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1

The Role of DNA double-strand break repair in cellular response to low  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DNA double-strand break repair in cellular response to low DNA double-strand break repair in cellular response to low dose radiation exposure. David J. Chen Division of Molecular Radiation Biology, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas TX 75390 It has been assumed that molecular pathways that involved in the biological response for low dose of radiation should be similar to those for high dose radiation in general. The low dose-rate effect and DNA double-strand break repair are inextricably linked in mammalian cells. It has been reported that mammalian mutant cells deficient in nonhomologous end join (NHEJ) pathway have little or no cellular recovery when expose to low-dose-rate radiation. Recently, it has also been reported that cells deficient in

2

Cellular responses to environmental DNA damage  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains the proceedings of the conference entitled Cellular Responses to Environmental DNA Damage held in Banff,Alberta December 1--6, 1991. The conference addresses various aspects of DNA repair in sessions titled DNA repair; Basic Mechanisms; Lesions; Systems; Inducible Responses; Mutagenesis; Human Population Response Heterogeneity; Intragenomic DNA Repair Heterogeneity; DNA Repair Gene Cloning; Aging; Human Genetic Disease; and Carcinogenesis. Individual papers are represented as abstracts of about one page in length.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Live Cell Imaging and in situ analysis of cellular responses to DNA doublestrand  

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Live Cell Imaging and in situ analysis of cellular responses to DNA double- Live Cell Imaging and in situ analysis of cellular responses to DNA double- strand breaks in mammalian cells. David J. Chen Division of Molecular Radiation Biology, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas TX 75390 The integrity of the human genome is constantly threatened by internal as well as external factors with the propensity to cause DNA damage. Of the various types of DNA damage that can occur within the mammalian cell nucleus, the DNA double strand break (DSB) is perhaps the most dangerous. Estimates put the number of endogenous DSBs anywhere between 10-100 per nucleus per day. A direct link between DSBs and cancer has been surmised by researchers based upon the fact that many cancer-predisposition

4

Mechanisms underlying cellular responses of cells from haemopoeitic tissue to low dose-low LET radiation  

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underlying cellular responses of cells from haemopoeitic underlying cellular responses of cells from haemopoeitic tissue to low dose-low LET radiation Munira Kadhim 1 , Sarah Irons 1 , Deborah Bowler 1 , Virginia Serra 1 , Stefania Militi 2 , Kim Chapman 1 1 Genomic Instability Research Group, School of Life Sciences, Oxford Brookes University, Gipsy Lane, Headington, Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX3 0BP, UK 2 Mammalian Genetics Unit, Medical Research Council Harwell, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Oxfordshire, OX11 0RD, UK Radiation-induced responses at the cellular and whole body levels are influenced by genetic predisposition, with implications for environmental and potentially, diagnostic exposures. Currently, the extent to which genetic background play a role in the mechanisms and signalling pathways involved in radiation-induced

5

Mechanisms underlying cellular responses of cells from haemopoeitic tissue  

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underlying cellular responses of cells from haemopoeitic tissue underlying cellular responses of cells from haemopoeitic tissue to low dose-low LET radiation Munira Kadhim Oxford Brookes University Abstract Radiation-induced responses at the cellular and whole body levels are influenced by genetic predisposition, with implications for environmental and potentially, diagnostic exposures. Currently, the extent to which genetic background play a role in the mechanisms and signalling pathways involved in radiation-induced delayed Genomic Instability (GI) is not fully understood. In previous studies, our results have shown that the CBA/H and C57BL/6 mouse strains, have differing sensitivities in the induction of radiation-induced genomic instability (RIGI) in terms of chromosomal instability, following exposure to high dose-high LET and high dose-low LET

6

Journal of Mammalogy, 84(2):354368, 2003 MAMMALIAN RESPONSE TO GLOBAL WARMING ON VARIED  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

354 Journal of Mammalogy, 84(2):354­368, 2003 MAMMALIAN RESPONSE TO GLOBAL WARMING ON VARIED how Rocky Mountain mam- malian communities changed during past global warming events characterized not) in different ways. Nevertheless, examination of past global warming episodes suggested

California at Berkeley, University of

7

Molecular Mechanism Underlying Cellular Adaptive Response to Low Dose Radiation  

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Mechanism Underlying Cellular Adaptive Response to Low Dose Radiation Mechanism Underlying Cellular Adaptive Response to Low Dose Radiation Colette A. Sacksteder § , DJ Black ‡ , Heather Smallwood § , David G. Camp II † , and Thomas C. Squier § § Cell Biology and Biochemistry; † Biological Sciences Division Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 ‡ School of Biological Sciences, University of Missouri, Kansas City MO 64110 The goal of this research is to identify the molecular mechanisms by which cells adapt to low dose radiation exposure. Previously we have shown a radiation dependent increase of Calmodulin (CaM) in RAW 264.7 macrophages (RAW). Therefore we hypothesize that CaM and associated signaling complexes are sensors of low-dose radiation, resulting in alterations in energy metabolism and gene expression. The ultimate experimental goal

8

Frequent biphasic cellular responses of permanent fish cell cultures to deoxynivalenol (DON)  

SciTech Connect

Contamination of animal feed with mycotoxins is a major problem for fish feed mainly due to usage of contaminated ingredients for production and inappropriate storage of feed. The use of cereals for fish food production further increases the risk of a potential contamination. Potential contaminants include the mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) which is synthesized by globally distributed fungi of the genus Fusarium. The toxicity of DON is well recognized in mammals. In this study, we confirm cytotoxic effects of DON in established permanent fish cell lines. We demonstrate that DON is capable of influencing the metabolic activity and cell viability in fish cells as determined by different assays to indicate possible cellular targets of this toxin. Evaluation of cell viability by measurement of membrane integrity, mitochondrial activity and lysosomal function after 24 h of exposure of fish cell lines to DON at a concentration range of 0-3000 ng ml{sup -1} shows a biphasic effect on cells although differences in sensitivity occur. The cell lines derived from rainbow trout are particularly sensitive to DON. The focus of this study lies, furthermore, on the effects of DON at different concentrations on production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the different fish cell lines. The results show that DON mainly reduces ROS production in all cell lines that were used. Thus, our comparative investigations reveal that the fish cell lines show distinct species-related endpoint sensitivities that also depend on the type of tissue from which the cells were derived and the severity of exposure. - Highlights: > DON uptake by cells is not extensive. > All fish cell lines are sensitive to DON. > DON is most cytotoxic to rainbow trout cells. > Biphasic cellular responses were frequently observed. > Our results are similar to studies on mammalian cell lines.

Pietsch, Constanze, E-mail: constanze.pietsch@unibas.ch [University Basel, Man-Society-Environment, Department of Environmental Sciences, Vesalgasse 1, CH-4051 Basel (Switzerland); Bucheli, Thomas D.; Wettstein, Felix E. [Agroscope Reckenholz-Taenikon (ART), Research Station ART, Reckenholzstrasse 191, CH-8046 Zuerich (Switzerland); Burkhardt-Holm, Patricia [University Basel, Man-Society-Environment, Department of Environmental Sciences, Vesalgasse 1, CH-4051 Basel (Switzerland)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

In vitro cellular responses to silicon carbide nanoparticles: impact of physico-chemical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 In vitro cellular responses to silicon carbide nanoparticles: impact of physico-chemical features of Nanoparticle Research 14, 10 (2012) 1143" DOI : 10.1007/s11051-012-1143-7 #12;2 Abstract Silicon carbide, and of the oxidation state of the surface on cellular H2O2 production. Keywords silicon carbide nanoparticles, laser

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

10

Expression of mammalian GPCRs in C. elegans generates novel behavioural responses to human ligands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Functionally expressing mammalian G protein coupled receptors in the gustatory neurons of C. elegans results in novel behavior and provides a clever way to study these medically important receptors in vivo.

Michelle S Teng; Martijn PJ Dekkers; Bee Ng; Suzanne Rademakers; Gert Jansen; Andrew G Fraser; John McCafferty

2006-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

11

Molecular dissection of the roles of the SOD genes in mammalian response to low dose irradiation  

SciTech Connect

It has been long recognized that a significant fraction of the radiation-induced genetic damage to cells are caused by secondary oxidative species. Internal cellular defense systems against oxidative stress play significant roles in countering genetic damage induced by ionizing radiation. The role of the detoxifying enzymes may be even more prominent in the case of low-dose, low-LET irradiation, as the majority of genetic damage may be caused by secondary oxidative species. In this study we have attempted to decipher the roles of the superoxide dismutase (SOD) genes, which are responsible for detoxifying the superoxide anions. We used adenovirus vectors to deliver RNA interference (RNAi or siRNA) technology to down-regulate the expression levels of the SOD genes. We have also over-expressed the SOD genes by use of recombinant adenovirus vectors. Cells infected with the vectors were then subjected to low dose ?-irradiation. Total RNA were extracted from the exposed cells and the expression of 9000 genes were profiled by use of cDNA microarrays. The result showed that low dose radiation had clear effects on gene expression in HCT116 cells. Both over-expression and down-regulation of the SOD1 gene can change the expression profiles of sub-groups of genes. Close to 200 of the 9000 genes examined showed over two-fold difference in expression under various conditions. Genes with changed expression pattern belong to many categories that include: early growth response, DNA-repair, ion transport, apoptosis, and cytokine response.

Eric Y. Chuang

2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

12

Chronic cellular responses of rat skin to 13 Mev proton irradiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHRONIC CELLULAR RESPONSES OF RAT SKIN TO 13 MEV PROTON IRRADIATION A Thesis by DONALD KING HINKLE, D. V. M. Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas AErM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1966 Major Subject: Laboratory Animal Medicine CHRONIC CELLULAR RESPONSES OF RAT SKIN TO 13 MEV PROTON IRRADIATION A Thesis by DONALD KING HINKLE, D. V. M. Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas ARM University in partial...

Hinkle, Donald King

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

13

Corrosion of, and cellular responses to MgZnCa bulk metallic glasses Xuenan Gu a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Corrosion of, and cellular responses to Mg­Zn­Ca bulk metallic glasses Xuenan Gu a , Yufeng Zheng a: Magnesium alloy Bulk metallic glass Mechanical property Corrosion Cytotoxicity a b s t r a c t Mg­Zn­Ca bulk, mechanical testing, corrosion and cytotoxicity tests. It was found that the Mg66Zn30Ca4 sample presents

Zheng, Yufeng

14

Soft X-ray tomography of phenotypic switching and the cellular response to antifungal peptoids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soft X-ray tomography of phenotypic switching and the cellular response to antifungal peptoids that circumvent fungal drug- resistance mechanisms. In this work we used soft X-ray tomogra- phy to image of an entire, fully functional biological system, i.e., in the milieu of a cell (8, 10). Recently, soft X-ray

Barron, Annelise E.

15

Mechanisms Underlying Cellular Responses to Low Doses/Low LET Ionizing Radiation in Primary Haemopoietic Cells.  

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Mechanisms Underlying Cellular Responses to Low Doses/Low LET Ionizing Radiation Mechanisms Underlying Cellular Responses to Low Doses/Low LET Ionizing Radiation in Primary Haemopoietic Cells. Munira Kadhim 1 , Stefania Militi 1 , Debbie Bowler 1 , Denise Macdonald 1 and Kevin Prise 2 1 Radiation and Genome Stability Unit, MRC, Harwell, Didcot, Oxon, OX11 0RD, UK 2 Gray Cancer Institute ,PO Box 100, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, HA6 2JR, UK Because the human population is genetically heterogeneous, it is important to understand the role that heterogeneity may play in radiation response. Exposure to ionizing radiation can lead to a suite of changes, including increased mutation rate, delayed reproductive cell death, and delayed chromosomal aberrations, all of which are manifestations of the complex genomic instability (GI) phenotype. Following exposure to either high LET

16

Cellular response to low dose radiation: Role of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase like kinases  

SciTech Connect

It is increasingly realized that human exposure either to an acute low dose or multiple chronic low doses of low LET radiation has the potential to cause different types of cancer. Therefore, the central theme of research for DOE and NASA is focused on understanding the molecular mechanisms and pathways responsible for the cellular response to low dose radiation which would not only improve the accuracy of estimating health risks but also help in the development of predictive assays for low dose radiation risks associated with tissue degeneration and cancer. The working hypothesis for this proposal is that the cellular mechanisms in terms of DNA damage signaling, repair and cell cycle checkpoint regulation are different for low and high doses of low LET radiation and that the mode of action of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase like kinases (PIKK: ATM, ATR and DNA-PK) determines the dose dependent cellular responses. The hypothesis will be tested at two levels: (I) Evaluation of the role of ATM, ATR and DNA-PK in cellular response to low and high doses of low LET radiation in simple in vitro human cell systems and (II) Determination of radiation responses in complex cell microenvironments such as human EpiDerm tissue constructs. Cellular responses to low and high doses of low LET radiation will be assessed from the view points of DNA damage signaling, DNA double strand break repair and cell cycle checkpoint regulation by analyzing the activities (i.e. post-translational modifications and kinetics of protein-protein interactions) of the key target proteins for PI-3 kinase like kinases both at the intra-cellular and molecular levels. The proteins chosen for this proposal are placed under three categories: (I) sensors/initiators include ATM ser1981, ATR, 53BP1, gamma-H2AX, MDC1, MRE11, Rad50 and Nbs1; (II) signal transducers include Chk1, Chk2, FANCD2 and SMC1; and (III) effectors include p53, CDC25A and CDC25C. The primary goal of this proposal is to elucidate the differences in cellular defense mechanisms between low and high doses of low LET radiation and to define the radiation doses where the cellular DNA damage signaling and repair mechanisms tend to shift. This information is critically important to address and advance some of the low dose research program objectives of DOE. The results of this proposed study will lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms for the cellular responses to low and high doses of low LET radiation. Further, systematic analysis of the role of PIKK signaling pathways as a function of radiation dose in tissue microenvironment will provide useful mechanistic information for improving the accuracy of radiation risk assessment for low doses. Knowledge of radiation responses in tissue microenvironment is important for the accurate prediction of ionizing radiation risks associated with cancer and tissue degeneration in humans.

Balajee, A.S.; Meador, J.A.; Su, Y.

2011-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

17

Radiation-induced bystander effect and adaptive response in mammalian cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

responses at low doses of radiation and have the potential to impact the shape of the dose the actual target and radiation dose effect and can contribute to our current understanding in radiation risk provide the best estimate of cancer risk over the dose range from 20 to 250 cGy. The cancer risk at doses

18

Cellular and molecular responses of Neurospora crassa to non-thermal plasma at atmospheric pressure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Filamentous fungi have been rarely explored in terms of plasma treatments. This letter presents the cellular and molecular responses of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa to an argon plasma jet at atmospheric pressure. The viability and cell morphology of N. crassaspores exposed to plasma were both significantly reduced depending on the exposure time when treated in water. The intracellular genomicDNA content was dramatically reduced in fungal tissues after a plasma treatment and the transcription factor tah-3 was found to be required for fungal tolerance to a harsh plasma environment.

Gyungsoon Park; Young H. Ryu; Young J. Hong; Eun H. Choi; Han S. Uhm

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Quantitative High Content Imaging of Cellular Adaptive Stress Response Pathways in Toxicity for Chemical Safety Assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Steven Wink , Steven Hiemstra , Suzanna Huppelschoten , Erik Danen , Marije Niemeijer , Giel Hendriks , Harry Vrieling , Bram Herpers , and Bob van de Water * ... (37-39) The true power of HCS using automated imagers lies in its ability to capture when and where specific molecular signaling events are taking place, enabling characterization of cellular responses to multiple changes in the environment with high time and spatial resolution, relatively high throughput (depending on the exact setup) and on a single cell basis, enabling the detection of heterogeneity within populations. ... (141) The members of this family are highly expressed in the liver and include PXR, RXR, CAR, AHR, and HXR. ...

Steven Wink; Steven Hiemstra; Suzanna Huppelschoten; Erik Danen; Marije Niemeijer; Giel Hendriks; Harry Vrieling; Bram Herpers; Bob van de Water

2014-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

20

E-Print Network 3.0 - alter cellular responses Sample Search...  

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Waltham, MA 02254... The cellular industry is growing quickly but so is the fraud. For instance, based on the surveys conducted... by the Cellular Telecommunications...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

7th International Workshop on Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response  

SciTech Connect

The extended abstracts that follow present a summary of the Proceedings of the 7th International Workshop: Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response, held at Columbia Universitys Kellogg Center in New York City on March 1517, 2006. These International Workshops on Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response have been held regularly since 1993 (15). Since the first workshop, there has been a rapid growth (see Fig. 1) in the number of centers developing microbeams for radiobiological research, and worldwide there are currently about 30 microbeams in operation or under development. Single-cell/single-particle microbeam systems can deliver beams of different ionizing radiations with a spatial resolution of a few micrometers down to a few tenths of a micrometer. Microbeams can be used to addressquestions relating to the effects of low doses of radiation (a single radiation track traversing a cell or group of cells), to probe subcellular targets (e.g. nucleus or cytoplasm), and to address questions regarding the propagation of information about DNA damage (for example, the radiation-induced bystander effect). Much of the recent research using microbeams has been to study low-dose effects and non-targeted responses such as bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive responses. This Workshop provided a forum to assess the current state of microbeam technology and current biological applications and to discuss future directions for development, both technological and biological. Over 100 participants reviewed the current state of microbeam research worldwide and reported on new technological developments in the fields of both physics and biology.

Brenner, David J.

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

22

Differential in vitro cellular response induced by exposure to synthetic vitreous fibers (SVFs) and asbestos crocidolite fibers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Differential in vitro cellular response induced by exposure to synthetic vitreous fibers (SVFs the effects of synthetic vitreous fibers (SVFs) on a mesothelial (MeT5A) and a fibroblast cell line (NIH3T3 crocidolite asbestos fibers, SVFs did not induce a significant increase in DNA synthesis. © 2005 Elsevier Inc

Ahmad, Sajjad

23

Activation of the Fanconi Anemia/BRCA Pathway and Recombination Repair in the Cellular Response to Solar Ultraviolet Light  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in the Cellular Response to Solar Ultraviolet Light Jessica Dunn...School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts Recombination repair plays...primary skin cells exposed to solar-simulated light. UV-induced...integrity of their genome, solar UV light plays a pivotal role...

Jessica Dunn; Marisa Potter; Adam Rees; and Thomas M. Rnger

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

PARP-1, PARP-2, and the cellular response to low doses of ionizing radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Purpose Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is rapidly and directly activated by single-strand breaks and is required for efficient base excision repair. These properties indicate that inhibition of PARP-1 might enhance the cellular response to low doses of radiation. We tested the effect of chemical inhibition of PARP-1 on low-dose clonogenic survival in a number of cell lines and the low-dose radiation response of a PARP-1 knockout murine cell line. Methods and materials Clonogenic cell survival of V79-379A and CHO-K1 hamster fibroblasts, T98G and U373-MG human glioma cells, and 3T3 mouse embryo fibroblast PARP-1 knockout cells was measured using a precise flow cytometry-based plating assay. Chemical inhibitors of PARP enzymes were tested for their effect on clonogenic survival after a range of ionizing radiation doses. Results Chemical inhibition of PARP activity induced marked radiosensitization of V79, CHO, and exponentially growing T98G cells in the 0.050.3-Gy range. This effect was not seen in U373 cells or in confluent T98G populations. Low-dose radiosensitization was not apparent in PARP-1 knockout cells. Conclusion Low-dose radiosensitization of actively dividing tumor cells by PARP-1 inhibitors suggests that they may have a role in enhancing the efficacy of ultrafractionated or low-dose-rate radiotherapy regimens. We hypothesize that PARP-2 compensates for the absence of PARP-1 in the knockout cell line.

Anthony Chalmers; Peter Johnston; Mick Woodcock; Michael Joiner; Brian Marples

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Cellular responses and disease expression in oysters (Crassostrea virginica) exposed to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

30 January 2001 Abstract Exposure of oysters to water soluble fractions derived from field in Virginia, USA, dominated by higher molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) on cellular; Diseases; Perkinsus marinus; Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; Effects-physiology; Hemocyte activities

Hartley, Troy W.

26

Molecular events basic to cellular radiation response. Progress report, October 1, 1978-September 30, 1979  

SciTech Connect

Research during the past year has been directed at induction of specific protein synthesis in differentiated mammalian cells. The Primer Hypothesis for the regulation of eukaryotic gene expression suggests that RNA transcription is primed by small molecular weight RNA. It predicts that albumin mRNA transcription in a 3T3 fibroblast, which ordinarily does not produce albumin, can be initiated by RNA primer present in liver cells. In experiments this past year, mouse fibroblasts were incubated with mouse liver RNA. These cells did indeed produce albumin which was detected by counterimmunoelectrophoresis. Confluent 3T3 cell cultures were incubated with mouse liver RNA and polylysine in serum free media. Counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIEP) of the dialyzed and lyophilized media against mouse albumin antisera gave a single precipitin line indicating albumin snthesis by the fibroblasts. The synthesis of this protein immunologicaly similar to albumin required new albumin mRNA transcription since it was not synthesized in the presence of actinomycin, could be found in media which had been incubated with RNA significantly smaller in size than albumin mRNA, and was synthesized in the absence of added poly A containing RNA. These results represent the first reported demonstration that RNA can be taken up from the media by cells in culture, and can induce in those cells the production of a differentiated cell product not ordinarily synthesized by those cells, i.e, a change in the normal transcription pattern in those cells.

Kolodny, G.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Mechanisms underlying cellular responses of cells from haemopoietic tissue to low dose/low LET radiation  

SciTech Connect

To accurately define the risks associated with human exposure to relevant environmental doses of low LET ionizing radiation, it is necessary to completely understand the biological effects at very low doses (i.e., less than 0.1 Gy), including the lowest possible dose, that of a single electron track traversal. At such low doses, a range of studies have shown responses in biological systems which are not related to the direct interaction of radiation tracks with DNA. The role of these non-targeted responses in critical tissues is poorly understood and little is known regarding the underlying mechanisms. Although critical for dosimetry and risk assessment, the role of individual genetic susceptibility in radiation risk is not satisfactorily defined at present. The aim of the proposed grant is to critically evaluate radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander responses in key stem cell populations from haemopoietic tissue. Using stem cells from two mouse strains (CBA/H and C57BL/6J) known to differ in their susceptibility to radiation effects, we plan to carefully dissect the role of genetic predisposition on two non-targeted radiation responses in these models; the bystander effect and genomic instability, which we believe are closely related. We will specifically focus on the effects of low doses of low LET radiation, down to doses approaching a single electron traversal. Using conventional X-ray and ?-ray sources, novel dish separation and targeted irradiation approaches, we will be able to assess the role of genetic variation under various bystander conditions at doses down to a few electron tracks. Irradiations will be carried out using facilities in routine operation for bystander targeted studies. Mechanistic studies of instability and the bystander response in different cell lineages will focus initially on the role of cytokines which have been shown to be involved in bystander signaling and the initiation of instability. These studies also aim to uncover protein mediators of the bystander responses using advanced proteomic screening of factors released from irradiated, bystander and unstable cells. Integral to these studies will be an assessment of the role of genetic susceptibility in these responses, using CBA/H and C57BL/6J mice. The relevance of in vivo interactions between stem cells and the stem cell niche will be explored in the future by re-implantation techniques of previously irradiated cells. The above studies will provide fundamental mechanistic information relating genetic predisposition to important low dose phenomena, and will aid in the development of Department of Energy policy, as well as radiation risk policy for the public and the workplace. We believe the proposed studies accurately reflect the goals of the DOE low dose program.

Munira A Kadhim

2010-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

28

4 T-cell responses and cellular immunity in coeliac disease  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Increasing evidence points to a direct role for T cells in the mediation of the coeliac intestinal lesion. There is good evidence for increased local T-cell reactivity, manifest as increased in T-cell activation in the lamina propria and T-cell proliferation in the epithelial compartment. A likely scenario is that gluten elicits antigen-specific responses by lamina propria T helper cells, probably of the Th1 (inflammatory-mediator) subtype, leading to secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Such cytokines may have direct effects on intestinal enterocytes, as well as mediating indirect effects by upregulation of MHC antigens and by enhancing the activity of cytolytic T cells. Although gluten-specific IEL responses have not been demonstrated by intraepithelial T lymphocytes (IELs), increasing evidence suggests that \\{IELs\\} can act as cytolytic effector cells and hence are likely to exert enteropathic effects under the influence of pro-inflammatory cytokines.

Ludwik K. Trejdosiewicz; Peter D. Howdle

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Mechanisms underlying cellular responses of cells from haemopoietic tissue to low  

SciTech Connect

The above studies will provide fundamental mechanistic information relating genetic predisposition to important low dose phenomena, and will aid in the development of Department of Energy policy, as well as radiation risk policy for the public and the workplace. We believe the proposed studies accurately reflect the goals of the DOE low dose program. To accurately define the risks associated with human exposure to relevant environmental doses of low LET ionizing radiation, it is necessary to completely understand the biological effects at very low doses (i.e. less than 0.1 Gy), including the lowest possible dose, that of a single electron track traversal. At such low doses, a range of studies have shown responses in biological systems which are not related to the direct interaction of radiation tracks with DNA. The role of these "??non-targeted"? responses in critical tissues is poorly understood and little is known regarding the underlying mechanisms. Although critical for dosimetry and risk assessment, the role of individual genetic susceptibility in radiation risk is not satisfactorily defined at present. The aim of the proposed grant is to critically evaluate non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation with a focus on the induction of genomic instability (GI) in key stem cell populations from haemopoietic tissue. Using stem cells from two mouse strains (CBA/CaH and C57BL/6J) known to differ in their susceptibility to radiation effects, we plan to carefully dissect the role of genetic predisposition in these models on genomic instability. We will specifically focus on the effects of low doses of low LET radiation, down to the dose of 10mGy (0.01Gy) X-rays. Using conventional X-ray and we will be able to assess the role of genetic variation under various conditions at a range of doses down to the very low dose of 0.01Gy. Irradiations will be carried out using facilities in routine operation for such studies. Mechanistic studies of instability in different cell lineages will include the role of cytokines which have been shown to be in the initiation of instability. These studies also aim to uncover the possible mechanism of the initiation, perpetuation and delayed pathways of the instability response using relevant biological endpoints i.e. chromosomal instability, apoptosis induction, cytokine and gene array analysis. Integral to these studies will be an assessment of the role of genetic susceptibility in these responses, using CBA/CaH and C57BL/6J mice. The overall results suggest that low dose low LET X-irradiation induced delayed GI in both CBA/CaH and C57BL/6J haemopoeitic tissue. Using several biological approaches, some key strain and dose-specific differences have been identified in radiation-induced signalling in the initiation and perpetuation of the instability process. Furthermore, the induction of non-targeted radiation effects and genetic dependency may be linked to the use of alternative signalling pathways and mechanisms which have potential implications on evaluation of non-targeted effects in radiation risk assessment.

Kadhim, Munira A

2012-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

30

In vitro cellular responses to silicon carbide particles manufactured through the Acheson process: impact of physico-chemical features on pro-inflammatory and pro-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 In vitro cellular responses to silicon carbide particles manufactured through the Acheson process ROS: Reactive Oxygen Species SiC: Silicon carbide SSA: Specific Surface Area TNF: Tumor Necrosis carbide (SiC) an industrial-scale product manufactured through the Acheson process, is largely employed

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

31

Mammalian Cell Culture | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mammalian Cell Culture At EMSL, researchers use the single-molecule fluorescencepatch clamp microscope to combine high-sensitivity fluorescence imaging simultaneously with...

32

Intrinsically disordered domains deviate significantly from random sequences in mammalian proteins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to characterize mammalian intrinsically disordered domains (IDDs) we examined the patterns ... sequence motifs. We considered IDDs from mouse proteins associated with innate immune responses as well...

Shunsuke Teraguchi; Ashwini Patil; Daron M Standley

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Mammalian Cell Fusion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The types of cell fusion best understood in mammals include the fusion of sperm and egg [3], fusion of cytotrophoblast cells to form syncytiotrophoblast [4], fusion of myoblasts to form myotubes [5], and fusion o...

Xiaofeng Zhou; Jeffrey L. Platt

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Functions of disordered regions in mammalian early base excision repair proteins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reactive oxygen species, generated endogenously and induced as a toxic response, produce several dozen oxidized or modified bases and/or single-strand breaks in mammalian and other genomes. These lesions are pred...

Muralidhar L. Hegde; Tapas K. Hazra; Sankar Mitra

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Toxicology and cellular effect of manufactured nanomaterials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The increasing use of nanotechnology in consumer products and medical applications underlies the importance of understanding its potential toxic effects to people and the environment. Herein are described methods and assays to predict and evaluate the cellular effects of nanomaterial exposure. Exposing cells to nanomaterials at cytotoxic doses induces cell cycle arrest and increases apoptosis/necrosis, activates genes involved in cellular transport, metabolism, cell cycle regulation, and stress response. Certain nanomaterials induce genes indicative of a strong immune and inflammatory response within skin fibroblasts. Furthermore, the described multiwall carbon nanoonions (MWCNOs) can be used as a therapeutic in the treatment of cancer due to its cytotoxicity.

Chen, Fanqing

2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

36

Structural Insights to How Mammalian Capping Enzyme Reads the CTD Code  

SciTech Connect

Physical interaction between the phosphorylated RNA polymerase II carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) and cellular capping enzymes is required for efficient formation of the 5' mRNA cap, the first modification of nascent mRNA. Here, we report the crystal structure of the RNA guanylyltransferase component of mammalian capping enzyme (Mce) bound to a CTD phosphopeptide. The CTD adopts an extended {beta}-like conformation that docks Tyr1 and Ser5-PO{sub 4} onto the Mce nucleotidyltransferase domain. Structure-guided mutational analysis verified that the Mce-CTD interface is a tunable determinant of CTD binding and stimulation of guanylyltransferase activity, and of Mce function in vivo. The location and composition of the CTD binding site on mammalian capping enzyme is distinct from that of a yeast capping enzyme that recognizes the same CTD primary structure. Thus, capping enzymes from different taxa have evolved different strategies to read the CTD code.

Ghosh, Agnidipta; Shuman, Stewart; Lima, Christopher D. (SKI)

2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

37

MFR PAPER 1140 Cellular Response to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Service, Galveston Laboratory, Galveston, Texas, has been to conduct investiga- tions related are with the Galveston Laboratory, Gulf Coastal Fisheries Center, Na- tional Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA, Galveston, TX 77550. This paper is Contribution No. 374 of the Galveston Laboratory. Figure 1.-Aphagocytic torm

38

Erythropoietin binding protein from mammalian serum  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Purified mammalian erythropoietin binding-protein is disclosed, and its isolation, identification, characterization, purification, and immunoassay are described. The erythropoietin binding protein can be used for regulation of erythropoiesis by regulating levels and half-life of erythropoietin. A diagnostic kit for determination of level of erythropoietin binding protein is also described. 11 figs.

Clemons, G.K.

1997-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

39

Chapter 32 - Cellular Signaling in Dentin Repair andRegeneration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Injury to the dentin-pulp complex results in a variety of cellular responses that determine tooth vitality and survival. Initially, these responses center on the odontoblasts as the first line of defense and environmental sensors, but will subsequently encompass other cells in the pulp with a complex interplay being seen between regenerative responses involving odontoblasts and the inflammation associated with pulpal responses to injury. Local degradation of dentin matrix following injury will release bioactive molecules contributing to cellular signaling. While tissue repair and regeneration will likely occur only when infection and inflammation are under control, low-level cytokine stimulation during the earlier stages of dental disease, and possibly as resolution of inflammation ensues, may facilitate and promote reparative events. Whether odontoblasts survive the injurious challenge will determine if reactionary or reparative dentinogenesis occurs during repair and regeneration in the dentin-pulp complex. Notably the complexity of cellular responses is significantly greater for reparative dentinogenesis where stem/progenitor cell recruitment and induction of differentiation are required prior to up-regulation of cellular secretion of new matrix. Angiogeneic and neurogenic signaling are also important events during repair and regeneration. Improved understanding of cellular signaling following tooth injury helps underpin our approaches to diagnosis and treatment planning, as well as driving novel strategies for translation of new clinical therapeutic approaches.

Anthony (Tony) J. Smith; Paul R. Cooper

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Linking Molecular Events to Cellular  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Linking Molecular Events to Cellular Responses at Low Dose Exposures Linking Molecular Events to Cellular Responses at Low Dose Exposures Thomas Weber Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Why This Project It currently costs billions of dollars to protect workers and the public from exposure to man-made radiation, despite exposure levels lower than the natural background levels of radiation. If it could be demonstrated that there is no increased cancer risk associated with these low dose exposures, these resources could be directed toward more critical societal issues. Defining low dose radiation cancer risks is limited by our ability to measure and directly correlate relevant cellular and molecular responses occurring at the low radiation dose and dose rate with tumor formation. This deficiency has led to conservative risk assessments based on low dose

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Effect of Gas Sparging in Mammalian Cell Bioreactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the major problems in the operations of mammalian cell bioreactors is the detrimental effect of gas sparging. Since the most convenient way to oxygenate any bioreactor is by gas sparging, this adverse effect has ...

Wang, Daniel I.C.

42

Synchronization of Mammalian Cell Cultures by Serum Deprivation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mammalian cells are amenable to study the regulation of cell cycle progression in vitro by shifting them into the same phase of the cycle. Procedures to arrest cultured cells in specific phases of the cell cycle ...

Thomas J. Langan; Richard C. Chou

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Bioreactor Systems for Producing Antibody from Mammalian Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We can classify anchorage-dependent systems as either laboratory- or industrial-scale systems. The laboratory-scale systems use plastic wares capable of providing a suitable surface area to sustain mammalian cell...

Darrin Kuystermans; Mohamed Al-Rubeai

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Amplification of signaling via cellular allosteric relay and protein disorder  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Amplification of signaling via cellular allosteric relay and protein disorder Buyong Maa,1 and Ruth conformational ensemble (14). All such events are allosteric. The allosteric order/disorder rationale factor (TF) catabolite activator protein (CAP) activation by cAMP in response to extracellular stim- uli

Kalodimos, Charalampos "Babis"

45

Microfluidics-integrated time-lapse imaging for analysis of cellular Dirk R. Albrecht,yza  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

th March 2010 DOI: 10.1039/b923699f An understanding of the mechanisms regulating cellular responses internal programs for growth and differentiation, and cooperatively integrate various inputs for cellular, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA c Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Bhatia, Sangeeta

46

Fracture mechanics of cellular glass  

SciTech Connect

Cellular glasses are prime candidate materials for the structural substrate of mirrored glass for solar concentrator reflecting panels. These materials are brittle, however, and susceptible to mechanical failure from slow crack growth caused by a stress corrosion mechanism. The results are detailed of one part of a program established to develop improved cellular glasses and to characterize the behavior of these and commercially available materials. Commercial and developmental cellular glasses were tested and analyzed using standard testing techniques and models developed from linear fracture mechanics. Two models describing the fracture behavior of these materials are developed. Slow crack growth behavior in cellular glass was found to be more complex than that encountered in dense glasses or ceramics. The crack velocity was found to be strongly dependent upon water vapor transport to the tip of the moving crack. The existence of a static fatigue limit was not conclusively established, however, it is speculated that slow crack growth behavior in Region I may be slower, by orders of magnitude, than that found in dense glasses.

Zwissler, J.G.; Adams, M.A.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

The metal-responsive transcription factor-1 contributes to HIF-1 activation during hypoxic stress  

SciTech Connect

Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), the major transcriptional regulator of the mammalian cellular response to low oxygen (hypoxia), is embedded within a complex network of signaling pathways. We have been investigating the importance of another stress-responsive transcription factor, MTF-1, for the adaptation of cells to hypoxia. This article reports that MTF-1 plays a central role in hypoxic cells by contributing to HIF-1 activity. Loss of MTF-1 in transformed Mtf1 null mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) results in an attenuation of nuclear HIF-1{alpha} protein accumulation, HIF-1 transcriptional activity, and expression of an established HIF-1 target gene, glucose transporter-1 (Glut1). Mtf1 null (Mtf1 KO) MEFs also have constitutively higher levels of both glutathione (GSH) and the rate-limiting enzyme involved in GSH synthesis-glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic subunit-than wild type cells. The altered cellular redox state arising from increased GSH may perturb oxygen-sensing mechanisms in hypoxic Mtf1 KO cells and decrease the accumulation of HIF-1{alpha} protein. Together, these novel findings define a role for MTF-1 in the regulation of HIF-1 activity.

Murphy, Brian J. [Biosciences Division, SRI International, 333 Ravenswood Avenue, Menlo Park, CA 94025-3493 (United States)]. E-mail: brian.murphy@sri.com; Sato, Barbara G. [Biosciences Division, SRI International, 333 Ravenswood Avenue, Menlo Park, CA 94025-3493 (United States); Dalton, Timothy P. [Center for Environmental Genetics, Department of Environmental Health, University of Cincinnati, OH 45267-0056 (United States); Laderoute, Keith R. [Biosciences Division, SRI International, 333 Ravenswood Avenue, Menlo Park, CA 94025-3493 (United States)

2005-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

48

Chemical Conjugate TMV?Peptide Bivalent Fusion Vaccines Improve Cellular Immunity and Tumor Protection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chemical conjugation of CTL peptides to tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) has shown promise as a molecular adjuvant scaffold for augmentation of cellular immune responses to peptide vaccines. This study demonstrates the ease of generating complex multipeptide ...

Alison A. McCormick; Tina A. Corbo; Sherri Wykoff-Clary; Kenneth E. Palmer; Gregory P. Pogue

2006-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

49

A universally programmable Quantum Cellular Automaton  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the role of classical control in the context of reversible quantum cellular automata. Employing the structure theorem for quantum cellular automata, we give a general construction scheme to turn an arbitrary cellular automaton with external classical control into an autonomous one, thereby proving the computational equivalence of these two models. We use this technique to construct a universally programmable cellular automaton on a one-dimensional lattice with single cell dimension 12.

D. J. Shepherd; T. Franz; R. F. Werner

2005-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

50

MOBILE PHONES: THE NEW (CELLULAR) GEOGRAPHY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MOBILE PHONES: THE NEW (CELLULAR) GEOGRAPHY Pablo Mateos MSc in Geographic Information Science first at p.mateos@ucl.ac.uk MATEOS, PABLO (2004) "Mobile phones: The new (cellular) geography", unpublished MSc dissertation, University of Leicester. #12;Mobile Phones: The New (Cellular) Geography 1

Jones, Peter JS

51

{sub p}53-Dependent Adaptive Responses in Human Cells Exposed to Space Radiations  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: It has been reported that priming irradiation or conditioning irradiation with a low dose of X-rays in the range of 0.02-0.1 Gy induces a p53-dependent adaptive response in mammalian cells. The aim of the present study was to clarify the effect of space radiations on the adaptive response. Methods and Materials: Two human lymphoblastoid cell lines were used; one cell line bears a wild-type p53 (wtp53) gene, and another cell line bears a mutated p53 (mp53) gene. The cells were frozen during transportation on the space shuttle and while in orbit in the International Space Station freezer for 133 days between November 15, 2008 and March 29, 2009. After the frozen samples were returned to Earth, the cells were cultured for 6 h and then exposed to a challenging X-ray-irradiation (2 Gy). Cellular sensitivity, apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations were scored using dye-exclusion assays, Hoechst33342 staining assays, and chromosomal banding techniques, respectively. Results: In cells exposed to space radiations, adaptive responses such as the induction of radioresistance and the depression of radiation-induced apoptosis and chromosome aberrations were observed in wtp53 cells but not in mp53 cells. Conclusion: These results have confirmed the hypothesis that p53-dependent adaptive responses are apparently induced by space radiations within a specific range of low doses. The cells exhibited this effect owing to space radiations exposure, even though the doses in space were very low.

Takahashi, Akihisa [Department of Biology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, Nara (Japan); Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Ibaraki (Japan); Su Xiaoming [Department of Biology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, Nara (Japan); Suzuki, Hiromi [Japan Space Forum, Tokyo (Japan); Space Environmental Medicine, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima (Japan); Omori, Katsunori [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Ibaraki (Japan); Seki, Masaya; Hashizume, Toko [Space Environmental Medicine, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima (Japan); Advanced Engineering Services Company, Limited, Ibaraki (Japan); Shimazu, Toru [Japan Space Forum, Tokyo (Japan); Ishioka, Noriaki [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Ibaraki (Japan); Space Environmental Medicine, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima (Japan); Iwasaki, Toshiyasu [Radiation Safety Research Center, Nuclear Technology Research Laboratory, Central Research Institute of the Electric Power Industry of Japan, Tokyo (Japan); Ohnishi, Takeo, E-mail: tohnishi@naramed-u.ac.j [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, Nara (Japan); Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Ibaraki (Japan)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

52

The small GTPase Rab5 homologue Ypt5 regulates cell morphology, sexual development, ion-stress response and vacuolar formation in fission yeast  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Multiple functions of Rab5 GTPase in fission yeast were found. Roles of Rab5 in fission yeast were discussed. Relation between Rab5 and actin cytoskeleton were discussed. -- Abstract: Inner-membrane transport is critical to cell function. Rab family GTPases play an important role in vesicle transport. In mammalian cells, Rab5 is reported to be involved in the regulation of endosome formation, phagocytosis and chromosome alignment. Here, we examined the role of the fission yeast Rab5 homologue Ypt5 using a point mutant allele. Mutant cells displayed abnormal cell morphology, mating, sporulation, endocytosis, vacuole fusion and responses to ion stress. Our data strongly suggest that fission yeast Rab5 is involved in the regulation of various types of cellular functions.

Tsukamoto, Yuta; Katayama, Chisako [Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Shinohara, Miki; Shinohara, Akira [Institute for Protein Research, Osaka University, 3-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)] [Institute for Protein Research, Osaka University, 3-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Maekawa, Shohei [Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Miyamoto, Masaaki, E-mail: miya@kobe-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan) [Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Center for Supports to Research and Education Activities, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

2013-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

53

Cellular Response to Ordered Collagen Layers on Mica  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 III RESULTS : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 10 A. Formation of 2D collagen layers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 1. Assembly of unidirectionally aligned collagen lay- ers on muscovite mica.... : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 32 4 Early stages of collagen assembly on muscovite. : : : : : : : : : : : : 33 5 AFM topography of triangular collagen networks on phlogopite, comparing the e ects of glycine. : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 34 6 E ect of K+ on collagen...

Leow, Wee Wen

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

54

Efficiency of cellular information processing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that a rate of conditional Shannon entropy reduction, characterizing the learning of an internal process about an external process, is bounded by the thermodynamic entropy production. This approach allows for the definition of an informational efficiency that can be used to study cellular information processing. We analyze three models of increasing complexity inspired by the E. coli sensory network, where the external process is an external ligand concentration jumping between two values. We start with a simple model for which ATP must be consumed so that a protein inside the cell can learn about the external concentration. With a second model for a single receptor we show that the rate at which the receptor learns about the external environment can be nonzero even without any dissipation inside the cell since chemical work done by the external process compensates for this learning rate. The third model is more complete, also containing adaptation. For this model we show inter alia that a bacterium in an environment that changes at a very slow time-scale is quite inefficient, dissipating much more than it learns. Using the concept of a coarse-grained learning rate, we show for the model with adaptation that while the activity learns about the external signal the option of changing the methylation level increases the concentration range for which the learning rate is substantial.

Andre C. Barato; David Hartich; Udo Seifert

2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

55

A novel method for mammalian large genetic circuit assembly and delivery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Genetic manipulation of mammalian cells provides a foundation for contemporary biological research both basic and applied. Existing methods for construction and introduction of large scale exogenous genetic information ...

Li, Yinqing, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

E-Print Network 3.0 - adult mammalian hearts Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Seminars in Cell & Developmental Biology 18 (2007) 12 Model systems for the study of heart development and disease Summary: in the mammalian heart during aging. Incredibly, many...

57

HANDBOOK OF THE CELLULAR & INTEGRATIVE PHYSIOLOGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HANDBOOK OF THE CELLULAR & INTEGRATIVE PHYSIOLOGY GRADUATE AND INTEGRATIVE PHYSIOLOGY A. GENERAL INFORMATION In addition to the general and Integrative Physiology Graduate Program has adopted specific requirements for its Doctor

Mohaghegh, Shahab

58

Carbon Fiber Composite Cellular A Dissertation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon Fiber Composite Cellular Structures ____________________________________ A Dissertation and honeycombs. However, for weight sensitive, ambient temperature applications, carbon fiber composites have emerged as a promising material due to its high specific strength and low density. Carbon fiber reinforced

Wadley, Haydn

59

Modeling of fatigue for cellular materials  

SciTech Connect

Dimensional arguments are used to analyze the fatigue of cellular materials. A modeling describing the fatigue of foams with or without macrocrack is derived and compared to the existing experimental data of cementitious foams and phenolic foams; agreement is good.

Huang, J.S.; Lin, J.Y. [National Cheng Kung Univ., Tainan (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Civil Engineering

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

60

Control of Formation and Cellular Detachment from Shewanella...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Formation and Cellular Detachment from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Biofilms by Cyclic di-GMP. Control of Formation and Cellular Detachment from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Biofilms...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Science Against Stress: Research Shows Way to Some Cellular Relief...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Science Against Stress: Research Shows Way to Some Cellular Relief Science Against Stress: Research Shows Way to Some Cellular Relief December 30, 2011 - 10:14am Addthis...

62

A practical guide to microfluidic perfusion culture of adherent mammalian Lily Kim,ab  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A practical guide to microfluidic perfusion culture of adherent mammalian cells{{ Lily Kim,§ab Yi with microsystem technologies for on-chip experimentation. Microfluidic perfusion culture in particular allows and operating a robust microfluidic perfusion culture system for routine culture of adherent mammalian cells

Voldman, Joel

63

Bacteriophage lambda vector for transducing a cDNA clone library into mammalian cells.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...for transducing a cDNA clone library into mammalian cells. H Okayama...mammalian cells with a cDNA clone library constructed with the pcD expression...cells and still leave enough space for insertion of the pcD recombinants...relatively easy to transfer a cDNA library containing cDNAs in a wide...

H Okayama; P Berg

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Vacuum-assisted cell loading enables shear-free mammalian microfluidic Martin Kolnik,a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vacuum-assisted cell loading enables shear-free mammalian microfluidic culture{ Martin Kolnik,a Lev Microfluidic perfusion cultures for mammalian cells provide a novel means for probing single-cell behavior of cells during long-term continuous perfusion culture. Introduction Microfluidic cell culture technology

Hasty, Jeff

65

Asymptotics of cellular buckling close to the Maxwell load Short title: Asymptotics of cellular buckling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in kink-banding [11], in the buckling of railway tracks [14] and pipelines [9, 8], and are also closely falls on the point where the global energy minimum switches from the pre-buckled to the post-buckledAsymptotics of cellular buckling close to the Maxwell load Short title: Asymptotics of cellular

Burton, Geoffrey R.

66

Cellular-automaton model for reactive systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method for constructing a variety of probabilistic lattice-gas cellular automata for chemically reacting systems is described. The microscopic reactive dynamics give rise to a general fourth-order polynomial rate law for the average particle density. The reduction of the microdynamical equations to a discrete or continuous Boltzmann equation is presented. Connection between the linearized Boltzmann equations and a reaction-diffusion macroscopic equation is discussed. As an example of the general formalism a set of cellular automata rules that yield the Schlgl phenomenological model is constructed. Simulation results are presented.

David Dab; Anna Lawniczak; Jean-Pierre Boon; Raymond Kapral

1990-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

67

Mammalian Tissue Response to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation: The Role of Oxidative Metabolism and Intercellular Communication  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the project was to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the biological effects of low dose/low dose rate ionizing radiation in organs/tissues of irradiated mice that differ in their susceptibility to ionizing radiation, and in human cells grown under conditions that mimic the natural in vivo environment. The focus was on the effects of sparsely ionizing cesium-137 gamma rays and the role of oxidative metabolism and intercellular communication in these effects. Four Specific Aims were proposed. The integrated outcome of the experiments performed to investigate these aims has been significant towards developing a scientific basis to more accurately estimate human health risks from exposures to low doses ionizing radiation. By understanding the biochemical and molecular changes induced by low dose radiation, several novel markers associated with mitochondrial functions were identified, which has opened new avenues to investigate metabolic processes that may be affected by such exposure. In particular, a sensitive biomarker that is differentially modulated by low and high dose gamma rays was discovered.

Azzam, Edouard I

2013-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

68

Improving Cellular Nonlinear Network Computational Capabilities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Cellular Neural Network (CNN) is a bidimensional array of analog dynamic processors whose cells interact directly within a finite local neighborhood [2]. The CNN provides an useful computation paradigm when the problem can be reformulated as a well-defined ...

Victor M. Preciado

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Detecting Fraud in Cellular Telephone Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Detecting Fraud in Cellular Telephone Networks Johan H van Heerden Thesis presented for the degree fraud. Hence it is of great importance that fraud management sys- tems are implemented to detect, alarm, and shut down fraud within minutes, minimising revenue loss. Modern proprietary fraud management systems

van Vuuren, Jan H.

70

Creating Living Cellular Machines ROGER D. KAMM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Abstract--Development of increasingly complex integrated cellular systems will be a major challenge the ethical implications of this work. Future prospects as well as ways of addressing these complex ethical healthcare technol- ogies to alternative energy sources to environmental protection. But the potential

Bashir, Rashid

71

Cellular Energy Efficiency Evaluation Framework (Invited Paper)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cellular Energy Efficiency Evaluation Framework (Invited Paper) Gunther Auer, Vito Giannini, Istv, the power consumption of the entire system needs to be captured and an appropriate energy efficiency evaluation frameworks are discussed, such that the energy efficiency of the entire network comprising

Stevenson, Paul

72

Route classification using cellular handoff patterns  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Understanding utilization of city roads is important for urban planners. In this paper, we show how to use handoff patterns from cellular phone networks to identify which routes people take through a city. Specifically, this paper makes three contributions. ... Keywords: handoff patterns, route classification

Richard A. Becker; Ramon Caceres; Karrie Hanson; Ji Meng Loh; Simon Urbanek; Alexander Varshavsky; Chris Volinsky

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Cellular/Molecular Separate Ca2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cellular/Molecular Separate Ca2 Sources Are Buffered by Distinct Ca2 Handling Systems in Aplysia's University, Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6, Canada AlthoughthecontributionofCa2 bufferingsystemscanvarybetweenneuronaltypesandcellularcompartments,itisunknownwhether distinct Ca2 sources within a neuron have different buffers. As individual Ca2

Blohm, Gunnar

74

Porous and cellular materials for structural applications  

SciTech Connect

The symposium, Porous and Cellular Materials for Structural Applications, was held on April 13--15 at the 1998 MRS Spring Meeting in San Francisco. Recent developments were presented and discussed in the area of porous and cellular materials, including polymer-, ceramic-, and metal-based materials. The general focus of the symposium was on porous materials that are being developed, at least in part, for structural applications. Theoretical aspects of the mechanical behavior of porous and cellular materials were discussed, as well as the specific mechanical properties of a wide variety of solid foam materials. Design principles for the use of solid foams in structures were presented, and a number of promising applications for porous and cellular materials were shown. Papers on the manufacture of solid foams and the production of parts containing solid foams were presented. A significant portion of the symposium was devoted to new porous materials that cannot be classified as foams, such as hollow spheres, hot isostatically compacted and expanded (HICE) materials and GASAR materials. Thirty nine papers were processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

Schwartz, D.S.; Shih, D.S. [eds.] [Boeing Co., St. Louis, MO (United States); Evans, A.G. [ed.] [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Wadley, H.N.G. [ed.] [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

75

Molecular mechanisms and cellular consequences of low-dose exposure to ionizing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

mechanisms and cellular consequences of low-dose exposure to ionizing mechanisms and cellular consequences of low-dose exposure to ionizing radiation Andrew J. Wyrobek 1 , Francesco Marchetti 1 , Xiu Lowe 1 , Xiaochen Lu 2 , Terumi Kohwi- Shigematsu 1 , Brian Davy 1 , Thomas E. Schmid 1 , Sylvia Ahn 1 , Tarlochan Nijjar 1 Matthew A. Coleman 2 , Contact information: ajwyrobek@gmail.com 1 Life Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, 2 BioSciences Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA. The objectives of this research are to characterize the genome-wide molecular responses to low-dose ionizing radiation (<10cGy), to identify tissue and cell-type specific differences in pathways responses, and to identify the pivotal molecular pathway responses that control risks to genome integrity and health. This project utilizes mouse in

76

E-Print Network 3.0 - adult mammalian brain Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

brain Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: adult mammalian brain Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Hemby & Wn fE&) Progress In Brain...

77

A new role for muscle segment homeobox genes in mammalian embryonic diapause  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...conditions through sexual reproduction is one of the fundamental forces in mammalian evolution. However, the underlying...1973 Endocrine control of egg implantation. In Handbook of physiology (eds RO Greep, EG Astwood, and SR...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Transcription Inhibition by Platinum DNA Cross-links in Live Mammalian Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have investigated the processing of site-specific Pt?DNA cross-links in live mammalian cells to enhance our understanding of the mechanism of action of platinum-based anticancer drugs. The activity of platinum drugs ...

Ang, Wee Han

79

The mechanism and function of pervasive noncoding transcription in the mammalian genome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The vast majority of the mammalian genome does not encode proteins. Only 2% of the genome is exonic, yet recent deep survey of human transcripitome suggested that 75% of the genome is transcribed, including half of the ...

Wu, Xuebing, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Membrane penetrating peptides greatly enhance baculovirus transduction efficiency into mammalian cells  

SciTech Connect

Research highlights: {yields} Ligation of CTP with GP64 enhances baculovirus transduction into mammalian cells. {yields} Fusion of PTD with VP39 enhances baculovirus transduction into mammalian cells. {yields} CTP and PTD-carrying viruses improve the transduction of co-transduced baculoviruses. {yields} Virus entry and gene expression can be separate events in different cell types. -- Abstract: The baculovirus group of insect viruses is widely used for foreign gene introduction into mammalian cells for gene expression and protein production; however, the efficiency of baculovirus entry into mammalian cells is in general still low. In this study, two recombinant baculoviruses were engineered and their ability to improve viral entry was examined: (1) cytoplasmic transduction peptide (CTP) was fused with baculovirus envelope protein, GP64, to produce a cytoplasmic membrane penetrating baculovirus (vE-CTP); and (2) the protein transduction domain (PTD) of HIV TAT protein was fused with the baculovirus capsid protein VP39 to form a nuclear membrane penetrating baculovirus (vE-PTD). Transduction experiments showed that both viruses had better transduction efficiency than vE, a control virus that only expresses EGFP in mammalian cells. Interestingly, vE-CTP and vE-PTD were also able to improve the transduction efficiency of a co-transduced baculovirus, resulting in higher levels of gene expression. Our results have described new routes to further enhance the development of baculovirus as a tool for gene delivery into mammalian cells.

Chen, Hong-Zhang [Institute of Biotechnology, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan, ROC (China) [Institute of Biotechnology, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan, ROC (China); Institute of Molecular Biology, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan, ROC (China); Wu, Carol P. [Institute of Molecular Biology, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan, ROC (China)] [Institute of Molecular Biology, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chao, Yu-Chan, E-mail: mbycchao@imb.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Molecular Biology, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan, ROC (China)] [Institute of Molecular Biology, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan, ROC (China); Liu, Catherine Yen-Yen, E-mail: liucat_2@yahoo.com [Institute of Molecular Biology, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan, ROC (China)

2011-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Phase transitions in probabilistic cellular automata  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the low-noise regime of a large class of probabilistic cellular automata, including the North-East-Center model of A. Toom. They are defined as stochastic perturbations of cellular automata with a binary state space and a monotonic transition function and possessing a property of erosion. These models were studied by A. Toom, who gave both a criterion for erosion and a proof of the stability of homogeneous space-time configurations. Basing ourselves on these major findings, we prove, for a set of initial conditions, exponential convergence of the induced processes toward the extremal invariant measure with a highly predominant state. We also show that this invariant measure presents exponential decay of correlations in space and in time and is therefore strongly mixing. This result is due to joint work with A. de Maere. For the two-dimensional probabilistic cellular automata in the same class and for the same extremal invariant measure, we give an upper bound to the probability of a block of cells with the opposite state. The upper bound decreases exponentially fast as the diameter of the block increases. This upper bound complements, for dimension 2, a lower bound of the same form obtained for any dimension greater than 1 by R. Fern\\'andez and A. Toom. In order to prove these results, we use graphical objects that were introduced by A. Toom and we give a review of their construction.

Lise Ponselet

2013-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

82

Defects and Faults in Quantum Cellular Automata at Nano Scale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Defects and Faults in Quantum Cellular Automata at Nano Scale Mehdi Baradaran Tahoori, Mariam considerable research on quantum dot cellular automata (QCA) as a new computing scheme in the nano, quantum dot cellular automata (QCA) not only gives a solution at nano scale, but also it offers a new

83

Zonal organization of the mammalian main and accessory olfactory systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...connect to the accessory olfactory cortex (AOC), i.e. the medial amygdaloid nucleus...PMCoA). Interestingly, some of the AOC regions mediate di erent behavioural responses...also some overlap in func- tions across AOC regions: lesioning of the male rat BST...

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Benign, 3D encapsulation of sensitive mammalian cells in porous silica gels formed by LysSil nanoparticle assembly  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­Sil nanoparticle assembly Mark A. Snyder, Döne Demirgöz, Efrosini Kokkoli *, Michael Tsapatsis * Department 2008 Keywords: Silica gels Nanoparticles Mammalian cell encapsulation Laser scanning confocal nanoparticles in aqueous solutions of the basic amino acid L-Lysine for encapsulation of living mammalian cells

Kokkoli, Efie

85

Cellular telephone-based radiation detection instrument  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A network of radiation detection instruments, each having a small solid state radiation sensor module integrated into a cellular phone for providing radiation detection data and analysis directly to a user. The sensor module includes a solid-state crystal bonded to an ASIC readout providing a low cost, low power, light weight compact instrument to detect and measure radiation energies in the local ambient radiation field. In particular, the photon energy, time of event, and location of the detection instrument at the time of detection is recorded for real time transmission to a central data collection/analysis system. The collected data from the entire network of radiation detection instruments are combined by intelligent correlation/analysis algorithms which map the background radiation and detect, identify and track radiation anomalies in the region.

Craig, William W. (Pittsburg, CA); Labov, Simon E. (Berkeley, CA)

2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

86

Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer in Cellular Solids.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??To determine the characteristics and properties of cellular solids for an application, and to allow a systematic practical use by means of correlations and modelling (more)

Ettrich, Jrg

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Elucidation of the Ebola Virus VP24 Cellular Interactome and Disruption of Virus Biology through Targeted Inhibition of Host-Cell Protein Function  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Elucidation of the Ebola Virus VP24 Cellular Interactome and Disruption of Virus Biology through Targeted Inhibition of Host-Cell Protein Function ... One such virus is Ebola, which has profound consequences for human health and causes viral hemorrhagic fever where case fatality rates can approach 90%. ... The Ebola virus VP24 protein plays a critical role in the evasion of the host immune response and is likely to interact with multiple cellular proteins. ...

Isabel Garca-Dorival; Weining Wu; Stuart Dowall; Stuart Armstrong; Olivier Touzelet; Jonathan Wastling; John N. Barr; David Matthews; Miles Carroll; Roger Hewson; Julian A. Hiscox

2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

88

Orthogonal Control of Endogenous Gene Expression in Mammalian Cells Using Synthetic Ligands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ARTICLE Orthogonal Control of Endogenous Gene Expression in Mammalian Cells Using Synthetic Ligands South Mathews Avenue, Urbana, Illinois 61801 ABSTRACT: Gene switches have wide utility in synthetic-finger DNA binding domain (DBD). Our gene switch is specifically and reversibly con- trolled by 4

Zhao, Huimin

89

Structure, Subnuclear Distribution, and Nuclear Matrix Association of the Mammalian Telomeric Complex  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

order complexes at dispersed sites through- out the nuclear volume. M AMMALIAN telomeres have attractedStructure, Subnuclear Distribution, and Nuclear Matrix Association of the Mammalian Telomeric DNA and TRF colocalize in individual, con- densed structures in the nuclear matrix. Telomeric Tr

de Lange, Titia

90

In many ways, the red blood cells of non-mammalian vertebrates are very different from those of mammals. One of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In many ways, the red blood cells of non-mammalian vertebrates are very different from those of mammals. One of the most obvious differences is that non-mammalian red blood cells are nucleated whereas mammalian red blood cells extrude their nuclei before entering the circulation. In addition, these nucleated

Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

91

Cellular Algebras and Graph Invariants Based on Quantum Walks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider two graph invariants inspired by quantum walks- one in continuous time and one in discrete time. We will associate a matrix algebra called a cellular algebra with every graph. We show that, if the cellular algebras of two graphs have a similar structure, then they are not distinguished by either of the proposed invariants.

Jamie Smith

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Manganese Superoxide Dismutase Regulates a Metabolic Switch during the Mammalian Cell Cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...changes in cellular redox environment, and mitochondrial function...shift toward a more oxidizing environment during S- and G2 phase could...89 and 202 of MnSOD, and engineer expression vectors of wild-type...a shift in cellular redox environment. This study investigates...

Ehab H. Sarsour; Amanda L. Kalen; Zhen Xiao; Timothy D. Veenstra; Leena Chaudhuri; Sujatha Venkataraman; Philip Reigan; Garry R. Buettner; and Prabhat C. Goswami

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Quantum Cellular Automaton Theory of Light  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a quantum theory of light based on quantum cellular automata (QCA). This approach allows us to have a thorough quantum theory of free electrodynamics encompassing an hypothetical discrete Planck scale. The theory is particularly relevant because it provides predictions at the macroscopic scale that can be experimentally tested. We show how, in the limit of small wave-vector k, the free Maxwell's equations emerge from two Weyl QCAs derived from informational principles in Ref. [1]. Within this framework the photon is introduced as a composite particle made of a pair of correlated massless Fermions, and the usual Bosonic statistics is recovered in the low photon density limit. We derive the main phenomenological features of the theory, consisting in dispersive propagation in vacuum, the occurrence of a small longitudinal polarization, and a saturation effect originated by the Fermionic nature of the photon. We then discuss whether these effects can be experimentally tested, and observe that only the dispersive effects are accessible with current technology, from observations of arrival times of pulses originated at cosmological distances.

Alessandro Bisio; Giacomo Mauro D'Ariano; Paolo Perinotti

2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

94

Bioinspired Cellular Structures: Additive Manufacturing and Mechanical Properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biological materials (e.g., wood, trabecular bone, marine skeletons) rely heavily on the use of cellular architecture, which provides several advantages. (1) The resulting structures can bear the variety of real...

J. Stampfl; H. E. Pettermann

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Cellular/Molecular Properties of Synaptically Evoked Astrocyte Calcium Signal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cellular/Molecular Properties of Synaptically Evoked Astrocyte Calcium Signal Reveal Synaptic. Key words: astrocytes; intracellular calcium; neurotransmitter release; glutamate; synaptic activity). In this loop of information exchange between astrocytes and neurons, the synaptic control of the astrocytic Ca2

Newman, Eric A.

96

Design principles of mammalian signaling networks : emergent properties at modular and global scales  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis utilizes modeling approaches rooted in statistical physics and physical chemistry to investigate several aspects of cellular signal transduction at both the modular and global levels. Design principles of ...

Locasale, Jason W

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Management Responsibilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Management Responsibilities Management Responsibilities Depleted UF6 Management Responsibilities DOE has responsibility for safe and efficient management of approximately 700,000 metric tons of depleted UF6. Organizational Responsibilities In the United States, the U.S. Department of Energy is responsible for managing all the depleted uranium that has been generated by the government and has been declared surplus to national defense needs. In addition, as a result of two memoranda of agreement that have been signed between the DOE and USEC, the DOE has assumed management responsibility for approximately 145,000 metric tons of depleted UF6 that has been or will be generated by USEC. Any additional depleted UF6 that USEC generates will be USEC's responsibility to manage. DOE Management Responsibility

98

E-Print Network 3.0 - automated cellular imaging Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ko Summary: and appreciated the value of automated intrusion detection. The cellular fraud problem is well understood and put... Attacks on Cellular Systems Hai-Ping Ko GTE...

99

Scientists ratchet up understanding of cellular protein factory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Understanding of cellular protein factory Understanding of cellular protein factory Scientists ratchet up understanding of cellular protein factory The research could aid in development of new antibiotics used to fight multidrug resistant superbugs such as MRSA found in many U.S. hospitals. December 2, 2010 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

100

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Interaction of Genome and Cellular  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Genome and Cellular Micronenvioronment of Genome and Cellular Micronenvioronment Mina Bissell Life Sciences Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Why this Project While normal stoma can delay or prevent tumorigenesis, abnormal stromal components can promote tumor growth. Acquired or inherited mutations that alter stromal cell function can release the context-suppressed malignant cells. Literature spanning more than a century has shown that inflammation associated with tissue wounding can produce tunors. Radiation produces changes in reactive oxygen that are similar to inflammation and may represent a mechanism for radiation-induced damage. Project Goals To determine the underlying role of stromal alterations in controling genomic instability accompanying epithelial-mesenchyumal transformation.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

An analog time-multiplexing cellular neural networks computer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S T E R OF SCIENCE December 1995 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering AN ANALOG TIME-MULTIPLEXING CELLULAR NEURAL NETWORKS COMPUTER A Thesis by A P O L L O Q U A N F O N G Submitted to Texas A & M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of M A S T E R OF SCIENCE A .D . Patton (Head of Department) December 1995 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering iii ABSTRACT An Analog Time-Multiplexing Cellular Neural Networks Computer. (December 1995) Apollo Quan Fong...

Fong, Apollo Quan

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Influence of imperfections on effective properties of cellular solids  

SciTech Connect

The mechanical properties of cellular solids, or solid foams, is affected by imperfections such as wavy distortions of cell walls, variations in cell wall thickness, non-uniform cell shape, etc. The present paper is focused mainly on elastic stiffnesses of closed cell cellular solids. A perfect model is first discussed and shown to predict the behavior of PVC foams well. However, this model over-estimates the stiffnesses of aluminum foams. The relatively poor properties of the aluminum foam are believed to be caused by imperfections in the cells. The main body of the paper focuses on modeling different kinds of imperfections, and analyzing their impact on foam properties.

Grenestedt, J.L. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Aeronautics

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

103

Cellular response of the primate (M. mulatta) spleen to bone marrow transplantation in gamma irradiated recipients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. They further stated that this disease was due to the combined effects of late radiation damage, immunologic reaction of the graft against the host and impaired immunologic defense against micro- organisms. Foreign bone marrow treatment was effective only... physicists who had been experimenting with a source that emitted neutron and gamma rays. Five of these physicists were exposed to lethal doses of ioniz- ing radiation. Hemograms taken on October 30, 1958, showed total aplasia. Supportive therapy had...

Fraunfelter, Frank Clare

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

8th International Workshop on Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......present in vivo. The Gray Cancer Institute (Northwood, UK...V. Belyakov et al., Br J Cancer 88 (5), 767 (2003). 5) O. V. Belyakov et al., Br J Cancer 84 (5), 674 (2001). 6...found that mitochondrial DNA depleted human skin fibroblasts showed......

Yoshiya Furusawa; Katsumi Kobayashi; Yasuhiko Kobayashi; Takashi Nakano; Shunichi Yamashita

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

8th International Workshop on Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......and Intracellular Energy-deposited Sites...irradiation diagnostics. Home developed software...reduced glutathione consumption. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION...exclude such low-energy particle components...The electron beam energy is 30keV and the...system produced an average dose rate of 5Gy......

Yoshiya Furusawa; Katsumi Kobayashi; Yasuhiko Kobayashi; Takashi Nakano; Shunichi Yamashita

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Cellular Pathways Regulating Responses to Compatible and Self-Incompatible Pollen in Brassica and Arabidopsis Stigmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that is known to regulate polarized secretion. We show through transgenic studies that loss of Exo70A1 stigmas (absence of surface secretions), which prevent pollen grains from unrelated plant species (foreign of pollen capture, and the proteins and lipids in the pollen coat promote subsequent stages of interactions

Toronto, University of

107

Genetic variation in the cellular response of Daphnia magna (Crustacea: Cladocera) to its bacterial parasite  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...major goal in the field of ecological immunology. In this study...antagonists. One of the goals of ecological immunology is to determine...encapsulation; they are also vehicles for other immune functions...common in the early days of ecological immunology) of measuring...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

8th International Workshop on Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......rope of existing or under development microbeam facilities for radiobiological...standard cell culture conditions (temperature, CO2, humidity). A motorized...online optical microscopy at SNAKE Volker HABLE1 , Christoph GREUBEL1...operation at the ion microprobe SNAKE (Superconducting Nanoscope......

Yoshiya Furusawa; Katsumi Kobayashi; Yasuhiko Kobayashi; Takashi Nakano; Shunichi Yamashita

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

8th International Workshop on Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......end-window was vacuum-tight and the...static tandem accelerator (Pelletron) at...beam exits the accelerator vacuum through a 100 nm...visualization of nuclear targets, results...KN Van De Graaff accelerator is used to produce......

Yoshiya Furusawa; Katsumi Kobayashi; Yasuhiko Kobayashi; Takashi Nakano; Shunichi Yamashita

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Gaining Control of Cellular Traffic Accounting by Spurious TCP Retransmission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

yhwan@ndsl.kaist.edu EunYoung Jeong KAIST notav@ndsl.kaist.edu Jongil Won KAIST wji4@ndsl. Regardless of the policies, we find that TCP retransmissions can be easily abused to manipulate the current-riding" attacks even in the 10 Gbps links. I. INTRODUCTION The demand for cellular Internet access is rapidly

Park, KyoungSoo

111

Red fluorescent proteins: chromophore formation and cellular applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Red fluorescent proteins: chromophore formation and cellular applications Atsushi Miyawaki1,2 , Daria M Shcherbakova3,4 and Vladislav V Verkhusha3,4 In the last decade, a number of red fluorescent proteins (RFPs) that emit orange, red, and far-red fluorescence have been isolated from anthozoans (corals

Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

112

Cytosolic Ca2+ ions regulate numerous aspects of cellular  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cytosolic Ca2+ ions regulate numerous aspects of cellular activity in virtually all cell types (Berridge et al. 2000). This versatility is made possible by the diverse mechanisms by which Ca2+ signals; Marchant & Parker, 2000). Endogenous Ca2+ binding proteins play a key role in determining the magnitude

Parker, Ian

113

Cellular mechanisms of membrane protein folding William R Skach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cellular mechanisms of membrane protein folding William R Skach The membrane protein­folding. This Perspective will focus on emerging evidence that the RTC functions as a protein-folding machine that restricts. The process of polytopic (multispanning) membrane protein folding can be viewed as a series of sequential

Cai, Long

114

Environmental Distinctions between Cellular and Slabular Convective Lines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The organizational mode of quasi-linear convective systems often falls within a spectrum of modes described by a line of discrete cells on one end (cellular) and an unbroken two-dimensional swath of ascent on the other (slabular). Convective ...

Richard P. James; J. Michael Fritsch; Paul M. Markowski

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Effects of Triclocarban, Triclosan, and Methyl Triclosan on Thyroid Hormone Action and Stress in Frog and Mammalian Culture Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Effects of Triclocarban, Triclosan, and Methyl Triclosan on Thyroid Hormone Action and Stress in Frog and Mammalian Culture Systems ... Triclosan (TCS) and triclocarban (TCC) are widely used broad spectrum bactericides that are common pollutants of waterways and soils. ... Methyl triclosan (mTCS) is the predominant bacterial TCS metabolite. ...

Ashley Hinther; Caleb M. Bromba; Jeremy E. Wulff; Caren C. Helbing

2011-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

116

The mammalian proton-coupled peptide cotransporter PepT1: sitting on the transporterchannel fence?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...channels and pumps. Figure 1 Helical wheel plan of the TMDs in PepT1 showing the putative...3636-3644. doi:10.1021/jm0511029 . Review. The mammalian proton-coupled peptide...Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't Review | Cancer Research UK United Kingdom Wellcome...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

PUBLISHED ONLINE: 18 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1038/NPHYS2975 Mammalian pitch sensation shaped by the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ARTICLES PUBLISHED ONLINE: 18 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1038/NPHYS2975 Mammalian pitch sensation shaped by the cochlear fluid Florian Gomez and Ruedi Stoop* The perceived pitch of a complex harmonic sound changes to govern perceived pitch, but these rules are violated in psychoacoustic experiments. Cognitive cortical

Loss, Daniel

118

Persistent DNA damage foci, cellular senescence and low dose radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Persistent DNA damage foci, cellular senescence and low dose radiation Persistent DNA damage foci, cellular senescence and low dose radiation Denise Munoz 1 , Albert Davalos 1 , Francis Rodier 1 , Misako Kawahara 1 , Judith Campisi 1,2 and Steven Yannone 1,3 1 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Mailstop 84-171, Berkeley CA 94720; 2 Buck Institute for Age Research, 8001 Redwood Boulevard, Novato CA 94945; 3 Corresponding author Ionizing radiation (IR) induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are cytologically detectable as large nuclear foci that contain phosphorylated histone H2AX (γH2AX), the adaptor protein 53BP1, and several other proteins that participate in the sensing and processing of DNA damage (DNA damage foci). In normal human cells, moderately high IR (0.5-1 Gy) doses cause the rapid appearance of these foci (acute DNA damage foci), which gradually disappear

119

Cellular-automaton-based simulation of 2D polymer dynamics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A cellular-automaton-based model that simulates flexible polymers in good solvents is constructed. Excluded-volume effects as well as hydrodynamic interactions are incorporated in this model in a very natural way. The center-of-mass velocity autocorrelation function of a single polymer chain in a 2D solution is found to obey a dynamic scaling relation which violates the nondraining concept.

J. M. Vianney A. Koelman

1990-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

120

Differential Role of Transcription-Coupled Repair in UVBInduced Response of Human Fibroblasts and Keratinocytes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Cancer Institute, Rome, Italy Most solar radiation-induced skin cancers...cellular components by the higher-energy shorter solar wavelengths comprising the UVB spectra...learn more about the response to solar radiation of the target cells for...

Mariarosaria D'Errico; Massimo Teson; Angelo Calcagnile; Tiziana Nardo; Naomi De Luca; Chiara Lazzari; Silvia Soddu; Giovanna Zambruno; Miria Stefanini; and Eugenia Dogliotti

2005-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Reprogramming of tRNA modifications controls the oxidative stress response by codon-biased translation of proteins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Selective translation of survival proteins is an important facet of the cellular stress response. We recently demonstrated that this translational control involves a stress-specific reprogramming of modified ribonucleosides ...

Chan, Clement T. Y.

122

Investigating the Roles of Tat Specific Factor 1 in Both HIV-1 and Cellular Gene Expression.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? HIV-1 relies on both viral and cellular host factors for expression of its genome. Tat specific factor 1 (Tat-SF1) was identified as a cellular (more)

Miller, Heather Bennett

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Mimicry of a Cellular Low Energy Status Blocks Tumor Cell Anabolism and Suppresses the Malignant Phenotype  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...regulated by the energy status of the cell, which is...indicator of the cellular energy status (4). Changes in cellular...thus shutting down this energy consuming pathway. Similarly...21-25) has prompted us to explore the feasibility...

Johannes V. Swinnen; Annelies Beckers; Koen Brusselmans; Sophie Organe; Joanna Segers; Leen Timmermans; Frank Vanderhoydonc; Ludo Deboel; Rita Derua; Etienne Waelkens; Ellen De Schrijver; Tine Van de Sande; Agns Nol; Fabienne Foufelle; and Guido Verhoeven

2005-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

124

Analysis on equilibrium points of cells in cellular neural networks described using cloning templates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the paper, the region of the number of equilibrium points of a cell in cellular neural networks is considered by the relationship between parameters of cellular neural networks. The number of equilibrium points can be obtained by our results, and ... Keywords: Cellular neural networks, Cloning template, Equilibrium point, Stability

Qi Han; Xiaofeng Liao; Tengfei Weng; Chuandong Li; Hongyu Huang

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Protein cellular localization with multiclass support vector machines and decision trees  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many cellular functions are carried out in compartments of the cell. The cellular localization of a protein is thus related to its function identification. This paper investigates the use of two Machine Learning techniques, Support Vector Machines (SVMs) ... Keywords: decision trees, machine learning, multiclass support vector machines, protein cellular localization

Ana Carolina Lorena; Andr C. P. L. F. de Carvalho

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

MondoA-Mlx Heterodimers Are Candidate Sensors of Cellular Energy Status: Mitochondrial Localization and Direct Regulation of Glycolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the maintenance of energy homeostasis by sensing cellular metabolic status at the OMM and translocating...maintaining cellular energy homeostasis. Retrograde...identified here will allow us to rigorously test...sensors of cellular energy status: mitochondrial localization...

Christopher L. Sans; Daniel J. Satterwhite; Carrie A. Stoltzman; Kevin T. Breen; Donald E. Ayer

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Response Elements  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The Guide provides acceptable methods for meeting the requirement of DOE O 151.1C for response elements that respond or contribute to response as needed in an emergency. Cancels DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-1, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-2, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-3, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-4, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-1, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-2, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-3, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-4, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-5, and DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-6.

2007-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

128

Diamond Patterns in the Cellular Front of an Overdriven Detonation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A nonlinear integral-differential equation describing the cellular front of an overdriven detonation is obtained by an analysis carried out in the neighborhood of the instability threshold. The analysis reveals both an unusual mean streaming motion, resulting from the rotational part of the oscillatory flow, and pressure bursts generated by the crossover of cusps representative of Mach stems propagating on the detonation front. A numerical study of the nonlinear equation exhibits the diamond patterns observed in experiments. An overall physical understanding is provided.

P. Clavin and B. Denet

2002-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

129

In situ Observation of Sulfur in Living Mammalian Cells: Uptake of Taurine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In situ Observation of Sulfur in Living In situ Observation of Sulfur in Living Mammalian Cells: Uptake of Taurine into MDCK Cells Sulfur is essential for life. It plays important roles in the amino acids methionine and cysteine, and has a structural function in disulfide bonds. As a component of iron-sulfur clusters it takes part in electron and sulfur transfer reactions.1 Glutathione, a sulfur-containing tripeptide, is an important part of biological antioxidant systems.2 Another example for the biological relevance of sulfur is the amino acid taurine, which is present in high concentrations in algae and the animal kingdom. Taurine has been implicated in a range of physiological phenomena, but its osmolytic role in cell volume regulation has been studied in greatest detail.3 In situ information on sulfur is rare despite its important biological role. This is due to the fact that sulfur is not easily accessible with most biophysical techniques. In recent years, sulfur x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has become increasingly important in the study of sulfur species in biological systems.4 The near-edge region of the XAS spectrum is a sensitive probe of electronic structure and hence chemical form.5

130

Transcriptome analysis reveals response regulator SO2426-mediated gene expression in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under chromate challenge  

SciTech Connect

Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 exhibits diverse metal ion-reducing capabilities and thus is of potential utility as a bioremediation agent. Knowledge of the molecular components and regulatory mechanisms dictating cellular responses to heavy metal stress, however, remains incomplete. In a previous work, the S. oneidensis so2426 gene, annotated as a DNA-binding response regulator, was demonstrated to be specifically responsive at both the transcript and protein levels to acute chromate [Cr(VI)] challenge. To delineate the cellular function of SO2426 and its contribution to metal stress response, we integrated genetic and physiological approaches with a genome-wide screen for target gene candidates comprising the SO2426 regulon.

Chourey, Karuna [ORNL; Wei, Wei [ORNL; Wan, Xiu-Feng [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Thompson, Dorothea K. [Purdue University

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-3047E Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers G described in this report was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and funded by the California. Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers. California Energy

132

CONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to Workforce  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

account of in workforce planning. The importance of integrating academic training with clinical trainingCONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to Workforce of the Healthcare Science Workforce Modernising Scientific Careers: The Next Steps Response by the Wellcome Trust

Rambaut, Andrew

133

Genome-wide single-cell-level screen for protein abundance and localization changes in response to DNA damage in S. cerevisiae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An effective response to DNA damaging agents involves modulating numerous facets of cellular homeostasis in addition to DNA repair and cell-cycle checkpoint pathways. Fluorescence microscopy-based imaging offers the ...

Mazumder, Aprotim

134

A New Phase in Cellular Communication | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering Thin-Film Oxide Interfaces Engineering Thin-Film Oxide Interfaces Novel Materials Become Multifunctional at the Ultimate Quantum Limit Outsmarting Flu Viruses How Lead-Free Solder (Mis)Behaves under Stress Dynamics of Polymer Chains Atop Different Materials Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed A New Phase in Cellular Communication NOVEMBER 15, 2012 Bookmark and Share Interactions between N-WASP, phospho-Nephrin and Nck produce large polymers (top panel) that phase separate to produce liquid droplets suspended in aqueous solution (bottom panel). In many physical processes, substances undergo phase transitions, where they are transformed from one state (solid, liquid, or gas) to another.

135

Cellular Neural Network for Real Time Image Processing  

SciTech Connect

Since their introduction in 1988, Cellular Nonlinear Networks (CNNs) have found a key role as image processing instruments. Thanks to their structure they are able of processing individual pixels in a parallel way providing fast image processing capabilities that has been applied to a wide range of field among which nuclear fusion. In the last years, indeed, visible and infrared video cameras have become more and more important in tokamak fusion experiments for the twofold aim of understanding the physics and monitoring the safety of the operation. Examining the output of these cameras in real-time can provide significant information for plasma control and safety of the machines. The potentiality of CNNs can be exploited to this aim. To demonstrate the feasibility of the approach, CNN image processing has been applied to several tasks both at the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade (FTU) and the Joint European Torus (JET)

Vagliasindi, G.; Arena, P.; Fortuna, L. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica Elettronica e dei Sistemi - Universita degli Studi di Catania, I-95125 Catania (Italy); Mazzitelli, G. [ENEA-Gestione Grandi Impianti Sperimentali, via E. Fermi 45, I-00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Murari, A. [Consorzio RFX-Associazione EURATOM ENEA per la Fusione, I-35127 Padova (Italy)

2008-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

136

Cellular telephone-based wide-area radiation detection network  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A network of radiation detection instruments, each having a small solid state radiation sensor module integrated into a cellular phone for providing radiation detection data and analysis directly to a user. The sensor module includes a solid-state crystal bonded to an ASIC readout providing a low cost, low power, light weight compact instrument to detect and measure radiation energies in the local ambient radiation field. In particular, the photon energy, time of event, and location of the detection instrument at the time of detection is recorded for real time transmission to a central data collection/analysis system. The collected data from the entire network of radiation detection instruments are combined by intelligent correlation/analysis algorithms which map the background radiation and detect, identify and track radiation anomalies in the region.

Craig, William W. (Pittsburg, CA); Labov, Simon E. (Berkeley, CA)

2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

137

Cellular glass insulation keeps liquefied gas from vaporizing  

SciTech Connect

The North West Shelf Project, located on the Burrup Peninsula in Western Australia, supplies much of that vast state with natural gas for domestic and industrial applications. Some of the gas is also exported to Japan as liquefied natural gas (LNG). While awaiting shipment to Japan, the LNG is stored at {minus}322 F in four storage tanks, each with a capacity of 2.5 million ft{sup 3}. When Woodside Offshore Petroleum Pty Ltd., operator of the LNG facility, selected insulation material for the storage tanks, it went in search of a material with more than just insulating value. Since the insulation is installed inside the tanks, it must be able to resist wicking or absorbing the LNG. Also, it had to have sufficient strength to withstand the weight of the 2.5 million ft{sup 3} of LNG without being crushed or losing its insulting properties. And, as a safety precaution, the selected materials should neither burn nor support combustion. Ultimately, Woodside selected a cellular glass insulation called Foamglas, from Pittsburgh Corning Corp., that met all the performance criteria and was cost competitive with the lesser-performing alternatives. Foamglas is produced from strong, inert borosilicate glass. Its insulating capability is provided by the tiny, closed cells of air encapsulated within the foam-like structure of the glass. Since the cells are closed,neither liquid nor vapor can enter the structure of the insulation. The inert glass itself will not absorb or react with LNG, nor will it burn or support a fire. The cellular structure provides effective insulation in both not and cold applications, and offers a fire barrier.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

E-Print Network 3.0 - assembly cellular iron Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: , iron storage function and cellular regulation. Biochim. Biophys. Acta Bioenerg. 1275: 161-203. HOFMANN... Availability of iron from iron-storage proteins to marine...

139

Progress on cellular resolution retinal imaging: setting the stage for translation between clinical and basic science  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

I will review our progress on developing clinical and animal (mice) cellular resolution in vivo retinal imaging modalities. Example applications of these technologies to in vivo...

Zawadzki, Robert J

140

Progress on Cellular Resolution Retinal Imaging: Setting the Stage for Translation between Clinical and Basic Science  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

I will review our progress on developing clinical and animal (mice) cellular resolution in vivo retinal imaging modalities. Example applications of these technologies to in vivo...

Zawadzki, Robert J

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Commercial & Industrial Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resources News & Events Expand News & Events Skip navigation links Smart Grid Demand Response Agricultural Residential Demand Response Commercial & Industrial Demand Response...

142

Cellular/Molecular Dopamine Inhibits Mitral/Tufted3Granule Cell Synapses in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of spatiotemporal firing patterns of MTs, which form an odor representation passed to higher brain centers are translated into distributed output patterns encoded in the firing of mitral/tufted cells (MTs). Although MT circuits. Mammalian periglomerular neurons, which release GABA and dopamine, attenuate inputs from ORN

Delaney, Kerry R.

143

Cellular memory: Neutrophil orientation reverses during temporally decreasing chemoattractant concentrations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...inflammatory responses, such as host resistance to infectious disease, and in deleterious...processing may involve concepts similar to electric circuit theory (3). Thus, the...extraordinary model system for understanding elementary cell functions. Because the DNA is condensed...

Eric Albrecht; Howard R. Petty

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Pathway for Polyarginine Entry into Mammalian Cells Stephen M. Fuchs and Ronald T. Raines*,,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- dently discovered that the RNA-binding HIV1 TAT protein was capable of crossing lipid bilayers (8, 9). The dissection of HIV TAT function has revealed that a small cationic domain, residues 47-57, is responsible

Raines, Ronald T.

145

Inverse bifurcation analysis of a model for the mammalian G1/S regulatory module  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Given a large, complex ordinary differential equation model of a gene regulatory network, relating its dynamical properties to its network structure is a challenging task. Biologically important questions include: what network components are responsible ...

James Lu; Heinz W. Engl; Rainer Machn; Peter Schuster

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Engagement of CD81 induces ezrin tyrosine phosphorylation and its cellular redistribution with filamentous actin  

SciTech Connect

CD81 is a tetraspanin family member involved in diverse cellular interactions in the immune and nervous systems and in cell fusion events. However, the mechanism of action of CD81 and of other tetraspanins has not been defined. We reasoned that identifying signaling molecules downstream of CD81 would provide mechanistic clues. We engaged CD81 on the surface of Blymphocytes and identified the induced tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins by mass spectrometry. This analysis showed that the most prominent tyrosine phosphorylated protein was ezrin, an actin binding protein and a member of the ezrin-radixin-moesin family. We also found that CD81 engagement induces spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) and that Syk was involved in tyrosine phosphorylation of ezrin. Ezrin colocalized with CD81 and F-actin upon stimulation and this association was disrupted when Syk activation was blocked. Taken together, these studies suggest a model in which CD81 interfaces between the plasma membrane and the cytoskeleton by activating Syk, mobilizing ezrin, and recruiting F-actin to facilitate cytoskeletal reorganization and cell signaling. This may be a mechanism explaining the pleiotropic effects induced in response to stimulating cells by anti-CD81 antibodies or by the hepatitis C virus, which uses this molecule as its key receptor.

Coffey, Greg P.; Rajapaksa, Ranjani; Liu, Raymond; Sharpe, Orr; Kuo, Chiung-Chi; Wald Krauss, Sharon; Sagi, Yael; Davis, R. Eric; Staudt, Louis M.; Sharman, Jeff P.; Robinson, William H.; Levy, Shoshana

2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

147

Impact of Resolution on Simulation of Closed Mesoscale Cellular Convection Identified by Dynamically Guided Watershed Segmentation  

SciTech Connect

Organized mesoscale cellular convection (MCC) is a common feature of marine stratocumulus that forms in response to a balance between mesoscale dynamics and smaller scale processes such as cloud radiative cooling and microphysics. We use the Weather Research and Forecasting model with chemistry (WRF-Chem) and fully coupled cloud-aerosol interactions to simulate marine low clouds during the VOCALS-REx campaign over the southeast Pacific. A suite of experiments with 3- and 9-km grid spacing indicates resolution-dependent behavior. The simulations with finer grid spacing have smaller liquid water paths and cloud fractions, while cloud tops are higher. The observed diurnal cycle is reasonably well simulated. To isolate organized MCC characteristics we develop a new automated method, which uses a variation of the watershed segmentation technique that combines the detection of cloud boundaries with a test for coincident vertical velocity characteristics. This ensures that the detected cloud fields are dynamically consistent for closed MCC, the most common MCC type over the VOCALS-REx region. We demonstrate that the 3-km simulation is able to reproduce the scaling between horizontal cell size and boundary layer height seen in satellite observations. However, the 9-km simulation is unable to resolve smaller circulations corresponding to shallower boundary layers, instead producing invariant MCC horizontal scale for all simulated boundary layers depths. The results imply that climate models with grid spacing of roughly 3 km or smaller may be needed to properly simulate the MCC structure in the marine stratocumulus regions.

Martini, Matus; Gustafson, William I.; Yang, Qing; Xiao, Heng

2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

148

Structural analysis of fish versus mammalian hemoglobins: Effect of the heme pocket environment on autooxidation and hemin loss  

SciTech Connect

The underlying stereochemical mechanisms for the dramatic differences in autooxidation and hemin loss rates of fish versus mammalian hemoglobins (Hb) have been examined by determining the crystal structures of perch, trout IV, and bovine Hb at high and low pH. The fish Hbs autooxidize and release hemin {approx}50- to 100-fold more rapidly than bovine Hb. Five specific amino acid replacements in the CD corner and along the E helix appear to cause the increased susceptibility of fish Hbs to oxidative degradation compared with mammalian Hbs. Ile is present at the E11 helical position in most fish Hb chains whereas a smaller Val residue is present in all mammalian {alpha} and {beta} chains. The larger IleE11 side chain sterically hinders bound O{sub 2} and facilitates dissociation of the neutral superoxide radical, enhancing autooxidation. Lys(E10) is found in most mammalian Hb and forms favorable electrostatic and hydrogen bonding interactions with the heme-7-propionate. In contrast, Thr(E10) is present in most fish Hbs and is too short to stabilize bound heme, and causes increased rates of hemin dissociation. Especially high rates of hemin loss in perch Hb are also due to a lack of electrostatic interaction between His(CE3) and the heme-6 propionate in {alpha} subunits whereas this interaction does occur in trout IV and bovine Hb. There is also a larger gap for solvent entry into the heme crevice near {beta} CD3 in the perch Hb ({approx}8 {angstrom}) compared with trout IV Hb ({approx}6 {angstrom}) which in turn is significantly higher than that in bovine Hb ({approx}4 {angstrom}) at low pH. The amino acids at CD4 and E14 differ between bovine and the fish Hbs and have the potential to modulate oxidative degradation by altering the orientation of the distal histidine and the stability of the E-helix. Generally rapid rates of lipid oxidation in fish muscle can be partly attributed to the fact that fish Hbs are highly susceptible to oxidative degradation.

Aranda IV, Roman; Cai, He; Worley, Chad E.; Levin, Elena J.; Li, Rong; Olson, John S.; Phillips, Jr., George N.; Richards, Mark P.; (Rice); (UW)

2010-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

149

A Micro-Payment Scheme Encouraging Collaboration in Multi-Hop Cellular Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Micro-Payment Scheme Encouraging Collaboration in Multi-Hop Cellular Networks Markus Jakobsson1. We propose a micro-payment scheme for multi-hop cellular networks that encourages collaboration ­ makes collaboration rational and cheating undesirable. Keywords: audit, collaboration, detection, micro

Levente, Buttyán

150

Playing with complexity: From cellular evolutionary algorithms with coalitions to self-organizing maps  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Since its origins, Cellular Automata (CA) has been used to model many type of physical and computational phenomena. Interacting CAs in spatial lattices combined with evolutionary game theory have been very popular for modeling genetics or behavior in ... Keywords: Cellular evolutionary algorithms, Coalitions, Game theory, Optimization, Prediction, Self organized networks (SOM)

Juan C. Burguillo

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Power-consumption minimization mechanism for heterogeneous multi-cell cellular network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power-consumption minimization mechanism for heterogeneous multi-cell cellular network Chulhyun, yhchoi } @snu.ac.kr Power-consumption minimization mechanism for heterogeneous multi-cell cellular consumes large amount of energy, reduction of energy consumption in ICT attracts attention of research

152

PHM 8100 November 8, 2012 Strategies to enhance tumor penetration and cellular uptake of nanoparticles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PHM 8100 November 8, 2012 1 Strategies to enhance tumor penetration and cellular uptake through fibrin gels in vitro and found that activated SK significantly improves the rate of drug delivery to simultaneously improve their tumor penetration and cellular uptake. Future studies will focus on developing

Thomas, David D.

153

The effects of topology upon fluid-flow and heat-transfer within cellular copper structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effects of topology upon fluid-flow and heat-transfer within cellular copper structures J. Tian February 2004 Available online 20 March 2004 Abstract The fluid-flow and heat-transfer features of cellular and packed beds, but also a function of orientation (open area ratio). The overall heat transfer depends

Wadley, Haydn

154

The effects of topology upon fluid-flow and heat-transfer within cellular copper structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 The effects of topology upon fluid-flow and heat-transfer within cellular copper structures J The fluid-flow and heat-transfer features of copper cellular metal structures made by the transient liquid media. The experimental results for pressure drop and heat transfer were expressed on the basis

Wadley, Haydn

155

Random Linear Cellular Automata: Fractals associated with random multiplication of polynomials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cellular automaton (LCA). As in the case of LCA with states in a nite eld we associate with this sequence with respect to linear cellular automata (LCA) with states in the residue classes of the integers modulo-similarity properties of the evolution patterns of the LCA. The self-similarity structure of the evolution set of LCA

Mauldin, R. Daniel

156

Searches for Exploitable Biochemical Differences between Normal and Cancer Cells: V. Cellular Conservation of Purines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...result in nucleotide conservation and a shift in equilibrium...informa tion on the conservation of, and equilibrium be tween, cellular purine pools during rapid growth...recycling or total cellular conservation accompanied conservation...acetic acid, 25 ml.; water, 25 ml. The net RF...

L. L. Bennett, Jr.; Howard E. Skipper; Linda Simpson; Glynn P. Wheeler; and William S. Wilcox

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Self-Optimization in Mobile Cellular Networks: Power Control and User Association  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Self-Optimization in Mobile Cellular Networks: Power Control and User Association Chung Shue Chen develop mathematical and algorith- mic tools for the self-optimization of mobile cellular networks the wireless devices are proposed. We focus on the optimization of transmit power and of user association

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

158

An Experiment in Reducing Cellular Base Station Power Draw With Virtual Coverage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

providers offer "low-power" GSM Base Stations (BTS) for use with renewable energy sources, these have cellular network during a six-month deployment in rural Papua, Indonesia. We demonstrate that the systemAn Experiment in Reducing Cellular Base Station Power Draw With Virtual Coverage Kurtis Heimerl UC

Parikh, Tapan S.

159

A Novel "Green" Inkjet-Printed Monopole Antenna Topology for Concurrent RFID and Cellular Communications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"green" inkjet-printed monopole antenna topology for integrated RFID-reader and cellular communicationA Novel "Green" Inkjet-Printed Monopole Antenna Topology for Concurrent RFID and Cellular Communications Zissis Konstas*(l), Konstantinos Katsibas(2) and Manos M. Tentzeris(l) (1) School of

Tentzeris, Manos

160

On the Interaction between Marine Boundary Layer Cellular Cloudiness and Surface Heat Fluxes  

SciTech Connect

The interaction between marine boundary layer cellular cloudiness and surface uxes of sensible and latent heat is investigated. The investigation focuses on the non-precipitating closed-cell state and the precipitating open-cell state at low geostrophic wind speed. The Advanced Research WRF model is used to conduct cloud-system-resolving simulations with interactive surface fluxes of sensible heat, latent heat, and of sea salt aerosol, and with a detailed representation of the interaction between aerosol particles and clouds. The mechanisms responsible for the temporal evolution and spatial distribution of the surface heat fluxes in the closed- and open-cell state are investigated and explained. It is found that the horizontal spatial structure of the closed-cell state determines, by entrainment of dry free tropospheric air, the spatial distribution of surface air temperature and water vapor, and, to a lesser degree, of the surface sensible and latent heat flux. The synchronized dynamics of the the open-cell state drives oscillations in surface air temperature, water vapor, and in the surface fluxes of sensible and latent heat, and of sea salt aerosol. Open-cell cloud formation, cloud optical depth and liquid water path, and cloud and rain water path are identified as good predictors of the spatial distribution of surface air temperature and sensible heat flux, but not of surface water vapor and latent heat flux. It is shown that by enhancing the surface sensible heat flux, the open-cell state creates conditions by which it is maintained. While the open-cell state under consideration is not depleted in aerosol, and is insensitive to variations in sea-salt fluxes, it also enhances the sea-salt flux relative to the closed-cell state. In aerosol-depleted conditions, this enhancement may replenish the aerosol needed for cloud formation, and hence contribute to the perpetuation of the open-cell state as well. Spatial homogenization of the surface fluxes is found to have only a small effect on cloud properties in the investigated cases. This indicates that sub-grid scale spatial variability in the surface flux of sensible and latent heat and of sea salt aerosol may not be required in large scale and global models to describe marine boundary layer cellular cloudiness.

Kazil, J.; Feingold, G.; Wang, Hailong; Yamaguchi, T.

2014-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

AcidBase Regulation in Fishes: Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and functional studies that have begun to define the protein transporters involved in the acid­base relevant ion gill membrane transport processes in acid­base balance. J. Exp. Zool. 293:302­319, 2002. r 2002 Wiley on recent advances in our understand- ing of membrane transport systems which are responsible for the net

Claiborne, James Berkeley

162

Cellular Pharmacology of Cyclopentenyl Cytosine in Molt-4 Lymphoblasts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...nucleotides. In the Molt-4 system, the concentration of drug...either immediately or after storage at -70 C. High-Pressure...ammonium formate, pH 5.0, pumped at 1 ml/min was used in experiments...activation. By con trast, the system believed to be responsible...

Harry Ford, Jr.; David A. Cooney; Gurpreet S. Ahluwalia; Zhang Hao; Michael E. Rommel; LeRoi Hicks; Kathryn A. Dobyns; Joseph E. Tomaszewski; and David G. Johns

1991-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

163

Cellular cardiomyoplasty for a patient with heart failure  

SciTech Connect

Background: A 73-year-old man with a history of myocardial infarction and hypertension for 5 years suffered heart failure (NYHA III-IV). Methods: 2D echo indicated hypokinesia at septal, left ventricular anterior wall and apical regions. Coronary angiograms demonstrated 60% stenosis in distal left main and 99% stenosis in proximal and distal left anterior descending coronary arteries (LAD). Both proximal artery and middle left circumflex coronary artery (LC) had 90% stenosis, and diffuse stenosis of right coronary artery (RC) was found. Myocardial perfusion imaging using {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI indicated defective perfusion of left ventricular apex, anterior wall and septal region and severe reduced perfusion of posterior inferior wall. Myocardial metabolic activities ({sup 18}F-deoxyglucose) also showed comparable reductions. After exposing the heart, LAD, LC, and RC were all completely occluded and bypass procedure could not be completed. Autologous satellite cells were implanted without any complication and the patient had an uneventful recovery. Results: During the first 2 months, he remained in heart failure, and by the third month, he gradually improved and reached NYHA II. At fifth month after the procedure, significant increased ejection fraction (37.1-48.6%) and wall movement with modest reduction of left ventricular systolic diameter (48-45 mm) were observed. Imaging with {sup 18}F-deoxyglucose showed dramatic improvement in myocardial metabolic activity with similar improvement in myocardial perfusion ({sup 99m}Tc-MIBI). Conclusion: This is the first successful case of cellular cardiomyoplasty without any conjunctional procedure for patient with severe coronary heart disease and heart failure.

Zhang Fumin; Chen Yijiang; Yang Zhijian; Gao Xiang; Ma Wenzhu; Li Chuanfu; Kao, Race L

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Chaun-Yuan Li  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chaun-Yuan Li Chaun-Yuan Li Radiation Biology Research, Duke University Medical Center Funded Projects Molecular Characterization of the Role of SOD Genes in Mammalian Cellular Response to Low Dose Ionizing, abstract, description. Technical Abstracts 2006 Workshop: The Roles of Superoxide Dismutage (SOD) in Low Dose Radiation Induced Adaptive Response Yang, Z., Chuang, E., Batinic-Haberle, I., and Li, C.-Y. 2005 Workshop: Molecular Characterization of the Roles of SOD Genes in Mammalian Cellular Response to Low Dose Radiation Li, C.-Y., Guo, Z., Yang, Z., and Chuang, E. 2003 Workshop: Molecular Characterization of the Roles of SOD Genes in Mammalian Cellular Response to Low Dose Radiation Li, C.-Y. and Chuang, E. Publications Li, F., Sonveaux, P., Rabbani, Z.N., Liu, S., Yan, B., Huang, Q.,

165

Channel Alternation And Rotation For Trisectorized Cellular Systems Vincent A. Nguyen, Peng-Jun Wan, Ophir Frieder  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

existing base stations are used, CAR deployment schemes do not introduce additional manufacturing costs to pay off leaving cellular carriers with battered balance sheets, cellular network designers must strive

166

A Carbohydrate RecognitionBased Drug Delivery and Controlled Release System using Intraperitoneal Macrophages as a Cellular Vehicle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...fluorescence imaging system (FIS) with excitation...nm). For the detection of macrophages...for a cellular vehicle in a drug delivery system so as to control...controlled release system using intraperitoneal...as a cellular vehicle. | The lymphoid...

Yuzuru Ikehara; Toru Niwa; Le Biao; Sanae Kabata Ikehara; Norifumi Ohashi; Takeshi Kobayashi; Yoshitaka Shimizu; Naoya Kojima; and Hayao Nakanishi

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

524 IEEE COMMUNICATIONS SURVEYS & TUTORIALS, VOL. 13, NO. 4, FOURTH QUARTER 2011 Green Cellular Networks: A Survey, Some Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

524 IEEE COMMUNICATIONS SURVEYS & TUTORIALS, VOL. 13, NO. 4, FOURTH QUARTER 2011 Green Cellular in realizing a "green" cellular network technology. Index Terms--Green communication, energy efficient net and challenges and suggest some techniques to enable an energy efficient or "green" cellular network. Since base

Shihada, Basem

168

Rat injury model under controlled field-relevant primary blast conditions: Acute response to a wide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 1 Rat injury model under controlled field-relevant primary blast conditions: Acute response.edu Keywords: Traumatic Brain Injury, Primary Blast, Mortality, Cellular Membrane Permeability, Lung Injury the risk of sustaining blast induced injury by military personnel and civilians. The blast injury

Farritor, Shane

169

Discovery of GSK2126458, a Highly Potent Inhibitor of PI3K and the Mammalian Target of Rapamycin  

SciTech Connect

Phosphoinositide 3-kinase {alpha} (PI3K{alpha}) is a critical regulator of cell growth and transformation, and its signaling pathway is the most commonly mutated pathway in human cancers. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a class IV PI3K protein kinase, is also a central regulator of cell growth, and mTOR inhibitors are believed to augment the antiproliferative efficacy of PI3K/AKT pathway inhibition. 2,4-Difluoro-N-{l_brace}2-(methyloxy)-5-[4-(4-pyridazinyl)-6-quinolinyl]-3-pyridinyl{r_brace}benzenesulfonamide (GSK2126458, 1) has been identified as a highly potent, orally bioavailable inhibitor of PI3K{alpha} and mTOR with in vivo activity in both pharmacodynamic and tumor growth efficacy models. Compound 1 is currently being evaluated in human clinical trials for the treatment of cancer.

Knight, Steven D.; Adams, Nicholas D.; Burgess, Joelle L.; Chaudhari, Amita M.; Darcy, Michael G.; Donatelli, Carla A.; Luengo, Juan I.; Newlander, Ken A.; Parrish, Cynthia A.; Ridgers, Lance H.; Sarpong, Martha A.; Schmidt, Stanley J.; Aller, Glenn S.Van; Carson, Jeffrey D.; Diamond, Melody A.; Elkins, Patricia A.; Gardiner, Christine M.; Garver, Eric; Gilbert, Seth A.; Gontarek, Richard R.; Jackson, Jeffrey R.; Kershner, Kevin L.; Luo, Lusong; Raha, Kaushik; Sherk, Christian S.; Sung, Chiu-Mei; Sutton, David; Tummino, Peter J.; Wegrzyn, Ronald J.; Auger, Kurt R.; Dhanak, Dashyant (GSKPA)

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

170

Different anti-aggregation and pro-degradative functions of the members of the mammalian sHSP family in neurological disorders  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...various members of the HSPB family differ largely, thereby...1. Introduction The family of the mammalian small...act as basic units/building blocks, capable of generating...in fact, several HSPB family members have been shown...Protein aggregation is a multi-step nucleation-dependent...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Design and analysis of active fluid-and-cellular solid composites for controllable stiffness robotic elements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this thesis is to investigate the use of a new class of materials for realizing soft robots. Specifically, meso-scale composites--composed of cellular solids impregnated with active fluids-were be designed ...

Cheng, Nadia G. (Nadia Gen San)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Mapping textures on 3d terrains: a hybrid cellular automata approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. I propose a method for generating textures for 3D terrains using various approaches - in particular, a hybrid approach that integrates the concepts of cellular automata, probabilistic distribution according to height and Wang tiles. I also look...

Sinvhal, Swapnil

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

173

Design and application of a cellular, piezoelectric, artificial muscle actuator for biorobotic systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the foremost challenges in robotics is the development of muscle-like actuators that have the capability to reproduce the smooth motions observed in animals. Biological muscles have a unique cellular structure that ...

Secord, Thomas W. (Thomas William)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Next-generation biomedical implants using additive manufacturing of complex, cellular and functional mesh arrays  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...biomedical implants using additive manufacturing of complex, cellular and...intramedullary rods, using additive manufacturing (AM) by electron beam...implants could be fabricated by additive manufacturing-(AM) from precursor...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Optimal Energy Cost for Strongly Stable Multi-hop Green Cellular Networks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With the ever increasing user adoption of mobile devices like smart phones and tablets, the cellular service providers' energy consumption and cost are fast-growing and have received tremendous attention. How to effectively reduce the energy cost of ...

Weixian Liao, Ming Li, Sergio Salinas, Pan Li, Miao Pan

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Cellular and genetic mechanisms of new tissue production in the regenerating planarian Schmidtea mediterranea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regeneration of missing body parts is biologically fascinating, yet poorly understood. Many instances of regeneration, such as the replacement of amphibian limbs or planarian heads, require both a source for new cellular ...

Wagner, Daniel Elger

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate olfactory rhythms in drosophila melanogaster  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from basiconic sensillae. To address the question of cellular mechanisms mediating olfaction rhythms, UAS-Gal4 strategies were used for tissue specific expression of dominant negative forms of CLK (CLOCK) and CYC (CYCLE). Specifically, OR (Odorant...

Krishnan, Parthasarathy

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

178

E-Print Network 3.0 - activates cellular cyclic Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

29th SPRBM Scientific... : Christopher Jacobs 8:00-8:40 Keynote Shuming Nie Next Generation Quantum Dots for Molecular and Cellular... Imaging 8:40-9:00 Yingxiao Wang...

179

Engineered sensors and genetic regulatory networks for control of cellular metabolism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Complex synthetic genetic programs promise unprecedented control over cellular metabolism and behavior. In this thesis, I describe the design and development of a synthetic genetic program to detect conditions underlying ...

Moser, Felix, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Cellular resolution ex vivo imaging of gastrointestinal tissues with coherence microscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optical coherence microscopy (OCM) combines confocal microscopy and optical coherence tomography (OCT) to improve imaging depth and contrast, enabling cellular imaging in human tissues. We aim to investigate OCM for ex ...

Fujimoto, James G.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Bhutta and Anand1 present a thoughtful and elegant discussion of the cellular  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of complex and interrelated events that include neurogenesis within the germinal matrix, migration of newly of preterm birth might interrupt the earliest and most basic cellular processes that drive this maturational

182

Distinct regulatory mechanisms balance DegP proteolysis to maintain cellular fitness during heat stress  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Intracellular proteases combat proteotoxic stress by degrading damaged proteins, but their activity must be carefully controlled to maintain cellular fitness. The activity of Escherichia coli DegP, a highly conserved ...

Kim, Seokhee

183

9.09J / 7.29J Cellular Neurobiology, Spring 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This course serves as an introduction to the structure and function of the nervous system. Emphasis is placed on the cellular properties of neurons and other excitable cells. Topics covered include the structure and ...

Littleton, Troy

184

Cellular Uptake, Cytotoxicity, and Innate Immune Response of Silica?Titania Hollow Nanoparticles Based on Size and Surface Functionality  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This research was supported by the Center for Advanced Materials Processing (CAMP) under the 21st Century Frontier R&D Programs of the Ministry of Commerce, Industry, and Energy (MOCIE), and WCU (World Class University) program through the National Research Foundation of Korea funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (R31-10013). ...

Wan-Kyu Oh; Sojin Kim; Moonjung Choi; Chanhoi Kim; Yoon Seon Jeong; Bo-Ram Cho; Ji-Sook Hahn; Jyongsik Jang

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

185

p85? Acts as a Novel Signal Transducer for Mediation of Cellular Apoptotic Response to UV Radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...mediation of type B UV (UVB) radiation-induced cell death. This...University School of Medicine, Japan) and described previously...University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan) and were described in a previous...cells were then exposed to UVB radiation 36 h after infection with the...

Lun Song; Jingxia Li; Jianping Ye; Gang Yu; Jin Ding; Dongyun Zhang; Weiming Ouyang; Zigang Dong; Sung O. Kim; Chuanshu Huang

2007-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

186

Genetic control and dynamics of the cellular immune response to the human Tcell leukaemia virus, HTLVI  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Charles R. M. Bangham 1 * Sarah E. Hall 1 Katie J. M. Jeffery 1 Alison M. Vine 1 Aviva Witkover 1 Martin A. Nowak 2 Dominik...Wucherpfennig, K. W., H llsberg, P., Richardson, J. H., Benjamin, D. & Ha er, D. A. 1992 T-cell activation by auto...

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Cellular response to 11[beta]-dichloro, a novel aniline mustard-estradienone, in various prostate cancer cell lines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cancer is a group of diseases characterized by uncontrolled cell growth and abnormal cell cycle and apoptosis regulation. Among the types of cancer, prostate cancer is the leading cause of death in men. Although many ...

Gonzlez, Francis Hber

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Novel Metastasis-Related Gene CIM Functions in the Regulation of Multiple Cellular StressResponse Pathways  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...GRP75 and -LGALS3 (anti-myc for CIM detection, Santa Cruz Biotechnology...analyzed further as candidate targets of CIM. Gene ontology (GO; ref. 30) analysis was employed...metastatic capabilities promoted by CIM in lung cancer cells, as described...

Kiyoshi Yanagisawa; Hiroyuki Konishi; Chinatsu Arima; Shuta Tomida; Toshiyuki Takeuchi; Yukako Shimada; Yasushi Yatabe; Tetsuya Mitsudomi; Hirotaka Osada; and Takashi Takahashi

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

The perlecan heparan sulfate proteoglycan mediates cellular uptake of HIV-1 Tat through a pathway responsible for biological activity  

SciTech Connect

Cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) mediate internalization of HIV-1 Tat. Herein, we report that human WiDr cells, which express perlecan but no other HSPGs, can internalize {sup 125}I-labeled Tat with minimal lysosomal degradation. Pre-treatment of cells with heparitinase almost completely abolished {sup 125}I-Tat surface binding, while the use of an HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR) promoter-reporter construct demonstrated that transactivation was potently blocked by pretreatment of cells with heparitinase, indicating an essential role for perlecan in the biologic effects of Tat. We conclude that the perlecan mediates Tat uptake and is required for HIV-1 LTR-directed transactivation in this human cell type.

Argyris, Elias G. [Dorrance H. Hamilton Laboratories, Division of Infectious Diseases and Environmental Medicine, Center for Human Virology and Biodefense, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States); Kulkosky, Joseph [Dorrance H. Hamilton Laboratories, Division of Infectious Diseases and Environmental Medicine, Center for Human Virology and Biodefense, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States); Meyer, Marie E. [Dorrance H. Hamilton Laboratories, Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolic Diseases, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States); Xu Yan [Dorrance H. Hamilton Laboratories, Division of Infectious Diseases and Environmental Medicine, Center for Human Virology and Biodefense, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States); Mukhtar, Muhammad [Dorrance H. Hamilton Laboratories, Division of Infectious Diseases and Environmental Medicine, Center for Human Virology and Biodefense, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States); Pomerantz, Roger J. [Dorrance H. Hamilton Laboratories, Division of Infectious Diseases and Environmental Medicine, Center for Human Virology and Biodefense, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States)]. E-mail: roger.j.pomerantz@jefferson.edu; Williams, Kevin Jon [Dorrance H. Hamilton Laboratories, Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolic Diseases, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States)]. E-mail: K_Williams@mail.jci.tju.edu

2004-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

190

Partial characterization of the antigen(s) from Listeria monocytogenes responsible for the induction of cellular immunity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fractions from Seqhadex G-ZOO gel filtration column . 31 LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page Elution profile of soluble antigen from DEAE Sephacel ion exchange column . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Calibration curve of Sephadex G-200 column used for molecular... weight determination of soluble antigen 34 Elution profile of soluble antigen from Sephadex G-200 gel filtration column . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Agarose double diffusion with fractions reacted with anti-soluble antibody . 39 10 Agarose double...

Smith, John Stephen

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Comparison of physical, chemical and cellular responses to nano- and micro-sized calcium silicate/poly(?-caprolactone) bioactive composites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...bone marrow-derived stromal cells on akermanite-bioactive ceramics. Biomaterials...Chang, W Zhai, S Ni, and J WangPorous akermanite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering...and J WangIn vitro bioactivity of akermanite ceramics. J. Biomed. Mater. Res...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Cellular Responses of the Late Blight Pathogen Phytophthora infestans to Cyclic Lipopeptide Surfactants and Their Dependence on G Proteins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...control depends heavily on agrochemicals. Cyclic lipopeptides...Based on the length and composition of the fatty acid as well...differing in the amino acid compositions of the peptide ring (7...control depends heavily on agrochemicals. Cyclic lipopeptides...

Judith E. van de Mortel; Ha Tran; Francine Govers; Jos M. Raaijmakers

2009-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

193

Genomics Approaches to Study Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Host Response to Avian Influenza Virus in Chickens  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are always accompanied by remarkable changes in gene expression. Therefore understanding the gene expression profile of infected cells at the global level is important to get insights into interactions between hosts and viruses. Different genomic approaches...

Wang, Ying

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

194

Iterative cellular array multiplier using overlapped four-bit scanning technique and its application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ITERATIVE CELLULAR ARRAY MULTIPLIER USING OVERLAPPED FOUR-BIT SCANNING TECHNIQUE AND ITS APPLICATION A Thesis WU WOAN KIM Submitted to the 0%ce of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1990 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering ITERATIVE CELLULAR ARRAY MULTIPLIER USING OVERLAPPED FOUR-BIT SCANNING TECHNIQUE AND ITS APPLICATION A Thesis WU WOAN KIM Approved as to style and content by: Karan...

Kim, Wu Woan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

195

Prenatal and postweaning dietary copper effects on cellular and humoral immunity in calves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PRENATAL AND POSTWEANING DIETARY COPPER EFFECTS ON CELLULAR AND HUMORAL IMMUNITY IN CALVES A Thesis by MICHAEL SHANE DAVIS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfilhnent of the requircmcnts... for the degree ol' MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1999 Major Subject: Nutrition PRENATAL AND POSTWEANING DIETARY COPPER EFFECTS ON CELLULAR AND HUMORAL IMMUNITY IN CALVES A Thesis by Michael Shane Davis Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

Davis, Michael Shane

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Enhancement of DNA repair in human skin cells by thymidine dinucleotides: Evidence for a p53-mediated mammalian SOS?response  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1562 , 7929831 . 24 Tishler R B Calderwood S K Coleman C N Price B D ( 1993 ) Cancer Res 53 : 2212 2216 , 8485705 . 25 Hupp T R Meek D W Midgley...35 Weeda G Van Ham R C A Masurel R Westerveld A Odijk H de Wit J Bootsma D van der Eb A J Hoeijmakers H J ( 1990 ) Mol Cell...

Mark S. Eller; Tomoko Maeda; Cristina Magnoni; Diana Atwal; Barbara A. Gilchrest

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Asymptotic Cellular Growth Rate as the Effective Information Utilization Rate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the average asymptotic growth rate of cells in randomly fluctuating environments. Using a game-theoretic perspective, we show that any response strategy has an asymptotic growth rate, which is the sum of: (i) the maximal growth rate at the worst possible distribution of environments, (ii) relative information between the actual distribution of environments to the worst one, and (iii) information utilization rate which is the information rate of the sensory devices minus the "information dissipation rate", the amount of information not utilized by the cell for growth. In non-stationary environments, the optimal strategy is the time average of the instantaneous optimal strategy and the optimal switching times are evenly spaced in the statistical (Fisher) metric.

Pugatch, Rami; Tlusty, Tsvi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Evolutionarily conserved IMPACT impairs various stress responses that require GCN1 for activating the eIF2 kinase GCN2  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: GCN1 is required for mammalian and yeast GCN2 function in a variety of conditions. Mammalian IMPACT competes with GCN2 for GCN1 binding. IMPACT and its yeast counterpart YIH1 downregulate GCN1-dependent GCN2 activation. -- Abstract: In response to a range of environmental stresses, phosphorylation of the alpha subunit of the translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2?) represses general protein synthesis coincident with increased translation of specific mRNAs, such as those encoding the transcription activators GCN4 and ATF4. The eIF2? kinase GCN2 is activated by amino acid starvation by a mechanism involving GCN2 binding to an activator protein GCN1, along with association with uncharged tRNA that accumulates during nutrient deprivation. We previously showed that mammalian IMPACT and its yeast ortholog YIH1 bind to GCN1, thereby preventing GCN1 association with GCN2 and stimulation of this eIF2? kinase during amino acid depletion. GCN2 activity is also enhanced by other stresses, including proteasome inhibition, UV irradiation and lack of glucose. Here, we provide evidence that IMPACT affects directly and specifically the activation of GCN2 under these stress conditions in mammalian cells. We show that activation of mammalian GCN2 requires its interaction with GCN1 and that IMPACT promotes the dissolution of the GCN2GCN1 complex. To a similar extent as the overexpression of YIH1, overexpression of IMPACT in yeast cells inhibited growth under all stress conditions that require GCN2 and GCN1 for cell survival, including exposure to acetic acid, high levels of NaCl, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} or benomyl. This study extends our understanding of the roles played by GCN1 in GCN2 activation induced by a variety of stress arrangements and suggests that IMPACT and YIH1 use similar mechanisms for regulating this eIF2? kinase.

Cambiaghi, Tavane D.; Pereira, Catia M. [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Parasitology, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de So Paulo (Brazil)] [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Parasitology, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de So Paulo (Brazil); Shanmugam, Renuka; Bolech, Michael [Institute of Natural and Mathematical Sciences, Massey University (New Zealand)] [Institute of Natural and Mathematical Sciences, Massey University (New Zealand); Wek, Ronald C. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Indiana University School of Medicine (United States)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Indiana University School of Medicine (United States); Sattlegger, Evelyn [Institute of Natural and Mathematical Sciences, Massey University (New Zealand)] [Institute of Natural and Mathematical Sciences, Massey University (New Zealand); Castilho, Beatriz A., E-mail: bacastilho@unifesp.br [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Parasitology, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de So Paulo (Brazil)

2014-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

199

Mass Market Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mass Market Demand Response Mass Market Demand Response Speaker(s): Karen Herter Date: July 24, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Demand response programs are often quickly and poorly crafted in reaction to an energy crisis and disappear once the crisis subsides, ensuring that the electricity system will be unprepared when the next crisis hits. In this paper, we propose to eliminate the event-driven nature of demand response programs by considering demand responsiveness a component of the utility obligation to serve. As such, demand response can be required as a condition of service, and the offering of demand response rates becomes a requirement of utilities as an element of customer service. Using this foundation, we explore the costs and benefits of a smart thermostat-based demand response system capable of two types of programs: (1) a mandatory,

200

Demand Response Assessment INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand Response Assessment INTRODUCTION This appendix provides more detail on some of the topics raised in Chapter 4, "Demand Response" of the body of the Plan. These topics include 1. The features, advantages and disadvantages of the main options for stimulating demand response (price mechanisms

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Adaptive Response of Mouse Skin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Adaptive Response of Mouse Skin Epithelial Cells to Low Dose Adaptive Response of Mouse Skin Epithelial Cells to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation: Induction of NF-κB, MnSOD, 14-3-3ζ and Cyclin B1 Authors: Jian Jian Li, Kazi M. Ahmed, Ming Fan, Shaozhong Dong, Douglas R. Spitz, and Cheng-Rong Yu Institutions: Division of Molecular Radiobiology, Purdue University School of Health Sciences, West Lafayette, Indiana; Free Radical and Radiation Biology Program, Department of Radiation Oncology, Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa; Molecular Immunology Section, Laboratory of Immunology, National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland Gene expression profiles demonstrate that a group of key stress-responsive genes are associated with radiation exposure and may contribute to cellular

202

A Cellular Cell | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

» A Cellular » A Cellular Cell News Featured Articles 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Science Headlines Presentations & Testimony News Archives Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 09.08.11 A Cellular Cell Scientists show structure of critical communications protein using bright light at Argonne Laboratory. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo Crystal structure of the beta2 adrenergic receptor-Gs protein complex Image from the RCSB PDB (www.pdb.org External link ) of PDB ID: 3SN6 Crystal structure of the beta2 adrenergic receptor-Gs protein complex. How does a cell use its cell? Specifically, how does it pick up signals

203

Three-dimensional simulations of cellular non-premixed jet flames  

SciTech Connect

The formation, dynamics and structure of cellular flames in circular non-premixed jets are examined with three-dimensional numerical simulations incorporating detailed descriptions of chemistry and transport. Similar to past experiments reported in the literature, CO{sub 2}-diluted hydrogen in diluted or pure oxygen co-flowing streams in the proximity of the extinction limit are considered. As in the experiments, several preferred cellular states are found to co-exist with the particular state realized depending on initial conditions as well as on the jet characteristics. The simulations provide additionally the temporal transitions to different stationary or rotating cellular flames, their detailed structure, and the dependence of the scaling of the realized number of cells with the vorticity thickness. (author)

Valaer, A.L.; Frouzakis, C.E.; Boulouchos, K. [Aerothermochemistry and Combustion System Laboratory, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, CH-8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Papas, P. [Division of Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Tomboulides, A.G. [Department of Engineering and Management of Energy Resources, University of Western Macedonia, 50100 Kozani (Greece)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

204

2012 CELLULAR & MOLECULAR FUNGAL BIOLOGY GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, JUNE 17 - 22, 2012  

SciTech Connect

The Gordon Research Conference on CELLULAR & MOLECULAR FUNGAL BIOLOGY was held at Holderness School, Holderness New Hampshire, June 17 - 22, 2012. The 2012 Gordon Conference on Cellular and Molecular Fungal Biology (CMFB) will present the latest, cutting-edge research on the exciting and growing field of molecular and cellular aspects of fungal biology. Topics will range from yeast to filamentous fungi, from model systems to economically important organisms, and from saprophytes and commensals to pathogens of plants and animals. The CMFB conference will feature a wide range of topics including systems biology, cell biology and morphogenesis, organismal interactions, genome organisation and regulation, pathogenesis, energy metabolism, biomass production and population genomics. The Conference was well-attended with 136 participants. Gordon Research Conferences does not permit publication of meeting proceedings.

Judith Berman

2012-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

205

Promoter Decommissioning by the NuRD Chromatin Remodeling Complex Triggers Synaptic Connectivity in the Mammalian Brain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Summary Precise control of gene expression plays fundamental roles in brain development, but the roles of chromatin regulators in neuronal connectivity have remained poorly understood. We report that depletion of the NuRD complex by invivo \\{RNAi\\} and conditional knockout of the core NuRD subunit Chd4 profoundly impairs the establishment of granule neuron parallel fiber/Purkinje cell synapses in the rodent cerebellar cortex invivo. By interfacing genome-wide sequencing of transcripts and ChIP-seq analyses, we uncover a network of repressed genes and distinct histone modifications at target gene promoters that are developmentally regulated by the NuRD complex in the cerebellum invivo. Finally, in a targeted invivo \\{RNAi\\} screen of NuRD target genes, we identify a program of NuRD-repressed genes that operate as critical regulators of presynaptic differentiation in the cerebellar cortex. Our findings define NuRD-dependent promoter decommissioning as a developmentally regulated programming mechanism that drives synaptic connectivity in the mammalian brain.

Tomoko Yamada; Yue Yang; Martin Hemberg; Toshimi Yoshida; HaYoung Cho; J.Patrick Murphy; Diasynou Fioravante; WadeG. Regehr; StevenP. Gygi; Katia Georgopoulos; Azad Bonni

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Demand Responsive Lighting Host: Francis Rubinstein Demand Response Research Center Technical Advisory Group Meeting August 31, 2007 10:30 AM - Noon Meeting Agenda * Introductions (10 minutes) * Main Presentation (~ 1 hour) * Questions, comments from panel (15 minutes) Project History * Lighting Scoping Study (completed January 2007) - Identified potential for energy and demand savings using demand responsive lighting systems - Importance of dimming - New wireless controls technologies * Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting (commenced March 2007) Objectives * Provide up-to-date information on the reliability, predictability of dimmable lighting as a demand resource under realistic operating load conditions * Identify potential negative impacts of DR lighting on lighting quality Potential of Demand Responsive Lighting Control

207

A Possible Nanometer-scale Computing Device Based on an Adding Cellular Automaton  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a simple one-dimensional Cellular Automaton (CA) which has the property that an initial state composed of two binary numbers evolves quickly into a final state which is their sum. We call this CA the Adding Cellular Automaton (ACA). The ACA requires only 2N two-state cells in order to add any two N-1 bit binary numbers. The ACA could be directly realized as a wireless nanometer-scale computing device - a possible implementation using coupled quantum dots is outlined.

Simon C. Benjamin; Neil F. Johnson

1996-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

208

Design of cellular VLSI 2-D mesh for large state space viterbi algorithms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DESIGN OF CELLULAR VLSI 2-D MESH FOR LARGE STATE SPACE VITERBI ALGORITHMS A Thesis by SAIFUL HASAN Submitted to the OAice of Graduate Studies of Texas A 8t M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1991 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering DESIGN OF CELLULAR VLSI 2-D MESH FOR LARGE STATE SPACE VITERBI ALGORITHMS A Thesis by SAIFUL HASAN Appmved as to style and content by: William Bliss ( Co-chairman of Committee ) Hosame Abu...

Hasan, Saiful

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Demand response enabling technology development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand Response Enabling Technology Development Phase IEfficiency and Demand Response Programs for 2005/2006,Application to Demand Response Energy Pricing SenSys 2003,

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

F) Enhanced ACP Date RAA ACP Demand Response SpinningReserve Demonstration Demand Response Spinning Reservesupply spinning reserve. Demand Response Spinning Reserve

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Cross-sector Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resources News & Events Expand News & Events Skip navigation links Smart Grid Demand Response Agricultural Residential Demand Response Commercial & Industrial Demand Response...

212

Demand Response Programs for Oregon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand Response Programs for Oregon Utilities Public Utility Commission May 2003 Public Utility ....................................................................................................................... 1 Types of Demand Response Programs............................................................................ 3 Demand Response Programs in Oregon

213

Demand response enabling technology development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

behavior in developing a demand response future. Phase_II_Demand Response Enabling Technology Development Phase IIYi Yuan The goal of the Demand Response Enabling Technology

Arens, Edward; Auslander, David; Huizenga, Charlie

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Automated Demand Response and Commissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fully-Automated Demand Response Test in Large Facilities14in DR systems. Demand Response using HVAC in Commercialof Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

The integration of ad hoc sensor and cellular networks for multi-class data transmission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The integration of ad hoc sensor and cellular networks for multi-class data transmission Fei Hu a. On the other hand, large-scale Ad hoc Sensor Networks (ASN), when deployed among mobile patients who may carry different kinds of micro-sensors to measure ECG, blood pressure, basal temperature or other physiological

Kumar, Sunil

216

Adaptive Semi-Soft Handoff for Cellular IP Networks Eriko Nurvitadhi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to wireless networks becomes a critical issue. For this reason, a number of micro-mobility protocols handoff is still a major obstacle to enabling seamless micro-mobility in wireless access networksAdaptive Semi-Soft Handoff for Cellular IP Networks Eriko Nurvitadhi , Ben Lee , Chansu Yu

Yu, Chansu

217

THE PERFORMANCE OF SPACE-TIME CODED COOPERATIVE DIVERSITY IN AN ASYNCHRONOUS CELLULAR UPLINK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE PERFORMANCE OF SPACE-TIME CODED COOPERATIVE DIVERSITY IN AN ASYNCHRONOUS CELLULAR UPLINK Kanchan G. Vardhe and Daryl Reynolds Lane Dept. of Comp. Sci. and Elect. Eng. West Virginia University Morgantown, WV kanchanv@csee.wvu.edu, darylreynolds@ieee.org ABSTRACT Most of the prior work on cooperative

Reynolds, Daryl

218

Cellular Automata in Simulated Hardware Rob J. de Boer & Alex D. Staritsky,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C A S H Cellular Automata in Simulated Hardware Rob J. de Boer & Alex D. Staritsky, Theoretical hardware and provides a similar, slower, but more flexible, environment. The basic idea of CASH 2.1 Game of Life The following is a listing of the life.c program in the examples directory

Utrecht, Universiteit

219

Potential cellular targets and antibacterial efficacy of atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma (APNTP) has been gaining increasing interest as a new alternative antibacterial approach. Although this approach has demonstrated promising antibacterial activity, its exact mechanism of action remains unclear. Mechanistic elucidation of the antimicrobial activity will facilitate development and rational optimisation of this approach for potential medical applications. In this study, the antibacterial efficacy of an in-house-built APNTP jet was evaluated alongside an investigation of the interactions between APNTP and major cellular components in order to identify the potential cellular targets involved in plasma-mediated bacterial destruction mechanisms. The investigated plasma jet exhibited excellent, rapid antibacterial activity against a selected panel of clinically significant bacterial species including Bacillus cereus, meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, all of which were completely inactivated within 2min of plasma exposure. Plasma-mediated damaging effects were observed, to varying degrees, on all of the investigated cellular components including DNA, a model protein enzyme, and lipid membrane integrity and permeability. The antibacterial efficacy of APNTP appears to involve a multiple-target mechanism, which potentially reduces the likelihood of emergence of microbial resistance towards this promising antimicrobial approach. However, cellular membrane damage and resulting permeability perturbation was found to be the most likely rate-determining step in this mechanism.

Mahmoud Y. Alkawareek; Sean P. Gorman; William G. Graham; Brendan F. Gilmore

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Biology by design: reduction and synthesis of cellular components and behaviour  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...easily stored fuel for combustion engines (Hahn-Hagerdal...delicate interplay of chemical gradients, cellular...create a model system of chemical gradient-induced pattern...in DNA to allow DNA looping. For these reasons...organisms involved in chemical processing, because...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Embryonics: A Bio-Inspired Cellular Architecture with Fault-Tolerant Properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper details and expands the work on Embryonics, a recently proposed fault-tolerant cellular architecture with reconfiguration properties inspired by the ontogenetic development of multicellular systems. The design of a selector-based embryonic ... Keywords: FPGAs, bio-inspired systems, embryonics, fault-tolerant systems, reliability models

Cesar Ortega-Sanchez; Daniel Mange; Steve Smith; Andy Tyrrell

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Major Cellular and Physiological Impacts of Ocean Acidification on a Reef Building Coral  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kaniewska1 *¤ , Paul R. Campbell2 , David I. Kline1 , Mauricio Rodriguez-Lanetty3 , David J. Miller4 Reef Studies and Coral Genomics Group, School of Pharmacy and Molecular Sciences, James Cook University: Kaniewska P, Campbell PR, Kline DI, Rodriguez-Lanetty M, Miller DJ, et al. (2012) Major Cellular

223

Pathogens Penetrating the Central Nervous System: Infection Pathways and the Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Invasion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...contributed equally to this work. SUMMARY The brain is well protected against microbial invasion...cellular barriers, such as the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the blood-cerebrospinal...pathogens reach the CNS and infect the brain. In particular, we focus on recent data...

Samantha J. Dando; Alan Mackay-Sim; Robert Norton; Bart J. Currie; James A. St. John; Jenny A. K. Ekberg; Michael Batzloff; Glen C. Ulett; Ifor R. Beacham

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Case: Cellular phones Authors: Michael Hamid, Jose de Jesus Rodriguez, Nicole Trahan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a cancerous tumor in the brain allegedly caused by her cellular phone. The problem originates into the brain. Therefore, the near field effect on the brain needs to be investigated at normal operating intensity. Very little is known about the near field effects of radiation on the body, especially brain

Williams, John M.

225

Issues in the theory of models -5 Cellular Automata (2): Urban CA models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Issues in the theory of models -5 Cellular Automata (2): Urban CA models Batty, Michael, Helen and Design 24, no. 2: 159-64. Introduction to the Special E+P B issue on CA. Some of the papers were-see if you are interested in CA. Colonna, Antonio, Vittorio Di Stefano, Silvana Lombardo, Lorenzo Papini

Clarke, Keith

226

Cellular Pharmacology of N,N-Dimethyl Daunorubicin and N,N-Dimethyl Adriamycin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Spectra Physics Model 3500B HPLC(Spectra Physics, Santa Clara, Calif.), fitted with...10 m@.i sodium azide, an agent that does not alter the cellular accu mulation of...Sartorelli and 0. G. Johns(eds.), Handbook of Experimental Pharmacology, Vol. 38...

Merrill J. Egorin; Ronald E. Clawson; Louis A. Ross; and Nicholas R. Bachur

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

An Energy-Efficient Power Allocation Game with Selfish Channel State Reporting in Cellular Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Energy-Efficient Power Allocation Game with Selfish Channel State Reporting in Cellular Networks Information (CSI) reports, reducing the cell's energy efficiency. To analyze this conflict of interest, we paper pro- vides valuable theoretical insight to energy-efficient networks when CSI reports cannot

Boyer, Edmond

228

JOURNAL OF CELLULAR PHYSIOLOGY 198:188196 (2004) Geldanamycin, a Heat Shock Protein 90-Binding Agent,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

JOURNAL OF CELLULAR PHYSIOLOGY 198:188­196 (2004) Geldanamycin, a Heat Shock Protein 90-Binding and Feramisco, 1982). It has been reported that Hsp90 plays a critical role in regulating signal transduc- tion of proteins including nuclear hormone receptors, protein kinases, and transcription factors (Pratt, 1998

Tian, Weidong

229

Autotransporters: The Cellular Environment Reshapes a Folding Mechanism to Promote Protein Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the cellular environment affects protein folding mechanisms. Here, we focus on one unique aspect affect protein folding kinetics and the conformations of folding intermediates? We focus on recent have been made to understand the mechanisms by which proteins fold to their native conformations.3

Clark, Patricia L.

230

Mimicry of a Cellular Low Energy Status Blocks Tumor Cell Anabolism and Suppresses the Malignant Phenotype  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Chemical Biology Mimicry of a Cellular Low Energy Status Blocks Tumor Cell Anabolism and...cancer cells typically show a high rate of energy-consuming anabolic processes driving...ribotide, an AMP analogue, mimicking a low energy status of the cell. Treatment of cancer...

Johannes V. Swinnen; Annelies Beckers; Koen Brusselmans; Sophie Organe; Joanna Segers; Leen Timmermans; Frank Vanderhoydonc; Ludo Deboel; Rita Derua; Etienne Waelkens; Ellen De Schrijver; Tine Van de Sande; Agns Nol; Fabienne Foufelle; Guido Verhoeven

2005-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

231

Response Protocol Distressed Students  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Response Protocol Distressed Students REFERRAL IDENTIFIERS: Student distress may manifest, the Distressed Student Protocol will assist you in responding to the student and providing appropriate referrals

California at Santa Barbara, University of

232

Demand Response In California  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation covers the demand response in California and is given at the FUPWG 2006 Fall meeting, held on November 1-2, 2006 in San Francisco, California.

233

GADRAS Detector Response Function.  

SciTech Connect

The Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) applies a Detector Response Function (DRF) to compute the output of gamma-ray and neutron detectors when they are exposed to radiation sources. The DRF is fundamental to the ability to perform forward calculations (i.e., computation of the response of a detector to a known source), as well as the ability to analyze spectra to deduce the types and quantities of radioactive material to which the detectors are exposed. This document describes how gamma-ray spectra are computed and the significance of response function parameters that define characteristics of particular detectors.

Mitchell, Dean J.; Harding, Lee; Thoreson, Gregory G; Horne, Steven M.

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

In vitro discrimination of the role of LRP1 at the BBB cellular level: Focus on brain capillary endothelial cells and brain pericytes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Several studies have demonstrated that the bloodbrain barrier (BBB) (dynamic cellular complex composed by brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) and surrounded by astrocytic end feet and pericytes) regulates the exchanges of amyloid ? (A?) peptide between the blood and the brain. Deregulation of these exchanges seems to be a key trigger for the brain accumulation of A? peptide observed in Alzheimers disease (AD). Whereas the involvement of receptor for advanced glycation end-products in A? peptide transcytosis has been demonstrated in our laboratory, low-density lipoprotein receptors role at the cellular level needs to be clarified. For this, we used an in vitro BBB model that consists of a co-culture of bovine \\{BCECs\\} and rat glial cells. This model has already been used to characterize low-density lipoprotein receptor-related peptide (LRP)s involvement in the transcytosis of molecules such as tPA and angiopep-2. Our results suggest that A? peptide efflux across the BCEC monolayer involves a transcellular transport. However, the experiments with RAP discard an involvement of LRP family members at \\{BCECs\\} level. In contrast, our results show a strong transcriptional expression of LRP1 in pericytes and suggest its implication in A? endocytosis. Moreover, the observations of pericytes contraction and local downregulation of LRP1 in response to A? treatment opens up perspectives for studying this cell type with respect to A? peptide metabolism and AD.

Pietra Candela; Julien Saint-Pol; Mlanie Kuntz; Marie-Christine Boucau; Yordenca Lamartiniere; Fabien Gosselet; Laurence Fenart

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Identification of Tat-SF1 cellular targets by exon array analysis reveals dual roles in transcription and splicing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

discovered over a decade ago as a cellular protein required for Tat-specific, TAR-dependent activation of HIV) that Tat-SF1 is required for efficient HIV-1 propagation and showed that this host factor is requiredIdentification of Tat-SF1 cellular targets by exon array analysis reveals dual roles

Hartemink, Alexander

236

Cellular and Biochemical Differences between Two Attenuated Poxvirus Vaccine Candidates (MVA and NYVAC) and Role of the C7L Gene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...generation of recombinant viruses in a nonhuman mammalian cell line. Virology 238: 198-211. 15 Carroll, M. W., W. W. Overwijk, R. S. Chamberlain, S. A. Rosenberg, B. Moss, and N. P. Restifo. 1997. Highly attenuated modified vaccinia virus...

Jos Luis Njera; Carmen Elena Gmez; Elena Domingo-Gil; Mara Magdalena Gherardi; Mariano Esteban

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

237

Sensor response rate accelerator  

SciTech Connect

An apparatus and method for sensor signal prediction and for improving sensor signal response time, is disclosed. An adaptive filter or an artificial neural network is utilized to provide predictive sensor signal output and is further used to reduce sensor response time delay.

Vogt, Michael C. (Westmont, IL)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Information Incident Response Procedure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Information Incident Response Procedure Authority The Information Incident Response Procedure (IIRP) is authorized under the UWM Information Security Policy S59; section III-D (http://www4.uwm Information Security Office, and UWM Internal Audit. This document will be reviewed and updated annually

Saldin, Dilano

239

ENERGY EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION ENERGY EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN COMMISSIONREPORT October 2006 CEC-600-2006-014 Arnold Schwarzenegger, Governor #12;CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Jackalyne Pfannenstiel Chairman James D Deputy Director FUELS AND TRANSPORTATION DIVISION #12;The Energy Emergency Response Plan is prepared

240

RESPONSIBILITIES October 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PRINCIPLES RESPONSIBILITIES PRACTICES October 2012 HEALTH & SAFETY POLICY AT STANFORD #12;1 Health & Safety Policy at Stanford October 2012 Table of Contents PRINCIPLES OF HEALTH & SAFETY 2 RESPONSIBILITIES PROVIDING A SAFE WORKPLACE 4 Facility Design 4 Hazard Identification and Correction 4 Shutdown of Dangerous

Kay, Mark A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Eastern Frequency Response Study  

SciTech Connect

This study was specifically designed to investigate the frequency response of the Eastern Interconnection that results from large loss-of-generation events of the type targeted by the North American Electric Reliability Corp. Standard BAL-003 Frequency Response and Frequency Bias Setting (NERC 2012a), under possible future system conditions with high levels of wind generation.

Miller, N.W.; Shao, M.; Pajic, S.; D'Aquila, R.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Mammalian sperm morphometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...royalsoc.ac.uk/publish/pro_bs/jan98pb2.htm) and are available...Manfredi Romanini, G. M. 1985 The nuclear content of de- oxyribonucleic...1995 Delayed male maturity is a cost of producing large sperm in Drosphila...royalsoc.ac.uk/publish/pro_bs/jan98pb2.htm). Sperm morphometry...

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Your Records Management Responsibilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Your Records Management Your Records Management Responsibilities Table of Contents INTRODUCTION RECORDS MANAGEMENT IN THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT RECORDS MANAGEMENT IN THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY IMPORTANCE OF RECORDS MANAGEMENT YOUR RECORDS MANAGEMENT RESPONSIBILITIES RECORDS MANAGEMENT LIFE CYCLE ELECTRONIC RECORDS & RECORDKEEPING LAW, REGULATION, AND POLICY ASSISTANCE RECORDS MANAGEMENT TERMS 2 INTRODUCTION If you are a government employee or contractor working for a federal agency, records management is part of your job. This pamphlet explains your responsibilities for federal records and provides the context for understanding records management in the federal government and in the Department of Energy. TOP RECORDS MANAGEMENT IN THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT

244

Science and Cellular Stresses | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Science and Science and Cellular Stresses News Featured Articles 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Science Headlines Presentations & Testimony News Archives Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 12.21.11 Science and Cellular Stresses Research reveals new insights into tumor suppression. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo p53 tumor suppressor Protein Databank The holiday season can be stressful with its just-missed parking spots and perfectly horrible holiday sweaters. And spending time bonding with family and friends can be a great way to relieve those stresses (while perhaps causing others!). In a sense, cells studied by the Office of Science's Brookhaven National

245

Hamming sets, Ising sets, cellular automata, neural nets, and the random walk  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cellular automata and neural nets are nonlinear dynamical systems of interest to physicists as models of computational devices and physical processes. The possible states of both N?cell automata and N?binary?neuron networks can be represented by the 2 N corners of the unit hypercube (the Hamming set) in N?dimensional space. This representation is transparently related to the representation of the states of N spin?one?half particle systems and of N?step random walks by strings of positive and negative ones (the Ising set). The dynamics of discrete neural networks and cellular automata can be described by the 2 N by 2 N transition matrices which describe the mappings of the Hamming set and Ising set into themselves. This representation renders some properties of these nonlinear systems readily apparent and highlights their relation to the lattice gas systems of interacting spins and the random walk.

Donald R. Franceschetti; D. Wayne Jones; Bruce W. Campbell; John W. Hanneken

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Path-integral solution of the one-dimensional Dirac quantum cellular automaton  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantum cellular automata have been recently considered as a fundamental approach to quantum field theory, resorting to a precise automaton, linear in the field, for the Dirac equation in one dimension. In such linear case a quantum automaton is isomorphic to a quantum walk, and a convenient formulation can be given in terms of transition matrices, leading to a new kind of discrete path integral that we solve analytically in terms of Jacobi polynomials versus the arbitrary mass parameter.

Giacomo Mauro D'Ariano; Nicola Mosco; Paolo Perinotti; Alessandro Tosini

2014-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

247

Accident Response Group  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To establish Department of Energy (DOE) policy for DOE response to accidents and significant incidents involving nuclear weapons or nuclear weapon components. Cancels DOE O 5530.1. Canceled by DOE O 153.1.

1991-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

248

RTP Customer Demand Response  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper provides new evidence on customer demand response to hourly pricing from the largest and...real-time pricing...(RTP) program in the United States. RTP creates value by inducing load reductions at times...

Steven Braithwait; Michael OSheasy

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Supplier Management Responsibility  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Supplier management, at the organization level, has two basic responsibilities: (1) to ensure that the engineering environment is based on a defined engineering process, with engineers trained to work within that...

Raymond Kehoe; Alka Jarvis

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

What's BP's social responsibility?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

would like to suggest a third, inanimate culprit: the cult of corporate social responsibility. As crude poured into the Gulf of Mexico and the world economy struggled to recover from the financial crisis

251

Oil spill response resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from Marathon Oil Company for their encouragement and support. Last, but not least, I would like to thank Lynette Schlandt for her help during my stay at this University. vu TABLE OF CONTENTS Page ABSTRACT. . . . . nl DEDICATION... tool for control. The State of Texas passed and implemented OSPRA (Oil Spill Prevention and Response Act) of 1991. The most significant requirement for both these laws was the need for a Facility Response Plan for the companies. This would help a...

Muthukrishnan, Shankar

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

252

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

No. ER06-615-000 CAISO Demand Response Resource User Guide -8 2.1. Demand Response Provides a Range of Benefits to8 2.2. Demand Response Benefits can be Quantified in Several

Heffner, Grayson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Societal responses to the Anthropocene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...consumption between them. For example, in the European Union, electricity supplies from gas have risen to 25 per cent and from coal...individuals. The wiring of the planet with fibre optics, cellular wireless, satellites and digital television is transforming human...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Cooperation Management Among Base Stations Based on Cells Switch-Off for a Green LTE Cellular Network  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The sudden increase in subscribers and demand for high-speed data has prompted cellular operators to increase the number of base stations to fulfill the needs of mobile subscribers. This increase has subsequently...

Mohammed H. Alsharif; Rosdiadee Nordin; Mahamod Ismail

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

The use of a simple cellular automata model as a testbed for kinetic theories of vehicular traffic flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The broad objective of this thesis is to explore the potential for the use of Cellular Automata (CA) models to provide a testbed for comparison of different kinetic models of vehicular traffic. We intend to develop a quantitative technique...

Raney, Bryan Keith

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

A Hybrid Geometric Modeling Method for Large Scale Conformal Cellular 3D Systems, 26081 Avenue Hall, Valencia, CA 91354  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Structures, Conformal Structures, Additive Manufacturing, STL 1 INTRODUCTION Cellular material structures can distributions than stochastic metal foams [5]. With the development of additive manufacturing processes (also, 8, 9]. The manufacturing of mesoscopic truss structures utilizes the unique capability of additive

Chen, Yong

257

An Analog Cellular Automaton Model of Gravitation: Planck-Scale Black Holes Randall C. O'Reilly  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Analog Cellular Automaton Model of Gravitation: Planck-Scale Black Holes Randall C. O by Randall C. O'Reilly, initially published online at URL listed below on 12/28/05 (Dated: December 28, 2005

O'Reilly, Randall C.

258

Disruption of Cellular Energy Balance by Suramin in Intact Human Prostatic Carcinoma Cells, a Likely Antiproliferative Mechanism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...transforming growth factor Y(44). Thus, inhibition of tetrazolium conversion was not competitively...serum, multiple growth factors, or calcium. The rapid...suramin of tetrazolium conversion in intact DU 145 cells...disruption of cellular energy balance or respiration...

Randall Rago; Jacque Mitchen; Ann-Lii Cheng; Terry Oberley; and George Wilding

1991-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

259

A Key Role for Cyclic AMP-Responsive Element Binding Protein in Hypoxia-Mediated Activation of the Angiogenesis Factor CCN1 (CYR61) in Tumor Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Metastasis, and the Cellular Microenvironment A Key Role for Cyclic AMP-Responsive Element...Belgian Friends of the Hebrew University (A. Honigman). The costs of publication of...solely to indicate this fact. Hypoxia is a prominent feature of solid tumors known to...

Ronit Meyuhas; Eli Pikarsky; Einat Tavor; Avihu Klar; Rinat Abramovitch; Jacob Hochman; Tal Goshen Lago; and Alik Honigman

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Systems-Wide Analysis of Acclimation Responses to Long-Term Heat Stress and Recovery in the Photosynthetic Model Organism Chlamydomonas reinhardtii  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario N1G2W1, Canada [W] Online version contains Web-only data. [OPEN] Articles can be viewed online without a subscription. Early acclimation responses of Chlamydomonas to...

Dorothea Hemme; Daniel Veyel; Timo Mühlhaus; Frederik Sommer; Jessica Jüppner; Ann-Katrin Unger; Michael Sandmann; Ines Fehrle; Stephanie Schönfelder; Martin Steup; Stefan Geimer; Joachim Kopka; Patrick Giavalisco; Michael Schroda

2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

The effects of captan and dieldrin on the growth and macromolecular synthesis of the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE EFFECTS OF CAPTAN AND DIELDRIN ON THE GROWTH AND MACROMOLECULAR SYNTHESIS OF THE CELLULAR SLIME MOLD Dictyosteiium discoideum A Thesis by RODNEY JOHN BUSHWAY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1973 Major Subject: Biochemistry and Biophysics THE EFFECTS OF CAFTAN AND DIELDRIN ON THE GROWTH AND MACROMOLECULAR SYNTHESIS OF THE CELLULAR SLIME MOLD Diotyosteiiwn discoidewn A Thesis by RODNEY...

Bushway, Rodney John

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

262

Demand Response In California  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency & Energy Efficiency & Demand Response Programs Dian M. Grueneich, Commissioner Dian M. Grueneich, Commissioner California Public Utilities Commission California Public Utilities Commission FUPWG 2006 Fall Meeting November 2, 2006 Commissioner Dian M. Grueneich November 2, 2006 1 Highest Priority Resource Energy Efficiency is California's highest priority resource to: Meet energy needs in a low cost manner Aggressively reduce GHG emissions November 2, 2006 2 Commissioner Dian M. Grueneich November 2, 2006 3 http://www.cpuc.ca.gov/PUBLISHED/REPORT/51604.htm Commissioner Dian M. Grueneich November 2, 2006 4 Energy Action Plan II Loading order continued "Pursue all cost-effective energy efficiency, first." Strong demand response and advanced metering

263

Different anti-aggregation and pro-degradative functions of the members of the mammalian sHSP family in neurological disorders  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the cellular capacity to refold heat-denatured luciferase (a...on the ATP-dependent H+-pump [103]). Cell lysates used...expression and induction of small heat shock proteins in rat brain and...2008 Expression of the small heat shock protein family in the mouse...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Logarithmic transformation of response Logarithmic transformation of response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Logarithmic transformation of response Logarithmic transformation of response Often, support S of Y is S = (0, ). Logarithm is then one of transformations to consider when trying to obtain a correct (wrong. Model Building 1. Transformation of response #12;Logarithmic transformation of response When does

Komarek, Arnost

265

Response Protocol Distressed Students  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Response Protocol Distressed Students REFERRAL IDENTIFIERS: Student distress may manifest, the Distressed Student Protocol will assist you in responding to the student and providing appropriate referrals not know which office to contact.The coordinators will consult about a student, provide referrals to campus

California at Santa Barbara, University of

266

General Responsibilities and Requirements  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The material presented in this guide provides suggestions and acceptable ways of implementing DOE M 435.1-1 and should not be viewed as additional or mandatory requirements. The objective of the guide is to ensure that responsible individuals understand what is necessary and acceptable for implementing the requirements of DOE M 435.1-1.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

267

The Responsibilities of Engineers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the discipline of structural engineering. The circumstances surrounding the failure of the Sleipner A platform off the coast of Norway in 1991 will be discussed to demonstrate how the responsibilities of engineers can be derived from knowledge of the nature...

Smith, Justin Douglas 1978-

2012-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

268

Federal Response October 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any infor- mation, apparatus, product, or process Field Office (JFO) · JFO transition to the Long-Term Recovery Office · Process for prioritization

269

GIS-Based Cellular Automaton Model to allocate Kansas High Plains Irrigated Agriculture Land Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GIS-Based Cellular Automaton Model to Allocate Irrigated Agriculture Land Use Peiwen Chiu Kansas State University GIS Day 2013 November 20, 2013 University of Kansas High Plains/Ogallala Aquifer 8 States 186,000 mi2 480,000 km2 http... of Acreage From the Model Iterations Whats Next This work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation (grant GEO0909515) and the United States Department of Agriculture/Agricultural Research Service (Ogallala Aquifer Initiative). Any findings...

Chiu, Peiwen

2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

270

ERCOT Demand Response Paul Wattles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ERCOT Demand Response Paul Wattles Senior Analyst, Market Design & Development, ERCOT Whitacre;Definitions of Demand Response · `The short-term adjustment of energy use by consumers in response to price to market or reliability conditions.' (NAESB) #12;Definitions of Demand Response · The common threads

Mohsenian-Rad, Hamed

271

Response to Request  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Booz Allen Hamilton Response to Booz Allen Hamilton Response to Department of Energy Request for Information Implementing the National Broadband Plan by Studying the Communications Requirements of Electric Utilities to Inform the Federal Smart Grid Policy Department of Energy August 9, 2010 1 Booz Allen Hamilton Introduction Booz Allen Hamilton (Booz Allen) has had an enduring relationship with the Department of Energy (DOE) for more than two decades. We are pleased to be responding to the DOE's Request for Information (RFI), Implementing the National Broadband Plan by Studying the Communcations Requirements of Electric Utilities to Inform Federal Smart Grid Policy, with our perspectives on the use of broadband communications technology to meet emerging Smart Grid requirements. In its RFI,

272

Structural response synthesis  

SciTech Connect

The open loop control technique of predicting a conditioned input signal based on a specified output response for a second order system has been analyzed both analytically and numerically to gain a firm understanding of the method. Differences between this method of control and digital closed loop control using pole cancellation were investigated as a follow up to previous experimental work. Application of the technique to diamond turning using a fast tool is also discussed.

Ozisik, H.; Keltie, R.F.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Response properties of neighboring neurons in the auditory midbrain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The inferior colliculus, the primary nucleus in the mammalian auditory midbrain, occupies a central position in the ascending auditory pathway. Nearly all ascending neural pathways converge and synapse in the central nucleus ...

Seshagiri, Chandran V. (Chandran Venkatraman)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Response Operations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Response Operations Response Operations Response Operations Overview The federal government primarily plays a coordinating and support role during disaster response. DOE's role is to facilitate recovery from disruptions to the energy supply. OE's capabilities and resources include personnel with emergency response and energy systems operations experience, leading-edge analytical modeling and visualization capabilities, coordination and contacts with private industry, state governments, and U.S. government agencies, and facilitation of special policy waivers or legal authorities by the Secretary of Energy. Response and Restoration State and Local Energy Assurance Planning National Response Framework ESF-12 This National Response Framework (NRF) is a guide to how the Nation conducts all-hazards response. Emergency Support Function #12 - Energy

275

Correlation of globe thermometer response and a YSI radiometer response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CORRELATION OF GLOBE THERMOMETER RESPONSE AND A YSI RADIOMETER RESPONSE A Thesis by ROBERT HOWARD FRANKNECHT Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1979 Major Subjects Industrial Hygiene CORRELATION OF GLOBE THERMOMETER RESPONSE AND A YSI RADIOMETER RESPONSE A Thesis by ROBERT HOMARD FRANKNECHT Approved as to sty1e and content by: C'6~& . ~ Chairman of Committee ead...

Franknecht, Robert Howard

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

CONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to Sustainable Food  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to Sustainable Food March 2011 Page 1 of 2 House of Commons Environmental Audit Committee: Sustainable Food Inquiry Response by the Wellcome Trust March 2011 solutions for the production of healthy and sustainable food. As a research funder dedicated to improving

Rambaut, Andrew

277

Demand Response | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Demand Response Demand Response Demand Response Demand response provides an opportunity for consumers to play a significant role in the operation of the electric grid by reducing or shifting their electricity usage during peak periods in response to time-based rates or other forms of financial incentives. Demand response programs are being used by electric system planners and operators as resource options for balancing supply and demand. Such programs can lower the cost of electricity in wholesale markets, and in turn, lead to lower retail rates. Methods of engaging customers in demand response efforts include offering time-based rates such as time-of-use pricing, critical peak pricing, variable peak pricing, real time pricing, and critical peak rebates. It also includes direct load control programs which provide the

278

A gluttonous plant reveals how its cellular power plant devours foreign DNA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

December 20, 2013 December 20, 2013 A gluttonous plant reveals how its cellular power plant devours foreign DNA Amborella trichopoda, a sprawling shrub that grows on just a single island in the remote South Pacific, is the only plant in its family and genus. It is also one of the oldest flowering plants, having branched off from others about 200 million years ago. Now, researchers from Indiana University, with the U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (DOE JGI), Penn State University, and the Institute of Research for Development in New Caledonia, have determined a remarkable expansion of the genome of the plant's critical energy-generating structures. Its mitochondria, the plant's energy-producing organelles, in an epic demonstration of horizontal gene transfer, have acquired six genome equivalents of foreign DNA -- one from a

279

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Multi-cellular Crosstalk in Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About this Project About this Project Multi-cellular Crosstalk in Radiation Damage Technical Abstracts 2006 Workshop: Low-LET Bystander Effects in Cells In Vitro Are Significantly Less Than Published For High-LET Radiation Blakely, E.A., Thompson, A.C., Chang, P., Schwarz, R.I., Bjornstad, K., Rosen, C., Wisnewski, C., and Mocherla, D. 2005 Workshop: X-ray Microbeam Bystander Studies with Human Mammary Epithelial Cells and Fibroblasts Blakely, E.A., Schwarz, R.I., Thompson, A.C., Bjornstad, K.A., Chang, P.Y., Rosen, C.J., Sudar, D., Romano, R., and Parvin, B. 2003 Workshop: 12.5 keV X-ray Microbeam Bystander Studies with Human Mammary Epithelial Cells and Fibroblasts Blakely, E.A., Schwarz, R.I., Thompson, A.C., Bjornstad, K.A., Chang, P.Y., Rosen, C.J., and Sudar, D. 2001 Workshop:

280

Cellular telephone-based radiation sensor and wide-area detection network  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A network of radiation detection instruments, each having a small solid state radiation sensor module integrated into a cellular phone for providing radiation detection data and analysis directly to a user. The sensor module includes a solid-state crystal bonded to an ASIC readout providing a low cost, low power, light weight compact instrument to detect and measure radiation energies in the local ambient radiation field. In particular, the photon energy, time of event, and location of the detection instrument at the time of detection is recorded for real time transmission to a central data collection/analysis system. The collected data from the entire network of radiation detection instruments are combined by intelligent correlation/analysis algorithms which map the background radiation and detect, identify and track radiation anomalies in the region.

Craig, William W. (Pittsburg, CA); Labov, Simon E. (Berkeley, CA)

2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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281

Neuronal micro-culture engineering by microchannel devices of cellular scale dimensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Purpose: The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effect of microchannel geometry on neuronal cultures and to maintain these cultures for long period of time (over several weeks) inside the closed microchannels of cellular scale dimensions. Methods: The primary hippocampal neurons from E-18 rat were cultured inside the closed polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannels of varying sizes. The effect of the channel geometry on the spatial and the temporal variations in the neural microenvironment was investigated by studying neural maturation and variation in the media osmolality respectively. The cultures were maintained for longer time spans by PDMS device pretreatment, control on media evaporation (by using hydrophobic ethylene propylene membrane) and an effective culture maintenance protocol. Further, the devices were integrated with the planar microelectrode arrays (MEA) to record spontaneous electrical activity. Results: A direct influence of channel geometry on neuron maturation was observed ...

Goyal, Gaurav

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Cancer Genesis and Progression as Dynamics in Functional Landscape of Endogenous Molecular-Cellular Network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An endogenous molecular-cellular network for both normal and abnormal functions is assumed to exist. This endogenous network forms a nonlinear stochastic dynamical system, with many stable attractors in its functional landscape. Normal or abnormal robust states can be decided by this network in a manner similar to the neural network. In this context cancer is hypothesized as one of its robust intrinsic states. This hypothesis implies that a nonlinear stochastic mathematical cancer model is constructible based on available experimental data and its quantitative prediction is directly testable. Within such model the genesis and progression of cancer may be viewed as stochastic transitions between different attractors. Thus it further suggests that progressions are not arbitrary. Other important issues on cancer, such as genetic vs epigenetics, double-edge effect, dormancy, are discussed in the light of present hypothesis. A different set of strategies for cancer prevention, cure, and care, is therefore suggested.

P. Ao; D. Galas; L. Hood; X. -M. Zhu

2007-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

283

Developing an Abaqus *HYPERFOAM Model for M9747 (4003047) Cellular Silicone Foam  

SciTech Connect

This report documents work done to develop an Abaqus *HYPERFOAM hyperelastic model for M9747 (4003047) cellular silicone foam for use in quasi-static analyses at ambient temperature. Experimental data, from acceptance tests for 'Pad A' conducted at the Kansas City Plant (KCP), was used to calibrate the model. The data includes gap (relative displacement) and load measurements from three locations on the pad. Thirteen sets of data, from pads with different serial numbers, were provided. The thirty-nine gap-load curves were extracted from the thirteen supplied Excel spreadsheets and analyzed, and from those thirty-nine one set of data, representing a qualitative mean, was chosen to calibrate the model. The data was converted from gap and load to nominal (engineering) strain and nominal stress in order to implement it in Abaqus. Strain computations required initial pad thickness estimates. An Abaqus model of a right-circular cylinder was used to evaluate and calibrate the *HYPERFOAM model.

Siranosian, Antranik A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stevens, R. Robert [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

284

Cellular interface morphologies in directional solidification. IV. The formation of deep cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Steadily growing, spatially periodic, two-dimensional cellular interfaces with groves up to 15 times longer than their wavelength are calculated by a novel finite-element method applied to the solutal model for solidification that includes diffusion in the solid. The deep cells are formed by either continuously decreasing the temperature gradient or increasing the growth velocity from the values for a marginally unstable planar interface. As predicted by previous finite-element calculations [L. Ungar and R. Brown, Phys. Rev. B. 29, 1367 (1984)], large-amplitude cells are found at half the spatial wavelength of the small-amplitude instability to the planar shape. Steady-state growth is predicted to end when droplets of the melt are detached from the bottom of the grooves between the cells. The influence of the ratio of solid to liquid diffusivities on the cell shape and the adjacent concentration field is examined.

Lyle H. Ungar and Robert A. Brown

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Whole-brain calcium imaging with cellular resolution in freely behaving C. elegans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ability to acquire large-scale recordings of neuronal activity in awake and unrestrained animals poses a major challenge for studying neural coding of animal behavior. We present a new instrument capable of recording intracellular calcium transients from every neuron in the head of a freely behaving C. elegans with cellular resolution while simultaneously recording the animal's position, posture and locomotion. We employ spinning-disk confocal microscopy to capture 3D volumetric fluorescent images of neurons expressing the calcium indicator GCaMP6s at 5 head-volumes per second. Two cameras simultaneously monitor the animal's position and orientation. Custom software tracks the 3D position of the animal's head in real-time and adjusts a motorized stage to keep it within the field of view as the animal roams freely. We observe calcium transients from 78 neurons and correlate this activity with the animal's behavior. Across worms, multiple neurons show significant correlations with modes of behavior correspo...

Nguyen, Jeffrey P; Linder, Ashley N; Plummer, George S; Shaevitz, Joshua W; Leifer, Andrew M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Assessment of Demand Response Resource  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessment of Demand Response Resource Potentials for PGE and Pacific Power Prepared for: Portland January 15, 2004 K:\\Projects\\2003-53 (PGE,PC) Assess Demand Response\\Report\\Revised Report_011504.doc #12;#12;quantec Assessment of Demand Response Resource Potentials for I-1 PGE and Pacific Power I. Introduction

287

Pricing data center demand response  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Demand response is crucial for the incorporation of renewable energy into the grid. In this paper, we focus on a particularly promising industry for demand response: data centers. We use simulations to show that, not only are data centers large loads, ... Keywords: data center, demand response, power network, prediction based pricing

Zhenhua Liu; Iris Liu; Steven Low; Adam Wierman

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

DNA Damage Pathways: Low Dose Response and Cross-Talk in TGFβ and ATM  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Damage Pathways: Low Dose Response and Cross-Talk in TGFβ and ATM Damage Pathways: Low Dose Response and Cross-Talk in TGFβ and ATM Signaling Peter O'Neill University of Oxford Abstract The ATM and TGFbeta signal transduction pathways are essential to cellular and tissue control responses to ionizing radiation (IR) and aberrant modifications to these pathways are extensive in cancer. We hypothesize that the ATM and TGFbeta signaling pathways are fully induced at high doses of acute low-LET radiation, whereas only partially induced at low doses. As a consequence of partial stimulation of these pathways important questions arise not only on the validity of the linear no-threshold assumption used in radiation regulations, but also on our ability to extrapolate experimental and human epidemiology data from high to low doses. The

289

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Assessing Biological Function of DNA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessing Biological Function of DNA Damage Response Genes Assessing Biological Function of DNA Damage Response Genes Larry H. Thompson Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Why This Project To understand the relative importance of individual DNA repair and DNA-damage response pathways to the recovery of mammalian cells after exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation (IR). This understanding may lead to better ways of setting limits on human exposure to IR. In spite of the discovery of many mammalian DNA repair genes, our current knowledge of how many of these genes contribute to cellular recovery from IR exposure is quite limited. Project Goals Measure cellular responses at doses in the 5-100 cGy range, which generally cause changes too small to detect in normal, repair-proficient cells Focus on DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and DNA oxidative base

290

Overview of Demand Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

08 PJM 08 PJM www.pjm.com ©2003 PJM Overview of Demand Response PJM ©2008 PJM www.pjm.com ©2003 PJM Growth, Statistics, and Current Footprint AEP, Dayton, ComEd, & DUQ Dominion Generating Units 1,200 + Generation Capacity 165,000 MW Peak Load 144,644 MW Transmission Miles 56,070 Area (Square Miles) 164,250 Members 500 + Population Served 51 Million Area Served 13 States and DC Generating Units 1,200 + Generation Capacity 165,000 MW Peak Load 144,644 MW Transmission Miles 56,070 Area (Square Miles) 164,250 Members 500 + Population Served 51 Million Area Served 13 States and DC Current PJM RTO Statistics Current PJM RTO Statistics PJM Mid-Atlantic Integrations completed as of May 1 st , 2005 ©2008 PJM

291

Optimized Adenovirus-Antibody Complexes Stimulate Strong Cellular and Humoral Immune Responses against an Encoded Antigen in Nave Mice and Those with Preexisting Immunity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Comparative particle-induced cytotoxicity toward macrophages and fibroblasts. Cell Biol. Toxicol. 19 : 145-159. 34. Overwijk, WW , DR Surman, K Tsung and NP Restifo. 1997. Identification of a Kb-restricted CTL epitope of beta-galactosidase...

Jin Huk Choi; Joe Dekker; Stephen C. Schafer; Jobby John; Craig E. Whitfill; Christopher S. Petty; Eid E. Haddad; Maria A. Croyle

2011-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

292

Effect of Cellular Density and Viral Oncogenes on the Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Antigen Response to ?-Interferon in BALB-c/3T3 Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Breast Cancer Patients with WHO Class II Obesity or Greater (BMI 35) Have Poorer Overall...women with BMI 30 (WHO criteria of class I obesity or more), which classified 115 women (44.4%) as class I obese or more and 144 (55...

Margaret K. Offermann and Douglas V. Faller

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Cellular and humoral immune responses in patients vaccinated with HER2 protein combined with a novel nanoparticle antigen delivery system of cholesteryl hydrophobized polysacharide(CHP-HER2)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...induction of apoptosis in Ewing's sarcoma CHP-100 cells The enhanced expression of the...inhibition and apoptosis in Ewing's sarcoma CHP-100 cells were evaluated. The inhibitory...induction of apoptosis in Ewing's sarcoma CHP-100 cells. | The enhanced expression...

Shigehisa Kitano; Shinichi Kageyama; Yasuhiro Nagata; Yoshihiro Miyahara; Atsunori Hiasa; Hiroaki Naota; Satoshi Okumura; Hiroshi Imai; Taizou Shiraishi; Masahiro Masuya; Masakatsu Nishikawa; Andrew M. Scott; Roger Murphy; Eric W. Hoffman; Lloyd J. Old; Hiroshi Shiku

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Antiglioma Immunological Memory in Response to Conditional Cytotoxic/Immune-Stimulatory Gene Therapy: Humoral and Cellular Immunity Lead to Tumor Regression  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Yagiz 1 David Foulad 1 Yohei Mineharu 1 Kurt M. Kroeger 1 Katherine A. Treuer 1 W. Stephen Nichols 2 Nicholas S. Sanderson 1...EGFRvIII-KLH vaccines. J Immunol Methods 2008;339:74-81. 48 Wheeler CJ , Black KL, Liu G, et al. Vaccination elicits correlated...

A.K.M. Ghulam Muhammad; Marianela Candolfi; Gwendalyn D. King; Kader Yagiz; David Foulad; Yohei Mineharu; Kurt M. Kroeger; Katherine A. Treuer; W. Stephen Nichols; Nicholas S. Sanderson; Jieping Yang; Maksim Khayznikov; Nico Van Rooijen; Pedro R. Lowenstein; and Maria G. Castro

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Identification of Molecular and Cellular Responses of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Biofilms under Culture Conditions Relevant to Field Conditions for Bioreduction of Heavy Metals  

SciTech Connect

Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough is a Gramnegative sulfate-reducing bacterium (SRB), and the physiology of SRBs can impact many anaerobic environments including radionuclide waste sites, oil reservoirs and metal pipelines. In an attempt to understand D. vulgaris as a population that can adhere to surfaces, D. vulgaris cultures were grown in a defined medium and analysed for carbohydrate production, motility and biofilm formation. Desulfovibrio vulgaris wild-type cells had increasing amounts of carbohydrate into stationary phase and approximately half of the carbohydrate remained internal. In comparison, a mutant that lacked the 200 kb megaplasmid, strain DMP, produced less carbohydrate and the majority of carbohydrate remained internal of the cell proper. To assess the possibility of carbohydrate re-allocation, biofilm formation was investigated. Wild-type cells produced approximately threefold more biofilm on glass slides compared with DMP; however, wild-type biofilm did not contain significant levels of exopolysaccharide. In addition, stains specific for extracellular carbohydrate did not reveal polysaccharide material within the biofilm. Desulfovibrio vulgaris wild-type biofilms contained long filaments as observed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the biofilm-deficient DMP strain was also deficient in motility. Biofilms grown directly on silica oxide transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grids did not contain significant levels of an exopolysaccharide matrix when viewed with TEM and SEM, and samples stained with ammonium molybdate also showed long filaments that resembled flagella. Biofilms subjected to protease treatments were degraded, and different proteases that were added at the time of inoculation inhibited biofilm formation. The data indicated that D. vulgaris did not produce an extensive exopolysaccharide matrix, used protein filaments to form biofilm between cells and silica oxide surfaces, and the filaments appeared to be flagella. It is likely that D. vulgaris used flagella for more than a means of locomotion to a surface, but also used flagella, or modified flagella, to establish and/or maintain biofilm structure.

Fields, Matthew W [Montana State University

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Identification of Molecular and Cellular Responses of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Biofilms under Culture Conditions Relevant to Field Conditions for Bioreduction of Toxic Metals and Radionuclides  

SciTech Connect

Our findings demonstrated that D. vulgaris surface-adhered populations produce extracellular structures, and that that the cells have altered carbon and energy flux compared to planktonic cells. Biofilms did not have greatly increased carbohydrate accumulation. Interestingly genes present on the native plasmid found in D. vulgaris Hildenborough were necessary for wild type biofilm formation. In addition, extracellular appendages dependent on functions or proteins encoded by flaG or fliA also contributed to biofilm formation. Studies with SRB biofilms have indicated that the reduction and precipitation of metals can occur within the biofilm matrix; however, little work has been done to elucidate the physiological state of surface-adhered cells during metal reduction (Cr6+, U6+) and how this process is affected by nutrient feed levels (i.e., the stimulant).

Judy D. Wall

2011-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

297

Timing of Toll-Like Receptor 9 Agonist Administration in Pneumococcal Vaccination Impacts Both Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses as Well as Nasopharyngeal Colonization in Mice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...immunogenicity assays were evaluated using Kruskal-Wallis with Dunn's multiple-comparison...comparisons were performed using the Kruskal-Wallis with Dunn's multiple-comparison...comparisons were performed using the Kruskal-Wallis with Dunn's multiple-comparison...

Katrine M. Jensen; Jesper Melchjorsen; Frederik Dagnaes-Hansen; Uffe B. S. Srensen; Rune R. Laursen; Lars stergaard; Ole S. Sgaard; Martin Tolstrup

2012-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

298

Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Gurin Vectors Prime for Strong Cellular Responses to Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Gag in Rhesus Macaques  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...The nonparametric two-sided Kruskal-Wallis test with corrections for multiple...BCG Wt and BCG-pSL10 groups (Kruskal-Wallis test, P = 0.003; Dunn's...group after 3 immunizations). Kruskal-Wallis test (week 2 postprime), P...

Jaimie D. Sixsmith; Michael W. Panas; Sunhee Lee; Geoffrey O. Gillard; KeriAnn White; Michelle A. Lifton; Harikrishnan Balachandran; Linh Mach; John P. Miller; Christy Lavine; C. Todd DeMarco; Georgia D. Tomaras; Connie Gee; Steven A. Porcelli; Michelle H. Larsen; Richard Frothingham; Joern E. Schmitz; William R. Jacobs Jr.; Barton F. Haynes; Norman L. Letvin; Birgit Korioth-Schmitz

2014-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

299

Phosphorylation of the ? Subunit of Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 2 Is Required for Activation of NF-?B in Response to Diverse Cellular Stresses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...that phosphorylation of eIF2a is fundamental to the process by which diverse...with DAPI mountain medium, and electronic images from the Rhodamine Red and...initiation factor 2 (eIF2) is fundamental to the process by which many stress...

Hao-Yuan Jiang; Sheree A. Wek; Barbara C. McGrath; Donalyn Scheuner; Randal J. Kaufman; Douglas R. Cavener; Ronald C. Wek

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Replication protein A and g-H2AX foci assembly is triggered by cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pathway that removes the oxidized base lesions from the genomic DNA [6]. Evidence for the stimulation

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Economics of User-in-the-Loop Demand Control with Differentiated QoS in Cellular Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economics of User-in-the-Loop Demand Control with Differentiated QoS in Cellular Networks Rainer more heterogeneity in demand over time. Designing for over-provisioning capacity has been the standard a temporal demand control can alleviate the severity of busy-hour situations which formerly caused con

Yanikomeroglu, Halim

302

IEEE Wireless Communications April 201374 1536-1284/13/$25.00 2013 IEEE NEXT GENERATION COGNITIVE CELLULAR NETWORKS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the licensed spectrum, a crucial requirement of cognitive radio networks is that they must effi- ciently COGNITIVE CELLULAR NETWORKS INTRODUCTION Radio frequency (RF) spectrum is a valuable but tightly regulated for sharing spectrum with cognitive radio networks. Hence, cognitive radios should be able to independently

Wang, Cheng-Xiang

303

On Digital Philosophy (Discrete Physics) and the Cellular Automaton: A Mathematical Deterministic Structure for Reality (as a Huge Computer Simulation)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this note we overview some notable definitions, works and thoughts concerning digital philosophy - that mainly, suggests a finite and discrete characteristic for the real world - and the cellular automaton which, definitely, could be a more (or maybe the one most) perfect mathematical deterministic model for physical world than other models.

Zahedi, Ramin

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Cellular HIV-1 DNA load predicts HIV-RNA rebound and the outcome of highly active antiretroviral therapy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cellular HIV-1 DNA load predicts HIV-RNA rebound and the outcome of highly active antiretroviral-time PCR assay in multiple samples per patient with a median (interquartile range) follow-up of 76 (45­102) weeks. Results: The median (range) baseline HIV-1 DNA load was 297 (, 10 to 3468) copies per 1 3 106

305

Int. J. Wireless and Mobile Computing, Vol. 2, No. 4, 2007 237 Interworking of 3G cellular networks and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and wireless LANs Wei Song and Weihua Zhuang* Centre for Wireless Communications, Department of ElectricalInt. J. Wireless and Mobile Computing, Vol. 2, No. 4, 2007 237 Interworking of 3G cellular networks@bbcr.uwaterloo.ca E-mail: wzhuang@bbcr.uwaterloo.ca *Corresponding author Aladdin Saleh Wireless Technology Department

Zhuang, Weihua

306

Baseline Cellular HIV DNA Load Predicts HIV DNA Decline and Residual HIV Plasma Levels during Effective Antiretroviral Therapy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...significant predictive power, but published data on its correlation...correlated with HIV DNA load decrease until...cellular HIV DNA load predicts HIV DNA...significant predictive power, but published data on its correlation...correlated with HIV DNA load decrease until...

Saverio Giuseppe Parisi; Samantha Andreis; Carlo Mengoli; Renzo Scaggiante; Roberto Ferretto; Vinicio Manfrin; Mario Cruciani; Mario Giobbia; Caterina Boldrin; Monica Basso; Massimo Andreoni; Giorgio Pal; Loredana Sarmati

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

307

Local, Sustainable, Small-Scale Cellular Networks Kurtis Heimerl, Shaddi Hasan, Kashif Ali, Eric Brewer, Tapan Parikh  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

investment required to run cellular systems; base stations can cost upwards of US$100,000 and require of this concept by conducting an ongoing six-month long field deployment in rural Papua, Indonesia, in partnership Africa currently without network coverage are in rural areas without grid power [21]. Galperin et al. [13

Parikh, Tapan S.

308

The business value of demand response for balance responsible parties.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? By using IT-solutions, the flexibility on the demand side in the electrical systems could be increased. This is called demand response and is part (more)

Jonsson, Mattias

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

How to Get More Response from Demand Response  

SciTech Connect

Despite all the rhetoric, demand response's contribution to meet peak load will remain elusive in the absence of enabling technology and standardized business protocols. (author)

Neumann, Scott; Sioshansi, Fereidoon; Vojdani, Ali; Yee, Gaymond

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

310

Hawaiian Electric Company Demand Response Roadmap Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of control. Water heater demand response options are notcurrent water heater and air conditioning demand responsecustomer response Demand response water heater participation

Levy, Roger

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and D. Kathan (2009). Demand Response in U.S. ElectricityEnergy Financial Group. Demand Response Research Center [2008). Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering.

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Hawaiian Electric Company Demand Response Roadmap Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Like HECO actual utility demand response implementations canindustry-wide utility demand response applications tend toobjective. Figure 4. Demand Response Objectives 17

Levy, Roger

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

their partnership in demand response automation research andand Techniques for Demand Response. LBNL Report 59975. Mayof Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities.

Kiliccote, Sila; Global Energy Partners; Pacific Gas and Electric Company

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Barrier Immune Radio Communications for Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities,Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities.for Automated Demand Response. Technical Document to

Rubinstein, Francis

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

23 ii Retail Demand Response in SPP List of Figures and10 Figure 3. Demand Response Resources by11 Figure 4. Existing Demand Response Resources by Type of

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Home Network Technologies and Automating Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Automating Demand Response Charles McParland, Lawrenceand Automating Demand Response Charles McParland, LBNLCommercial and Residential Demand Response Overview of the

McParland, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Wireless Demand Response Controls for HVAC Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Strategies Linking Demand Response and Energy Efficiency,Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities,technical support from the Demand Response Research Center (

Federspiel, Clifford

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilitiesof Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities,was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and

Watson, David S.; Kiliccote, Sila; Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table 1. Economic demand response and real time pricing (Implications of Demand Response Programs in CompetitiveAdvanced Metering, and Demand Response in Electricity

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Biofilm Shows Spatially Stratified Metabolic Responses to Contaminant Exposure  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to elucidate the spatiotemporal responses of live S. oneidensis MR-1 biofilms to U(VI) (uranyl, UO22+) and Cr(VI) (chromate, CrO42-), important environmental contaminants at DOE contaminated sites. Toward this goal, we applied noninvasive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging, diffusion, relaxation and spectroscopy techniques to monitor in situ spatiotemporal responses of S. oneidensis biofilms to U(VI) and Cr(VI) exposure in terms of changes in biofilm structures, diffusion properties, and cellular metabolism. Exposure to U(VI) or Cr(VI) did not appear to change the overall biomass distribution but caused changes in the physicochemical microenvironments inside the biofilm as indicated by diffusion measurements. Changes in the diffusion properties of the biofilms in response to U(VI) and Cr(VI) exposure imply a novel function of the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) affecting the biotransformation and transport of contaminants in the environment. In the presence of U(VI) or Cr(VI), the anaerobic metabolism of lactate was inhibited significantly, although the biofilms were still capable of reducing U(VI) and Cr(VI). Local concentrations of Cr(III)aq in the biofilm suggested relatively high Cr(VI) reduction activities at the top of the biofilm, near the medium-biofilm interface. The depth-resolved metabolic activities of the biofilm suggested higher diversion effects of gluconeogenesis and C1 metabolism pathways at the bottom of the biofilm and in the presence of U(VI). This study provides a noninvasive means to investigate spatiotemporal responses of biofilms, including surface-associated microbial communities in engineering, natural and medical settings, to various environmental perturbations including exposure to environmental contaminants and antimicrobials.

Cao, Bin; Majors, Paul D.; Ahmed, B.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Sylvia, Crystal P.; Shi, Liang; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beyenal, Haluk

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Response Events | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Response Events Response Events Emergency preparedness and response activities help to facilitate recovery from disruptions to the energy supply, thereby reducing the impact of these events. As such, the ISER approach for emergency response is to leverage a coordinated integration of several DOE capabilities and resources to emergency response situations. These capabilities and resources include personnel with emergency response and/or energy systems operations experience, leading-edge analytical modeling and visualization capabilities, coordination and contacts with private industry, state governments, and U.S. government agencies, and facilitation of special policy waivers or legal authorities by the Secretary of Energy. This approach enables ISER to provide highly scalable support for a range of

322

Role of Methotrexate Polyglutamylation and Cellular Energy Metabolism in Inhibition of Methotrexate Binding to Dihydrofolate Reductase by 5-Formyltetrahydrofolate in Ehrlich Ascites Tumor Cells in Vitro  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...dala noi shown). Hence, cellular energy metabolism appears to be critical lo Ihe...study is the finding that the cellular energy metabolism plays a critical role in determining...tower levels of reduced pyridine nucleo tides would present the most favorable conditions...

Larry H. Matherly; David W. Fry; and I. David Goldman

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Demand Response: Load Management Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CenterPoint Load Management Programs CATEE Conference October, 2012 Agenda Outline I. General Demand Response Definition II. General Demand Response Program Rules III. CenterPoint Commercial Program IV. CenterPoint Residential Programs... V. Residential Discussion Points Demand Response Definition of load management per energy efficiency rule 25.181: ? Load control activities that result in a reduction in peak demand, or a shifting of energy usage from a peak to an off...

Simon, J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Framework, Dr. Daniel M. Violette, Summit Blue Consulting,Response Resources by Daniel M. Violette, Rachel Freeman andFramework, Dr. Daniel M. Violette, Summit Blue Consulting,

Heffner, Grayson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Pantex Plant Emergency Response Exercise  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Joint Information Center Emergency Manager Offsite Interface Coordinator DOE Technical Advisor Emergency Press Center Radiation Safety Figure 1. Pantex Plant Emergency Response...

326

09-024 FOIA Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Substation, released 8152008 and awarded 82208 * T00580, T00582 and T00583, Hat Rock Substation, released 102008 and awarded 11408 Response: BPA has provided you with all...

327

Demand Response Programs, 6. edition  

SciTech Connect

The report provides a look at the past, present, and future state of the market for demand/load response based upon market price signals. It is intended to provide significant value to individuals and companies who are considering participating in demand response programs, energy providers and ISOs interested in offering demand response programs, and consultants and analysts looking for detailed information on demand response technology, applications, and participants. The report offers a look at the current Demand Response environment in the energy industry by: defining what demand response programs are; detailing the evolution of program types over the last 30 years; discussing the key drivers of current initiatives; identifying barriers and keys to success for the programs; discussing the argument against subsidization of demand response; describing the different types of programs that exist including:direct load control, interruptible load, curtailable load, time-of-use, real time pricing, and demand bidding/buyback; providing examples of the different types of programs; examining the enablers of demand response programs; and, providing a look at major demand response programs.

NONE

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

328

09-051 FOIA Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Christina J. Brannon Freedom of Information ActPrivacy Act Officer Enclosure: Responsive Document BPA Reliability Program Manual Chapter 000 Table of Contents Page: - 1 - Date:...

329

Advice and Responses - Hanford Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- 201 Advice Letters Response to Advice Description Date Adopted 281 In-trench Macroencapsulation of Waste at ERDF November 6, 2014 280 TPA-280 Remedial InvestigationFeasibility...

330

Electrical substation service-area estimation using Cellular Automata: An initial report  

SciTech Connect

The service areas for electric power substations can be estimated using a Cellular Automata (CA) model. The CA model is a discrete, iterative process whereby substations acquire service area by claiming neighboring cells. The service area expands from a substation until a neighboring substation service area is met or the substation`s total capacity or other constraints are reached. The CA-model output is dependent on the rule set that defines cell interactions. The rule set is based on a hierarchy of quantitative metrics that represent real-world factors such as land use and population density. Together, the metrics determine the rate of cell acquisition and the upper bound for service area size. Assessing the CA-model accuracy requires comparisons to actual service areas. These actual service areas can be extracted from distribution maps. Quantitative assessment of the CA-model accuracy can be accomplished by a number of methods. Some are as simple as finding the percentage of cells predicted correctly, while others assess a penalty based on the distance from an incorrectly predicted cell to its correct service area. This is an initial report of a work in progress.

Fenwick, J.W.; Dowell, L.J.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

DOE contractors' workshop: Cellular and molecular aspects of radiation induced DNA damage and repair  

SciTech Connect

For four decades the US Department of Energy and its predecessors have been the lead federal agency in supporting radiation biology research. Over the years emphasis in this program has gradually shifted from dose-effect studies on animals to research on the effects of radiations of various qualities on cells and molecules. Mechanistic studies on the action of radiation at the subcellular level are few in number and there is a need for more research in this area if we are to gain a better understanding of how radiation affects living cells. The intent of this workshop was to bring together DOE contractors and grantees who are investigating the effects of radiation at the cellular and molecular levels. The aims were to foster the exchange of information on research projects and experimental results, promote collaborative research efforts, and obtain an overview of research currently supported by the Health Effects Research Division of the Office of Health and Environmental Research. The latter is needed by the Office for program planning purposes. This report on the workshop which took place in Albuquerque, New Mexico on March 10-11, 1987, includes an overview with future research recommendations, extended abstracts of the plenary presentations, shorter abstracts of each poster presentation, a workshop agenda and the names and addresses of the attendees.

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Value of Demand Response -Introduction Klaus Skytte  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Value of Demand Response - Introduction Klaus Skytte Systems Analysis Department February 7, 2006 Energinet.dk, Ballerup #12;What is Demand Response? Demand response (DR) is the short-term response

333

Honeywell Demonstrates Automated Demand Response Benefits for...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Honeywell Demonstrates Automated Demand Response Benefits for Utility, Commercial, and Industrial Customers Honeywell Demonstrates Automated Demand Response Benefits for Utility,...

334

KINGSTON UNIVERSITY FRAUD RESPONSE PLAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

KINGSTON UNIVERSITY FRAUD RESPONSE PLAN KUIA Page 1 09/12/2008 1. INTRODUCTION The purpose of this plan is to formalise the responsibilities and action plan in the event of a suspected fraud of irregularities in the event of fraud and corruption. The suspicion of fraud and irregularity is currently

Jones, Graeme A.

335

Departmental Radiological Emergency Response Assets  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The order establishes requirements and responsibilities for the DOE/NNSA national radiological emergency response assets and capabilities and Nuclear Emergency Support Team assets. Cancels DOE O 5530.1A, DOE O 5530.2, DOE O 5530.3, DOE O 5530.4, and DOE O 5530.5.

2007-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

336

Automated Demand Response and Commissioning  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the results from the second season of research to develop and evaluate the performance of new Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR) hardware and software technology in large facilities. Demand Response (DR) is a set of activities to reduce or shift electricity use to improve the electric grid reliability and manage electricity costs. Fully-Automated Demand Response does not involve human intervention, but is initiated at a home, building, or facility through receipt of an external communications signal. We refer to this as Auto-DR. The evaluation of the control and communications must be properly configured and pass through a set of test stages: Readiness, Approval, Price Client/Price Server Communication, Internet Gateway/Internet Relay Communication, Control of Equipment, and DR Shed Effectiveness. New commissioning tests are needed for such systems to improve connecting demand responsive building systems to the electric grid demand response systems.

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

The immune response in turkeys infected with fowl pox viruses and methods of measuring the response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

10 reported in-vitro neutralization with animal viruses and stated that the serum and virus are freely dissociable. Fenner and Burnet reported that inactivation of fowl pox virus by immune 27 56 serum was rarely effective. Pilchard et al... the results 27 reported open to serious question. Fenner and Burnet was not able to demonstrate hemagglutinins in suspensions of heavily infected CAN with fowl pox virus using techniques similar to 26 those successful with other mammalian pox viruses...

Sarker, Abdul Jalil

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

338

CDK inhibitors, p21{sup Cip1} and p27{sup Kip1}, participate in cell cycle exit of mammalian cardiomyocytes  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Expression of p21 and p27 in the hearts showed a peak during postnatal stages. p21 and p27 bound to cyclin E, cyclin A and CDK2 in the hearts at postnatal stages. Cardiomyocytes in both KO mice showed failure in the cell cycle exit at G1-phase. These data show the first apparent phenotypes in the hearts of Cip/Kip KO mice. -- Abstract: Mammalian cardiomyocytes actively proliferate during embryonic stages, following which cardiomyocytes exit their cell cycle after birth. The irreversible cell cycle exit inhibits cardiac regeneration by the proliferation of pre-existing cardiomyocytes. Exactly how the cell cycle exit occurs remains largely unknown. Previously, we showed that cyclin E- and cyclin A-CDK activities are inhibited before the CDKs levels decrease in postnatal stages. This result suggests that factors such as CDK inhibitors (CKIs) inhibit CDK activities, and contribute to the cell cycle exit. In the present study, we focused on a Cip/Kip family, which can inhibit cyclin E- and cyclin A-CDK activities. Expression of p21{sup Cip1} and p27{sup Kip1} but not p57{sup Kip2} showed a peak around postnatal day 5, when cyclin E- and cyclin A-CDK activities start to decrease. p21{sup Cip1} and p27{sup Kip1} bound to cyclin E, cyclin A and CDK2 at postnatal stages. Cell cycle distribution patterns of postnatal cardiomyocytes in p21{sup Cip1} and p27{sup Kip1} knockout mice showed failure in the cell cycle exit at G1-phase, and endoreplication. These results indicate that p21{sup Cip1} and p27{sup Kip} play important roles in the cell cycle exit of postnatal cardiomyocytes.

Tane, Shoji; Ikenishi, Aiko; Okayama, Hitomi; Iwamoto, Noriko [School of Life Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University, Yonago 683-8503 (Japan)] [School of Life Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University, Yonago 683-8503 (Japan); Nakayama, Keiichi I. [Medical Institute of Bioregulation, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan)] [Medical Institute of Bioregulation, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Takeuchi, Takashi, E-mail: takeuchi@med.tottori-u.ac.jp [School of Life Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University, Yonago 683-8503 (Japan)] [School of Life Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University, Yonago 683-8503 (Japan)

2014-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

339

The Effects of Resistance Exercise, Resistance Training, and a Multi-Ingredient High Caffeine Pre-Exercise Supplement on the p38 and ERK1/2 Cellular Signaling Proteins.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mitogen Activated Protein Kinases (MAPKs) have been implicated in cellular signal transduction leading to cellular growth and differentiation in skeletal muscle following exercise. This dissertation provides a review of ...

Kudrna, Rebecca A.

2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

340

Detailed Modeling and Response of Demand Response Enabled Appliances  

SciTech Connect

Proper modeling of end use loads is very important in order to predict their behavior, and how they interact with the power system, including voltage and temperature dependencies, power system and load control functions, and the complex interactions that occur between devices in such an interconnected system. This paper develops multi-state time variant residential appliance models with demand response enabled capabilities in the GridLAB-DTM simulation environment. These models represent not only the baseline instantaneous power demand and energy consumption, but the control systems developed by GE Appliances to enable response to demand response signals and the change in behavior of the appliance in response to the signal. These DR enabled appliances are simulated to estimate their capability to reduce peak demand and energy consumption.

Vyakaranam, Bharat; Fuller, Jason C.

2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Demand Response Research in Spain  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Research in Spain Demand Response Research in Spain Speaker(s): Iñigo Cobelo Date: August 22, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Mary Ann Piette The Spanish power system is becoming increasingly difficult to operate. The peak load grows every year, and the permission to build new transmission and distribution infrastructures is difficult to obtain. In this scenario Demand Response can play an important role, and become a resource that could help network operators. The present deployment of demand response measures is small, but this situation however may change in the short term. The two main Spanish utilities and the transmission network operator are designing research projects in this field. All customer segments are targeted, and the research will lead to pilot installations and tests.

342

Radiological Emergency Response Plan (Vermont)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation establishes a radiological emergency response plan fund, into which any entity operating a nuclear reactor or storing nuclear fuel and radioactive waste in this state (referred to...

343

Receptor-independent, vacuolar ATPase-mediated cellular uptake of histamine receptor-1 ligands: Possible origin of pharmacological distortions and side effects  

SciTech Connect

The aims of this study were to investigate whether several histamine receptor agonists and antagonists are subjected to receptor-independent ion trapping into acidic organelles, and whether this sequestration influences their pharmacological or toxicological properties. Vacuolar (V)-ATPase-dependent intracellular sequestration of agonists was recognized as morphological alterations (large fluid-filled vacuoles for betahistine and 1-methylhistamine, granular uptake for fluorescent BODIPY FL histamine) prevented by the specific V-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin A1 in rabbit vascular smooth muscle cells. Lipophilicity was the major determinant of these cellular effects (order of potency: BODIPY FL histamine > betahistine > 1-methylhistamine > histamine) that occurred at high concentrations. This ranking was dissociable from the potency order for H{sub 1} receptor-mediated contraction of the rabbit aorta, a response uninfluenced by bafilomycin. Antihistamines are inherently more lipophilic and caused vacuolization of a proportion of cells at 5-500 {mu}M. Agonist or antagonist-induced vacuoles were of macroautophagic nature (labeled with GFP-conjugated LC3, Rab7 and CD63; detection of LC3 II). Further, the 2 most lipophilic antihistamines tested, astemizole and terfenadine, were potentiated by V-ATPase blockade in the aortic contractility assay (13- and 3.6-fold more potent, respectively, pA{sub 2} scale), suggesting that V-ATPase-mediated cation trapping sequesters these antagonists from the vicinity of H{sub 1} receptors in the therapeutic concentration range. This potentiation did not apply to less lipophilic antagonists (pyrilamine, diphenhydramine). While some agonists and all tested antagonists of the histamine H{sub 1} receptors induce the V-ATPase-dependent vacuolar and autophagic cytopathology, sequestration affects the pharmacology of only the most lipophilic antagonists, the ones prone to off-target arrhythmogenic side effects.

Morissette, Guillaume [Centre de Recherche en Rhumatologie et Immunologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec QC, G1V 4G2 (Canada)]|[Department of Medicine, Universite Laval (Canada); Lodge, Robert [Centre de Recherche en Infectiologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec QC, G1V 4G2 (Canada); Bouthillier, Johanne [Centre de Recherche en Rhumatologie et Immunologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec QC, G1V 4G2 (Canada)]|[Department of Medicine, Universite Laval (Canada); Marceau, Francois [Centre de Recherche en Rhumatologie et Immunologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec QC, G1V 4G2 (Canada)]|[Department of Medicine, Universite Laval (Canada)], E-mail: francois.marceau@crchul.ulaval.ca

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

344

Demand Response and Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand Response & Energy Efficiency International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations ESL-IC-09-11-05 Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Austin, Texas, November 17 - 19, 2009 2 ?Less than 5..., 2009 4 An Innovative Solution to Get the Ball Rolling ? Demand Response (DR) ? Monitoring Based Commissioning (MBCx) EnerNOC has a solution involving two complementary offerings. ESL-IC-09-11-05 Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference...

345

Presidential responsiveness to public opinion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

particularly understand this theoretical trend by observing the intellectual evolution from the canonical works of Hobbes and Locke, who argued that political elites (e.g., monarchs and parliaments) had no obligation to lead their nations in a manner... responsiveness scores derived from the president?s positions on cases before the U.S. Supreme Court, recorded in amicus curiae briefs submitted to the nation?s highest court by the Solicitor General. Chapter VII examines responsiveness in the unilateral...

Vaughn, Justin Scott

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

346

A cellular automaton model for the change of public attitude regarding nuclear energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A model was constructed to investigate how the public opinion on nuclear energy varies depending upon information environment and personal communication between people. Here the nuclear risk informed of by the newsmedia and the frequency of anti-nuclear movements are treated as exogenous variables. The information environment is assumed to be represented in terms of public opinion as well as those exogenous variables, and the public are assumed to vary, randomly but homogeneously in a global sense, their attitude regarding nuclear energy in accordance with the strength of information environment. Personal communication begins round some opinion leaders who were excited by the information environment, and the attitude of the public who are affected by the opinion leaders are secondarily changed to anti-nuclear or pronuclear states. Moreover the public attitude is also changed naturally in an exponential way with time. Public opinion is supposed to appear as a superposed result of these three modes of attitudinal change. Such public opinion is fed back to the information environment. All the treatments are discretized and the process of personal communication is modeled by the cellular automaton method. Each cell in this approach is assumed to take one discrete state of six possible states which represent the status of public opinion. Model constants are determined by fitting calculations to the actual fraction of opinion in Japan. From simulation with this model, the following become clear: (i) The society is a highly non-linear system with a self-organizing potential: (ii) In the society composed of one type of constituent members with a homogeneous characteristic, the trend of public opinion is catastrophically turned over only when the effort for ameliorating the public acceptance extended over a long period of time, such as education, persuasion and advertisement, exceeds a certain threshold, and (iii) in the case when the amount of information on nuclear risk released from the newsmedia is reduced continuously from now on, the acceptability of nuclear energy is remarkably improved so far as the extent of the reduction exceeds a certain threshold.

Teruaki Ohnishi

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Open Automated Demand Response Communications in Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. Barat, D. Watson. 2006 Demand Response Spinning ReserveKueck, and B. Kirby 2008. Demand Response Spinning ReserveReport 2009. Open Automated Demand Response Communications

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Standardized Automated Demand Response Signals. Presented atand Automated Demand Response in Industrial RefrigeratedActions for Industrial Demand Response in California. LBNL-

Mares, K.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

INTEGRATION OF PV IN DEMAND RESPONSE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INTEGRATION OF PV IN DEMAND RESPONSE PROGRAMS Prepared by Richard Perez et al. NREL subcontract response programs. This is because PV generation acts as a catalyst to demand response, markedly enhancing by solid evidence from three utility case studies. BACKGROUND Demand Response: demand response (DR

Perez, Richard R.

350

Mammalian comparative genomics and epigenomics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The human genome sequence can be thought of as an instruction manual for our species, written and rewritten over more than a billion of years of evolution. Taking a complete inventory of our genome, dissecting its genes ...

Mikkelsen, Tarjei Sigurd, 1978-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Enzyme Regulation in Mammalian Tissues  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...rock with the equivalent uranium content of that of the...very simple theory of cancer-a cancer cell is a cell which...livers which is then depleted immedi-ately after...McArdle Laboratory for Cancer Research). Shields...

George Weber

1969-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

352

Ethanol alters cellular activation and CD14 partitioning in lipid rafts  

SciTech Connect

Alcohol consumption interferes with innate immunity. In vivo EtOH administration suppresses cytokine responses induced through Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and inhibits TLR4 signaling. Actually, EtOH exhibits a generalized suppressive effect on signaling and cytokine responses induced by through most TLRs. However, the underlying mechanism remains unknown. RAW264.7 cells were treated with LPS or co-treated with EtOH or with lipid raft-disrupting drugs. TNF-{alpha} production, IRAK-1 activation, and CD14 partition were evaluated. EtOH or nystatin, a lipid raft-disrupting drug, suppressed LPS-induced production of TNF-{alpha}. The suppressive effect of EtOH on LPS-induced TNF-{alpha} production was additive with that of methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin (MCD), another lipid raft-disrupting drug. EtOH interfered with IRAK-1 activation, an early TLR4 intracellular signaling event. Cell fractionation analyses show that acute EtOH altered LPS-related partition of CD14, a critical component of the LPS receptor complex. These results suggest a novel mechanism of EtOH action that involves interference with lipid raft clustering induced by LPS. This membrane action of EtOH might be one of the mechanisms by which EtOH acts as a generalized suppressor for TLR signaling.

Dai Qun [Department of Cellular Biology and Anatomy, Louisiana State University Health Science Center, 1501 Kings Highway, Shreveport, LA 71130 (United States); Zhang Jun [Department of Cellular Biology and Anatomy, Louisiana State University Health Science Center, 1501 Kings Highway, Shreveport, LA 71130 (United States); Pruett, Stephen B. [Department of Cellular Biology and Anatomy, Louisiana State University Health Science Center, 1501 Kings Highway, Shreveport, LA 71130 (United States)]. E-mail: spruet@lsuhsc.edu

2005-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

353

Demand Response Programs Oregon Public Utility Commission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand Response Programs Oregon Public Utility Commission January 6, 2005 Mike Koszalka Director;Demand Response Results, 2004 Load Control ­ Cool Keeper ­ ID Irrigation Load Control Price Responsive

354

Facilitating Renewable Integration by Demand Response  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Demand response is seen as one of the resources ... expected to incentivize small consumers to participate in demand response. This chapter models the involvement of small consumers in demand response programs wi...

Juan M. Morales; Antonio J. Conejo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Demand Response as a System Reliability Resource  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Barat, and D. Watson. 2007. Demand Response Spinning ReserveKueck, and B. Kirby. 2009. Demand Response Spinning ReserveFormat of 2009-2011 Demand Response Activity Applications.

Joseph, Eto

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Demand response-enabled residential thermostat controls.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

human dimension of demand response technology from a caseArens, E. , et al. 2008. Demand Response Enabling TechnologyArens, E. , et al. 2006. Demand Response Enabling Technology

Chen, Xue; Jang, Jaehwi; Auslander, David M.; Peffer, Therese; Arens, Edward A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Incident Response Planning for Selected Livestock Shows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was interviewed, and then data were transcribed and categorized to consensus. Nine themes arose including: background information, challenges, communication, example incidents, executing incident response, incident response planning, incident response training...

Tomascik, Chelsea Roxanne

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

358

Appendix C - Comments and Responses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

C C COMMENTS AND RESPONSES This appendix contains the comments that were received during the 30-day public comment period on the draft EA (March 22 through April 22, 2002) and their responses. Comments were obtained during the public meeting held in Carlsbad, New Mexico, on April 16, 2002, as well as from letters and electronic mail messages. The comment entries are organized according to comment categories. In compliance with the provisions of the National Environmental Policy Act and Council on Environmental Quality regulations, public comments on the draft EA were assessed individually and collectively. Some comments resulted in changes or modifications that have been incorporated into the final EA. Comments not requiring modifications to the EA resulted in a response to correct the

359

Applications for Alaska Strategic Technical Assistance Response...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Applications for Alaska Strategic Technical Assistance Response Team Program Are Due Feb. 6 Applications for Alaska Strategic Technical Assistance Response Team Program Are Due...

360

Demand Response as a System Reliability Resource  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Demand Response Technology Development The objective ofin planning demand response technology RD&D by conductingNew and Emerging Technologies into the California Smart Grid

Joseph, Eto

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

water heaters with embedded demand responsive controls can be designed to automatically provide day-ahead and real-time response

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California Long-term Energy Efficiency Strategic Plan. B-2 Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response> B-4 Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

The engineers responsibility for quality  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper offers a definition of quality for products, explains why engineers are morally responsible for quality, and outlines how engineers can fulfill this responsibility.

Michael C. Loui

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Demand Response - Policy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Demand Response - Policy Demand Response - Policy Since its inception, the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) has been committed to modernizing the nation's...

365

Sandia National Laboratories: demand response inverter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

demand response inverter ECIS-Princeton Power Systems, Inc.: Demand Response Inverter On March 19, 2013, in DETL, Distribution Grid Integration, Energy, Energy Surety, Facilities,...

366

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Demand Response A pilot program from NSTAR in Massachusetts,Massachusetts, aiming to test whether an intensive program of energy efficiency and demand response

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) Response...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) Response to Smart Grid RFI National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) Response to Smart Grid RFI The National Electrical...

368

Mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis An adopted set of enzymes making a pathway of major importance for the cellular metabolism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The highly conserved fatty acid de novo synthesis pathway in mitochondria proceeds in an acyl carrier protein-dependent manner through a discrete set of enzymes. Saccharomyces cerevisiae has served as a model for studies of mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis type II (FAS II) and as a template for identification of mammalian components. Inactivation of mitochondrial FAS II in yeast results in respiratory deficiency and loss of cytochromes. The pathway produces the octanoyl-ACP substrate for lipoic acid synthesis, but several pieces of evidence indicate that it is capable of the generation of longer fatty acids. A number of structures of mitochondrial FAS II enzymes have been published in the past few years, allowing for a comparison with their prokaryotic counterparts, several of which have been described as promising targets for antibiotics. Recently, novel links between mitochondrial FAS and RNA processing in yeast and vertebrates have been reported. In S. cerevisiae, deficiency in mitochondrial FAS results in failure of maturation of mitochondrial \\{RNAse\\} P, while, in mammals, mitochondrial 3-hydroxyacyl thioester dehydratase and the RPP14 subunit of \\{RNase\\} P are encoded by the same bicistronic transcript. The first publications linking mitochondrial FAS II to disease states in mammals are emerging.

J. Kalervo Hiltunen; Zhijun Chen; Antti M. Haapalainen; Rik K. Wierenga; Alexander J. Kastaniotis

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Response  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...tune in to the Young Scientists Network [ysnadm@ crow-t-robot.stanford.edu], set up by physicists who have been publicly...s editorial in the Careers issue (23 Sept., p. 1787) paints a painful and, for a former scientist, all-too-accurate...

Charles Hsu

1994-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

370

Response  

Energy Savers (EERE)

and applied science. They bring together a large set of investigators spanning science, engineering, and policy disciplines focused on a single critical national need, and work...

371

Response  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Advertising: 202-326-6555; Forproduct advertising inquiries contact 202-326-6544, FAX 202-682-0816. m Information for Contributors appears on pages 600-602 of the 31 July 1992 issue. Editorial correspon-dence, including requests...

G. A. Blake

1992-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

372

Response  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...44-457-838-519, FAX +44-457-838-898 * Other: Contact ScienceAdvertising: 202-326-6544, FAX 202-682-0816. m Information for Contributors appears on pages 36-38 of the 3 January 1992 issue. Editorial correspon-dence, including requests...

Richard Stolarski

1992-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

373

Response  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...chromatography-mass spec-trometry...best available treatment technology...compounds and their treatment and incin-eration...associated with wastewater chlorination...an appropriate balance between the rights...metric tons of plant materials contains...the world's plant materials are...

Philip H. Abelson

1994-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

374

Response  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Data Base for 1992: U.S. Spent Fuel and Radioactive Waste Inventories, Projections and Characteristics, publi. DOE/RW-0006, Rev. 8 (U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC, 1989), p. 113. 2. T. Taylor, quoted by S. Salesky...

Philip H. Abelson

1995-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

375

Transcriptional Response of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough to Oxidative Stress Mimicking Environmental Conditions  

SciTech Connect

Sulphate-reducing bacteria are anaerobes readily found in oxic-anoxic interfaces. Multiple defence pathways against oxidative conditions were identified in these organisms and proposed to be differentially expressed under different concentrations of oxygen, contributing to their ability to survive oxic conditions. In this study, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough cells were exposed to the highest concentration of oxygen that sulphate-reducing bacteria are likely to encounter in natural habitats, and the global transcriptomic response was determined. 307 genes were responsive, with cellular roles in energy metabolism, protein fate, cell envelope and regulatory functions, including multiple genes encoding heat shock proteins, peptidases and proteins with heat shock promoters. Of the oxygen reducing mechanisms of D. vulgaris only the periplasmic hydrogen-dependent mechanism is up-regulated, involving the [NiFeSe]hydrogenase, formate dehydrogenase(s) and the Hmc membrane complex. The oxidative defence response concentrates on damage repair by metal-free enzymes. These data, together with the down regulation of the Fur operon, which restricts the availability of iron, and the lack of response of the PerR operon, suggest that a major effect of this oxygen stress is the inactivation and/or degradation of multiple metalloproteins present in D. vulgaris as a consequence of oxidative damage to their metal clusters.

Pereira, Patricia M.; He, Qiang; Xavier, Antonio V.; Zhou, Jizhong; Pereira, Ines A.C.; Louro, Ricardo O.

2008-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

376

Pantex Plant Emergency Response Exercise  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance November 2000 Independent Oversight Evaluation of the Pantex Plant Emergency Response Exercise OVERSIGHT Table of Contents 1.0 INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................... 1 2.0 RESULTS ................................................................................................... 4 2.1 Positive Program Attributes ............................................................... 4 2.2 Weaknesses and Items Requiring Attention ..................................... 5 3.0 CONCLUSIONS ........................................................................................ 9 4.0 RATING .................................................................................................... 10

377

Erythropoietin and Ovarian Cancer Response  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Ovarian Cancer - Response Peter Solar Jan Koval Jaromir Mikes Jan...Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts We have read with interest...were disclosed. References 1 Solar P , Koval J, Mikes J, et...2 Jeong JY , Feldman L, Solar P, Szenajch J, Sytkowski...

Peter Solr; Jn Koval; Jaromr Mike; Jn Kleban; Zuzana Solrov; Jn Lazr; Ingrid Hodorov; Peter Fedoro?ko; and Arthur J. Sytkowski

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

UNC Tomorrow: NC State Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNC Tomorrow: NC State Response Submitted by James L. Oblinger Chancellor May 1, 2008 #12;#12;Table of Engineering 47 Expanding the Industrial Extension Service 49 Entrepreneurship, Industry Clusters, and Economic Behavioral Health Institute 63 4.6 Our Environment Energy and Environment: Research and Extension 67

379

Cardiovascular Mortality Among Heart Transplant Recipients With Asymptomatic Antibody-Mediated or Stable Mixed Cellular and Antibody-Mediated Rejection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Background Little has been reported on the clinical significance of asymptomatic antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) alone or mixed rejection (MR), defined as concurrent cellular rejection (CR) and AMR in heart transplantation. In this study, we examined whether a differential impact on cardiovascular mortality (CVM) existed when comparing asymptomatic AMR, to stable MR or CR. Methods The Utah Transplantation Affiliated Hospitals (UTAH) Cardiac Transplant Program pathology database of all heart transplant recipients between 1985 and 2004 was queried. Patients were classified as cellular, antibody-mediated, or mixed rejectors based on their predominant pattern of rejection type in the first three months post-transplant. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were fit to each of the three groups and analyses were adjusted for age at the time of transplant, gender, and underlying primary cardiac disease. Results Eight hundred and sixty nine heart transplant recipients qualified for analysis. Over the study period, patients with asymptomatic AMR or stable MR patterns had significantly worse CVM when compared to patients with stable CR pattern (AMR, 21.2%; MR, 18.0%; CR, 12.6%; AMR vs. CR, p = 0.009; MR vs. CR, p = 0.001). In contrast, CVM was comparable in patients with asymptomatic AMR or stable MR patterns (p = 0.9). Conclusions Asymptomatic or subclinical AMR and MR are clinically relevant, should be recognized, and deserve consideration for therapeutic intervention in hopes of avoiding adverse outcomes.

Abdallah G. Kfoury; M. Elizabeth H. Hammond; Gregory L. Snow; Stavros G. Drakos; Josef Stehlik; Patrick W. Fisher; Bruce B. Reid; Melanie D. Everitt; Feras M. Bader; Dale G. Renlund

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Cellular mechanisms of developmental and sex differences in the rapid hormonal modulation of a social communication signal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Some gymnotiform electric fish species rapidly modify their electric signal waveforms by altering the action potential (AP) waveforms of their electrocytes, the excitable cells that produce the electric organ discharge (EOD). The fish Brachyhypopomus gauderio alters EOD amplitude and pulse duration as a social signal in accordance with the prevailing social conditions, under the dual regulation of melanocortins and androgens. We show here that B. gauderio uses two distinct cellular mechanisms to change signal amplitude, and its use of these two mechanisms varies with age and sex of the signaler. EOD amplitude and waveform are regulated by the coordinated timing and shaping of two \\{APs\\} generated from two opposing excitable membranes in each electrocyte. The two membranes fire in sequence within 100?s of each other with the second AP being broader than the first. We have shown previously that mature males increase EOD amplitude and duration when melanocortin peptide hormones act directly on electrocytes to selectively broaden the second AP and increase the delay between the two \\{APs\\} by approximately 25?s. Here we show that females selectively broaden only the second AP as males do, but increase amplitude of both \\{APs\\} with no change in delay between them, a previously unreported second mechanism of EOD amplitude change in B. gauderio. Juvenile fish broaden both \\{APs\\} and increase the delay between the APs. Cellular mechanisms of EOD plasticity are therefore shaped during development, presumably by sex steroids, becoming sexually dimorphic at maturity.

Michael R. Markham; Philip K. Stoddard

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;#12;2008 Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering Staff Report Federal Energy metering penetration and potential peak load reduction from demand response have increased since 2006. Significant activity to promote demand response or to remove barriers to demand response occurred at the state

Tesfatsion, Leigh

382

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Report 2009. Open Automated Demand Response Communicationsand Techniques for Demand Response. California Energyand S. Kiliccote. Estimating Demand Response Load Impacts:

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Incorporating Demand Response into Western Interconnection Transmission Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aggregator Programs. Demand Response Measurement andIncorporating Demand Response into Western Interconnection13 Demand Response Dispatch

Satchwell, Andrew

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Opportunities, Barriers and Actions for Industrial Demand Response in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Techniques for Demand Response, report for theand Reliability Demand Response Programs: Final Report.Demand Response

McKane, Aimee T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Automated Demand Response Opportunities in Wastewater Treatment Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure,study of automated demand response in wastewater treatmentopportunities for demand response control strategies in

Thompson, Lisa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Vibrant Response Exercise 2014 | National Nuclear Security Administrat...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Media Room Photo Gallery Vibrant Response Exercise 2014 Vibrant Response Exercise 2014 NNSANews posted a photo: Vibrant Response Exercise 2014...

387

Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Predictive Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on AddThis.com...

388

National Action Plan on Demand Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Action Plan on Demand National Action Plan on Demand Action Plan on Demand National Action Plan on Demand Response Response Federal Utilities Partnership Working Group Federal Utilities Partnership Working Group November 18, 2008 November 18, 2008 Daniel Gore Daniel Gore Office of Energy Market Regulation Office of Energy Market Regulation Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Federal Energy Regulatory Commission The author's views do not necessarily represent the views of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Presentation Contents Presentation Contents Statutory Requirements Statutory Requirements National Assessment [Study] of Demand Response National Assessment [Study] of Demand Response National Action Plan on Demand Response National Action Plan on Demand Response General Discussion on Demand Response and Energy Outlook

389

The Mammalian Brain in the Electromagnetic Fields Designed by Man with Special Reference to Blood-Brain Barrier Function, Neuronal Damage and Possible Physical Mechanisms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......their emitted energy. The SAR Fig...exposure. At a frequency of 900 MHz, these...25 W/m2 at a frequency of 900 MHz. In...RF exposure, response is only seen at...important for energy transfer and storage in biological......

Leif G. Salford; Henrietta Nittby; Arne Brun; Gustav Grafstrm; Lars Malmgren; Marianne Sommarin; Jacob Eberhardt; Bengt Widegren; Bertil R. R. Persson

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Rapid Relief: A Prefabricated Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the industrial revolution and that with these new tools, progress should occur accordingly. Le Corbusier goes on to explain how ?it is not right that we should produce bad things because of a bad tool; nor is it right that we should waste our energy, our..., potable water, power, medication, sanitation, adequate sheltering, and any form of organizational help? (Cutter and Gall, 2012). All in all, ?FEMA failed to fulfill its responsibilities as the leading coordinating emergency management institution...

Gohmert, Brent Cole

2013-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

391

Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

The Demand Response Spinning Reserve project is a pioneeringdemonstration of how existing utility load-management assets can providean important electricity system reliability resource known as spinningreserve. Using aggregated demand-side resources to provide spinningreserve will give grid operators at the California Independent SystemOperator (CAISO) and Southern California Edison (SCE) a powerful, newtool to improve system reliability, prevent rolling blackouts, and lowersystem operating costs.

Eto, Joseph H.; Nelson-Hoffman, Janine; Torres, Carlos; Hirth,Scott; Yinger, Bob; Kueck, John; Kirby, Brendan; Bernier, Clark; Wright,Roger; Barat, A.; Watson, David S.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Systems analysis of the dynamic macrophage response to productive and non-productive murine cytomegalovirus infection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The mammalian immune system is capable of detecting and responding to different infectious conditions with specificity at the adaptive level, however whether this ability extends to individual cells of the innate immune ...

Lacaze, Paul Andrew

2011-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

393

Smart Buildings and Demand Response  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advances in communications and control technology the strengthening of the Internet and the growing appreciation of the urgency to reduce demand side energy use are motivating the development of improvements in both energy efficiency and demand response (DR) systems in buildings. This paper provides a framework linking continuous energy management and continuous communications for automated demand response (Auto?DR) in various times scales. We provide a set of concepts for monitoring and controls linked to standards and procedures such as Open Automation Demand Response Communication Standards (OpenADR). Basic building energy science and control issues in this approach begin with key building components systems end?uses and whole building energy performance metrics. The paper presents a framework about when energy is used levels of services by energy using systems granularity of control and speed of telemetry. DR when defined as a discrete event requires a different set of building service levels than daily operations. We provide examples of lessons from DR case studies and links to energy efficiency.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Search Response Team | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search Response Team | National Nuclear Security Administration Search Response Team | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Search Response Team Home > About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response > Responding to Emergencies > First Responders > Search Response Team Search Response Team Search Response Team logo NNSA's Search Response Team (SRT) is a national

395

Search Response Team | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Search Response Team | National Nuclear Security Administration Search Response Team | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Search Response Team Home > About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response > Responding to Emergencies > First Responders > Search Response Team Search Response Team Search Response Team logo NNSA's Search Response Team (SRT) is a national

396

Spatial and Temporal Measurements of Temperature and Cell Viability in Response to Nanoparticle Mediated Photothermal Therapy  

SciTech Connect

Aim: Nanoparticle enhanced photothermal therapy is a promising alternative to tumor resection. However, quantitative measurements of cellular response to these treatments are limited. This paper introduces a Bimodal Enhanced Analysis of Spatiotemporal Temperature (BEAST) algorithm to rapidly determine the viability of cancer cells in vitro following photothermal therapy alone or in combination with nanoparticles. Materials & Methods: To illustrate the capability of the BEAST viability algorithm, single wall carbon nanohorns were added to renal cancer (RENCA) cells in vitro and time-dependent spatial temperature maps measured with an infrared camera during laser therapy were correlated with post-treatment cell viability distribution maps obtained by cell-staining fluorescent microscopy. Conclusion: The BEAST viability algorithm accurately and rapidly determined the cell viability as function of time, space, and temperature.

Whitney, Jon R [ORNL; Rodgers, Amanda [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Harvie, Erica [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Carswell, William [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Torti, Suzy [Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem; Puretzky, Alexander A [ORNL; Rouleau, Christopher M [ORNL; Geohegan, David B [ORNL; Rylander, Christopher [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Rylander, Nichole M [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Adaptive Responses to Low Dose/Low Dose-Rate γ-Rays in Normal Human Fibroblasts:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Responses to Low Dose/Low Dose-Rate γ-Rays in Normal Human Fibroblasts: Responses to Low Dose/Low Dose-Rate γ-Rays in Normal Human Fibroblasts: The Role of Oxidative Metabolism Edouard I. Azzam 1 , Sonia M. de Toledo 1 , Badri N. Pandey 1 , Perumal Venkatachalam 1 , Manuela Buoannano 1 , Zhi Yang 1 , Ling Li 3 , Donna M. Gordon 2 , Roger W. Howell 1 , Debkumar Pain 2 and Douglas R. Spitz 3 1 Department of Radiology, 2 Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, UMDNJ-New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ 3 Free Radical and Radiation Biology Program, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA To investigate low dose/low dose-rate effects of low linear energy transfer ionizing radiation, we used γ-irradiated cells adapted to grow in three-dimensional architecture that mimics cell growth in vivo. We determined cellular, molecular and biochemical changes in these

398

Effect of different secondary quinoline insoluble content on the cellular structure of carbon foam derived from coal tar pitch  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Carbon foam was produced using mesophase pitches obtained under different temperatures as precursors, via foaming and carbonization process. The physicochemical properties of mesophase pitch, as well as the microstructure and physical properties of carbon foam were investigated by optical microscope, infrared spectrometer, thermograviment analyzer (TGA), X-ray diffractometer (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and universal testing machine, respectively. The results show that the amount of secondary quinoline insoluble in mesophase pitches increase with heat-treatment temperature increase, meanwhile, the cell size of carbon foams increased firstly and then reduced. Moreover, the compressive strength of carbon foams also exhibited the same variation trend. The cellular structure of carbon foam can be severely affected by the secondary quinoline insoluble content of mesophase pitch; thus it is critical to tailor the secondary quinoline insoluble content of mesophase pitch for obtaining carbon foam with high performance.

Heguang Liu; Tiehu Li; Yachun Shi; Xilin Wang; Jing Lv; Wenjuan Zhang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Expancel Foams: Fabrication and Characterization of a New Reduced Density Cellular Material for Structural Applications  

SciTech Connect

This study was initiated to produce a low-density centering medium for use in experiments investigating the response of materials to shock-loading. While the main drivers for material selection were homogeneity, dimensional stability, performance and cost, other secondary requirements included fine cell size, the ability to manufacture 5--10 cm-sized parts and an extremely compressed development time. The authors chose a non-traditional methodology using a hollow, expandable, polymeric microballoon material system called Expancel{reg_sign}. These microballoons are made from a copolymer of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) and polymethacrylonitrile (PMAN) and use iso-pentane as the blowing agent. The average diameter (by volume) of the unexpanded powder is approximately 13 {micro}m, while the average of the expanded powder is 35--55 {micro}m, with a few large microballoons approaching 150--200 p.m. A processing method was developed that established a pre-mixed combination of unexpanded and expanded Expancel at a ratio such that the tap (or vibration) density of the mixed powders was the same as that desired of the final part. Upon heating above the tack temperature of the polymer, this zero-rise approach allowed only expansion of the unexpanded powder to fill the interstices between the pre-expanded balloons. The mechanical action of the expanding powder combined with the elevated processing temperature yielded flee-standing and mechanically robust parts. Although mechanical properties of these foams were not a key performance requirement, the data allowed for the determination of the best temperature to heat the samples. Processing the foam at higher temperatures enhanced both modulus and strength. The maximum allowable temperature was limited by dimensional stability and shrinkback considerations. Tomographic analysis of foam billets revealed very flat density profiles. Parts of any density between the low density expanded powder (approximately 0.013 g/cm{sup 3}) and the higher density unexpanded powder (approximately 0.5 g/cm{sup 3}) can be produced using this technique. The extremely wide range of accessible densities, ease of processing, relatively inexpensive materials, uniformity of the density, scaleable nature of the process should make this technology highly competitive for a variety of Defense Programs and commercial applications.

L. Whinnery; S. Goods; B. Even

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Response Predicting LTCC Firing Shrinkage: A Response Surface Analysis Study  

SciTech Connect

The Low Temperature Cofired Ceramic (LTCC) technology is used in a variety of applications including military/space electronics, wireless communication, MEMS, medical and automotive electronics. The use of LTCC is growing due to the low cost of investment, short development time, good electrical and mechanical properties, high reliability, and flexibility in design integration (3 dimensional (3D) microstructures with cavities are possible)). The dimensional accuracy of the resulting x/y shrinkage of LTCC substrates is responsible for component assembly problems with the tolerance effect that increases in relation to the substrate size. Response Surface Analysis was used to predict product shrinkage based on specific process inputs (metal loading, layer count, lamination pressure, and tape thickness) with the ultimate goal to optimize manufacturing outputs (NC files, stencils, and screens) in achieving the final product design the first time. Three (3) regression models were developed for the DuPont 951 tape system with DuPont 5734 gold metallization based on green tape thickness.

Girardi, Michael; Barner, Gregg; Lopez, Cristie; Duncan, Brent; Zawicki, Larry

2009-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Balancing oil and environment... responsibly.  

SciTech Connect

Balancing Oil and EnvironmentResponsibly As the price of oil continues to skyrocket and global oil production nears the brink, pursuing unconventional oil supplies, such as oil shale, oil sands, heavy oils, and oils from biomass and coal has become increasingly attractive. Of particular significance to the American way is that our continent has significant quantities of these resources. Tapping into these new resources, however, requires cutting-edge technologies for identification, production, processing and environmental management. This job needs a super hero or two for a job of this size and proportion

Weimer, Walter C.; Teske, Lisa

2007-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

402

Systems Biology Model of Interactions Between Tissue Growth Factors and DNA Damage Pathways: Low Dose Response and Cross-Talk in TGFbeta and ATM Signaling  

SciTech Connect

The etiology of radiation carcinogenesis has been described in terms of aberrant changes that span several levels of biological organization. Growth factors regulate many important cellular and tissue functions including apoptosis, differentiation and proliferation. A variety of genetic and epigenetic changes of growth factors have been shown to contribute to cancer initiation and progression. It is known that cellular and tissue damage to ionizing radiation is in part initiated by the production of reactive oxygen species, which can activate cytokine signaling, and the DNA damage response pathways, most notably the ATM signaling pathway. Recently the transforming growth factor ? (TGF?) pathway has been shown to regulate or directly interact with the ATM pathway in the response to radiation. The relevance of this interaction with the ATM pathway is not known although p53 becomes phosphorylated and DNA damage responses are involved. However, growth factor interactions with DNA damage responses have not been elucidated particularly at low doses and further characterization of their relationship to cancer processes is warranted. Our goal will be to use a systems biology approach to mathematically and experimentally describe the low dose responses and cross-talk between the ATM and TGF? pathways initiated by low and high LET radiation. We will characterize ATM and TGF? signaling in epithelial and fibroblast cells using 2D models and ultimately extending to 3D organotypic cell culture models to begin to elucidate possible differences that may occur for different cell types and/or inter-cellular communication. We will investigate the roles of the Smad and Activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2) proteins as the potential major contributors to cross- talk between the TGF? and ATM pathways, and links to cell cycle control and/or the DNA damage response, and potential differences in their responses at low and high doses. We have developed various experimental approaches to apply to these problems using confocal microscopy and flow cytometry to detail changes at low dose/dose-rate in order to understand individual cell responses, and will establish our mathematical models based on the experimental findings resulting from changes in DNA repair, apoptosis and proliferation.

O'Neill, Peter [University of Oxford; Anderson, Jennifer [University of Oxford

2014-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

403

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: 2003 Molecular Characterization of the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization of the Roles of SOD Genes in Mammalian Characterization of the Roles of SOD Genes in Mammalian Cellular Response to Low Dose Radiation Authors: Chuan-Yuan Li,1 Eric Chuang2 Institutions: 1Dept of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, 2Advanced Technology Center, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland The potential risks of exposure to low dose radiation are of major concerns to the DOE/OBER Low Dose Radiation Research Program. It has been long recognized that much of the radiation-induced genetic damage to cells are caused by secondary oxidative species. Therefore, internal cellular defense systems against oxidative stress play significant roles in countering genetic damage induced by ionizing radiation. The role of the detoxifying

404

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Molecular Characterization of the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Molecular Characterization of the Roles of SOD Genes in Mammalian Molecular Characterization of the Roles of SOD Genes in Mammalian Cellular Response to Low Dose Radiation Authors: Chuan-Yuan Li, Zhanjun Guo, Zhonghui Yang, and Eric Chuang Institutions: Dept of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC Advanced Technology Center, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland Background The potential risks of exposure to low dose radiation are of major concerns to the DOE/OBER Low Dose Radiation Research Program. It has been long recognized that much of the radiation-induced genetic damage to cells are caused by secondary oxidative species. Therefore internal cellular defense systems against oxidative stress play significant roles in countering genetic damage induced by ionizing radiation. The role of the detoxifying

405

Involvement, attributions, and consumer responses to rebates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper examines effects of both purchasing involvement and product involvement on consumers' responses to rebates. In Part One, the study examines ... effects of involvement on consumer responses to a rebate ...

Kenneth A. Hunt; Susan M. Keaveney; Moonkyu Lee

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

BPA-2011-01054-FOIA Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

that is contracted for sale to, leased to, or have other interest to, by the utility company. Response: BPA has performed a reasonable search and found no responsive records....

407

INL Equipment to Aid Regional Response Team  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INL Equipment to Aid Regional Response Team DOE-ID is transferring equipment to the Idaho Falls Police Department's Hazardous Materials Response Team for their use in responding to...

408

Safety Management Functions, Responsibilities, and Authorities Manual  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Manual defines safety management functions, responsibilities, and authorities for DOE senior management with responsibilities for line, support, oversight, and enforcement actions. Canceled by DOE M 411.1-1A. Does not cancel other directives.

1997-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

409

New Insights Into Regulation of Ethylene Responsiveness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E. M. (1993). Arabidopsis ethylene-response gene ETR1:1997). Activation of the ethylene gas response pathway inby the nuclear protein ETHYLENE-INSENSITIVE3 and related

Deslauriers, Steve

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

University of Saskatchewan Workplace Responsibilities System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of Saskatchewan Workplace Responsibilities System Department of Health, Safety & Environment University of Saskatchewan Workplace Responsibilities System Department of Health, Safety of the University of Saskatchewan (herein referred to as University), as well as its visitors, is of utmost concern

Saskatchewan, University of

411

Object schemas for responsive robotic language use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of natural language should be added to a robot system without sacrificing responsiveness to the environment. In this paper, we present a robot that manipulates objects on a tabletop in response to verbal interaction. ...

Hsiao, Kai-yuh

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Responsible University Officials: Director of Purchasing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Responsible University Officials: Director of Purchasing Controller Responsible Offices: Purchasing Resource Services Controller's Office Origination Date: December 1, 2008 Purchasing Policy - Quick Reference Guide The entire Purchasing Policy and Procedures document is available on the NU Portal

Kuzmanovic, Aleksandar

413

BPA-2011-00698-FOIA Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2010 on an hourly timeframe. Response: 1. BPA has provided the responsive records on CD-ROM Please note these are net schedules, not actual metered interchange. This data does not...

414

Quantum-classical correspondence in response theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, theoretical analysis of correspondence between classical and quantum dynamics is studied in the context of response theory. Thesis discusses the mathematical origin of time-divergence of classical response ...

Kryvohuz, Maksym

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Role of oxygen in regulating embryo viability .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Mammalian embryo development in vitro remains suboptimal compared to that in vivo, culminating in reduced viability and smaller foetuses. Cellular metabolism is fundamental to the (more)

Wale, Petra Lee

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Interaction of a plant pseudo-response regulator with a calmodulin-like protein  

SciTech Connect

Research highlights: {yields} The pseudo-response regulator PRR2 specifically binds CML9, a calmodulin-like protein {yields} The interaction is confirmed in plant cell nuclei {yields} The interaction requires an intact PRR2 protein. -- Abstract: Calmodulin (CaM) plays a crucial role in the regulation of diverse cellular processes by modulating the activities of numerous target proteins. Plants possess an extended CaM family including numerous CaM-like proteins (CMLs), most of which appear to be unique to plants. We previously demonstrated a role for CML9 in abiotic stress tolerance and seed germination in Arabidopsis thaliana. We report here the isolation of PRR2, a pseudo-response regulator as a CML9 interacting protein by screening an expression library prepared from Arabidopsis seedlings with CML9 as bait in a yeast two-hybrid system. PRR2 is similar to the response regulators of the two-component system, but lacks the invariant residue required for phosphorylation by which response regulators switch their output response, suggesting the existence of alternative regulatory mechanisms. PRR2 was found to bind CML9 and closely related CMLs but not a canonical CaM. Mapping analyses indicate that an almost complete form of PRR2 is required for interaction with CML9, suggesting a recognition mode different from the classical CaM-target peptide complex. PRR2 contains several features that are typical of transcription factors, including a GARP DNA recognition domain, a Pro-rich region and a Golden C-terminal box. PRR2 and CML9 as fusion proteins with fluorescent tags co-localized in the nucleus of plant cells, and their interaction in the nuclear compartment was validated in planta by using a fluorophore-tagged protein interaction assay. These findings suggest that binding of PRR2 to CML9 may be an important mechanism to modulate the physiological role of this transcription factor in plants.

Perochon, Alexandre; Dieterle, Stefan; Pouzet, Cecile; Aldon, Didier; Galaud, Jean-Philippe [UMR 5546 CNRS/Universite Toulouse 3, Pole de Biotechnologie vegetale, BP 42617 Auzeville, 31326 Castanet-Tolosan cedex (France)] [UMR 5546 CNRS/Universite Toulouse 3, Pole de Biotechnologie vegetale, BP 42617 Auzeville, 31326 Castanet-Tolosan cedex (France); Ranty, Benoit, E-mail: ranty@scsv.ups-tlse.fr [UMR 5546 CNRS/Universite Toulouse 3, Pole de Biotechnologie vegetale, BP 42617 Auzeville, 31326 Castanet-Tolosan cedex (France)] [UMR 5546 CNRS/Universite Toulouse 3, Pole de Biotechnologie vegetale, BP 42617 Auzeville, 31326 Castanet-Tolosan cedex (France)

2010-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

417

Ebola Virus Modulates Transforming Growth Factor ? Signaling and Cellular Markers of Mesenchyme-Like Transition in Hepatocytes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Virus-Cell Interactions Ebola Virus Modulates Transforming Growth Factor...contributed equally to this publication. Ebola virus (EBOV) causes a severe hemorrhagic...signaling responses in the pathogenesis of Ebola virus disease. IMPORTANCE Ebola virus...

Jason Kindrachuk; Victoria Wahl-Jensen; David Safronetz; Brett Trost; Thomas Hoenen; Ryan Arsenault; Friederike Feldmann; Dawn Traynor; Elena Postnikova; Anthony Kusalik; Scott Napper; Joseph E. Blaney; Heinz Feldmann; Peter B. Jahrling

2014-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

418

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-62226 Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study F. Rubinstein, S. Kiliccote Energy Environmental Technologies Division January 2007 #12;LBNL-62226 Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study in this report was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and funded by the California Energy

419

Demand Response Resources in Pacific Northwest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand Response Resources in Pacific Northwest Chuck Goldman Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory cagoldman@lbl.gov Pacific Northwest Demand Response Project Portland OR May 2, 2007 #12;Overview · Typology Annual Reports ­ Journal articles/Technical reports #12;Demand Response Resources · Incentive

420

Demand Response and Ancillary Services September 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand Response and Ancillary Services September 2008 #12;© 2008 EnerNOC, Inc. All Rights Reserved programs The purpose of this presentation is to offer insight into the mechanics of demand response and industrial demand response resources across North America in both regulated and restructured markets As of 6

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Demand Response Projects: Technical and Market Demonstrations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand Response Projects: Technical and Market Demonstrations Philip D. Lusk Deputy Director Energy Analyst #12;PLACE CAPTION HERE. #12;#12;#12;#12;City of Port Angeles Demand Response History energy charges · Demand charges during peak period only ­ Reduced demand charges for demand response

422

THE STATE OF DEMAND RESPONSE IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE STATE OF DEMAND RESPONSE IN CALIFORNIA Prepared For: California Energy in this report. #12; ABSTRACT By reducing system loads during criticalpeak times, demand response can help reduce the threat of planned rotational outages. Demand response is also widely regarded as having

423

THE STATE OF DEMAND RESPONSE IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE STATE OF DEMAND RESPONSE IN CALIFORNIA Prepared For: California Energy in this report. #12; ABSTRACT By reducing system loads during criticalpeak times, demand response (DR) can.S. and internationally and lay out ideas that could help move California forward. KEY WORDS demand response, peak

424

Abnormal Electrical Brain Responses to Pitch in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abnormal Electrical Brain Responses to Pitch in Congenital Amusia Isabelle Peretz, PhD,1 Elvira- sults suggest that this disorder is critically dependent on fine-grained pitch discrimination. Here, we2-P3 response elicited by pitch changes. This abnormal brain response begins as early as 200

425

199602000 response.doc FISH PASSAGE CENTER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

199602000 response.doc FISH PASSAGE CENTER 2501 SW First Avenue, Suite 230, Portland, OR 97201, 2002 Northwest Power Planning Council Attention Judi Hertz Response to ISRP 851 SW 6th Avenue, Suite of environmental conditions (e.g., runoff volumes, #12;August 23, 2002 2 199602000 response.doc estuary/ocean

426

Regulation of mTOR complex 1 in response to growth factors and nutrients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In multicellular organisms, cells ensure the simultaneous availability of growth factors and nutrients before they invest in cellular processes that lead to growth. The TOR kinase is a master regulator of cellular growth ...

Sancak, Yasemin S. (Yasemin Shechner)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

MOLECULAR AND CELLULAR BIOLOGY, 0270-7306/01/$04.00 0 DOI: 10.1128/MCB.21.5.16031612.2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MOLECULAR AND CELLULAR BIOLOGY, 0270-7306/01/$04.00 0 DOI: 10.1128/MCB.21.5.1603­1612.2001 Mar. 2001, p. 1603­1612 Vol. 21, No. 5 Copyright © 2001, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights

Lahav, Galit

428

Bioinspired Total Synthesis of Agelastatin A and Derivatives for Cellular Target Identification; Syntheses of ^(15)N-labeled Oroidin and Keramadine Analog for Metabiosynthetic Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

agelastatin A derivatives leading to a bioactive biotin probe that is proving to be useful for cellular target identification. In an effort toward understanding the biosynthesis of P-2-AIs, a synthesis of^( 15)N-oroidin labeled oroidin was developed and pulse...

Reyes, Jeremy Chris Punzalan

2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

429

Investigation of the use of fly-ash based autoclaved cellular concrete blocks in coal mines for air duct work. Final report, January 25, 1993--December 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

Coal mines are required to provide ventilation to occupied portions of underground mines. Concrete block is used in this process to construct air duct walls. However, normal concrete block is heavy and not easy to work with and eventually fails dramatically after being loaded due to mine ceiling convergence and/or floor heave. Autoclaved cellular concrete block made from (70{plus_minus}%) coal fly ash is lightweight and less rigid when loaded. It is lighter and easier to use than regular concrete block for underground mine applications. It has also been used in surface construction around the world for over 40 years. Ohio Edison along with eight other electric utility companies, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and North American Cellular Concrete constructed a mobile demonstration plant to produce autoclaved cellular concrete block from utility fly ash. To apply this research in Ohio, Ohio Edison also worked with the Ohio Coal Development Office and CONSOL Inc. to produce autoclaved cellular concrete block not only from coal ash but also from LIMB ash, SNRB ash, and PFBC ash from various clean coal technology projects sponsored by the Ohio Coal Development Office. The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the potential for beneficial use of fly ash and clean coal technology by-products in the production of lightweight block.

Horvath, M.L. [Ohio Edison Co., Akron, OH (United States)

1995-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

430

Multiple Factors Affecting Cellular Redox Status and Energy Metabolism Modulate Hypoxia-Inducible Factor Prolyl Hydroxylase Activity In Vivo and In Vitro  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...use of these cells allowed us to monitor GHO hydroxylation status without using proteasome inhibitors...found that MitoQ could not help us to distinguish between these...factors affecting cellular redox status and energy metabolism modulate hypoxia-inducible...

Yi Pan; Kyle D. Mansfield; Cara C. Bertozzi; Viktoriya Rudenko; Denise A. Chan; Amato J. Giaccia; M. Celeste Simon

2006-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

431

Abstract 1523: Trafficking of intracytoplasmic lipid droplets in pancreatic cancer cells by pigment epithelium-derived factor alters triacylglycerol metabolism and cellular invasion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...thus, it requires a robust and renewable source of energy to meet its metabolic demands...well as providing a source of energy. LDs are composed of a triacylglycerol...cellular invasion and reduces lipid energy stores due to an increase in ATGL-mediated...

Margo A. Quinn; Philip Fitchev; Mark Talamonti; Janardan Khandekar; Lijun Huang; Daniel L. Sweeney; Mona L. Cornwell; and Susan E. Crawford

2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

432

Role of Methotrexate Polyglutamylation and Cellular Energy Metabolism in Inhibition of Methotrexate Binding to Dihydrofolate Reductase by 5-Formyltetrahydrofolate in Ehrlich Ascites Tumor Cells in Vitro  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...10). For analysis of MIX derivatives bound to dihydrofolate...the Absence of Exogenous Energy Substrates. Incubation...Dissociation of Intracellular MIX Bound to Dihydrofolate...level of nonexchangeable MIX and abolished the 5-CHO-H4PleGlu-de...shown). Hence, cellular energy metabolism appears to...

Larry H. Matherly; David W. Fry; and I. David Goldman

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Response (3/3/2010)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March: 3 March: 3 , 2010 Mr. James A. Ajello, Chair ~nviro-ental Management Advisory Board C/O Hawaiian Electric Industries, Inc. P.O. BO; 730 Honolulu, Hawaii 96808-0730 Dear Mr. Ajello: Thank you for your October 20,2009, letter and recommendations contained in the Envikonmental Management Advisory Board (EMAB) September 30,2009, Reports and Recommendations. I highly value EMAB's guidance and believe that the Office of Environmental Management (EM) will benefit from the Board's insight. I have asked Mr. Timothy Harms, Director, Office of Management Systems and Analysis, to ensure that they are implemented, as appropriate, in support of our program goals and mission. The Office of Management Systems and Analysis is responsible for assuring that recommendations by groups such as the National

434

Measurement and Verification for Demand Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Measurement and Verification for Measurement and Verification for Demand Response Prepared for the National Forum on the National Action Plan on Demand Response: Measurement and Verification Working Group AUTHORS: Miriam L. Goldberg & G. Kennedy Agnew-DNV KEMA Energy and Sustainability National Forum of the National Action Plan on Demand Response Measurement and Verification for Demand Response was developed to fulfill part of the Implementation Proposal for The National Action Plan on Demand Response, a report to Congress jointly issued by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) in June 2011. Part of that implementation proposal called for a "National Forum" on demand response to be conducted by DOE and FERC. Given that demand response has matured, DOE and FERC decided that a "virtual" project

435

WELLCOME TRUST CONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to the Reform of the National Curriculum in England  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WELLCOME TRUST CONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to the Reform of the National Curriculum in England April 2013 1 Department for Education: Reform of the National Curriculum in England CONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to the Reform of the National Curriculum in England April 2013 2

Rambaut, Andrew

436

Advertiser retains sole responsibility for content ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

techniques similar to 3D printing to ex- trude cellular material between layers of gel. By delivering as innovative medical devices. It's also where we use our strengths in 3D printing and additive manufacturing

Cai, Long

437

MNK1 expression increases during cellular senescence and modulates the subcellular localization of hnRNP A1  

SciTech Connect

Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNP A1) is an RNA-binding protein that modulates splice site usage, polyadenylation, and cleavage efficiency. This protein has also been implicated in mRNA stability and transport from the nucleus. We have previously demonstrated that hnRNP A1 had diminished protein levels and showed cytoplasmic accumulation in senescent human diploid fibroblasts. Furthermore, we have shown that inhibition of p38 MAPK, a key regulator of cellular senescence, elevated hnRNP A1 protein levels and inhibited hnRNP A1 cytoplasmic localization. In this study, we have explored the possible involvement of MNK1, one of the downstream effector of p38 MAPK, in the regulation of hnRNP A1. We have demonstrated that pharmacological inhibition of MNK1 by CGP 57380 decreased the phosphorylation levels of hnRNP A1 in young and senescent fibroblast cells and blocked the cytoplasmic accumulation of hnRNP A1 in senescent cells. In addition, MNK1 formed a complex with hnRNP A1 in vivo. The expression levels of MNK1, phospho-MNK1, and phospho-eIF4E proteins were found to be elevated in senescent cells. These data suggest that MNK1 regulates the phosphorylation and the subcellular distribution of hnRNP A1 and that MNK1 may play a role in the induction of senescence. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MNK1 and not MAPKAPK2 phosphorylates hnRNP A1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MNK1 has elevated levels in senescent cells, this has not been reported previously. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MNK1 activity induces cytoplasmic accumulation of hnRNP A1 in senescent cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Altered cytoplasmic localization of hnRNP A1 may alter gene expression patterns. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our studies may increase our understanding of RNA metabolism during cellular aging.

Ziaei, Samira, E-mail: ziaeisamira@gmail.com [City College of New York, City University of New York, New York, NY (United States) [City College of New York, City University of New York, New York, NY (United States); The Graduate School and University Center of CUNY, New York, NY (United States); Shimada, Naoko, E-mail: lensdev@yahoo.co.jp [City College of New York, City University of New York, New York, NY (United States)] [City College of New York, City University of New York, New York, NY (United States); Kucharavy, Herman, E-mail: veterduy@yahoo.com [City College of New York, City University of New York, New York, NY (United States)] [City College of New York, City University of New York, New York, NY (United States); Hubbard, Karen, E-mail: khubbard@sci.ccny.cuny.edu [City College of New York, City University of New York, New York, NY (United States) [City College of New York, City University of New York, New York, NY (United States); The Graduate School and University Center of CUNY, New York, NY (United States)

2012-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

438

No Effect of the Transforming Growth Factor {beta}1 Promoter Polymorphism C-509T on TGFB1 Gene Expression, Protein Secretion, or Cellular Radiosensitivity  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To study whether the promoter polymorphism (C-509T) affects transforming growth factor {beta}1 gene (TGFB1) expression, protein secretion, and/or cellular radiosensitivity for both human lymphocytes and fibroblasts. Methods and Materials: Experiments were performed with lymphocytes taken either from 124 breast cancer patients or 59 pairs of normal monozygotic twins. We used 15 normal human primary fibroblast strains as controls. The C-509T genotype was determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism or TaqMan single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping assay. The cellular radiosensitivity of lymphocytes was measured by G0/1 assay and that of fibroblasts by colony assay. The amount of extracellular TGFB1 protein was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and TGFB1 expression was assessed via microarray analysis or reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Results: The C-509T genotype was found not to be associated with cellular radiosensitivity, neither for lymphocytes (breast cancer patients, P=.811; healthy donors, P=.181) nor for fibroblasts (P=.589). Both TGFB1 expression and TGFB1 protein secretion showed considerable variation, which, however, did not depend on the C-509T genotype (protein secretion: P=.879; gene expression: lymphocytes, P=.134, fibroblasts, P=.605). There was also no general correlation between TGFB1 expression and cellular radiosensitivity (lymphocytes, P=.632; fibroblasts, P=.573). Conclusion: Our data indicate that any association between the SNP C-509T of TGFB1 and risk of normal tissue toxicity cannot be ascribed to a functional consequence of this SNP, either on the level of gene expression, protein secretion, or cellular radiosensitivity.

Reuther, Sebastian; Metzke, Elisabeth [Laboratory of Radiobiology and Experimental Radiooncology, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany)] [Laboratory of Radiobiology and Experimental Radiooncology, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Bonin, Michael [Department of Medical Genetics, University of Tuebingen (Germany)] [Department of Medical Genetics, University of Tuebingen (Germany); Petersen, Cordula [Clinic of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany)] [Clinic of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Dikomey, Ekkehard, E-mail: dikomey@uke.de [Laboratory of Radiobiology and Experimental Radiooncology, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany)] [Laboratory of Radiobiology and Experimental Radiooncology, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Raabe, Annette [Laboratory of Radiobiology and Experimental Radiooncology, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany)] [Laboratory of Radiobiology and Experimental Radiooncology, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany)

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Phosphorylation of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 dUTPase Regulates Viral Virulence and Genome Integrity by Compensating for Low Cellular dUTPase Activity in the Central Nervous System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...frequency in progeny virus genomes in the brains of mice where endogenous cellular dUTPase...frequency in progeny virus genomes in the brains of mice where endogenous cellular dUTPase...frequency altered by the mutation in the brains of mice. This is the first report, to...

Akihisa Kato; Jun Arii; Yoshio Koyanagi; Yasushi Kawaguchi

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

440

Impaired Transcriptional Response of the Murine Heart to Cigarette Smoke in the Setting of High Fat Diet and Obesity  

SciTech Connect

Smoking and obesity are each well-established risk factors for cardiovascular heart disease, which together impose earlier onset and greater severity of disease. To identify early signaling events in the response of the heart to cigarette smoke exposure within the setting of obesity, we exposed normal weight and high fat diet-induced obese (DIO) C57BL/6 mice to repeated inhaled doses of mainstream (MS) or sidestream (SS) cigarette smoke administered over a two week period, monitoring effects on both cardiac and pulmonary transcriptomes. MS smoke (250 ?g wet total particulate matter (WTPM)/L, 5 h/day) exposures elicited robust cellular and molecular inflammatory responses in the lung with 1466 differentially expressed pulmonary genes (p < 0.01) in normal weight animals and a much-attenuated response (463 genes) in the hearts of the same animals. In contrast, exposures to SS smoke (85 ?g WTPM/L) with a CO concentration equivalent to that of MS smoke (250 CO ppm) induced a weak pulmonary response (328 genes) but an extensive cardiac response (1590 genes). SS smoke and to a lesser extent MS smoke preferentially elicited hypoxia- and stress-responsive genes as well as genes predicting early changes of vascular smooth muscle and endothelium, precursors of cardiovascular disease. The most sensitive smoke-induced cardiac transcriptional changes of normal weight mice were largely absent in DIO mice after smoke exposure, while genes involved in fatty acid utilization were unaffected. At the same time, smoke exposure suppressed multiple proteome maintenance genes induced in the hearts of DIO mice. Together, these results underscore the sensitivity of the heart to SS smoke and reveal adaptive responses in healthy individuals that are absent in the setting of high fat diet and obesity.

Tilton, Susan C.; Karin, Norman J.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Waters, Katrina M.; Mikheev, Vladimir B.; Lee, K. M.; Corley, Richard A.; Pounds, Joel G.; Bigelow, Diana J.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Noise-enhanced nonlinear response and the role of modular structure for signal detection in neuronal networks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We show that sensory noise can enhance the nonlinear response of neuronal networks, and when delivered together with a weak signal, it improves the signal detection by the network. We reveal this phenomenon in neuronal networks that are in a dynamical state preceding a saddle-node bifurcation corresponding to the appearance of sustained network oscillations. In this state, even a weak subthreshold pulse can evoke a large-amplitude oscillation of neuronal activity. The signal-to-noise ratio reaches a maximum at an optimum level of sensory noise, manifesting stochastic resonance (SR) at the population level. We demonstrate SR by use of simulations and numerical integration of rate equations in a cortical model. Using this model, we mimic the experiments of Gluckman etal. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 4098 (1996)] that have given evidence of SR in mammalian brain. We also study neuronal networks in which neurons are grouped in modules and every module works in the regime of SR. We find that even a few modules can strongly enhance the reliability of signal detection in comparison with the case when a modular organization is absent.

M. A. Lopes; K.-E. Lee; A. V. Goltsev; J. F. F. Mendes

2014-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

442

The effects of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet on cellular activity at SLA-treated titanium surfaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Titanium (Ti) is a primary material used for dental implants, and the sandblasted, large-grit, and acid-etched (SLA) surface treatment is commonly used on titanium to promote early osseointegration. Despite their benefits, SLA-treated Ti surfaces are disadvantaged by their hydrophobic property, and much research has been performed to address this problem. In current study, we hypothesized the effects of a nitrogen-based non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet (NTAPPJ) treatment on SLA-treated Ti would increase hydrophilicity and cellular activity. Samples with and without the NTAPPJ treatment were analyzed using a field emission scanning electron microscope, optical surface roughness system, X-ray photoelectron spectroscope, and water contact angle measuring system. MC3T3-E1 cells (murine osteoblastic cell line) attachments and proliferations were examined by the MTT and BrdU colorimetry assay. Cell immunofluorescent microscopic images were observed by a confocal laser scanning microscope for a morphological analysis. This study found that the nitrogen-based NTAPPJ treatment on SLA-treated Ti significantly increased the hydrophilicity and MC3T3-E1 cell attachments and proliferations. Hence, it was concluded that an additional procedure of nitrogen-based NTAPPJ treatment just prior to implantation of SLA-treated Ti into oral defect sites could improve the success of dental implant surgery.

Eun-Jung Lee; Jae-Sung Kwon; Soo-Hyuk Uhm; Doo-Hoon Song; Yong Hee Kim; Eun Ha Choi; Kyoung-Nam Kim

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Dose point kernel for boron-11 decay and the cellular S values in boron neutron capture therapy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The study of the radiobiology of boronneutron capture therapy is based on the cellular level dosimetry of boron-10s thermal neutron capture reaction B 10 ( n ? ) Li 7 in which one 1.47 MeV helium-4 ion and one 0.84 MeV lithium-7 ion are spawned. Because of the chemical preference of boron-10 carrier molecules the dose is heterogeneously distributed in cells. In the present work the (scaled) dose point kernel of boron-11 decay called B 11 -DPK was calculated by GEANT4Monte Carlo simulation code. The DPK curve drops suddenly at the radius of 4.26 ? m the continuous slowing down approximation (CSDA) range of a lithium-7 ion. Then after a slight ascending the curve decreases to near zero when the radius goes beyond 8.20 ? m which is the CSDA range of a 1.47 MeV helium-4 ion. With the DPK data S values for nuclei and cells with the boron-10 on the cell surface are calculated for different combinations of cell and nucleus sizes. The S value for a cell radius of 10 ? m and a nucleus radius of 5 ? m is slightly larger than the value published by Tung et al. [Appl. Radiat. Isot.61 739743 (2004)]. This result is potentially more accurate than the published value since it includes the contribution of a lithium-7 ion as well as the alpha particle.

Yunzhi Ma; JinPeng Geng; Song Gao; Shanglian Bao

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Process for Transition of Responsibilities | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

for Transition of Responsibilities Process for Transition of Responsibilities Process for Transition of Responsibilities (Waste Management Conference 2006) Process for Transition...

445

Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy....

446

LEED Demand Response Credit: A Plan for Research towards Implementation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C. McParland, Open Automated Demand Response Communicationsand Open Automated Demand Response", Grid Interop Forum,Testing of Automated Demand Response for Integration of

Kiliccote, Sila

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Demand Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Open Automated Demand Response. In Grid Interop Forum.work was sponsored by the Demand Response Research Center (load-management.php. Demand Response Research Center (2009).

Goli, Sasank

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Linking Continuous Energy Management and Open Automated Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. Barat, D. Watson. Demand Response Spinning ReserveOpen Automated Demand Response Communication Standards:Dynamic Controls for Demand Response in a New Commercial

Piette, Mary Ann

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reliability signals for demand response GTA HTTPS HVAC IT kWand Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems. and Techniques for Demand Response. California Energy

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Open Automated Demand Response Communications Specification (Version 1.0)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Techniques for Demand Response. May 2007. LBNL-59975.tofacilitateautomating demandresponseactionsattheInteroperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure,

Piette, Mary Ann

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Open Automated Demand Response for Small Commerical Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ofFullyAutomatedDemand ResponseinLargeFacilities. FullyAutomatedDemandResponseTestsinLargeFacilities. OpenAutomated DemandResponseCommunicationStandards:

Dudley, June Han

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Scenarios for Consuming Standardized Automated Demand Response Signals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities.Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities.Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure.

Koch, Ed

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reliability Corporation. Demand response data task force:Energy. Benefits of demand response in electricity marketsAssessment of demand response & advanced metering, staff

Cappers, Peter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Direct versus Facility Centric Load Control for Automated Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure.and Techniques for Demand Response. LBNL Report 59975. Mayand Communications for Demand Response and Energy Efficiency

Piette, Mary Ann

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing Technologies and Demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Goodin. 2009. Open Automated Demand Response Communicationsin Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services. InOpen Automated Demand Response Demonstration Project. LBNL-

Ghatikar, Girish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

advanced metering and demand response in electricityGoldman, and D. Kathan. Demand response in U.S. electricity29] DOE. Benefits of demand response in electricity markets

Mathieu, Johanna L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Robinson, Michael, 2008, "Demand Response in Midwest ISOPresentation at MISO Demand Response Working Group Meeting,Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy, ENERGY RESOURCES and CONSERVATION Response to several FOIA requests -...

459

The Role of Demand Response in Default Service Pricing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE ROLE OF DEMAND RESPONSE IN DEFAULT SERVICE PRICING Galenfor providing much-needed demand response in electricitycompetitive retail markets, demand response often appears to

Barbose, Galen; Goldman, Chuck; Neenan, Bernie

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

The Role of Demand Response in Default Service Pricing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center onThe Role of Demand Response in Default Service Pricing Galenfor providing much-needed demand response in electricity

Barbose, Galen; Goldman, Charles; Neenan, Bernie

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy | Department...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Energy Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy, World Oil Price, 1970-2020 (1999 dollars per barrel) Response to...

462

Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy, nepdg20012250.pdf....

463

IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies 2012 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies 2012 IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies 2012 IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies 2012.pdf More Documents &...

464

Elastic response of exotic ferromagnets?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Resonantultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) measurements have been carried out as a function of temperature (2300 K) and magnetic field (02 T) for a series of exotic ferromagnetic materials including Eu8Ga16Ge30 (T c ?32 K) EuFe4Sb12 (T c ?82 K) Au4V (T c ?46 K) and Yb14MnSb11 (T c ?53 K). The different materials show remarkable differences in their elastic response near the Curie temperature revealing a sudden softening at T c in EuFe4Sb12 and a stiffening of the elastic moduli at T c in Yb14MnSb11. Ongoing attempts to theoretically model the data using Landau theory will be discussed. [Work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. DMR0506292. Oak Ridge National Laboratory is managed by UT?Batelle LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE?AC05?00OR22725.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Riverland expedited response action proposal  

SciTech Connect

The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) recommended that the US Department of Energy (DOE) prepare an expedited response action (ERA) for the Riverland Railroad Car Wash Pit and the 600 Area Army Munitions Burial Site. A non-time-critical ERA proposal includes preparation of an engineering evaluation/cost analysis (EE/CA) section. The EE/CA is a rapid, focused evaluation of available technologies using specific screening factors to assess feasibility, appropriateness, and cost. The ERA proposal will undergo reviews by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), DOE, EPA, Ecology, and the public. Ecology and EPA will issue an Action Agreement Memorandum after resolution of all review comments. The, memorandum will authorize remediation activities. The ERA goal is to reduce the potential for any contaminant migration to the soil column, groundwater, and Columbia River. The ERA may be the final remediation of the 100-IU-1 Operable Unit. A No Action Record of Decision may be issued after cleanup completion.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Safety Management Functions, Responsibilities, and Authorities  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Manual provides the responsibilities of Headquarters and field element offices required by DOE P 411.1, Safety Management Functions, Responsibilities and Authorities Policy, dated 1-28-97. It also contains detailed requirements to supplement the policy's direction for each DOE organization having safety management functions to establish and maintain separate documentation of their responsibilities and authorities. Cancels DOE M 411.1-1A. Canceled by DOE M 411.1-1C.

2001-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

467

Comprehensive Environmental Cleanup and Responsibility Act (Montana) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Comprehensive Environmental Cleanup and Responsibility Act Comprehensive Environmental Cleanup and Responsibility Act (Montana) Comprehensive Environmental Cleanup and Responsibility Act (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Institutional Fuel Distributor Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Montana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Montana Department of Environmental Quality The Comprehensive Environmental Cleanup and Responsibility Act contains general provisions (sections 705-729), along with the Voluntary Cleanup and Redevelopment Act (sections 730-738) and the Controlled Allocation of

468

Sandia National Laboratories: About Sandia: Environmental Responsibility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Responsibility Responsibility Environmental Management System Pollution Prevention About Environmental Responsibility Environmental responsibility workers at Sandia Long-term management aimed at preserving and enhancing the quality of the environment has evolved at Sandia National Laboratories for more than 50 years. Recycling, establishing community environmental partnerships, incorporating sustainable design in new and renovated facilities, and environmental restoration are all integral parts of Sandia's environmental stewardship. Sandia also partners with the Department of Energy to improve public participation in environmental issues, such as the implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and Long-term Stewardship for environmental restoration. Participation in community organizations and

469

Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

17 6. Barriers to Retail23 ii Retail Demand Response in SPP List of Figures and6 Table 3. SPP Retail DR Survey

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Phytoplankton photosynthetic response to solar ultraviolet irradiance ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Phytoplankton photosynthetic response to solar ultraviolet irradiance in the Ross Sea Polynya: Development and evaluation of a time-dependent model with...

471

ESPC RISK, RESPONSIBILITY AND PERFORMANCE MATRIX  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Document helps determine the risk, responsibility, and performance of a contractor's proposed approach under a Federal energy savings performance contract (ESPC).

472

BPA-2012-01628-FOIA Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

becomes cheaper, distributed generation more common, and energy efficiency and demand response reduce the need to build much new capacity (May 3rd letter and December 7th...

473

Distributed Automated Demand Response - Energy Innovation Portal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transmission Find More Like This Return to Search Distributed Automated Demand Response Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Contact LLNL About This Technology...

474

Demand Response (transactional control) - Energy Innovation Portal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transmission Electricity Transmission Find More Like This Return to Search Demand Response (transactional control) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Contact PNNL About...

475

Regulation Services with Demand Response - Energy Innovation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regulation Services with Demand Response Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Contact PNNL About This Technology Using grid frequency information, researchers have created...

476

Topics in Residential Electric Demand Response.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Demand response and dynamic pricing are touted as ways to empower consumers, save consumers money, and capitalize on the smart grid and expensive advanced meter (more)

Horowitz, Shira R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

BPA-20110-00524-FOIA Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

existing and past members of the board of directors of the Bonneville Environmental Foundation Renewable, Inc. (BEFR). Response: BPA has provided the following link that should...

478

BPA-2011-01417-FOIA Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

participate as an ex-officio non-voting board member of the Bonneville Environmental Foundation (BEF). Response: BPA has performed a reasonable search and is providing the...

479

BPA-2011-01258-FOIA Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

thus allowed him to participate in matters relating to the Bonneville Environmental Foundation ("BEF") or its subsidiary, BEF Renewable Inc. Response: BPA has performed a...

480

BPA-2011-01259-FOIA Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

regarding hisher participation in matters relating to the Bonneville Environmental Foundation ("BEF") or its subsidiary, BEF Renewable Inc. Response: BPA has performed a...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Energy demand-side management energy information systemdemand response. Demand-side management (DSM) program goalsa goal for demand-side management (DSM) coordination and

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Demand response at the Naval Postgraduate School .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this MBA project is to assist the Naval Postgraduate School's Public Works department to assimilate into a Demand Response program that will (more)

Stouffer, Dean

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Demand response exchange in a deregulated environment .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis presents the development of a new and separate market for trading Demand Response (DR) in a deregulated power system. This market is termed (more)

Nguyen, DT

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Demand response exchange in a deregulated environment.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis presents the development of a new and separate market for trading Demand Response (DR) in a deregulated power system. This market is termed (more)

Nguyen, DT

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Records Management POC Responsibilities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

POINT OF CONTACT RESPONSIBILITIES FOR RECORDS MANAGEMENT Records Management Procedures for Storage, Transfer and Retrieval of Records from WNRC Records Management Handbook...

486

BPA-2012-005525-FOIA Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the following: A copy of the supplemental labor job posting that was distributed to contracting companies for your position of Telecommunications Support Technician. Response:...

487

Search Response Team | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

expertise. SRT is a full-response asset, which includes the manpower and equipment to conduct aerial, vehicle, or search operations by foot to locate a potential radiological...

488

NBP RFI: Communications Requirements- Honeywell Responses To...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the National Broadband Plan by Studying the Communications Requirements of Electric Utilities To Inform Federal Smart NBP RFI: Communications Requirements- Honeywell Responses To...

489

3D Site Response using NLSSI  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

3D Site Response using NLSSI Justin Coleman, P.E. Bob Spears Nuclear Science and Technology Idaho National Laboratory October 22, 2014

490

Appendix D Draft Oil Spill Response Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

D D Draft Oil Spill Response Plan U.S. Department of the Interior Minerals Management Service MMS Cape Wind Energy Project January 2009 Final EIS Appendix D Draft Oil Spill Response Plan DRAFT Oil Spill Response Plan CAPE WIND ASSOCIATES, LLC BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS PREPARED FOR Cape Wind Associates, LLC 75 Arlington Street Boston, Massachusetts 02116 PREPARED BY ESS Group, Inc. 401 Wampanoag Trail, Suite 400 East Providence, Rhode Island 02915 Project No. E159-601 December 2005 DRAFT OIL SPILL RESPONSE PLAN Cape Wind Associates, LLC Boston, Massachusetts Prepared For: Cape Wind Associates, LLC 75 Arlington Street Boston, Massachusetts 02116 Prepared By: ESS Group, Inc. 401 Wampanoag Trail, Suite 400

491

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

District Small Business Summer Solutions: Energy and DemandSummer Solutions: Energy and Demand Impacts Monthly Energy> B-2 Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

The proteome and phosphoproteome of Neurospora crassa in response to cellulose, sucrose and carbon starvation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Improving cellulolytic enzyme production by plant biomass degrading fungi holds great potential in reducing costs associated with production of next-generation biofuels generated from lignocellulose. How fungi sense cellulosic materials and respond by secreting enzymes has mainly been examined by assessing function of transcriptional regulators and via transcriptional profiling. Here, we obtained global proteomic and phosphoproteomic profiles of the plant biomass degrading filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa grown on different carbon sources, i.e. sucrose, no carbon, and cellulose, by performing isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ)-based LCMS/MS analyses. A comparison between proteomes and transcriptomes under identical carbon conditions suggests that extensive post-transcriptional regulation occurs in N. crassa in response to exposure to cellulosic material. Several hundred amino acid residues with differential phosphorylation levels on crystalline cellulose (Avicel) or carbon-free medium vs sucrose medium were identified, including phosphorylation sites in a major transcriptional activator for cellulase genes, CLR1, as well as a cellobionic acid transporter, CBT1. Mutation of phosphorylation sites on CLR1 did not have a major effect on transactivation of cellulase production, while mutation of phosphorylation sites in CBT1 increased its transporting capacity. Our data provides rich information at both the protein and phosphorylation levels of the early cellular responses to carbon starvation and cellulosic induction and aids in a greater understanding of the underlying post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms in filamentous fungi.

Yi Xiong; Samuel T. Coradetti; Xin Li; Marina A. Gritsenko; Therese Clauss; Vlad Petyuk; David Camp; Richard Smith; Jamie H.D. Cate; Feng Yang; N. Louise Glass

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Early mucosal responses in blue catfish (Ictalurus furcatus) skin to Aeromonas hydrophila infection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Bacterial pathogens are well-equipped to detect, adhere to, and initiate infection in their finfish hosts. The mucosal surfaces of fish, such as the skin, function as the front line of defense against such bacterial insults that are routinely encountered in the aquatic environment. While recent progress has been made, and despite the obvious importance of mucosal surfaces, the precise molecular events that occur soon after encountering bacterial pathogens remain unclear. Indeed, these early events are critical in mounting appropriate responses that ultimately determine host survival or death. In the present study, we investigated the transcriptional consequences of a virulent Aeromonas hydrophila challenge in the skin of blue catfish, Ictalurus furcatus. We utilized an 860K Agilent microarray to examine gene expression profiles at key early timepoints following challenge (2h, 12h, and 24h). A total of 1155 unique genes were significantly altered during at least one timepoint. We observed dysregulation in a number of genes involved in diverse pathways including those involved in antioxidant responses, apoptosis, cytoskeletal rearrangement, immunity, and extracellular matrix protein diversity and regulation. Taken together, A.hydrophila coordinately modulates mucosal factors across numerous cellular pathways in a manner predicted to enhance its ability to adhere to and infect the blue catfish host.

Chao Li; Benjamin Beck; Baofeng Su; Jeffery Terhune; Eric Peatman

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

HIV-1 Tat modulates T-bet expression and induces Th1 type of immune response  

SciTech Connect

The HIV-1 transactivator Tat performs various viral and cellular functions. Primarily, it induces processive transcription from the HIV-1 LTR promoter. However, Tat secreted from infected cells is known to activate uninfected lymphocytes through receptors. To further delineate the specific target genes, extracellular Tat was expressed on the cell membrane of stimulator cells and co-cultured with human PBMCs. Along with induced CD4{sup +} T cell proliferation and IFN-{gamma} secretion, there was strong upregulation of T-bet expression which is majorly implicated in generating T{sub H}1 type of immune response. To further delineate the effect of extracellular Tat on HIV replication, both p24 analysis and in vivo GFP expression were performed. There was a significant inhibition of HIV-1 replication in human CEM-GFP cell line and hPBMCs. Thus, for the first time we report that apart from its transactivation activity, extracellular Tat acts as a costimulatory molecule that affects viral replication by modulating host immune response through induction of T-bet expression and IFN-{gamma} secretion.

Kulkarni, Asavari [National Center for Cell Science, Pune University Campus, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411 007 (India); Ravi, Dyavar S. [National Center for Cell Science, Pune University Campus, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411 007 (India); Singh, Kamini [National Center for Cell Science, Pune University Campus, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411 007 (India); Rampalli, Shravanti [National Center for Cell Science, Pune University Campus, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411 007 (India); Parekh, Vrajesh [National Center for Cell Science, Pune University Campus, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411 007 (India); Mitra, Debashis [National Center for Cell Science, Pune University Campus, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411 007 (India); Chattopadhyay, Samit [National Center for Cell Science, Pune University Campus, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411 007 (India)]. E-mail: samit@nccs.res.in

2005-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

495

Cellular Gate Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a biochemically plausible mechanism for constructing digital logic signals and gates of significant complexity within living cells. These mechanisms rely largely on co-opting existing biochemical machinery and ...

Knight, Thomas F.

1998-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

496

Multifunctional periodic cellular metals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...webs or truss members. Recent results indicate that...In Fourth Conf. on Aerospace Materials, Processes...continuous in one direction. Recent advances in topology design and...Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University...

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Scalable Cellular Array Architecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cockshott,W.P. Shaw,P. Barrie,P. Milne,G.J. Computing and control Engineering Journal pp 219-224 IEE

Cockshott, W.P.

498

Furfuryl alcohol cellular product  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Self-extinguishing rigid foam products are formed by polymerization of furfuryl alcohol in the presence of a lightweight, particulate, filler, zinc chloride and selected catalysts.

Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.

1982-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

499

PIER: Demand Response Research Center Director, Mary Ann Piette  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 PIER: Demand Response Research Center Director, Mary Ann Piette Program Development and Outreach Response Research Plan #12;2 Demand Response Research Center Objective Scope Stakeholders Develop, prioritize, conduct and disseminate multi- institutional research to facilitate Demand Response. Technologies

500

Smart Buildings Using Demand Response March 6, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Smart Buildings Using Demand Response March 6, 2011 Sila Kiliccote Deputy, Demand Response Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Demand Response Research Center 1 #12;Presentation Outline Demand Response Research Center ­ DRRC Vision and Research Portfolio Introduction to Demand

Kammen, Daniel M.