic studies. The trapped ions are excited by light from a laser and caused thereby to fluoresce. The fluorescent light emitted by the excited ions is reflected by the mirror and directed onto the detector. The AOD is scanned, and the photodetector output is recorded and analyzed. The ions remain in the second section for an extended period, enabling multiple studies to be carried out on the same ensemble of ions.

  8. Efficiency measurements of TPV cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broman, L.; Jarefors, K. [Solar Energy Research Center, Hoegskolan Dalarna, S-781 88 Borlaenge (Sweden); Marks, J. [Department of Operational Efficiency, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Box 7060, S-750 07 Uppsala (Sweden); Wanlass, M. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 (United States of America)

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for measuring TPV cell efficiencies at different radiation intensities and for different graybody emitter temperatures has been constructed. The apparatus has been used for measuring V-I characteristics, efficiencies and fill factors for several InGaAs TPV cells. Measured results are used to determine how cells may function together with edge filters, and those results are compared with theory. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Solar cell module lamination process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carey, Paul G. (Mountain View, CA); Thompson, Jesse B. (Brentwood, CA); Aceves, Randy C. (Tracy, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A solar cell module lamination process using fluoropolymers to provide protection from adverse environmental conditions and thus enable more extended use of solar cells, particularly in space applications. A laminate of fluoropolymer material provides a hermetically sealed solar cell module structure that is flexible and very durable. The laminate is virtually chemically inert, highly transmissive in the visible spectrum, dimensionally stable at temperatures up to about 200.degree. C. highly abrasion resistant, and exhibits very little ultra-violet degradation.

  10. Cell signalling and phospholipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boss, W.F.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These studies explored whether phosphoinositide (PI) has a role in plants analogous to its role in animal cells. Although no parallel activity of PI in signal transduction was found in plant cells, activity of inositol phospholipid kinase was found to be modulated by light and by cell wall degrading enzymes. These studies indicate a major role for inositol phospholipids in plant growth and development as membrane effectors but not as a source of second messengers.

  11. Fuel cell gas management system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DuBose, Ronald Arthur (Marietta, GA)

    2000-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A fuel cell gas management system including a cathode humidification system for transferring latent and sensible heat from an exhaust stream to the cathode inlet stream of the fuel cell; an anode humidity retention system for maintaining the total enthalpy of the anode stream exiting the fuel cell equal to the total enthalpy of the anode inlet stream; and a cooling water management system having segregated deionized water and cooling water loops interconnected by means of a brazed plate heat exchanger.

  12. Corrosion resistant PEM fuel cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Y.; Meng, W.J.; Swathirajan, S.; Harris, S.J.; Doll, G.L.

    1997-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention contemplates a PEM fuel cell having electrical contact elements (including bipolar plates/septums) comprising a titanium nitride coated light weight metal (e.g., Al or Ti) core, having a passivating, protective metal layer intermediate the core and the titanium nitride. The protective layer forms a barrier to further oxidation/corrosion when exposed to the fuel cell`s operating environment. Stainless steels rich in Cr, Ni, and Mo are particularly effective protective interlayers. 6 figs.

  13. Manufacturing Fuel Cell Manhattan Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Chief Scientist. There, he was responsible for proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell technology assessment and advanced development, as well as technical initiatives within...

  14. Thermal Management of Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saadah, Mohammed Ahmed

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ratio of the solar cell output power to the incident lightpower to operate the fan. Natural cooling is preferred for solar

  15. Lux expression in eukaryotic cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gupta, Rakesh K. (New Delhi, IN); Patterson, Stacy S. (Knoxville, TN); Sayler, Gary S. (Blaine, TN); Ripp, Steven A. (Knoxville, TN)

    2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The luxA, B, C, D, and E genes from Photorhabdus luminescens have been introduced into Saccharomyces cerevisiae bioluminescent yeast cells.

  16. Multi-cell storage battery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brohm, Thomas (Hattersheim, DE); Bottcher, Friedhelm (Kelkheim, DE)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-cell storage battery, in particular to a lithium storage battery, which contains a temperature control device and in which groups of one or more individual cells arranged alongside one another are separated from one another by a thermally insulating solid layer whose coefficient of thermal conductivity lies between 0.01 and 0.2 W/(m*K), the thermal resistance of the solid layer being greater by at least a factor .lambda. than the thermal resistance of the individual cell. The individual cell is connected, at least in a region free of insulating material, to a heat exchanger, the thermal resistance of the heat exchanger in the direction toward the neighboring cell being selected to be greater by at least a factor .lambda. than the thermal resistance of the individual cell and, in addition, the thermal resistance of the heat exchanger toward the temperature control medium being selected to be smaller by at least a factor of about 10 than the thermal resistance of the individual cell, and .lambda. being the ratio of the energy content of the individual cell to the amount of energy that is needed to trigger a thermally induced cell failure at a defined upper operating temperature limit.

  17. Improving Solar-Cell Efficiency

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Improving Solar Cell Efficiency October 7, 2014 Bookmark and Share The two-dimensional grazing...

  18. NANOCOMPOSITE ENABLED SENSITIZED SOLAR CELL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phuyal, Dibya

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gap NIR – Near Infrared DSSC – Dye Sensitized Solar Cell TiOinterplay among various DSSC components. DSSCs consist of ainvestigated. In a conventional DSSC, a thick semiconducting

  19. CLIMATE CHANGE FUEL CELL PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven A. Gabrielle

    2004-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the first year of operation of a fuel cell power plant located at the Sheraton Edison Hotel, Edison, New Jersey. PPL EnergyPlus, LLC installed the plant under a contract with the Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, Inc. A DFC{reg_sign}300 fuel cell, manufactured by FuelCell Energy, Inc. of Danbury, CT was selected for the project. The fuel cell successfully operated from June 2003 to May 2004. This report discusses the performance of the plant during this period.

  20. Fuel Cell Projects Kickoff Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    high volume production of 500,000 unitsyear Fuel Cell Barriers A. Durability B. Cost C. Performance D. Water Transport within the Stack E. System Thermal and Water...

  1. Computed tomography of cryogenic cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY OF CRYOGENIC CELLS G. SCHNEIDER, and E.absorption, computed tomography (CT) can be performed. Sincethis work is to apply computed tomography, which has already

  2. Bulb mounting of solar cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, M.E.

    1983-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    An energy converting assembly is provided for parasiting of light from a fluorescent light bulb utilizing a solar cell. The solar cell is mounted on a base member elongated in the dimension of elongation of the fluorescent bulb, and electrical interconnections to the cell are provided. A flexible sheet of opaque material having a flat white interior reflective surface surrounds the fluorescent bulb and reflects light emitted from the bulb back toward the bulb and the solar cell. The reflective sheet is tightly held in contact with the bottom of the bulb by adhesive, a tie strap, an external clip, or the like.

  3. Optimization of Fuel Cell System Operating Conditions for Fuel Cell Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andy

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    simulation tool for hydrogen fuel cell vehicles, Journal ofApplication on Direct Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles, 2008. Acsystem for direct hydrogen fuel cell vehicles Fig. 3 Driver

  4. Fuel Cell Hybrid Bus Lands at Hickam AFB: Hydrogen Fuel Cell...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hybrid Bus Lands at Hickam AFB: Hydrogen Fuel Cell & Infrastructure Technologies Program, Fuel Cell Bus Demonstration Project (Fact Sheet) Fuel Cell Hybrid Bus Lands at Hickam AFB:...

  5. Optimization of Fuel Cell System Operating Conditions for Fuel Cell Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andy

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An Indirect Methanol Pem Fuel Cell System, SAE 2001, (paperof automotive PEM fuel cell stacks, SAE 2000 (paper numberParasitic Loads in Fuel Cell Vehicles, International Journal

  6. Microfluidic platform for the study of intercellular communication via soluble factor-cell and cell-cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenis, Paul J. A.

    Microfluidic platform for the study of intercellular communication via soluble factor-cell and cell are available today. Here, we report the design and validation of a microfluidic platform that enables (i) soluble molecule-cell and/or (ii) cell-cell paracrine signaling. In the microfluidic platform, multiple

  7. Quantification of the Relative Importance of CTL, B Cell, NK Cell, and Target Cell Limitation in the Control of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , Massachusetts, United States of America Abstract CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), natural killer (NK) cells Asquith1 1 Department of Immunology, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom, 2 ISPED, Bordeaux infected cell death, the remaining cell death being attributable to intrinsic, immune (CD8+ T cell, NK cell

  8. Cell-to-cell communication and cellular environment alter the somatostatin status of delta cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, Catriona, E-mail: catriona.kelly@qub.ac.uk [SAAD Centre for Pharmacy and Diabetes, School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulster, Coleraine (United Kingdom)] [SAAD Centre for Pharmacy and Diabetes, School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulster, Coleraine (United Kingdom); Flatt, Peter R.; McClenaghan, Neville H. [SAAD Centre for Pharmacy and Diabetes, School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulster, Coleraine (United Kingdom)] [SAAD Centre for Pharmacy and Diabetes, School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulster, Coleraine (United Kingdom)

    2010-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Research highlights: {yields} TGP52 cells display enhanced functionality in pseudoislet form. {yields} Somatostatin content was reduced, but secretion increased in high glucose conditions. {yields} Cellular interactions and environment alter the somatostatin status of TGP52 cells. -- Abstract: Introduction: Somatostatin, released from pancreatic delta cells, is a potent paracrine inhibitor of insulin and glucagon secretion. Islet cellular interactions and glucose homeostasis are essential to maintain normal patterns of insulin secretion. However, the importance of cell-to-cell communication and cellular environment in the regulation of somatostatin release remains unclear. Methods: This study employed the somatostatin-secreting TGP52 cell line maintained in DMEM:F12 (17.5 mM glucose) or DMEM (25 mM glucose) culture media. The effect of pseudoislet formation and culture medium on somatostatin content and release in response to a variety of stimuli was measured by somatostatin EIA. In addition, the effect of pseudoislet formation on cellular viability (MTT and LDH assays) and proliferation (BrdU ELISA) was determined. Results: TGP52 cells readily formed pseudoislets and showed enhanced functionality in three-dimensional form with increased E-cadherin expression irrespective of the culture environment used. However, culture in DMEM decreased cellular somatostatin content (P < 0.01) and increased somatostatin secretion in response to a variety of stimuli including arginine, calcium and PMA (P < 0.001) when compared with cells grown in DMEM:F12. Configuration of TGP52 cells as pseudoislets reduced the proliferative rate and increased cellular cytotoxicity irrespective of culture medium used. Conclusions: Somatostatin secretion is greatly facilitated by cell-to-cell interactions and E-cadherin expression. Cellular environment and extracellular glucose also significantly influence the function of delta cells.

  9. Microbial fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nealson, Kenneth H; Pirbazari, Massoud; Hsu, Lewis

    2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A microbial fuel cell includes an anode compartment with an anode and an anode biocatalyst and a cathode compartment with a cathode and a cathode biocatalyst, with a membrane positioned between the anode compartment and the cathode compartment, and an electrical pathway between the anode and the cathode. The anode biocatalyst is capable of catalyzing oxidation of an organic substance, and the cathode biocatalyst is capable of catalyzing reduction of an inorganic substance. The reduced organic substance can form a precipitate, thereby removing the inorganic substance from solution. In some cases, the anode biocatalyst is capable of catalyzing oxidation of an inorganic substance, and the cathode biocatalyst is capable of catalyzing reduction of an organic or inorganic substance.

  10. Photovoltaic cell assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beavis, Leonard C. (Albuquerque, NM); Panitz, Janda K. G. (Edgewood, NM); Sharp, Donald J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A photovoltaic assembly for converting high intensity solar radiation into lectrical energy in which a solar cell is separated from a heat sink by a thin layer of a composite material which has excellent dielectric properties and good thermal conductivity. This composite material is a thin film of porous Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 in which the pores have been substantially filled with an electrophoretically-deposited layer of a styrene-acrylate resin. This composite provides electrical breakdown strengths greater than that of a layer consisting essentially of Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 and has a higher thermal conductivity than a layer of styrene-acrylate alone.

  11. PEM fuel cell degradation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borup, Rodney L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The durability of PEM fuel cells is a major barrier to the commercialization of these systems for stationary and transportation power applications. While significant progress has been made in understanding degradation mechanisms and improving materials, further improvements in durability are required to meet commercialization targets. Catalyst and electrode durability remains a primary degradation mode, with much work reported on understanding how the catalyst and electrode structure degrades. Accelerated Stress Tests (ASTs) are used to rapidly evaluate component degradation, however the results are sometimes easy, and other times difficult to correlate. Tests that were developed to accelerate degradation of single components are shown to also affect other component's degradation modes. Non-ideal examples of this include ASTs examining catalyst degradation performances losses due to catalyst degradation do not always well correlate with catalyst surface area and also lead to losses in mass transport.

  12. Federico Zenith Control of fuel cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Federico Zenith Control of fuel cells Doctoral thesis for the degree of philosophiæ doctor with control of fuel cells, focusing on high-temperature proton- exchange-membrane fuel cells. Fuel cells-wide electric grids. Whereas studies about the design of fuel cell systems and the electrochemical properties

  13. Federico Zenith Control of fuel cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Federico Zenith Control of fuel cells Doctoral thesis for the degree of philosophiæ doctor with control of fuel cells, focusing on high-temperature proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells. Fuel cells-wide electric grids. Whereas studies about the design of fuel cell systems and the electrochemical properties

  14. VERTEX CHAMBERS TARGET CELL CALORIMETER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DRIFT VC 1/2 FC 1/2 VERTEX CHAMBERS TARGET CELL DVC MC 1­3 HODOSCOPE H0 MONITOR BC 1/2 BC 3/4 TRD at Threashold Lambda Physics (u ­L spin transfer) Motivation: ­ W L Target cell e beam L p p e ­ Elastic: Peltier elements ( T ~ ­20C ) ­ Custom built electronics + HELIX chips low autgassing (

  15. Bonded polyimide fuel cell package

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morse, Jeffrey D.; Jankowski, Alan; Graff, Robert T.; Bettencourt, Kerry

    2010-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Described herein are processes for fabricating microfluidic fuel cell systems with embedded components in which micron-scale features are formed by bonding layers of DuPont Kapton.TM. polyimide laminate. A microfluidic fuel cell system fabricated using this process is also described.

  16. Energy 101: Fuel Cell Technology

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Learn how fuel cell technology generates clean electricity from hydrogen to power our buildings and transportation-while emitting nothing but water. This video illustrates the fundamentals of fuel cell technology and its potential to supply our homes, offices, industries, and vehicles with sustainable, reliable energy.

  17. Plastic Schottky barrier solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Waldrop, James R. (Thousand Oaks, CA); Cohen, Marshall J. (Thousand Oaks, CA)

    1984-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A photovoltaic cell structure is fabricated from an active medium including an undoped, intrinsically p-type organic semiconductor comprising polyacetylene. When a film of such material is in rectifying contact with a magnesium electrode, a Schottky-barrier junction is obtained within the body of the cell structure. Also, a gold overlayer passivates the magnesium layer on the undoped polyacetylene film.

  18. Zirconia fuel cells and electrolyzers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isaacs, H.S.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of the historical development, operation, and problems of solid oxide electrolyte fuel cells and electrolyzers is given. The thermodynamic principles of operation are reviewed, and the overvoltage losses during operation of fuel cells and steam electrolyzers are discussed including physical factors and electrochemical factors. (WHK)

  19. Energy 101: Fuel Cell Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Learn how fuel cell technology generates clean electricity from hydrogen to power our buildings and transportation-while emitting nothing but water. This video illustrates the fundamentals of fuel cell technology and its potential to supply our homes, offices, industries, and vehicles with sustainable, reliable energy.

  20. Bronx Zoo Fuel Cell Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoang Pham

    2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A 200 kW Fuel Cell has been installed in the Lion House, Bronx Zoo, NY. The Fuel Cell is a 200 kW phosphoric acid type manufactured by United Technologies Corporation (UTC) and will provide thermal energy at 725,000 Btu/hr.

  1. Graphite-based photovoltaic cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lagally, Max (Madison, WI); Liu, Feng (Salt Lake City, UT)

    2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention uses lithographically patterned graphite stacks as the basic building elements of an efficient and economical photovoltaic cell. The basic design of the graphite-based photovoltaic cells includes a plurality of spatially separated graphite stacks, each comprising a plurality of vertically stacked, semiconducting graphene sheets (carbon nanoribbons) bridging electrically conductive contacts.

  2. Cell boundary fault detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles Jens (Rochester, MN); Pinnow, Kurt Walter (Rochester, MN); Ratterman, Joseph D. (Rochester, MN); Smith, Brian Edward (Rochester, MN)

    2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and program product determine a nodal fault along the boundary, or face, of a computing cell. Nodes on adjacent cell boundaries communicate with each other, and the communications are analyzed to determine if a node or connection is faulty.

  3. Photovoltaic cells employing zinc phosphide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barnett, Allen M. (Newark, DE); Catalano, Anthony W. (Wilmington, DE); Dalal, Vikram L. (Newark, DE); Masi, James V. (Wilbraham, MA); Meakin, John D. (Newark, DE); Hall, Robert B. (Newark, DE)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A photovoltaic cell having a zinc phosphide absorber. The zinc phosphide can be a single or multiple crystal slice or a thin polycrystalline film. The cell can be a Schottky barrier, heterojunction or homojunction device. Methods for synthesizing and crystallizing zinc phosphide are disclosed as well as a method for forming thin films.

  4. DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 14014: Fuel Cell System...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 14014: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 14014: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2014 Program record 14014...

  5. Rechargeable lithium-ion cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bechtold, Dieter (Bad Vilbel, DE); Bartke, Dietrich (Kelkheim, DE); Kramer, Peter (Konigstein, DE); Kretzschmar, Reiner (Kelkheim, DE); Vollbert, Jurgen (Hattersheim, DE)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to a rechargeable lithium-ion cell, a method for its manufacture, and its application. The cell is distinguished by the fact that it has a metallic housing (21) which is electrically insulated internally by two half shells (15), which cover electrode plates (8) and main output tabs (7) and are composed of a non-conductive material, where the metallic housing is electrically insulated externally by means of an insulation coating. The cell also has a bursting membrane (4) which, in its normal position, is located above the electrolyte level of the cell (1). In addition, the cell has a twisting protection (6) which extends over the entire surface of the cover (2) and provides centering and assembly functions for the electrode package, which comprises the electrode plates (8).

  6. Ambient pressure fuel cell system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilson, Mahlon S. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ambient pressure fuel cell system is provided with a fuel cell stack formed from a plurality of fuel cells having membrane/electrode assemblies (MEAs) that are hydrated with liquid water and bipolar plates with anode and cathode sides for distributing hydrogen fuel gas and water to a first side of each one of the MEAs and air with reactant oxygen gas to a second side of each one of the MEAs. A pump supplies liquid water to the fuel cells. A recirculating system may be used to return unused hydrogen fuel gas to the stack. A near-ambient pressure blower blows air through the fuel cell stack in excess of reaction stoichiometric amounts to react with the hydrogen fuel gas.

  7. Dye Sensitized Tandem Photovoltaic Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barber, Greg D.

    2009-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This work provided a new way to look at photoelectrochemical cells and their performance. Although thought of as low efficiency, a the internal efficiency of a 9% global efficiency dye sensitized solar cell is approximately equal to an 18% efficient silicon cell when each is compared to their useful spectral range. Other work undertaken with this contract also reported the first growth oriented titania and perovskite columns on a transparent conducting oxide. Other work has shown than significant performance enhancement in the performance of dye sensitized solar cells can be obtained through the use of coupling inverse opal photonic crystals to the nanocrystalline dye sensitized solar cell. Lastly, a quick efficient method was developed to bond titanium foils to transparent conducting oxide substrates for anodization.

  8. Electrode for a lithium cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thackeray, Michael M. (Naperville, IL); Vaughey, John T. (Elmhurst, IL); Dees, Dennis W. (Downers Grove, IL)

    2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a positive electrode for an electrochemical cell or battery, and to an electrochemical cell or battery; the invention relates more specifically to a positive electrode for a non-aqueous lithium cell or battery when the electrode is used therein. The positive electrode includes a composite metal oxide containing AgV.sub.3O.sub.8 as one component and one or more other components consisting of LiV.sub.3O.sub.8, Ag.sub.2V.sub.4O.sub.11, MnO.sub.2, CF.sub.x, AgF or Ag.sub.2O to increase the energy density of the cell, optionally in the presence of silver powder and/or silver foil to assist in current collection at the electrode and to improve the power capability of the cell or battery.

  9. Cell reorientation under cyclic stretching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ariel Livne; Eran Bouchbinder; Benjamin Geiger

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mechanical cues from the extracellular microenvironment play a central role in regulating the structure, function and fate of living cells. Nevertheless, the precise nature of the mechanisms and processes underlying this crucial cellular mechanosensitivity remains a fundamental open problem. Here we provide a novel framework for addressing cellular sensitivity and response to external forces by experimentally and theoretically studying one of its most striking manifestations -- cell reorientation to a uniform angle in response to cyclic stretching of the underlying substrate. We first show that existing approaches are incompatible with our extensive measurements of cell reorientation. We then propose a fundamentally new theory that shows that dissipative relaxation of the cell's passively-stored, two-dimensional, elastic energy to its minimum actively drives the reorientation process. Our theory is in excellent quantitative agreement with the complete temporal reorientation dynamics of individual cells, measured over a wide range of experimental conditions, thus elucidating a basic aspect of mechanosensitivity.

  10. Additive estrogenic effects of mixtures of frequently used UV filters on pS2-gene transcription in MCF-7 cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heneweer, Marjoke [Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, PO Box 80176, 3508 TD Utrecht (Netherlands)]. E-mail: M.Heneweer@iras.uu.nl; Muusse, Martine [Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, PO Box 80176, 3508 TD Utrecht (Netherlands); Berg, Martin van den [Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, PO Box 80176, 3508 TD Utrecht (Netherlands); Sanderson, J. Thomas [Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, PO Box 80176, 3508 TD Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2005-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to protect consumers from ultraviolet (UV) radiation and enhance light stability of the product, three to eight UV filters are usually added to consumer sunscreen products. High lipophilicity of the UV filters has been shown to cause bioaccumulation in fish and humans, leading to environmental levels of UV filters that are similar to those of PCBs and DDT. In this paper, estrogen-regulated pS2 gene transcription in the human mammary tumor cell line MCF-7 was used as a measure of estrogenicity of four individual UV filters. Since humans are exposed to more than one UV filter at a time, an equipotent binary mixture of 2-hydroxy-4-methoxy-benzophenone (BP-3) and its metabolite 2,4-dihydroxy benzophenone (BP-1), as well as an equipotent multi-component mixture of BP-1, BP-3, octyl methoxy cinnamate (OMC) and 3-(4-methylbenzylidene) camphor (4-MBC), were also evaluated for their ability to induce pS2 gene transcription in order to examine additivity. An estrogen receptor-mediated mechanism of action was expected for all UV filters. Therefore, our null-hypothesis was that combined estrogenic responses, measured as increased pS2 gene transcription in MCF-7 cells after exposure to mixtures of UV filters, are additive, according to a concentration-addition model. Not all UV filters produced a full concentration-response curve within the concentration range tested (100 nM-1 {mu}M). Therefore, instead of using EC{sub 50} values for comparison, the concentration at which each compound caused a 50% increase of basal pS2 gene transcription was defined as the C50 value for that compound and used to calculate relative potencies. For comparison, the EC{sub 50} value of a compound is the concentration at which the compound elicits an effect that is 50% of its maximal effect. Individual UV filters increased pS2 gene transcription concentration-dependently with C50 values of 0.12 {mu}M, 0.5 {mu}M, 1.9 {mu}M, and 1.0 {mu}M for BP-1, BP-3, 4-MBC and OMC, respectively. Estradiol (E2) had a C50 value of 4.8 pM. Experiments with equipotent mixtures all supported our null hypothesis that mixtures of UV filters act additively to activate the estrogen receptor (ER). In view of our results and observed plasma levels it cannot be excluded that daily exposure to sunscreen formulations may have estrogenic effects in humans.

  11. Microaspiration for high-pressure freezing: a new method for ultrastructural preservation of fragile and sparse tissues for TEM and electron tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auer, Manfred; Triffo, W.J.; Palsdottir, H.; McDonald, K.L.; Inman, J.L.; Bissell, M.J.; Raphael, R.M.; Auer, M.; Lee, J.K.

    2008-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    High-pressure freezing is the preferred method to prepare thick biological specimens for ultrastructural studies. However, the advantages obtained by this method often prove unattainable for samples that are difficult to handle during the freezing and substitution protocols. Delicate and sparse samples are difficult to manipulate and maintain intact throughout the sequence of freezing, infiltration, embedding, and final orientation for sectioning and subsequent TEM imaging. An established approach to surmount these difficulties is the use of cellulose microdialysis tubing to transport the sample. With an inner diameter of 200 micrometers, the tubing protects small and fragile samples within the thickness constraints of high-pressure freezing, and the tube ends can be sealed to avoid loss of sample. Importantly, the transparency of the tubing allows optical study of the specimen at different steps in the process. Here, we describe the use of a micromanipulator and microinjection apparatus to handle and position delicate specimens within the tubing. We report two biologically significant examples that benefit from this approach, 3D cultures of mammary epithelial cells and cochlear outer hair cells. We illustrate the potential for correlative light and electron microscopy as well as electron tomography.

  12. Overview of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities: 2011 IPHE Stationary...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Overview of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities: 2011 IPHE Stationary Fuel Cell Workshop Overview of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities: 2011 IPHE Stationary Fuel Cell Workshop...

  13. Cell Component Accelerated Stress Test Protocols for PEM Fuel...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Cell Component Accelerated Stress Test Protocols for PEM Fuel Cells Cell Component Accelerated Stress Test Protocols for PEM Fuel Cells Accelerated Stress Test Protocols for PEM...

  14. DOE Cell Component Accelerated Stress Test Protocols for PEM...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Cell Component Accelerated Stress Test Protocols for PEM Fuel Cells DOE Cell Component Accelerated Stress Test Protocols for PEM Fuel Cells This document describes test protocols...

  15. Leveraging National Lab Capabilities: 2014 Fuel Cell Seminar...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Cell Seminar and Energy Exposition Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Overview Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities: 5th International Conference on Polymer Batteries and Fuel Cells...

  16. DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Program Record, Record # 11003, Fuel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Program Record, Record 11003, Fuel Cell Stack Durability DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Program Record, Record 11003, Fuel Cell Stack Durability Dated...

  17. Overview of Fuel Cell Electric Bus Development | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Fuel Cell Electric Bus Development Overview of Fuel Cell Electric Bus Development Presentation slides from the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar ""Fuel Cell Buses"" held...

  18. Lung Natural Helper Cells Are a Critical Source of Th2 Cell-Type Cytokines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Immunity Article Lung Natural Helper Cells Are a Critical Source of Th2 Cell-Type Cytokines 2 (Th2) cells in the lung is thought to be a cause of asthma. Here we report that innate lymphocytes termed lung natural helper (LNH) cells are a T cell-independent source of Th2 cell-type cytokines

  19. Solar-Hydrogen Fuel-Cell Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLuchi, Mark A.; Ogden, Joan M.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M. A. (1992). Hydrogen Fuel-Cell Vehicles. Re- koebensteinthan both. Solar-hydrogen and fuel-cell vehicles wouldberegulation. Solar-Hydrogen Fuel-Cell Vehicles MarkA. DeLuchi

  20. The challenges of organic polymer solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saif Addin, Burhan K. (Burhan Khalid)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technical and commercial prospects of polymer solar cells were evaluated. Polymer solar cells are an attractive approach to fabricate and deploy roll-to-roll processed solar cells that are reasonably efficient (total ...

  1. Organic Tandem Solar Cells: Design and Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chun-Chao

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Y. Wu, and G. Li, ?Polymer solar cells with enhanced open-tandem and triple-junction solar cells,? Materials, 2012, 5(molecules for high performance solar cells,” Advanced Energy

  2. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Manufacturing Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Manufacturing Overview Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Manufacturing R Reserved. 3 The Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Electrochemistry #12;Copyright © 2011 Versa Power Systems. All Rights

  3. Control of the Embryonic Stem Cell State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Richard A.

    Embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells hold great promise for regenerative medicine. These cells can be propagated in culture in an undifferentiated state but can be induced to differentiate into specialized ...

  4. High efficiency, radiation-hard solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ager III, J.W.; Walukiewicz, W.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar Energy Mat. and Solar Cells 75, 261-9 (2003) andD. J. , “Advanced Space Solar Cells,” Prog. Photovolt: Res.Igari, and W. Warta, “Solar Cell Efficiency Tables (Version

  5. Microfluidic Microbial Fuel Cells for Microstructure Interrogations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parra, Erika Andrea

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sediment microbial fuel cells demonstrating marine (left)5 FutureWork 5.1 Microfluidic Microbial Fuel Cell Continuedthe micro- patterned microbial fuel cell. Note that V oc,max

  6. Cell fleet planning : an industry case study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silva, Armando C.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this thesis is to demonstrate the practical use of the Cell Fleet Planning Model in planning the fleet for the U.S. airline industry. The Cell Model is a cell theory, linear programming approach to fleet ...

  7. Air Breathing Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ren; Xiaoming (Los Alamos, NM)

    2003-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for activating a membrane electrode assembly for a direct methanol fuel cell is disclosed. The method comprises operating the fuel cell with humidified hydrogen as the fuel followed by running the fuel cell with methanol as the fuel.

  8. Generation of ovine induced pluripotent stem cells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sartori, Chiara

    2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are pluripotent cells derived from the early embryo and are able to differentiate into cells belonging to the three germ layers. They are a valuable tool in research and for clinical use, but ...

  9. Control of Transcription by Cell Size

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Chia-Yung

    Cell size increases significantly with increasing ploidy. Differences in cell size and ploidy are associated with alterations in gene expression, although no direct connection has been made between cell size and transcription. ...

  10. Hypoxia activated cell signaling receptors in cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lester, Robin D.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cancer cells MCF-7 and MDA- MB-231. Biomed. Pharmacother.and prevents apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. J.Gaithersburg, MD). Cell Culture MDA-MB-468, MDA-MB-435, ZR-

  11. Solar-Hydrogen Fuel-Cell Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLuchi, Mark A.; Ogden, Joan M.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    nosulfur. fA methanol/fuel-cell vehicle wouldhaveno tailpipeanalysis of fuel cell vehicles using methanol and hy- drogenused fuel-cell vehicles and (d) biomass-derived methanol

  12. Fuel Cells for Transportation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE R&D Activities Fuel Cells for Transportation Fuel Cells for Transportation Photo of Ford Focus fuel cell car in front of windmills The transportation sector is the single...

  13. MICROFLUIDIC CONTROL OF STEM CELL DIFFUSIBLE SIGNALING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voldman, Joel

    MICROFLUIDIC CONTROL OF STEM CELL DIFFUSIBLE SIGNALING Katarina Blagovi, Lily Y. Kim, Alison M cell differentiation. KEYWORDS: Embryonic stem cells, microfluidic perfusion, diffusible signaling; they secrete molecules to which they respond. Microfluidics offers a potential solution to this challenge

  14. Fabrication and Characterization of Organic Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yengel, Emre

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Würfel P. Physics of solar cells : from principles to newgeneration photovoltaics: solar cells for 2020 and beyond.MB. INDIUM-PHOSPHIDE SOLAR-CELLS MADE BY ION- IMPLANTATION.

  15. Fabrication and Characterization of Organic Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yengel, Emre

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Würfel P.  Physics of solar cells : from principles to new generation  photovoltaics:  solar  cells  for  2020  and Spitzer  MB.   INDIUM?PHOSPHIDE  SOLAR?CELLS  MADE  BY  ION?

  16. Commercialization of Novel Organic Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kassegne, Samuel Kinde

    Commercialization of Novel Organic Solar Cells Master of Engineering Final Report Shanel C. Miller................................................................................................................... 12 2.1 How do Solar Cells Work?.................................................................................................. 12 2.2 Types of Solar Cells that Exist Today

  17. Nontoxic quantum dot research improves solar cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nontoxic quantum dot research improves solar cells Nontoxic quantum dot research improves solar cells Solar cells made with low-cost, nontoxic copper-based quantum dots can achieve...

  18. Climate Change Fuel Cell Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alice M. Gitchell

    2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A 200 kW, natural gas fired fuel cell was installed at the Richard Stockton College of New Jersey. The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the financial and operational suitability of retrofit fuel cell technology at a medium sized college. Target audience was design professionals and the wider community, with emphasis on use in higher education. ''Waste'' heat from the fuel cell was utilized to supplement boiler operations and provide domestic hot water. Instrumentation was installed in order to measure the effectiveness of heat utilization. It was determined that 26% of the available heat was captured during the first year of operation. The economics of the fuel cell is highly dependent on the prices of electricity and natural gas. Considering only fuel consumed and energy produced (adjusted for boiler efficiency), the fuel cell saved $54,000 in its first year of operation. However, taking into account the price of maintenance and the cost of financing over the short five-year life span, the fuel cell operated at a loss, despite generous subsidies. As an educational tool and market stimulus, the fuel cell attracted considerable attention, both from design professionals and the general public.

  19. Climate Change Fuel Cell Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Belard

    2006-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Verizon is presently operating the largest Distributed Generation Fuel Cell project in the USA. Situated in Long Island, NY, the power plant is composed of seven (7) fuel cells operating in parallel with the Utility grid from the Long Island Power Authority (LIPA). Each fuel cell has an output of 200 kW, for a total of 1.4 mW generated from the on-site plant. The remaining power to meet the facility demand is purchased from LIPA. The fuel cell plant is utilized as a co-generation system. A by-product of the fuel cell electric generation process is high temperature water. The heat content of this water is recovered from the fuel cells and used to drive two absorption chillers in the summer and a steam generator in the winter. Cost savings from the operations of the fuel cells are forecasted to be in excess of $250,000 per year. Annual NOx emissions reductions are equivalent to removing 1020 motor vehicles from roadways. Further, approximately 5.45 million metric tons (5 millions tons) of CO2 per year will not be generated as a result of this clean power generation. The project was partially financed with grants from the New York State Energy R&D Authority (NYSERDA) and from Federal Government Departments of Defense and Energy.

  20. 1986 fuel cell seminar: Program and abstracts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ninety nine brief papers are arranged under the following session headings: gas industry's 40 kw program, solid oxide fuel cell technology, phosphoric acid fuel cell technology, molten carbonate fuel cell technology, phosphoric acid fuel cell systems, power plants technology, fuel cell power plant designs, unconventional fuels, fuel cell application and economic assessments, and plans for commerical development. The papers are processed separately for the data base. (DLC)

  1. Fuel Cell Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, Peter M. [Brown University] [Brown University

    2014-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Executive Summary In conjunction with the Brown Energy Initiative, research Projects selected for the fuel cell research grant were selected on the following criteria: ? They should be fundamental research that has the potential to significantly impact the nation’s energy infrastructure. ? They should be scientifically exciting and sound. ? They should synthesize new materials, lead to greater insights, explore new phenomena, or design new devices or processes that are of relevance to solving the energy problems. ? They involve top-caliper senior scientists with a record of accomplishment, or junior faculty with outstanding promise of achievement. ? They should promise to yield at least preliminary results within the given funding period, which would warrant further research development. ? They should fit into the overall mission of the Brown Energy Initiative, and the investigators should contribute as partners to an intellectually stimulating environment focused on energy science. Based on these criteria, fourteen faculty across three disciplines (Chemistry, Physics and Engineering) and the Charles Stark Draper Laboratory were selected to participate in this effort.1 In total, there were 30 people supported, at some level, on these projects. This report highlights the findings and research outcomes of the participating researchers.

  2. Optimization of cell adhesion environments for a liver cell bioreactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wongchaowart, Michael B

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MilliF bioreactor offers great potential for the formation of i vivo-like liver tissue outside the body, making it a valuable tool for applications such as drug toxicity models and biosensors. Cell adhesion is an ...

  3. Precise single cell monitoring reveals principles of cell growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Son, Sungmin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accumulation of mass is a fundamental cellular process that is associated with metabolism, signaling and regulation. Despite the wealth of knowledge in molecular processes the principles of growth in mammalian cells are ...

  4. DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 14012: Fuel Cell System...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Results from the analysis were communicated to the FCT Office at the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation 3 and at a meeting of the...

  5. The transcriptional landscape of ?? T cell differentiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma. Genes Dev.that T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia induced by Tcf-1 -

  6. Canadian Fuel Cell Commercialization Roadmap Update: Progress...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Commercialization Roadmap Update: Progress of Canada's Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Industry Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Canadian Fuel Cell...

  7. Sandia National Laboratories: hydrogen fuel cell

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cell More Efficient Fuel Cells under Development by Engineers On July 10, 2014, in Center for Infrastructure Research and Innovation (CIRI), Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage...

  8. Durable Fuel Cell Membrane Electrode Assembly (MEA)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Durable Fuel Cell Membrane Electrode Assembly (MEA) Durable Fuel Cell Membrane Electrode Assembly (MEA) A revolutionary method of building a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) for...

  9. Fuel Cell & Hydrogen Technologies | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fuel Cell Technologies SHARE Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies Oak Ridge National Laboratory pursues activities that address the barriers facing the development and deployment of...

  10. Sandia National Laboratories: fuel cell vehicle

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fuel cell vehicle ECIS-Automotive Fuel Cell Corporation: Hydrocarbon Membrane Fuels the Success of Future Generation Vehicles On February 14, 2013, in CRF, Energy, Energy...

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: Automotive Fuel Cell Cooperation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Automotive Fuel Cell Cooperation ECIS-Automotive Fuel Cell Corporation: Hydrocarbon Membrane Fuels the Success of Future Generation Vehicles On February 14, 2013, in CRF, Energy,...

  12. How Fuel Cells Work | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    30 likes How Fuel Cells Work Fuel cells produce electrical power without any combustion and operate on fuels like hydrogen, natural gas and propane. This clean energy technology...

  13. Dynamic surface topography influences cell function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiang, Jennifer Deng

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A) Relative surface topography of hydrogel over a wire (B)oscillating surface topography on cell morphology. In FigureSAN DIEGO Dynamic Surface Topography Influences Cell

  14. Screen Electrode Materials & Cell Chemistries and Streamlining...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Cell Chemistries and Streamlining Optimization of Electrode Screen Electrode Materials & Cell Chemistries and Streamlining Optimization of Electrode 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies...

  15. Characterization of Fuel-Cell Diffusion Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunterman, Haluna Penelope Frances

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to take up or eject fluid. Most fuel-cell materials arethe wetting fluid. Therefore, P C for fuel-cell systems is

  16. Ames Lab 101: Improving Solar Cell Efficiency

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Biswas, Rana

    2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Rana Biswas, a scientist with the Ames Laboratory, discusses his team's research in creating more efficient solar cells and working with Iowa Thin Film to produce these cells.

  17. Sandia National Laboratories: DOE Fuel Cell Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fuel Cell Technologies New Report Describes Joint Opportunities for Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuel-Cell Vehicle Markets On March 6, 2015, in Capabilities, Center for Infrastructure...

  18. Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program: 2002 Annual Progress Report Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program: 2002 Annual Progress Report...

  19. Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program FY2003 Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program FY2003...

  20. Webinar: National Fuel Cell Technology Evaluation Center

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video recording and text version of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar titled "National Fuel Cell Technology Evaluation Center (NFCTEC)," originally presented on March 11, 2014.

  1. Fuel Cell Animation- Chemical Process (Text Version)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This text version of the fuel cell animation demonstrates how a fuel cell uses hydrogen to produce electricity, with only water and heat as byproducts.

  2. Fuel Cell Technology Challenges | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology Challenges Fuel Cell Technology Challenges Cost and durability are the major challenges to fuel cell commercialization. However, hurdles vary according to the...

  3. Solid oxide fuel cell generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Draper, R.; George, R.A.; Shockling, L.A.

    1993-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid oxide fuel cell generator has a pair of spaced apart tubesheets in a housing. At least two intermediate barrier walls are between the tubesheets and define a generator chamber between two intermediate buffer chambers. An array of fuel cells have tubes with open ends engaging the tubesheets. Tubular, axially elongated electrochemical cells are supported on the tubes in the generator chamber. Fuel gas and oxidant gas are preheated in the intermediate chambers by the gases flowing on the other side of the tubes. Gas leakage around the tubes through the tubesheets is permitted. The buffer chambers reentrain the leaked fuel gas for reintroduction to the generator chamber.

  4. Solid oxide fuel cell generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Draper, Robert (Churchill Boro, PA); George, Raymond A. (Pittsburgh, PA); Shockling, Larry A. (Plum Borough, PA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid oxide fuel cell generator has a pair of spaced apart tubesheets in a housing. At least two intermediate barrier walls are between the tubesheets and define a generator chamber between two intermediate buffer chambers. An array of fuel cells have tubes with open ends engaging the tubesheets. Tubular, axially elongated electrochemical cells are supported on the tubes in the generator chamber. Fuel gas and oxidant gas are preheated in the intermediate chambers by the gases flowing on the other side of the tubes. Gas leakage around the tubes through the tubesheets is permitted. The buffer chambers reentrain the leaked fuel gas for reintroduction to the generator chamber.

  5. Photovoltaic cell and production thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Narayanan, Srinivasamohan (Gaithersburg, MD); Kumar, Bikash (Bangalore, IN)

    2008-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An efficient photovoltaic cell, and its process of manufacture, is disclosed wherein the back surface p-n junction is removed from a doped substrate having an oppositely doped emitter layer. A front surface and edges and optionally the back surface periphery are masked and a back surface etch is performed. The mask is not removed and acts as an anti-reflective coating, a passivating agent, or both. The photovoltaic cell retains an untextured back surface whether or not the front is textured and the dopant layer on the back surface is removed to enhance the cell efficiency. Optionally, a back surface field is formed.

  6. Reference electrode for electrolytic cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kessie, R.W.

    1988-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A reference electrode device is provided for a high temperature electrolytic cell used to electrolytically recover uranium from spent reactor fuel dissolved in an anode pool, the device having a glass tube to enclose the electrode and electrolyte and serve as a conductive membrane with the cell electrolyte, and an outer metal tube about the glass tube to serve as a shield and basket for any glass sections broken by handling of the tube to prevent their contact with the anode pool, the metal tube having perforations to provide access between the bulk of the cell electrolyte and glass membrane. 4 figs.

  7. Mixed ternary heterojunction solar cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Wen S. (Seattle, WA); Stewart, John M. (Seattle, WA)

    1992-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A thin film heterojunction solar cell and a method of making it has a p-type layer of mixed ternary I-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductor material in contact with an n-type layer of mixed binary II-VI semiconductor material. The p-type semiconductor material includes a low resistivity copper-rich region adjacent the back metal contact of the cell and a composition gradient providing a minority carrier mirror that improves the photovoltaic performance of the cell. The p-type semiconductor material preferably is CuInGaSe.sub.2 or CuIn(SSe).sub.2.

  8. Organic fuel cells and fuel cell conducting sheets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Masel, Richard I. (Champaign, IL); Ha, Su (Champaign, IL); Adams, Brian (Savoy, IL)

    2007-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A passive direct organic fuel cell includes an organic fuel solution and is operative to produce at least 15 mW/cm.sup.2 when operating at room temperature. In additional aspects of the invention, fuel cells can include a gas remover configured to promote circulation of an organic fuel solution when gas passes through the solution, a modified carbon cloth, one or more sealants, and a replaceable fuel cartridge.

  9. Human papillomavirus 16 E5 induces bi-nucleated cell formation by cell-cell fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu Lulin; Plafker, Kendra [Department of Cell Biology, University of Oklahoma (United States); Vorozhko, Valeriya [Department of Cell Biology, University of Oklahoma (United States); Cell Cycle and Cancer Biology Research Program, Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation (United States); Zuna, Rosemary E. [Department of Pathology, University of Oklahoma HSC (United States); Hanigan, Marie H. [Department of Cell Biology, University of Oklahoma (United States); Gorbsky, Gary J. [Department of Cell Biology, University of Oklahoma (United States); Cell Cycle and Cancer Biology Research Program, Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation (United States); Plafker, Scott M. [Department of Cell Biology, University of Oklahoma (United States); Angeletti, Peter C. [Nebraska Center for Virology (United States); Ceresa, Brian P. [Department of Cell Biology, University of Oklahoma (United States)], E-mail: brian-ceresa@oushc.edu

    2009-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) 16 is a DNA virus encoding three oncogenes - E5, E6, and E7. The E6 and E7 proteins have well-established roles as inhibitors of tumor suppression, but the contribution of E5 to malignant transformation is controversial. Using spontaneously immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells), we demonstrate that expression of HPV16 E5 is necessary and sufficient for the formation of bi-nucleated cells, a common characteristic of precancerous cervical lesions. Expression of E5 from non-carcinogenic HPV6b does not produce bi-nucleate cells. Video microscopy and biochemical analyses reveal that bi-nucleates arise through cell-cell fusion. Although most E5-induced bi-nucleates fail to propagate, co-expression of HPV16 E6/E7 enhances the proliferation of these cells. Expression of HPV16 E6/E7 also increases bi-nucleated cell colony formation. These findings identify a new role for HPV16 E5 and support a model in which complementary roles of the HPV16 oncogenes lead to the induction of carcinogenesis.

  10. Fuel cell with internal flow control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haltiner, Jr., Karl J. (Fairport, NY); Venkiteswaran, Arun (Karnataka, IN)

    2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A fuel cell stack is provided with a plurality of fuel cell cassettes where each fuel cell cassette has a fuel cell with an anode and cathode. The fuel cell stack includes an anode supply chimney for supplying fuel to the anode of each fuel cell cassette, an anode return chimney for removing anode exhaust from the anode of each fuel cell cassette, a cathode supply chimney for supplying oxidant to the cathode of each fuel cell cassette, and a cathode return chimney for removing cathode exhaust from the cathode of each fuel cell cassette. A first fuel cell cassette includes a flow control member disposed between the anode supply chimney and the anode return chimney or between the cathode supply chimney and the cathode return chimney such that the flow control member provides a flow restriction different from at least one other fuel cell cassettes.

  11. Module level solutions to solar cell polarization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xavier, Grace (Fremont, CA), Li; Bo (San Jose, CA)

    2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A solar cell module includes interconnected solar cells, a transparent cover over the front sides of the solar cells, and a backsheet on the backsides of the solar cells. The solar cell module includes an electrical insulator between the transparent cover and the front sides of the solar cells. An encapsulant protectively packages the solar cells. To prevent polarization, the insulator has resistance suitable to prevent charge from leaking from the front sides of the solar cells to other portions of the solar cell module by way of the transparent cover. The insulator may be attached (e.g., by coating) directly on an underside of the transparent cover or be a separate layer formed between layers of the encapsulant. The solar cells may be back junction solar cells.

  12. Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Blake Marshall, AMO's lead for Additive Manufacturing Technologies, will provide an overview of current R&D activities in additive manufacturing and its application to fuel cell prototyping and...

  13. NETL: Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and water concerns associated with fossil fuel based electric power generation. The NETL Fuel Cell Program maintains a portfolio of RD&D projects that address the technical issues...

  14. Navy fuel cell demonstration project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black, Billy D.; Akhil, Abbas Ali

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report on a field evaluation by the Department of the Navy of twenty 5-kW PEM fuel cells carried out during 2004 and 2005 at five Navy sites located in New York, California, and Hawaii. The key objective of the effort was to obtain an engineering assessment of their military applications. Particular issues of interest were fuel cell cost, performance, reliability, and the readiness of commercial fuel cells for use as a standalone (grid-independent) power option. Two corollary objectives of the demonstration were to promote technological advances and to improve fuel performance and reliability. From a cost perspective, the capital cost of PEM fuel cells at this stage of their development is high compared to other power generation technologies. Sandia National Laboratories technical recommendation to the Navy is to remain involved in evaluating successive generations of this technology, particularly in locations with greater environmental extremes, and it encourages their increased use by the Navy.

  15. Inorganic non-aqueous cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuo, H. C.; Dey, A. N.; Foster, D. L.; Gopikanth, M. L.; Schlaikjer, C. R.

    1985-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel inorganic non-aqueous electrochemical cell having an alkali or alkaline earth metal anode, an inorganic electrolyte comprised of an SO/sub 2/ solvent with an alkali or alkaline earth metal halide salt of aluminum, tantalum niobium or antimony, dissolved in the SO/sub 2/ and a cathode comprised of a carbonaceous material having an apparent bulk density in excess of 5 lb/ft/sup 3/ (80 gm/1). Lower bulk density carbonaceous material may, however, be used in electrolytes having high salt concentrations. Ketjenblack EC (furnace black) carbonaceous material may be admixed with a solid cathode active material which is substantially insoluble in the SO/sub 2/ electrolyte to provide a high primary cell capacity and an effectively rechargeable cell. There is no SO/sub 2/ per se discharge in the cell.

  16. Semi-finished modular cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bachelder, Laura Govoni, 1971-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis subject is a pre-fabricated element (cell): a system that employs natural, light, and economic materials to produce a near-finished portion of a building. The intent is to introduce sustainable design into ...

  17. CLIMATE CHANGE FUEL CELL PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Walneuski

    2004-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    ChevronTexaco has successfully operated a 200 kW PC25C phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant at the corporate data center in San Ramon, California for the past two years and seven months following installation in December 2001. This site was chosen based on the ability to utilize the combined heat (hot water) and power generation capability of this modular fuel cell power plant in an office park setting . In addition, this project also represents one of the first commercial applications of a stationary fuel cell for a mission critical data center to assess power reliability benefits. This fuel cell power plant system has demonstrated outstanding reliability and performance relative to other comparably sized cogeneration systems.

  18. Cell Data Sheet Specification (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, S.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The presentation shows a brief status report on the development of a specification being considered by IEC TC82 WG7 for a concentrator cell data sheet and solicits suggestions from the community.

  19. Hydrogen,Fuel Cells & Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;The President's FY04 Budget Request for FreedomCAR and Hydrogen Fuel Initiatives 4.0Office of Nuclear commercialization decision by 2015. Fuel Cell Vehicles in the Showroom and Hydrogen at Fueling Stations by 2020 #12

  20. Cell fusion in Neurospora crassa 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lichius, Alexander

    2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary research aims of this thesis were the identification of novel cell fusion mutants of Neurospora crassa and the subsequent functional characterization of selected candidate proteins during conidial anastomosis ...