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1

Cellular responses to environmental DNA damage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains the proceedings of the conference entitled Cellular Responses to Environmental DNA Damage held in Banff,Alberta December 1--6, 1991. The conference addresses various aspects of DNA repair in sessions titled DNA repair; Basic Mechanisms; Lesions; Systems; Inducible Responses; Mutagenesis; Human Population Response Heterogeneity; Intragenomic DNA Repair Heterogeneity; DNA Repair Gene Cloning; Aging; Human Genetic Disease; and Carcinogenesis. Individual papers are represented as abstracts of about one page in length.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Cellular responses against DNA damaged by platinum anticancer drugs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The anticancer activity of platinum-based drugs such as cisplatin, carboplatin, and oxaliplatin is mediated by their ability to attack DNA such that generated adducts trigger numerous cellular responses. A better understanding ...

Jung, Yongwon, 1977-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Mammalian Host Responses to Proinflammatory Stimuli by Microbial Pathogens  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

response in Helicobacter pylori gastritis. Ann Med, 2009.Y. , et al. , Helicobacter pylori potentiates epithelial:is highly produced in Helicobacter pylori-infected gastric

Clark, Robin Teresa

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Journal of Mammalogy, 84(2):354368, 2003 MAMMALIAN RESPONSE TO GLOBAL WARMING ON VARIED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

354 Journal of Mammalogy, 84(2):354­368, 2003 MAMMALIAN RESPONSE TO GLOBAL WARMING ON VARIED how Rocky Mountain mam- malian communities changed during past global warming events characterized not) in different ways. Nevertheless, examination of past global warming episodes suggested

California at Berkeley, University of

5

DNA damage response to different surface chemistry of silver nanoparticles in mammalian cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) have recently received much attention for their possible applications in biotechnology and life sciences. Ag NPs are of interest to defense and engineering programs for new material applications as well as for commercial purposes as an antimicrobial. However, little is known about the genotoxicity of Ag NPs following exposure to mammalian cells. This study was undertaken to examine the DNA damage response to polysaccharide surface functionalized (coated) and non-functionalized (uncoated) Ag NPs in two types of mammalian cells; mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF). Both types of Ag NPs up-regulated the cell cycle checkpoint protein p53 and DNA damage repair proteins Rad51 and phosphorylated-H2AX expression. Furthermore both of them induced cell death as measured by the annexin V protein expression and MTT assay. Our observations also suggested that the different surface chemistry of Ag NPs induce different DNA damage response: coated Ag NPs exhibited more severe damage than uncoated Ag NPs. The results suggest that polysaccharide coated particles are more individually distributed while agglomeration of the uncoated particles limits the surface area availability and access to membrane bound organelles.

Ahamed, Maqusood; Karns, Michael; Goodson, Michael; Rowe, John [Department of Biology, Centre for Tissue Regeneration and Engineering, University of Dayton, Dayton-45469, OH (United States); Hussain, Saber M.; Schlager, John J. [Applied Biotechnology Branch, Human Effectiveness Directorate Air Force Research Laboratory/HEPB, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base-45433, OH (United States); Hong Yiling [Department of Biology, Centre for Tissue Regeneration and Engineering, University of Dayton, Dayton-45469, OH (United States)], E-mail: Yiling.Hong@notes.udayton.edu

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

6

Frequent biphasic cellular responses of permanent fish cell cultures to deoxynivalenol (DON)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contamination of animal feed with mycotoxins is a major problem for fish feed mainly due to usage of contaminated ingredients for production and inappropriate storage of feed. The use of cereals for fish food production further increases the risk of a potential contamination. Potential contaminants include the mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) which is synthesized by globally distributed fungi of the genus Fusarium. The toxicity of DON is well recognized in mammals. In this study, we confirm cytotoxic effects of DON in established permanent fish cell lines. We demonstrate that DON is capable of influencing the metabolic activity and cell viability in fish cells as determined by different assays to indicate possible cellular targets of this toxin. Evaluation of cell viability by measurement of membrane integrity, mitochondrial activity and lysosomal function after 24 h of exposure of fish cell lines to DON at a concentration range of 0-3000 ng ml{sup -1} shows a biphasic effect on cells although differences in sensitivity occur. The cell lines derived from rainbow trout are particularly sensitive to DON. The focus of this study lies, furthermore, on the effects of DON at different concentrations on production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the different fish cell lines. The results show that DON mainly reduces ROS production in all cell lines that were used. Thus, our comparative investigations reveal that the fish cell lines show distinct species-related endpoint sensitivities that also depend on the type of tissue from which the cells were derived and the severity of exposure. - Highlights: > DON uptake by cells is not extensive. > All fish cell lines are sensitive to DON. > DON is most cytotoxic to rainbow trout cells. > Biphasic cellular responses were frequently observed. > Our results are similar to studies on mammalian cell lines.

Pietsch, Constanze, E-mail: constanze.pietsch@unibas.ch [University Basel, Man-Society-Environment, Department of Environmental Sciences, Vesalgasse 1, CH-4051 Basel (Switzerland); Bucheli, Thomas D.; Wettstein, Felix E. [Agroscope Reckenholz-Taenikon (ART), Research Station ART, Reckenholzstrasse 191, CH-8046 Zuerich (Switzerland); Burkhardt-Holm, Patricia [University Basel, Man-Society-Environment, Department of Environmental Sciences, Vesalgasse 1, CH-4051 Basel (Switzerland)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Growth hormone responsive neural precursor cells reside within the adult mammalian brain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

within the adult mammalian brain. Sci. Rep. 2, 250; DOI:of neurons from adult brain stem cells during recovery afterin the adult mammalian brain. J Neurosci 17, 5046–5061 (

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

In vitro cellular responses to silicon carbide nanoparticles: impact of physico-chemical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 In vitro cellular responses to silicon carbide nanoparticles: impact of physico-chemical features of Nanoparticle Research 14, 10 (2012) 1143" DOI : 10.1007/s11051-012-1143-7 #12;2 Abstract Silicon carbide, and of the oxidation state of the surface on cellular H2O2 production. Keywords silicon carbide nanoparticles, laser

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

9

alter cellular responses: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

34 Variable community responses to herbivory in fire-altered landscapes of northern Patagonia, Argentina Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: relationships...

10

Molecular dissection of the roles of the SOD genes in mammalian response to low dose irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been long recognized that a significant fraction of the radiation-induced genetic damage to cells are caused by secondary oxidative species. Internal cellular defense systems against oxidative stress play significant roles in countering genetic damage induced by ionizing radiation. The role of the detoxifying enzymes may be even more prominent in the case of low-dose, low-LET irradiation, as the majority of genetic damage may be caused by secondary oxidative species. In this study we have attempted to decipher the roles of the superoxide dismutase (SOD) genes, which are responsible for detoxifying the superoxide anions. We used adenovirus vectors to deliver RNA interference (RNAi or siRNA) technology to down-regulate the expression levels of the SOD genes. We have also over-expressed the SOD genes by use of recombinant adenovirus vectors. Cells infected with the vectors were then subjected to low dose ?-irradiation. Total RNA were extracted from the exposed cells and the expression of 9000 genes were profiled by use of cDNA microarrays. The result showed that low dose radiation had clear effects on gene expression in HCT116 cells. Both over-expression and down-regulation of the SOD1 gene can change the expression profiles of sub-groups of genes. Close to 200 of the 9000 genes examined showed over two-fold difference in expression under various conditions. Genes with changed expression pattern belong to many categories that include: early growth response, DNA-repair, ion transport, apoptosis, and cytokine response.

Eric Y. Chuang

2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

11

Chronic cellular responses of rat skin to 13 Mev proton irradiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHRONIC CELLULAR RESPONSES OF RAT SKIN TO 13 MEV PROTON IRRADIATION A Thesis by DONALD KING HINKLE, D. V. M. Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas AErM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1966 Major Subject: Laboratory Animal Medicine CHRONIC CELLULAR RESPONSES OF RAT SKIN TO 13 MEV PROTON IRRADIATION A Thesis by DONALD KING HINKLE, D. V. M. Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas ARM University in partial...

Hinkle, Donald King

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Corrosion of, and cellular responses to MgZnCa bulk metallic glasses Xuenan Gu a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Corrosion of, and cellular responses to Mg­Zn­Ca bulk metallic glasses Xuenan Gu a , Yufeng Zheng a: Magnesium alloy Bulk metallic glass Mechanical property Corrosion Cytotoxicity a b s t r a c t Mg­Zn­Ca bulk, mechanical testing, corrosion and cytotoxicity tests. It was found that the Mg66Zn30Ca4 sample presents

Zheng, Yufeng

13

Soft X-ray tomography of phenotypic switching and the cellular response to antifungal peptoids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soft X-ray tomography of phenotypic switching and the cellular response to antifungal peptoids that circumvent fungal drug- resistance mechanisms. In this work we used soft X-ray tomogra- phy to image of an entire, fully functional biological system, i.e., in the milieu of a cell (8, 10). Recently, soft X-ray

Barron, Annelise E.

14

7th International Workshop on Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The extended abstracts that follow present a summary of the Proceedings of the 7th International Workshop: Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response, held at Columbia University’s Kellogg Center in New York City on March 15–17, 2006. These International Workshops on Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response have been held regularly since 1993 (1–5). Since the first workshop, there has been a rapid growth (see Fig. 1) in the number of centers developing microbeams for radiobiological research, and worldwide there are currently about 30 microbeams in operation or under development. Single-cell/single-particle microbeam systems can deliver beams of different ionizing radiations with a spatial resolution of a few micrometers down to a few tenths of a micrometer. Microbeams can be used to addressquestions relating to the effects of low doses of radiation (a single radiation track traversing a cell or group of cells), to probe subcellular targets (e.g. nucleus or cytoplasm), and to address questions regarding the propagation of information about DNA damage (for example, the radiation-induced bystander effect). Much of the recent research using microbeams has been to study low-dose effects and ‘‘non-targeted’’ responses such as bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive responses. This Workshop provided a forum to assess the current state of microbeam technology and current biological applications and to discuss future directions for development, both technological and biological. Over 100 participants reviewed the current state of microbeam research worldwide and reported on new technological developments in the fields of both physics and biology.

Brenner, David J.

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

15

Comparison of cellular responses induced by low level light in different cell types  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Discoveries are rapidly being made in multiple laboratories that shed "light" on the fundamental molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the use of low level light therapy (LLLT) in vitro, in animal models and in ...

Hamblin, Michael R.

16

E-Print Network 3.0 - activity-a cellular response Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Page 1 of 3 Texas AgriLife Extension Service Procedure 25.99.09.X1.01 CELLULAR COMMUNICATION ... Source: Wilkins, Neal - Institute of Renewable Natural Resources &...

17

Cation Influx in Single Ovarian (Granulosa) Cells: Recruitment as a Cellular Mechanism of LH-[Ca 2 ? ] i Dose Response*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The gonadotropic hormones, LH and FSH, activate adenylyl cyclase in their respective target cells and thereby initiate many biochemical responses. In addition to stimulating cAMP production, both LH and FSH promote agonist-specific increases in the cytoplasmic concentration of free calcium ions ([Ca 2 ? ] i) in gonadal cells. Here, we have applied single cell fluorescence video microscopy with the Ca 2 ?-sensitive dye fura-2 to investigate the mechanism(s) by which LH induces a rise in the [Ca 2 ? ] i in individual (swine) granulosa cells collected from single Graafian follicles. Stimulation with LH induced a rapid onset, biphasic, spike- and plateau-like [Ca 2 ? ] i signal in responsive granulosa cells. The cellular mechanisms mediating this biphasic LH-stimulated increase in [Ca 2 ? ] i were examined by external Ca 2 ? removal and via the manganese (Mn 2 ? ) quench technique, which showed that LH triggers initial intracellular Ca 2 ? mobilization

Jorge A. Flores; Claudia Aguirre; Om P. Sharma; Johannes D. Veldhuis

18

Mechanisms underlying cellular responses of cells from haemopoietic tissue to low  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The above studies will provide fundamental mechanistic information relating genetic predisposition to important low dose phenomena, and will aid in the development of Department of Energy policy, as well as radiation risk policy for the public and the workplace. We believe the proposed studies accurately reflect the goals of the DOE low dose program. To accurately define the risks associated with human exposure to relevant environmental doses of low LET ionizing radiation, it is necessary to completely understand the biological effects at very low doses (i.e. less than 0.1 Gy), including the lowest possible dose, that of a single electron track traversal. At such low doses, a range of studies have shown responses in biological systems which are not related to the direct interaction of radiation tracks with DNA. The role of these "Ă?Â?non-targeted"Ă?Âť responses in critical tissues is poorly understood and little is known regarding the underlying mechanisms. Although critical for dosimetry and risk assessment, the role of individual genetic susceptibility in radiation risk is not satisfactorily defined at present. The aim of the proposed grant is to critically evaluate non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation with a focus on the induction of genomic instability (GI) in key stem cell populations from haemopoietic tissue. Using stem cells from two mouse strains (CBA/CaH and C57BL/6J) known to differ in their susceptibility to radiation effects, we plan to carefully dissect the role of genetic predisposition in these models on genomic instability. We will specifically focus on the effects of low doses of low LET radiation, down to the dose of 10mGy (0.01Gy) X-rays. Using conventional X-ray and we will be able to assess the role of genetic variation under various conditions at a range of doses down to the very low dose of 0.01Gy. Irradiations will be carried out using facilities in routine operation for such studies. Mechanistic studies of instability in different cell lineages will include the role of cytokines which have been shown to be in the initiation of instability. These studies also aim to uncover the possible mechanism of the initiation, perpetuation and delayed pathways of the instability response using relevant biological endpoints i.e. chromosomal instability, apoptosis induction, cytokine and gene array analysis. Integral to these studies will be an assessment of the role of genetic susceptibility in these responses, using CBA/CaH and C57BL/6J mice. The overall results suggest that low dose low LET X-irradiation induced delayed GI in both CBA/CaH and C57BL/6J haemopoeitic tissue. Using several biological approaches, some key strain and dose-specific differences have been identified in radiation-induced signalling in the initiation and perpetuation of the instability process. Furthermore, the induction of non-targeted radiation effects and genetic dependency may be linked to the use of alternative signalling pathways and mechanisms which have potential implications on evaluation of non-targeted effects in radiation risk assessment.

Kadhim, Munira A

2012-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

19

Advanced Computational Approaches for Characterizing Stochastic Cellular Responses to Low Dose, Low Dose Rate Exposures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

OAK - B135 This project final report summarizes modeling research conducted in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Low Dose Radiation Research Program at the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute from October 1998 through June 2003. The modeling research described involves critically evaluating the validity of the linear nonthreshold (LNT) risk model as it relates to stochastic effects induced in cells by low doses of ionizing radiation and genotoxic chemicals. The LNT model plays a central role in low-dose risk assessment for humans. With the LNT model, any radiation (or genotoxic chemical) exposure is assumed to increase oneˇŻs risk of cancer. Based on the LNT model, others have predicted tens of thousands of cancer deaths related to environmental exposure to radioactive material from nuclear accidents (e.g., Chernobyl) and fallout from nuclear weapons testing. Our research has focused on developing biologically based models that explain the shape of dose-response curves for low-dose radiation and genotoxic chemical-induced stochastic effects in cells. Understanding the shape of the dose-response curve for radiation and genotoxic chemical-induced stochastic effects in cells helps to better understand the shape of the dose-response curve for cancer induction in humans. We have used a modeling approach that facilitated model revisions over time, allowing for timely incorporation of new knowledge gained related to the biological basis for low-dose-induced stochastic effects in cells. Both deleterious (e.g., genomic instability, mutations, and neoplastic transformation) and protective (e.g., DNA repair and apoptosis) effects have been included in our modeling. Our most advanced model, NEOTRANS2, involves differing levels of genomic instability. Persistent genomic instability is presumed to be associated with nonspecific, nonlethal mutations and to increase both the risk for neoplastic transformation and for cancer occurrence. Our research results, based on applications of NEOTRANS2, indicate that nonlinear threshold-type, dose-response relationships for excess stochastic effects (problematic nonlethal mutations, neoplastic transformation) should be expected after exposure to low linear energy transfer (LET) gamma rays or gamma rays in combination with high-LET alpha radiation. Similar thresholds are expected for low-dose-rate low-LET beta irradiation. We attribute the thresholds to low-dose, low-LET radiation induced protection against spontaneous mutations and neoplastic transformations. The protection is presumed mainly to involve selective elimination of problematic cells via apoptosis. Low-dose, low-LET radiation is presumed to trigger wide-area cell signaling, which in turn leads to problematic bystander cells (e.g., mutants, neoplastically transformed cells) selectively undergoing apoptosis. Thus, this protective bystander effect leads to selective elimination of problematic cells (a tissue cleansing process in vivo). However, this protective bystander effects is a different process from low-dose stimulation of the immune system. Low-dose, low-LET radiation stimulation of the immune system may explain why thresholds for inducing excess cancer appear much larger (possibly more than 100-fold larger) than thresholds for inducing excess mutations and neoplastic transformations, when the dose rate is low. For ionizing radiation, the current risk assessment paradigm is such that the relative risk (RR) is always ˇÝ 1, no matter how small the dose. Our research results indicate that for low-dose or low-dose-rate, low-LET irradiation, RR < 1 may be more the rule than the exception. Directly tied to the current RR paradigm are the billion-dollar cleanup costs for radionuclide-contaminated DOE sites. Our research results suggest that continued use of the current RR paradigm for which RR ˇÝ 1 could cause more harm than benefit to society (e.g., by spreading unwarranted fear about phantom excess risks associated with low-dose low-LET radiation). Such phantom risks also may arise from risk assessments conducted for com

Scott, Bobby, R., Ph.D.

2003-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

20

In vitro cellular responses to silicon carbide particles manufactured through the Acheson process: impact of physico-chemical features on pro-inflammatory and pro-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 In vitro cellular responses to silicon carbide particles manufactured through the Acheson process ROS: Reactive Oxygen Species SiC: Silicon carbide SSA: Specific Surface Area TNF: Tumor Necrosis carbide (SiC) an industrial-scale product manufactured through the Acheson process, is largely employed

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Mammalian Cell Culture | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fund Las ConchasTrail5,722,326 SiteMammalian Cell Culture

22

Quantification of Cellular Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation by Stable Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry Reveals Tissue- and Drug-Dependent Stress Response Dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is an essential post-translational modification with the biopolymer poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR). The reaction is catalyzed by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) and plays key roles in cellular physiology ...

Martello, Rita

23

Integrated characterization of cellular physiology underlying hepatic metabolism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The macroscopic metabolic phenotype of a cellular system, such as insulin resistance, is the result of the integration of many hundreds or thousands of preceding cellular events, which culminates in the cell's final response ...

Wong, Matthew Sing

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Toxicology and cellular effect of manufactured nanomaterials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The increasing use of nanotechnology in consumer products and medical applications underlies the importance of understanding its potential toxic effects to people and the environment. Herein are described methods and assays to predict and evaluate the cellular effects of nanomaterial exposure. Exposing cells to nanomaterials at cytotoxic doses induces cell cycle arrest and increases apoptosis/necrosis, activates genes involved in cellular transport, metabolism, cell cycle regulation, and stress response. Certain nanomaterials induce genes indicative of a strong immune and inflammatory response within skin fibroblasts. Furthermore, the described multiwall carbon nanoonions (MWCNOs) can be used as a therapeutic in the treatment of cancer due to its cytotoxicity.

Chen, Fanqing

2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

25

Noise removal at the rod synapse of mammalian retina   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mammalian rods respond to single photons with a hyperpolarization of about 1 mV which is accompanied by continuous noise. Since the mammalian rod bipolar cell collects signals from 20-100 rods, the noise from the converging ...

van Rossum, Mark; Smith, Robert

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Symposium on molecular and cellular mechanisms of mutagenesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These proceedings contain abstracts only of the 21 papers presented at the Sympsoium. The papers dealt with molecular mechanisms of mutagenesis and cellular responses to chemical and physical mutagenic agents. (ERB)

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

BE.450 Molecular and Cellular Pathophysiology, Spring 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This courses focuses on the fundamentals of tissue and organ response to injury from a molecular and cellular perspective. There is a special emphasis on disease states that bridge infection, inflammation, immunity, and ...

Schauer, David

28

Cellular and molecular analysis of neuronal structure plasticity in the mammalian cortex  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Despite decades of evidence for functional plasticity in the adult brain, the role of structural plasticity in its manifestation remains unclear. cpg15 is an activity-regulated gene encoding a membrane-bound ligand that ...

Lee, Wei-Chung Allen

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

adherent mammalian cells: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

bats) correlate with predictable chromosomal structural changes (KFTkaryotypic fission theory). Chromosome studies (more) Kolnicki, Robin Lee 2012-01-01 438 Mammalian Abp1, a...

30

Engineering A new era is beginning in the mammalian  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

concepts applicable to mammalian cells may also be applicable other systems including microalgae. Dr in Biodesign B105 School for Engineering of Matter, Transport & Energy #12;

31

Establishment of the epigenetic landscape in mammalian embryonic stem cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Temporal and spatial variation of histone methylation is an important factor in mammalian development. Deciphering the details of such epigenetic phenomena has the potential to enrich both stem cell biology and therapeutics, ...

Koche, Richard Patrick

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Micropatterning of Proteins and Mammalian Cells on Indium Tin Oxide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Micropatterning of Proteins and Mammalian Cells on Indium Tin Oxide Sunny S. Shah, Michael C and electrochemical activation to create micropatterned cocultures on indium tin oxide (ITO) substrates applications in tissue engineering and biosensing. KEYWORDS: indium tin oxide · photolithography · switchable

Revzin, Alexander

33

Microfluidics-integrated time-lapse imaging for analysis of cellular Dirk R. Albrecht,yza  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

th March 2010 DOI: 10.1039/b923699f An understanding of the mechanisms regulating cellular responses internal programs for growth and differentiation, and cooperatively integrate various inputs for cellular, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA c Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Bhatia, Sangeeta

34

Assays for mammalian tyrosinase: a comparative study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work describes a comparative study of the tyrosinase activity determined using three methods which are the most extensively employed; two radiometric assays using L-tyrosine as substrate (tyrosine hydroxylase and melanin formation activities) and one spectrophotometric assay using L-dopa (dopa oxidase activity). The three methods were simultaneously employed to measure the activities of the soluble, melanosomal, and microsomal tyrosinase isozymes from Harding-Passey mouse melanoma through their purification processes. The aim of this study was to find any correlation among the tyrosinase activities measured by the three different assays and to determine whether that correlation varied with the isozyme and its degree of purification. The results show that mammalian tyrosinase has a greater turnover number for L-dopa than for L-tyrosine. Thus, enzyme activity, expressed as mumol of substrate transformed per min, is higher in assays using L-dopa as substrate than those using L-tyrosine. Moreover, the percentage of hydroxylated L-tyrosine that is converted into melanin is low and is affected by several factors, apparently decreasing the tyrosinase activity measured by the melanin formation assay. Bearing these considerations in mind, average interassay factors are proposed. Their values are 10 to transform melanin formation into tyrosine hydroxylase activity, 100 to transform tyrosine hydroxylase into dopa oxidase activity, and 1,000 to transform melanin formation into dopa oxidase activity. Variations in these values due to the presence in the tyrosinase preparations of either inhibitors or regulatory factors in melanogenesis independent of tyrosinase are also discussed.

Jara, J.R.; Solano, F.; Lozano, J.A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Fracture mechanics of cellular glass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cellular glasses are prime candidate materials for the structural substrate of mirrored glass for solar concentrator reflecting panels. These materials are brittle, however, and susceptible to mechanical failure from slow crack growth caused by a stress corrosion mechanism. The results are detailed of one part of a program established to develop improved cellular glasses and to characterize the behavior of these and commercially available materials. Commercial and developmental cellular glasses were tested and analyzed using standard testing techniques and models developed from linear fracture mechanics. Two models describing the fracture behavior of these materials are developed. Slow crack growth behavior in cellular glass was found to be more complex than that encountered in dense glasses or ceramics. The crack velocity was found to be strongly dependent upon water vapor transport to the tip of the moving crack. The existence of a static fatigue limit was not conclusively established, however, it is speculated that slow crack growth behavior in Region I may be slower, by orders of magnitude, than that found in dense glasses.

Zwissler, J.G.; Adams, M.A.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Theoretical Physics in Cellular Biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Theoretical Physics in Cellular Biology: Some Illustrative Case Studies Living matter obeys in many areas of biology. This truism is becoming ever more relevant with the rapid growth of the ability of biological experiment to produce large amounts of quantitative data: comprehending that data surely

37

MOBILE PHONES: THE NEW (CELLULAR) GEOGRAPHY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MOBILE PHONES: THE NEW (CELLULAR) GEOGRAPHY Pablo Mateos MSc in Geographic Information Science first at p.mateos@ucl.ac.uk MATEOS, PABLO (2004) "Mobile phones: The new (cellular) geography", unpublished MSc dissertation, University of Leicester. #12;Mobile Phones: The New (Cellular) Geography 1

Jones, Peter JS

38

INTRODUCTION The mammalian hair follicle is a representative but highly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTRODUCTION The mammalian hair follicle is a representative but highly complex epithelial organ, hair follicle induction requires complex signaling between the two apposing tissue layers, which to the formation of the hair follicle, which contain the dermal papilla, proliferating matrix cells and slowly

Chuong, Cheng-Ming

39

The small GTPase Rab5 homologue Ypt5 regulates cell morphology, sexual development, ion-stress response and vacuolar formation in fission yeast  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: •Multiple functions of Rab5 GTPase in fission yeast were found. •Roles of Rab5 in fission yeast were discussed. •Relation between Rab5 and actin cytoskeleton were discussed. -- Abstract: Inner-membrane transport is critical to cell function. Rab family GTPases play an important role in vesicle transport. In mammalian cells, Rab5 is reported to be involved in the regulation of endosome formation, phagocytosis and chromosome alignment. Here, we examined the role of the fission yeast Rab5 homologue Ypt5 using a point mutant allele. Mutant cells displayed abnormal cell morphology, mating, sporulation, endocytosis, vacuole fusion and responses to ion stress. Our data strongly suggest that fission yeast Rab5 is involved in the regulation of various types of cellular functions.

Tsukamoto, Yuta; Katayama, Chisako [Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Shinohara, Miki; Shinohara, Akira [Institute for Protein Research, Osaka University, 3-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)] [Institute for Protein Research, Osaka University, 3-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Maekawa, Shohei [Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Miyamoto, Masaaki, E-mail: miya@kobe-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan) [Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Center for Supports to Research and Education Activities, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

2013-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

40

Cellular Manipulation and Control by Electromagnetism | Argonne...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

phenomenon for sensors; however, one may also use intense electromagnetic radiation, such as pulsed power, plasmas, or lasers, to induce changes in cellular...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Steady State Control of the Cellular Response to Stress /  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Professor Professor Alexander Hoffmann, Chair Pavel Pevzner,M; Elkan, Charles; Hoffmann, Alexander. The dissertationBehar and Alexander Hoffmann. Understanding the temporal

Loriaux, Paul Michael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Cellular Response to Ordered Collagen Layers on Mica  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 III RESULTS : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 10 A. Formation of 2D collagen layers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 1. Assembly of unidirectionally aligned collagen lay- ers on muscovite mica.... : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 32 4 Early stages of collagen assembly on muscovite. : : : : : : : : : : : : 33 5 AFM topography of triangular collagen networks on phlogopite, comparing the e ects of glycine. : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 34 6 E ect of K+ on collagen...

Leow, Wee Wen

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

43

Effect of Gold Nanorod Surface Chemistry on Cellular Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gold nanorods (GNRs) stabilized with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and GNR functionalized via a ligand exchange method with either thiolated polyethylene glycol (PEG5000) or mercaptohexadecanoic acid (MHDA) were ...

Grabinski, Christin

44

Robust expression of a bioactive mammalian protein in chlamydomonas chloroplast  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and compositions are disclosed to engineer chloroplast comprising heterologous mammalian genes via a direct replacement of chloroplast Photosystem II (PSII) reaction center protein coding regions to achieve expression of recombinant protein above 5% of total protein. When algae is used, algal expressed protein is produced predominantly as a soluble protein where the functional activity of the peptide is intact. As the host algae is edible, production of biologics in this organism for oral delivery or proteins/peptides, especially gut active proteins, without purification is disclosed.

Mayfield, Stephen P. (Cardiff, CA)

2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

45

E-Print Network 3.0 - adult mammalian hearts Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 Seminars in Cell & Developmental Biology 18 (2007) 12 Model systems for the study of heart development and disease Summary: in the mammalian heart during aging. Incredibly, many...

46

A novel method for mammalian large genetic circuit assembly and delivery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Genetic manipulation of mammalian cells provides a foundation for contemporary biological research both basic and applied. Existing methods for construction and introduction of large scale exogenous genetic information ...

Li, Yinqing, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Carbon Fiber Composite Cellular A Dissertation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Fiber Composite Cellular Structures ____________________________________ A Dissertation and honeycombs. However, for weight sensitive, ambient temperature applications, carbon fiber composites have emerged as a promising material due to its high specific strength and low density. Carbon fiber reinforced

Wadley, Haydn

48

Master of Molecular and cellular biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Master of Molecular and cellular biology From molecular developmental biology to biomedicine, evolution and systems biology ©UPMC-Directiondelacommunication-éditionF�VRIER2010-Imprimerie Biol, Development of marine organisms, Senior Lab practical Or Systems Biology -Barcelona: IEO Omics

Arleo, Angelo

49

HANDBOOK OF THE CELLULAR & INTEGRATIVE PHYSIOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HANDBOOK OF THE CELLULAR & INTEGRATIVE PHYSIOLOGY GRADUATE AND INTEGRATIVE PHYSIOLOGY A. GENERAL INFORMATION In addition to the general and Integrative Physiology Graduate Program has adopted specific requirements for its Doctor

Mohaghegh, Shahab

50

Techniques for green radio cellular communications   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis proposes four novel techniques to solve the problem of growing energy consumption requirements in cellular communication networks. The first and second part of this work propose a novel energy efficient ...

Videv, Stefan

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Control of Formation and Cellular Detachment from Shewanella...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Formation and Cellular Detachment from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Biofilms by Cyclic di-GMP. Control of Formation and Cellular Detachment from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Biofilms...

52

A practical guide to microfluidic perfusion culture of adherent mammalian Lily Kim,ab  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A practical guide to microfluidic perfusion culture of adherent mammalian cells{{ Lily Kim,§ab Yi with microsystem technologies for on-chip experimentation. Microfluidic perfusion culture in particular allows and operating a robust microfluidic perfusion culture system for routine culture of adherent mammalian cells

Voldman, Joel

53

JOURNAL OF CELLULAR PHYSIOLOGY 209:604610 (2006) Mornings With Art, Lessons Learned  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

JOURNAL OF CELLULAR PHYSIOLOGY 209:604­610 (2006) Mornings With Art, Lessons Learned: Feedback of no return'' is achieved; (ii) feedback regulation; and (iii) redundancy. Lessons learned from the molecular cycle checkpoint responses after exposure to alkylating agents. We have learned these lessons and now

Gao, Jinming

54

Cell-to-cell communication and cellular environment alter the somatostatin status of delta cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research highlights: {yields} TGP52 cells display enhanced functionality in pseudoislet form. {yields} Somatostatin content was reduced, but secretion increased in high glucose conditions. {yields} Cellular interactions and environment alter the somatostatin status of TGP52 cells. -- Abstract: Introduction: Somatostatin, released from pancreatic delta cells, is a potent paracrine inhibitor of insulin and glucagon secretion. Islet cellular interactions and glucose homeostasis are essential to maintain normal patterns of insulin secretion. However, the importance of cell-to-cell communication and cellular environment in the regulation of somatostatin release remains unclear. Methods: This study employed the somatostatin-secreting TGP52 cell line maintained in DMEM:F12 (17.5 mM glucose) or DMEM (25 mM glucose) culture media. The effect of pseudoislet formation and culture medium on somatostatin content and release in response to a variety of stimuli was measured by somatostatin EIA. In addition, the effect of pseudoislet formation on cellular viability (MTT and LDH assays) and proliferation (BrdU ELISA) was determined. Results: TGP52 cells readily formed pseudoislets and showed enhanced functionality in three-dimensional form with increased E-cadherin expression irrespective of the culture environment used. However, culture in DMEM decreased cellular somatostatin content (P < 0.01) and increased somatostatin secretion in response to a variety of stimuli including arginine, calcium and PMA (P < 0.001) when compared with cells grown in DMEM:F12. Configuration of TGP52 cells as pseudoislets reduced the proliferative rate and increased cellular cytotoxicity irrespective of culture medium used. Conclusions: Somatostatin secretion is greatly facilitated by cell-to-cell interactions and E-cadherin expression. Cellular environment and extracellular glucose also significantly influence the function of delta cells.

Kelly, Catriona, E-mail: catriona.kelly@qub.ac.uk [SAAD Centre for Pharmacy and Diabetes, School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulster, Coleraine (United Kingdom)] [SAAD Centre for Pharmacy and Diabetes, School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulster, Coleraine (United Kingdom); Flatt, Peter R.; McClenaghan, Neville H. [SAAD Centre for Pharmacy and Diabetes, School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulster, Coleraine (United Kingdom)] [SAAD Centre for Pharmacy and Diabetes, School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulster, Coleraine (United Kingdom)

2010-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

55

Statistical Properties of a Quantum Cellular Automaton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study a quantum cellular automaton (QCA) whose time-evolution is defined from global transition function of classical cellular automata (CA). In order to investigate natural transformations from CA to QCA, the present QCA includes CA with Wolfram's rule 150 and 105 as special cases. We firstly compute the time-evolution of the QCA and examine its statistical properties. As a basic statistical value, the probability of finding an active cell averaged over a spatial-temporal space is introduced, and the difference between CA and QCA is considered. In addition, it is shown that statistical properties in QCA are related to the classical trajectory in the configuration space.

Norio Inui; Shuichi Inokuchi; Yoshihiro Mizoguchi; Norio Konno

2005-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

56

Fuzzy cellular automata models in immunology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The self-nonself character of antigens is considered to be fuzzy. The Chowdhury et al. cellular automata model is generalized accordingly. New steady states are found. The first corresponds to a below-normal help and suppression and is proposed to be related to autoimmune diseases. The second corresponds to a below-normal B-cell level.

Ahmed, E. [Mansoura Univ. (Egypt)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Cellular Energy Efficiency Evaluation Framework (Invited Paper)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cellular Energy Efficiency Evaluation Framework (Invited Paper) Gunther Auer, Vito Giannini, Istv, the power consumption of the entire system needs to be captured and an appropriate energy efficiency evaluation frameworks are discussed, such that the energy efficiency of the entire network comprising

Stevenson, Paul

58

Cellular/Molecular Separate Ca2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cellular/Molecular Separate Ca2 Sources Are Buffered by Distinct Ca2 Handling Systems in Aplysia's University, Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6, Canada AlthoughthecontributionofCa2 bufferingsystemscanvarybetweenneuronaltypesandcellularcompartments,itisunknownwhether distinct Ca2 sources within a neuron have different buffers. As individual Ca2

Blohm, Gunnar

59

Primary Cilia: Cellular Sensors for the Skeleton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Primary Cilia: Cellular Sensors for the Skeleton CHARLES T. ANDERSON,1 * ALESHA B. CASTILLO,2 of microtubules and are thus called 910 cilia. The pri- mary cilium is enclosed in a specialized membrane (Vieira. Anderson, Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California. E-mail: ctanders

Stearns, Tim

60

Mammalian Tissue Response to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation: The Role of Oxidative Metabolism and Intercellular Communication  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the project was to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the biological effects of low dose/low dose rate ionizing radiation in organs/tissues of irradiated mice that differ in their susceptibility to ionizing radiation, and in human cells grown under conditions that mimic the natural in vivo environment. The focus was on the effects of sparsely ionizing cesium-137 gamma rays and the role of oxidative metabolism and intercellular communication in these effects. Four Specific Aims were proposed. The integrated outcome of the experiments performed to investigate these aims has been significant towards developing a scientific basis to more accurately estimate human health risks from exposures to low doses ionizing radiation. By understanding the biochemical and molecular changes induced by low dose radiation, several novel markers associated with mitochondrial functions were identified, which has opened new avenues to investigate metabolic processes that may be affected by such exposure. In particular, a sensitive biomarker that is differentially modulated by low and high dose gamma rays was discovered.

Azzam, Edouard I

2013-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

The Siderocalin/Enterobactin Interaction: A Link between Mammalian Immunity and Bacterial Iron Transport  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The siderophore enterobactin (Ent) is produced by enteric bacteria to mediate iron uptake. Ent scavenges iron and is taken up by the bacteria as the highly stable ferric complex [Fe{sup III}(Ent)]{sup 3-}. This complex is also a specific target of the mammalian innate immune system protein, Siderocalin (Scn), which acts as an anti-bacterial agent by specifically sequestering siderophores and their ferric complexes during infection. Recent literature suggesting that Scn may also be involved in cellular iron transport has increased the importance of understanding the mechanism of siderophore interception and clearance by Scn; Scn is observed to release iron in acidic endosomes and [Fe{sup III}(Ent)]{sup 3-} is known to undergo a change from catecholate to salicylate coordination in acidic conditions, which is predicted to be sterically incompatible with the Scn binding pocket (also referred to as the calyx). To investigate the interactions between the ferric Ent complex and Scn at different pH values, two recombinant forms of Scn with mutations in three residues lining the calyx were prepared: Scn-W79A/R81A and Scn-Y106F. Binding studies and crystal structures of the Scn-W79A/R81A:[Fe{sup III}(Ent)]{sup 3-} and Scn-Y106F:[Fe{sup III}(Ent)]{sup 3-} complexes confirm that such mutations do not affect the overall conformation of the protein but do weaken significantly its affinity for [Fe{sup III}(Ent)]{sup 3-}. Fluorescence, UV-Vis and EXAFS spectroscopies were used to determine Scn/siderophore dissociation constants and to characterize the coordination mode of iron over a wide pH range, in the presence of both mutant proteins and synthetic salicylate analogs of Ent. While Scn binding hinders salicylate coordination transformation, strong acidification results in the release of iron and degraded siderophore. Iron release may therefore result from a combination of Ent degradation and coordination change.

Meux, Susan C.

2008-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

62

Transcription Inhibition by Platinum DNA Cross-links in Live Mammalian Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have investigated the processing of site-specific Pt?DNA cross-links in live mammalian cells to enhance our understanding of the mechanism of action of platinum-based anticancer drugs. The activity of platinum drugs ...

Ang, Wee Han

63

Molecular analysis of mammalian adenylyl cyclases and edema factor, a bacterial adenylyly cyclase toxin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adenylyl cyclases (ACs) catalyze the conversion of ATP to cAMP, an important second messenger central to many signaling pathways. Nine different isoforms of mammalian ACs (mACs) are present, each with distinct localization, physiological function...

Suryanarayana, Srividya

2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

64

The functional role of the mammalian tectorial membrane in the cochlear mechanics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sound-evoked vibrations transmitted into the mammalian cochlea produce traveling waves that provide the mechanical tuning necessary for spectral decomposition of sound. These traveling waves of motion propagate along the ...

Ghaffari, Roozbeh, 1979-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

A unique regulatory phase of DNA methylation in the early mammalian embryo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DNA methylation is highly dynamic during mammalian embryogenesis. It is broadly accepted that the paternal genome is actively depleted of 5-methylcytosine at fertilization, followed by passive loss that reaches a minimum ...

Chan, Michelle M.

66

A platform for rapid prototyping of synthetic gene networks in mammalian cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mammalian synthetic biology may provide novel therapeutic strategies, help decipher new paths for drug discovery and facilitate synthesis of valuable molecules. Yet, our capacity to genetically program cells is currently ...

Wroblewska, Liliana

67

The mechanism and function of pervasive noncoding transcription in the mammalian genome  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The vast majority of the mammalian genome does not encode proteins. Only 2% of the genome is exonic, yet recent deep survey of human transcripitome suggested that 75% of the genome is transcribed, including half of the ...

Wu, Xuebing, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

AN APPROACH TO VISUAL MODELING OF CELLULAR AUTOMATA Sajjan Sarkar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AN APPROACH TO VISUAL MODELING OF CELLULAR AUTOMATA by Sajjan Sarkar A Thesis Presented in Partial APPROACH TO VISUAL MODELING OF CELLULAR AUTOMATA by Sajjan Sarkar has been approved April 2009 Graduate

69

Cellular membrane trafficking of mesoporous silica nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This dissertation mainly focuses on the investigation of the cellular membrane trafficking of mesoporous silica nanoparticles. We are interested in the study of endocytosis and exocytosis behaviors of mesoporous silica nanoparticles with desired surface functionality. The relationship between mesoporous silica nanoparticles and membrane trafficking of cells, either cancerous cells or normal cells was examined. Since mesoporous silica nanoparticles were applied in many drug delivery cases, the endocytotic efficiency of mesoporous silica nanoparticles needs to be investigated in more details in order to design the cellular drug delivery system in the controlled way. It is well known that cells can engulf some molecules outside of the cells through a receptor-ligand associated endocytosis. We are interested to determine if those biomolecules binding to cell surface receptors can be utilized on mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials to improve the uptake efficiency or govern the mechanism of endocytosis of mesoporous silica nanoparticles. Arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) is a small peptide recognized by cell integrin receptors and it was reported that avidin internalization was highly promoted by tumor lectin. Both RGD and avidin were linked to the surface of mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials to investigate the effect of receptor-associated biomolecule on cellular endocytosis efficiency. The effect of ligand types, ligand conformation and ligand density were discussed in Chapter 2 and 3. Furthermore, the exocytosis of mesoporous silica nanoparticles is very attractive for biological applications. The cellular protein sequestration study of mesoporous silica nanoparticles was examined for further information of the intracellular pathway of endocytosed mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials. The surface functionality of mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials demonstrated selectivity among the materials and cancer and normal cell lines. We aimed to determine the specific organelle that mesoporous silica nanoparticles could approach via the identification of harvested proteins from exocytosis process. Based on the study of endo- and exocytosis behavior of mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials, we can design smarter drug delivery vehicles for cancer therapy that can be effectively controlled. The destination, uptake efficiency and the cellular distribution of mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials can be programmable. As a result, release mechanism and release rate of drug delivery systems can be a well-controlled process. The deep investigation of an endo- and exocytosis study of mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials promotes the development of drug delivery applications.

Fang, I-Ju

2012-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

70

Defects and Faults in Quantum Cellular Automata at Nano Scale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Defects and Faults in Quantum Cellular Automata at Nano Scale Mehdi Baradaran Tahoori, Mariam considerable research on quantum dot cellular automata (QCA) as a new computing scheme in the nano, quantum dot cellular automata (QCA) not only gives a solution at nano scale, but also it offers a new

71

Cellular membrane collapse by atmospheric-pressure plasma jet  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cellular membrane dysfunction caused by air plasma in cancer cells has been studied to exploit atmospheric-pressure plasma jets for cancer therapy. Here, we report that plasma jet treatment of cervical cancer HeLa cells increased electrical conductivity across the cellular lipid membrane and caused simultaneous lipid oxidation and cellular membrane collapse. We made this finding by employing a self-manufactured microelectrode chip. Furthermore, increased roughness of the cellular lipid membrane and sequential collapse of the membrane were observed by atomic force microscopy following plasma jet treatment. These results suggest that the cellular membrane catastrophe occurs via coincident altered electrical conductivity, lipid oxidation, and membrane roughening caused by an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet, possibly resulting in cellular vulnerability to reactive species generated from the plasma as well as cytotoxicity to cancer cells.

Kim, Kangil; Sik Yang, Sang, E-mail: jsjlee@ajou.ac.kr, E-mail: ssyang@ajou.ac.kr [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ajou University, Suwon 443-749 (Korea, Republic of); Jun Ahn, Hak; Lee, Jong-Soo, E-mail: jsjlee@ajou.ac.kr, E-mail: ssyang@ajou.ac.kr [Department of Biological Sciences, Ajou University, Suwon 443-749 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Biological Sciences, Ajou University, Suwon 443-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Kim, Jae-Ho [Department of Molecular Science and Technology, Ajou University, Suwon 443-749 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Molecular Science and Technology, Ajou University, Suwon 443-749 (Korea, Republic of)

2014-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

72

Cellular telephone-based radiation detection instrument  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A network of radiation detection instruments, each having a small solid state radiation sensor module integrated into a cellular phone for providing radiation detection data and analysis directly to a user. The sensor module includes a solid-state crystal bonded to an ASIC readout providing a low cost, low power, light weight compact instrument to detect and measure radiation energies in the local ambient radiation field. In particular, the photon energy, time of event, and location of the detection instrument at the time of detection is recorded for real time transmission to a central data collection/analysis system. The collected data from the entire network of radiation detection instruments are combined by intelligent correlation/analysis algorithms which map the background radiation and detect, identify and track radiation anomalies in the region.

Craig, William W. (Pittsburg, CA); Labov, Simon E. (Berkeley, CA)

2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

73

TRP channels as cellular sensors David E. Clapham  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lipid bilayers1 . While energy-requiring pumps labour to build charge and concentration gradients across the membrane, ion channels spend this stored energy, much as a switch releases the electrical energy Mammalian TRP family tree. The evolutionary distance is shown by the total branch lengths in point accepted

Gunawardena, Jeremy

74

Tyrosinase maturation through the mammalian secretory pathway: bringing color to life  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tyrosinase maturation through the mammalian secretory pathway: bringing color to life Ning Wang-mail: dhebert@biochem.umass.edu Summary Tyrosinase has been extensively utilized as a model substrate to study in the matur- ation of tyrosinase from when it is first synthesized by cytosolic ribosomes until the mature

Hebert, Daniel N.

75

A NEW LATE ORLEANIAN/EARLY ASTARACIAN MAMMALIAN FAUNA FROM KULTAK (MILAS-MUGLA), WESTERN TURKEY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 A NEW LATE ORLEANIAN/EARLY ASTARACIAN MAMMALIAN FAUNA FROM KULTAK (MILAS-MUGLA), WESTERN TURKEY Kultak (Milas-Mugla), western Turkey. Une nouvelle faune de Mammifères datant de la fin de l are common constituents of the Middle Miocene faunas of Turkey, but Ancylotherium (Metaschizotherium

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

76

The late Miocene mammalian fauna of Chorora, Awash basin, Ethiopia: systematics, biochronology and 40  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The late Miocene mammalian fauna of Chorora, Awash basin, Ethiopia: systematics, biochronology, 75014 PARIS, France Zeresenay ALEMSEGED - National Museum, P.O.Box 76, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Hervé New whole-rock 40 K-40 Ar ages on lava flows bracketing the Chorora Fm, Ethiopia, confirm that its

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

77

of CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY MAMMALIAN PALEONTOLOGY ON A GLOBAL STAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BULLETIN of CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY MAMMALIAN PALEONTOLOGY ON A GLOBAL STAGE: PAPERS, USA 2007 #12;BULLETIN OF CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY Number 39, pages 1­234, 94 figures, 20. BULLETINs of CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY are published at irregular intervals by Carnegie Museum

California at Berkeley, University of

78

Induction of a bystander mutagenic effect of alpha particles in mammalian cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

biological effects of nuclear versus cytoplasmic irradiation has been of interest to biologistsInduction of a bystander mutagenic effect of alpha particles in mammalian cells Hongning Zhou for Radiological Research, College of Physicians and Surgeons, and Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public

79

On the Asymptotic Behaviour of Circular Fuzzy Cellular Automata  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fuzzification) . Fuzzy cellular automata were first introduced in [5] as a model to describe the impact CA (e.g., see [11]). They have been shown to be useful tools for pattern recognition purposes (eOn the Asymptotic Behaviour of Circular Fuzzy Cellular Automata HEATHER BETEL AND PAOLA FLOCCHINI

Flocchini, Paola

80

Modeling energy consumption in cellular networks L. Decreusefond  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling energy consumption in cellular networks L. Decreusefond Telecom Paristech, LTCI Paris Abstract--In this paper we present a new analysis of energy consumption in cellular networks. We focus on the distribution of energy consumed by a base station for one isolated cell. We first define the energy consumption

Boyer, Edmond

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Design of Autonomous DNA Cellular Automata , Sudheer Sahu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Design of Autonomous DNA Cellular Automata Peng Yin ¡ , Sudheer Sahu ¡ , Andrew J. Turberfield cellular computing devices, i.e. autonomous nano-mechanical DNA computing devices embedded in DNA lattices. As a prototype of such devices, we recently reported the design of an Autonomous DNA Turing Machine, which

Yin, Peng

82

PAS kinase is required for normal cellular energy balance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PAS kinase is required for normal cellular energy balance Huai-Xiang Hao*, Caleb M. Cardon*, Wojtek, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 Edited by Steven L. McKnight, University in a cell-autonomous manner to maintain cellular energy homeostasis and is a potential therapeutic target

Rutter, Jared

83

Cellular Algebras and Graph Invariants Based on Quantum Walks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider two graph invariants inspired by quantum walks- one in continuous time and one in discrete time. We will associate a matrix algebra called a cellular algebra with every graph. We show that, if the cellular algebras of two graphs have a similar structure, then they are not distinguished by either of the proposed invariants.

Jamie Smith

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

In many ways, the red blood cells of non-mammalian vertebrates are very different from those of mammals. One of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In many ways, the red blood cells of non-mammalian vertebrates are very different from those of mammals. One of the most obvious differences is that non-mammalian red blood cells are nucleated whereas mammalian red blood cells extrude their nuclei before entering the circulation. In addition, these nucleated

Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

85

The chaos within: exploring noise in cellular biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cellular biology exists embedded in a world dominated by random dynamics and chance. Many vital molecules and pieces of cellular machinery diffuse within cells, moving along random trajectories as they collide with the other biomolecular inhabitants of the cell. Cellular components may block each other's progress, be produced or degraded at random times, and become unevenly separated as cells grow and divide. Cellular behaviour, including important features of stem cells, tumours and infectious bacteria, is profoundly influenced by the chaos which is the environment within the cell walls. Here we will look at some important causes and effects of randomness in cellular biology, and some ways in which researchers, helped by the vast amounts of data that are now flowing in, have made progress in describing the randomness of nature.

Iain G. Johnston

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

86

A ratchet mechanism for amplification in low-frequency mammalian hearing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The sensitivity and frequency selectivity of hearing result from tuned amplification by an active process in the mechanoreceptive hair cells. In most vertebrates the active process stems from the active motility of hair bundles. The mammalian cochlea exhibits an additional form of mechanical activity termed electromotility: its outer hair cells (OHCs) change length upon electrical stimulation. The relative contributions of these two mechanisms to the active process in the mammalian inner ear is the subject of intense current debate. Here we show that active hair-bundle motility and electromotility can together implement an efficient mechanism for amplification that functions like a ratchet: sound-evoked forces acting on the basilar membrane are transmitted to the hair bundles whereas electromotility decouples active hair-bundle forces from the basilar membrane. This unidirectional coupling can extend the hearing range well below the resonant frequency of the basilar membrane. It thereby provides a concept for...

Reichenbach, Tobias; 10.1073/pnas.0914345107

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Cellular/Molecular Properties of Synaptically Evoked Astrocyte Calcium Signal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cellular/Molecular Properties of Synaptically Evoked Astrocyte Calcium Signal Reveal Synaptic. Key words: astrocytes; intracellular calcium; neurotransmitter release; glutamate; synaptic activity). In this loop of information exchange between astrocytes and neurons, the synaptic control of the astrocytic Ca2

Newman, Eric A.

88

E-Print Network 3.0 - analyze cellular localization Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy-Efficient Operation of Cellular Network Infrastructure Summary: at which base station operation decisions should be made? At what locality level of the cellular...

89

Special Relativity Theory and Cellular Automata Light as a Cellular Automata Process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new formulation of special relativity is described. It is based on a postulate that the universe is a vast Cellular Automata (CA). We show that any CA model automatically leads to a maximum speed limit for the transfer of information from place to place in CA space, and hence leads to strict physical locality of all physical interactions. Furthermore, we show that the Lorentz transformation follows mathematically from CA theory, where photon propagation is postulated to be the simply shifting of the photon information pattern from cell to adjacent cell in every CA 'clock cycle' (which incidently is simplest possible CA 'motion'). Minkowski 4D flat space-time of special relativity can be seen as the direct consequence of the low level universal CA processes, seen by inertial observers with ordinary measuring instruments, and who are not aware of, and cannot measure with the true absolute units of CA space and time.

Ostoma, T; Ostoma, Tom; Trushyk, Mike

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Design principles of mammalian signaling networks : emergent properties at modular and global scales  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis utilizes modeling approaches rooted in statistical physics and physical chemistry to investigate several aspects of cellular signal transduction at both the modular and global levels. Design principles of ...

Locasale, Jason W

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Cellular and molecular research to reduce uncertainties in estimates of health effects from low-level radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study was undertaken by five radiation scientists to examine the feasibility of reducing the uncertainties in the estimation of risk due to protracted low doses of ionizing radiation. In addressing the question of feasibility, a review was made by the study group: of the cellular, molecular, and mammalian radiation data that are available; of the way in which altered oncogene properties could be involved in the loss of growth control that culminates in tumorigenesis; and of the progress that had been made in the genetic characterizations of several human and animal neoplasms. On the basis of this analysis, the study group concluded that, at the present time, it is feasible to mount a program of radiation research directed at the mechanism(s) of radiation-induced cancer with special reference to risk of neoplasia due to protracted, low doses of sparsely ionizing radiation. To implement a program of research, a review was made of the methods, techniques, and instruments that would be needed. This review was followed by a survey of the laboratories and institutions where scientific personnel and facilities are known to be available. A research agenda of the principal and broad objectives of the program is also discussed. 489 refs., 21 figs., 14 tabs.

Elkind, M.M.; Bedford, J.; Benjamin, S.A.; Waldren, C.A. (Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (USA)); Gotchy, R.L. (Science Applications International Corp., McLean, VA (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Integration of the phosphorylation-dependent signaling in the DNA damage response network : implications for cancer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The cellular response to DNA damage is an evolutionarily conserved process mediated by Ser/Thr kinases that results in the formation of multiple protein-protein complexes designed to control the cell cycle. The assembly ...

Manke, Isaac Andrew

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Ratchet Cellular Automata for Colloids in Dynamic Traps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We numerically investigate the transport of kinks in a ratchet cellular automata geometry for colloids interacting with dynamical traps. We find that thermal effects can enhance the transport efficiency in agreement with recent experiments. At high temperatures we observe the creation and annihilation of thermally induced kinks that degrade the signal transmission. We consider both the deterministic and stochastic cases and show how the trap geometry can be adjusted to switch between these two cases. The operation of the dynamical trap geometry can be achieved with the adjustment of fewer parameters than ratchet cellular automata constructed using static traps.

C. J. Olson Reichhardt; C. Reichhardt

2006-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

94

An analog time-multiplexing cellular neural networks computer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

S T E R OF SCIENCE December 1995 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering AN ANALOG TIME-MULTIPLEXING CELLULAR NEURAL NETWORKS COMPUTER A Thesis by A P O L L O Q U A N F O N G Submitted to Texas A & M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of M A S T E R OF SCIENCE A .D . Patton (Head of Department) December 1995 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering iii ABSTRACT An Analog Time-Multiplexing Cellular Neural Networks Computer. (December 1995) Apollo Quan Fong...

Fong, Apollo Quan

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Cisplatin-induced nucleosome and RNA polymerase II modification mediate cellular response to the drug  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(cont.) with recombinant material. The in vitro system established in this study will facilitate the investigation of platinum-DNA damage by DNA repair processes and help elucidate the role of specific post-translational ...

Wang, Dong, 1975-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Cellular Pathways Regulating Responses to Compatible and Self-Incompatible Pollen in Brassica and Arabidopsis Stigmas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that is known to regulate polarized secretion. We show through transgenic studies that loss of Exo70A1 stigmas (absence of surface secretions), which prevent pollen grains from unrelated plant species (foreign of pollen capture, and the proteins and lipids in the pollen coat promote subsequent stages of interactions

Toronto, University of

97

Chemical biology of mutagenesis and DNA repair: cellular responses to DNA alkylation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The reaction of DNA-damaging agents with the genome results in a plethora of lesions, commonly referred to as adducts. Adducts may cause DNA to mutate, they may represent the chemical precursors of lethal events and they ...

Shrivastav, Nidhi

98

Cellular response of the primate (M. mulatta) spleen to bone marrow transplantation in gamma irradiated recipients  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This monkey reminded the author of an animal that was sensitized to a foreign protein. E. Histo atholo of the S leen. Many of the follicles were hyperplastic. The capsule was small and distended. The reticulo- endothelial cells lining the sinusoids were... higher than the radiation con- trols. E. Histo atholo of the S leen. Both spleens had a reduced number of lyrnphocytes and poorly defined follicles. The reticulo- endothelial-like cells were more prominent in the follicles than normal donors...

Fraunfelter, Frank Clare

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Video Article Preparation of Complaint Matrices for Quantifying Cellular Contraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solutions should be disposed as hazardous waste. 6. Dry coverslips in incubator at warm temperature (~37°C and remodeling with traction forces. Here we present a detailed experimental protocol for the preparation of two mechanical stiffness, which is suitable for measuring cellular contraction. These protocols include

Gardel, Margaret

100

RESEARCH ARTICLE Abundant Indispensable Redundancies in Cellular Metabolic Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and translation to metabolism, cell cycle, and embry- onic development (de Visser et al. 2003; Wagner 2005c and Jianzhi Zhang Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Michigan Cellular life is a highly redundant complex system; yet, the evolutionary maintenance of the redundancy remains unexplained

Zhang, Jianzhi

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Red fluorescent proteins: chromophore formation and cellular applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Red fluorescent proteins: chromophore formation and cellular applications Atsushi Miyawaki1,2 , Daria M Shcherbakova3,4 and Vladislav V Verkhusha3,4 In the last decade, a number of red fluorescent proteins (RFPs) that emit orange, red, and far-red fluorescence have been isolated from anthozoans (corals

Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

102

Cytosolic Ca2+ ions regulate numerous aspects of cellular  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cytosolic Ca2+ ions regulate numerous aspects of cellular activity in virtually all cell types (Berridge et al. 2000). This versatility is made possible by the diverse mechanisms by which Ca2+ signals; Marchant & Parker, 2000). Endogenous Ca2+ binding proteins play a key role in determining the magnitude

Parker, Ian

103

Cellular mechanisms of membrane protein folding William R Skach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cellular mechanisms of membrane protein folding William R Skach The membrane protein­folding. This Perspective will focus on emerging evidence that the RTC functions as a protein-folding machine that restricts. The process of polytopic (multispanning) membrane protein folding can be viewed as a series of sequential

Cai, Long

104

Quantifying Security in Hybrid Cellular Markus Jakobsson1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantifying Security in Hybrid Cellular Networks Markus Jakobsson1 and Liu Yang2 1 School and recipients to provide auditing information. Our scheme is an exten- sion of [6], where the authors addressed be expected from the use of this approach. For one thing, the energy consumption of the mobile device can

105

A Boundary Operator for Computing the Homology of Cellular Structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Lienhardt S. Peltier Abstract The paper focuses on homology computation over cellular structures through the computation of incidence numbers. Roughly speaking, if two cells are incident, then their incidence number. Lienhardt, S. Peltier Universit´e de Poitiers, Laboratoire XLIM, D´epartement SIC, CNRS 6172; B^atiment SP2

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

106

VillageCell: Cost Effective Cellular Connectivity in Rural Areas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

highly suitable for rural populations in the developing world where energy and infrastructure shortagesVillageCell: Cost Effective Cellular Connectivity in Rural Areas Abhinav Anand, Veljko Pejovic densities and low income rural ar- eas of the developing world, where big telecoms often defer from

Belding-Royer, Elizabeth M.

107

Interactome Mapping of the Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase-Mammalian Target of Rapamycin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-mTOR pathway. Identification of 67 new interactions was fol- lowed by validation by co-affinity purification annotated interactome of 802 interactions for the PI3K-mTOR pathway. Our screen revealed a predominant place of lithium and other GSK3 inhibitors used in bipolar disease and depression. Molecular & Cellular Proteomics

108

Anthrax pathogen evades the mammalian immune system through stealth siderophore Strong, B. Rowe Byers, and Kenneth N. Raymond  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

production Anthrax pathogen evades the mammalian immune system through stealth siderophore StrongMed and Google Scholar, Supplementary Material www.pnas.org/cgi/content/full/0607055103/DC1 Supplementary material can be found at: References www.pnas.org/cgi/content/full/103/49/18499#BIBL This article cites 24

Strong, Roland K.

109

The fractal structure of cellular automata on Abelian groups  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is well-known that the spacetime diagrams of some cellular automata have a fractal structure: for instance Pascal's triangle modulo 2 generates a Sierpinski triangle. Explaining the fractal structure of the spacetime diagrams of cellular automata is a much explored topic, but virtually all of the results revolve around a special class of automata, whose typical features include irreversibility, an alphabet with a ring structure, a global evolution that is a ring homomorphism, and a property known as (weakly) p-Fermat. The class of automata that we study in this article has none of these properties. Their cell structure is weaker, as it does not come with a multiplication, and they are far from being p-Fermat, even weakly. However, they do produce fractal spacetime diagrams, and we explain why and how.

Johannes Gütschow; Vincent Nesme; Reinhard F. Werner

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Design and evaluation of a cellular rectifier system with distributed control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents the design and experimental evaluation of a six-cell 6 kW cellular (parallel) rectifier system which operates at nearly unity power factor. The cellular rectifier system implements both distributed load ...

Perreault, David J.

111

Reprogramming of tRNA modifications controls the oxidative stress response by codon-biased translation of proteins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Selective translation of survival proteins is an important facet of the cellular stress response. We recently demonstrated that this translational control involves a stress-specific reprogramming of modified ribonucleosides ...

Chan, Clement T. Y.

112

Characterizing Geospatial Dynamics of Application Usage in a 3G Cellular Data Network  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Characterizing Geospatial Dynamics of Application Usage in a 3G Cellular Data Network M. Zubair and application access, exist in cellular network usage. Such geospatial correlation patterns provide local-grained characterization of the geospatial dynamics of application usage in a 3G cellular data network. Our analysis

Fisher, Kathleen

113

Administrative Policy: Cellular Communication Devices and Services Page 1 of 6  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of their use of personal cellular telephones and related devices for University business purposes. Should thoseAdministrative Policy: Cellular Communication Devices and Services Page 1 of 6 Governance & Policies Effective: May 8, 2007 Administrative Policy CELLULAR COMMUNICATION DEVICES and SERVICES Approved

Hardy, Christopher R.

114

Manipulation of cellular GSH biosynthetic capacity via TAT-mediated protein transduction of wild-type or a dominant-negative mutant of glutamate cysteine ligase alters cell sensitivity to oxidant-induced cytotoxicity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The glutathione (GSH) antioxidant defense system plays a central role in protecting mammalian cells against oxidative injury. Glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL) is the rate-limiting enzyme in GSH biosynthesis and is a heterodimeric holoenzyme composed of catalytic (GCLC) and modifier (GCLM) subunits. As a means of assessing the cytoprotective effects of enhanced GSH biosynthetic capacity, we have developed a protein transduction approach whereby recombinant GCL protein can be rapidly and directly transferred into cells when coupled to the HIV TAT protein transduction domain. Bacterial expression vectors encoding TAT fusion proteins of both GCL subunits were generated and recombinant fusion proteins were synthesized and purified to near homogeneity. The TAT-GCL fusion proteins were capable of heterodimerization and formation of functional GCL holoenzyme in vitro. Exposure of Hepa-1c1c7 cells to the TAT-GCL fusion proteins resulted in the time- and dose-dependent transduction of both GCL subunits and increased cellular GCL activity and GSH levels. A heterodimerization-competent, enzymatically deficient GCLC-TAT mutant was also generated in an attempt to create a dominant-negative suppressor of GCL. Transduction of cells with a catalytically inactive GCLC(E103A)-TAT mutant decreased cellular GCL activity in a dose-dependent manner. TAT-mediated manipulation of cellular GCL activity was also functionally relevant as transduction with wild-type GCLC(WT)-TAT or mutant GCLC(E103A)-TAT conferred protection or enhanced sensitivity to H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced cell death, respectively. These findings demonstrate that TAT-mediated transduction of wild-type or dominant-inhibitory mutants of the GCL subunits is a viable means of manipulating cellular GCL activity to assess the effects of altered GSH biosynthetic capacity.

Backos, Donald S.; Brocker, Chad N. [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Graduate Program in Toxicology, School of Pharmacy, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Franklin, Christopher C., E-mail: christopher.franklin@ucdenver.ed [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Graduate Program in Toxicology, School of Pharmacy, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); University of Colorado Cancer Center, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

115

Electrocatalytic reduction of nitric oxide at electrodes modified with electropolymerized films of [Cr(v-tpy){sub 2}]{sup 3+} and their application to cellular NO determinations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nitric oxide can be electrocatalytically reduced at electrodes modified with electropolymerized films of [Cr(v-tpy){sub 2}]{sup 3+}. Upon further modification with a thin film of Nafion (to prevent interferences from anions, especially nitrite), these electrodes can be employed as NO sensors in solution with submicromolar detection limits and fast response. We have carried out preliminary studies of cellular NO release from Rhodobacter sphaeroides bacterial cells with excellent results. 21 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Maskus, M.; Wu, Q.; Shapleigh, J.P.; Abruna, H.D. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)] [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Pariente, F. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (Spain)] [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (Spain); Toffanin, A. [Ciudad Universitaria, Madrid (Spain)] [Ciudad Universitaria, Madrid (Spain)

1996-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

116

Response Elements  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Guide provides acceptable methods for meeting the requirement of DOE O 151.1C for response elements that respond or contribute to response as needed in an emergency. Cancels DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-1, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-2, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-3, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-4, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-1, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-2, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-3, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-4, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-5, and DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-6.

2007-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

117

The effects of nitrogen oxides on cytochrome P-450 mediated mixed-function oxidations in mammalian lung  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EFFECTS OF NITROGEN OXIDES ON CYTOCHROME P-450 MEDIATED MIXED-FUNCTION OXIDATIONS IN ~IAN IUNG A Thesis by LEO DEAN TUCKER, II Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AAM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1979 Major Subject: Biology THE EFFECTS OF NITROGEN OXIDES ON CYTOCHROME P-450 MEDIATED MIXED-FUNCTION OXIDATIONS IN MAMMALIAN LUNG A Thesis by LEO DEAN TUCKER, II Approved as to style and content by...

Tucker, Leo Dean

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Wireless Demand Response Controls for HVAC Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this scoping study were to develop and test control software and wireless hardware that could enable closed-loop, zone-temperature-based demand response in buildings that have either pneumatic controls or legacy digital controls that cannot be used as part of a demand response automation system. We designed a SOAP client that is compatible with the Demand Response Automation Server (DRAS) being used by the IOUs in California for their CPP program, design the DR control software, investigated the use of cellular routers for connecting to the DRAS, and tested the wireless DR system with an emulator running a calibrated model of a working building. The results show that the wireless DR system can shed approximately 1.5 Watts per design CFM on the design day in a hot, inland climate in California while keeping temperatures within the limits of ASHRAE Standard 55: Thermal Environmental Conditions for Human Occupancy.

Federspiel, Clifford

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

119

Cellular telephone-based wide-area radiation detection network  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A network of radiation detection instruments, each having a small solid state radiation sensor module integrated into a cellular phone for providing radiation detection data and analysis directly to a user. The sensor module includes a solid-state crystal bonded to an ASIC readout providing a low cost, low power, light weight compact instrument to detect and measure radiation energies in the local ambient radiation field. In particular, the photon energy, time of event, and location of the detection instrument at the time of detection is recorded for real time transmission to a central data collection/analysis system. The collected data from the entire network of radiation detection instruments are combined by intelligent correlation/analysis algorithms which map the background radiation and detect, identify and track radiation anomalies in the region.

Craig, William W. (Pittsburg, CA); Labov, Simon E. (Berkeley, CA)

2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

120

Novel localization of OCTN1, an organic cation/carnitine transporter, to mammalian mitochondria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carnitine is a zwitterion essential for the {beta}-oxidation of fatty acids. We report novel localization of the organic cation/carnitine transporter, OCTN1, to mitochondria. We made GFP- and RFP-human OCTN1 cDNA constructs and showed expression of hOCTN1 in several transfected mammalian cell lines. Immunostaining of GFP-hOCTN1 transfected cells with different intracellular markers and confocal fluorescent microscopy demonstrated mitochondrial expression of OCTN1. There was striking co-localization of an RFP-hOCTN1 fusion protein and a mitochondrial-GFP marker construct in transfected MEF-3T3 and no co-localization of GFP-hOCTN1 in transfected human skin fibroblasts with other intracellular markers. L-[{sup 3}H]Carnitine uptake in freshly isolated mitochondria of GFP-hOCTN1 transfected HepG2 demonstrated a K {sub m} of 422 {mu}M and Western blot with an anti-GFP antibody identified the expected GFP-hOCTN1 fusion protein (90 kDa). We showed endogenous expression of native OCTN1 in HepG2 mitochondria with anti-GST-hOCTN1 antibody. Further, we definitively confirmed intact L-[{sup 3}H]carnitine uptake (K {sub m} 1324 {mu}M), solely attributable to OCTN1, in isolated mitochondria of mutant human skin fibroblasts having <1% of carnitine acylcarnitine translocase activity (alternate mitochondrial carnitine transporter). This mitochondrial localization was confirmed by TEM of murine heart incubated with highly specific rabbit anti-GST-hOCTN1 antibody and immunogold labeled goat anti-rabbit antibody. This suggests an important yet different role for OCTN1 from other OCTN family members in intracellular carnitine homeostasis.

Lamhonwah, Anne-Marie [Division of Neurology, Department of Pediatrics, Hospital for Sick Children and Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont., M5G 1X8 (Canada); Tein, Ingrid [Division of Neurology, Department of Pediatrics, Hospital for Sick Children and Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont., M5G 1X8 (Canada)]. E-mail: ingrid.tein@sickkids.ca

2006-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-3047E Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers G described in this report was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and funded by the California. Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers. California Energy

122

E-Print Network 3.0 - assembly cellular iron Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: , iron storage function and cellular regulation. Biochim. Biophys. Acta Bioenerg. 1275: 161-203. HOFMANN... Availability of iron from iron-storage proteins to marine...

123

E-Print Network 3.0 - accelerates cellular senescence Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in plants 9 Ageing in plants: conserved strategies and novel pathways Summary: accelerated senescence occurs considering autophagy as a main contributor to the cellular...

124

E-Print Network 3.0 - ataxia patients cellular Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cardiomyopathy. Although its cellular function is still not fully clear, the fact... ., Beal, M. F. and Bogdanov, M. B. (2000) Oxidative stress in patients with Friedreich ataxia....

125

Cellular/Molecular Dopamine Inhibits Mitral/Tufted3Granule Cell Synapses in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of spatiotemporal firing patterns of MTs, which form an odor representation passed to higher brain centers are translated into distributed output patterns encoded in the firing of mitral/tufted cells (MTs). Although MT circuits. Mammalian periglomerular neurons, which release GABA and dopamine, attenuate inputs from ORN

Delaney, Kerry R.

126

CONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to Workforce  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

account of in workforce planning. The importance of integrating academic training with clinical trainingCONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to Workforce of the Healthcare Science Workforce Modernising Scientific Careers: The Next Steps Response by the Wellcome Trust

Rambaut, Andrew

127

Engagement of CD81 induces ezrin tyrosine phosphorylation and its cellular redistribution with filamentous actin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CD81 is a tetraspanin family member involved in diverse cellular interactions in the immune and nervous systems and in cell fusion events. However, the mechanism of action of CD81 and of other tetraspanins has not been defined. We reasoned that identifying signaling molecules downstream of CD81 would provide mechanistic clues. We engaged CD81 on the surface of Blymphocytes and identified the induced tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins by mass spectrometry. This analysis showed that the most prominent tyrosine phosphorylated protein was ezrin, an actin binding protein and a member of the ezrin-radixin-moesin family. We also found that CD81 engagement induces spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) and that Syk was involved in tyrosine phosphorylation of ezrin. Ezrin colocalized with CD81 and F-actin upon stimulation and this association was disrupted when Syk activation was blocked. Taken together, these studies suggest a model in which CD81 interfaces between the plasma membrane and the cytoskeleton by activating Syk, mobilizing ezrin, and recruiting F-actin to facilitate cytoskeletal reorganization and cell signaling. This may be a mechanism explaining the pleiotropic effects induced in response to stimulating cells by anti-CD81 antibodies or by the hepatitis C virus, which uses this molecule as its key receptor.

Coffey, Greg P.; Rajapaksa, Ranjani; Liu, Raymond; Sharpe, Orr; Kuo, Chiung-Chi; Wald Krauss, Sharon; Sagi, Yael; Davis, R. Eric; Staudt, Louis M.; Sharman, Jeff P.; Robinson, William H.; Levy, Shoshana

2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

128

Impact of Resolution on Simulation of Closed Mesoscale Cellular Convection Identified by Dynamically Guided Watershed Segmentation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Organized mesoscale cellular convection (MCC) is a common feature of marine stratocumulus that forms in response to a balance between mesoscale dynamics and smaller scale processes such as cloud radiative cooling and microphysics. We use the Weather Research and Forecasting model with chemistry (WRF-Chem) and fully coupled cloud-aerosol interactions to simulate marine low clouds during the VOCALS-REx campaign over the southeast Pacific. A suite of experiments with 3- and 9-km grid spacing indicates resolution-dependent behavior. The simulations with finer grid spacing have smaller liquid water paths and cloud fractions, while cloud tops are higher. The observed diurnal cycle is reasonably well simulated. To isolate organized MCC characteristics we develop a new automated method, which uses a variation of the watershed segmentation technique that combines the detection of cloud boundaries with a test for coincident vertical velocity characteristics. This ensures that the detected cloud fields are dynamically consistent for closed MCC, the most common MCC type over the VOCALS-REx region. We demonstrate that the 3-km simulation is able to reproduce the scaling between horizontal cell size and boundary layer height seen in satellite observations. However, the 9-km simulation is unable to resolve smaller circulations corresponding to shallower boundary layers, instead producing invariant MCC horizontal scale for all simulated boundary layers depths. The results imply that climate models with grid spacing of roughly 3 km or smaller may be needed to properly simulate the MCC structure in the marine stratocumulus regions.

Martini, Matus; Gustafson, William I.; Yang, Qing; Xiao, Heng

2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

129

Energy consumption in cellular network: ON-OFF model and impact of mobility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy consumption in cellular network: ON-OFF model and impact of mobility Thanh Tung Vu Telecom consumption in cellular network and we focus on the distribution of energy consumed by a base station. We first define the energy consumption model, in which the consumed energy is divided into two parts

130

The effects of topology upon fluid-flow and heat-transfer within cellular copper structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and packed beds, but also a function of orientation (open area ratio). The overall heat transfer dependsThe effects of topology upon fluid-flow and heat-transfer within cellular copper structures J. Tian February 2004 Available online 20 March 2004 Abstract The fluid-flow and heat-transfer features of cellular

Wadley, Haydn

131

A Novel "Green" Inkjet-Printed Monopole Antenna Topology for Concurrent RFID and Cellular Communications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"green" inkjet-printed monopole antenna topology for integrated RFID-reader and cellular communicationA Novel "Green" Inkjet-Printed Monopole Antenna Topology for Concurrent RFID and Cellular Communications Zissis Konstas*(l), Konstantinos Katsibas(2) and Manos M. Tentzeris(l) (1) School of

Tentzeris, Manos

132

Self-Optimization in Mobile Cellular Networks: Power Control and User Association  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Self-Optimization in Mobile Cellular Networks: Power Control and User Association Chung Shue Chen develop mathematical and algorith- mic tools for the self-optimization of mobile cellular networks the wireless devices are proposed. We focus on the optimization of transmit power and of user association

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

133

A Micro-Payment Scheme Encouraging Collaboration in Multi-Hop Cellular Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Micro-Payment Scheme Encouraging Collaboration in Multi-Hop Cellular Networks Markus Jakobsson1. We propose a micro-payment scheme for multi-hop cellular networks that encourages collaboration ­ makes collaboration rational and cheating undesirable. Keywords: audit, collaboration, detection, micro

Levente, Buttyán

134

Trigger-Wave Propagation in Arbitrary Metrics in Asynchronous Cellular Logic Arrays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Trigger-Wave Propagation in Arbitrary Metrics in Asynchronous Cellular Logic Arrays Przemyslaw image processing tasks using trigger-wave propagation in a medium with a hardware-controlled metric. The principles of wave propagation in cellular four-connected logic arrays emulating different distance measure

Dudek, Piotr

135

Limitations and Trade-offs in Gene Expression due to Competition for Shared Cellular Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Limitations and Trade-offs in Gene Expression due to Competition for Shared Cellular Resources- lational resources in the cell. The fact that these common resources are available only in limited amounts, and surprisingly, as activators to each other, purely due to the limited availability of shared cellular resources

Del Vecchio, Domitilla

136

Mining Call and Mobility Data to Improve Paging Efficiency in Cellular Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Data Mining, CDMA 1. INTRODUCTION Location management is a key component in the operation of cellularMining Call and Mobility Data to Improve Paging Efficiency in Cellular Networks Hui Zang Sprint a different, data-driven approach in how we design and evaluate our solution. Specifically, we mine more than

137

Administrative Policy: Cellular Communication Devices and Services Page 1 of 6  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to be sufficient to pay for the cost of their use of personal cellular telephones and related devices a qualified employee to use the same device for both personal and University business purposes. AppliesAdministrative Policy: Cellular Communication Devices and Services Page 1 of 6 Governance

Hardy, Christopher R.

138

On the Interaction between Marine Boundary Layer Cellular Cloudiness and Surface Heat Fluxes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The interaction between marine boundary layer cellular cloudiness and surface uxes of sensible and latent heat is investigated. The investigation focuses on the non-precipitating closed-cell state and the precipitating open-cell state at low geostrophic wind speed. The Advanced Research WRF model is used to conduct cloud-system-resolving simulations with interactive surface fluxes of sensible heat, latent heat, and of sea salt aerosol, and with a detailed representation of the interaction between aerosol particles and clouds. The mechanisms responsible for the temporal evolution and spatial distribution of the surface heat fluxes in the closed- and open-cell state are investigated and explained. It is found that the horizontal spatial structure of the closed-cell state determines, by entrainment of dry free tropospheric air, the spatial distribution of surface air temperature and water vapor, and, to a lesser degree, of the surface sensible and latent heat flux. The synchronized dynamics of the the open-cell state drives oscillations in surface air temperature, water vapor, and in the surface fluxes of sensible and latent heat, and of sea salt aerosol. Open-cell cloud formation, cloud optical depth and liquid water path, and cloud and rain water path are identified as good predictors of the spatial distribution of surface air temperature and sensible heat flux, but not of surface water vapor and latent heat flux. It is shown that by enhancing the surface sensible heat flux, the open-cell state creates conditions by which it is maintained. While the open-cell state under consideration is not depleted in aerosol, and is insensitive to variations in sea-salt fluxes, it also enhances the sea-salt flux relative to the closed-cell state. In aerosol-depleted conditions, this enhancement may replenish the aerosol needed for cloud formation, and hence contribute to the perpetuation of the open-cell state as well. Spatial homogenization of the surface fluxes is found to have only a small effect on cloud properties in the investigated cases. This indicates that sub-grid scale spatial variability in the surface flux of sensible and latent heat and of sea salt aerosol may not be required in large scale and global models to describe marine boundary layer cellular cloudiness.

Kazil, J.; Feingold, G.; Wang, Hailong; Yamaguchi, T.

2014-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

139

AcidBase Regulation in Fishes: Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and functional studies that have begun to define the protein transporters involved in the acid­base relevant ion gill membrane transport processes in acid­base balance. J. Exp. Zool. 293:302­319, 2002. r 2002 Wiley on recent advances in our understand- ing of membrane transport systems which are responsible for the net

Claiborne, James Berkeley

140

Discovery of a Novel Prolactin in Non-Mammalian Vertebrates: Evolutionary Perspectives and Its Involvement in Teleost Retina Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Background: The three pituitary hormones, viz. prolactin (PRL), growth hormone (GH) and somatolactin (SL), together with the mammalian placental lactogen (PL), constitute a gene family of hormones with similar gene structure and encoded protein sequences. These hormones are believed to have evolved from a common ancestral gene through several rounds of gene duplication and subsequent divergence. Principal Findings: In this study, we have identified a new PRL-like gene in non-mammalian vertebrates through bioinformatics and molecular cloning means. Phylogenetic analyses showed that this novel protein is homologous to the previously identified PRL. A receptor transactivation assay further showed that this novel protein could bind to PRL receptor to trigger the downstream post-receptor event, indicating that it is biologically active. In view of its close phylogenetic relationship with PRL and also its ability to activate PRL receptor, we name it as PRL2 and the previously identified PRL as PRL1. All the newly discovered PRL2 sequences possess three conserved disulfide linkages with the exception of the shark PRL2 which has only two. In sharp contrast to the classical PRL1 which is predominantly expressed in the pituitary, PRL2 was found to be mainly expressed in the eye and brain of the zebrafish but not in the pituitary. A largely reduced inner nuclear layer of the retina was observed after morpholino knockdown of zebrafish PRL2, indicating its role on retina development in teleost.

Xigui Huang; Michelle N. Y. Hui; Yun Liu; Don S. H. Yuen; Yong Zhang; Wood Yee Chan; Hao Ran; Shuk Han Cheng; Christopher H. K. Cheng

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Cellular cardiomyoplasty for a patient with heart failure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Background: A 73-year-old man with a history of myocardial infarction and hypertension for 5 years suffered heart failure (NYHA III-IV). Methods: 2D echo indicated hypokinesia at septal, left ventricular anterior wall and apical regions. Coronary angiograms demonstrated 60% stenosis in distal left main and 99% stenosis in proximal and distal left anterior descending coronary arteries (LAD). Both proximal artery and middle left circumflex coronary artery (LC) had 90% stenosis, and diffuse stenosis of right coronary artery (RC) was found. Myocardial perfusion imaging using {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI indicated defective perfusion of left ventricular apex, anterior wall and septal region and severe reduced perfusion of posterior inferior wall. Myocardial metabolic activities ({sup 18}F-deoxyglucose) also showed comparable reductions. After exposing the heart, LAD, LC, and RC were all completely occluded and bypass procedure could not be completed. Autologous satellite cells were implanted without any complication and the patient had an uneventful recovery. Results: During the first 2 months, he remained in heart failure, and by the third month, he gradually improved and reached NYHA II. At fifth month after the procedure, significant increased ejection fraction (37.1-48.6%) and wall movement with modest reduction of left ventricular systolic diameter (48-45 mm) were observed. Imaging with {sup 18}F-deoxyglucose showed dramatic improvement in myocardial metabolic activity with similar improvement in myocardial perfusion ({sup 99m}Tc-MIBI). Conclusion: This is the first successful case of cellular cardiomyoplasty without any conjunctional procedure for patient with severe coronary heart disease and heart failure.

Zhang Fumin; Chen Yijiang; Yang Zhijian; Gao Xiang; Ma Wenzhu; Li Chuanfu; Kao, Race L

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Channel Alternation And Rotation For Trisectorized Cellular Systems Vincent A. Nguyen, Peng-Jun Wan, Ophir Frieder  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

existing base stations are used, CAR deployment schemes do not introduce additional manufacturing costs to pay off leaving cellular carriers with battered balance sheets, cellular network designers must strive

143

IGF-I enhances cellular senescence via the reactive oxygen species-p53 pathway  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cellular senescence plays an important role in tumorigenesis and aging process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We demonstrated IGF-I enhanced cellular senescence in primary confluent cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer IGF-I enhanced cellular senescence in the ROS and p53-dependent manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These results may explain the underlying mechanisms of IGF-I involvement in tumorigenesis and in regulation of aging. -- Abstract: Cellular senescence is characterized by growth arrest, enlarged and flattened cell morphology, the expression of senescence-associated {beta}-galactosidase (SA-{beta}-gal), and by activation of tumor suppressor networks. Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) plays a critical role in cellular growth, proliferation, tumorigenesis, and regulation of aging. In the present study, we show that IGF-I enhances cellular senescence in mouse, rat, and human primary cells in the confluent state. IGF-I induced expression of a DNA damage marker, {gamma}H2AX, the increased levels of p53 and p21 proteins, and activated SA-{beta}-gal. In the confluent state, an altered downstream signaling of IGF-I receptor was observed. Treatment with a reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger, N-acetylcystein (NAC) significantly suppressed induction of these markers, indicating that ROS are involved in the induction of cellular senescence by IGF-I. In p53-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts, the IGF-I-induced augmentation of SA-{beta}-gal and p21 was inhibited, demonstrating that p53 is required for cellular senescence induced by IGF-I. Thus, these data reveal a novel pathway whereby IGF-I enhances cellular senescence in the ROS and p53-dependent manner and may explain the underlying mechanisms of IGF-I involvement in tumorigenesis and in regulation of aging.

Handayaningsih, Anastasia-Evi; Takahashi, Michiko; Fukuoka, Hidenori; Iguchi, Genzo; Nishizawa, Hitoshi; Yamamoto, Masaaki; Suda, Kentaro [Division of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan)] [Division of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Takahashi, Yutaka, E-mail: takahash@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Division of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan)] [Division of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan)

2012-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

144

Cellular Uptake and Biocompatibility of Bismuth Ferrite Harmonic Advanced Nanoparticles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bismuth Ferrite (BFO) nanoparticles (BFO-NP) display interesting optical (nonlinear response) and magnetic properties which make them amenable for bio-oriented applications as intra- and extra membrane contrast agents. Due to the relatively recent availability of this material in well dispersed nanometric form, its biocompatibility was not known to date. In this study, we present a thorough assessment of the effects of in vitro exposure of human adenocarcinoma (A549), lung squamous carcinoma (NCI-H520), and acute monocytic leukemia (THP-1) cell lines to uncoated and poly(ethylene glycol)-coated BFO-NP in the form of cytotoxicity, haemolytic response and biocompatibility. Our results support the attractiveness of the functional-BFO towards biomedical applications focused on advanced diagnostic imaging.

Staedler, Davide; Magouroux, Thibaud; Rogov, Andrii; Maguire, Ciaran Manus; Mohamed, Bashir M; Schwung, Sebastian; Rytz, Daniel; Jüstel, Thomas; Hwu, Stéphanie; Mugnier, Yannick; Dantec, Ronan Le; Volkov, Yuri; Gerber-Lemaire, Sandrine; Prina-Melloc, Adriele; Bonacina, Luigi; Wolf, Jean-Pierre

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Real-Time Molecular Monitoring of Chemical Environment in ObligateAnaerobes during Oxygen Adaptive Response  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Determining the transient chemical properties of the intracellular environment canelucidate the paths through which a biological system adapts to changes in its environment, for example, the mechanisms which enable some obligate anaerobic bacteria to survive a sudden exposure to oxygen. Here we used high-resolution Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectromicroscopy to continuously follow cellular chemistry within living obligate anaerobes by monitoring hydrogen bonding in their cellular water. We observed a sequence of wellorchestrated molecular events that correspond to changes in cellular processes in those cells that survive, but only accumulation of radicals in those that do not. We thereby can interpret the adaptive response in terms of transient intracellular chemistry and link it to oxygen stress and survival. This ability to monitor chemical changes at the molecular level can yield important insights into a wide range of adaptive responses.

Holman, Hoi-Ying N.; Wozei, Eleanor; Lin, Zhang; Comolli, Luis R.; Ball, David. A.; Borglin, Sharon; Fields, Matthew W.; Hazen, Terry C.; Downing, Kenneth H.

2009-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

146

524 IEEE COMMUNICATIONS SURVEYS & TUTORIALS, VOL. 13, NO. 4, FOURTH QUARTER 2011 Green Cellular Networks: A Survey, Some Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

524 IEEE COMMUNICATIONS SURVEYS & TUTORIALS, VOL. 13, NO. 4, FOURTH QUARTER 2011 Green Cellular in realizing a "green" cellular network technology. Index Terms--Green communication, energy efficient net and challenges and suggest some techniques to enable an energy efficient or "green" cellular network. Since base

Shihada, Basem

147

9.09J / 7.29J Cellular Neurobiology, Spring 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This course serves as an introduction to the structure and function of the nervous system. Emphasis is placed on the cellular properties of neurons and other excitable cells. Topics covered include the structure and ...

Littleton, Troy

148

Design and application of a cellular, piezoelectric, artificial muscle actuator for biorobotic systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the foremost challenges in robotics is the development of muscle-like actuators that have the capability to reproduce the smooth motions observed in animals. Biological muscles have a unique cellular structure that ...

Secord, Thomas W. (Thomas William)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Design and analysis of active fluid-and-cellular solid composites for controllable stiffness robotic elements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this thesis is to investigate the use of a new class of materials for realizing soft robots. Specifically, meso-scale composites--composed of cellular solids impregnated with active fluids-were be designed ...

Cheng, Nadia G. (Nadia Gen San)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Cellular Foams: A Potential Innovative Solid Breeder Material for Fusion Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ceramic foam and cellular materials are being used in a wide variety of industries and are finding ever growing number of applications. Over the past decade advances in manufacturing of cellular materials have resulted in ceramics with highly uniform interconnected porosities ranging in size from a few {mu}m to several mm. These relatively new ceramic foam materials have a unique set of thermo-mechanical properties, such as excellent thermal shock resistance and high surface to volume ratios. Based on new advances in processing ceramic foams, we suggest the development of ceramic foams or cellular ceramics for solid breeders in fusion reactor blankets. A cellular breeder material has a number of thermo-mechanical advantages over pebble beds, which can enhance blanket performance, improve operational stability, and reduce overall blanket costs.

Sharafat, S.; Ghoniem, N.; Williams, B.; Babcock, J. [University of California Los Angeles (United States)

2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

151

Detecting the Presence of a Proximate Cellular User through Distributed Femtocell Sensing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, their spectrum usage and resulting interference become non-negligible. While using different operating frequency for femtocells is indeed possible, a co-channel deploy- ment of these will increase spectral efficiency, a much sought design by cellular opera- tors...

Parag, Pankaj 1988-

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

152

E-Print Network 3.0 - atpase-mediated cellular uptake Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1) mediates sterol-specific unidirectional Summary: , cholesterol-depletion-driven recycling of NPC1L1 to the cell surface facilitates cellular uptake of non... be used to...

153

Engineered sensors and genetic regulatory networks for control of cellular metabolism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Complex synthetic genetic programs promise unprecedented control over cellular metabolism and behavior. In this thesis, I describe the design and development of a synthetic genetic program to detect conditions underlying ...

Moser, Felix, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Cellular and genetic mechanisms of new tissue production in the regenerating planarian Schmidtea mediterranea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regeneration of missing body parts is biologically fascinating, yet poorly understood. Many instances of regeneration, such as the replacement of amphibian limbs or planarian heads, require both a source for new cellular ...

Wagner, Daniel Elger

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Rat injury model under controlled field-relevant primary blast conditions: Acute response to a wide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 1 Rat injury model under controlled field-relevant primary blast conditions: Acute response.edu Keywords: Traumatic Brain Injury, Primary Blast, Mortality, Cellular Membrane Permeability, Lung Injury the risk of sustaining blast induced injury by military personnel and civilians. The blast injury

Farritor, Shane

156

b-cell ABCA1 influences insulin secretion, glucose homeostasis and response to thiazolidinedione treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

b-cell ABCA1 influences insulin secretion, glucose homeostasis and response to thiazolidinedione secretion by b-cells. The reasons for b-cell dysfunction in this disease are incompletely understood but may include the accumulation of toxic lipids within this cell type. We examined the role of Abca1, a cellular

Cai, Long

157

Prenatal and postweaning dietary copper effects on cellular and humoral immunity in calves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PRENATAL AND POSTWEANING DIETARY COPPER EFFECTS ON CELLULAR AND HUMORAL IMMUNITY IN CALVES A Thesis by MICHAEL SHANE DAVIS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfilhnent of the requircmcnts... for the degree ol' MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1999 Major Subject: Nutrition PRENATAL AND POSTWEANING DIETARY COPPER EFFECTS ON CELLULAR AND HUMORAL IMMUNITY IN CALVES A Thesis by Michael Shane Davis Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

Davis, Michael Shane

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Coulter counter determination of bacterial growth and cellular size change following ??Co gamma irradiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COULTER COUNTER DETERMINATION OF BACTERIAL GROWTH AND CELLULAR SIZE CHANGE FOLLOWING Co GAMMA IRRADIATION A Thesis by GARY W. GASTON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1976 Ma)or Subject: Biophysics COULTER COUNTER DETERMINATION OF BACTERIAL GROWTH AND CELLULAR SIZE CHANGE FOLLOWING Co GAMMA IRRADIATION A Thesis by GARY W. GASTON APPROVED as to style and content by: ead...

Gaston, Gary W

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Mapping textures on 3d terrains: a hybrid cellular automata approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?. Benati [7] showed that cellular automata can be used to model phenomena typical of living communities like reproduction, self-organization and a complex evolution. An interesting relation between fractals and cellular automata has been discussed... automata approach to represent a model. This gives the advantage of direct texture simulation on the model. II.c Terrain Generation Fractals [57] have been used to generate terrains by many terrain generation engines like fracPlanet [1] and Frac...

Sinvhal, Swapnil

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

160

Genomics Approaches to Study Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Host Response to Avian Influenza Virus in Chickens  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

have been utilized in the current study to investigate the host-AIV interactions in chickens. The Ser to Asn mutation on position 631 in the chicken Mx1 protein was reported to result in a positive antiviral function in vitro. With AIV infection, the Mx...

Wang, Ying

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Energy deposition in the body from external sources to chemically trigger cellular responses in desired localized regions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

blast region was not centered at the smaller microbubble because only the effectthe blast region measures at 49 µm in diameter. The effectblast region and measures at 12 µm in diameter. Discussion The effect

Ibsen, Stuart Duncan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Cellular response to 11[beta]-dichloro, a novel aniline mustard-estradienone, in various prostate cancer cell lines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cancer is a group of diseases characterized by uncontrolled cell growth and abnormal cell cycle and apoptosis regulation. Among the types of cancer, prostate cancer is the leading cause of death in men. Although many ...

González, Francis Héber

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Partial characterization of the antigen(s) from Listeria monocytogenes responsible for the induction of cellular immunity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Percent migration inhibition was determined using the following formula: migration in experimental supernatants inhibition = 100 X 100 migration in media control supernatants 27 RESULTS i . Naintenance and Determinatioh of Virulence A culture of L...

Smith, John Stephen

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

A systems-level analysis of dynamic reprogramming of RNA modifications in the translational control of cellular responses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In addition to the four canonical ribonucleosides (adenosine, uridine, guanosine, cytosine), transfer RNAs (tRNA) and ribosomal RNAs (rRNA) are comprised of more than 100 enzyme-catalyzed modifications, with about 20-35 ...

Chan, Tsz Yan Clement

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

The role of mismatch repair and recombination in cellular responses to the DNA damaging anticancer drug Cisplatin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(ll)) is a successful DNA-damaging anticancer drug used in the treatment of testicular, ovarian and other tumors. In the past decade, several mutually non-exclusive hypotheses have ...

Zdraveski, Zoran Z. (Zoran Zare), 1969-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Asymptotic Cellular Growth Rate as the Effective Information Utilization Rate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the average asymptotic growth rate of cells in randomly fluctuating environments. Using a game-theoretic perspective, we show that any response strategy has an asymptotic growth rate, which is the sum of: (i) the maximal growth rate at the worst possible distribution of environments, (ii) relative information between the actual distribution of environments to the worst one, and (iii) information utilization rate which is the information rate of the sensory devices minus the "information dissipation rate", the amount of information not utilized by the cell for growth. In non-stationary environments, the optimal strategy is the time average of the instantaneous optimal strategy and the optimal switching times are evenly spaced in the statistical (Fisher) metric.

Pugatch, Rami; Tlusty, Tsvi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EMERGENCY RESPONSE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANNEX Q HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EMERGENCY RESPONSE #12;ANNEX Q - HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EMERGENCY RESPONSE 03/10/2014 v.2.0 Page Q-1 PROMULGATION STATEMENT Annex Q: Hazardous Materials Emergency Response, and contents within, is a guide to how the University conducts a response specific to a hazardous materials

168

Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting Host: Francis Rubinstein Demand Response Research Center demand responsive lighting systems ­ Importance of dimming ­ New wireless controls technologies · Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting (commenced March 2007) #12;Objectives · Provide up-to-date information

169

Antibody responses in allogeneic radiation chimeras  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The construction of long-lived allogeneic radiation chimeras, free of graft-versus-host disease, has been achieved using serologic elimination of Thy 1/sup +/ cells from donor bone marrow. Humoral immune function was not restored in these animals as evidenced by lack of primary antibody responses to a T cell-dependent antigen, namely, sheep erythrocytes (SRBC) both in vivo and in vitro. No evidence for a suppressor cell-mediated mechanism was found. Using separated chimera spleen cell populations and specific helper cell soluble mediators, the functional capabilities of chimera B cells, T cells, and macrophages were assessed. These findings suggested that the failure of chimeras to produce antibody is not the result of impaired B cell, T cell, or macrophage function, but rather, that it is due to ineffective cellular interactions. Physiologic cellular interactions depend upon the sharing of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) determinants between interacting cells. However, the self-recognition repertoire of developing T cells may be influenced by the environment which these cells differentiate such that they learn to recognize host MHC determinants as self. These findings support the interpretation that the immunologic hyporeactivity of allogeneic bone marrow chimeras reflects the role of the host environment in restricting the interactive capabilities of donor-derived cells.

Coico, R.F.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Evolutionarily conserved IMPACT impairs various stress responses that require GCN1 for activating the eIF2 kinase GCN2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: •GCN1 is required for mammalian and yeast GCN2 function in a variety of conditions. •Mammalian IMPACT competes with GCN2 for GCN1 binding. •IMPACT and its yeast counterpart YIH1 downregulate GCN1-dependent GCN2 activation. -- Abstract: In response to a range of environmental stresses, phosphorylation of the alpha subunit of the translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2?) represses general protein synthesis coincident with increased translation of specific mRNAs, such as those encoding the transcription activators GCN4 and ATF4. The eIF2? kinase GCN2 is activated by amino acid starvation by a mechanism involving GCN2 binding to an activator protein GCN1, along with association with uncharged tRNA that accumulates during nutrient deprivation. We previously showed that mammalian IMPACT and its yeast ortholog YIH1 bind to GCN1, thereby preventing GCN1 association with GCN2 and stimulation of this eIF2? kinase during amino acid depletion. GCN2 activity is also enhanced by other stresses, including proteasome inhibition, UV irradiation and lack of glucose. Here, we provide evidence that IMPACT affects directly and specifically the activation of GCN2 under these stress conditions in mammalian cells. We show that activation of mammalian GCN2 requires its interaction with GCN1 and that IMPACT promotes the dissolution of the GCN2–GCN1 complex. To a similar extent as the overexpression of YIH1, overexpression of IMPACT in yeast cells inhibited growth under all stress conditions that require GCN2 and GCN1 for cell survival, including exposure to acetic acid, high levels of NaCl, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} or benomyl. This study extends our understanding of the roles played by GCN1 in GCN2 activation induced by a variety of stress arrangements and suggests that IMPACT and YIH1 use similar mechanisms for regulating this eIF2? kinase.

Cambiaghi, Tavane D.; Pereira, Catia M. [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Parasitology, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de Săo Paulo (Brazil)] [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Parasitology, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de Săo Paulo (Brazil); Shanmugam, Renuka; Bolech, Michael [Institute of Natural and Mathematical Sciences, Massey University (New Zealand)] [Institute of Natural and Mathematical Sciences, Massey University (New Zealand); Wek, Ronald C. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Indiana University School of Medicine (United States)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Indiana University School of Medicine (United States); Sattlegger, Evelyn [Institute of Natural and Mathematical Sciences, Massey University (New Zealand)] [Institute of Natural and Mathematical Sciences, Massey University (New Zealand); Castilho, Beatriz A., E-mail: bacastilho@unifesp.br [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Parasitology, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de Săo Paulo (Brazil)

2014-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

171

Chemical Spill Response Procedure Initial Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemical Spill Response Procedure Initial Response 1. Advise lab occupants of the spill such as quantity spilled and chemical name. Risk Assessment 3. Conduct an initial risk assessment to determine if to the chemical spill. This link can be found at the bottom of the Campus Security homepage, http

172

Keynote address: cellular reduction of nitroimidazole drugs: potential for selective chemotherapy and diagnosis of hypoxic cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nitroimidazole drugs were initially developed as selective radiosensitizers of hypoxic cells and, consequently, as adjuvants to improve the local control probabilities of current radiotherapies. Misonidazole (MISO), the prototype radiosensitizing drug, was found in Phase I clinical studies to cause dose-limiting neurotoxicities (mainly peripheral neuropathies). MISO was also found to be cytotoxic in the absence of radiation and to covalently bind to cellular molecules, both processes demonstrating rates much higher in hypoxic compared with oxygenated cells. It is likely that neurotoxicity, cellular cytotoxicity and adduct formation results from reactions between reduction intermediates of MISO and cellular target molecules. Spin-offs from radiosensitizer research include the synthesis and characterization of more potent hypoxic cytotoxins and the exploitation of sensitizer-adducts as probes for measuring cellular and tissue oxygen levels. Current developments in hypoxic cell cytotoxin and hypoxic cell marker research are reviewed with specific examples from studies which characterize the cellular reduction of TF-MISO, (1-(2-nitro-1-imidazolyl)-3(2,2,2-trifluoroethoxy)-2-propanol). 45 references.

Chapman, J.D.; Lee, J.; Meeker, B.E.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

2012 CELLULAR & MOLECULAR FUNGAL BIOLOGY GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, JUNE 17 - 22, 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Gordon Research Conference on CELLULAR & MOLECULAR FUNGAL BIOLOGY was held at Holderness School, Holderness New Hampshire, June 17 - 22, 2012. The 2012 Gordon Conference on Cellular and Molecular Fungal Biology (CMFB) will present the latest, cutting-edge research on the exciting and growing field of molecular and cellular aspects of fungal biology. Topics will range from yeast to filamentous fungi, from model systems to economically important organisms, and from saprophytes and commensals to pathogens of plants and animals. The CMFB conference will feature a wide range of topics including systems biology, cell biology and morphogenesis, organismal interactions, genome organisation and regulation, pathogenesis, energy metabolism, biomass production and population genomics. The Conference was well-attended with 136 participants. Gordon Research Conferences does not permit publication of meeting proceedings.

Judith Berman

2012-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

174

Tuning of the electro-mechanical behavior of the cellular carbon nanotube structures with nanoparticle dispersions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mechanical and electrical characteristics of cellular network of the carbon nanotubes (CNT) impregnated with metallic and nonmetallic nanoparticles were examined simultaneously by employing the nanoindentation technique. Experimental results show that the nanoparticle dispersion not only enhances the mechanical strength of the cellular CNT by two orders of magnitude but also imparts variable nonlinear electrical characteristics; the latter depends on the contact resistance between nanoparticles and CNT, which is shown to depend on the applied load while indentation. Impregnation with silver nanoparticles enhances the electrical conductance, the dispersion with copper oxide and zinc oxide nanoparticles reduces the conductance of CNT network. In all cases, a power law behavior with suppression in the differential conductivity at zero bias was noted, indicating electron tunneling through the channels formed at the CNT-nanoparticle interfaces. These results open avenues for designing cellular CNT foams with desired electro-mechanical properties and coupling.

Gowda, Prarthana; Misra, Abha, E-mail: abha@isu.iisc.ernet.in [Departments of Instrumentation and Applied Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012, Karnataka (India)] [Departments of Instrumentation and Applied Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012, Karnataka (India); Ramamurty, Upadrasta [Departments of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012, Karnataka (India) [Departments of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012, Karnataka (India); Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials Research, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia)

2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

175

Method of forming a continuous polymeric skin on a cellular foam material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Hydrophobic cellular material is coated with a thin hydrophilic polymer skin which stretches tightly over the outer surface of the foam but which does not fill the cells of the foam, thus resulting in a polymer-coated foam structure having a smoothness which was not possible in the prior art. In particular, when the hydrophobic cellular material is a specially chosen hydrophobic polymer foam and is formed into arbitrarily chosen shapes prior to the coating with hydrophilic polymer, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets of arbitrary shapes can be produced by subsequently coating the shapes with metal or with any other suitable material. New articles of manufacture are produced, including improved ICF targets, improved integrated circuits, and improved solar reflectors and solar collectors. In the coating method, the cell size of the hydrophobic cellular material, the viscosity of the polymer solution used to coat, and the surface tensin of the polymer solution used to coat are all very important to the coating.

Duchane, David V. (Los Alamos, NM); Barthell, Barry L. (Los Alamos, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Application of spectral hole burning to the study of in vitro cellular systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chapter 1 of this thesis describes the various stages of tumor development and a multitude of diagnostic techniques used to detect cancer. Chapter 2 gives an overview of the aspects of hole burning spectroscopy important for its application to the study of cellular systems. Chapter 3 gives general descriptions of cellular organelles, structures, and physical properties that can serve as possible markers for the differentiation of normal and cancerous cells. Also described in Chapter 3 are the principles of cryobiology important for low temperature spectroscopy of cells, characterization of MCF-10F (normal) and MCF-7 (cancer) cells lines which will serve as model systems, and cellular characteristics of aluminum phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate (APT), which was used as the test probe. Chapters 4 and 5 are previously published papers by the author pertaining to the results obtained from the application of hole burning to the study of cellular systems. Chapter 4 presents the first results obtained by spectral hole burning of cellular systems and Chapter 5 gives results for the differentiation of MCF-10F and MCF-7 cells stained with APT by an external applied electric (Stark) field. A general conclusion is presented in Chapter 6. Appendices A and B provide additional characterization of the cell/probe model systems. Appendix A describes the uptake and subcellular distribution of APT in MCF-10F and MCF-7 cells and Appendix B compares the hole burning characteristics of APT in cells when the cells are in suspension and when they are examined while adhering to a glass coverslip. Appendix C presents preliminary results for a novel probe molecule, referred to as a molecular thumbtack, designed by the authors for use in future hole burning applications to cellular systems.

Milanovich, Nebojsa

1999-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

177

Design of cellular VLSI 2-D mesh for large state space viterbi algorithms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DESIGN OF CELLULAR VLSI 2-D MESH FOR LARGE STATE SPACE VITERBI ALGORITHMS A Thesis by SAIFUL HASAN Submitted to the OAice of Graduate Studies of Texas A 8t M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1991 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering DESIGN OF CELLULAR VLSI 2-D MESH FOR LARGE STATE SPACE VITERBI ALGORITHMS A Thesis by SAIFUL HASAN Appmved as to style and content by: William Bliss ( Co-chairman of Committee ) Hosame Abu...

Hasan, Saiful

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

2012 MICROBIAL STRESS RESPONSE GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, JULY 20-25, 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Gordon Research Conference on MICROBIAL STRESS RESPONSE was held at Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, Massachusetts, July 15-20, 2012. The Conference was well-attended with 180 participants. The 2012 Microbial Stress Responses Gordon Research Conference will provide a forum for the open reporting of recent discoveries on the diverse mechanisms employed by microbes to respond to stress. Approaches range from analysis at the molecular level (how are signals perceived and transmitted to change gene expression or function) to cellular and microbial community responses. Gordon Research Conferences does not permit publication of meeting proceedings.

Timothy Donohue

2012-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

179

A Pricing Based Algorithm for Cell Switching Off in Green Cellular Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Pricing Based Algorithm for Cell Switching Off in Green Cellular Networks Ali Yildiz and Tolga--In this study, we propose a pricing based algorithm that assigns user terminals (UTs) to base stations (BSs) and optimizes the transmission powers in a way that minimizes the energy expenditure. The algorithm takes

Yanikomeroglu, Halim

180

Deformation rate effects on failure modes of open-cell Al foams and textile cellular materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

September 2005 Abstract The compressive behavior of open-cell aluminum alloy foam and stainless steel woven: Metallic cellular materials; Dynamic compression; Aluminum foams; Woven textile lattice 0020-7683/$ - see are of attracting interest for a variety of automotive, locomotive, marine, and aerospace applications (Gibson

Barthelat, Francois

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

STRAIN RATE EFFECTS IN METALLIC CELLULAR MATERIALS Sungsoo Lee, Francois Barthelat and Horacio D. Espinosa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rate. For Aluminum foam materials, the deformation was more localized for quasi-static loading than such as automotive, locomotive and aerospace [1]. Sandwich plates with solid face sheets and cellular core materials strain rate behavior of an Aluminum foam material and a 304 stainless steel tetragonal truss core

Espinosa, Horacio D.

182

Cellular Microbiology (2001) 3(12), 795810 Role of tyrosine kinases and the tyrosine phosphatase  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cellular Microbiology (2001) 3(12), 795±810 Role of tyrosine kinases and the tyrosine phosphatase. Central to this interface is a battery of bacterial proteins delivered into host cells via a specialized). This organelle delivers into host cells a battery of bacterial proteins that have the capacity to modulate

Galan, Jorge E

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

A new communication paradigm for mobile TV over cellular network Dr. Hongxiang Li  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new communication paradigm for mobile TV over cellular network Dr. Hongxiang Li Electrical terrestrial TV network and propose a new mobile TV communication paradigm that is radically different from and communication theory (i.e., Network Coding and Dirty Paper Coding) in the new mobile TV system design. Despite

184

Roadmap: Biology Molecular and Cellular Biology Bachelor of Science [AS-BS-BSCI-MCBI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roadmap: Biology ­ Molecular and Cellular Biology ­ Bachelor of Science [AS-BS-BSCI-MCBI] College of Arts and Sciences Department of Biological Sciences Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 3 | Last Updated Biological Diversity 4 Fulfills Kent Core Basic Sciences CHEM 10060 General Chemistry I 4 Fulfills Kent

Sheridan, Scott

185

Roadmap: Biology Molecular and Cellular Biology Bachelor of Science [AS-BS-BSCI-MCBI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roadmap: Biology ­ Molecular and Cellular Biology ­ Bachelor of Science [AS-BS-BSCI-MCBI] College of Arts and Sciences Department of Biological Sciences Catalog Year: 2012-2013 Page 1 of 3 | Last Updated Biological Diversity 4 Fulfills Kent Core Basic Sciences CHEM 10060 General Chemistry I 4 Fulfills Kent

Sheridan, Scott

186

Case: Cellular phones Authors: Michael Hamid, Jose de Jesus Rodriguez, Nicole Trahan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a cancerous tumor in the brain allegedly caused by her cellular phone. The problem originates into the brain. Therefore, the near field effect on the brain needs to be investigated at normal operating intensity. Very little is known about the near field effects of radiation on the body, especially brain

Williams, John M.

187

IEEE COMMUNICATIONS LETTERS, ACCEPTED FOR PUBLICATION 1 Planning of Cellular Networks Enhanced by Energy Harvesting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by Energy Harvesting Meng Zheng, Przemyslaw Pawelczak, Member, IEEE, Slawomir Sta´nczak, Senior Member, IEEE energy sources and a fundamentally new concept of energy balancing, and propose a novel algorithm be made by enriching cellular infrastructure with energy harvesting sources, in comparison to traditional

Kuzmanov, Georgi

188

Cellular/Molecular A Chimera Analysis of Prestin Knock-Out Mice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cellular/Molecular A Chimera Analysis of Prestin Knock-Out Mice Mary Ann Cheatham,1 Sharon Low, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208, and 3MusWorks, Falls Church, Virginia 22042 A chimera. In this report, we describe a chimera analysis of prestin function. A chimera is a genetic composite. It contains

Dallos, Peter

189

Issues in the theory of models -5 Cellular Automata (2): Urban CA models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Issues in the theory of models -5 Cellular Automata (2): Urban CA models Batty, Michael, Helen and Design 24, no. 2: 159-64. Introduction to the Special E+P B issue on CA. Some of the papers were-see if you are interested in CA. Colonna, Antonio, Vittorio Di Stefano, Silvana Lombardo, Lorenzo Papini

Clarke, Keith

190

An Energy-Efficient Power Allocation Game with Selfish Channel State Reporting in Cellular Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Energy-Efficient Power Allocation Game with Selfish Channel State Reporting in Cellular Networks With energy-efficient resource allocation, mobile users and base station have different objectives. While the base station strives for an energy-efficient operation of the complete cell, each user aims to maximize

Boyer, Edmond

191

An Experiment in Reducing Cellular Base Station Power Draw With Virtual Coverage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

providers offer "low-power" GSM Base Stations (BTS) for use with renewable energy sources, these have permission and/or a fee. ACM DEV 4, December 06 -- 07 2013, Cape Town, South Africa Copyright is held. For example, the GSM Association estimates that 95% of people living without cellular access in East Africa

Parikh, Tapan S.

192

GreenCache: Augmenting Off-the-Grid Cellular Towers with Multimedia Caches  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or commercial advantage and that copies bear this notice and the full citation on the first page. To copy to run cellular towers "off the grid" [4]. Today's "off the grid" cellu- lar towers operate off diesel with expensive and "dirty" diesel fuel. S

Shenoy, Prashant

193

The integration of ad hoc sensor and cellular networks for multi-class data transmission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The integration of ad hoc sensor and cellular networks for multi-class data transmission Fei Hu a. On the other hand, large-scale Ad hoc Sensor Networks (ASN), when deployed among mobile patients who may carry different kinds of micro-sensors to measure ECG, blood pressure, basal temperature or other physiological

Kumar, Sunil

194

Adaptive Semi-Soft Handoff for Cellular IP Networks Eriko Nurvitadhi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to wireless networks becomes a critical issue. For this reason, a number of micro-mobility protocols handoff is still a major obstacle to enabling seamless micro-mobility in wireless access networksAdaptive Semi-Soft Handoff for Cellular IP Networks Eriko Nurvitadhi , Ben Lee , Chansu Yu

Yu, Chansu

195

THE PERFORMANCE OF SPACE-TIME CODED COOPERATIVE DIVERSITY IN AN ASYNCHRONOUS CELLULAR UPLINK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE PERFORMANCE OF SPACE-TIME CODED COOPERATIVE DIVERSITY IN AN ASYNCHRONOUS CELLULAR UPLINK Kanchan G. Vardhe and Daryl Reynolds Lane Dept. of Comp. Sci. and Elect. Eng. West Virginia University Morgantown, WV kanchanv@csee.wvu.edu, darylreynolds@ieee.org ABSTRACT Most of the prior work on cooperative

Reynolds, Daryl

196

The relationships between metabolic rate and the respiratory, circulatory and cellular mechanisms governing oxygen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The relationships between metabolic rate and the respiratory, circulatory and cellular mechanisms governing oxygen transport from the respiratory medium to the tissues in air- breathing vertebrates have for albacore (Thunnus alalunga, 82­197mlkg-1). Plasma volume within the primary circulatory system (calculated

Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

197

Cellular studies of auditory hair cell regeneration Jennifer S. Stone and Edwin W Rubel*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Colloquium Cellular studies of auditory hair cell regeneration in birds Jennifer S. Stone and Edwin that mature birds are able to regenerate hair cells, the receptors for auditory perception. This surprising finding generated hope in the field of auditory neuro- science that new hair cells someday may be coaxed

Rubel, Edwin

198

Cellular/Molecular Nociceptor and Hair Cell Transducer Properties of TRPA1, a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cellular/Molecular Nociceptor and Hair Cell Transducer Properties of TRPA1, a Channel for Pain)channelisactivatedbypain-producingchemicals,anditsinhibitionimpairshaircellmechanotrans- duction. As shown here and previously, TRPA1 is expressed by hair cells as well as by most nociceptors to mediate transduction in both hair cells and nociceptors. Accordingly, we find that heterologouslyexpressed

Alford, Simon

199

Cellular/Molecular Vestibular Hair Bundles Control pH with (Na , K )/H  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cellular/Molecular Vestibular Hair Bundles Control pH with (Na , K )/H Exchangers NHE6 and NHE9 21205, and 3Graduate School of Life Science, University of Hyogo, Ako, Hyogo 678-1297, Japan In hair acidify mechani- cally sensitive hair bundles without efficient removal of H . We found that, whereas

Rao, Rajini

200

Autotransporters: The Cellular Environment Reshapes a Folding Mechanism to Promote Protein Transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the cellular environment affects protein folding mechanisms. Here, we focus on one unique aspect affect protein folding kinetics and the conformations of folding intermediates? We focus on recent have been made to understand the mechanisms by which proteins fold to their native conformations.3

Clark, Patricia L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

1Cellular Polymers, Vol. 26, No. 1, 2007 On the Bulk Modulus of Open Cell Foams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrostaticcompressionoffoamisofinterestinavarietyofcontextsincluding under-sea applications. Syntactic foam, for instance, consists of hollow glass1Cellular Polymers, Vol. 26, No. 1, 2007 On the Bulk Modulus of Open Cell Foams © Rapra Technology, 2007 On the Bulk Modulus of Open Cell Foams B. Moore, T. Jaglinski, D.S. Stone§ and R.S. Lakes

Lakes, Roderic

202

Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

F) Enhanced ACP Date RAA ACP Demand Response – SpinningReserve Demonstration Demand Response – Spinning Reservesupply spinning reserve. Demand Response – Spinning Reserve

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Automated Demand Response and Commissioning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fully-Automated Demand Response Test in Large Facilities14in DR systems. Demand Response using HVAC in Commercialof Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities”

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Automated Demand Response and Commissioning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Demand Response in Commercial Buildings”, Lawrencesystems. Demand Response using HVAC in Commercial BuildingsDemand Response Test in Large Facilities13 National Conference on Building

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

CRA Comments & Responses  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

- High-Level Liquid Waste (51105) 11 Response to CRA Comments (92005) Enclosure 1 - Computer Code VerificationTesting (92005) Inventory and Performance Assessment Reports...

206

Climate Change Response  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

the Interior Climate Change Response "From the Everglades to the Great Lakes to Alaska and everywhere in between, climate change is a leading threat to natural and cultural...

207

GADRAS Detector Response Function.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) applies a Detector Response Function (DRF) to compute the output of gamma-ray and neutron detectors when they are exposed to radiation sources. The DRF is fundamental to the ability to perform forward calculations (i.e., computation of the response of a detector to a known source), as well as the ability to analyze spectra to deduce the types and quantities of radioactive material to which the detectors are exposed. This document describes how gamma-ray spectra are computed and the significance of response function parameters that define characteristics of particular detectors.

Mitchell, Dean J.; Harding, Lee; Thoreson, Gregory G; Horne, Steven M.

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Demand Response In California  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation covers the demand response in California and is given at the FUPWG 2006 Fall meeting, held on November 1-2, 2006 in San Francisco, California.

209

Spectral dependencies of killing, mutation, and transformation in mammalian cells and their relevance to hazards caused by solar ultraviolet radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using germicidal lamps and Westinghouse sunlamps with and without filtration, the effectiveness of ultraviolet and near-ultraviolet light in inducing molecular and cellular changes was measured. Cell survival and the induction of resistance to 6-thioguanine or to ouabain were measured with V79 Chinese hamster cells, cell survival and neoplastic transformation were measured with C3H mouse 10 T 1/2 cells, and the induction of pyrimidine dimers containing thymine was measured in both cell lines. The short-wavelength cutoff of the sunlamp emission was shifted from approximately 290 nm (unfiltered) to approximately 300 and approximately 310 nm by appropriate filters. Although it was found that the efficiency with which all end points were induced progressively decreased as the short-wavelength cutoff was shifted to longer wavelengths, the rates of decrease differed appreciably. For example, doses of near-ultraviolet light longer than approximately 300 nm that were effective in mutating or in transforming cells were ineffective in killing them. In respect to pyrimidine dimer induction, several but not all cellular end points were induced by dose ratios of sunlamp light (short-wavelength cutoff, approximately 290 nm) to germicidal lamp light (254 nm) in fairly close accord with the doses required to produce equivalent proportions of dimers. However, for near-ultraviolet light having cutoffs at longer wavelengths, the biological action observed was appreciably greater than what would be predicted from the proportion of dimers induced. From the latter observation, it is inferred that increasing intensities of short-wavelength ultraviolet light, as would be expected from reductions in stratospheric ozone around the earth, would result in smaller increases in biological action, e.g., skin cancer, compared to current levels of action than would be predicted from an action spectrum completely corresponding to that of a pyrimidine dimer induction spectrum in DNA.

Suzuki, F.; Han, A.; Lankas, G.R.; Utsumi, H.; Elkind, M.M.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Sensor response rate accelerator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for sensor signal prediction and for improving sensor signal response time, is disclosed. An adaptive filter or an artificial neural network is utilized to provide predictive sensor signal output and is further used to reduce sensor response time delay.

Vogt, Michael C. (Westmont, IL)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

ENERGY EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION ENERGY EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN COMMISSIONREPORT October 2006 CEC-600-2006-014 Arnold Schwarzenegger, Governor #12;CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Jackalyne Pfannenstiel Chairman James D Deputy Director FUELS AND TRANSPORTATION DIVISION #12;The Energy Emergency Response Plan is prepared

212

Eastern Frequency Response Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was specifically designed to investigate the frequency response of the Eastern Interconnection that results from large loss-of-generation events of the type targeted by the North American Electric Reliability Corp. Standard BAL-003 Frequency Response and Frequency Bias Setting (NERC 2012a), under possible future system conditions with high levels of wind generation.

Miller, N.W.; Shao, M.; Pajic, S.; D'Aquila, R.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

RESPONSIBILITIES October 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

culture with strong programs of personal safety, accident and injury prevention, wellness promotionPRINCIPLES RESPONSIBILITIES PRACTICES October 2012 HEALTH & SAFETY POLICY AT STANFORD #12;1 Health & Safety Policy at Stanford October 2012 Table of Contents PRINCIPLES OF HEALTH & SAFETY 2 RESPONSIBILITIES

Kay, Mark A.

214

Rev. Mammalian Function  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(rumi­ nant) and postgastric (cecant) fermen­ tation. The advantages of ruminant digestion are emphasized, but the greater ability of cecants to utilize low protein roughage is not discussed. Similarly, the high blood pressures of mammals...

Armitage, Kenneth

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Frequency Response Analysis Tool  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Frequency response has received a lot of attention in recent years at the national level, which culminated in the development and approval of North American Electricity Reliability Corporation (NERC) BAL-003-1 Frequency Response and Frequency Bias Setting Reliability Standard. This report is prepared to describe the details of the work conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in collaboration with the Bonneville Power Administration and Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) Joint Synchronized Information Subcommittee (JSIS) to develop a frequency response analysis tool (FRAT). The document provides the details on the methodology and main features of the FRAT. The tool manages the database of under-frequency events and calculates the frequency response baseline. Frequency response calculations are consistent with frequency response measure (FRM) in NERC BAL-003-1 for an interconnection and balancing authority. The FRAT can use both phasor measurement unit (PMU) data, where available, and supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) data. The tool is also capable of automatically generating NERC Frequency Response Survey (FRS) forms required by BAL-003-1 Standard.

Etingov, Pavel V.; Kosterev, Dmitry; Dai, T.

2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

216

Accident Response Group  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish Department of Energy (DOE) policy for DOE response to accidents and significant incidents involving nuclear weapons or nuclear weapon components. Cancels DOE O 5530.1. Canceled by DOE O 153.1.

1991-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

217

What's BP's social responsibility?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

would like to suggest a third, inanimate culprit: the cult of corporate social responsibility. As crude poured into the Gulf of Mexico and the world economy struggled to recover from the financial crisis

218

Oil spill response resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS. TABLE OF CONTENTS . . Vn INTRODUCTION. . Oil Pollution Act. Oil Spill Response Equipment . . OB JECTIVES . 12 LITERATURE REVIEW. United States Contingency Plan. . Response Resources Definition of Clean in Context to an Oil Spill. Oil... this fitle. Title IV expands federal authority in managing oil spill clean up operations and amends the provisions for oil spill clean up under the Federal Water Pollution Control Act. It also called for Oil spill plans for vessels and facilities starting...

Muthukrishnan, Shankar

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

The use of a simple cellular automata model as a testbed for kinetic theories of vehicular traffic flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The broad objective of this thesis is to explore the potential for the use of Cellular Automata (CA) models to provide a testbed for comparison of different kinetic models of vehicular traffic. We intend to develop a quantitative technique...

Raney, Bryan Keith

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

An Analog Cellular Automaton Model of Gravitation: Planck-Scale Black Holes Randall C. O'Reilly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Analog Cellular Automaton Model of Gravitation: Planck-Scale Black Holes Randall C. O by Randall C. O'Reilly, initially published online at URL listed below on 12/28/05 (Dated: December 28, 2005

O'Reilly, Randall C.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

A Hybrid Geometric Modeling Method for Large Scale Conformal Cellular 3D Systems, 26081 Avenue Hall, Valencia, CA 91354  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structures, Conformal Structures, Additive Manufacturing, STL 1 INTRODUCTION Cellular material structures can distributions than stochastic metal foams [5]. With the development of additive manufacturing processes (also, 8, 9]. The manufacturing of mesoscopic truss structures utilizes the unique capability of additive

Chen, Yong

222

The effects of captan and dieldrin on the growth and macromolecular synthesis of the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EFFECTS OF CAPTAN AND DIELDRIN ON THE GROWTH AND MACROMOLECULAR SYNTHESIS OF THE CELLULAR SLIME MOLD Dictyosteiium discoideum A Thesis by RODNEY JOHN BUSHWAY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1973 Major Subject: Biochemistry and Biophysics THE EFFECTS OF CAFTAN AND DIELDRIN ON THE GROWTH AND MACROMOLECULAR SYNTHESIS OF THE CELLULAR SLIME MOLD Diotyosteiiwn discoidewn A Thesis by RODNEY...

Bushway, Rodney John

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Identification and characterization of tac5, a telomerase activation mutant, characterization of DNA damage responses and assessment of interactions between telomere-related proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the genetically tractable Arabidopsis model may provide insight into the cellular response to dysfunctional telomeres. As explained in chapter IV, the yeast two-hybrid screen was utilized to confirm the interactions of ATR with AtPOT2 and Ku80 and to identify...

Jasti, Madhuri

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

224

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

No. ER06-615-000 CAISO Demand Response Resource User Guide -8 2.1. Demand Response Provides a Range of Benefits to8 2.2. Demand Response Benefits can be Quantified in Several

Heffner, Grayson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Structural building response review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The integrity of a nuclear power plant during a postulated seismic event is required to protect the public against radiation. Therefore, a detailed set of seismic analyses of various structures and equipment is performed while designing a nuclear power plant. This report describes the structural response analysis method, including the structural model, soil-structure interaction as it relates to structural models, methods for seismic structural analysis, numerical integration methods, methods for non-seismic response analysis approaches for various response combinations, structural damping values, nonlinear response, uncertainties in structural properties, and structural response analysis using random properties. The report describes the state-of-the-art in these areas for nuclear power plants. It also details the past studies made at Sargent and Lundy to evaluate different alternatives and the conclusions reached for the specific purposes that those studies were intended. These results were incorporated here because they fall into the general scope of this report. The scope of the present task does not include performing new calculations.

Not Available

1980-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

226

GIS-Based Cellular Automaton Model to allocate Kansas High Plains Irrigated Agriculture Land Use  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GIS-Based Cellular Automaton Model to Allocate Irrigated Agriculture Land Use Peiwen Chiu Kansas State University GIS Day 2013 November 20, 2013 University of Kansas High Plains/Ogallala Aquifer 8 States 186,000 mi2 480,000 km2 http... of Acreage From the Model Iterations What’s Next This work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation (grant GEO0909515) and the United States Department of Agriculture/Agricultural Research Service (Ogallala Aquifer Initiative). Any findings...

Chiu, Peiwen

2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

227

Comprehensive functional testing and dynamic compensation techniques for Cellular Neural Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is an analog computer that has the capability to solve a first order differential equation as is often required for spatial filtering operations in image processing applications. Each cell in the array is identical and is connected only to it's nearest... The first order nonlinear differential equation defining the dynamics of a cellular neural network cell can be written as follows [I]: C ' = ? ' + g A(i j;)r, l)y& &(r)+ g B(i j;k, l)u&&+I (la) [C()r, l)e)v(i j ) ' C(k, l)aV(i j ) y' j(r) (~xij (r)+l~ )ij...

Grimaila, Michael Russell

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Response Operations | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Response Operations Response Operations Overview The federal government primarily plays a coordinating and support role during...

229

Responsibility, Moral and Otherwise  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the waters by blurring concerns about depth with debates about the nature and basis of moral demands. Thus, for example, one increasingly popular view understands moral responsibility as accountability for meeting standards we impose on each other... from what is needed for something to be properly attributed to one’s self, I don’t believe that the former kind builds upon the latter, or that it is necessarily deeper. What depth there might be to our status as responsible beings, a depth we...

Wolf, Susan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Logarithmic transformation of response Logarithmic transformation of response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Logarithmic transformation of response Logarithmic transformation of response Often, support S of Y is S = (0, ). Logarithm is then one of transformations to consider when trying to obtain a correct (wrong. Model Building 1. Transformation of response #12;Logarithmic transformation of response When does

Komarek, Arnost

231

Cellular Automata Theory and Physics A new Paradigm for the Unification of Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new paradigm for the unification of physics is described. It is called Cellular Automata (CA) theory, which is the most massively parallel computer model currently known to science. We maintain that at the tiniest distance and time scales the universe is completely deterministic, and utterly simple. Our universe is a Cellular Automaton consisting of a huge array of cells capable of storing numeric information. These cells form a vast, 3D 'geometric' CA, where each cell has 26 surrounding neighboring cells that influence the state of a given cell. CA theory directly implies that all the laws of physics must result from interactions that are strictly local, therefore forbidding any form of action at a distance. CA theory suggests that space, time, matter, energy, and motion are all the same thing: the end result of information changing state in the CA. The CA model automatically contains an inherent maximum speed limit for which information can be moved from place to place.We propose that light (photon) motio...

Ostoma, T; Ostoma, Tom; Trushyk, Mike

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

General Responsibilities and Requirements  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The material presented in this guide provides suggestions and acceptable ways of implementing DOE M 435.1-1 and should not be viewed as additional or mandatory requirements. The objective of the guide is to ensure that responsible individuals understand what is necessary and acceptable for implementing the requirements of DOE M 435.1-1.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

233

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 2.0 Demand ResponseFully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities,was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Response properties of neighboring neurons in the auditory midbrain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The inferior colliculus, the primary nucleus in the mammalian auditory midbrain, occupies a central position in the ascending auditory pathway. Nearly all ascending neural pathways converge and synapse in the central nucleus ...

Seshagiri, Chandran V. (Chandran Venkatraman)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Structural response synthesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The open loop control technique of predicting a conditioned input signal based on a specified output response for a second order system has been analyzed both analytically and numerically to gain a firm understanding of the method. Differences between this method of control and digital closed loop control using pole cancellation were investigated as a follow up to previous experimental work. Application of the technique to diamond turning using a fast tool is also discussed.

Ozisik, H.; Keltie, R.F.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Whole-brain calcium imaging with cellular resolution in freely behaving C. elegans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The ability to acquire large-scale recordings of neuronal activity in awake and unrestrained animals poses a major challenge for studying neural coding of animal behavior. We present a new instrument capable of recording intracellular calcium transients from every neuron in the head of a freely behaving C. elegans with cellular resolution while simultaneously recording the animal's position, posture and locomotion. We employ spinning-disk confocal microscopy to capture 3D volumetric fluorescent images of neurons expressing the calcium indicator GCaMP6s at 5 head-volumes per second. Two cameras simultaneously monitor the animal's position and orientation. Custom software tracks the 3D position of the animal's head in real-time and adjusts a motorized stage to keep it within the field of view as the animal roams freely. We observe calcium transients from 78 neurons and correlate this activity with the animal's behavior. Across worms, multiple neurons show significant correlations with modes of behavior correspo...

Nguyen, Jeffrey P; Linder, Ashley N; Plummer, George S; Shaevitz, Joshua W; Leifer, Andrew M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Cellular telephone-based radiation sensor and wide-area detection network  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A network of radiation detection instruments, each having a small solid state radiation sensor module integrated into a cellular phone for providing radiation detection data and analysis directly to a user. The sensor module includes a solid-state crystal bonded to an ASIC readout providing a low cost, low power, light weight compact instrument to detect and measure radiation energies in the local ambient radiation field. In particular, the photon energy, time of event, and location of the detection instrument at the time of detection is recorded for real time transmission to a central data collection/analysis system. The collected data from the entire network of radiation detection instruments are combined by intelligent correlation/analysis algorithms which map the background radiation and detect, identify and track radiation anomalies in the region.

Craig, William W. (Pittsburg, CA); Labov, Simon E. (Berkeley, CA)

2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

238

Neuronal micro-culture engineering by microchannel devices of cellular scale dimensions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Purpose: The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effect of microchannel geometry on neuronal cultures and to maintain these cultures for long period of time (over several weeks) inside the closed microchannels of cellular scale dimensions. Methods: The primary hippocampal neurons from E-18 rat were cultured inside the closed polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannels of varying sizes. The effect of the channel geometry on the spatial and the temporal variations in the neural microenvironment was investigated by studying neural maturation and variation in the media osmolality respectively. The cultures were maintained for longer time spans by PDMS device pretreatment, control on media evaporation (by using hydrophobic ethylene propylene membrane) and an effective culture maintenance protocol. Further, the devices were integrated with the planar microelectrode arrays (MEA) to record spontaneous electrical activity. Results: A direct influence of channel geometry on neuron maturation was observed ...

Goyal, Gaurav

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Cancer Genesis and Progression as Dynamics in Functional Landscape of Endogenous Molecular-Cellular Network  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An endogenous molecular-cellular network for both normal and abnormal functions is assumed to exist. This endogenous network forms a nonlinear stochastic dynamical system, with many stable attractors in its functional landscape. Normal or abnormal robust states can be decided by this network in a manner similar to the neural network. In this context cancer is hypothesized as one of its robust intrinsic states. This hypothesis implies that a nonlinear stochastic mathematical cancer model is constructible based on available experimental data and its quantitative prediction is directly testable. Within such model the genesis and progression of cancer may be viewed as stochastic transitions between different attractors. Thus it further suggests that progressions are not arbitrary. Other important issues on cancer, such as genetic vs epigenetics, double-edge effect, dormancy, are discussed in the light of present hypothesis. A different set of strategies for cancer prevention, cure, and care, is therefore suggested.

P. Ao; D. Galas; L. Hood; X. -M. Zhu

2007-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

240

Quantum Field as a quantum cellular automaton: the Dirac free evolution in one dimension  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a quantum cellular automaton model in one space-dimension which has the Dirac equation as emergent. This model, a discrete-time and causal unitary evolution of a lattice of quantum systems, is derived from the assumptions of homogeneity, parity and time-reversal invariance. The comparison between the automaton and the Dirac evolutions is rigorously set as a discrimination problem between unitary channels. We derive an exact lower bound for the probability of error in the discrimination as an explicit function of the mass, the number and the momentum of the particles, and the duration of the evolution. Computing this bound with experimentally achievable values, we see that in that regime the QCA model cannot be discriminated from the usual Dirac evolution. Finally, we show that the evolution of one-particle states with narrow-band in momentum can be effi- ciently simulated by a dispersive differential equation for any regime. This analysis allows for a comparison with the dynamics of wave-packets as it is described by the usual Dirac equation. This paper is a first step in exploring the idea that quantum field theory could be grounded on a more fundamental quantum cellular automaton model and that physical dynamics could emerge from quantum information processing. In this framework, the discretization is a central ingredient and not only a tool for performing non-perturbative calculation as in lattice gauge theory. The automaton model, endowed with a precise notion of local observables and a full probabilistic interpretation, could lead to a coherent unification of an hypothetical discrete Planck scale with the usual Fermi scale of high-energy physics.

Alessandro Bisio; Giacomo Mauro D'Ariano; Alessandro Tosini

2015-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

The Media Spectacle of Terrorism and Response-Able Literature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE MEDIA SPECTACLE OF TERRORISM AND RESPONSE-ABLE LITERATURE A Dissertation by DAVID COCKLEY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY May 2009 Major Subject: English THE MEDIA SPECTACLE OF TERRORISM AND RESPONSE-ABLE LITERATURE A Dissertation by DAVID COCKLEY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University...

Cockley, David

2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

242

Correlation of globe thermometer response and a YSI radiometer response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CORRELATION OF GLOBE THERMOMETER RESPONSE AND A YSI RADIOMETER RESPONSE A Thesis by ROBERT HOWARD FRANKNECHT Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1979 Major Subjects Industrial Hygiene CORRELATION OF GLOBE THERMOMETER RESPONSE AND A YSI RADIOMETER RESPONSE A Thesis by ROBERT HOMARD FRANKNECHT Approved as to sty1e and content by: C'6~& . ~ Chairman of Committee ead...

Franknecht, Robert Howard

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Chk2 regulates transcription-independent p53-mediated apoptosis in response to DNA damage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The tumor suppressor protein p53 plays a central role in the induction of apoptosis in response to genotoxic stress. The protein kinase Chk2 is an important regulator of p53 function in mammalian cells exposed to ionizing radiation (IR). Cells derived from Chk2-deficient mice are resistant to the induction of apoptosis by IR, and this resistance has been thought to be a result of the defective transcriptional activation of p53 target genes. It was recently shown, however, that p53 itself and histone H1.2 translocate to mitochondria and thereby induces apoptosis in a transcription-independent manner in response to IR. We have now examined whether Chk2 also regulates the transcription-independent induction of apoptosis by p53 and histone H1.2. The reduced ability of IR to induce p53 stabilization in Chk2-deficient thymocytes was associated with a marked impairment of p53 and histone H1 translocation to mitochondria. These results suggest that Chk2 regulates the transcription-independent mechanism of p53-mediated apoptosis by inducing stabilization of p53 in response to IR.

Chen Chen [Department of Geriatric Research, National Institute for Longevity Sciences, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Obu, Aichi 474-8522 (Japan); Shimizu, Shigeomi [Department of Post-Genomics Diseases, Osaka University Medical School, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Tsujimoto, Yoshihide [Department of Post-Genomics Diseases, Osaka University Medical School, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Motoyama, Noboru [Department of Geriatric Research, National Institute for Longevity Sciences, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Obu, Aichi 474-8522 (Japan)]. E-mail: motoyama@nils.go.jp

2005-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

244

CONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to RCUK Large Facilities Roadmap  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to RCUK Large Facilities Roadmap December 2007 Page 1 of 4 RCUK Large Facilities Roadmap Response by the Wellcome Trust December 2007 1. The Wellcome Trust is pleased to have the opportunity to feed into the process of prioritising the RCUK Large Facilities Roadmap

Rambaut, Andrew

245

CONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to Sustainable Food  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to Sustainable Food March 2011 Page 1 of 2 House of Commons Environmental Audit Committee: Sustainable Food Inquiry Response by the Wellcome Trust March 2011 solutions for the production of healthy and sustainable food. As a research funder dedicated to improving

Rambaut, Andrew

246

Technology Partnership Ombudsman - Roles, Responsibilities, Authoritie...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Technology Partnership Ombudsman - Roles, Responsibilities, Authorities and Accountabilities Technology Partnership Ombudsman - Roles, Responsibilities, Authorities and...

247

Assessment of Demand Response Resource  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessment of Demand Response Resource Potentials for PGE and Pacific Power Prepared for: Portland January 15, 2004 K:\\Projects\\2003-53 (PGE,PC) Assess Demand Response\\Report\\Revised Report_011504.doc #12;#12;quantec Assessment of Demand Response Resource Potentials for I-1 PGE and Pacific Power I. Introduction

248

Oxidative stress suppresses the cellular bioenergetic effect of the 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase/hydrogen sulfide pathway  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: •Oxidative stress impairs 3-MST-derived H{sub 2}S production in isolated enzyme and in isolated mitochondria. •This impairs the stimulatory bioenergetic effects of H{sub 2}S in hepatocytes. •This has implications for the pathophysiology of diseases with oxidative stress. -- Abstract: Recent data show that lower concentrations of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), as well as endogenous, intramitochondrial production of H{sub 2}S by the 3-mercaptopyruvate (3-MP)/3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3-MST) pathway serves as an electron donor and inorganic source of energy to support mitochondrial electron transport and ATP generation in mammalian cells by donating electrons to Complex II. The aim of our study was to investigate the role of oxidative stress on the activity of the 3-MP/3-MST/H{sub 2}S pathway in vitro. Hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, 100–500 ?M) caused a concentration-dependent decrease in the activity of recombinant mouse 3-MST enzyme. In mitochondria isolated from murine hepatoma cells, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (50–500 ?M) caused a concentration-dependent decrease in production of H{sub 2}S from 3-MP. In cultured murine hepatoma cells H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, (3–100 ?M), did not result in overall cytotoxicity, but caused a partial decrease in basal oxygen consumption and respiratory reserve rapacity. The positive bioenergetic effect of 3-MP (100–300 nM) was completely abolished by pre-treatment of the cells with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (50 ?M). The current findings demonstrate that oxidative stress inhibits 3-MST activity and interferes with the positive bioenergetic role of the 3-MP/3-MST/H{sub 2}S pathway. These findings may have implications for the pathophysiology of various conditions associated with increased oxidative stress, such as various forms of critical illness, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes or physiological aging.

Módis, Katalin [Department of Anesthesiology, University of Texas Medical Branch and Shriners Burns Hospital for Children, Galveston, TX (United States)] [Department of Anesthesiology, University of Texas Medical Branch and Shriners Burns Hospital for Children, Galveston, TX (United States); Asimakopoulou, Antonia [Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacology, Department of Pharmacy, University of Patras, Patras (Greece)] [Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacology, Department of Pharmacy, University of Patras, Patras (Greece); Coletta, Ciro [Department of Anesthesiology, University of Texas Medical Branch and Shriners Burns Hospital for Children, Galveston, TX (United States)] [Department of Anesthesiology, University of Texas Medical Branch and Shriners Burns Hospital for Children, Galveston, TX (United States); Papapetropoulos, Andreas [Department of Anesthesiology, University of Texas Medical Branch and Shriners Burns Hospital for Children, Galveston, TX (United States) [Department of Anesthesiology, University of Texas Medical Branch and Shriners Burns Hospital for Children, Galveston, TX (United States); Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacology, Department of Pharmacy, University of Patras, Patras (Greece); Szabo, Csaba, E-mail: szabocsaba@aol.com [Department of Anesthesiology, University of Texas Medical Branch and Shriners Burns Hospital for Children, Galveston, TX (United States)] [Department of Anesthesiology, University of Texas Medical Branch and Shriners Burns Hospital for Children, Galveston, TX (United States)

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

249

KELP VERSUS CORALLINE: CELLULAR BASIS FOR MECHANICAL STRENGTH IN THE WAVE-SWEPT SEAWEED CALLIARTHRON (CORALLINACEAE, RHODOPHYTA)1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

KELP VERSUS CORALLINE: CELLULAR BASIS FOR MECHANICAL STRENGTH IN THE WAVE-SWEPT SEAWEED- ing in girth versus growing strong tissues. Brown macroalgae, such as kelps, grow thick stipes an order of magnitude stronger than some kelp tissues, but genicula rarely exceed 1 mm in diameter

Martone, Patrick T.

250

Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #1 Answer Key Fall 2003 Fall 2003 Biology 111 Exam #1 Answer Key -Cellular Communications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- Cellular Communications There is no time limit on this test, though I have tried to design one that you to be labeled. Furthermore, I was looking for a diagram of an enzyme that had a shape complementary to the alpha activation energy. Energy needed to initiate an chemical reaction. b. List three different non

Campbell, A. Malcolm

251

Cellular HIV-1 DNA load predicts HIV-RNA rebound and the outcome of highly active antiretroviral therapy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cellular HIV-1 DNA load predicts HIV-RNA rebound and the outcome of highly active antiretroviral-time PCR assay in multiple samples per patient with a median (interquartile range) follow-up of 76 (45­102) weeks. Results: The median (range) baseline HIV-1 DNA load was 297 (, 10 to 3468) copies per 1 3 106

252

Project #14: Shuming Nie and Peng Xi: Superresolution Imaging of Cellular Dynamics with Quantum Dots and STED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, therefore opening up new possibilities in studying molecular dynamics in living cells. A major engineering of fluorescent labels for imaging applications. Compared to organic dyes and fluorescent proteins, QDs have to develop nextgeneration QDs for molecular and cellular imaging at ultrahigh resolution and sensitivity

Weber, Rodney

253

he building that houses the Donnelly Centre for Cellular and Biomolecular Research can be described as transparent,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

T he building that houses the Donnelly Centre for Cellular and Biomolecular Research can faculty. Each of the new recruits, along with other researchers in the building, have started new towards the glass wall of the building to the expansive and unobstructed view of the skyline and the city

Zandstra, Peter W.

254

Biology is the study of life. Biologists analyze how systems function in organisms at the cellular and molecular levels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biology is the study of life. Biologists analyze how systems function in organisms at the cellular and public sectors. People with degrees in biology are needed in areas as diverse as farming, food processing, and the environment, as well as in the biomedical and biotechnology fields. A degree in biology can also be used

Saldin, Dilano

255

On Digital Philosophy (Discrete Physics) and the Cellular Automaton: A Mathematical Deterministic Structure for Reality (as a Huge Computer Simulation)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this note we overview some notable definitions, works and thoughts concerning digital philosophy - that mainly, suggests a finite and discrete characteristic for the real world - and the cellular automaton which, definitely, could be a more (or maybe the one most) perfect mathematical deterministic model for physical world than other models.

Zahedi, Ramin

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

BIOLOGY OF REPRODUCTION 64, 611618 (2001) Increased Proliferative Activity and Programmed Cellular Death in the Turkey Hen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cellular Death in the Turkey Hen Pituitary Gland Following Interruption of Incubation Behavior1 R. Ramesh,2 in turkey hens is charac- terized by ovarian regression, hyperprolactinemia, and persis- tent nesting. Nest-deprivation of incubating turkey hens results in disruption of broodiness accompanied by a precipitous de- cline in plasma

Ramachandran, Ramesh

257

MMA-WS12/13,R.Hoffmann,Rechnerarchitektur,TUDarmstadt 3. Cellular Automata (CA) Part 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

& Literature Cellular Automata Basics Formal Definition Grids Boundaries Neighborhoods Rule Types Speed Diffusion Hydrodynamics Sound Waves Wave Optics Ising Spin Systems Simulation of Digital Logic Numerical of a liquid, the interfacial tension between two liquids, or that between a liquid and a solid. Surfactants

Hoffmann, Rolf

258

MMA-WS13/14,R.Hoffmann,Rechnerarchitektur,TUDarmstadt 3. Cellular Automata (CA) Part 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

& Literature Cellular Automata Basics Formal Definition Grids Boundaries Neighborhoods Rule Types Speed Diffusion Hydrodynamics Sound Waves Wave Optics Ising Spin Systems Simulation of Digital Logic Numerical of a liquid, the interfacial tension between two liquids, or that between a liquid and a solid. Surfactants

Hoffmann, Rolf

259

IEEE Wireless Communications April 201374 1536-1284/13/$25.00 2013 IEEE NEXT GENERATION COGNITIVE CELLULAR NETWORKS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the licensed spectrum, a crucial requirement of cognitive radio networks is that they must effi- ciently COGNITIVE CELLULAR NETWORKS INTRODUCTION Radio frequency (RF) spectrum is a valuable but tightly regulated for sharing spectrum with cognitive radio networks. Hence, cognitive radios should be able to independently

Wang, Cheng-Xiang

260

Insights into the regulation of NF-kappaB and mediation of the cellular stress response by NF-kappaB  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cancer Res 65, 4273-4281. Hoffmann, A. , Natoli, G. , andS.L. , Huang, C.S. , and Hoffmann, A. (2006). IkappaBepsilonK.I. , DiDonato, J.A. , Hoffmann, A. , Hardwick, J.M. , and

Ho, Jessica Q.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Insights into the regulation of NF-kappaB and mediation of the cellular stress response by NF-kappaB  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SDS sodium dodecyl sulfate TAD transcription activationtransactivating domains (TADs), which are thought to assistis because both p50 and p52 lack TAD domains, unlike p65, c-

Ho, Jessica Q.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Replication protein A and g-H2AX foci assembly is triggered by cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pathway that removes the oxidized base lesions from the genomic DNA [6]. Evidence for the stimulation

263

Cellular Biology at the University of Utah The Department of Biology at the University of Utah invites applications for a tenure-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cellular Biology at the University of Utah The Department of Biology at the University of Utah biology. Applicants should be addressing fundamental questions in any aspect of eukaryotic cellular biology including, but not limited to, gene expression, signaling, trafficking, development, evolution

Tipple, Brett

264

Texas AgriLife Research Procedure 25.99.09.A1 Cellular Communication Devices and Services Page 1 of 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a personal device. To receive reimbursement, the employee will submit an itemized bill documenting callsTexas AgriLife Research Procedure 25.99.09.A1 Cellular Communication Devices and Services Page 1 of 3 Texas AgriLife Research Procedure 25.99.09.A1.01 CELLULAR COMMUNICATION DEVICES AND SERVICES

265

Cellular morphology of organic-inorganic hybrid foams based on alkali alumino-silicate matrix  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Organic-inorganic hybrid foams based on an alkali alumino-silicate matrix were prepared by using different foaming methods. Initially, the synthesis of an inorganic matrix by using aluminosilicate particles, activated through a sodium silicate solution, was performed at room temperature. Subsequently the viscous paste was foamed by using three different methods. In the first method, gaseous hydrogen produced by the oxidization of Si powder in an alkaline media, was used as blowing agent to generate gas bubbles in the paste. In the second method, the porous structure was generated by mixing the paste with a “meringue” type of foam previously prepared by whipping, under vigorous stirring, a water solution containing vegetal proteins as surfactants. In the third method, a combination of these two methods was employed. The foamed systems were consolidated for 24 hours at 40°C and then characterized by FTIR, X-Ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and compression tests. Low density foams (?500 Kg/m{sup 3}) with good cellular structure and mechanical properties were obtained by combining the “meringue” approach with the use of the chemical blowing agent based on Si.

Verdolotti, Letizia; Capasso, Ilaria; Lavorgna, Marino [Institute of Composite and Biomedical Materials, National Research Council, Naples (Italy); Liguori, Barbara; Caputo, Domenico [Department of Chemical, Materials and Industrial Engineering, University of Naples Federico II, Naples (Italy); Iannace, Salvatore [Institute of Composite and Biomedical Materials, National Research Council, Naples, Italy and IMAST SCRAL, Piazza Bovio 22 Napoli 80133 (Italy)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

266

The business value of demand response for balance responsible parties.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? By using IT-solutions, the flexibility on the demand side in the electrical systems could be increased. This is called demand response and is part… (more)

Jonsson, Mattias

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

How to Get More Response from Demand Response  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite all the rhetoric, demand response's contribution to meet peak load will remain elusive in the absence of enabling technology and standardized business protocols. (author)

Neumann, Scott; Sioshansi, Fereidoon; Vojdani, Ali; Yee, Gaymond

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

268

Biofilm Shows Spatially Stratified Metabolic Responses to Contaminant Exposure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to elucidate the spatiotemporal responses of live S. oneidensis MR-1 biofilms to U(VI) (uranyl, UO22+) and Cr(VI) (chromate, CrO42-), important environmental contaminants at DOE contaminated sites. Toward this goal, we applied noninvasive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging, diffusion, relaxation and spectroscopy techniques to monitor in situ spatiotemporal responses of S. oneidensis biofilms to U(VI) and Cr(VI) exposure in terms of changes in biofilm structures, diffusion properties, and cellular metabolism. Exposure to U(VI) or Cr(VI) did not appear to change the overall biomass distribution but caused changes in the physicochemical microenvironments inside the biofilm as indicated by diffusion measurements. Changes in the diffusion properties of the biofilms in response to U(VI) and Cr(VI) exposure imply a novel function of the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) affecting the biotransformation and transport of contaminants in the environment. In the presence of U(VI) or Cr(VI), the anaerobic metabolism of lactate was inhibited significantly, although the biofilms were still capable of reducing U(VI) and Cr(VI). Local concentrations of Cr(III)aq in the biofilm suggested relatively high Cr(VI) reduction activities at the top of the biofilm, near the medium-biofilm interface. The depth-resolved metabolic activities of the biofilm suggested higher diversion effects of gluconeogenesis and C1 metabolism pathways at the bottom of the biofilm and in the presence of U(VI). This study provides a noninvasive means to investigate spatiotemporal responses of biofilms, including surface-associated microbial communities in engineering, natural and medical settings, to various environmental perturbations including exposure to environmental contaminants and antimicrobials.

Cao, Bin; Majors, Paul D.; Ahmed, B.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Sylvia, Crystal P.; Shi, Liang; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beyenal, Haluk

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and D. Kathan (2009). Demand Response in U.S. ElectricityEnergy Financial Group. Demand Response Research Center [2008). Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering.

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Hawaiian Electric Company Demand Response Roadmap Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Like HECO actual utility demand response implementations canindustry-wide utility demand response applications tend toobjective. Figure 4. Demand Response Objectives 17  

Levy, Roger

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

23 ii Retail Demand Response in SPP List of Figures and10 Figure 3. Demand Response Resources by11 Figure 4. Existing Demand Response Resources by Type of

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

their partnership in demand response automation research andand Techniques for Demand Response. LBNL Report 59975. Mayof Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities.

Kiliccote, Sila; Global Energy Partners; Pacific Gas and Electric Company

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities”of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities”,was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and

Watson, David S.; Kiliccote, Sila; Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Hawaiian Electric Company Demand Response Roadmap Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of control. Water heater demand response options are notcurrent water heater and air conditioning demand responsecustomer response Demand response water heater participation

Levy, Roger

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sector, the demand response potential of California buildinga demand response event prohibit a building’s participationdemand response strategies in California buildings are

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings DavidStrategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings Davidadjusted for demand response in commercial buildings. The

Watson, David S.; Kiliccote, Sila; Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Response Systems National Conference on BuildingDemand Response Systems National Conference on BuildingDemand Response Systems National Conference on Building

Kiliccote, Sila; Global Energy Partners; Pacific Gas and Electric Company

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In terms of demand response capability, building operatorsautomated demand response and improve building energy andand demand response features directly into building design

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Demand Response for Ancillary Services  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many demand response resources are technically capable of providing ancillary services. In some cases, they can provide superior response to generators, as the curtailment of load is typically much faster than ramping thermal and hydropower plants. Analysis and quantification of demand response resources providing ancillary services is necessary to understand the resources economic value and impact on the power system. Methodologies used to study grid integration of variable generation can be adapted to the study of demand response. In the present work, we describe and illustrate a methodology to construct detailed temporal and spatial representations of the demand response resource and to examine how to incorporate those resources into power system models. In addition, the paper outlines ways to evaluate barriers to implementation. We demonstrate how the combination of these three analyses can be used to translate the technical potential for demand response providing ancillary services into a realizable potential.

Alkadi, Nasr E [ORNL; Starke, Michael R [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Emergency Response Guideline Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Task 5 of the collaborative effort between ORNL, Brazil, and Westinghouse for the International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative entitled “Development of Advanced Instrumentation and Control for an Integrated Primary System Reactor” focuses on operator control and protection system interaction, with particular emphasis on developing emergency response guidelines (ERGs). As in the earlier tasks, we will use the IRIS plant as a specific example of an integrated primary system reactor (IPSR) design. The present state of the IRIS plant design – specifically, the lack of a detailed secondary system design – precludes establishing detailed emergency procedures at this time. However, we can create a structure for their eventual development. This report summarizes our progress to date. Section 1.2 describes the scope of this effort. Section 2 compares IPSR ERG development to the recent AP1000 effort, and identifies three key plant differences that affect the ERGs and control room designs. The next three sections investigate these differences in more detail. Section 3 reviews the IRIS Safety-by-Design™ philosophy and its impact on the ERGs. Section 4 looks at differences between the IRIS and traditional loop PWR I&C Systems, and considers their implications for both control room design and ERG development. Section 5 examines the implications of having one operating staff control multiple reactor units. Section 6 provides sample IRIS emergency operating procedures (EOPs). Section 7 summarizes our conclusions.

Gary D. Storrick

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Emergency Response Health Physics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Health physics is an important discipline with regard to understanding the effects of radiation on human health; however, there are major differences between health physics for research or occupational safety and health physics during a large-scale radiological emergency. The deployment of a U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) monitoring and assessment team to Japan in the wake of the March 2011 accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant yielded a wealth of lessons on these difference. Critical teams (CMOC (Consequence Management Outside the Continental U.S.) and CMHT (Consequence Management Home Team) ) worked together to collect, compile, review, and analyze radiological data from Japan to support the response needs of and answer questions from the Government of Japan, the U.S. military in Japan, the U.S. Embassy and U.S. citizens in Japan, and U.S. citizens in America. This paper addresses the unique challenges presented to the health physicist or analyst of radiological data in a large-scale emergency. A key lesson learned was that public perception and the availability of technology with social media requires a diligent effort to keep the public informed of the science behind the decisions in a manner that is meaningful to them.

Mena, RaJah [National Security Technologies, LLC, Remote Sensing Laboratory–Nellis; Pemberton, Wendy [National Security Technologies, LLC, Remote Sensing Laboratory–Nellis; Beal, William [Remote Sensing Laboratory at Andrews

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Demand Response: Load Management Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CenterPoint Load Management Programs CATEE Conference October, 2012 Agenda Outline I. General Demand Response Definition II. General Demand Response Program Rules III. CenterPoint Commercial Program IV. CenterPoint Residential Programs... V. Residential Discussion Points Demand Response Definition of load management per energy efficiency rule 25.181: ? Load control activities that result in a reduction in peak demand, or a shifting of energy usage from a peak to an off...

Simon, J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Demand Response and Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Response & Energy Efficiency International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations ESL-IC-09-11-05 Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Austin, Texas, November 17 - 19, 2009 2 ?Less than 5... for Enhanced Building Operations, Austin, Texas, November 17 - 19, 2009 5 What is Demand Response? ?The temporary reduction of electricity demanded from the grid by an end-user in response to capacity shortages, system reliability events, or high wholesale...

284

Demand Response Programs, 6. edition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report provides a look at the past, present, and future state of the market for demand/load response based upon market price signals. It is intended to provide significant value to individuals and companies who are considering participating in demand response programs, energy providers and ISOs interested in offering demand response programs, and consultants and analysts looking for detailed information on demand response technology, applications, and participants. The report offers a look at the current Demand Response environment in the energy industry by: defining what demand response programs are; detailing the evolution of program types over the last 30 years; discussing the key drivers of current initiatives; identifying barriers and keys to success for the programs; discussing the argument against subsidization of demand response; describing the different types of programs that exist including:direct load control, interruptible load, curtailable load, time-of-use, real time pricing, and demand bidding/buyback; providing examples of the different types of programs; examining the enablers of demand response programs; and, providing a look at major demand response programs.

NONE

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

285

Pantex Plant Emergency Response Exercise  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Joint Information Center Emergency Manager Offsite Interface Coordinator DOE Technical Advisor Emergency Press Center Radiation Safety Figure 1. Pantex Plant Emergency Response...

286

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

37 3.8.1. Impacts of DR programs on Wholesale MarketPrice Response on Wholesale Markets.in Organized Wholesale Markets .19

Heffner, Grayson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Demand Response Technology Roadmap A  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

workshop agendas, presentation materials, and transcripts. For the background to the Demand Response Technology Roadmap and to make use of individual roadmaps, the reader is...

288

Demand Response Technology Roadmap M  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

between May 2014 and February 2015. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Demand Response Executive Sponsor Team decided upon the scope of the project in May. Two subsequent...

289

Improving the accuracy and efficiency of time-resolved electronic spectra calculations: Cellular dephasing representation with a prefactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Time-resolved electronic spectra can be obtained as the Fourier transform of a special type of time correlation function known as fidelity amplitude, which, in turn, can be evaluated approximately and efficiently with the dephasing representation. Here we improve both the accuracy of this approximation—with an amplitude correction derived from the phase-space propagator—and its efficiency—with an improved cellular scheme employing inverse Weierstrass transform and optimal scaling of the cell size. We demonstrate the advantages of the new methodology by computing dispersed time-resolved stimulated emission spectra in the harmonic potential, pyrazine, and the NCO molecule. In contrast, we show that in strongly chaotic systems such as the quartic oscillator the original dephasing representation is more appropriate than either the cellular or prefactor-corrected methods.

Zambrano, Eduardo; Šulc, Miroslav; Vaní?ek, Ji?í [Laboratory of Theoretical Physical Chemistry, Institut des Sciences et Ingénierie Chimiques, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)] [Laboratory of Theoretical Physical Chemistry, Institut des Sciences et Ingénierie Chimiques, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

2013-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

290

Honeywell Demonstrates Automated Demand Response Benefits for...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Honeywell Demonstrates Automated Demand Response Benefits for Utility, Commercial, and Industrial Customers Honeywell Demonstrates Automated Demand Response Benefits for Utility,...

291

Wireless Demand Response Controls for HVAC Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

temperature-based demand response in buildings that havedemand response advantages of global zone temperature setup in buildings

Federspiel, Clifford

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Departmental Radiological Emergency Response Assets  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The order establishes requirements and responsibilities for the DOE/NNSA national radiological emergency response assets and capabilities and Nuclear Emergency Support Team assets. Cancels DOE O 5530.1A, DOE O 5530.2, DOE O 5530.3, DOE O 5530.4, and DOE O 5530.5.

2007-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

293

Automated Demand Response and Commissioning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the results from the second season of research to develop and evaluate the performance of new Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR) hardware and software technology in large facilities. Demand Response (DR) is a set of activities to reduce or shift electricity use to improve the electric grid reliability and manage electricity costs. Fully-Automated Demand Response does not involve human intervention, but is initiated at a home, building, or facility through receipt of an external communications signal. We refer to this as Auto-DR. The evaluation of the control and communications must be properly configured and pass through a set of test stages: Readiness, Approval, Price Client/Price Server Communication, Internet Gateway/Internet Relay Communication, Control of Equipment, and DR Shed Effectiveness. New commissioning tests are needed for such systems to improve connecting demand responsive building systems to the electric grid demand response systems.

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

CDK inhibitors, p21{sup Cip1} and p27{sup Kip1}, participate in cell cycle exit of mammalian cardiomyocytes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: •Expression of p21 and p27 in the hearts showed a peak during postnatal stages. •p21 and p27 bound to cyclin E, cyclin A and CDK2 in the hearts at postnatal stages. •Cardiomyocytes in both KO mice showed failure in the cell cycle exit at G1-phase. •These data show the first apparent phenotypes in the hearts of Cip/Kip KO mice. -- Abstract: Mammalian cardiomyocytes actively proliferate during embryonic stages, following which cardiomyocytes exit their cell cycle after birth. The irreversible cell cycle exit inhibits cardiac regeneration by the proliferation of pre-existing cardiomyocytes. Exactly how the cell cycle exit occurs remains largely unknown. Previously, we showed that cyclin E- and cyclin A-CDK activities are inhibited before the CDKs levels decrease in postnatal stages. This result suggests that factors such as CDK inhibitors (CKIs) inhibit CDK activities, and contribute to the cell cycle exit. In the present study, we focused on a Cip/Kip family, which can inhibit cyclin E- and cyclin A-CDK activities. Expression of p21{sup Cip1} and p27{sup Kip1} but not p57{sup Kip2} showed a peak around postnatal day 5, when cyclin E- and cyclin A-CDK activities start to decrease. p21{sup Cip1} and p27{sup Kip1} bound to cyclin E, cyclin A and CDK2 at postnatal stages. Cell cycle distribution patterns of postnatal cardiomyocytes in p21{sup Cip1} and p27{sup Kip1} knockout mice showed failure in the cell cycle exit at G1-phase, and endoreplication. These results indicate that p21{sup Cip1} and p27{sup Kip} play important roles in the cell cycle exit of postnatal cardiomyocytes.

Tane, Shoji; Ikenishi, Aiko; Okayama, Hitomi; Iwamoto, Noriko [School of Life Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University, Yonago 683-8503 (Japan)] [School of Life Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University, Yonago 683-8503 (Japan); Nakayama, Keiichi I. [Medical Institute of Bioregulation, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan)] [Medical Institute of Bioregulation, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Takeuchi, Takashi, E-mail: takeuchi@med.tottori-u.ac.jp [School of Life Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University, Yonago 683-8503 (Japan)] [School of Life Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University, Yonago 683-8503 (Japan)

2014-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

295

Detailed Modeling and Response of Demand Response Enabled Appliances  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Proper modeling of end use loads is very important in order to predict their behavior, and how they interact with the power system, including voltage and temperature dependencies, power system and load control functions, and the complex interactions that occur between devices in such an interconnected system. This paper develops multi-state time variant residential appliance models with demand response enabled capabilities in the GridLAB-DTM simulation environment. These models represent not only the baseline instantaneous power demand and energy consumption, but the control systems developed by GE Appliances to enable response to demand response signals and the change in behavior of the appliance in response to the signal. These DR enabled appliances are simulated to estimate their capability to reduce peak demand and energy consumption.

Vyakaranam, Bharat; Fuller, Jason C.

2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

296

Proteolytic processing of the cellular prion protein ? its importance in health and as a modulator of TSE disease susceptibility in sheep   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Expression of the cellular prion protein (PrPC) from the PRNP gene is crucial for the development of a group of fatal neurodegenerative disorders called prion diseases. During prion infection ...

Campbell, Lauren Smith

2014-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

297

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

12: Market Impacts of Price Responsive Load in PJM and ISO-44 Figure 15: PJM Synchronized Reserve Scheduled MW:particularly those in PJM’s service territory, have begun

Heffner, Grayson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Radiological Emergency Response Plan (Vermont)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation establishes a radiological emergency response plan fund, into which any entity operating a nuclear reactor or storing nuclear fuel and radioactive waste in this state (referred to...

299

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Standardized Automated Demand Response Signals. Presented atand Automated Demand Response in Industrial RefrigeratedActions for Industrial Demand Response in California. LBNL-

Mares, K.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Open Automated Demand Response Communications in Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A. Barat, D. Watson. 2006 Demand Response Spinning ReserveKueck, and B. Kirby 2008. Demand Response Spinning ReserveReport 2009. Open Automated Demand Response Communications

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Examining Uncertainty in Demand Response Baseline Models and Variability in Automated Response to Dynamic Pricing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

demand response and energy ef?ciency in commercial buildings,”building control strategies and techniques for demand response,”building electricity use with application to demand response,”

Mathieu, Johanna L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

INTEGRATION OF PV IN DEMAND RESPONSE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTEGRATION OF PV IN DEMAND RESPONSE PROGRAMS Prepared by Richard Perez et al. NREL subcontract response programs. This is because PV generation acts as a catalyst to demand response, markedly enhancing by solid evidence from three utility case studies. BACKGROUND Demand Response: demand response (DR

Perez, Richard R.

303

Mammalian comparative genomics and epigenomics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The human genome sequence can be thought of as an instruction manual for our species, written and rewritten over more than a billion of years of evolution. Taking a complete inventory of our genome, dissecting its genes ...

Mikkelsen, Tarjei Sigurd, 1978-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Demand Response as a System Reliability Resource  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Barat, and D. Watson. 2007. Demand Response Spinning ReserveKueck, and B. Kirby. 2009. Demand Response Spinning ReserveFormat of 2009-2011 Demand Response Activity Applications.

Joseph, Eto

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Demand Response A pilot program from NSTAR in Massachusetts,Massachusetts, aiming to test whether an intensive program of energy efficiency and demand response

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

California Long-term Energy Efficiency Strategic Plan. B-2 Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response> B-4 Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) Response...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) Response to Smart Grid RFI National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) Response to Smart Grid RFI The National Electrical...

308

Hawaiian Electric Company Demand Response Roadmap Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and best practices to guide HECO demand response developmentbest practices for DR renewable integration – Technically demand responseof best practices. This is partially because demand response

Levy, Roger

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Wireless Demand Response Controls for HVAC Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Response Controls for HVAC Systems Clifford Federspiel,tests. Figure 5: Specific HVAC electric power consumptioncontrol, demand response, HVAC, wireless Executive Summary

Federspiel, Clifford

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

water heaters with embedded demand responsive controls can be designed to automatically provide day-ahead and real-time response

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Demand Response as a System Reliability Resource  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Demand Response Technology Development The objective ofin planning demand response technology RD&D by conductingNew and Emerging Technologies into the California Smart Grid

Joseph, Eto

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

emergency response assets | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and state and local agencies to respond Accident Response Group NNSA's Accident Response Group (ARG) provides technical guidance and...

313

Transcriptional Response of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough to Oxidative Stress Mimicking Environmental Conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sulphate-reducing bacteria are anaerobes readily found in oxic-anoxic interfaces. Multiple defence pathways against oxidative conditions were identified in these organisms and proposed to be differentially expressed under different concentrations of oxygen, contributing to their ability to survive oxic conditions. In this study, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough cells were exposed to the highest concentration of oxygen that sulphate-reducing bacteria are likely to encounter in natural habitats, and the global transcriptomic response was determined. 307 genes were responsive, with cellular roles in energy metabolism, protein fate, cell envelope and regulatory functions, including multiple genes encoding heat shock proteins, peptidases and proteins with heat shock promoters. Of the oxygen reducing mechanisms of D. vulgaris only the periplasmic hydrogen-dependent mechanism is up-regulated, involving the [NiFeSe]hydrogenase, formate dehydrogenase(s) and the Hmc membrane complex. The oxidative defence response concentrates on damage repair by metal-free enzymes. These data, together with the down regulation of the Fur operon, which restricts the availability of iron, and the lack of response of the PerR operon, suggest that a major effect of this oxygen stress is the inactivation and/or degradation of multiple metalloproteins present in D. vulgaris as a consequence of oxidative damage to their metal clusters.

Pereira, Patricia M.; He, Qiang; Xavier, Antonio V.; Zhou, Jizhong; Pereira, Ines A.C.; Louro, Ricardo O.

2008-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

314

Response  

Energy Savers [EERE]

and applied science. They bring together a large set of investigators spanning science, engineering, and policy disciplines focused on a single critical national need, and work...

315

Response  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' Research |Regulation Services System:Affairs,How toDOEPatricia A.

316

Synthesis and Application of an Environmentally Insensitive Cy3-Based Arsenical Fluorescent Probe to Identify Adaptive Microbial Responses Involving Proximal Dithiol Oxidation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reversible disulfide oxidation between proximal cysteines in proteins represents a common regulatory control mechanism to modulate flux through metabolic pathways in response to changing environmental conditions. To enable in vivo measurements of cellular redox changes linked to disulfide bond formation, we have synthesized a cell-permeable monosubstituted cyanine dye derivatized with arsenic (i.e., TRAP_Cy3) to trap and visualize dithiols in cytosolic proteins. Alkylation of reactive thiols prior to displacement of the bound TRAP-Cy3 by ethanedithiol permits facile protein capture and mass spectrometric identification of proximal reduced dithiols to the exclusion of individual cysteines. Applying TRAP_Cy3 to evaluate cellular responses to increases in oxygen and light levels in the photosynthetic microbe Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, we observe large decreases in the abundance of reduced dithiols in cellular proteins, which suggest redox-dependent mechanisms involving the oxidation of proximal disulfides. Under these same growth conditions that result in the oxidation of proximal thiols, there is a reduction in the abundance of post-translational oxidative modifications involving nitrotyrosine and methionine sulfoxide formation. These results suggest that the redox status of proximal cysteines respond to environmental conditions, acting to regulate metabolic flux and minimize the formation of reactive oxygen species to decrease oxidative protein damage.

Fu, Na; Su, Dian; Cort, John R.; Chen, Baowei; Xiong, Yijia; Qian, Weijun; Konopka, Allan; Bigelow, Diana J.; Squier, Thomas C.

2013-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

317

Sam Swift is responsible for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sam Swift is responsible for managing the Light Micro- scopy Facility in the University of Dundee dimen- sional images (in x and y), or optical sections, are acquired at regular focus intervals dimensional object (see Figure 1). ArticleArticle Figure 1. Imaging in 3 dimensions ­ a stack of images

Trinkle-Mulcahy, Laura

318

The unfolded-protein-response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

proteins in the ER. At the restrictive temperature, see53mutants lack phosphomannomutaseThe unfolded- protein-response pathway in yeast The accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) triggers the increased production of several ER- resident proteins. This signalling

Walter, Peter

319

Presidential responsiveness to public opinion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the project markedly, and Dr. Paul Kellstedt patiently indulged my persistent questions about elementary aspects of time-series analysis and the nuances of the public mood measure. Kurt Ritter, Ed Portis and Cary Nederman also demonstrated generous amounts... PRESIDENCY ................71 Presidential-Congressional Action: A Literature Review ..............71 Presidential Responsiveness and Congressional Roll Call Votes...75 Data...

Vaughn, Justin Scott

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

320

Demand Response Programs for Oregon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wholesale prices and looming shortages in Western power markets in 2000-01, Portland General Electric programs for large customers remain, though they are not active at current wholesale prices. Other programs demand response for the wholesale market -- by passing through real-time prices for usage above a set

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Report 2009. Open Automated Demand Response Communicationsand Techniques for Demand Response. California Energyand S. Kiliccote. Estimating Demand Response Load Impacts:

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Opportunities, Barriers and Actions for Industrial Demand Response in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Techniques for Demand Response, report for theand Reliability Demand Response Programs: Final Report.Demand Response

McKane, Aimee T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Automated Demand Response Opportunities in Wastewater Treatment Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure,study of automated demand response in wastewater treatmentopportunities for demand response control strategies in

Thompson, Lisa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;#12;2008 Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering Staff Report Federal Energy metering penetration and potential peak load reduction from demand response have increased since 2006. Significant activity to promote demand response or to remove barriers to demand response occurred at the state

Tesfatsion, Leigh

325

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of integrating demand response and energy efficiencyand D. Kathan (2009), Demand Response in U.S. ElectricityFRAMEWORKS THAT PROMOTE DEMAND RESPONSE 3.1. Demand Response

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

The effects of emotional responsiveness in marriage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

responsiveness on the quality of the marital interaction. Two kinds of mnotional responsiveness were evaluated: ezmtional linkage and asyzamtry in responsiveness. In terzm of exmtional linkage, it was proposed that being too emotionally linked may... be as dysfunctional for the relationship as those relationships low in ezmtional linkage. The second hypothesis involved an asyzmetry in emotional responsiveness: those couples in which one spouse is nnre responsive than the other spouse will display more...

Hass, Sally Duffin

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Microbial Protein-Protein Interactions (MiPPI) Data from the Genomics: GTL Center for Molecular and Cellular Systems (CMCS)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Genomic Science Center for Molecular and Cellular Systems (CMCS), established in 2002, seeks to identify and characterize the complete set of protein complexes within a cell to provide a mechanistic basis for the understanding of biochemical functions. The CMCS is anchored at ORNL and PNNL. CMCS initially focused on the identification and characterization of protein complexes in two microbial systems,Rhodopseudomonas palustris (R. palustris) and Shewanella oneidensis (S. oneidensis). These two organisms have also been the focus of major DOE Genomic Science/Microbial Cell Program (MCP) projects. To develop an approach for identifying the diverse types of complexes present in microbial organisms, CMCS incorporates a number of molecular biology, microbiology, analytical and computational tools in an integrated pipeline.

328

Spinning Reserve From Responsive Loads  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Responsive load is the most underutilized reliability resource available to the power system today. It is currently not used at all to provide spinning reserve. Historically there were good reasons for this, but recent technological advances in communications and controls have provided new capabilities and eliminated many of the old obstacles. North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC), Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), Northeast Power Coordinating Council (NPCC), New York State Reliability Council (NYSRC), and New York Independent System Operator (NYISO) rules are beginning to recognize these changes and are starting to encourage responsive load provision of reliability services. The Carrier ComfortChoice responsive thermostats provide an example of these technological advances. This is a technology aimed at reducing summer peak demand through central control of residential and small commercial air-conditioning loads. It is being utilized by Long Island Power Authority (LIPA), Consolidated Edison (ConEd), Southern California Edison (SCE), and San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG&E). The technology is capable of delivering even greater response in the faster spinning reserve time frame (while still providing peak reduction). Analysis of demand reduction testing results from LIPA during the summer of 2002 provides evidence to back up this claim. It also demonstrates that loads are different from generators and that the conventional wisdom, which advocates for starting with large loads as better ancillary service providers, is flawed. The tempting approach of incrementally adapting ancillary service requirements, which were established when generators were the only available resources, will not work. While it is easier for most generators to provide replacement power and non-spinning reserve (the slower response services) than it is to supply spinning reserve (the fastest service), the opposite is true for many loads. Also, there is more financial reward for supplying spinning reserve than for supplying the other reserve services as a result of the higher spinning reserve prices. The LIPAedge program (LIPA's demand reduction program using Carrier ComfortChoice thermostats) provides an opportunity to test the use of responsive load for spinning reserve. With potentially 75 MW of spinning reserve capability already installed, this test program can also make an important contribution to the capacity needs of Long Island during the summer of 2003. Testing could also be done at ConEd ({approx}30 MW), SCE ({approx}15 MW), and/or SDG&E ({approx}15 MW). This paper is divided into six chapters. Chapter 2 discusses the contingency reserve ancillary services, their functions in supporting power system reliability, and their technical requirements. It also discusses the policy and tariff requirements and attempts to distinguish between ones that are genuinely necessary and ones that are artifacts of the technologies that were historically used to provide the services. Chapter 3 discusses how responsive load could provide contingency reserves (especially spinning reserve) for the power system. Chapter 4 specifically discusses the Carrier ComfortChoice responsive thermostat technology, the LIPAedge experience with that technology, and how the technology could be used to supply spinning reserve. Chapter 5 discusses a number of unresolved issues and suggests areas for further research. Chapter 6 offers conclusions and recommendations.

Kirby, B.J.

2003-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

329

Systems analysis of the dynamic macrophage response to productive and non-productive murine cytomegalovirus infection   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The mammalian immune system is capable of detecting and responding to different infectious conditions with specificity at the adaptive level, however whether this ability extends to individual cells of the innate immune ...

Lacaze, Paul Andrew

2011-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

330

Thermomechanical response of WIPP repositories  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coarsely zoned STEALTH 2D calculations were used to investigate two candidate WIPP repositories. The grid was designed for one hundred thousand years of response with modest computing costs. As a result, the early time mechanical response was compromised by non-real oscillations that could not be damped completely before a few thousand years. In spite of these oscillations, it was possible to see that the dominant effects of stress and strain peaked between one and two thousand years, at the time of maximum heat in the site. This time corresponded to the condition that the surface heat loss rate balanced the heat generation rate. Though the creep strains were quite small, a large volume of salt was involved and the effects were significant. The peak surface uplift of 75HLW was increased by about 25% due to creep. However, the deviatoric stress relaxation due to creep produced large changes in the stress fields. The Rustler layer survived reasonable failure criterion for the 75HLW case with creep, and failed both in tension and shear, according to these same criterion, when the calculation was repeated without creep. The deviatoric stress fields, with and without salt creep, concentrated near the repository as expected and also in the Rustler layer due to its relatively high Young's modulus compared to the neighboring layers. Since the time of interest is so much smaller than the 100,000 years this calculation was designed to examine, it is possible to model the WIPP stratigraphy in much more detail and still be able to calculate the response for the time of interest. A finer zoned calculation of the response of the WIPP stratigraphy to a repository similar to the 75 K watt/acre repository is modeled in this report. In this calculation the Rustler formation is modeled as a five layered formation using material properties derived from data taken at the Nome site.

Maxwell, D.E.; Wahi, K.K.; Dial, B.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Multipath Probabilistic Early Response TCP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Chair of Committee, A. L. Narasimha Reddy Committee Members, Riccardo Bettati Srinivas Shakottai Head of Department, Costas N. Georghiades August 2012 Major Subject: Computer Engineering iii ABSTRACT Multipath Probabilistic Early Response TCP.... (August 2012) Ankit Singh, B.Tech., Indian Institute of Technology, Guwahati Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. A. L. Narasimha Reddy Many computers and devices such as smart phones, laptops and tablet devices are now equipped with multiple network...

Singh, Ankit

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

332

Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Demand Response Spinning Reserve project is a pioneeringdemonstration of how existing utility load-management assets can providean important electricity system reliability resource known as spinningreserve. Using aggregated demand-side resources to provide spinningreserve will give grid operators at the California Independent SystemOperator (CAISO) and Southern California Edison (SCE) a powerful, newtool to improve system reliability, prevent rolling blackouts, and lowersystem operating costs.

Eto, Joseph H.; Nelson-Hoffman, Janine; Torres, Carlos; Hirth,Scott; Yinger, Bob; Kueck, John; Kirby, Brendan; Bernier, Clark; Wright,Roger; Barat, A.; Watson, David S.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Solar mechanics thermal response capabilities.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In many applications, the thermal response of structures exposed to solar heat loads is of interest. Solar mechanics governing equations were developed and integrated with the Calore thermal response code via user subroutines to provide this computational simulation capability. Solar heat loads are estimated based on the latitude and day of the year. Vector algebra is used to determine the solar loading on each face of a finite element model based on its orientation relative to the sun as the earth rotates. Atmospheric attenuation is accounted for as the optical path length varies from sunrise to sunset. Both direct and diffuse components of solar flux are calculated. In addition, shadowing of structures by other structures can be accounted for. User subroutines were also developed to provide convective and radiative boundary conditions for the diurnal variations in air temperature and effective sky temperature. These temperature boundary conditions are based on available local weather data and depend on latitude and day of the year, consistent with the solar mechanics formulation. These user subroutines, coupled with the Calore three-dimensional thermal response code, provide a complete package for addressing complex thermal problems involving solar heating. The governing equations are documented in sufficient detail to facilitate implementation into other heat transfer codes. Suggestions for improvements to the approach are offered.

Dobranich, Dean D.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Systems Biology Model of Interactions Between Tissue Growth Factors and DNA Damage Pathways: Low Dose Response and Cross-Talk in TGFbeta and ATM Signaling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The etiology of radiation carcinogenesis has been described in terms of aberrant changes that span several levels of biological organization. Growth factors regulate many important cellular and tissue functions including apoptosis, differentiation and proliferation. A variety of genetic and epigenetic changes of growth factors have been shown to contribute to cancer initiation and progression. It is known that cellular and tissue damage to ionizing radiation is in part initiated by the production of reactive oxygen species, which can activate cytokine signaling, and the DNA damage response pathways, most notably the ATM signaling pathway. Recently the transforming growth factor ? (TGF?) pathway has been shown to regulate or directly interact with the ATM pathway in the response to radiation. The relevance of this interaction with the ATM pathway is not known although p53 becomes phosphorylated and DNA damage responses are involved. However, growth factor interactions with DNA damage responses have not been elucidated particularly at low doses and further characterization of their relationship to cancer processes is warranted. Our goal will be to use a systems biology approach to mathematically and experimentally describe the low dose responses and cross-talk between the ATM and TGF? pathways initiated by low and high LET radiation. We will characterize ATM and TGF? signaling in epithelial and fibroblast cells using 2D models and ultimately extending to 3D organotypic cell culture models to begin to elucidate possible differences that may occur for different cell types and/or inter-cellular communication. We will investigate the roles of the Smad and Activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2) proteins as the potential major contributors to cross- talk between the TGF? and ATM pathways, and links to cell cycle control and/or the DNA damage response, and potential differences in their responses at low and high doses. We have developed various experimental approaches to apply to these problems using confocal microscopy and flow cytometry to detail changes at low dose/dose-rate in order to understand individual cell responses, and will establish our mathematical models based on the experimental findings resulting from changes in DNA repair, apoptosis and proliferation.

O'Neill, Peter [University of Oxford; Anderson, Jennifer [University of Oxford

2014-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

335

Response Predicting LTCC Firing Shrinkage: A Response Surface Analysis Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Low Temperature Cofired Ceramic (LTCC) technology is used in a variety of applications including military/space electronics, wireless communication, MEMS, medical and automotive electronics. The use of LTCC is growing due to the low cost of investment, short development time, good electrical and mechanical properties, high reliability, and flexibility in design integration (3 dimensional (3D) microstructures with cavities are possible)). The dimensional accuracy of the resulting x/y shrinkage of LTCC substrates is responsible for component assembly problems with the tolerance effect that increases in relation to the substrate size. Response Surface Analysis was used to predict product shrinkage based on specific process inputs (metal loading, layer count, lamination pressure, and tape thickness) with the ultimate goal to optimize manufacturing outputs (NC files, stencils, and screens) in achieving the final product design the first time. Three (3) regression models were developed for the DuPont 951 tape system with DuPont 5734 gold metallization based on green tape thickness.

Girardi, Michael; Barner, Gregg; Lopez, Cristie; Duncan, Brent; Zawicki, Larry

2009-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

336

Role of oxygen in regulating embryo viability .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Mammalian embryo development in vitro remains suboptimal compared to that in vivo, culminating in reduced viability and smaller foetuses. Cellular metabolism is fundamental to the… (more)

Wale, Petra Lee

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Functional gene screening in embryonic stem cell implicates Wnt antagonism in neural differentiation.   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The multilineage differentiation capacity of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells offers a potential testing platform for gene products that mediate mammalian lineage determination and cellular specialization. Identification ...

Aubert, Jerome; Dunstan, Hannah; Chambers, Ian; Smith, Austin G

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Subject Responses to Electrochromic Windows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Forty-three subjects worked in a private office with switchable electrochromic windows, manually-operated Venetian blinds, and dimmable fluorescent lights. The electrochromic window had a visible transmittance range of approximately 3-60%. Analysis of subject responses and physical data collected during the work sessions showed that the electrochromic windows reduced the incidence of glare compared to working under a fixed transmittance (60%) condition. Subjects used the Venetian blinds less often and preferred the variable transmittance condition, but used slightly more electric lighting with it than they did when window transmittance was fixed.

Clear, Robert; Inkarojrit, Vorapat; Lee, Eleanor

2006-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

339

Demand Response | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProvedDecember 2005Department ofDOE AccidentWasteZone Modeling |Demand Response Demand

340

Balancing oil and environment... responsibly.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Balancing Oil and Environment…Responsibly As the price of oil continues to skyrocket and global oil production nears the brink, pursuing unconventional oil supplies, such as oil shale, oil sands, heavy oils, and oils from biomass and coal has become increasingly attractive. Of particular significance to the American way is that our continent has significant quantities of these resources. Tapping into these new resources, however, requires cutting-edge technologies for identification, production, processing and environmental management. This job needs a super hero or two for a job of this size and proportion…

Weimer, Walter C.; Teske, Lisa

2007-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Anxiety and extreme response styles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANXIETY AND EXTRENE RESPONSE STYLES A Thesis by TERESA ANN RHONE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AAN University in partial f ulfillment of the requirement for the degree oT NASTER OF SCIENCE I'1ay 1971 Na jor Sub ject... to Subjects IV. RESUI TS AND DISCUSSION V ~ SUIINARY AND DISCUSSION REFERENCES APPENDIX VITA B 1O 10 15 17 26 29 32 41 LIST QF TABLES Table 1 EXPERII'IEI'JTAL DESIGN F OR THE AIJALYS IS QF VAnIANCE 2 ERRORS ALLO'JJED AND TINE INTERVALS...

Rhone, Teresa Ann

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Response (6/14/2010)  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAXBalancedDepartment ofColumbusReportNuclearGas5, FirstBaseRespond to22,Response

343

Systems biology analysis of Zymomonas mobilis ZM4 ethanol stress responses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Zymomonas mobilis ZM4 is a capable ethanogenic bacterium with high ethanol productivity and high level of ethanol tolerance. Previous studies indicated that several stress-related proteins and changes in the ZM4 membrane lipid composition may contribute to ethanol tolerance. However, the molecular mechanisms of ethanol stress response have not been elucidated fully. In this study, ethanol stress responses were investigated using systems biology tools. Medium supplementation with an initial 47.3 g/L (6% v/v) ethanol reduced Z. mobilis ZM4 glucose consumption, growth rate and ethanol productivity compared to that of untreated controls. Metabolomic profiling showed that ethanol-treated ZM4 cells accumulated greater amounts of glycerol during the entire fermentation process, which may indicate an important role for this metabolite. A proteomic analysis of early exponential growth identified about one thousand proteins, or approximately 56% of the predicted ZM4 proteome. Proteins related to metabolism and stress response such as chaperones and key regulators were more abundant in the early ethanol stress condition. Transcriptomic studies indicated the response of ZM4 to ethanol is dynamic, complex and involves many genes from all the different functional categories. There were fewer genes significantly differentially expressed in the exponential phase compared to that of stationary phase and early stationary phase. Most down-regulated genes were related to translation and ribosome biogenesis, while the ethanol-upregulated genes were mostly related to cellular processes and metabolism. Correlations among the transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolism were examined and among significantly expressed genes or proteins, we observe higher correlation coefficients when fold-change values are higher. This systems biology study elucidates key Z. mobilis ZM4 metabolites, genes and proteins that form the foundation of its distinctive physiology and its multifaceted response to ethanol stress.

Yang, Shihui [ORNL; Pan, Chongle [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B [ORNL; Engle, Nancy L [ORNL; Zhou, Wen [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Dam, Phuongan [ORNL; Xu, Ying [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Dice, Lezlee T [ORNL; Davison, Brian H [ORNL; Brown, Steven D [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

MOLECULAR AND CELLULAR BIOLOGY, 0270-7306/01/$04.00 0 DOI: 10.1128/MCB.21.5.16031612.2001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MOLECULAR AND CELLULAR BIOLOGY, 0270-7306/01/$04.00 0 DOI: 10.1128/MCB.21.5.1603­1612.2001 Mar. 2001, p. 1603­1612 Vol. 21, No. 5 Copyright © 2001, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights

Lahav, Galit

345

‘Bioinspired’ Total Synthesis of Agelastatin A and Derivatives for Cellular Target Identification; Syntheses of ^(15)N-labeled Oroidin and Keramadine Analog for ‘Metabiosynthetic’ Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

agelastatin A derivatives leading to a bioactive biotin probe that is proving to be useful for cellular target identification. In an effort toward understanding the biosynthesis of P-2-AIs, a synthesis of^( 15)N-oroidin labeled oroidin was developed and pulse...

Reyes, Jeremy Chris Punzalan

2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

346

Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Lab Procedures 25.99.09.V0.01 Cellular Communication Devices and Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by the Director or designee, be reimbursed for business calls made using a personal device. To receive Devices and Services Approved: December 28, 2012 Next Scheduled Review: December 28, 2014 Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory Procedures 25.99.09.V0.01 Cellular Communication Devices

347

Open Automated Demand Response Communications in Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services Silain Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services Silasuccessfully in the wholesale non- spinning ancillary

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Innovative Research Universities Australia Response to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Innovative Research Universities Australia Response to DEST Knowledge Transfer Project Developing Introduction This response builds on the IRU Australia's earlier discussion paper The Third Mission Australia and overseas, this paper contends that engagement1 activity between universities

349

Safety Management Functions, Responsibilities, and Authorities Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual defines safety management functions, responsibilities, and authorities for DOE senior management with responsibilities for line, support, oversight, and enforcement actions. Canceled by DOE M 411.1-1A. Does not cancel other directives.

1997-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

350

University of Saskatchewan Workplace Responsibilities System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Saskatchewan Workplace Responsibilities System Department of Health, Safety & Environment University of Saskatchewan Workplace Responsibilities System Department of Health, Safety of the University of Saskatchewan (herein referred to as University), as well as its visitors, is of utmost concern

Saskatchewan, University of

351

Responsible University Officials: Director of Purchasing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Responsible University Officials: Director of Purchasing Controller Responsible Offices: Purchasing Resource Services Controller's Office Origination Date: December 1, 2008 Purchasing Policy - Quick Reference Guide The entire Purchasing Policy and Procedures document is available on the NU Portal

Kuzmanovic, Aleksandar

352

Safety Management Functions, Responsibilities, and Authorities Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual defines safety management functions, responsibilities, and authorities for DOE senior management with responsibilities for line, support, oversight, and enforcement actions. Cancels DOE M 411.1-1B. Canceled by DOE O 450.2.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

353

Quantum-classical correspondence in response theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, theoretical analysis of correspondence between classical and quantum dynamics is studied in the context of response theory. Thesis discusses the mathematical origin of time-divergence of classical response ...

Kryvohuz, Maksym

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Regulation of mTOR complex 1 in response to growth factors and nutrients  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In multicellular organisms, cells ensure the simultaneous availability of growth factors and nutrients before they invest in cellular processes that lead to growth. The TOR kinase is a master regulator of cellular growth ...

Sancak, Yasemin S. (Yasemin Shechner)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While there is general agreement that demand response (DR) is a valued component in a utility resource plan, there is a lack of consensus regarding how to value DR. Establishing the value of DR is a prerequisite to determining how much and what types of DR should be implemented, to which customers DR should be targeted, and a key determinant that drives the development of economically viable DR consumer technology. Most approaches for quantifying the value of DR focus on changes in utility system revenue requirements based on resource plans with and without DR. This ''utility centric'' approach does not assign any value to DR impacts that lower energy and capacity prices, improve reliability, lower system and network operating costs, produce better air quality, and provide improved customer choice and control. Proper valuation of these benefits requires a different basis for monetization. The review concludes that no single methodology today adequately captures the wide range of benefits and value potentially attributed to DR. To provide a more comprehensive valuation approach, current methods such as the Standard Practice Method (SPM) will most likely have to be supplemented with one or more alternative benefit-valuation approaches. This report provides an updated perspective on the DR valuation framework. It includes an introduction and four chapters that address the key elements of demand response valuation, a comprehensive literature review, and specific research recommendations.

Heffner, Grayson

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Climate Engineering Responses to Climate Emergencies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Novim Climate Engineering Responses to Climate Emergencies Jason J. Blackstock David S. Battisti Santa Barbara, California #12;Climate Engineering Responses to Climate Emergencies This report should, A. A. N. Patrinos, D. P. Schrag, R. H. Socolow and S. E. Koonin, Climate Engineering Responses

Battisti, David

357

EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN DEVINE TEST SITE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HSE MANUAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN DEVINE TEST SITE EXPLORATION GEOPHYSICS LAB FIELD SITE MEDINA LIST OF CONTACTS ­ SITE MANAGERS AND EMERGENCY RESPONSE PAGE 20 CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION PAGE 21 2 #12 is too trivial. The Bureau's test-site manager is responsible for orienting you previous to your arrival

Texas at Austin, University of

358

GPU-based Responsive Grass Orthmann Jens  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

takes dynamic en- vironments one step further by integrating responsive real-time simulation of ground. The collision detection with dynamic scene objects, the response and the re- covering are directly simulated simulation is given, followed by a overview of the responsive grass system in Section 3. Section 4 proposes

Blanz, Volker

359

THE STATE OF DEMAND RESPONSE IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE STATE OF DEMAND RESPONSE IN CALIFORNIA Prepared For: California Energy in this report. #12; ABSTRACT By reducing system loads during criticalpeak times, demand response (DR) can.S. and internationally and lay out ideas that could help move California forward. KEY WORDS demand response, peak

360

THE STATE OF DEMAND RESPONSE IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE STATE OF DEMAND RESPONSE IN CALIFORNIA Prepared For: California Energy in this report. #12; ABSTRACT By reducing system loads during criticalpeak times, demand response can help reduce the threat of planned rotational outages. Demand response is also widely regarded as having

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Demand Response Resources in Pacific Northwest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Response Resources in Pacific Northwest Chuck Goldman Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory cagoldman@lbl.gov Pacific Northwest Demand Response Project Portland OR May 2, 2007 #12;Overview · Typology Annual Reports ­ Journal articles/Technical reports #12;Demand Response Resources · Incentive

362

Barrier Immune Radio Communications for Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-2294E Barrier Immune Radio Communications for Demand Response F. Rubinstein, G. Ghatikar, J Ann Piette of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's (LBNL) Demand Response Research Center (DRRC and Environment's (CIEE) Demand Response Emerging Technologies Development (DRETD) Program, under Work for Others

363

Demand Response and Ancillary Services September 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Response and Ancillary Services September 2008 #12;© 2008 EnerNOC, Inc. All Rights Reserved programs The purpose of this presentation is to offer insight into the mechanics of demand response and industrial demand response resources across North America in both regulated and restructured markets As of 6

364

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-62226 Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study F. Rubinstein, S. Kiliccote Energy Environmental Technologies Division January 2007 #12;LBNL-62226 Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study in this report was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and funded by the California Energy

365

Species Interactions Reverse Grassland Responses to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

droughts. Eco- logical responses to climate change in regions with Mediterranean climate regimes maySpecies Interactions Reverse Grassland Responses to Changing Climate K. B. Suttle,1 * Meredith A. Thomsen,2 Mary E. Power1 Predictions of ecological response to climate change are based largely on direct

Wilmers, Chris

366

MNK1 expression increases during cellular senescence and modulates the subcellular localization of hnRNP A1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNP A1) is an RNA-binding protein that modulates splice site usage, polyadenylation, and cleavage efficiency. This protein has also been implicated in mRNA stability and transport from the nucleus. We have previously demonstrated that hnRNP A1 had diminished protein levels and showed cytoplasmic accumulation in senescent human diploid fibroblasts. Furthermore, we have shown that inhibition of p38 MAPK, a key regulator of cellular senescence, elevated hnRNP A1 protein levels and inhibited hnRNP A1 cytoplasmic localization. In this study, we have explored the possible involvement of MNK1, one of the downstream effector of p38 MAPK, in the regulation of hnRNP A1. We have demonstrated that pharmacological inhibition of MNK1 by CGP 57380 decreased the phosphorylation levels of hnRNP A1 in young and senescent fibroblast cells and blocked the cytoplasmic accumulation of hnRNP A1 in senescent cells. In addition, MNK1 formed a complex with hnRNP A1 in vivo. The expression levels of MNK1, phospho-MNK1, and phospho-eIF4E proteins were found to be elevated in senescent cells. These data suggest that MNK1 regulates the phosphorylation and the subcellular distribution of hnRNP A1 and that MNK1 may play a role in the induction of senescence. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MNK1 and not MAPKAPK2 phosphorylates hnRNP A1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MNK1 has elevated levels in senescent cells, this has not been reported previously. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MNK1 activity induces cytoplasmic accumulation of hnRNP A1 in senescent cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Altered cytoplasmic localization of hnRNP A1 may alter gene expression patterns. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our studies may increase our understanding of RNA metabolism during cellular aging.

Ziaei, Samira, E-mail: ziaeisamira@gmail.com [City College of New York, City University of New York, New York, NY (United States) [City College of New York, City University of New York, New York, NY (United States); The Graduate School and University Center of CUNY, New York, NY (United States); Shimada, Naoko, E-mail: lensdev@yahoo.co.jp [City College of New York, City University of New York, New York, NY (United States)] [City College of New York, City University of New York, New York, NY (United States); Kucharavy, Herman, E-mail: veterduy@yahoo.com [City College of New York, City University of New York, New York, NY (United States)] [City College of New York, City University of New York, New York, NY (United States); Hubbard, Karen, E-mail: khubbard@sci.ccny.cuny.edu [City College of New York, City University of New York, New York, NY (United States) [City College of New York, City University of New York, New York, NY (United States); The Graduate School and University Center of CUNY, New York, NY (United States)

2012-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

367

No Effect of the Transforming Growth Factor {beta}1 Promoter Polymorphism C-509T on TGFB1 Gene Expression, Protein Secretion, or Cellular Radiosensitivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To study whether the promoter polymorphism (C-509T) affects transforming growth factor {beta}1 gene (TGFB1) expression, protein secretion, and/or cellular radiosensitivity for both human lymphocytes and fibroblasts. Methods and Materials: Experiments were performed with lymphocytes taken either from 124 breast cancer patients or 59 pairs of normal monozygotic twins. We used 15 normal human primary fibroblast strains as controls. The C-509T genotype was determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism or TaqMan single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping assay. The cellular radiosensitivity of lymphocytes was measured by G0/1 assay and that of fibroblasts by colony assay. The amount of extracellular TGFB1 protein was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and TGFB1 expression was assessed via microarray analysis or reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Results: The C-509T genotype was found not to be associated with cellular radiosensitivity, neither for lymphocytes (breast cancer patients, P=.811; healthy donors, P=.181) nor for fibroblasts (P=.589). Both TGFB1 expression and TGFB1 protein secretion showed considerable variation, which, however, did not depend on the C-509T genotype (protein secretion: P=.879; gene expression: lymphocytes, P=.134, fibroblasts, P=.605). There was also no general correlation between TGFB1 expression and cellular radiosensitivity (lymphocytes, P=.632; fibroblasts, P=.573). Conclusion: Our data indicate that any association between the SNP C-509T of TGFB1 and risk of normal tissue toxicity cannot be ascribed to a functional consequence of this SNP, either on the level of gene expression, protein secretion, or cellular radiosensitivity.

Reuther, Sebastian; Metzke, Elisabeth [Laboratory of Radiobiology and Experimental Radiooncology, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany)] [Laboratory of Radiobiology and Experimental Radiooncology, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Bonin, Michael [Department of Medical Genetics, University of Tuebingen (Germany)] [Department of Medical Genetics, University of Tuebingen (Germany); Petersen, Cordula [Clinic of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany)] [Clinic of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Dikomey, Ekkehard, E-mail: dikomey@uke.de [Laboratory of Radiobiology and Experimental Radiooncology, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany)] [Laboratory of Radiobiology and Experimental Radiooncology, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Raabe, Annette [Laboratory of Radiobiology and Experimental Radiooncology, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany)] [Laboratory of Radiobiology and Experimental Radiooncology, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany)

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

A Babcock-Leighton solar dynamo model with multi-cellular meridional circulation in advection- and diffusion-dominated regimes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Babcock-Leighton type solar dynamo models with single-celled meridional circulation are successful in reproducing many solar cycle features. Recent observations and theoretical models of meridional circulation do not indicate a single-celled flow pattern. We examine the role of complex multi-cellular circulation patterns in a Babcock-Leighton solar dynamo in advection- and diffusion-dominated regimes. We show from simulations that presence of a weak, second, high-latitude reverse cell speeds up the cycle and slightly enhances the poleward branch in butterfly diagram, whereas the presence of a second cell in depth reverses the tilt of butterfly wing to an anti-solar type. A butterfly diagram constructed from middle of convection zone yields a solar-like pattern, but this may be difficult to realize in the Sun because of magnetic buoyancy effects. Each of the above cases behaves similarly in higher and lower magnetic diffusivity regimes. However, our dynamo with a meridional circulation containing four cells in...

Belucz, Bernadett; Forgacs-Dajka, Emese

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Advertiser retains sole responsibility for content ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

techniques similar to 3D printing to ex- trude cellular material between layers of gel. By delivering as innovative medical devices. It's also where we use our strengths in 3D printing and additive manufacturing

Cai, Long

370

WELLCOME TRUST CONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to the Reform of the National Curriculum in England  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WELLCOME TRUST CONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to the Reform of the National Curriculum in England April 2013 1 Department for Education: Reform of the National Curriculum in England CONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to the Reform of the National Curriculum in England April 2013 2

Rambaut, Andrew

371

Market Response ModelsMarket Response Models Demand CreationDemand Creation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Market Response ModelsMarket Response Models andand Demand CreationDemand Creation Dominique MImportance of Marketing Investments Need for a Market Response focusNeed for a Market Response focus Digital data enriched acquisition and retention costsasymmetry between acquisition and retention costs In both cases, longIn both

Brock, David

372

CONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to Copyright in the Knowledge Economy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to Copyright in the Knowledge Economy Wellcome Trust response to Copyright in the Knowledge Economy November 2008 Page 1 of 8 European Commission: Copyright in the Knowledge Economy Response by the Wellcome Trust November 2008 1. The Wellcome Trust is pleased to have

Rambaut, Andrew

373

Impaired Transcriptional Response of the Murine Heart to Cigarette Smoke in the Setting of High Fat Diet and Obesity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Smoking and obesity are each well-established risk factors for cardiovascular heart disease, which together impose earlier onset and greater severity of disease. To identify early signaling events in the response of the heart to cigarette smoke exposure within the setting of obesity, we exposed normal weight and high fat diet-induced obese (DIO) C57BL/6 mice to repeated inhaled doses of mainstream (MS) or sidestream (SS) cigarette smoke administered over a two week period, monitoring effects on both cardiac and pulmonary transcriptomes. MS smoke (250 ?g wet total particulate matter (WTPM)/L, 5 h/day) exposures elicited robust cellular and molecular inflammatory responses in the lung with 1466 differentially expressed pulmonary genes (p < 0.01) in normal weight animals and a much-attenuated response (463 genes) in the hearts of the same animals. In contrast, exposures to SS smoke (85 ?g WTPM/L) with a CO concentration equivalent to that of MS smoke (250 CO ppm) induced a weak pulmonary response (328 genes) but an extensive cardiac response (1590 genes). SS smoke and to a lesser extent MS smoke preferentially elicited hypoxia- and stress-responsive genes as well as genes predicting early changes of vascular smooth muscle and endothelium, precursors of cardiovascular disease. The most sensitive smoke-induced cardiac transcriptional changes of normal weight mice were largely absent in DIO mice after smoke exposure, while genes involved in fatty acid utilization were unaffected. At the same time, smoke exposure suppressed multiple proteome maintenance genes induced in the hearts of DIO mice. Together, these results underscore the sensitivity of the heart to SS smoke and reveal adaptive responses in healthy individuals that are absent in the setting of high fat diet and obesity.

Tilton, Susan C.; Karin, Norman J.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Waters, Katrina M.; Mikheev, Vladimir B.; Lee, K. M.; Corley, Richard A.; Pounds, Joel G.; Bigelow, Diana J.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Demand...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Demand for Fossil Fuels Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Demand for Fossil Fuels Response to several FOIA...

375

Rates and technologies for mass-market demand response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roger. 2002. Using Demand Response to Link Wholesale andfor advanced metering, demand response, and dynamic pricing.EPRI. 2001. Managing Demand-Response To Achieve Multiple

Herter, Karen; Levy, Roger; Wilson, John; Rosenfeld, Arthur

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing Technologies and Demonstration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Goodin. 2009. “Open Automated Demand Response Communicationsin Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services. ” InOpen Automated Demand Response Demonstration Project. LBNL-

Ghatikar, Girish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO Markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Robinson, Michael, 2008, "Demand Response in Midwest ISOPresentation at MISO Demand Response Working Group Meeting,Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Results and commissioning issues from an automated demand response pilot  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities"Management and Demand Response in Commercial Buildings", L Band Commissioning Issues from an Automated Demand Response.

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, Dave; Sezgen, Osman; Motegi, Naoya

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Demand Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Open Automated Demand Response. In Grid Interop Forum.work was sponsored by the Demand Response Research Center (load-management.php. Demand Response Research Center (2009).

Goli, Sasank

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reliability Corporation. Demand response data task force:Energy. Benefits of demand response in electricity marketsAssessment of demand response & advanced metering, staff

Cappers, Peter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Linking Continuous Energy Management and Open Automated Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A. Barat, D. Watson. Demand Response Spinning ReserveOpen Automated Demand Response Communication Standards:Dynamic Controls for Demand Response in a New Commercial

Piette, Mary Ann

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Direct versus Facility Centric Load Control for Automated Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure.and Techniques for Demand Response. LBNL Report 59975. Mayand Communications for Demand Response and Energy Efficiency

Piette, Mary Ann

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Open Automated Demand Response Communications Specification (Version 1.0)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Techniques for Demand Response. May 2007. LBNL-59975.to facilitate automating  demand response actions at the Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure,

Piette, Mary Ann

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Open Automated Demand Response for Small Commerical Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Fully Automated Demand  Response in Large Facilities.  Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities.  Open Automated  Demand Response Communication Standards: 

Dudley, June Han

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

LEED Demand Response Credit: A Plan for Research towards Implementation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

C. McParland, Open Automated Demand Response Communicationsand Open Automated Demand Response", Grid Interop Forum,Testing of Automated Demand Response for Integration of

Kiliccote, Sila

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Making the most of Responsive Electricity Customer. Energy Efficiency...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Making the most of Responsive Electricity Customer. Energy Efficiency and Demand Response: How do we make the most out of using less energy? Making the most of Responsive...

387

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Building Control Strategies and Techniques for Demand Response.Building Systems and DR Strategies 16 Demand ResponseDemand Response Systems. ” Proceedings, 16 th National Conference on Building

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

LEED Demand Response Credit: A Plan for Research towards Implementation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in California. DEMAND RESPONSE AND COMMERCIAL BUILDINGSload and demand response against other buildings and alsoDemand Response and Energy Efficiency in Commercial Buildings",

Kiliccote, Sila

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Open Automated Demand Response Communications Specification (Version 1.0)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Keywords: demand response, buildings, electricity use, Interface  Automated Demand Response  Building Automation of demand response in  commercial buildings.   One key 

Piette, Mary Ann

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Results and commissioning issues from an automated demand response pilot  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Management and Demand Response in Commercial Buildings", L BAutomated Demand Response National Conference on BuildingAutomated Demand Response National Conference on Building

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, Dave; Sezgen, Osman; Motegi, Naoya

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Data for Automated Demand Response in Commercial Buildings,Demand Response Infrastructure for Commercial Buildings",demand response and energy efficiency functions into the design of buildings,

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Scenarios for Consuming Standardized Automated Demand Response Signals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Keywords: Demand response, automation, commercial buildings,Demand Response and Energy Efficiency in Commercial Buildings,Building Control Strategies and Techniques for Demand Response.

Koch, Ed

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Open Automated Demand Response for Small Commerical Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand  Response for Small Commercial Buildings.   CEC?500?automated demand response  For small commercial buildings, AUTOMATED DEMAND RESPONSE FOR SMALL COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS

Dudley, June Han

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Automated Demand Response Strategies and Commissioning Commercial Building Controls  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Demand Response in New and Existing Commercial BuildingsDemand Response Strategies and National Conference on BuildingDemand Response Strategies and Commissioning Commercial Building

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila; Linkugel, Eric

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing Technologies and Demonstration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Automated Demand Response in Commercial Buildings. Inbased demand response information to building controlDemand Response Standard for the Residential Sector. California Energy Commission, PIER Buildings

Ghatikar, Girish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is manual demand response where building staff receive acommercial buildings’ demand response technologies andBuilding Control Strategies and Techniques for Demand Response.

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Direct versus Facility Centric Load Control for Automated Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Keywords: Demand response, automation, commercial buildings,Demand Response and Energy Efficiency in Commercial Buildings,Building Control Strategies and Techniques for Demand Response.

Piette, Mary Ann

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Scalable Cellular Array Architecture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cockshott,W.P. Shaw,P. Barrie,P. Milne,G.J. Computing and control Engineering Journal pp 219-224 IEE

Cockshott, W.P.

399

Furfuryl alcohol cellular product  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Self-extinguishing rigid foam products are formed by polymerization of furfuryl alcohol in the presence of a lightweight, particulate, filler, zinc chloride and selected catalysts.

Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.

1982-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

400

Final Report [The c-Abl signaling network in the radioadaptive response  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radioadaptive response, or radiation hormesis, i.e. a low dose of radiation can protect cells and organisms from the effects of a subsequent higher dose, is a widely recognized phenomenon. Mechanisms underlying such radiation hormesis, however, remain largely unclear. Preliminary studies indicate an important role of c-Abl signaling in mediating the radioadaptive response. We propose to investigate how c-Abl regulates the crosstalk between p53 and NF?B in response to low doses irradiation. We found in our recent study that low dose IR induces a reciprocal p53 suppression and NF?B activation, which induces HIF-a and subsequently a metabolic reprogramming resulting in a transition from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis. Of importance is that this glycolytic switch is essential for the radioadaptive response. This low-dose radiationinduced HIF1? activation was in sharp contrast with the high-dose IR-induced p53 activation and HIF1? inhibition. HIF1? and p53 seem to play distinct roles in mediating the radiation dose-dependent metabolic response. The induction of HIF1?-mediated glycolysis is restricted to a low dose range of radiation, which may have important implications in assessing the level of radiation exposure and its potential health risk. Our results support a dose-dependent metabolic response to IR. When IR doses are below the threshold of causing detectable DNA damage (<0.2Gy) and thus little p53 activation, HIF1? is induced resulting in induction of glycolysis and increased radiation resistance. When the radiation dose reaches levels eliciting DNA damage, p53 is activated and diminishes the activity of HIF1? and glycolysis, leading to the induction of cell death. Our work challenges the LNT model of radiation exposure risk and provides a metabolic mechanism of radioadaptive response. The study supports a need for determining the p53 and HIF1? activity as a potential reliable biological readout of radiation exposure in humans. The exquisite sensitivity of cellular metabolism to low doses of radiation could also serve as a valuable biomarker for estimating the health effects of low-level radiation exposure.

Chi-Min, Yuan

2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Demand Response For Power System Reliability: FAQ  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Demand response is the most underutilized power system reliability resource in North America. Technological advances now make it possible to tap this resource to both reduce costs and improve. Misconceptions concerning response capabilities tend to force loads to provide responses that they are less able to provide and often prohibit them from providing the most valuable reliability services. Fortunately this is beginning to change with some ISOs making more extensive use of load response. This report is structured as a series of short questions and answers that address load response capabilities and power system reliability needs. Its objective is to further the use of responsive load as a bulk power system reliability resource in providing the fastest and most valuable ancillary services.

Kirby, Brendan J [ORNL

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Riverland expedited response action proposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) recommended that the US Department of Energy (DOE) prepare an expedited response action (ERA) for the Riverland Railroad Car Wash Pit and the 600 Area Army Munitions Burial Site. A non-time-critical ERA proposal includes preparation of an engineering evaluation/cost analysis (EE/CA) section. The EE/CA is a rapid, focused evaluation of available technologies using specific screening factors to assess feasibility, appropriateness, and cost. The ERA proposal will undergo reviews by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), DOE, EPA, Ecology, and the public. Ecology and EPA will issue an Action Agreement Memorandum after resolution of all review comments. The, memorandum will authorize remediation activities. The ERA goal is to reduce the potential for any contaminant migration to the soil column, groundwater, and Columbia River. The ERA may be the final remediation of the 100-IU-1 Operable Unit. A No Action Record of Decision may be issued after cleanup completion.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

A chimera embryo assay reveals a decrease in embryonic cellular proliferation induced by sperm from X-irradiated male mice  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Male mice were divided into three experimental groups and a control group. Mice in the experimental groups received one of three doses of acute X irradiation (1.73, 0.29, and 0.05 Gy) and together with the control unirradiated mice were then mated weekly to unirradiated female mice for a 9-week experimental period. Embryos were recovered from the weekly matings at the four-cell stage and examined by the chimera assay for proliferative disadvantage. Aggregation chimeras were constructed of embryos from female mice mated to irradiated males (experimental embryos) and embryos from females mated to unexposed males (control embryos) and contained either one experimental embryo and one control embryo (heterologous chimera) or two control embryos (control chimera). The control embryo in heterologous chimeras and either embryo in control chimeras were prelabeled with the vital dye fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), and the chimeras were cultured for 40 h and viewed under phase-contrast and epifluorescence microscopy to obtain total embryo cell number and the cellular contribution from the FITC-labeled embryo. Experimental and control embryos that were cultured singly were also examined for embryo cell number at the end of the 40-h culture period. In control chimeras, the mean ratio of the unlabeled cells:total chimera cell number (henceforth referred to as ''mean ratio'') was 0.50 with little or no weekly variation over the 9-week experimental period. During Weeks 4-7, the mean ratios of heterologous chimeras differed significantly from the mean ratio of control chimeras with the greatest differences occurring during Week 7 (0.41 for chimeras of 0.05 Gy dose group, 0.40 for chimeras of the 0.29 Gy dose group, and 0.17 for chimeras of the 1.73 Gy dose group).

Obasaju, M.F.; Wiley, L.M.; Oudiz, D.J.; Raabe, O.; Overstreet, J.W.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Safety Management Functions, Responsibilities, and Authorities  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual provides the responsibilities of Headquarters and field element offices required by DOE P 411.1, Safety Management Functions, Responsibilities and Authorities Policy, dated 1-28-97. It also contains detailed requirements to supplement the policy's direction for each DOE organization having safety management functions to establish and maintain separate documentation of their responsibilities and authorities. Cancels DOE M 411.1-1A. Canceled by DOE M 411.1-1C.

2001-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

405

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3 3.0 Previous Experience with Demand Responsive Lighting11 4.3. Prevalence of Lighting13 4.4. Impact of Title 24 on Lighting

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Wastewater plant takes plunge into demand response  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Commission and the Bonneville Power Administration, the Eugene-Springfield Water Pollution Control Facility in Eugene, Ore., was put through a series of demand response tests....

407

Search Response Team | National Nuclear Security Administration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

expertise. SRT is a full-response asset, which includes the manpower and equipment to conduct aerial, vehicle, or search operations by foot to locate a potential radiological...

408

United States Geological Survey Geospatial Information Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 United States Geological Survey Geospatial Information Response Standard Operating Procedures May 20, 2013 Executive Summary The Geospatial, reporting requirements, and business processes for acquiring and providing geospatial

Torgersen, Christian

409

Incident Response Planning for Selected Livestock Shows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the many threats we face? (U.S. Department of Homeland Security, 2011, para. 1). According to the National Response Framework (NRF), the first responders to a disaster are at the local and state levels (U.S. Department of Homeland Security, 2008a... to assist with the response (Wenzel, 2007). Due to the multiple levels and types of responses outlined in the NRF, individuals must understand that their pre-disaster responsibilities can change following a disaster event (Moats, 2007). As a result...

Tomascik, Chelsea Roxanne

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

410

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Energy demand-side management energy information systemdemand response. Demand-side management (DSM) program goalsa goal for demand-side management (DSM) coordination and

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

NBP RFI: Communications Requirements- Honeywell Responses To...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

the National Broadband Plan by Studying the Communications Requirements of Electric Utilities To Inform Federal Smart NBP RFI: Communications Requirements- Honeywell Responses To...

412

Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commission (FERC) 2008a. “Wholesale Competition in RegionsDemand Response into Wholesale Electricity Markets,” (URL:1 2. Wholesale and Retails Electricity Markets in

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Demand Response - Policy | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

prices or when grid reliability is jeopardized. In regions with centrally organized wholesale electricity markets, demand response can help stabilize volatile electricity prices...

414

Optimization of Demand Response Through Peak Shaving  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jun 19, 2013 ... efficient linear programming formulation for the demand response of such a consumer who could be a price taker, industrial or commercial user ...

2013-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

415

Autonomous Demand Response for Primary Frequency Regulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research documented within this report examines the use of autonomous demand response to provide primary frequency response in an interconnected power grid. The work builds on previous studies in several key areas: it uses a large realistic model (i.e., the interconnection of the western United States and Canada); it establishes a set of metrics that can be used to assess the effectiveness of autonomous demand response; and it independently adjusts various parameters associated with using autonomous demand response to assess effectiveness and to examine possible threats or vulnerabilities associated with the technology.

Donnelly, Matt; Trudnowski, Daniel J.; Mattix, S.; Dagle, Jeffery E.

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

416

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

District Small Business Summer Solutions: Energy and DemandSummer Solutions: Energy and Demand Impacts Monthly Energy> B-2 Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Microsoft Word - RFI_Response.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

capabilities of traditional AMR Consumer facing programs such as feedback, demand response, energy efficiency, and automation strategies Integrating new end user equipment...

418

Effects of protein or zinc deficiency on cellular immunity in vaccinated and non-vaccinated guinea pigs with experimentally induced pulmonary listeriosis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECTS OF PROTEIN OR ZINC DEFICIENCY ON CELLULAR IMMUNITY IN VACCINATED AND NON-VACCINATED GUINEA PIGS WITH EXPERIMENTALLY INDUCED PULMONARY LISTERIOS I 8 A Thesi s by LEZLEE HELAINE GRAHAM COGHLAN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas... animals were vaccinated on day 23, and all received aerosol challenge on day 33 and were killed 4 days later. Both zinc and protein deficiency resulted in animals that were clinically abnormal in growth patterns, hematology, ability to mount a delayed...

Coghlan, Lezlee Helaine Graham

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

"On Digital Philosophy (Discrete Physics) and the Cellular Automaton: A Perfect Mathematical Deterministic Structure for Reality- as A Huge Computer Simulation"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we provide an overview of some notable definitions, works and thoughts concerning digital philosophy that mainly suggest a finite and discrete characteristic for the real world, as well as, of the cellular automaton, which could serve as the basis of a (or maybe the only) perfect mathematical deterministic model for physical world. Keywords: Foundations of Physics, Ontology, Discrete Physics, Discrete Mathematics, Determinism, Reality, Computer Simulation.

Ramin Zahedi

2015-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

420

PIER: Demand Response Research Center Director, Mary Ann Piette  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 PIER: Demand Response Research Center Director, Mary Ann Piette Program Development and Outreach Response Research Plan #12;2 Demand Response Research Center Objective Scope Stakeholders Develop, prioritize, conduct and disseminate multi- institutional research to facilitate Demand Response. Technologies

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Extending In Silico Mechanism-of-Action Analysis by Annotating Targets with Pathways: Application to Cellular Cytotoxicity Readouts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

differences in the methodologies (such as different enrichment calculation and cut-off used) might be responsible for the numerically divergent results. Furthermore, none of the most representatives entries (namely “GO:0006457 protein folding”, “GO:0006915... ]. The annotation of these proteins with GO terms followed by subsequent enrichment calculations found a limited number of biological processes significantly enriched as well as strongly implicated in the toxicity phenotype (such as pathways related to protein...

Liggi, Sonia; Drakakis, Georgios; Koutsoukas, Alexios; Cortes–Ciriano, Isidro; Martínez–Alonso, Patricia; Malliavin, Thérčse E.; Velazquez-Campoy, Adrian; Brewerton, Suzanne C.; Bodkin, Michael J.; Evans, David A.; Glen, Robert C.; Carrodeguas, José Alberto; Bender, Andreas

2014-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

422

Response to Professor Hayes' response. Christopher R. Knittel and Aaron Smith  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Response to Professor Hayes' response. Christopher R. Knittel and Aaron Smith We wrote and $1.09/gallon in 2011. These claims have received significant media coverage and have

Rothman, Daniel

423

CONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to House of Commons International Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

universities ­ such as Imperial Innovations: Imperial College's technology transfer vehicle; · Private sectorCONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to House of Commons International Development Committee's Inquiry into the Department of International Development's Bilateral Programme in India November

Rambaut, Andrew

424

Demand Response and Electric Grid Reliability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Response and Electric Grid Reliability Paul Wattles Senior Analyst, Market Design & Development, ERCOT CATEE Conference, Galveston October 10, 2012 2 North American Bulk Power Grids CATEE Conference October 10, 2012 ? The ERCOT... adequacy ? ?Achieving more DR participation would . . . displace some generation investments, but would achieve the same level of reliability... ? ?Achieving this ideal requires widespread demand response and market structures that enable loads...

Wattles, P.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Regulation of phosphate starvation response in Arabidopsis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2006 Major Subject: Biology REGULATION OF PHOSPHATE STARVATION RESPONSE IN ARABIDOPSIS A Thesis by BETH ELENE ARMSTRONG THOMAS Submitted... Alan Pepper Dorothy Shippen Head of Department, Vincent Cassone December 2006 Major Subject: Biology iii ABSTRACT Regulation of Phosphate Starvation Response...

Thomas, Beth Elene Armstrong

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

426

A Vision of Demand Response - 2016  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Envision a journey about 10 years into a future where demand response is actually integrated into the policies, standards, and operating practices of electric utilities. Here's a bottom-up view of how demand response actually works, as seen through the eyes of typical customers, system operators, utilities, and regulators. (author)

Levy, Roger

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

427

ACADEMIC FREEDOM AND RESPONSIBILITY A. Academic Freedom  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

74 ARTICLE XV ACADEMIC FREEDOM AND RESPONSIBILITY A. Academic Freedom The Board and the MSP endorse the principles and standards of academic freedom and academic responsibility as generally and traditionally accepted in institutions of higher education, such as the 1940 AAUP Statement on Academic Freedom which

Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

428

An All Women's Response to War  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An All Women’s Response to War I n t e r n a t i o n a l W oan All Women’s Response to the War to take place on March 8,the loudest. The continuous war and aggression in Iraq are

Dean, Rebecca

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

CCIT Investigation of and Response to Violations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 of 6 1.0 BACKGROUND As the operational administrator of the campus network and central academicCCIT Investigation of and Response to Violations Responsible Administrative Unit: CCIT Policy: Is the alleged activity interfering with normal operations of shared resources such as the campus network

430

Arthur Fine Bohrs Response to EPR: Criticism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arthur Fine Bohrs Response to EPR: Criticism and Defense If a specific question has meaning of focus that Niels Bohr makes in responding to EPR.1 EPR appeal to measurement as sometimes sufficient ("elements of reality"). In his response, Bohr, while paraphrasing thewordsofEPR

Fine, Arthur

431

Heat Shock Response Modulators as Therapeutic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heat Shock Response Modulators as Therapeutic Tools for Diseases of Protein Conformation* Published. This review addresses the regulation of molecular chaperones and components of protein homeostasis by heat understanding of pharmacologically active small molecule regu- lators of the heat shock response

Morimoto, Richard

432

Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes strategies that can be used in commercial buildings to temporarily reduce electric load in response to electric grid emergencies in which supplies are limited or in response to high prices that would be incurred if these strategies were not employed. The demand response strategies discussed herein are based on the results of three years of automated demand response field tests in which 28 commercial facilities with an occupied area totaling over 11 million ft{sup 2} were tested. Although the demand response events in the field tests were initiated remotely and performed automatically, the strategies used could also be initiated by on-site building operators and performed manually, if desired. While energy efficiency measures can be used during normal building operations, demand response measures are transient; they are employed to produce a temporary reduction in demand. Demand response strategies achieve reductions in electric demand by temporarily reducing the level of service in facilities. Heating ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) and lighting are the systems most commonly adjusted for demand response in commercial buildings. The goal of demand response strategies is to meet the electric shed savings targets while minimizing any negative impacts on the occupants of the buildings or the processes that they perform. Occupant complaints were minimal in the field tests. In some cases, ''reductions'' in service level actually improved occupant comfort or productivity. In other cases, permanent improvements in efficiency were discovered through the planning and implementation of ''temporary'' demand response strategies. The DR strategies that are available to a given facility are based on factors such as the type of HVAC, lighting and energy management and control systems (EMCS) installed at the site.

Watson, David S.; Kiliccote, Sila; Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann

2006-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

433

Wellcome Trust CONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to Ofqual's GCSE reform consultation -August 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wellcome Trust CONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to Ofqual's GCSE reform consultation - August 2013 1 Ofqual: GCSE reform consultation Response by the Wellcome Trust August 2013 Key points and indirect practical assessment in its reform proposals. The total contribution of direct and indirect

Rambaut, Andrew

434

Global protein phosphorylation dynamics during deoxynivalenol-induced ribotoxic stress response in the macrophage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Deoxynivalenol (DON), a trichothecene mycotoxin produced by Fusarium that commonly contaminates food, is capable of activating mononuclear phagocytes of the innate immune system via a process termed the ribotoxic stress response (RSR). To encapture global signaling events mediating RSR, we quantified the early temporal (? 30 min) phosphoproteome changes that occurred in RAW 264.7 murine macrophage during exposure to a toxicologically relevant concentration of DON (250 ng/mL). Large-scale phosphoproteomic analysis employing stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) in conjunction with titanium dioxide chromatography revealed that DON significantly upregulated or downregulated phosphorylation of 188 proteins at both known and yet-to-be functionally characterized phosphosites. DON-induced RSR is extremely complex and goes far beyond its prior known capacity to inhibit translation and activate MAPKs. Transcriptional regulation was the main target during early DON-induced RSR, covering over 20% of the altered phosphoproteins as indicated by Gene Ontology annotation and including transcription factors/cofactors and epigenetic modulators. Other biological processes impacted included cell cycle, RNA processing, translation, ribosome biogenesis, monocyte differentiation and cytoskeleton organization. Some of these processes could be mediated by signaling networks involving MAPK-, NF?B-, AKT- and AMPK-linked pathways. Fuzzy c-means clustering revealed that DON-regulated phosphosites could be discretely classified with regard to the kinetics of phosphorylation/dephosphorylation. The cellular response networks identified provide a template for further exploration of the mechanisms of trichothecenemycotoxins and other ribotoxins, and ultimately, could contribute to improved mechanism-based human health risk assessment. - Highlights: ? Mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) induces immunotoxicity via ribotoxic stress response. ? SILAC phosphoproteomics using TiO{sub 2} was applied to DON-treated RAW 264.7 cells. ? DON induces extensive protein phosphorylation changes involving 188 phosphoproteins. ? The main target of early DON-induced RSR is transcriptional regulation. ? Early DON-induced RSR is mediated by MAPK-, NF?B-, AKT- and AMPK-linked pathways.

Pan, Xiao [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Center for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Whitten, Douglas A. [Research Technology Support Facility, Proteomics Core, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Wu, Ming [Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Chan, Christina [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Wilkerson, Curtis G. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Research Technology Support Facility, Proteomics Core, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Pestka, James J., E-mail: pestka@msu.edu [Center for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

435

Radiological Emergency Response Health and Safety Manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This manual was created to provide health and safety (H&S) guidance for emergency response operations. The manual is organized in sections that define each aspect of H and S Management for emergency responses. The sections are as follows: Responsibilities; Health Physics; Industrial Hygiene; Safety; Environmental Compliance; Medical; and Record Maintenance. Each section gives guidance on the types of training expected for managers and responders, safety processes and procedures to be followed when performing work, and what is expected of managers and participants. Also included are generic forms that will be used to facilitate or document activities during an emergency response. These ensure consistency in creating useful real-time and archival records and help to prevent the loss or omission of information.

D. R. Bowman

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

BIOGRAPHIES Randolph Hall: Networks, Emergency Response,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and more than 75 scientific articles, primarily in emergency response, queuing, logistics and workforce planning. Larson's research on queues has resulted in new computational techniques and has been covered: Cybersecurity, Computa

Southern California, University of

437

BAYESIAN RESIDUAL ANALYSIS FOR BINARY RESPONSE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Mathematics and Statistics Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, 43403 USA Siddhartha Chib Olin School of Business Washington University, St. Louis 63130 USA March, 1994 Summary In a binary response

Albert, James H.

438

Centralized and Decentralized Control for Demand Response  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Demand response has been recognized as an essential element of the smart grid. Frequency response, regulation and contingency reserve functions performed traditionally by generation resources are now starting to involve demand side resources. Additional benefits from demand response include peak reduction and load shifting, which will defer new infrastructure investment and improve generator operation efficiency. Technical approaches designed to realize these functionalities can be categorized into centralized control and decentralized control, depending on where the response decision is made. This paper discusses these two control philosophies and compares their relative advantages and disadvantages in terms of delay time, predictability, complexity, and reliability. A distribution system model with detailed household loads and controls is built to demonstrate the characteristics of the two approaches. The conclusion is that the promptness and reliability of decentralized control should be combined with the predictability and simplicity of centralized control to achieve the best performance of the smart grid.

Lu, Shuai; Samaan, Nader A.; Diao, Ruisheng; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Jin, Chunlian; Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Zhang, Yu; Kirkham, Harold

2011-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

439

Georgia Hazardous Site Response Act (Georgia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Georgia Hazardous Site Response Act is Georgia’s version of Superfund. The Act provides for graduated fees on the disposal of hazardous waste, a trust fund to enable the EPD to clean up or plan...

440

Evaluation of High Freuqency Vibrator Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's operational frequencies. This study reveals significant response variability across the baseplate, which is dependent on accelerometer position with respect to radial position and internal baseplate structure. Consequently, the baseplate cannot be considered a...

Hendrix, Craig Michael

2012-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Capitalize on Existing Assets with Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Industrial facilities universally struggle with escalating energy costs. EnerNOC will demonstrate how commercial, industrial, and institutional end-users can capitalize on their existing assets—at no cost and no risk. Demand response, the voluntary...

Collins, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Slow motion responses of compliant offshore structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An efficient method is developed to predict slow motion responses of slender compliant offshore structures in the unidirectional irregular waves and currents. The environmental loads are computed using the modified Morison equation based on slender...

Cao, Peimin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

443

Responsibility and the traditional Muslim built environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study aims to analyze the effect of the responsibility enjoyed by individuals over the built environment. To understand these effects the study concentrates on the physical state of the property. It is concluded that ...

Akbar, Jamel A

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

1. Emergency Management Plan ACTIVE SHOOTER RESPONSE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1. Emergency Management Plan ACTIVE SHOOTER RESPONSE #12;The world has changed!The world has ­ But can transition to one of these #12;Why is this Necessary? Within the last five years, there have been

445

Hazardous materials transportation and emergency response programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation consists of the following visual aids; (1) detailed routing capabilities of truck, rail, barge; (2) legislative data base for hazardous materials; and (3) emergency response of accident site Eddyville, Kentucky (airports in vicinity of Eddyville, KY).

Joy, D.S.; Fore, C.S.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Crowdsourcing affective responses for predicting media effectiveness  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Emotion is key to the effectiveness of media, whether it be in influencing memory, likability or persuasion. Stories and narratives, even if fictional, have the ability to induce a genuine emotional response. However, the ...

McDuff, Daniel Jonathan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Measuring the capacity impacts of demand response  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Critical peak pricing and peak time rebate programs offer benefits by increasing system reliability, and therefore, reducing capacity needs of the electric power system. These benefits, however, decrease substantially as the size of the programs grows relative to the system size. More flexible schemes for deployment of demand response can help address the decreasing returns to scale in capacity value, but more flexible demand response has decreasing returns to scale as well. (author)

Earle, Robert; Kahn, Edward P.; Macan, Edo

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

448

Impedance response to induced epileptiform discharges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Subject: Bioengineering IMPEDANCE RESPONSE TO INDUCED EPILEPTIFORM DISCHARGES A Thesis by TERRY LYNN GERBER Approved as to style and content by erald E. Miller ( irman of Committee) William A. H an (Member) / , I / vW C' (gp frt 't- Thomas... W. Adair (Member) Newton C. Ellis (Head of Department) May 1984 ABSTRACT Impedance Response to Induced Epileptiform Discharges. (May 1984) Terry Lynn Gerber, B. S. , Texas A&M University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Gerald E. Miller...

Gerber, Terry Lynn

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

449

Responsive Copolymers for Enhanced Petroleum Recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this work was to: synthesize responsive copolymer systems; characterize molecular structure and solution behavior; measure rheological properties of aqueous fluids in fixed geometry flow profiles; and to tailor final polymer compositions for in situ rheology control under simulated conditions. This report focuses on the synthesis and characterization of novel stimuli responsive copolymers, the investigation of dilute polymer solutions in extensional flow and the design of a rheometer capable of measuring very dilute aqueous polymer solutions at low torque.

McCormick, C.; Hester, R.

2001-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

450

Large scale synthesis of pateamine A intermediates in route to designed derivatives for putative cellular receptor isolation and receptor/ligand studies: conformational studies of pateamine A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DERIVATIVES FOR PUTATIVE CELLULAR RECEPTOR ISOLATION AND RECEPTOR/LIGAND STUDIES; CONFORMATIONAL STUDIES OF PATEAMINE A A Thesis by INGRID PRICE BUCHLER Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... immunosuppressant exhibits significant biological activity with low cytotoxicity. For example, in the mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) pateamine A has an IC?value of 2. 6 nM as compared to FK506 and rapamycin which have IC?values between 20 and 50 nM...

Buchler, Ingrid Price

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Modeling the dynamic response of low-density, reticulated, elastomeric foam impregnated with Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering cellular solids, such as honeycombs and foams, are widely used in applications ranging from thermal insulation to energy absorption. Natural cellular materials, such as wood, have been used in structures for ...

Dawson, Matthew A. (Matthew Aaron), 1983-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reviews the relationship between energy efficiency and demand response and discusses approaches and barriers to coordinating energy efficiency and demand response. The paper is intended to support the 10 implementation goals of the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency's Vision to achieve all cost-effective energy efficiency by 2025. Improving energy efficiency in our homes, businesses, schools, governments, and industries - which consume more than 70 percent of the nation's natural gas and electricity - is one of the most constructive, cost-effective ways to address the challenges of high energy prices, energy security and independence, air pollution, and global climate change. While energy efficiency is an increasingly prominent component of efforts to supply affordable, reliable, secure, and clean electric power, demand response is becoming a valuable tool in utility and regional resource plans. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) estimated the contribution from existing U.S. demand response resources at about 41,000 megawatts (MW), about 5.8 percent of 2008 summer peak demand (FERC, 2008). Moreover, FERC recently estimated nationwide achievable demand response potential at 138,000 MW (14 percent of peak demand) by 2019 (FERC, 2009).2 A recent Electric Power Research Institute study estimates that 'the combination of demand response and energy efficiency programs has the potential to reduce non-coincident summer peak demand by 157 GW' by 2030, or 14-20 percent below projected levels (EPRI, 2009a). This paper supports the Action Plan's effort to coordinate energy efficiency and demand response programs to maximize value to customers. For information on the full suite of policy and programmatic options for removing barriers to energy efficiency, see the Vision for 2025 and the various other Action Plan papers and guides available at www.epa.gov/eeactionplan.

Goldman, Charles; Reid, Michael; Levy, Roger; Silverstein, Alison

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

453

Demand Response This is the first of the Council's power plans to treat demand response as a resource.1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Response This is the first of the Council's power plans to treat demand response the resource and describes some of the potential advantages and problems of the development of demand response. WHAT IS DEMAND RESPONSE? Demand response is a change in customers' demand for electricity corresponding

454

Automated Demand Response Strategies and Commissioning Commercial Building Controls  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4 9 . Piette et at Automated Demand Response Strategies andDynamic Controls for Demand Response in New and ExistingFully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities"

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila; Linkugel, Eric

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Analysis of Open Automated Demand Response Deployments in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-6560E Analysis of Open Automated Demand Response Deployments in California and Guidelines The work described in this report was coordinated by the Demand Response Research. #12; #12;Abstract This report reviews the Open Automated Demand Response

456

Measurement and evaluation techniques for automated demand response demonstration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Demand Response in Commercial Buildings. ” Highdemand-response technologies in large commercial and institutional buildings.building method California Independent System Operator (Cal ISO)’s Demand Response

Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Sezgen, Osman; ten Hope, Laurie

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Linking Continuous Energy Management and Open Automated Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Demand Response in a New Commercial Building in NewDemand Response and Energy Efficiency in Commercial Buildings.Demand Response Mary Ann Piette, Sila Kiliccote, and Girish Ghatikar Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Building

Piette, Mary Ann

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Modeling the mechanical response of PBX 9501  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An engineering overview of the mechanical response of Plastic-Bonded eXplosives (PBXs), specifically PBX 9501, will be provided with emphasis on observed mechanisms associated with different types of mechanical testing. Mechanical tests in the form of uniaxial tension, compression, cyclic loading, creep (compression and tension), and Hopkinson bar show strain rate and temperature dependence. A range of mechanical behavior is observed which includes small strain recoverable response in the form of viscoelasticity; change in stiffness and softening beyond peak strength due to damage in the form microcracks, debonding, void formation and the growth of existing voids; inelastic response in the form of irrecoverable strain as shown in cyclic tests, and viscoelastic creep combined with plastic response as demonstrated in creep and recovery tests. The main focus of this paper is to elucidate the challenges and issues involved in modeling the mechanical behavior of PBXs for simulating thermo-mechanical responses in engineering components. Examples of validation of a constitutive material model based on a few of the observed mechanisms will be demonstrated against three point bending, split Hopkinson pressure bar and Brazilian disk geometry.

Ragaswamy, Partha [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lewis, Matthew W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Liu, Cheng [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thompson, Darla G [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Ozone response relationships in healthy nonsmokers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant concentration responses were observed in FVC, FEV1, FEF25-75, SGaw, IC, and TLC in 20 healthy, nonsmoking volunteers exposed randomly to 0.00, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20, and 0.25 ppm O/sub 3/. In addition, significant response changes for FVC, FEV1, and FEF25-75 were shown with time over the 2-h exposure. Intermittent, heavy exercise (VE, 68 L/min) lasting 14 min was employed every 30 min during exposure. Inspection of the concentration and time response curves suggests that the threshold for the group response is at or below 0.15 ppm O/sub 3/. Six subjects experienced decreases greater than 5% in FEV1 or greater than 15% in SGaw at 0.15 ppm. This concentration is only slightly higher than the 1-h O/sub 3/ National Ambient Air Quality Standard. A dose-related response was also seen for cough, nose and throat irritation, and chest discomfort. The work load, length of exposure, and individual sensitivity must be considered for establishing a safe O/sub 3/ exposure level.

Kulle, T.J.; Sauder, L.R.; Hebel, J.R.; Chatham, M.D.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Ozone-response relationships in healthy nonsmokers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant concentration responses were observed in FVC1 FEV1, FEF 25-75, SGaw, IC, and TLC in 20 healthy, nonsmoking volunteers exposed randomly to 0.00, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20, and 0.25 ppm O3. In addition, significant response changes for FVC1 FEV1, FEF25-75 were shown with time over the 2-h exposure. Intermittent, heavy exercise (VE1 68L/min) lasting 14 min was employed every 30 min during exposure. Inspection of the concentration and time-response curves suggests that the threshold for the group response is at or below 0.15 ppm O/sub 3/. Six subjects experienced decreases > 5% in SGaw at 0.15 ppm. The concentration is only slightly higher than the 1-h O/sub 3/ National Ambient Air Quality Standard. A dose-related response was also seen for cough, nose and throat irritation, and chest discomfort. The work load, length of exposure, and individual sensitivity must be considered for establishing a safe O/sub 3/ exposure level.

Kulle, T.J.; Sauder, L.R.; Hebel, J.R.; Chatham, M.D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Nonlinear ac responses of erythrocyte suspensions: Experiment J. T. Zhu,a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lacking inversion symmetry, e.g., erythrocyte mem- branes made of proteins embedded in a lipid bilayer or gills to body tissues via the blood. As a result of the lack of nucleus and organelles, most mammalian eryth- rocytes cannot produce new structural or repair proteins or enzymes and their lifespan is limited

Huang, Ji-Ping

462

Altered Mitochondrial Retrograde Signaling in Response to mtDNA Depletion or a Ketogenic Diet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

kinase kinase MCI Mild cognitive impairment MCT Monocarboxylate transporter Mfn Mitofusin mtDNA Mitochondrial DNA mTOR Mammalian target of rapamycin mTORC1 mTOR complex 1 MRC Mitochondrial Respiratory Complex NAD(H) Nicotinamide adenine...

Selfridge, Jennifer Eva

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

463

Response Response  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart of the Review of theOFFICE OF CIVIL

464

NNSA Releases Pictures, Video of Consequence Management Response...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Releases Pictures, Video of Consequence Management Response Teams Deploying to Japan NNSA Releases Pictures, Video of Consequence Management Response Teams Deploying to Japan March...

465

Components Responsible for the Health Effects of Inhaled Engine...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Components Responsible for the Health Effects of Inhaled Engine Emissions Components Responsible for the Health Effects of Inhaled Engine Emissions Presentation given at the 2007...

466

Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. | Department...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Chapter 2 Energy Impacts, nepdg82518500.pdf Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. More Documents & Publications Response to several FOIA requests -...

467

Automated demand response applied to a set of commercial facilities.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Commercial facility demand response refers to voluntary actions by customers that change their consumption of electric power in response to price signals, incentives, or… (more)

Lincoln, Donald F.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Pulmonary and Systemic Immune Response to Inhaled Oil Condensates...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Pulmonary and Systemic Immune Response to Inhaled Oil Condensates Pulmonary and Systemic Immune Response to Inhaled Oil Condensates Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24,...

469

University of California Response to DOE Questions Regarding...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

University of California Response to DOE Questions Regarding Price-Anderson Renewal University of California Response to DOE Questions Regarding Price-Anderson Renewal Comments...

470

Terrestrial Climate Change and Ecosystem Response Recorded in...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Terrestrial Climate Change and Ecosystem Response Recorded in Lake Sediments and Related Deposits Reconstruction of past terrestrial climate and ecosystem response relies on...

471

NETL Gas Migration Study to Advance Understanding of Responsible...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Gas Migration Study to Advance Understanding of Responsible Oil and Natural Gas Development NETL Gas Migration Study to Advance Understanding of Responsible Oil and Natural Gas...

472

Microstructural Response of Variably Hydrated Ca-Rich Montmorillonite...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Microstructural Response of Variably Hydrated Ca-Rich Montmorillonite to Supercritical CO2. Microstructural Response of Variably Hydrated Ca-Rich Montmorillonite to Supercritical...

473

FERC Presendation: Demand Response as Power System Resources...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) presentation on demand response as power system resources before the Electicity Advisory Committee, October 29, 2010 Demand Response as...

474

ASSESSMENT OF VARIABLE EFFECTS OF SYSTEMS WITH DEMAND RESPONSE RESOURCES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ASSESSMENT OF VARIABLE EFFECTS OF SYSTEMS WITH DEMAND RESPONSE RESOURCES BY ANUPAMA SUNIL KOWLI B of consumers - called demand response resources (DRRs) - whose role has become increasingly important

Gross, George

475

Household Response To Dynamic Pricing Of Electricity: A Survey...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Household Response To Dynamic Pricing Of Electricity: A Survey Of The Experimental Evidence Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Household Response To Dynamic...

476

Model Annex for Preparedness and Response to Radiological Transportati...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Response to Radiological Transportation Incidents.docx More Documents & Publications TEPP Model Needs Assessment Document First Responder Initial Response Procedure Hazardous...

477

Model Recovery Procedure for Response to a Radiological Transportation...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Incident.docx More Documents & Publications Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure First Responder Initial Response Procedure TEPP Model Needs Assessment Document...

478

Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO Markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M T E P 06 - The Midwest ISO Transmission Expansion Plan,Demand Response in Midwest ISO Market," Presentation at MISODemand Response with Midwest ISO Wholesale Markets Ranjit

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Smart Grid Consortium, Response of New York State Smart Grid...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Consortium, Response of New York State Smart Grid Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges Smart Grid Consortium, Response of New York State Smart Grid Addressing Policy and...

480

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response:both the avoided energy costs (and demand charges) as wellCoordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response,

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

DOE response to questions from AHAM on the supplemental proposed...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

response to questions from AHAM on the supplemental proposed test procedure for residential clothes washers DOE response to questions from AHAM on the supplemental proposed test...

482

Subcellular Spatial Correlation of Particle Traversal and Biological Response in Clinical Ion Beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To report on the spatial correlation of physical track information (fluorescent nuclear track detectors, FNTDs) and cellular DNA damage response by using a novel hybrid detector (Cell-Fit-HD). Methods and Materials: The FNTDs were coated with a monolayer of human non-small cell lung carcinoma (A549) cells and irradiated with carbon ions (270.55 MeV u{sup ?1}, rising flank of the Bragg peak). Phosphorylated histone variant H2AX accumulating at the irradiation-induced double-strand break site was labeled (RIF). The position and direction of ion tracks in the FNTD were registered with the location of the RIF sequence as an ion track surrogate in the cell layer. Results: All RIF sequences could be related to their corresponding ion tracks, with mean deviations of 1.09 ?m and ?1.72 ?m in position and of 2.38° in slope. The mean perpendicular between ion track and RIF sequence was 1.58 ?m. The mean spacing of neighboring RIFs exhibited a regular rather than random spacing. Conclusions: Cell-Fit-HD allows for unambiguous spatial correlation studies of cell damage with respect to the intracellular ion traversal under therapeutic beam conditions.

Niklas, Martin, E-mail: m.niklas@dkfz.de [Division of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Consortium, National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Abdollahi, Amir [German Cancer Consortium, National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Molecular and Translational Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center, University of Heidelberg Medical School and National Center for Tumor Diseases, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology and Radiation Therapy, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Akselrod, Mark S. [Stillwater Crystal Growth Division, Landauer Inc, Stillwater, Oklahoma (United States); Debus, Jürgen [German Cancer Consortium, National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Molecular and Translational Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center, University of Heidelberg Medical School and National Center for Tumor Diseases, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology and Radiation Therapy, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Jäkel, Oliver [Division of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Consortium, National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology and Radiation Therapy, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center, Heidelberg (Germany); and others

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Modeling marrow damage from response data: Morphallaxis from radiation biology to benzene toxicity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Consensus principles from radiation biology were used to describe a generic set of nonlinear, first-order differential equations for modeling of toxicity-induced compensatory cell kinetics in terms of sublethal injury, repair, direct killing, killing of cells with unrepaired sublethal injury, and repopulation. This cellular model was linked to a probit model of hematopoietic mortality that describes death from infection and/or hemorrhage between {approximately} 5 and 30 days. Mortality data from 27 experiments with 851 doseresponse groups, in which doses were protracted by rate and/or fractionation, were used to simultaneously estimate all rate constants by maximum-likelihood methods. Data used represented 18,940 test animals distributed according to: (mice, 12,827); (rats, 2,925); (sheep, 1,676); (swine, 829); (dogs, 479); and (burros, 204). Although a long-term, repopulating hematopoietic stem cell is ancestral to all lineages needed to restore normal homeostasis, the dose-response data from the protracted irradiations indicate clearly that the particular lineage that is ``critical`` to hematopoietic recovery does not resemble stem-like cells with regard to radiosensitivity and repopulation rates. Instead, the weakest link in the chain of hematopoiesis was found to have an intrinsic radioresistance equal to or greater than stromal cells and to repopulate at the same rates. Model validation has been achieved by predicting the LD{sub 50} and/or fractional group mortality in 38 protracted-dose experiments (rats and mice) that were not used in the fitting of model coefficients.

Jones, T.D.; Morris, M.D.; Hasan, J.S.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

A novel peptide-nucleotide dual vaccine of human telomerase reverse transcriptase induces a potent cytotoxic T-cell response in vivo  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) is highly expressed in over 85% of human cancers, which makes it a broadly applicable molecular target for cancer therapy. Several groups have demonstrated that hTERT can efficiently evoke specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) responses for malignant tumors. In the present study, we developed a novel virus-like particulate peptide-nucleotide dual vaccine (PNDV) of hTERT, which was composed of a low-affinity epitope variant with encoding full-length gene in the same virus-size particulate. We verified the formation of PNDV by DNA retarding assay, DNase I protection assay and transmission electron microscopy, and confirmed its immunogenicity and transfection activities in mammalian cells. Furthermore, in vivo immunization of HLA-A2.1 transgenic mice generated efficient IFN-{gamma} secretion and hTERT-specific CTLs which are known to cause selective cell death of telomerase positive gastrointestinal cancer cells. To our knowledge, this represents the first report on collocating a low-affinity epitope variant with a full-length hTERT gene for anti-cancer vaccine design. This novel strategy for vaccine design not only enables enhanced immunity to a universal tumor antigen, but also has the potential to generate CTLs effective in telomerase-positive tumor cells of diverse tissue origins. Therefore, our findings bear significant implications for immunotherapy of human cancers.

Guo, Hong [Institute of Gastroenterology of PLA, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Hao, Jia [Institute of Gastroenterology of PLA, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Wu, Chao [Institute of Gastroenterology of PLA, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Shi, Yun [Institute of Gastroenterology of PLA, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Zhao, Xiao-yan [Institute of Gastroenterology of PLA, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Fang, Dian-chun [Institute of Gastroenterology of PLA, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China)]. E-mail: fandianchun@hotmail.com

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

485

EASA Institute of Advanced Studies on Sustainability, Munich -Germany ResponseResponse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EASA Institute of Advanced Studies on Sustainability, Munich - Germany ResponseResponse ofof WaterClimate Change Peter A. Wilderer Munich, Germany L. A. Colding Lecture, DTU Lyngby, Denmark, 19-06-2007 #12;EASA Institute of Advanced Studies on Sustainability, Munich - Germany content some general thoughts WS&T ­ long

Mosegaard, Klaus

486

Evaluating Radiometric Measurements Using a Fixed 45 Degrees Responsivity and Zenith Angle Dependent Responsivities (Poster)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This poster seeks to demonstrate the importance and application of an existing but unused approach that ultimately reduces the uncertainty of radiometric measurements. Current radiometric data is based on a single responsivity value that introduces significant uncertainty to the data, however, through using responsivity as a function of solar zenith angle, the uncertainty could be decreased by 50%.

Dooraghi, M.; Habte, A.; Reda, I.; Sengupta, M.; Gotseff, P.; Andreas, A.; Anderberg, M.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

CONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to Physicians and the Pharmaceutical Industry Working  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to Physicians and the Pharmaceutical Industry Working Party April 2008 Page 1 of 4 Royal College of Physicians: Physicians and the Pharmaceutical Industry to respond to the Royal College of Physicians consultation on physicians and the pharmaceutical industry

Rambaut, Andrew

488

ERCOT's Weather Sensitive Demand Response Pilot  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ERCOT’s Weather Sensitive Demand Response Pilot CATEE 12-17-13 ESL-KT-13-12-21 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 Disclaimer The information contained in this report has been obtained from... services along with other information about our business is available online at constellation.com. ESL-KT-13-12-21 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 Demand Response in ERCOT CATEE 121313 - Tim Carter...

Carter, T.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Demand Response Initiatives at CPS Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Response Initiatives at CPS Energy Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency (CATEE) Conference December 17, 2013 ESL-KT-13-12-53 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 CPSE’s DR Program • DR... than the military bases and Toyota combined. • Schools & Universities contributed 6 MW’s of Demand Response in 2013. 2013 DR Participants Trinity University - $5,654 Fort Sam ISD - $18,860 Judson ISD - $45,540 Alamo Colleges - $98,222 UTSA - $168...

Luna, R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Incident Prevention, Warning, and Response (IPWAR) Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual defines a structured, cohesive, and consistent process for performing incident prevention, warning, and response for DOE's Federal information systems and is consistent with the requirements of Federal laws, Executive orders, national security directives, and other regulations. The Manual also provides requirements and implementation instructions for the Department's Incident Prevention, Warning and Response process, and supplements DOE O 205.1, Department of Energy Cyber Security Management Program, dated 3-21-03. DOE N 205.17 cancels this manual. This manual cancels DOE N 205.4, Handling Cyber Security Alerts and Advisories and Reporting Cyber Security Incidents, dated 3/18/2002.

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

491

Nonlocal Electromagnetic Response of Graphene Nanostructures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nonlocal electromagnetic effects of graphene arise from its naturally dispersive dielectric response. We present semi-analytical solutions of nonlocal Maxwell's equations for graphene nano-ribbons array with features around 100 nm, where we found prominent departures from its local response. Interestingly, the nonlocal corrections are stronger for light polarization parallel to the ribbons, which manifests as additional broadening of the Drude peak. For the perpendicular polarization case, nonlocal effects lead to blue-shifts of the plasmon peaks. These manifestations provide a physical measure of nonlocal effects, and we quantify their dependence on ribbon width, doping and wavelength.

Fallahi, Arya; Tamagnone, Michele; Perruisseau-Carrier, Julien

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

3-Nitrotyrosine Modification of SERCA2a in the Aging Heart: A Distinct Signature of the Cellular Redox Environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the aging heart, decreased rates of calcium transport mediated by the SERCA2a isoform of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca-ATPase are responsible for the slower sequestration of cytosolic calcium and consequent prolonged muscle relaxation times. We report a 60% decrease in Ca-ATPase activity in the senescent Fischer 344 rat heart relative to that of young adult hearts; this functional decrease can be attributed, in part, to the 18% lower abundance of SERCA2a protein. Here, we show here that the additional loss of activity is a result of increased 3-nitrotyrosine modification of the Ca-ATPase. Age-dependent increases in nitration of cardiac SERCA2a are identified using multiple analytical methods. In the young (adult) heart one molar equivalent of nitrotyrosine is distributed over at least five tyrosines within the Ca-ATPase, identified as Tyr122, Tyr130, Tyr497, Tyr586 and Tyr990. In the senescent heart, the stoichiometry of nitration increases by more than two nitrotyrosines per Ca-ATPase, coinciding with the appearance of nitrated Tyr294, Tyr295, and Tyr753. The abundant recovery of native analogs for each of the nitrated peptides indicates partial modification of multiple tyrosines within cardiac SERCA2a. In contrast, within skeletal muscle SERCA2a a homogeneous pattern of nitration appears, with full site (1 mol/mol) nitration of Tyr753, in young, with additional nitration of Tyr294 and Tyr295, in senescent muscle. The nitration of these latter vicinal sites correlates with diminished transport function in both striated muscle types. Thus the enhanced function of the Ca-ATPase during aging in the heart in comparison with that in slow-twitch skeletal muscle is consistent with different endogenous degradation or repair activities that function to minimize the accumulation of Ca-ATPase with reduced activity.

Knyushko, Tanya V.; Sharov, Victor S.; Williams, Todd D.; Schoneich, Christian; Bigelow, Diana J.

2005-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

493

Methods for boron delivery to mammalian tissue  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Boron neutron capture therapy can be used to destroy tumors. This treatment modality is enhanced by delivering compounds to the tumor site where the compounds have high concentrations of boron, the boron compounds being encapsulated in the bilayer of a liposome or in the bilayer as well as the internal space of the liposomes. Preferred compounds, include carborane units with multiple boron atoms within the carborane cage structure. Liposomes with increased tumor specificity may also be used.

Hawthorne, M. Frederick (Encino, CA); Feaks, Debra A. (Los Angeles, CA); Shelly, Kenneth J. (Los Angeles, CA)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Compositions for boron delivery to mammalian tissue  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Boron neutron capture therapy can utilize X.sub.y B.sub.20 H.sub.17 L where X is an alkali metal, y is 1 to 4, and L is a two electron donor such as NH.sub.3, and Na.sub.2 B.sub.10 H.sub.9 NCO, among others. These borane salts may be used free or encapsulated in liposomes. Liposomes may also have embedded within their bilayers carboranes to increase the amount of delivered .sup.10 B and/or to increase the tumor specificity of the liposome.

Hawthorne, M. Frederick (Encino, CA); Feaks, Debra Arlene (Los Angeles, CA); Shelly, Kenneth John (Los Angeles, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Foundational platform for mammalian synthetic biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The emergent field of synthetic biology is different from many other biological engineering efforts, in that its roots, design principles, and forward engineering perspective have been adopted from electrical engineering ...

Davidsohn, Noah (Noah Justin)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Engineering mammalian cell line to improve sialylation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the key problems faced by many biotechnology companies is the cleavage of terminal sialic acid on the glycans of the therapeutic glycoproteins. This is caused by the degradative action of sialidase released to ...

Ngantung, Frederyk Anthonius

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

REQUEST FOR EMPLOYEE TERMINATION CLEARANCE SUPERVISOR'S RESPONSIBILITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REQUEST FOR EMPLOYEE TERMINATION CLEARANCE PROCESS SUPERVISOR'S RESPONSIBILITY: Before an employeeClearance@caltech.edu. The following departments will be notified prior to the employee's termination date: · Athenaeum · Bursar · Telecommunications · Travel Audit The following departments will be notified after the employee's termination date

Faraon, Andrei

498

USACE Small Business Area of Responsibility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACE Page 1 USACE Small Business Area of Responsibility OFC CODE STREET CITY ST ZIP TELEPHONE D S N-761-4609 Deputy to PARCs , Office of Small Business Prog, HQ U.S. Army Corps of CESB 60 Forsyth Street RM10M15

US Army Corps of Engineers

499

`KNOWLEDGE AND VIRTUE: RESPONSE TO KELP'  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 `KNOWLEDGE AND VIRTUE: RESPONSE TO KELP' DUNCAN PRITCHARD University of Edinburgh In a very interesting paper, `Pritchard on Virtue Epistemology', Christoph Kelp argues that my recent critique ability). In particular, RVE does not involve any appeal to an anti-luck condition.2 As Kelp makes clear

Edinburgh, University of

500

Response to changes in demand/supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Response to changes in demand/supply through improved marketing 21.2 #12;#12;111 Impacts of changes log demand in 1995. The composites board mills operating in Korea took advantage of flexibility environment changes on the production mix, some economic indications, statistics of demand and supply of wood