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1

The Quantification of Inflammatory Cellular Responses Using ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Quantification of Inflammatory Cellular Responses Using Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR). LeeAnn ...

2

Cellular Response to Diesel Exhaust Particles Strongly Depends...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cellular Response to Diesel Exhaust Particles Strongly Depends on the Exposure Method Title Cellular Response to Diesel Exhaust Particles Strongly Depends on the Exposure Method...

3

Cellular responses to environmental DNA damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume contains the proceedings of the conference entitled Cellular Responses to Environmental DNA Damage held in Banff,Alberta December 1--6, 1991. The conference addresses various aspects of DNA repair in sessions titled DNA repair; Basic Mechanisms; Lesions; Systems; Inducible Responses; Mutagenesis; Human Population Response Heterogeneity; Intragenomic DNA Repair Heterogeneity; DNA Repair Gene Cloning; Aging; Human Genetic Disease; and Carcinogenesis. Individual papers are represented as abstracts of about one page in length.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

The Role of DNA double-strand break repair in cellular response to low  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DNA double-strand break repair in cellular response to low DNA double-strand break repair in cellular response to low dose radiation exposure. David J. Chen Division of Molecular Radiation Biology, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas TX 75390 It has been assumed that molecular pathways that involved in the biological response for low dose of radiation should be similar to those for high dose radiation in general. The low dose-rate effect and DNA double-strand break repair are inextricably linked in mammalian cells. It has been reported that mammalian mutant cells deficient in nonhomologous end join (NHEJ) pathway have little or no cellular recovery when expose to low-dose-rate radiation. Recently, it has also been reported that cells deficient in

5

Live Cell Imaging and in situ analysis of cellular responses to DNA doublestrand  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Live Cell Imaging and in situ analysis of cellular responses to DNA double- Live Cell Imaging and in situ analysis of cellular responses to DNA double- strand breaks in mammalian cells. David J. Chen Division of Molecular Radiation Biology, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas TX 75390 The integrity of the human genome is constantly threatened by internal as well as external factors with the propensity to cause DNA damage. Of the various types of DNA damage that can occur within the mammalian cell nucleus, the DNA double strand break (DSB) is perhaps the most dangerous. Estimates put the number of endogenous DSBs anywhere between 10-100 per nucleus per day. A direct link between DSBs and cancer has been surmised by researchers based upon the fact that many cancer-predisposition

6

Mechanisms underlying cellular responses of cells from haemopoeitic tissue to low dose-low LET radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

underlying cellular responses of cells from haemopoeitic underlying cellular responses of cells from haemopoeitic tissue to low dose-low LET radiation Munira Kadhim 1 , Sarah Irons 1 , Deborah Bowler 1 , Virginia Serra 1 , Stefania Militi 2 , Kim Chapman 1 1 Genomic Instability Research Group, School of Life Sciences, Oxford Brookes University, Gipsy Lane, Headington, Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX3 0BP, UK 2 Mammalian Genetics Unit, Medical Research Council Harwell, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Oxfordshire, OX11 0RD, UK Radiation-induced responses at the cellular and whole body levels are influenced by genetic predisposition, with implications for environmental and potentially, diagnostic exposures. Currently, the extent to which genetic background play a role in the mechanisms and signalling pathways involved in radiation-induced

7

Mechanisms underlying cellular responses of cells from haemopoeitic tissue  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

underlying cellular responses of cells from haemopoeitic tissue underlying cellular responses of cells from haemopoeitic tissue to low dose-low LET radiation Munira Kadhim Oxford Brookes University Abstract Radiation-induced responses at the cellular and whole body levels are influenced by genetic predisposition, with implications for environmental and potentially, diagnostic exposures. Currently, the extent to which genetic background play a role in the mechanisms and signalling pathways involved in radiation-induced delayed Genomic Instability (GI) is not fully understood. In previous studies, our results have shown that the CBA/H and C57BL/6 mouse strains, have differing sensitivities in the induction of radiation-induced genomic instability (RIGI) in terms of chromosomal instability, following exposure to high dose-high LET and high dose-low LET

8

Molecular Mechanism Underlying Cellular Adaptive Response to Low Dose Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mechanism Underlying Cellular Adaptive Response to Low Dose Radiation Mechanism Underlying Cellular Adaptive Response to Low Dose Radiation Colette A. Sacksteder § , DJ Black ‡ , Heather Smallwood § , David G. Camp II † , and Thomas C. Squier § § Cell Biology and Biochemistry; † Biological Sciences Division Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 ‡ School of Biological Sciences, University of Missouri, Kansas City MO 64110 The goal of this research is to identify the molecular mechanisms by which cells adapt to low dose radiation exposure. Previously we have shown a radiation dependent increase of Calmodulin (CaM) in RAW 264.7 macrophages (RAW). Therefore we hypothesize that CaM and associated signaling complexes are sensors of low-dose radiation, resulting in alterations in energy metabolism and gene expression. The ultimate experimental goal

9

Systematic quantitative characterization of cellular responses induced by multiple signals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ram PT: Identification of Optimal Drug Combinations Targeting Cellular Networks: Integrating Phospho- Proteomics and Computational Network Analysis.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

A Computational Model of Cellular Response to Modulated Radiation Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To develop a model to describe the response of cell populations to spatially modulated radiation exposures of relevance to advanced radiotherapies. Materials and Methods: A Monte Carlo model of cellular radiation response was developed. This model incorporated damage from both direct radiation and intercellular communication including bystander signaling. The predictions of this model were compared to previously measured survival curves for a normal human fibroblast line (AGO1522) and prostate tumor cells (DU145) exposed to spatially modulated fields. Results: The model was found to be able to accurately reproduce cell survival both in populations which were directly exposed to radiation and those which were outside the primary treatment field. The model predicts that the bystander effect makes a significant contribution to cell killing even in uniformly irradiated cells. The bystander effect contribution varies strongly with dose, falling from a high of 80% at low doses to 25% and 50% at 4 Gy for AGO1522 and DU145 cells, respectively. This was verified using the inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor aminoguanidine to inhibit the bystander effect in cells exposed to different doses, which showed significantly larger reductions in cell killing at lower doses. Conclusions: The model presented in this work accurately reproduces cell survival following modulated radiation exposures, both in and out of the primary treatment field, by incorporating a bystander component. In addition, the model suggests that the bystander effect is responsible for a significant portion of cell killing in uniformly irradiated cells, 50% and 70% at doses of 2 Gy in AGO1522 and DU145 cells, respectively. This description is a significant departure from accepted radiobiological models and may have a significant impact on optimization of treatment planning approaches if proven to be applicable in vivo.

McMahon, Stephen J., E-mail: stephen.mcmahon@qub.ac.uk [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Butterworth, Karl T. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)] [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); McGarry, Conor K. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom) [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Radiotherapy Physics, Northern Ireland Cancer Centre, Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Trainor, Colman [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)] [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); O'Sullivan, Joe M. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom) [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Clinical Oncology, Northern Ireland Cancer Centre, Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Hounsell, Alan R. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom) [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Radiotherapy Physics, Northern Ireland Cancer Centre, Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Prise, Kevin M. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)] [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Frequent biphasic cellular responses of permanent fish cell cultures to deoxynivalenol (DON)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contamination of animal feed with mycotoxins is a major problem for fish feed mainly due to usage of contaminated ingredients for production and inappropriate storage of feed. The use of cereals for fish food production further increases the risk of a potential contamination. Potential contaminants include the mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) which is synthesized by globally distributed fungi of the genus Fusarium. The toxicity of DON is well recognized in mammals. In this study, we confirm cytotoxic effects of DON in established permanent fish cell lines. We demonstrate that DON is capable of influencing the metabolic activity and cell viability in fish cells as determined by different assays to indicate possible cellular targets of this toxin. Evaluation of cell viability by measurement of membrane integrity, mitochondrial activity and lysosomal function after 24 h of exposure of fish cell lines to DON at a concentration range of 0-3000 ng ml{sup -1} shows a biphasic effect on cells although differences in sensitivity occur. The cell lines derived from rainbow trout are particularly sensitive to DON. The focus of this study lies, furthermore, on the effects of DON at different concentrations on production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the different fish cell lines. The results show that DON mainly reduces ROS production in all cell lines that were used. Thus, our comparative investigations reveal that the fish cell lines show distinct species-related endpoint sensitivities that also depend on the type of tissue from which the cells were derived and the severity of exposure. - Highlights: > DON uptake by cells is not extensive. > All fish cell lines are sensitive to DON. > DON is most cytotoxic to rainbow trout cells. > Biphasic cellular responses were frequently observed. > Our results are similar to studies on mammalian cell lines.

Pietsch, Constanze, E-mail: constanze.pietsch@unibas.ch [University Basel, Man-Society-Environment, Department of Environmental Sciences, Vesalgasse 1, CH-4051 Basel (Switzerland); Bucheli, Thomas D.; Wettstein, Felix E. [Agroscope Reckenholz-Taenikon (ART), Research Station ART, Reckenholzstrasse 191, CH-8046 Zuerich (Switzerland); Burkhardt-Holm, Patricia [University Basel, Man-Society-Environment, Department of Environmental Sciences, Vesalgasse 1, CH-4051 Basel (Switzerland)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Mechanisms Underlying Cellular Responses to Low Dose/Low LET...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

expression, chromosomal and apoptotic analysis suggest a model for strain specific radiation response; normal DNA damage recognition and repair leading to cell death and...

13

Molecular Mechanism Underlying Cellular Response in 3D Skin to...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

biological response. At PNNL we are applying a system biology approach to identify molecular targets in complex human tissue exposed to low-dose ionizing radiation. Our goal is...

14

Molecular dissection of the roles of the SOD genes in mammalian response to low dose irradiation  

SciTech Connect

It has been long recognized that a significant fraction of the radiation-induced genetic damage to cells are caused by secondary oxidative species. Internal cellular defense systems against oxidative stress play significant roles in countering genetic damage induced by ionizing radiation. The role of the detoxifying enzymes may be even more prominent in the case of low-dose, low-LET irradiation, as the majority of genetic damage may be caused by secondary oxidative species. In this study we have attempted to decipher the roles of the superoxide dismutase (SOD) genes, which are responsible for detoxifying the superoxide anions. We used adenovirus vectors to deliver RNA interference (RNAi or siRNA) technology to down-regulate the expression levels of the SOD genes. We have also over-expressed the SOD genes by use of recombinant adenovirus vectors. Cells infected with the vectors were then subjected to low dose ?-irradiation. Total RNA were extracted from the exposed cells and the expression of 9000 genes were profiled by use of cDNA microarrays. The result showed that low dose radiation had clear effects on gene expression in HCT116 cells. Both over-expression and down-regulation of the SOD1 gene can change the expression profiles of sub-groups of genes. Close to 200 of the 9000 genes examined showed over two-fold difference in expression under various conditions. Genes with changed expression pattern belong to many categories that include: early growth response, DNA-repair, ion transport, apoptosis, and cytokine response.

Eric Y. Chuang

2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

15

Mechanisms Underlying Cellular Responses to Low Doses/Low LET Ionizing Radiation in Primary Haemopoietic Cells.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mechanisms Underlying Cellular Responses to Low Doses/Low LET Ionizing Radiation Mechanisms Underlying Cellular Responses to Low Doses/Low LET Ionizing Radiation in Primary Haemopoietic Cells. Munira Kadhim 1 , Stefania Militi 1 , Debbie Bowler 1 , Denise Macdonald 1 and Kevin Prise 2 1 Radiation and Genome Stability Unit, MRC, Harwell, Didcot, Oxon, OX11 0RD, UK 2 Gray Cancer Institute ,PO Box 100, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, HA6 2JR, UK Because the human population is genetically heterogeneous, it is important to understand the role that heterogeneity may play in radiation response. Exposure to ionizing radiation can lead to a suite of changes, including increased mutation rate, delayed reproductive cell death, and delayed chromosomal aberrations, all of which are manifestations of the complex genomic instability (GI) phenotype. Following exposure to either high LET

16

Cellular response to low dose radiation: Role of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase like kinases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is increasingly realized that human exposure either to an acute low dose or multiple chronic low doses of low LET radiation has the potential to cause different types of cancer. Therefore, the central theme of research for DOE and NASA is focused on understanding the molecular mechanisms and pathways responsible for the cellular response to low dose radiation which would not only improve the accuracy of estimating health risks but also help in the development of predictive assays for low dose radiation risks associated with tissue degeneration and cancer. The working hypothesis for this proposal is that the cellular mechanisms in terms of DNA damage signaling, repair and cell cycle checkpoint regulation are different for low and high doses of low LET radiation and that the mode of action of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase like kinases (PIKK: ATM, ATR and DNA-PK) determines the dose dependent cellular responses. The hypothesis will be tested at two levels: (I) Evaluation of the role of ATM, ATR and DNA-PK in cellular response to low and high doses of low LET radiation in simple in vitro human cell systems and (II) Determination of radiation responses in complex cell microenvironments such as human EpiDerm tissue constructs. Cellular responses to low and high doses of low LET radiation will be assessed from the view points of DNA damage signaling, DNA double strand break repair and cell cycle checkpoint regulation by analyzing the activities (i.e. post-translational modifications and kinetics of protein-protein interactions) of the key target proteins for PI-3 kinase like kinases both at the intra-cellular and molecular levels. The proteins chosen for this proposal are placed under three categories: (I) sensors/initiators include ATM ser1981, ATR, 53BP1, gamma-H2AX, MDC1, MRE11, Rad50 and Nbs1; (II) signal transducers include Chk1, Chk2, FANCD2 and SMC1; and (III) effectors include p53, CDC25A and CDC25C. The primary goal of this proposal is to elucidate the differences in cellular defense mechanisms between low and high doses of low LET radiation and to define the radiation doses where the cellular DNA damage signaling and repair mechanisms tend to shift. This information is critically important to address and advance some of the low dose research program objectives of DOE. The results of this proposed study will lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms for the cellular responses to low and high doses of low LET radiation. Further, systematic analysis of the role of PIKK signaling pathways as a function of radiation dose in tissue microenvironment will provide useful mechanistic information for improving the accuracy of radiation risk assessment for low doses. Knowledge of radiation responses in tissue microenvironment is important for the accurate prediction of ionizing radiation risks associated with cancer and tissue degeneration in humans.

Balajee, A.S.; Meador, J.A.; Su, Y.

2011-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

17

7th International Workshop on Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The extended abstracts that follow present a summary of the Proceedings of the 7th International Workshop: Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response, held at Columbia Universitys Kellogg Center in New York City on March 1517, 2006. These International Workshops on Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response have been held regularly since 1993 (15). Since the first workshop, there has been a rapid growth (see Fig. 1) in the number of centers developing microbeams for radiobiological research, and worldwide there are currently about 30 microbeams in operation or under development. Single-cell/single-particle microbeam systems can deliver beams of different ionizing radiations with a spatial resolution of a few micrometers down to a few tenths of a micrometer. Microbeams can be used to addressquestions relating to the effects of low doses of radiation (a single radiation track traversing a cell or group of cells), to probe subcellular targets (e.g. nucleus or cytoplasm), and to address questions regarding the propagation of information about DNA damage (for example, the radiation-induced bystander effect). Much of the recent research using microbeams has been to study low-dose effects and non-targeted responses such as bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive responses. This Workshop provided a forum to assess the current state of microbeam technology and current biological applications and to discuss future directions for development, both technological and biological. Over 100 participants reviewed the current state of microbeam research worldwide and reported on new technological developments in the fields of both physics and biology.

Brenner, David J.

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

18

Restriction of Receptor Movement Alters Cellular Response: Physical Force Sensing by EphA2  

SciTech Connect

Activation of the EphA2 receptor tyrosine kinase by ephrin-A1 ligands presented on apposed cell surfaces plays important roles in development and exhibits poorly understood functional alterations in cancer. We reconstituted this intermembrane signaling geometry between live EphA2-expressing human breast cancer cells and supported membranes displaying laterally mobile ephrin-A1. Receptor-ligand binding, clustering, and subsequent lateral transport within this junction were observed. EphA2 transport can be blocked by physical barriers nanofabricated onto the underlying substrate. This physical reorganization of EphA2 alters the cellular response to ephrin-A1, as observed by changes in cytoskeleton morphology and recruitment of a disintegrin and metalloprotease 10. Quantitative analysis of receptor-ligand spatial organization across a library of 26 mammary epithelial cell lines reveals characteristic differences that strongly correlate with invasion potential. These observations reveal a mechanism for spatio-mechanical regulation of EphA2 signaling pathways.

Salaita, Khalid; Nair, Pradeep M; Petit, Rebecca S; Neve, Richard M; Das, Debopriya; Gray, Joe W; Groves, Jay T

2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

19

Cellular frustration: a new conceptual framework for understanding cell-mediated immune responses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Here we propose that frustration within dynamic interactions between cells can provide the basis for a functional immune system. Cellular frustration arises when cells in the immune system interact through exchanges of potentially conflicting and diverse ... Keywords: cellular frustration, generalized kinetic proofreading, homeostasis, self-nonself discrimination, tolerance

F. Vistulo de Abreu; E. N. M. Nolte-Hoen; C. R. Almeida; D. M. Davis

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Mitochondrial-Derived Oxidants and Cellular Responses to Low Dose/Low LET Ionizing Radiation  

SciTech Connect

Exposure to ionizing radiation results in the immediate formation of free radicals and other reactive oxygen species (ROS). It has been assumed that the subsequent injury processes leading to genomic instability and carcinogenesis following radiation, derive from the initial oxidative damage caused by these free radicals and ROS. It is now becoming increasingly obvious that metabolic oxidation/reduction (redox) reactions can be altered by irradiation leading to persistent increases in steady-state levels of intracellular free radicals and ROS that contribute to the long term biological effects of radiation exposure by causing chronic oxidative stress. The objective during the last period of support (DE-FG02-05ER64050; 5/15/05-12/31/09) was to determine the involvement of mitochondrial genetic defects in metabolic oxidative stress and the biological effects of low dose/low LET radiation. Aim 1 was to determine if cells with mutations in succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) subunits C and D (SDHC and SDHD in mitochondrial complex II) demonstrated increases in steady-state levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS; O2- and H2O2) as well as demonstrating increased sensitivity to low dose/low LET radiation (10 cGy) in cultured mammalian cells. Aim #2 was to determine if mitochondrially-derived ROS contributed to increased sensitivity to low dose/low LET radiation in mammalian cells containing mutations in SDH subunits. Aim #3 was to determine if a causal relationship existed between increases in mitochondrial ROS production, alterations in electron transport chain proteins, and genomic instability in the progeny of irradiated cells. Evidence gathered in the 2005-2009 period of support demonstrated that mutations in genes coding for mitochondrial electron transport chain proteins (ETC); either Succinate Dehydrogenase (SDH) subunit C (SDHC) or subunit D (SDHD); caused increased ROS production, increased genomic instability, and increased sensitivity to low dose/low LET radiation that could be mitigated by over expression of the H2O2 metabolizing enzyme, catalase, and/or the mitochondrial form of superoxide dismutase (MnSOD). Furthermore, using radiation-induced genomically unstable cells, it was shown that steady-state levels of H2O2 were significantly elevated for many cell generations following exposure, catalase suppressed the radiation-induced mutator phenotype when added long after radiation exposure, unstable clones showed evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction some of which was characterized by improper assembly of SDH subunits (particularly subunit B), and chemical inhibitors of SDH activity could decrease steady-state levels of H2O2 as well as mutation frequency. These results support the hypotheses that 1) SDH mutations could contribute to transformation by inducing genomic instability and a mutator phenotype via increasing steady-state levels of ROS; 2) metabolic sources of O2- and H2O2 play a significant role in low dose radiation induced injury and genomic instability; and 3) increased mutation rates in irradiated mammal cells can be suppressed by scavengers of H2O2 (particularly catalase) long after radiation exposure. Overall the results obtained during this period of support provide clear evidence in support of the hypothesis that abnormal oxidative metabolism in mitochondria that result in increases in steady-sate levels of H2O2 and other ROS are capable of significantly contributing to radiation-induced mutator phenotypes in mammalian cells.

Spitz, Douglas R.

2009-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Interbilayer-crosslinked multilamellar vesicles as synthetic vaccines for potent humoral and cellular immune responses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vaccines based on recombinant proteins avoid the toxicity and antivector immunity associated with live vaccine (for example, viral) vectors, but their immunogenicity is poor, particularly for CD8+ T-cell responses. Synthetic ...

Moon, James J.

22

Cellular clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper progresses an analysis of what it means to be a cellular network operator and what form the ownership and control of future cellular networks may take. Alternative modes of ownership may allow for the creation of more flexible cellular networking ... Keywords: Cellular Cloud, Cellular network, Cloud Computing, Cognitive radio, DSA, LTE, MVNO, Services, Utility Cellular Network

Tim Forde; Linda Doyle

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Mechanisms underlying cellular responses of cells from haemopoietic tissue to low  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The above studies will provide fundamental mechanistic information relating genetic predisposition to important low dose phenomena, and will aid in the development of Department of Energy policy, as well as radiation risk policy for the public and the workplace. We believe the proposed studies accurately reflect the goals of the DOE low dose program. To accurately define the risks associated with human exposure to relevant environmental doses of low LET ionizing radiation, it is necessary to completely understand the biological effects at very low doses (i.e. less than 0.1 Gy), including the lowest possible dose, that of a single electron track traversal. At such low doses, a range of studies have shown responses in biological systems which are not related to the direct interaction of radiation tracks with DNA. The role of these "??non-targeted"? responses in critical tissues is poorly understood and little is known regarding the underlying mechanisms. Although critical for dosimetry and risk assessment, the role of individual genetic susceptibility in radiation risk is not satisfactorily defined at present. The aim of the proposed grant is to critically evaluate non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation with a focus on the induction of genomic instability (GI) in key stem cell populations from haemopoietic tissue. Using stem cells from two mouse strains (CBA/CaH and C57BL/6J) known to differ in their susceptibility to radiation effects, we plan to carefully dissect the role of genetic predisposition in these models on genomic instability. We will specifically focus on the effects of low doses of low LET radiation, down to the dose of 10mGy (0.01Gy) X-rays. Using conventional X-ray and we will be able to assess the role of genetic variation under various conditions at a range of doses down to the very low dose of 0.01Gy. Irradiations will be carried out using facilities in routine operation for such studies. Mechanistic studies of instability in different cell lineages will include the role of cytokines which have been shown to be in the initiation of instability. These studies also aim to uncover the possible mechanism of the initiation, perpetuation and delayed pathways of the instability response using relevant biological endpoints i.e. chromosomal instability, apoptosis induction, cytokine and gene array analysis. Integral to these studies will be an assessment of the role of genetic susceptibility in these responses, using CBA/CaH and C57BL/6J mice. The overall results suggest that low dose low LET X-irradiation induced delayed GI in both CBA/CaH and C57BL/6J haemopoeitic tissue. Using several biological approaches, some key strain and dose-specific differences have been identified in radiation-induced signalling in the initiation and perpetuation of the instability process. Furthermore, the induction of non-targeted radiation effects and genetic dependency may be linked to the use of alternative signalling pathways and mechanisms which have potential implications on evaluation of non-targeted effects in radiation risk assessment.

Kadhim, Munira A

2012-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

24

Advanced Computational Approaches for Characterizing Stochastic Cellular Responses to Low Dose, Low Dose Rate Exposures  

SciTech Connect

OAK - B135 This project final report summarizes modeling research conducted in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Low Dose Radiation Research Program at the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute from October 1998 through June 2003. The modeling research described involves critically evaluating the validity of the linear nonthreshold (LNT) risk model as it relates to stochastic effects induced in cells by low doses of ionizing radiation and genotoxic chemicals. The LNT model plays a central role in low-dose risk assessment for humans. With the LNT model, any radiation (or genotoxic chemical) exposure is assumed to increase ones risk of cancer. Based on the LNT model, others have predicted tens of thousands of cancer deaths related to environmental exposure to radioactive material from nuclear accidents (e.g., Chernobyl) and fallout from nuclear weapons testing. Our research has focused on developing biologically based models that explain the shape of dose-response curves for low-dose radiation and genotoxic chemical-induced stochastic effects in cells. Understanding the shape of the dose-response curve for radiation and genotoxic chemical-induced stochastic effects in cells helps to better understand the shape of the dose-response curve for cancer induction in humans. We have used a modeling approach that facilitated model revisions over time, allowing for timely incorporation of new knowledge gained related to the biological basis for low-dose-induced stochastic effects in cells. Both deleterious (e.g., genomic instability, mutations, and neoplastic transformation) and protective (e.g., DNA repair and apoptosis) effects have been included in our modeling. Our most advanced model, NEOTRANS2, involves differing levels of genomic instability. Persistent genomic instability is presumed to be associated with nonspecific, nonlethal mutations and to increase both the risk for neoplastic transformation and for cancer occurrence. Our research results, based on applications of NEOTRANS2, indicate that nonlinear threshold-type, dose-response relationships for excess stochastic effects (problematic nonlethal mutations, neoplastic transformation) should be expected after exposure to low linear energy transfer (LET) gamma rays or gamma rays in combination with high-LET alpha radiation. Similar thresholds are expected for low-dose-rate low-LET beta irradiation. We attribute the thresholds to low-dose, low-LET radiation induced protection against spontaneous mutations and neoplastic transformations. The protection is presumed mainly to involve selective elimination of problematic cells via apoptosis. Low-dose, low-LET radiation is presumed to trigger wide-area cell signaling, which in turn leads to problematic bystander cells (e.g., mutants, neoplastically transformed cells) selectively undergoing apoptosis. Thus, this protective bystander effect leads to selective elimination of problematic cells (a tissue cleansing process in vivo). However, this protective bystander effects is a different process from low-dose stimulation of the immune system. Low-dose, low-LET radiation stimulation of the immune system may explain why thresholds for inducing excess cancer appear much larger (possibly more than 100-fold larger) than thresholds for inducing excess mutations and neoplastic transformations, when the dose rate is low. For ionizing radiation, the current risk assessment paradigm is such that the relative risk (RR) is always 1, no matter how small the dose. Our research results indicate that for low-dose or low-dose-rate, low-LET irradiation, RR < 1 may be more the rule than the exception. Directly tied to the current RR paradigm are the billion-dollar cleanup costs for radionuclide-contaminated DOE sites. Our research results suggest that continued use of the current RR paradigm for which RR 1 could cause more harm than benefit to society (e.g., by spreading unwarranted fear about phantom excess risks associated with low-dose low-LET radiation). Such phantom risks also may arise from risk assessments conducted for com

Scott, Bobby, R., Ph.D.

2003-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

25

Advanced Computational Approaches for Characterizing Stochastic Cellular Responses to Low Dose, Low Dose Rate Exposures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

OAK - B135 This project final report summarizes modeling research conducted in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Low Dose Radiation Research Program at the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute from October 1998 through June 2003. The modeling research described involves critically evaluating the validity of the linear nonthreshold (LNT) risk model as it relates to stochastic effects induced in cells by low doses of ionizing radiation and genotoxic chemicals. The LNT model plays a central role in low-dose risk assessment for humans. With the LNT model, any radiation (or genotoxic chemical) exposure is assumed to increase ones risk of cancer. Based on the LNT model, others have predicted tens of thousands of cancer deaths related to environmental exposure to radioactive material from nuclear accidents (e.g., Chernobyl) and fallout from nuclear weapons testing. Our research has focused on developing biologically based models that explain the shape of dose-response curves for low-dose radiation and genotoxic chemical-induced stochastic effects in cells. Understanding the shape of the dose-response curve for radiation and genotoxic chemical-induced stochastic effects in cells helps to better understand the shape of the dose-response curve for cancer induction in humans. We have used a modeling approach that facilitated model revisions over time, allowing for timely incorporation of new knowledge gained related to the biological basis for low-dose-induced stochastic effects in cells. Both deleterious (e.g., genomic instability, mutations, and neoplastic transformation) and protective (e.g., DNA repair and apoptosis) effects have been included in our modeling. Our most advanced model, NEOTRANS2, involves differing levels of genomic instability. Persistent genomic instability is presumed to be associated with nonspecific, nonlethal mutations and to increase both the risk for neoplastic transformation and for cancer occurrence. Our research results, based on applications of NEOTRANS2, indicate that nonlinear threshold-type, dose-response relationships for excess stochastic effects (problematic nonlethal mutations, neoplastic transformation) should be expected after exposure to low linear energy transfer (LET) gamma rays or gamma rays in combination with high-LET alpha radiation. Similar thresholds are expected for low-dose-rate low-LET beta irradiation. We attribute the thresholds to low-dose, low-LET radiation induced protection against spontaneous mutations and neoplastic transformations. The protection is presumed mainly to involve selective elimination of problematic cells via apoptosis. Low-dose, low-LET radiation is presumed to trigger wide-area cell signaling, which in turn leads to problematic bystander cells (e.g., mutants, neoplastically transformed cells) selectively undergoing apoptosis. Thus, this protective bystander effect leads to selective elimination of problematic cells (a tissue cleansing process in vivo). However, this protective bystander effects is a different process from low-dose stimulation of the immune system. Low-dose, low-LET radiation stimulation of the immune system may explain why thresholds for inducing excess cancer appear much larger (possibly more than 100-fold larger) than thresholds for inducing excess mutations and neoplastic transformations, when the dose rate is low. For ionizing radiation, the current risk assessment paradigm is such that the relative risk (RR) is always 1, no matter how small the dose. Our research results indicate that for low-dose or low-dose-rate, low-LET irradiation, RR fear about phantom excess risks associated with low-dose low-LET radiation). Such phantom risks also may arise from risk assessments conducted for com

Scott, Bobby, R., Ph.D.

2003-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

26

Cellular consequences in the suppression of antibody response by the antigen-specific T-cell factor.,]. Exp. Med  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Previous studies from our laboratory indicated that a soluble factor extracted from carrier-primed suppressor T cells (TsF) ~ inhibits the in vitro secondary antibody response against a hapten coupled to the same carrier. The factor was found to possess determinants controlled by a locus (Ia-4) mapped in the I-J subregion of the mouse H-2 histocompatibility complex (1). Unlike other antigen-specific TsF, there has been shown a strict genetic restriction in that TsF derived from one strain of animals can suppress the response of only H-2 histocompatible strains (2, 3). Furthermore, TsF was shown to be absorbable by splenic T cells, but not by B cells or macrophages of the same H-2 haplotype origin. Such T cells, which were assumed to be the direct targets of TsF, were adherent to a tightly packed nylon-wool column, but were definitely killed by anti-Thy-I antiserum (2). Thus, the suppression of the antibody response by TsF is mediated by an interaction between the TsF and the acceptor site on the target cells. The most reasonable explanation is that such an acceptor site is controlled by a gene closely linked to that for the TsF within the same H-2 complex, as there have been no exceptional cases in which H-2 histoincompatible TsF can initiate the specific suppression. Because little is known about the consequences of this initial interaction between TsF and acceptor T cells, we have performed a series of experiments in which subsequent cellular events after the TsF-acceptor interaction were studied. In this communication, we wish to report that the final suppression of antibody response was, in fact, achieved via the intermediary type of the acceptor T cells. Some properties and the mode of action of this cell type are described. Materials and Methods Antigens. Keyhole limpet hemoeyanin (KLH) was purchased from Calbiochem-Behring

Taniguchi; Takeshi Tokuhisa

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Enhancement of DNA repair capacity of mammalian cells by carcinogen treatment  

SciTech Connect

To determine whether DNA excision repair is enhanced in mammalian cells in response to DNA damage, as it is in bacteria as part of the SOS response, we used an expression vector-host cell reactivation assay to measure cellular DNA repair capacity. When UV-damaged chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) vector DNA was introduced into monkey cells (CV-1), the level of CAT activity was inversely related to the UV fluence due to inhibition of CAT gene expression by UV photoproducts. When CV-1 cells were treated with either UV radiation or mitomycin C, 24-48 h before transfection, CAT expression from the UV-irradiated plasmid was increased. This increase also occurred in a line of normal human cells, but not in repair-deficient human xeroderma pigmentosum cells. We confirmed that this increase in CAT expression was due to repair, and not to production of damage-free templates by recombination; the frequency of generation of supF+ recombinants after transfection with UV-irradiated pZ189 vectors carrying different point mutations in the supF gene did not significantly increase in carcinogen-treated CV-1 cells. From these results we conclude that carcinogen treatment enhances the excision-repair capacity of normal mammalian cells.

Protic, M.; Roilides, E.; Levine, A.S.; Dixon, K.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Integrated characterization of cellular physiology underlying hepatic metabolism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The macroscopic metabolic phenotype of a cellular system, such as insulin resistance, is the result of the integration of many hundreds or thousands of preceding cellular events, which culminates in the cell's final response ...

Wong, Matthew Sing

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

The Gordon conference on mammalian DNA repair  

SciTech Connect

A brief overview of the Gordon Conference on Mammalian Repair held February 1-5, 1993 in Ventura, California is presented.

Cleaver, J.E.; Smerdon, M.J.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

30

Ultra-strong Light Weight Cellular Lattice Structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mechanical responses of the cellular lattice structures are determined by the lattice topologies, relative density and parent alloy mechanical properties.

31

1999 Gordon Research Conference on Mammalian DNA Repair. Final Progress Report  

SciTech Connect

This Conference will examine DNA repair as the key component in genomic surveillance that is so crucial to the overall integrity and function of mammalian cells. Recent discoveries have catapulted the field of DNA repair into a pivotal position for fundamental investigations into oncology, aging, environmental health, and developmental biology. We hope to highlight the most promising and exciting avenues of research in robust discussions at this conference. This Mammalian DNA Repair Gordon Conference differs from the past conferences in this series, in which the programs were broader in scope, with respect to topics and biological systems covered. A conference sponsored by the Genetics Society in April 1998 emphasized recombinational mechanisms for double-strand break repair and the role of mismatch repair deficiency in colorectal cancer. These topics will therefore receive somewhat less emphasis in the upcoming Conference. In view of the recent mechanistic advances in mammalian DNA repair, an upcoming comprehensive DNA repair meeting next autumn at Hilton Head; and the limited enrollment for Gordon Conferences we have decided to focus session-by-session on particular areas of controversy and/or new developments specifically in mammalian systems. Thus, the principal presentations will draw upon results from other cellular systems only to the extent that they impact our understanding of mammalian DNA repair.

1999-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

32

ICIN Archetype, adaptation and the mammalian heart  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

# The Author(s) 2011. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com Abstract Forty years ago, we started our quest for The Holy Grail of understanding ventricular rate control and rhythm in atrial fibrillation (AF). We therefore studied the morphology and function of a wide range of mammalian hearts. From mouse to whale, we found that all hearts show similar structural and functional characteristics. This suggests that the mammalian heart remained well conserved during evolution and in this aspect it differs from other organs and parts of the mammalian body. The archetype of the mammalian heart was apparently so successful that adaptation by natural selection (evolution) caused by varying habitat demands, as occurred in other organs and many other aspects of mammalian anatomy, bypassed the heart. The structure and function of the heart of placental mammals have thus been strikingly conserved throughout evolution. The changes in the mammalian heart that did take place were mostly adjustments (scaling), to compensate for variations in body size and shape. A remarkable scaling effect is, for instance, the difference in atrioventricular (AV) conduction time, which is vital for optimal cardiac function in all mammals, small and large. Scaling of AV conduction takes place in the AV node (AVN), but its substrate is unknown. This sheds new light on the vital role of the AVN in health and disease. The AVN is master and servant of the

F. L. Meijler; T. D. Meijler; F. L. Meijler; T. D. Meijler

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

BMC Cell Biology BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research article Aggresomes do not represent a general cellular response to protein misfolding in mammalian cells

Simon Beaudoin; Kevin Goggin; Cyntia Bissonnette; Catherine Grenier; Xavier Roucou

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Cellular array processing simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cellular array processing simulation (CAPS) system is a high-level image language that runs on a multiprocessor configuration. CAPS is interpretively decoded on a conventional minicomputer with all image operation instructions executed on an array processor. CAPS was designed to be both modular and table driven so that it can be easily maintained and modified. CAPS uses the image convolution operator as one of its primitives and performs this cellular operation by decomposing it into parallel image steps. Among its features is the ability to observe the imagery in real time as a user's algorithm is executed. CAPS also contains a language processor that permits users to develop re-entrant image processing subroutines or algorithms. 4 references.

Lee, H.C.; Preston, E.W.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Erythropoietin binding protein from mammalian serum  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Purified mammalian erythropoietin binding-protein is disclosed, and its isolation, identification, characterization, purification, and immunoassay are described. The erythropoietin binding protein can be used for regulation of erythropoiesis by regulating levels and half-life of erythropoietin. A diagnostic kit for determination of level of erythropoietin binding protein is also described.

Clemons, Gisela K. (Berkeley, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Erythropoietin binding protein from mammalian serum  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Purified mammalian erythropoietin binding-protein is disclosed, and its isolation, identification, characterization, purification, and immunoassay are described. The erythropoietin binding protein can be used for regulation of erythropoiesis by regulating levels and half-life of erythropoietin. A diagnostic kit for determination of level of erythropoietin binding protein is also described. 11 figs.

Clemons, G.K.

1997-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

37

Mammalian Host Responses to Proinflammatory Stimuli by Microbial Pathogens  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

9! >7:F9:*! O@787! &%8! *E&P,!! N):! ;:9(">"&7:?! '%&C%'7&@! DQT4! O@787! &%8! *E&P,! D%! >97*):9! '%I"&=9*8"%&! %

Clark, Robin Teresa

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

HANDBOOK OF THE CELLULAR & INTEGRATIVE PHYSIOLOGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HANDBOOK OF THE CELLULAR & INTEGRATIVE PHYSIOLOGY GRADUATE Interdisciplinary Graduate Programs in the Biomedical Sciences Handbook), the Cellular

Mohaghegh, Shahab

39

Focusing on RISC assembly in mammalian cells  

SciTech Connect

RISC (RNA-induced silencing complex) is a central protein complex in RNAi, into which a siRNA strand is assembled to become effective in gene silencing. By using an in vitro RNAi reaction based on Drosophila embryo extract, an asymmetric model was recently proposed for RISC assembly of siRNA strands, suggesting that the strand that is more loosely paired at its 5' end is selectively assembled into RISC and results in target gene silencing. However, in the present study, we were unable to establish such a correlation in cell-based RNAi assays, as well as in large-scale RNAi data analyses. This suggests that the thermodynamic stability of siRNA is not a major determinant of gene silencing in mammalian cells. Further studies on fork siRNAs showed that mismatch at the 5' end of the siRNA sense strand decreased RISC assembly of the antisense strand, but surprisingly did not increase RISC assembly of the sense strand. More interestingly, measurements of melting temperature showed that the terminal stability of fork siRNAs correlated with the positions of the mismatches, but not gene silencing efficacy. In summary, our data demonstrate that there is no definite correlation between siRNA stability and gene silencing in mammalian cells, which suggests that instead of thermodynamic stability, other features of the siRNA duplex contribute to RISC assembly in RNAi.

Hong Junmei; Wei Na [Institute of Molecular Medicine, Peking University, 100871 Beijing (China); Chalk, Alistair [Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institute, 171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Wang Jue [Institute of Molecular Medicine, Peking University, 100871 Beijing (China); Song, Yutong [Department of Woman and Child Health, Karolinska Institute, 171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Yi Fan [Institute of Molecular Medicine, Peking University, 100871 Beijing (China); Qiao Renping [State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, School of Pharmaceutical Science, Peking University, Beijing 100083 (China); Sonnhammer, Erik L.L. [Stockholm Bioinformatics Center, 171 74 Stockholm (Sweden); Wahlestedt, Claes [Scripps Florida, Jupiter, FL 33458 (United States); Liang Zicai [Institute of Molecular Medicine, Peking University, 100871 Beijing (China); Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institute, 171 76 Stockholm (Sweden)], E-mail: liangz@pku.edu.cn; Du, Quan [Institute of Molecular Medicine, Peking University, 100871 Beijing (China)], E-mail: quan.du@pku.edu.cn

2008-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

40

Maximum oxidative phosphorylation capacity of the mammalian heart  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Maximum oxidative phosphorylation capacity of the mammalian heart VAMSI K. MOOTHA, ANDREW E. ARAI, AND ROBERT S. BALABAN Laboratory of Cardiac Energetics, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National. Maximum oxidative phosphorylation capacity of the mammalian heart. Am. J. Physiol. 272 (Heart Circ

Mootha, Vamsi K.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Cellular Immune Findings in Lyme Disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

From 1981 through 1983, we did the first testing of cellular immunity in Lyme disease. Active established Lyme disease was often associated with lymphopenia, less spontaneous suppressor cell activity than normal, and a heightened response of lymphocytes to phytohemagglutinin and Lyme spirochetal antigens. Thus, a major feature of the immune response during active disease seems to be a lessening of suppression, but it is not yet known whether this response plays a role in the pathophysiology of the disease. Lyme disease, a tick-borne spirochetosis [1], is associated with characteristic immune findings. Elevated serum IgM levels in patients with active erythema chronicum migrans (ECM) predict subsequent nervous system, heart, or joint involvement, and serial determinations of IgM are generally the best laboratory indicator of disease activity [2]. In addition, patients with nervous system or joint abnormalities have an increased frequency of the B-cell alloantigen, DR2 [3]. During the last three summers, from 1981 through 1983, we performed the first tests of cellular immunity in Lyme disease. We report here that active Lyme disease is often associated with lymphopenia, less spontaneous suppressor cell activity than normal,

Leonard H. Sigal; Craig M. Moffat; Allen C. Steere; John; M. Dwyer, Ph.D.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Linking Molecular Events to Cellular  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Linking Molecular Events to Cellular Responses at Low Dose Exposures Linking Molecular Events to Cellular Responses at Low Dose Exposures Thomas Weber Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Why This Project It currently costs billions of dollars to protect workers and the public from exposure to man-made radiation, despite exposure levels lower than the natural background levels of radiation. If it could be demonstrated that there is no increased cancer risk associated with these low dose exposures, these resources could be directed toward more critical societal issues. Defining low dose radiation cancer risks is limited by our ability to measure and directly correlate relevant cellular and molecular responses occurring at the low radiation dose and dose rate with tumor formation. This deficiency has led to conservative risk assessments based on low dose

43

Combinatorial methods in computational genomics : mammalian phylogenetics using microinversions and fragment assembly with short reads  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methods in Computational Genomics: Mammalian Phylogeneticstheory of the method. Genomics, 4:114128, 1989. [37] JMethods in Computational Genomics: Mammalian Phylogenetics

Chaisson, Mark

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Effect of Gas Sparging in Mammalian Cell Bioreactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the major problems in the operations of mammalian cell bioreactors is the detrimental effect of gas sparging. Since the most convenient way to oxygenate any bioreactor is by gas sparging, this adverse effect has ...

Wang, Daniel I.C.

45

Engineering Mammalian Cells for Improved Recombinant Protein Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The production of recombinant glycoproteins from mammalian cell cultures requires robust processes that can achieve high protein yield while ensuring the efficacy of these proteins as human therapeutics. We describe two ...

Wong, Niki S.C.

46

Theoretical Physics in Cellular Biology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Theoretical Physics in Cellular Biology: Some Illustrative Case Studies Living matter obeys the laws of physics, and the principles and methods of theoretical physics ought to find useful application observation, I will describe a few specific instances where approaches inspired by theoretical physics allow

47

HIV-1 Gag p17 presented as virus-like particles on the E2 scaffold from Geobacillus stearothermophilus induces sustained humoral and cellular immune responses in the absence of IFN{gamma} production by CD4+ T cells  

SciTech Connect

We have constructed stable virus-like particles displaying the HIV-1 Gag(p17) protein as an N-terminal fusion with an engineered protein domain from the Geobacillus stearothermophilus pyruvate dehydrogenase subunit E2. Mice immunized with the Gag(p17)-E2 60-mer scaffold particles mounted a strong and sustained antibody response. Antibodies directed to Gag(p17) were boosted significantly with additional immunizations, while anti-E2 responses reached a plateau. The isotype of the induced antibodies was biased towards IgG1, and the E2-primed CD4+ T cells did not secrete IFN{gamma}. Using transgenic mouse model systems, we demonstrated that CD8+ T cells primed with E2 particles were able to exert lytic activity and produce IFN{gamma}. These results show that the E2 scaffold represents a powerful vaccine delivery system for whole antigenic proteins or polyepitope engineered proteins, evoking antibody production and antigen specific CTL activity even in the absence of IFN{gamma}-producing CD4+ T cells.

Caivano, Antonella [Institute of Protein Biochemistry, C.N.R., via P. Castellino 111, 80131 Naples (Italy); Doria-Rose, Nicole A. [Seattle Biomedical Research Institute, 307 Westlake Av, Seattle, WA 98109-5240 (United States); Dept. of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98124-6108 (United States); Buelow, Benjamin [Seattle Biomedical Research Institute, 307 Westlake Av, Seattle, WA 98109-5240 (United States); Dept. of Pathobiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98124-6108 (United States); Sartorius, Rossella; Trovato, Maria; D' Apice, Luciana [Institute of Protein Biochemistry, C.N.R., via P. Castellino 111, 80131 Naples (Italy); Domingo, Gonzalo J.; Sutton, William F. [Seattle Biomedical Research Institute, 307 Westlake Av, Seattle, WA 98109-5240 (United States); Haigwood, Nancy L. [Seattle Biomedical Research Institute, 307 Westlake Av, Seattle, WA 98109-5240 (United States); Dept. of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98124-6108 (United States); Dept. of Pathobiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98124-6108 (United States); De Berardinis, Piergiuseppe, E-mail: p.deberardinis@ibp.cnr.i [Institute of Protein Biochemistry, C.N.R., via P. Castellino 111, 80131 Naples (Italy)

2010-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

48

Energy consumption in cellular network: ON-OFF model and impact of mobility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Telecom Paristech, LTCI Paris, France Abstract--In this paper we present a new analysis of energy.5% of world-wide electrical energy is responsible to cellular network and 80% of this is consumed at baseEnergy consumption in cellular network: ON-OFF model and impact of mobility Thanh Tung Vu Telecom

49

Power Control in Wireless Cellular Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transmit power in wireless cellular networks is a key degree of freedom in the management of interference, energy, and connectivity. Power control in both the uplink and downlink of a cellular network has been extensively studied, especially over the ...

Mung Chiang; Prashanth Hande; Tian Lan; Chee Wei Tan

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Molecular, Cellular, Developmental Biology and Genetics Graduate Student Seminar Series  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular, Cellular, Developmental Biology and Genetics Graduate Student Seminar Series FALL 2013 regulation of torsinA during cellular polarization #12;Molecular, Cellular, Developmental Biology

Amin, S. Massoud

51

TECHNICAL NOTE Testing avian, squamate, and mammalian nuclear markers for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TECHNICAL NOTE Testing avian, squamate, and mammalian nuclear markers for cross amplification amplifications to assess 120 previously described nuclear markers for phylogeographic and phylogenetic analysis. marmorata or P. castaneus, and a subset of eight markers amplified single products across a test panel of 11

Grether, Gregory

52

CELLULAR RESPONSES AT LOW DOSES OF IONIZING RADIATION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and tissue levels including mutation induction and carcinogenesis. Furthermore, irradiation of the cytoplasm can initiate damage to the nucleus, and irradiated single cells...

53

Effect of Gold Nanorod Surface Chemistry on Cellular Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gold nanorods (GNRs) stabilized with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and GNR functionalized via a ligand exchange method with either thiolated polyethylene glycol (PEG5000) or mercaptohexadecanoic acid (MHDA) were ...

Grabinski, Christin

54

Insolvency modeling in the cellular telecommunication industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article, we test several models (decision tress and neural networks) to predict customer insolvency at one of the cellular telecommunication operator in Poland. In comparison to previous studies on customer insolvency, our research presents novelty ... Keywords: Cellular, Customer classification, Insolvency modeling, Predictive data mining, Revenue assurance

Tomasz S. Zbkowski; Wies?aw Szczesny

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Spectral Domain Boundaries in Cellular Automata  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Let A^{Z^D} be the Cantor space of Z^D-indexed configurations in a finite alphabet A, and let ? be the Z^D-action of shifts on A^{Z^D}. A cellular automaton is a continuous, ?-commuting self-map ? of A^{Z^D}, and a ?-invariant ... Keywords: Cellular automaton, defect, domain boundary, kink, subshift

Marcus Pivato

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

{sub p}53-Dependent Adaptive Responses in Human Cells Exposed to Space Radiations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: It has been reported that priming irradiation or conditioning irradiation with a low dose of X-rays in the range of 0.02-0.1 Gy induces a p53-dependent adaptive response in mammalian cells. The aim of the present study was to clarify the effect of space radiations on the adaptive response. Methods and Materials: Two human lymphoblastoid cell lines were used; one cell line bears a wild-type p53 (wtp53) gene, and another cell line bears a mutated p53 (mp53) gene. The cells were frozen during transportation on the space shuttle and while in orbit in the International Space Station freezer for 133 days between November 15, 2008 and March 29, 2009. After the frozen samples were returned to Earth, the cells were cultured for 6 h and then exposed to a challenging X-ray-irradiation (2 Gy). Cellular sensitivity, apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations were scored using dye-exclusion assays, Hoechst33342 staining assays, and chromosomal banding techniques, respectively. Results: In cells exposed to space radiations, adaptive responses such as the induction of radioresistance and the depression of radiation-induced apoptosis and chromosome aberrations were observed in wtp53 cells but not in mp53 cells. Conclusion: These results have confirmed the hypothesis that p53-dependent adaptive responses are apparently induced by space radiations within a specific range of low doses. The cells exhibited this effect owing to space radiations exposure, even though the doses in space were very low.

Takahashi, Akihisa [Department of Biology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, Nara (Japan); Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Ibaraki (Japan); Su Xiaoming [Department of Biology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, Nara (Japan); Suzuki, Hiromi [Japan Space Forum, Tokyo (Japan); Space Environmental Medicine, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima (Japan); Omori, Katsunori [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Ibaraki (Japan); Seki, Masaya; Hashizume, Toko [Space Environmental Medicine, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima (Japan); Advanced Engineering Services Company, Limited, Ibaraki (Japan); Shimazu, Toru [Japan Space Forum, Tokyo (Japan); Ishioka, Noriaki [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Ibaraki (Japan); Space Environmental Medicine, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima (Japan); Iwasaki, Toshiyasu [Radiation Safety Research Center, Nuclear Technology Research Laboratory, Central Research Institute of the Electric Power Industry of Japan, Tokyo (Japan); Ohnishi, Takeo, E-mail: tohnishi@naramed-u.ac.j [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, Nara (Japan); Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Ibaraki (Japan)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

57

Cellular Automata Methods in Mathematical Physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cellular automata (CA) are fully discrete, spatially-distributed dynamical systems which can serve as an alternative framework for mathematical descriptions of physical systems. Furthermore, they constitute intrinsically parallel models of computation ...

M. A. Smith

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

On Stability of Cellular Neural Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main results about stability of cellular neural networks (CNNs) are reviewed. Some of them are extended and reformulated, with the purpose of providing to the CNN designer simple criteria for checking the stability properties. A particular emphasis ...

Pier Paolo-Civalleri; Marco Gilli

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Robust expression of a bioactive mammalian protein in chlamydomonas chloroplast  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and compositions are disclosed to engineer chloroplast comprising heterologous mammalian genes via a direct replacement of chloroplast Photosystem II (PSII) reaction center protein coding regions to achieve expression of recombinant protein above 5% of total protein. When algae is used, algal expressed protein is produced predominantly as a soluble protein where the functional activity of the peptide is intact. As the host algae is edible, production of biologics in this organism for oral delivery or proteins/peptides, especially gut active proteins, without purification is disclosed.

Mayfield, Stephen P. (Cardiff, CA)

2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

60

Recombinant genomes which express chloramphenicol acetyltransferase in mammalian cells  

SciTech Connect

The authors constructed a series of recombinant genomes which directed expression of the enzyme chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) in mammalian cells. The prototype recombinant in this series, pSV2-cat, consisted of the beta-lactamase gene and origin of replication from pBR322 coupled to a simian virus 40 (SV40) early transcription region into which CAT coding sequences were inserted. Readily measured levels of CAT accumulated within 48 h after the introduction of pSV2-cat DNA into African green monkey kidney CV-1 cells. Because endogenous CAT activity is not present in CV-1 or other mammalian cells, and because rapid, sensitive assays for CAT activity are available, these recombinants provided a uniquely convenient system for monitoring the expression of foreign DNAs in tissue culture cells. To demonstrate the usefulness of this system, we constructed derivatives of pSV2-cat from which part or all of the SV 40 promoter region was removed. Deletion of one copy of the 72-base-pair repeat sequence in the SV40 promoter caused no significant decrease in CAT synthesis in monkey kidney CV-1 cells; however, an additional deletion of 50 base pairs from the second copy of the repeats reduced CAT synthesis to 11% of its level in the wild type. They also constructed a recombinant, pSVO-cat, in which the entire SV40 promoter region was removed and a unique HindIII site was substituted for the insertion of other promoter sequences.

Gorman, C.M.; Moffat, L.F.; Howard, B.H.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Adaptive Scheduling in Ad Hoc and Cellular Wireless Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Under unicast operations in wireless cellular networks, wetransmission operations in cellular wireless networks. Underoperation for failovers under heterogeneous traffic loading conditions in wireless

Tan, Choo Chin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Molecular and somatic-cell genetic analysis of metal-resistance mechanisms in mammalian cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combined molecular genetic analyses and somatic cell systems were utilized to delineate factors involved in metal metabolism. Somatic cells derived by selection procedures using toxic heavy metals were used to define primary factors involved in acquisition of metal resistance. Such cell variants permitted isolation of the specific genes involved in conferring heavy metal binding proteins, the metallothioneins. (MT). These isolated genes provided the molecular probes to dissect the multiple levels of control and organization of this one set of genes responsible for metal resistance. Studies on the roles of MT in metal resistance used these variants and cell lines derived from human tumors to illustrate that MTs play an important but not exclusive role in cadmium detoxification. Studies on Cd/sup + +/ responses in human tumor derived cell lines showed several orders of magnitude differences in Cd/sup + +/ sensitivity in lines having similar MT responses. Analysis of cultured normal blood cell responses showed that the most Cd/sup + +/ resistant population, the granulocytes, did not produce significant quantities of MT. The results presented here further show a lack of correlation between MT and cytotoxic responses to Cd/sup + +/ in freshly cultured human leukemic peripheral blood cells. In these, enhanced Cd/sup + +/ uptake may be a factor determining enhanced sensitivity. Theses results together indicate that an adequate understanding of cellular responses to toxic metals will not be provided by elucidation of the role(s) of one or a few known metal binding proteins such as MT. Other factors and systems that modulate cellular uptake and sensitivity must first be defined.

Enger, M.D.; Hildebrand, C.E.; Walters, R.A.; Seagrave, J.C.; Barham, S.S.; Hoagland, H.C.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Interplay between Np95 and Eme1 in the DNA damage response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mus81 (methyl methansulfonate UV sensitive clone 81) and Eme1 (essential meiotic endonuclease 1, also known as MMS4) form a heterodimeric endonuclease that is critical for genomic stability and the response to DNA crosslink damage and replication blockade. However, relatively little is known as to how this endonuclease is regulated following DNA damage. Here, we report mammalian Eme1 interacts with Np95, an E3 ubiquitin ligase that participates in chromatin modification, replication-linked epigenetic maintenance and the DNA damage response. Np95 and Eme1 co-localize on nuclear chromatin following exposure of cells to camptothecin, an agent that promotes the collapse of replication forks. The observed co localization following DNA damage was found to be dependent on an intact RING finger, the structural motif that encodes the E3 ubiquitin ligase activity of Np95. Taken together, these findings link Mus81-Eme1 with the replication-associated chromatin modifier functions of Np95 in the cellular response to DNA damage.

Mistry, Helena; Gibson, Lianne; Yun, J.W.; Sarras, Haya; Tamblyn, Laura [Department of Pharmacology, University of Toronto, 1 King's College Circle, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 1A8 (Canada); McPherson, John Peter [Department of Pharmacology, University of Toronto, 1 King's College Circle, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 1A8 (Canada)], E-mail: peter.mcpherson@utoronto.ca

2008-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

64

Increasing fault-tolerance in cellular automata-based systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the light of emergence of cellular computing, new cellular computing systems based on yet-unknown methods of fabrication need to address the problem of fault tolerance in a way which is not tightly connected to used technology. This may not be possible ... Keywords: Byl's loop, Game of Life, TMR, cellular automata, cellular computing, fault tolerance, rule 30, static module redundance

Lud?k aloudek; Luk Sekanina

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Quantifying cellular traction forces in three dimensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the gels. Analysis of the normal displacement profiles suggests that normal forces play important roles-dimensional (2-D) analysis and interpretation of cell-matrix interactions. Furthermore, these approaches cal allows a more complete analysis of cellular forces than does consideration of only in-plane (2-D

Stein, Derek

66

Cellular Energy Efficiency Evaluation Framework (Invited Paper)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cellular Energy Efficiency Evaluation Framework (Invited Paper) Gunther Auer, Vito Giannini, Istv, the power consumption of the entire system needs to be captured and an appropriate energy efficiency evaluation frameworks are discussed, such that the energy efficiency of the entire network comprising

Stevenson, Paul

67

Local, sustainable, small-scale cellular networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over five billion people are active cellular subscribers, spending over a trillion dollars a year on communications. Despite this, hundreds of millions of people are still not connected. Implicit in these networks is a top-down design, with large nation-scale ... Keywords: information and communications technology for development, legal factors

Kurtis Heimerl, Shaddi Hasan, Kashif Ali, Eric Brewer, Tapan Parikh

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Mammalian Tissue Response to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation: The Role of Oxidative Metabolism and Intercellular Communication  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the project was to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the biological effects of low dose/low dose rate ionizing radiation in organs/tissues of irradiated mice that differ in their susceptibility to ionizing radiation, and in human cells grown under conditions that mimic the natural in vivo environment. The focus was on the effects of sparsely ionizing cesium-137 gamma rays and the role of oxidative metabolism and intercellular communication in these effects. Four Specific Aims were proposed. The integrated outcome of the experiments performed to investigate these aims has been significant towards developing a scientific basis to more accurately estimate human health risks from exposures to low doses ionizing radiation. By understanding the biochemical and molecular changes induced by low dose radiation, several novel markers associated with mitochondrial functions were identified, which has opened new avenues to investigate metabolic processes that may be affected by such exposure. In particular, a sensitive biomarker that is differentially modulated by low and high dose gamma rays was discovered.

Azzam, Edouard I

2013-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

69

The effect of ascetic acid on mammalian cells  

SciTech Connect

Effects of the contrast agent, acetic acid, on mammalian cells are studied using light scattering measurements, viability and fluorescence pH assays. Results depend on whether cells are in PBS or are live and metabolizing. Acetic acid is a contrast agent used to aid the detection of cancerous and precancerous lesions of the uterine cervix. Typically 3% or 5% acetic acid is applied to the swface of the cervix and areas of the tissue that turn 'acetowhite' are considered more likely to be precancerous. The mechanism of action of acetic acid has never been understood in detail, although there are several hypotheses. One is that a decrease in pH causes cytokeratins in epithelial cells to polymerize. We will present data demonstrating that this is not the sole mechanism of acetowhitening. Another hypothesis is that a decrease in pH in the nucleus causes deacetylation of the histones which in turn results in a dense chromatin structure. Relevant to this hypothesis we have measured the internal pH of cells. Additional goals of this work are to understand what physical changes result in acetowhitening, to understand why there is variation in how cells respond to acetic acid, and to investigate how acetowhitening affects the light scatter properties measured by a fiber-optic probe we have developed for cervical cancer diagnostics.

Mariana, Oana C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Trujillo, Antoinette [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sanders, Claire K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Burnett, Kassidy S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Freyer, James P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mourant, Judith R [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Cellular membrane trafficking of mesoporous silica nanoparticles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This dissertation mainly focuses on the investigation of the cellular membrane trafficking of mesoporous silica nanoparticles. We are interested in the study of endocytosis and exocytosis behaviors of mesoporous silica nanoparticles with desired surface functionality. The relationship between mesoporous silica nanoparticles and membrane trafficking of cells, either cancerous cells or normal cells was examined. Since mesoporous silica nanoparticles were applied in many drug delivery cases, the endocytotic efficiency of mesoporous silica nanoparticles needs to be investigated in more details in order to design the cellular drug delivery system in the controlled way. It is well known that cells can engulf some molecules outside of the cells through a receptor-ligand associated endocytosis. We are interested to determine if those biomolecules binding to cell surface receptors can be utilized on mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials to improve the uptake efficiency or govern the mechanism of endocytosis of mesoporous silica nanoparticles. Arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) is a small peptide recognized by cell integrin receptors and it was reported that avidin internalization was highly promoted by tumor lectin. Both RGD and avidin were linked to the surface of mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials to investigate the effect of receptor-associated biomolecule on cellular endocytosis efficiency. The effect of ligand types, ligand conformation and ligand density were discussed in Chapter 2 and 3. Furthermore, the exocytosis of mesoporous silica nanoparticles is very attractive for biological applications. The cellular protein sequestration study of mesoporous silica nanoparticles was examined for further information of the intracellular pathway of endocytosed mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials. The surface functionality of mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials demonstrated selectivity among the materials and cancer and normal cell lines. We aimed to determine the specific organelle that mesoporous silica nanoparticles could approach via the identification of harvested proteins from exocytosis process. Based on the study of endo- and exocytosis behavior of mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials, we can design smarter drug delivery vehicles for cancer therapy that can be effectively controlled. The destination, uptake efficiency and the cellular distribution of mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials can be programmable. As a result, release mechanism and release rate of drug delivery systems can be a well-controlled process. The deep investigation of an endo- and exocytosis study of mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials promotes the development of drug delivery applications.

Fang, I-Ju

2012-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

71

Molecular mechanisms and cellular consequences of low-dose exposure to ionizing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

mechanisms and cellular consequences of low-dose exposure to ionizing mechanisms and cellular consequences of low-dose exposure to ionizing radiation Andrew J. Wyrobek 1 , Francesco Marchetti 1 , Xiu Lowe 1 , Xiaochen Lu 2 , Terumi Kohwi- Shigematsu 1 , Brian Davy 1 , Thomas E. Schmid 1 , Sylvia Ahn 1 , Tarlochan Nijjar 1 Matthew A. Coleman 2 , Contact information: ajwyrobek@gmail.com 1 Life Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, 2 BioSciences Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA. The objectives of this research are to characterize the genome-wide molecular responses to low-dose ionizing radiation (<10cGy), to identify tissue and cell-type specific differences in pathways responses, and to identify the pivotal molecular pathway responses that control risks to genome integrity and health. This project utilizes mouse in

72

Single-cell dynamics of mammalian gene regulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

doxycycline EM . . . . . . . . . . . .cell line) in response to doxycycline (DOX), an analogue ofa square wave of 10ug/mL doxycycline with a period of 24

Kolnik, Martin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

The Siderocalin/Enterobactin Interaction: A Link between Mammalian Immunity and Bacterial Iron Transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The siderophore enterobactin (Ent) is produced by enteric bacteria to mediate iron uptake. Ent scavenges iron and is taken up by the bacteria as the highly stable ferric complex [Fe{sup III}(Ent)]{sup 3-}. This complex is also a specific target of the mammalian innate immune system protein, Siderocalin (Scn), which acts as an anti-bacterial agent by specifically sequestering siderophores and their ferric complexes during infection. Recent literature suggesting that Scn may also be involved in cellular iron transport has increased the importance of understanding the mechanism of siderophore interception and clearance by Scn; Scn is observed to release iron in acidic endosomes and [Fe{sup III}(Ent)]{sup 3-} is known to undergo a change from catecholate to salicylate coordination in acidic conditions, which is predicted to be sterically incompatible with the Scn binding pocket (also referred to as the calyx). To investigate the interactions between the ferric Ent complex and Scn at different pH values, two recombinant forms of Scn with mutations in three residues lining the calyx were prepared: Scn-W79A/R81A and Scn-Y106F. Binding studies and crystal structures of the Scn-W79A/R81A:[Fe{sup III}(Ent)]{sup 3-} and Scn-Y106F:[Fe{sup III}(Ent)]{sup 3-} complexes confirm that such mutations do not affect the overall conformation of the protein but do weaken significantly its affinity for [Fe{sup III}(Ent)]{sup 3-}. Fluorescence, UV-Vis and EXAFS spectroscopies were used to determine Scn/siderophore dissociation constants and to characterize the coordination mode of iron over a wide pH range, in the presence of both mutant proteins and synthetic salicylate analogs of Ent. While Scn binding hinders salicylate coordination transformation, strong acidification results in the release of iron and degraded siderophore. Iron release may therefore result from a combination of Ent degradation and coordination change.

Meux, Susan C.

2008-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

74

The functional role of the mammalian tectorial membrane in the cochlear mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sound-evoked vibrations transmitted into the mammalian cochlea produce traveling waves that provide the mechanical tuning necessary for spectral decomposition of sound. These traveling waves of motion propagate along the ...

Ghaffari, Roozbeh, 1979-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

A unique regulatory phase of DNA methylation in the early mammalian embryo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DNA methylation is highly dynamic during mammalian embryogenesis. It is broadly accepted that the paternal genome is actively depleted of 5-methylcytosine at fertilization, followed by passive loss that reaches a minimum ...

Chan, Michelle M.

76

Review: At a glance: Cellular biology for engineers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Engineering contributions have played an important role in the rise and evolution of cellular biology. Engineering technologies have helped biologists to explore the living organisms at cellular and molecular levels, and have created new opportunities ... Keywords: Cell organelles, Cellular biology, Energy generation, Micro-bio-factory, Protein synthesis

K. Khoshmanesh; A. Z. Kouzani; S. Nahavandi; S. Baratchi; J. R. Kanwar

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

On cellular botnets: measuring the impact of malicious devices on a cellular network core  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vast expansion of interconnectivity with the Internet and the rapid evolution of highly-capable but largely insecure mobile devices threatens cellular networks. In this paper, we characterize the impact of the large scale compromise and coordination ... Keywords: denial-of-service, mobile phones, telecommunications

Patrick Traynor; Michael Lin; Machigar Ongtang; Vikhyath Rao; Trent Jaeger; Patrick McDaniel; Thomas La Porta

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Cellular telephone-based radiation detection instrument  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A network of radiation detection instruments, each having a small solid state radiation sensor module integrated into a cellular phone for providing radiation detection data and analysis directly to a user. The sensor module includes a solid-state crystal bonded to an ASIC readout providing a low cost, low power, light weight compact instrument to detect and measure radiation energies in the local ambient radiation field. In particular, the photon energy, time of event, and location of the detection instrument at the time of detection is recorded for real time transmission to a central data collection/analysis system. The collected data from the entire network of radiation detection instruments are combined by intelligent correlation/analysis algorithms which map the background radiation and detect, identify and track radiation anomalies in the region.

Craig, William W. (Pittsburg, CA); Labov, Simon E. (Berkeley, CA)

2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

79

An epidermal plakin that integrates actin and microtubule networks at cellular junctions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Plakins are cytoskeletal linker proteins initially thought to interact exclusively with intermediate filaments (IFs), but recently were found to associate additionally with actin and microtubule networks. Here, we report on ACF7, a mammalian orthologue of the Drosophila kakapo plakin genetically involved in epidermalmuscle adhesion and neuromuscular junctions. While ACF7/kakapo is divergent from other plakins in its IF-binding domain, it has at least one actin (K d ? 0.35 ?M) and one microtubule (K d ?6 ?M) binding domain. Similar to its fly counterpart, ACF7 is expressed in the epidermis. In well spread epidermal keratinocytes, ACF7 discontinuously decorates the cytoskeleton at the cell periphery, including microtubules (MTs) and actin filaments (AFs) that are aligned in parallel converging at focal contacts. Upon calcium induction of intercellular adhesion, ACF7 and the cytoskeleton reorganize at cellcell borders but with different kinetics from adherens junctions and desmosomes. Treatments with cytoskeletal depolymerizing drugs reveal that ACF7s cytoskeletal association is dependent upon the microtubule network, but ACF7 also appears to stabilize actin at sites where microtubules and microfilaments meet. We posit that ACF7 may function in microtubule dynamics to facilitate actinmicrotubule interactions at the cell periphery and to couple the microtubule network to cellular junctions. These attributes provide a clear explanation for the kakapo mutant phenotype in flies. Key words: kakapo ACF7 cytoskeleton integrins cell adhesion

Iakowos Karakesisoglou; Yanmin Yang; Elaine Fuchs

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Genome sequence of the brown Norway rat yields insights into mammalian evolution  

SciTech Connect

The laboratory rat (Rattus norvegicus) is an indispensable tool in experimental medicine and drug development, having made inestimable contributions to human health. We report here the genome sequence of the Brown Norway (BN) rat strain. The sequence represents a high-quality 'draft' covering over 90 percent of the genome. The BN rat sequence is the third complete mammalian genome to be deciphered, and three-way comparisons with the human and mouse genomes resolve details of mammalian evolution. This first comprehensive analysis includes genes and proteins and their relation to human disease, repeated sequences, comparative genome-wide studies of mammalian orthologous chromosomal regions and rearrangement breakpoints, reconstruction of ancestral karyotypes and the events leading to existing species, rates of variation, and lineage-specific and lineage-independent evolutionary events such as expansion of gene families, orthology relations and protein evolution.

Gibbs, Richard A.; Weinstock, George M.; Metzker, Michael L.; Muzny, Donna M.; Sodergren, Erica J.; Scherer, Steven; Scott, Graham; Steffen, David; Worley, Kim C.; Burch, Paula E.; Okwuonu, Geoffrey; Hines, Sandra; Lewis, Lora; DeRamo, Christine; Delgado, Oliver; Dugan-Rocha, Shannon; Miner, George; Morgan, Margaret; Hawes, Alicia; Gill, Rachel; Holt, Robert A.; Adams, Mark D.; Amanatides, Peter G.; Baden-Tillson, Holly; Barnstead, Mary; Chin, Soo; Evans, Cheryl A.; Ferriera, Steven; Fosler, Carl; Glodek, Anna; Gu, Zhiping; Jennings, Don; Kraft, Cheryl L.; Nguyen, Trixie; Pfannkoch, Cynthia M.; Sitter, Cynthia; Sutton, Granger G.; Venter, J. Craig; Woodage, Trevor; Smith, Douglas; Lee, Hong-Maei; Gustafson, Erik; Cahill, Patrick; Kana, Arnold; Doucette-Stamm, Lynn; Weinstock, Keith; Fechtel, Kim; Weiss, Robert B.; Dunn, Diane M.; Green, Eric D.; Blakesley, Robert W.; Bouffard, Gerard G.; de Jong, Pieter J.; Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Zhu, Baoli; Marra, Marco; Schein, Jacqueline; Bosdet, Ian; Fjell, Chris; Jones, Steven; Krzywinski, Martin; Mathewson, Carrie; Siddiqui, Asim; Wye, Natasja; McPherson, John; Zhao, Shaying; Fraser, Claire M.; Shetty, Jyoti; Shatsman, Sofiya; Geer, Keita; Chen, Yixin; Abramzon, Sofyia; Nierman, William C.; Havlak, Paul H.; Chen, Rui; Durbin, K. James; Egan, Amy; Ren, Yanru; Song, Xing-Zhi; Li, Bingshan; Liu, Yue; Qin, Xiang; Cawley, Simon; Cooney, A.J.; D'Souza, Lisa M.; Martin, Kirt; Wu, Jia Qian; Gonzalez-Garay, Manuel L.; Jackson, Andrew R.; Kalafus, Kenneth J.; McLeod, Michael P.; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; Virk, Davinder; Volkov, Andrei; Wheeler, David A.; Zhang, Zhengdong; Bailey, Jeffrey A.; Eichler, Evan E.; Tuzun, Eray; Birney, Ewan; Mongin, Emmanuel; Ureta-Vidal, Abel; Woodwark, Cara; Zdobnov, Evgeny; Bork, Peer; Suyama, Mikita; Torrents, David; Alexandersson, Marina; Trask, Barbara J.; Young, Janet M.; et al.

2004-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

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81

Radio-adaptive regimen attenuates features of cellular senescence  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radio-Adaptive Regimen Attenuates Features of Cellular Senescence Albert Davalos Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract Recent work from several laboratories suggest that...

82

Specialty Cellular Glass Products and Their Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cellular glass products are composed of hermetically-sealed cells containing gases which exhibit no extracellular diffusion. As such, these products are impermeable to liquids and gases. FOAMGLAS blocks have long been used as fireproof thermal insulation, especially in low temperature applications where condensation and subsequent ice formation in insulation can cause significant reduction in insulating value. Recently, specialty compositions have been developed in the borosilicate and boroaluminosilicate fields which exhibit a high degree of resistance to corrosion by aggressive chemicals as well. One product, sold as PENNGUARDTM block by Pennwalt Corporation, is used as a liner for chimneys where acid corrosion had previously caused substantial maintenance problems. The product is also used as an insulative, acid-resistant liner in numerous chemical processes. A more refractory foam called FOAMSID12 insulation has been developed for use in extremely corrosive environments at elevated temperatures. One such field of application, the Alcoa Smelting Process, involves the use of molten salts which tend to impregnate materials which are porous to either salt vapors or to the liquid phase. Such impregnation of ordinary insulating materials causes a significant increase in heat transfer rates. FOAMSID-12 blocks, with their unique properties of light weight, high strength, impermeability, and low thermal conductivity offer an opportunity for industrial energy conservation which did not previously exist.

Rostoker, D.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Nutrient Signaling, Mammalian Target of Rapamycin and Ovine Conceptus Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research was conducted to test the hypothesis that select nutrients including glucose, leucine, arginine and glutamine stimulate conceptus development by activating mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin; HGNC approved gene name: FRAP1, FK506 binding protein 12-rapamycin associated protein 1) signaling pathway. First, temporal changes in quantities of select nutrients (glucose, amino acids, glutathione, calcium, sodium and potassium) in uterine lumenal fluid from cyclic (Days 3 to 16) and pregnant (Days 10 to 16) ewes were determined. Total recoverable glucose, Arg, Gln, Leu, Asp, Glu, Asn, His, beta-Ala, Tyr, Trp, Met, Val, Phe, Ile, Lys, Cys, Pro, glutathione, calcium and sodium was greater in uterine fluid of pregnant compared to cyclic ewes between Days 10 and 16 after onset of estrus. Of note were remarkable increases in glucose, Arg, Leu and Gln in uterine flushings of pregnant ewes between Days 10 and 16 of pregnancy. Second, effects of the estrous cycle, pregnancy, progesterone (P4) and interferon tau (IFNT) on expression of both facilitative (SLC2A1, SLC2A3 and SLC2A4) and sodium-dependent (SLC5A1 and SLC5A11) glucose transporters, cationic amino acid transporters (SLC7A1, SLC7A2 and SLC7A3), neutral amino acid transporters (SLC1A4, SLC1A5, SLC3A1, SLC6A14, SLC6A19, SLC7A5, SLC7A6, SLC7A8, SLC38A3, SLC38A6 and SLC43A2) and acidic amino acid transporters (SLC1A1, SLC1A2 and SLC1A3) in ovine uterine endometria from Days 10 to 16 of the estrous cycle and Days 10 to 20 of pregnancy as well as in conceptuses from Days 13 to 18 of pregnancy were determined. Among these genes, SLC2A3 and SLC7A6 were detectable only in trophectoderm and endoderm of conceptuses. The abundance of mRNAs for SLC2A1, SLC2A4, SLC5A1, SLC5A11, SLC7A1, SLC7A2, SLC1A4, SLC1A5, SLC43A2 and SLC1A3 changed dynamically in ovine uterine endometria according to day of the estrous cycle and early pregnancy. Expression of mRNAs for SLC2A1, SLC5A11 and SLC7A1 in endometria was induced by P4 and further stimulated by IFNT with shortterm treatment (12 days), while expression of SLC7A1 and SLC1A5 in endometria required long-term treatment (20 days) with P4 and IFNT. Third, effects of the estrous cycle, pregnancy, P4 and IFNT on expression of nitric oxide synthase (NOS1, NOS2 and NOS3), GTP cyclohydrolase (GCH1), ornithine decarboxylase 1(ODC1), insulin-like growth factor II (IGF2), FRAP1 complexes (FRAP1, LST8, MAPKAP1, RAPTOR, RICTOR), regulators (TSC1, TSC2, RHEB) and an effector (EIF4EBP1) of FRAP1 signaling in ovine uterine endometria from Days 10 to 16 of the estrous cycle and Days 10 to 20 of pregnancy as well as in conceptuses from Days 13 to 18 of pregnancy were determined. All of these genes were expressed in ovine uterine endometrium and conceptuses. Among these genes, expression of NOS1, IGF2, RHEB and EIF4EBP1 changed dynamically due to day of the estrous cycle and early pregnancy. Progesterone stimulated NOS1 and GCH1 expression while IFNT inhibited NOS1 expression in uterine endometria, and P4 and IFNT stimulated expression of RHEB and EIF4EBP1 in uterine endometria. Collectively, these results indicate that: 1) the availability of select nutrients in the ovine uterine lumen increases to support the rapid growth and elongation of the conceptus during the peri-implantation stage of pregnancy; 2) P4 and/or IFNT stimulate(s) glucose and amino acid transporters to facilitate their transport from maternal tissues and/or blood into the uterine lumen during early pregnancy; 3) the FRAP1 cell signaling pathway mediates interactions between the maternal uterus and peri-implantation conceptus and both P4 and IFNT affect this pathway by regulating expression of RHEB and EIF4EBP1. Expression of NOS, ODC1 and IGF2 appear to be linked to FRAP1 signaling in both uteri and peri-implantation conceptuses.

Gao, Haijun

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Auctions by price and distance via cellular phones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider e-commerce auctions via cellular phones in which the winner is selected based on two factors: the requested price and the promise to provide a service on time. The auctioneer can verify that the bidder intends to provide the service by tracking ... Keywords: Auctions, Cellular, Distance, Electronic commerce, Multi-attribute, Simulation, Strategies

Yosi Ben Asher; Mohsen Abu Saleh

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Energy efficient wireless Internet access with cooperative cellular networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we study the energy-aware cooperative management of the cellular access networks of the operators that offer service over the same area. In particular, we evaluate the amount of energy that can be saved by using all networks in high traffic ... Keywords: Cellular systems, Energy efficiency, Green networking

Marco Ajmone Marsan; Michela Meo

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Substream-based soft handoff in CDMA cellular networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a new soft handoff scheme that enhances the reliability during soft handoff by increasing the signal distance (Euclidean and/or Hamming) in forward link code division multiple access cellular networks. Each base station participating in soft ... Keywords: CDMA cellular, soft handoff, substream

Sang Wu Kim

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Channel assignment in cellular networks with synchronous base stations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A radio spectrum is a shared, limited, and expensive resource in cellular networks. A network allocates a channel from this spectrum to provide connectivity to a user. With the ever increasing number of users, it is a challenge and a business opportunity ... Keywords: cellular networks, dynamic channel assignment

Kshirasagar Naik; David S.L. Wei; Stephan Olariu

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

BIOLOGICAL FRAMEWORKS FOR ENGINEERS Session #14 [Cellular Energetics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Discuss the importance of energy to the body and metabolism Discuss cellular respiration in detail of chemical bonds into free energy for the cell to utilize; nature's storage and handling of energy may provide insight into our engineering of energy solutions Interactive Activity: Discussions on cellular

Sniadecki, Nathan J.

89

Design automation of cellular neural networks for data fusion applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, a novel methodology for the design automation of cellular neural networks (CNNs) for different applications is proposed. In particular, an evolvable algorithm has been developed providing the ability to generate the netlist of the requested ... Keywords: Cellular neural networks, Data fusion, Design automation, Sensor network

Prodromos Chatziagorakis; Georgios Ch. Sirakoulis; John N. Lygouras

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

The chaos within: exploring noise in cellular biology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cellular biology exists embedded in a world dominated by random dynamics and chance. Many vital molecules and pieces of cellular machinery diffuse within cells, moving along random trajectories as they collide with the other biomolecular inhabitants of the cell. Cellular components may block each other's progress, be produced or degraded at random times, and become unevenly separated as cells grow and divide. Cellular behaviour, including important features of stem cells, tumours and infectious bacteria, is profoundly influenced by the chaos which is the environment within the cell walls. Here we will look at some important causes and effects of randomness in cellular biology, and some ways in which researchers, helped by the vast amounts of data that are now flowing in, have made progress in describing the randomness of nature.

Iain G. Johnston

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

91

ATM-Dependent Hyper-Radiosensitivity in Mammalian Cells Irradiated by Heavy Ions  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS) and the later appearing radioresistance (termed induced radioresistance [IRR]) was mainly studied in low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation with survival observation. The aim of this study was to find out whether equivalent hypersensitivity occurred in high LET radiation, and the roles of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase. Methods and Materials: Survival and mutation were measured by clonogenic assay and HPRT mutation assay. ATM Ser1981 activation was detected by Western blotting and immunofluorescent staining. Pretreatment of specific ATM inhibitor (10 {mu}M KU55933) and activator (20 {mu}g/mL chloroquine) before carbon radiation were adopted to explore the involvement of ATM. The roles of ATM were also investigated in its G2/M checkpoint function with histone H3 phosphorylation analysis and flow cytometric assay, and DNA double strand break (DSB) repair function measured using {gamma}-H2AX foci assay. Results: HRS/IRR was observed with survival and mutation in normal human skin fibroblast cells by carbon ions, while impaired in cells with intrinsic ATM deficiency or normal cells modified with specific ATM activator or inhibitor before irradiation. The dose-response pattern of ATM kinase activation was concordant with the transition from HRS to IRR. The ATM-dependent 'early' G2 checkpoint arrest and DNA DSB repair efficiency could explain the difference between HRS and IRR. Conclusions: These data demonstrate that the HRS/IRR by carbon ion radiation is an ATM-dependent phenomenon in the cellular response to DNA damage.

Xue Lian [School of Radiation Medicine and Public Health, Medical College of Soochow University, Suzhou (China); Yu Dong [Tumor Endocrinology Project, National Cancer Center Research Institute, Chuo-ku, Tokyo (Japan)], E-mail: ydong@ncc.go.jp; Furusawa, Yoshiya [Heavy-Ion Radiobiology Research Group, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba-shi (Japan); Cao Jianping [School of Radiation Medicine and Public Health, Medical College of Soochow University, Suzhou (China); Okayasu, Ryuichi [Heavy-Ion Radiobiology Research Group, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba-shi (Japan); Fan Saijun [School of Radiation Medicine and Public Health, Medical College of Soochow University, Suzhou (China)

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

A SURVEY ON MULTI-HOP CELLULAR NETWORKS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wireless mobile communications technology has been evolving rapidly in the past decade. The number of mobile subscribers has reached 2 billions and is expected to reach 3 billions by the end of 2010. Most countries have already deployed or have started to deploy the third generation (3G) wireless cellular networks. In 3G, in addition to traditional voice service, users are provided with multi-media data services and a wide range of data rates up to 2 Mbps. Although high data rates are achieved, the inherent cell capacity and cell coverage limitations of these networks still exist. The capacity limitation raises the hot spot problem in a busy city centre or a large crowd situation such that many call requests are blocked. There is also the dead spot problem which occurs when signals between mobile users and base stations are blocked by obstructions. Recently, there have been proposals to apply the multi-hop relaying concept to existing cellular networks to enhance their capacity and coverage. We call these networks multi-hop cellular networks. As these networks consist of cellular and ad hoc components and, as a result, have their own issues and characteristics, designing a good multi-hop cellular network is a non-trivial task. In this survey, we first provide an overview of wireless networks including cellular networks and ad hoc networks. We then examine existing multi-hop cellular network proposals in terms of

Y. Hung Tam

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

168 Dynamic Deformation and Fragmentation Response of Maraging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and fragmentation response of 25% dense 9-cell linear cellular alloy (LCA) made of .... of LiMnxFe1-xPO4 Glass and Glass-Ceramics for Lithium Ion Battery.

94

Arithmetic Design on Quantum-Dot Cellular Automata Nanotechnology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quantum-dot cellular automata nanotechnology promises molecular digital circuits with ultra-high clock frequencies, to replace the traditional approaches reaching their physical limits. Although large scale utilization requires still several breakthroughs, ... Keywords: Nanotechnology, arithmetic, digital design

Ismo Hnninen; Jarmo Takala

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Cellular/Molecular Connexin35 Mediates Electrical Transmission at Mixed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cellular/Molecular Connexin35 Mediates Electrical Transmission at Mixed Synapses on Mauthner Cells regions, suggesting that connexin35-mediated electrical transmission is common in goldfish brain" (electrical and chemical) synaptic terminals that offer the unique opportunity to correlate physiological

Rash, John E.

96

A Model to Determine Open or Closed Cellular Convection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple mechanism is proposed to help explain the observed presence in the atmosphere of open or closed cellular convection. If convection is produced by cooling concentrated near the top of the cloud layer, as in radiative cooling of stratus ...

H. Mark Helfand; Eugenia Kalnay

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Aircraft Investigation of Mesoscale Cellular Convection During AMTEX 75  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1 s data set collected by the NCAR Electra research aircraft in the presence of closed mesoscale cellular convection (MCC) has been examined for the purpose of determining the convective wind field and horizontal profiles of temperature and ...

Jeffry Rothermel; Ernest M. Agee

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

GPSCellular Drifter Technology for Coastal Ocean Observing Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A drifter for observing small spatial and temporal scales of motion in the coastal zone is presented. The drifter uses GPS to determine its position, and the Mobitex terrestrial cellular communications system to transmit the position data in near...

J. Carter Ohlmann; Peter F. White; Andrew L. Sybrandy; P. Peter Niiler

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

A Nanocrystal Sensor for Luminescence Detection of Cellular Forces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quantum dots have been used as bright fluorescent tags with high photostability to probe numerous biological systems. In this work we present the tetrapod quantum dot as a dynamic, next-generation nanocrystal probe that fluorescently reports cellular forces with spatial and temporal resolution. Its small size and colloidal state suggest that the tetrapod may be further developed as a tool to measure cellular forces in vivo and with macromolecular spatial resolution.

Choi, Charina; Chou, Jonathan; Lutker, Katie; Werb, Zena; Alivisatos, Paul

2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

100

Male Fertility and Lipid MetabolismChapter 9 Regulation of Avian and Mammalian Sperm Production by Dietary Fatty Acids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Male Fertility and Lipid Metabolism Chapter 9 Regulation of Avian and Mammalian Sperm Production by Dietary Fatty Acids Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

The evolution of imprinting: chromosomal mapping of orthologues of mammalian imprinted domains in monotreme and marsupial mammals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

platypus chromosomes and fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed according to protocols described previously [7,43]. The labelled DNA probes (and chromosome paints for chromosome identification) were hybridized to male platypus and wallaby chromo... JE, El-Mogharbel N, Kirby PJ, Car- valho-Silva DR, Graves JA: Autosomal location of genes from the conserved mammalian X in the platypus (Ornithorhyn- chus anatinus): implications for mammalian sex chromo- some evolution. Chromosome Res 2005, 13...

Edwards, Carol A; Rens, Willem; Clark, Oliver; Mungall, Andrew J; Hore, Timothy; Marshall Graves, Jennifer A; Dunham, Ian; Ferguson-Smith, Anne C; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A

2007-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

102

Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Peak load diagram Demand Response Demand Response (DR) is a set of time-dependent activities that reduce or shift electricity use to improve electric grid reliability, manage...

103

Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Peak load diagram Demand Response Demand response (DR) is a set of time-dependent activities that reduce or shift electricity use to improve electric grid reliability, manage...

104

A nanotube based electron microbeam cellular irradiator for radiobiology research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A prototype cellular irradiator utilizing a carbon nanotube (CNT) based field emission electron source has been developed for microscopic image-guided cellular region irradiation. The CNT cellular irradiation system has shown great potential to be a high temporal and spatial resolution research tool to enable researchers to gain a better understanding of the intricate cellular and intercellular microprocesses occurring following radiation deposition, which is essential to improving radiotherapy cancer treatment outcomes. In this paper, initial results of the system development are reported. The relationship between field emission current, the dose rate, and the dose distribution has been investigated. A beam size of 23 {mu}m has been achieved with variable dose rates of 1-100 Gy/s, and the system dosimetry has been measured using a radiochromic film. Cell irradiation has been demonstrated by the visualization of H2AX phosphorylation at DNA double-strand break sites following irradiation in a rat fibroblast cell monolayer. The prototype single beam cellular irradiator is a preliminary step to a multipixel cell irradiator that is under development.

Bordelon, David E. [Curriculum in Applied and Materials Sciences, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Zhang Jian; Graboski, Sarah; Cox, Adrienne; Schreiber, Eric; Chang, Sha [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Zhou, Otto Z. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Curriculum in Applied and Materials Sciences, and Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

105

Scientists ratchet up understanding of cellular protein factory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Understanding of cellular protein factory Understanding of cellular protein factory Scientists ratchet up understanding of cellular protein factory The research could aid in development of new antibiotics used to fight multidrug resistant superbugs such as MRSA found in many U.S. hospitals. December 2, 2010 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

106

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Interaction of Genome and Cellular  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Genome and Cellular Micronenvioronment of Genome and Cellular Micronenvioronment Mina Bissell Life Sciences Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Why this Project While normal stoma can delay or prevent tumorigenesis, abnormal stromal components can promote tumor growth. Acquired or inherited mutations that alter stromal cell function can release the context-suppressed malignant cells. Literature spanning more than a century has shown that inflammation associated with tissue wounding can produce tunors. Radiation produces changes in reactive oxygen that are similar to inflammation and may represent a mechanism for radiation-induced damage. Project Goals To determine the underlying role of stromal alterations in controling genomic instability accompanying epithelial-mesenchyumal transformation.

107

Cellular and molecular research to reduce uncertainties in estimates of health effects from low-level radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study was undertaken by five radiation scientists to examine the feasibility of reducing the uncertainties in the estimation of risk due to protracted low doses of ionizing radiation. In addressing the question of feasibility, a review was made by the study group: of the cellular, molecular, and mammalian radiation data that are available; of the way in which altered oncogene properties could be involved in the loss of growth control that culminates in tumorigenesis; and of the progress that had been made in the genetic characterizations of several human and animal neoplasms. On the basis of this analysis, the study group concluded that, at the present time, it is feasible to mount a program of radiation research directed at the mechanism(s) of radiation-induced cancer with special reference to risk of neoplasia due to protracted, low doses of sparsely ionizing radiation. To implement a program of research, a review was made of the methods, techniques, and instruments that would be needed. This review was followed by a survey of the laboratories and institutions where scientific personnel and facilities are known to be available. A research agenda of the principal and broad objectives of the program is also discussed. 489 refs., 21 figs., 14 tabs.

Elkind, M.M.; Bedford, J.; Benjamin, S.A.; Waldren, C.A. (Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (USA)); Gotchy, R.L. (Science Applications International Corp., McLean, VA (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Corrosion of, and cellular responses to MgZnCa bulk metallic glasses Xuenan Gu a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

were implemented in a Chemkin-type kinetic mechanism to simulate a high-T (1500 K) pyrolitic the species involved in the pathways. Kinetic simulation results in a high-temperature pyrolysis environment. Thermochim. Acta 1990, 168, 179. (60) Lewis, I. C. Carbon 1982, 20, 519. (61) Dobbins, R. A.; Govatzidakis, G

Zheng, Yufeng

109

Cisplatin-induced nucleosome and RNA polymerase II modification mediate cellular response to the drug  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) with recombinant material. The in vitro system established in this study will facilitate the investigation of platinum-DNA damage by DNA repair processes and help elucidate the role of specific post-translational ...

Wang, Dong, 1975-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Management Responsibilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Management Responsibilities Management Responsibilities Depleted UF6 Management Responsibilities DOE has responsibility for safe and efficient management of approximately 700,000 metric tons of depleted UF6. Organizational Responsibilities In the United States, the U.S. Department of Energy is responsible for managing all the depleted uranium that has been generated by the government and has been declared surplus to national defense needs. In addition, as a result of two memoranda of agreement that have been signed between the DOE and USEC, the DOE has assumed management responsibility for approximately 145,000 metric tons of depleted UF6 that has been or will be generated by USEC. Any additional depleted UF6 that USEC generates will be USEC's responsibility to manage. DOE Management Responsibility

111

Comparative mammalian genetic toxicology of shale oil products assayed in vitro and in vivo  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to determine the relative toxicity and mutagenicity (genetic toxicity) of crude and hydrotreated shale oil products from the Paraho surface retort. This was achieved by applying a battery of bioassays emphasizing mammalian systems and having both in vitro (cell culture supplemented with microsomes to allow metabolic activation) and short-term in vivo components. The results may be compared with the results from bioassays conducted in other laboratories to obtain a basis to estimate health hazards to humans.

Timourian, H.; Carrano, A.; Carver, J.; Felton, J.S.; Hatch, F.T.; Stuermer, D.S.; Thompson, L.H.

1980-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

112

Meeting QOS requirements in a cellular network with reuse partitioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reuse partitioning is a technique for providing more efficient spectrum reuse in cellular radio systems. A cell in such a system is divided into concentric zones, each associated with an overlaid cell plan. Calls that arise in the periphery of the cell ...

S. Papavassiliou; L. Tassiulas; P. Tandon

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Resource management policies for fixed relays in cellular networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mobile stations in the cell boundary experience poor spectral efficiency due to the path loss and interference from adjacent cells. Therefore, satisfying QoS requirements of each MS at the cell boundary has been an important issue. To resolve this spectral ... Keywords: Cellular networks, Fixed relay, Path selection, Resource reuse, Spectral efficiency

Won-Hyoung Park; Saewoong Bahk

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Environmental Distinctions between Cellular and Slabular Convective Lines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The organizational mode of quasi-linear convective systems often falls within a spectrum of modes described by a line of discrete cells on one end (cellular) and an unbroken two-dimensional swath of ascent on the other (slabular). Convective ...

Richard P. James; J. Michael Fritsch; Paul M. Markowski

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Decreasing Computational Time of Urban Cellular Automata Through Model Portability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates how portability of a model between different computer operating systems can lead to increased efficiency in code execution. The portability problem is not a trivial one, as many geographic models are designed to be run inside ... Keywords: Calibration, Cellular automata, Portability

Charles Dietzel; Keith C. Clarke

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Self-organizing relay stations in relay based cellular networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increasing popularity of wireless communications and the higher data requirements of new types of service lead to higher demands on wireless networks. Relay based cellular networks have been seen as an effective way to meet users' increased bit rate ... Keywords: Cooperative control, Mobile WiMAX, Passive DoA, Phased array antenna, Self-organization

Peng Jiang; John Bigham; Jiayi Wu

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

UTC Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Security Incident response teams, Cyber Security Incident handling ... is the mandatory standards for nuclear power reactor licensees, 10 CFR ...

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

118

Examination of mammalian microRNAs by high-throughput sequencing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Small non-coding RNAs play an important role in a wide range of cellular events. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are an abundant class of small RNAs that post-transcriptionally repress expression of their target genes. Since miRNA ...

Chiang, HyoJin Rosaria

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Persistent DNA damage foci, cellular senescence and low dose radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Persistent DNA damage foci, cellular senescence and low dose radiation Persistent DNA damage foci, cellular senescence and low dose radiation Denise Munoz 1 , Albert Davalos 1 , Francis Rodier 1 , Misako Kawahara 1 , Judith Campisi 1,2 and Steven Yannone 1,3 1 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Mailstop 84-171, Berkeley CA 94720; 2 Buck Institute for Age Research, 8001 Redwood Boulevard, Novato CA 94945; 3 Corresponding author Ionizing radiation (IR) induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are cytologically detectable as large nuclear foci that contain phosphorylated histone H2AX (γH2AX), the adaptor protein 53BP1, and several other proteins that participate in the sensing and processing of DNA damage (DNA damage foci). In normal human cells, moderately high IR (0.5-1 Gy) doses cause the rapid appearance of these foci (acute DNA damage foci), which gradually disappear

120

Realistic Multi-Lane Traffic Rules for Cellular Automata  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A set of lane changing rules for cellular automata simulating multi-lane traffic is proposed. It reproduces qualitatively that the passing lane becomes more crowded than the one for slower cars if the flux is high enough, which is true for motorways in countries like Germany where passing should be done on a specified lane as a rule. The rules have two parameters allowing to adjust the inversion point of the lane usage distribution and to calibrate the model.

Peter Wagner; Kai Nagel; Dietrich E. Wolf

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Modeling self-organizing traffic lights with elementary cellular automata  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There have been several highway traffic models proposed based on cellular automata. The simplest one is elementary cellular automaton rule 184. We extend this model to city traffic with cellular automata coupled at intersections using only rules 184, 252, and 136. The simplicity of the model offers a clear understanding of the main properties of city traffic and its phase transitions. We use the proposed model to compare two methods for coordinating traffic lights: a green-wave method that tries to optimize phases according to expected flows and a self-organizing method that adapts to the current traffic conditions. The self-organizing method delivers considerable improvements over the green-wave method. For low densities, the self-organizing method promotes the formation and coordination of platoons that flow freely in four directions, i.e. with a maximum velocity and no stops. For medium densities, the method allows a constant usage of the intersections, exploiting their maximum flux capacity. For high dens...

Gershenson, Carlos

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Evaluation of cellular glasses for solar mirror panel applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An analytic technique is developed to compare the structural and environmental performance of various materials considered for backing of second surface glass solar mirrors. Metals, ceramics, dense molded plastics, foamed plastics, forest products and plastic laminates are surveyed. Cellular glass is determined to be a prime candidate due to its low cost, high stiffness-to-weight ratio, thermal expansion match to mirror glass, evident minimal environmental impact and chemical and dimensional stability under conditions of use. While applications could employ this material as a foam core or compressive member of a composite material system, the present analysis addresses the bulk material only, allowing a basis for simple extrapolations. The current state of the art and anticipated developments in cellular glass technology are discussed. Material properties are correlated to design requirements using a Weibull weakest link statistical method appropriate for describing the behavior of such brittle materials. A mathematical model is presented which suggests a design approach which allows minimization of life cycle cost; given adequate information for a specific aplication, this would permit high confidence estimates of the cost/performance factor. A mechanical and environmental testing program is outlined, designed to providea material property basis for development of cellular glass hardware, together with methodology for collecting lifetime predictive data required by the mathematical treatment provided herein. Preliminary material property data from measurements is given.

Giovan, M.; Adams, M.

1979-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

123

Measurement and modeling of paging channel overloads on a cellular network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IP and cellular networks used to be isolated from each other. In recent decade however, the two networks have started to overlap with the emergence of devices that access the Internet using cellular infrastructures. One important question then is whether ... Keywords: Attack, CDMA, Cellular network security, Overload, Paging, Queuing systems

Jrmy Serror, Hui Zang, Jean C. Bolot

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Dual home agent (DHA)-based location management scheme in integrated cellular-WLAN networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For seamless integration of cellular and wireless local area network (WLAN) systems, we introduce a dual home agent (DHA)-based location management. The DHA maintains the location information both in the cellular and WLAN systems, and therefore unnecessary ... Keywords: Cellular-WLAN integration, Dual home agent (DHA), Mobile IP, Performance analysis

Sangheon Pack; Wonjun Lee

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Modeling the cracking process of rocks from continuity to discontinuity using a cellular automaton  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A rock discontinuous cellular automaton (RDCA) was developed for modeling rock fracturing processes from continuous to discontinuous deformation under mechanical loading. RDCA is an integration of the following basic concepts: (1) representation of heterogeneity ... Keywords: Cracking process, Discontinuity, Elasto-plastic cellular automaton, Level set, Partition of unity, Rock discontinuous cellular automaton

Peng-Zhi Pan; Fei Yan; Xia-Ting Feng

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Parallel implementation of kinetic cellular automata for modeling CO oxidation over Pd(110) surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For simulating CO catalytic oxidation on platinum-group metals asynchronous cellular automata (CA) with probabilistic transition rules (kinetic CA) are used. Based on the properties of surface kinetic CA has to have a huge cellular arrays and long evolution. ... Keywords: asynchronous mode, block-synchronous mode, catalytic oxidation reaction, kinetic cellular automata, synchronous mode

Valentina Markova; Anastasia Sharifulina

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Exelon response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This letter constitutes the response of Exelon Generation Company, LLC and its operating unit,Exelon Nuclear Partners, to the Department of Energysrequest for comments and information (July 27,...

128

AdCell: Ad Allocation in Cellular Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With more than four billion usage of cellular phones worldwide, mobile advertising has become an attractive alternative to online advertisements. In this paper, we propose a new targeted advertising policy for Wireless Service Providers (WSPs) via SMS or MMS- namely {\\em AdCell}. In our model, a WSP charges the advertisers for showing their ads. Each advertiser has a valuation for specific types of customers in various times and locations and has a limit on the maximum available budget. Each query is in the form of time and location and is associated with one individual customer. In order to achieve a non-intrusive delivery, only a limited number of ads can be sent to each customer. Recently, new services have been introduced that offer location-based advertising over cellular network that fit in our model (e.g., ShopAlerts by AT&T) . We consider both online and offline version of the AdCell problem and develop approximation algorithms with constant competitive ratio. For the online version, we assume tha...

Alaei, Saeed; Liaghat, Vahid; Pei, Dan; Saha, Barna

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Survival and mammalian predation of Rio Grande Turkeys on the Edwards Plateau, Texas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Trends in Rio Grande wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo intermedia) abundance on the Edwards Plateau (EP), Texas, have been either stable or in decline since the 1970s. Four study areas, 2 each within stable (Stable Area A, SAA; Stable Area B, SAB) and declining regions (Declining Area A, DAA; Declining Area B, DAB), were delineated to examine (1) both annual and seasonal survival, (2) relative mammalian predator mean abundance (RMA), and (3) potential effects of lunar phase on scent-station visitation. During February 2001-March 2003, 257 turkeys were captured and instrumented with radio transmitters. Survival probabilities were generated using a Kaplan-Meier product limit estimator; a log-rank test tested for differences among sites. Annual survival was statistically different between regions (stable 0.566 0.081; declining 0.737 0.094; X2 = 3.68, P = 0.055) in 2002. Seasonal survival differed between regions (stable 0.812 0.103; declining 0.718 0.130; X2 = 3.88, P = 0.049) in spring 2003. Annual survival results during 2002 were counterintuitive with turkey trend data. Scent-station transects were established on non-paved ranch roads within study regions. Scent-station indices revealed higher (H = 19.653, P ? 0.001) RMA of opossum (Didelphis virginiana) and skunk (eastern spotted [Spilogale putorius], striped [Mephitis mephitis], or western spotted [S. gracilis]) (SAA, x? = 0.0148; SAB, x? = 0.0151; DAA, x? = 0.0042; DAB, x? = 0.0065) on stable areas. Higher RMA of coyotes (Canis latrans) on declining areas (SAA, x? = 0.0067; SAB, x? = 0.0022; DAA x? = 0.0234; DAB x? = 0.0434) suggested a possible causative factor of the decline, but abundance indices were not verified by empirical data though. Lunar phase was not a significant (T = -0.225, P = 0.822) covariate in scent-station visits by raccoons, opossums (new, x? = 0.0111; full, x? = 0.0324), or unidentified tracks (new, x? = 0.0649; full, x? = 0.0375). Nightly precipitation and wind speed probably influence mammalian use of scent stations more so than lunar illumination.

Willsey, Beau Judson

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Proteomic Analysis of Calcium- and Phosphorylation-dependentCalmodulin Complexes in Mammalian Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Protein conformational changes due to cofactor binding (e.g. metal ions, heme) and/or posttranslational modifications (e.g. phosphorylation) modulate dynamic protein complexes. Calmodulin (CaM) plays an essential role in regulating calcium (Ca{sup 2+}) signaling and homeostasis. No systematic approach on the identification of phosphorylation-dependent Ca{sup 2+}/CaM binding proteins has been published. Herein, we report a proteome-wide study of phosphorylation-dependent CaM binding proteins from mammalian cells. This method, termed 'Dynamic Phosphoprotein Complex Trapping', 'DPPC Trapping' for short, utilizes a combination of in vivo and in vitro assays. The basic strategy is to drastically shift the equilibrium towards endogenous phosphorylation of Ser, Thr, and Tyr at the global scale by inhibiting corresponding phosphatases in vivo. The phosphorylation-dependent calmodulin-binding proteins are then trapped in vitro in a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent manner by CaM-Sepharose chromatography. Finally, the isolated calmodulin-binding proteins are separated by SDS-PAGE and identified by LC/MS/MS. In parallel, the phosphorylation-dependent binding is visualized by silver staining and/or Western blotting. Using this method, we selectively identified over 120 CaM-associated proteins including many previously uncharacterized. We verified ubiquitin-protein ligase EDD1, inositol 1, 4, 5-triphosphate receptor type 1 (IP{sub 3}R1), and ATP-dependent RNA helicase DEAD box protein 3 (DDX3), as phosphorylation-dependent CaM binding proteins. To demonstrate the utilities of our method in understanding biological pathways, we showed that pSer/Thr of IP{sub 3}R1 in vivo by staurosporine-sensitive kinase(s), but not by PKA/PKG/PKC, significantly reduced the affinity of its Ca{sup 2+}-dependent CaM binding. However, pSer/Thr of IP{sub 3}R1 did not substantially affect its Ca{sup 2+}-independent CaM binding. We further showed that phosphatase PP1, but not PP2A or PP2B, plays a critical role in modulating the phosphorylation-dependent CaM binding for IP{sub 3}R1. If combined with other phosphoprotein and phosphopeptide enrichment techniques such as IMAC, our method may serve as a general strategy to identify and characterize phosphorylation-dependent and functionally important protein complexes in mammalian cells.

Jang, Deok-Jin; Wang, Daojing

2006-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

131

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Molecular Characterization...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Role of SOD Genes in Mammalian Cellular Response to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation Chaun-Yuan Li Duke University Medical Center Durham, NC Why this Project? To evaluate the roles...

132

Arecoline augments cellular proliferation in the prostate gland of male Wistar rats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Areca nut chewing is the fourth most popular habit in the world due to its effects as a mild stimulant, causing a feeling of euphoria and slightly heightened alertness. Areca nuts contain several alkaloids and tannins, of which arecoline is the most abundant and known to have several adverse effects in humans, specially an increased risk of oral cancer. On evaluating the effects of arecoline on the male endocrine physiology in Wistar rats, it was found that arecoline treatment led to an overall enlargement and increase in the wet weight of the prostate gland, and a two-fold increase in serum gonadotropin and testosterone levels. Since the prostate is a major target for testosterone, the consequences of arecoline consumption were studied specifically in the prostate gland. Arecoline treatment led to an increase in the number of rough endoplasmic reticulum and reduction of secretory vesicles, signifying a hyperactive state of the prostate. Increased expression of androgen receptors in response to arecoline allowed for enhanced effect of testosterone in the prostate of treated animals, which augmented cell proliferation, subsequently confirmed by an increase in the expression of Ki-67 protein. Cellular proliferation was also the outcome of concomitant over expression of the G{sub 1}-to-S cell cycle regulatory proteins, cyclin D1 and CDK4, both at the transcriptional and translational levels. Taken together, the findings provide the first evidence that regular use of arecoline may lead to prostatic hyperplasia and hypertrophy, and eventually to disorders associated with prostate enlargement. - Highlights: > Effect of arecoline was investigated on the endocrine physiology of male Wistar rats. > Increase observed in prostate size, wet weight, serum testosterone and gonadotropins. > Arecoline increased RER, expression of androgen receptor and cellular proliferation. > Upregulation of cyclin D1 and CDK4 seen at transcriptional and translational levels. > It may cause disorders associated with prostatic hyperplasia and hyperactivity.

Saha, Indraneel; Chatterjee, Aniruddha; Mondal, Anushree; Maiti, Bishwa Ranjan; Chatterji, Urmi, E-mail: urmichatterji@gmail.com

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

In situ Observation of Sulfur in Living Mammalian Cells: Uptake of Taurine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In situ Observation of Sulfur in Living In situ Observation of Sulfur in Living Mammalian Cells: Uptake of Taurine into MDCK Cells Sulfur is essential for life. It plays important roles in the amino acids methionine and cysteine, and has a structural function in disulfide bonds. As a component of iron-sulfur clusters it takes part in electron and sulfur transfer reactions.1 Glutathione, a sulfur-containing tripeptide, is an important part of biological antioxidant systems.2 Another example for the biological relevance of sulfur is the amino acid taurine, which is present in high concentrations in algae and the animal kingdom. Taurine has been implicated in a range of physiological phenomena, but its osmolytic role in cell volume regulation has been studied in greatest detail.3 In situ information on sulfur is rare despite its important biological role. This is due to the fact that sulfur is not easily accessible with most biophysical techniques. In recent years, sulfur x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has become increasingly important in the study of sulfur species in biological systems.4 The near-edge region of the XAS spectrum is a sensitive probe of electronic structure and hence chemical form.5

134

Flow microfluorometric and spectrophotofluorometric analysis of DNA staining in mammalian cells  

SciTech Connect

The effects of pH, ionic strength, stain concentration, and magnesium concentration on DNA staining with the antibiotics mithramycin, chromomycin A3, and olivomycin were examined with DNA in solution and in mammalian cells. Ethanol-fixed Chinese hamster cells (line CHO) stained with mithramycin solution in the pH range 4.0 to 10.0 and analyzed by flow microfluorometry (FMF) showed only a slight increase in fluorescence intensity from pH 4.0 to 8.0. Above this range, there was a more dramatic increase in intensity of stained cells, and at pH 10.0 the flouorescence intensity was 1-1/2 times greater than cells stained at pH 4.5. The resolution in DNA distribution patterns also improved as a function of increasing pH, corresponding with a marked decrease in the coefficient of variation (CV). However, the distribution of cells in various phases of the cell cycle remained essentially the same over the pH ranges tested.

Crissman, H.A.; Stevenson, A.; Kissane, R.J.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Characterization and distribution of receptors for the atrial natriuretic peptides in mammalian brain  

SciTech Connect

Both rat SVI-labeled atrial natriuretic polypeptide ( SVI-ANP or atrial natriuretic factor fragment ANF-(99-126)) and human SVI- -ANP or human ANF-(99-126)) bind with high specificity and affinity to an apparent single class of sites in guinea pig brain. Similar results have been reported in peripheral tissues, which indicate that central and peripheral ANP binding sites have fairly similar structural requirements. In vitro receptor autoradiography shows that in the guinea pig brain, SVI-ANP binding sites are highly concentrated in the external plexiform layer of the olfactory bulb, subfornical organ, various thalamic nuclei, medial geniculate nucleus, and cerebellum. Lower densities are found in the central nucleus of the amygdala, dentate gyrus, hippocampus, and area postrema. Most remaining regions contain much lower densities of sites. In rat brain SVI-ANP binding sites are differentially distributed, with high densities in the subfornical organ, area postrema, and linings of ventricles but low densities in the thalamus and cerebellum. In monkey brain, SVI-ANP binding sites are concentrated in the cerebellum. The presence of high densities of SVI-ANP binding sites in various brain regions strongly suggests the existence of a family of brain-heart peptides, in analogy to the well-known brain-gut peptides. Moreover, the extensive distribution of SVI-ANP binding sites in mammalian brain suggests that the possible roles of ANP/ANF-like peptides in brain are not restricted to the central regulation of cardiovascular parameters.

Quirion, R.; Dalpe, M.; Dam, T.V.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

A New Phase in Cellular Communication | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering Thin-Film Oxide Interfaces Engineering Thin-Film Oxide Interfaces Novel Materials Become Multifunctional at the Ultimate Quantum Limit Outsmarting Flu Viruses How Lead-Free Solder (Mis)Behaves under Stress Dynamics of Polymer Chains Atop Different Materials Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed A New Phase in Cellular Communication NOVEMBER 15, 2012 Bookmark and Share Interactions between N-WASP, phospho-Nephrin and Nck produce large polymers (top panel) that phase separate to produce liquid droplets suspended in aqueous solution (bottom panel). In many physical processes, substances undergo phase transitions, where they are transformed from one state (solid, liquid, or gas) to another.

137

Cellular telephone-based wide-area radiation detection network  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A network of radiation detection instruments, each having a small solid state radiation sensor module integrated into a cellular phone for providing radiation detection data and analysis directly to a user. The sensor module includes a solid-state crystal bonded to an ASIC readout providing a low cost, low power, light weight compact instrument to detect and measure radiation energies in the local ambient radiation field. In particular, the photon energy, time of event, and location of the detection instrument at the time of detection is recorded for real time transmission to a central data collection/analysis system. The collected data from the entire network of radiation detection instruments are combined by intelligent correlation/analysis algorithms which map the background radiation and detect, identify and track radiation anomalies in the region.

Craig, William W. (Pittsburg, CA); Labov, Simon E. (Berkeley, CA)

2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

138

Cellular glass insulation keeps liquefied gas from vaporizing  

SciTech Connect

The North West Shelf Project, located on the Burrup Peninsula in Western Australia, supplies much of that vast state with natural gas for domestic and industrial applications. Some of the gas is also exported to Japan as liquefied natural gas (LNG). While awaiting shipment to Japan, the LNG is stored at {minus}322 F in four storage tanks, each with a capacity of 2.5 million ft{sup 3}. When Woodside Offshore Petroleum Pty Ltd., operator of the LNG facility, selected insulation material for the storage tanks, it went in search of a material with more than just insulating value. Since the insulation is installed inside the tanks, it must be able to resist wicking or absorbing the LNG. Also, it had to have sufficient strength to withstand the weight of the 2.5 million ft{sup 3} of LNG without being crushed or losing its insulting properties. And, as a safety precaution, the selected materials should neither burn nor support combustion. Ultimately, Woodside selected a cellular glass insulation called Foamglas, from Pittsburgh Corning Corp., that met all the performance criteria and was cost competitive with the lesser-performing alternatives. Foamglas is produced from strong, inert borosilicate glass. Its insulating capability is provided by the tiny, closed cells of air encapsulated within the foam-like structure of the glass. Since the cells are closed,neither liquid nor vapor can enter the structure of the insulation. The inert glass itself will not absorb or react with LNG, nor will it burn or support a fire. The cellular structure provides effective insulation in both not and cold applications, and offers a fire barrier.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Multi-cellular Crosstalk...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

grown in microwell slide chambers will be irradiated with precise 100-mm-wide exposure stripes of dose to define the responses in exposed and bystander cells The time course of the...

140

Reprogramming of tRNA modifications controls the oxidative stress response by codon-biased translation of proteins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Selective translation of survival proteins is an important facet of the cellular stress response. We recently demonstrated that this translational control involves a stress-specific reprogramming of modified ribonucleosides ...

Chan, Clement T. Y.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Cellular Effect of High Doses of Silica-Coated Quantum Dot ...  

Cellular Effect of High Doses of Silica-Coated Quantum Dot Profiled with High Throughput Gene Expression Analysis and High Content Cellomics ...

142

Coordination and Emergence in the Cellular Automated Fashion Game  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate a heterogeneous cellular automaton, where there are two types of agents, conformists and rebels. Each agent has to choose between two actions, 0 and 1. A conformist likes to choose an action that most of her neighbors choose, while in contrast a rebel wants to be different with most of her neighbors. Theoretically, this model is equivalent to the matching pennies game on regular networks. We study the dynamical process by assuming that each agent takes a myopic updating rule. An uniform updating probability is also introduced for each agent to study the whole spectrum from synchronous updating to asynchronous updating. Our model characterizes the phenomenon of fashion very well and has a great potential in the study of the finance and stock markets. A large number of simulations show that in most case agents can reach extraordinarily high degree of coordination. This process is also quite fast and steady. Considering that these dynamics are really simple, agents are selfish, myopic, and have ve...

Cao, Zhigang; Qu, Xinglong; Yang, Mingmin; Yang, Xiaoguang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Towards 3D Architectures: A Comparative Study on Cellular GAs Dimensionality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cellular Genetic Algorithms (cGAs) have shown their ability to solve not only difficult optimization problems, but also outperform centralized Genetic Algorithms (GAs) in terms of efficiency and efficacy. The study herein presented aims to analyze and ... Keywords: cellular genetic algorithms, optimization engines, 3D architectures

Alicia Morales-Reyes; Asmaa Al-Naqi; Ahmet T. Erdogan; Tughrul Arslan

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Breast MR segmentation and lesion detection with cellular neural networks and 3D template matching  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel fully automated system is introduced to facilitate lesion detection in dynamic contrast-enhanced, magnetic resonance mammography (DCE-MRM). The system extracts breast regions from pre-contrast images using a cellular neural network, generates ... Keywords: 3D template matching, Cellular neural network, Lesion detection, MR mammography, Segmentation

Gkhan Erta?; H.zcan Glr; Onur Osman; Osman N. Uan; Mehtap Tunac?; Memduh Dursun

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

A first look at cellular machine-to-machine traffic: large scale measurement and characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cellular network based Machine-to-Machine (M2M) communication is fast becoming a market-changing force for a wide spectrum of businesses and applications such as telematics, smart metering, point-of-sale terminals, and home security and automation systems. ... Keywords: cellular network, machine-to-machine traffic

Muhammad Zubair Shafiq; Lusheng Ji; Alex X. Liu; Jeffrey Pang; Jia Wang

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

An algorithm for automatic base station placement in cellular network deployment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The optimal base station placement is a serious task in cellular wireless networks. In this paper we propose a method that automatically distributes the base stations on a studied scenario, maintaining coverage requirement and enabling the transmission ... Keywords: capacity, cellular network planning, coverage

Istvn Trs; Pter Fazekas

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Machine-to-Machine Communications and Security Solution in Cellular Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper introduces an efficient machine-to-machine M2M communication model based on 4G cellular systems. M2M terminals are capable of establishing Ad Hoc clusters wherever they are close enough. It is also possible to extend the cellular coverage ... Keywords: 4G Network, Ad Hoc, Machine-To-Machine, Security, Terminals

Mahdy Saedy; Vahideh Mojtahed

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Modeling and simulation of crowd using cellular discrete event systems theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we discuss how Cellular Discrete Event System Specification (Cell-DEVS) theory can be used in modeling and simulation of the crowd. We will show that the efficient cell update mechanism of Cell-DEVS allows for more efficient entity-based ... Keywords: cellular discrete event systems, crowd, pedestrian

Ronnie Farrell, Mohammad Moallemi, Sixuan Wang, Wang Xiang, Gabriel Wainer

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Cellular / wireless LAN repeater system by wireless optical link with optical power supply  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wireless market, such as cellular systems and wireless LAN, becomes huge and is still expanding. Since operational frequency and transmission bit rate are increasing, much more base stations or access points are necessary to overcome capacity and link ... Keywords: RoF, cellular system, optical power transmission, optical transmission, wireless

Nobuo Nakajima; Naohiro Yokota

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

A cloud computing based framework for general 2D and 3D cellular automata simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cellular automata can be applied to solve several problems in a variety of areas, such as biology, chemistry, medicine, physics, astronomy, economics, and urban planning. The automata are defined by simple rules that give rise to behavior of great complexity ... Keywords: Cellular automata, Cloud computing, Game of life, Simulation, Sparse matrices, Web services

Rodrigo Marques, Bruno Feijo, Karin Breitman, Thieberson Gomes, Laercio Ferracioli, Hlio Lopes

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Traffic-driven power saving in operational 3G cellular networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Base stations (BSes) in the 3G cellular network are not energy proportional with respect to their carried traffic load. Our mea- surements show that 3G traffic exhibits high fluctuations both in time and over space, thus incurring energy waste. In this ... Keywords: 3g network traffic, cellular networks, energy efficiency

Chunyi Peng; Suk-Bok Lee; Songwu Lu; Haiyun Luo; Hewu Li

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Improved robust stability criteria for delayed cellular neural networks via the LMI approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uniqueness and robust exponential stability are analyzed for a class of uncertain cellular neural networks with time-varying delays. By dividing the variation interval of the time delay into two subintervals with equal length, a novel Lyapunov-Krasovskii ... Keywords: free-weighting matrix method, global robust exponential stability, linear matrix inequality (LMI), uncertain cellular neural networks

Cheng-De Zheng; Huaguang Zhang; Zhanshan Wang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

A new dynamic guard channel reservation scheme for cellular wireless networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a new dynamic guard channel reservation scheme, based on conditional real-time channel availability, is proposed to achieve better handoff performance and higher utilisation of system resources (radio spectrum) in cellular ... Keywords: blocking, cellular wireless networks, dynamic guard channel, forced termination probability, guard channel reservation, handoff performance, radio spectrum

Raj Kumar Samanta; Gautam Sanyal; Partha Bhattacharjee

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Mathematical Modeling for Evaluation of Quality of Service Parameters in Next Generation Cellular Wireless Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a mathematical model has been developed for cellular wireless network with Gamma inter-arrivals and general call holding times. Measurement based studies have shown that Poisson assumption averages out the traffic characteristics to a ... Keywords: Cellular wireless networks, QoS, mathematical model

Raj Kumar Samanta; Partha Bhattacharjee; Gautam Sanyal

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Wireless Demand Response Controls for HVAC Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this scoping study were to develop and test control software and wireless hardware that could enable closed-loop, zone-temperature-based demand response in buildings that have either pneumatic controls or legacy digital controls that cannot be used as part of a demand response automation system. We designed a SOAP client that is compatible with the Demand Response Automation Server (DRAS) being used by the IOUs in California for their CPP program, design the DR control software, investigated the use of cellular routers for connecting to the DRAS, and tested the wireless DR system with an emulator running a calibrated model of a working building. The results show that the wireless DR system can shed approximately 1.5 Watts per design CFM on the design day in a hot, inland climate in California while keeping temperatures within the limits of ASHRAE Standard 55: Thermal Environmental Conditions for Human Occupancy.

Federspiel, Clifford

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

156

Transcriptome analysis reveals response regulator SO2426-mediated gene expression in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under chromate challenge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 exhibits diverse metal ion-reducing capabilities and thus is of potential utility as a bioremediation agent. Knowledge of the molecular components and regulatory mechanisms dictating cellular responses to heavy metal stress, however, remains incomplete. In a previous work, the S. oneidensis so2426 gene, annotated as a DNA-binding response regulator, was demonstrated to be specifically responsive at both the transcript and protein levels to acute chromate [Cr(VI)] challenge. To delineate the cellular function of SO2426 and its contribution to metal stress response, we integrated genetic and physiological approaches with a genome-wide screen for target gene candidates comprising the SO2426 regulon.

Chourey, Karuna [ORNL; Wei, Wei [ORNL; Wan, Xiu-Feng [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Thompson, Dorothea K. [Purdue University

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

The role of mismatch repair and recombination in cellular responses to the DNA damaging anticancer drug Cisplatin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(ll)) is a successful DNA-damaging anticancer drug used in the treatment of testicular, ovarian and other tumors. In the past decade, several mutually non-exclusive hypotheses have ...

Zdraveski, Zoran Z. (Zoran Zare), 1969-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Genome-wide single-cell-level screen for protein abundance and localization changes in response to DNA damage in S. cerevisiae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An effective response to DNA damaging agents involves modulating numerous facets of cellular homeostasis in addition to DNA repair and cell-cycle checkpoint pathways. Fluorescence microscopy-based imaging offers the ...

Mazumder, Aprotim

159

Asymptotic Cellular Growth Rate as the Effective Information Utilization Rate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the average asymptotic growth rate of cells in randomly fluctuating environments. Using a game-theoretic perspective, we show that any response strategy has an asymptotic growth rate, which is the sum of: (i) the maximal growth rate at the worst possible distribution of environments, (ii) relative information between the actual distribution of environments to the worst one, and (iii) information utilization rate which is the information rate of the sensory devices minus the "information dissipation rate", the amount of information not utilized by the cell for growth. In non-stationary environments, the optimal strategy is the time average of the instantaneous optimal strategy and the optimal switching times are evenly spaced in the statistical (Fisher) metric.

Pugatch, Rami; Tlusty, Tsvi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

RF transceiver reference design for third generation W-CDMA cellular handset  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A radio frequency transceiver reference design for third generation UTRA/FDD W-CDMA cellular handset is presented in this paper, A number of commercial RFICs are analyzed by considering the heterodyne architecture implementation of the transceiver. Requirements ...

Sew Kin Wong; Sze Wei Lee; Moh Lim Sim

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Electrical conductivity of cellular Si ? Si C ceramic composites prepared from plant precursors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrical conductivity ( ? dc ) of the cellular Si ? Si C ceramic composites has been measured over a temperature range of 25 1073 K while the thermoelectric power ( S ) has been measured over 25 300 K . Remarkably

Debopriyo Mallick; Omprakash Chakrabarti; Dipten Bhattacharya; Manabendra Mukherjee; Himadri S. Maiti; Rabindranath Majumdar

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Modelling Surface Flows for Macroscopic Phenomena by Cellular Automata: An Application to Debris Flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cellular automata are good candidates for modelling and simulating complex dynamical systems, whose evolution depends on the local interactions of their constituent parts. Many macroscopic phenomena have such features, but their complexity involves sometime ...

Donato D'Ambrosio; Salvatore Di Gregorio; Giulio Iovine; Valeria Lupiano; Rocco Rongo; William Spataro

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

9.09J / 7.29J Cellular Neurobiology, Spring 2002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An introduction to the structure and function of the nervous system. Emphasis placed on the cellular properties of neurons and other excitable cells. Includes the structure and biophysical properties of excitable cells, ...

Quinn, William G.

164

Stable control of distributed hysteretic systems using cellular broadcast stochastic feedback  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work develops a provably stable broadcast feedback approach to regulating the aggregate output of a collection of stochastically behaving cellular units with pronounced hysteresis. Similar to skeletal muscle, comprised ...

Wood, Levi Benjamin

165

A flow modeling of lubricating greases under shear deformation by cellular automata  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Cellular Automata modeling of the lubricating grease flow under the shear deformation is proposed Lubricating greases are composed of thickening agent, liquid lubricant and various kinds of additives The thickening agent forms fibrous microstructures ...

Shunsuke Miyamoto; Hideyuki Sakai; Toshihiko Shiraishi; Shin Morishita

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

A Cellular Automata Breccia Simulator (CABS) and its application to rounding in hydrothermal breccias  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dissolution processes are ubiquitous in surficial and hydrothermal environments. Solution breccias are formed when dissolution processes dominate and are widely observed in hydrothermal systems. Distinct fragment shapes develop during dissolution and ... Keywords: Breccias, Cellular automata, Hydrothermal alteration, Numerical modelling, Simulation

M. Lalonde; G. Tremblay; M. Jbrak

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Design and application of a cellular, piezoelectric, artificial muscle actuator for biorobotic systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the foremost challenges in robotics is the development of muscle-like actuators that have the capability to reproduce the smooth motions observed in animals. Biological muscles have a unique cellular structure that ...

Secord, Thomas W. (Thomas William)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

ENERGY EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION ENERGY EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN COMMISSIONREPORT October 2006 CEC-600 Deputy Director FUELS AND TRANSPORTATION DIVISION #12;The Energy Emergency Response Plan is prepared, safety, and welfare. #12;ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The Energy Emergency Response Plan was prepared from

169

Demand Response Spinning Reserve  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Spinning Reserve Title Demand Response Spinning Reserve Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2007 Authors Eto, Joseph H., Janine Nelson-Hoffman, Carlos...

170

DOE Functions and Responsibilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety and Security is responsible for developing and maintaining the Department's Directives that address safety management functions, responsibilities and authorities (FRA)....

171

Real-Time Molecular Monitoring of Chemical Environment in ObligateAnaerobes during Oxygen Adaptive Response  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Determining the transient chemical properties of the intracellular environment canelucidate the paths through which a biological system adapts to changes in its environment, for example, the mechanisms which enable some obligate anaerobic bacteria to survive a sudden exposure to oxygen. Here we used high-resolution Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectromicroscopy to continuously follow cellular chemistry within living obligate anaerobes by monitoring hydrogen bonding in their cellular water. We observed a sequence of wellorchestrated molecular events that correspond to changes in cellular processes in those cells that survive, but only accumulation of radicals in those that do not. We thereby can interpret the adaptive response in terms of transient intracellular chemistry and link it to oxygen stress and survival. This ability to monitor chemical changes at the molecular level can yield important insights into a wide range of adaptive responses.

Holman, Hoi-Ying N.; Wozei, Eleanor; Lin, Zhang; Comolli, Luis R.; Ball, David. A.; Borglin, Sharon; Fields, Matthew W.; Hazen, Terry C.; Downing, Kenneth H.

2009-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

172

A Cellular Cell | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

» A Cellular » A Cellular Cell News Featured Articles 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Science Headlines Presentations & Testimony News Archives Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 09.08.11 A Cellular Cell Scientists show structure of critical communications protein using bright light at Argonne Laboratory. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo Crystal structure of the beta2 adrenergic receptor-Gs protein complex Image from the RCSB PDB (www.pdb.org External link ) of PDB ID: 3SN6 Crystal structure of the beta2 adrenergic receptor-Gs protein complex. How does a cell use its cell? Specifically, how does it pick up signals

173

Method of forming a continuous polymeric skin on a cellular foam material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hydrophobic cellular material is coated with a thin hydrophilic polymer skin which stretches tightly over the outer surface of the foam but which does not fill the cells of the foam, thus resulting in a polymer-coated foam structure having a smoothness which was not possible in the prior art. In particular, when the hydrophobic cellular material is a specially chosen hydrophobic polymer foam and is formed into arbitrarily chosen shapes prior to the coating with hydrophilic polymer, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets of arbitrary shapes can be produced by subsequently coating the shapes with metal or with any other suitable material. New articles of manufacture are produced, including improved ICF targets, improved integrated circuits, and improved solar reflectors and solar collectors. In the coating method, the cell size of the hydrophobic cellular material, the viscosity of the polymer solution used to coat, and the surface tensin of the polymer solution used to coat are all very important to the coating.

Duchane, David V. (Los Alamos, NM); Barthell, Barry L. (Los Alamos, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

2012 CELLULAR & MOLECULAR FUNGAL BIOLOGY GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, JUNE 17 - 22, 2012  

SciTech Connect

The Gordon Research Conference on CELLULAR & MOLECULAR FUNGAL BIOLOGY was held at Holderness School, Holderness New Hampshire, June 17 - 22, 2012. The 2012 Gordon Conference on Cellular and Molecular Fungal Biology (CMFB) will present the latest, cutting-edge research on the exciting and growing field of molecular and cellular aspects of fungal biology. Topics will range from yeast to filamentous fungi, from model systems to economically important organisms, and from saprophytes and commensals to pathogens of plants and animals. The CMFB conference will feature a wide range of topics including systems biology, cell biology and morphogenesis, organismal interactions, genome organisation and regulation, pathogenesis, energy metabolism, biomass production and population genomics. The Conference was well-attended with 136 participants. Gordon Research Conferences does not permit publication of meeting proceedings.

Judith Berman

2012-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

175

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers Title Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers Publication Type...

176

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers Title Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers...

177

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Chaun-Yuan Li  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chaun-Yuan Li Chaun-Yuan Li Radiation Biology Research, Duke University Medical Center Funded Projects Molecular Characterization of the Role of SOD Genes in Mammalian Cellular Response to Low Dose Ionizing, abstract, description. Technical Abstracts 2006 Workshop: The Roles of Superoxide Dismutage (SOD) in Low Dose Radiation Induced Adaptive Response Yang, Z., Chuang, E., Batinic-Haberle, I., and Li, C.-Y. 2005 Workshop: Molecular Characterization of the Roles of SOD Genes in Mammalian Cellular Response to Low Dose Radiation Li, C.-Y., Guo, Z., Yang, Z., and Chuang, E. 2003 Workshop: Molecular Characterization of the Roles of SOD Genes in Mammalian Cellular Response to Low Dose Radiation Li, C.-Y. and Chuang, E. Publications Li, F., Sonveaux, P., Rabbani, Z.N., Liu, S., Yan, B., Huang, Q.,

178

Chemical Spill Response Procedure Initial Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical Spill Response Procedure Initial Response 1. Advise lab occupants of the spill such as quantity spilled and chemical name. Risk Assessment 3. Conduct an initial risk assessment to determine if to the chemical spill. This link can be found at the bottom of the Campus Security homepage, http

179

Flow-Through Microfluidic Device for High-Efficiency Transfection of Mammalian Cells through Combined Microelectroporation and Sonoporation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this study we are presenting a proof-of-concept microfluidic device that simultaneously applies the conditions required for microelectroporation and micro-sonoporation in a flow-through fashion that allows for high throughput, high efficiency transfection of mammalian cells. During the design stage, we developed a low-cost, high-resolution polymer microfabrication technique termed laser stenciling. While few other electro-sonoporation protocols have been reported, to the best of our knowledge, we are the first to incorporate microelectroporation, which has been well established in literature to be advantageous to conventional electroporation, with flow-through micro-sonoporation. When comparing transfection efficiency for our electro-sonoporation method to that of sonoporation or microelectroporation alone, we observed single batch improvements up to 20 percent and 17 percent, respectively. The average improvement in efficiency was approximately 15 percent greater than achieved with sonoporation and 10 percent greater than that of electroporation. Importantly, there was little difference in short term cell viability between the three methods (maintained at > 90 percent). The average transfection efficiency for electro-sonoporation was 81.25 percent and cell viability was 91.56 percent. Overall, we have presented a device and electro-sonoporation method that meets or outperforms the transfection efficiency and cell viability standards for HeLa cells set by other reported electroporation and sonoporation methods.

Longsine, Whitney Leigh

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

A new communication paradigm for mobile TV over cellular network Dr. Hongxiang Li  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new communication paradigm for mobile TV over cellular network Dr. Hongxiang Li Electrical terrestrial TV network and propose a new mobile TV communication paradigm that is radically different from and communication theory (i.e., Network Coding and Dirty Paper Coding) in the new mobile TV system design. Despite

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Using neural networks and cellular automata for modelling intra-urban land-use dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Empirical models designed to simulate and predict urban land-use change in real situations are generally based on the utilization of statistical techniques to compute the land-use change probabilities. In contrast to these methods, artificial neural ... Keywords: Cellular automata, Fuzzy similarity measures, Land-use dynamics, Neural networks, Town planning, Urban modelling

C. M. Almeida; J. M. Gleriani; E. F. Castejon; B. S. Soares-Filho

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Cellular Controlled Short-Range Communication for Cooperative P2P Networking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article advocates a novel communication architecture and associated collaborative framework for future wireless communication systems. In contrast to the dominating cellular architecture and the upcoming peer-to-peer architecture, the new approach ... Keywords: Energy efficiency, Medium access control, Peer-to-peer networking, Wireless cooperative networking

Frank H. Fitzek; Marcos Katz; Qi Zhang

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Using Extended Logic Programming for Alarm-Correlation in Cellular Phone Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alarm correlation is a necessity in large mobile phone networks, where the alarm bursts resulting from severe failures would otherwise overload the network operators. In this paper, we describe how to realize alarm-correlation in cellular phone networks ... Keywords: alarm-correlation, diagnosis, logic programming

C. V. Damsio; P. Frhlich; W. Nejdl; L. M. Pereira; M. Schroeder

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Embryonics: A Bio-Inspired Cellular Architecture with Fault-Tolerant Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper details and expands the work on Embryonics, a recently proposed fault-tolerant cellular architecture with reconfiguration properties inspired by the ontogenetic development of multicellular systems. The design of a selector-based embryonic ... Keywords: FPGAs, bio-inspired systems, embryonics, fault-tolerant systems, reliability models

Cesar Ortega-Sanchez; Daniel Mange; Steve Smith; Andy Tyrrell

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Computationally efficient algorithms for location area planning in future cellular systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Efficient resource utilisation in future cellular systems is related to the control of the signalling load imposed by the location update and paging operations. Important means for controlling this load is the ''proper'' planning of location areas. In ... Keywords: Genetic algorithm paradigm, Simulated annealing, Taboo search

P. Demestichas; N. Georgantas; E. Tzifa; V. Demesticha; M. Striki; M. Kilanioti; M. Theologou

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Quantum dots for tracking cellular transport of lectin-functionalized nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect

Successful drug delivery by functionalized nanocarriers largely depends on their efficient intracellular transport which has not yet been fully understood. We developed a new tracking technique by encapsulating quantum dots into the core of wheat germ agglutinin-conjugated nanoparticles (WGA-NP) to track cellular transport of functionalized nanocarriers. The resulting nanoparticles showed no changes in particle size, zeta potential or biobinding activity, and the loaded probe presented excellent photostability and tracking ability. Taking advantage of these properties, cellular transport profiles of WGA-NP in Caco-2 cells was demonstrated. The cellular uptake begins with binding of WGA to its receptor at the cell surface. The subsequent endocytosis happened in a cytoskeleton-dependent manner and by means of clathrin and caveolae-mediated mechanisms. After endosome creating, transport occurs to both trans-Golgi and lysosome. Our study provides new evidences for quantum dots as a cellular tracking probe of nanocarriers and helps understand intracellular transport profile of lectin-functionalized nanoparticles.

Gao Xiaoling [Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmacy, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Medical Sciences, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Wang Tao [Surface Physics Laboratory (National Key Laboratory), Physics Department, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Wu Bingxian; Chen Jun [Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmacy, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Chen Jiyao [Surface Physics Laboratory (National Key Laboratory), Physics Department, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Yue Yang; Dai Ning [National Laboratory for Infrared Physics, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200083 (China); Chen Hongzhuan [Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Medical Sciences, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China)], E-mail: yaoli@shsmu.edu.cn; Jiang Xinguo [Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmacy, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China)], E-mail: xgjiang@shmu.edu.cn

2008-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

187

Unraveling complex temporal associations in cellular systems across multiple time-series microarray datasets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unraveling the temporal complexity of cellular systems is a challenging task, as the subtle coordination of molecular activities cannot be adequately captured by simple mathematical concepts such as correlation. This paper addresses the challenge with ... Keywords: Complex temporal association, Time-series microarray data

Wenyuan Li; Min Xu; Xianghong Jasmine Zhou

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Performance control for manufacturing sustainability: a cellular neural network-based approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The recent trends in optimisation of sustainability of production processes requires, amongst all the activities, a continuous detection and correction of process behaviours, monitoring those parameters critical to performance. Detection of special causes ... Keywords: associative memories, cellular neural networks, recognition process, statistical process control, sustainable manufacturing

Leonarda Carnimeo; Michele Dassisti

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

RadioJockey: Mining Program Execution to Optimize Cellular Radio Usage Pavan K. Athivarapu1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dormancy is typically invoked with a fixed short inactivity timer (e.g., 3-5s), thereby reducing the energy. BACKGROUND AND MOTIVATION 2.1 Energy and Signaling Overhead During normal usage, a cellular radio switches costs. This has a major implication on the energy consumed by background applications that typically

190

An Energy-Efficient Power Allocation Game with Selfish Channel State Reporting in Cellular Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Energy-Efficient Power Allocation Game with Selfish Channel State Reporting in Cellular Networks With energy-efficient resource allocation, mobile users and base station have different objectives. While the base station strives for an energy-efficient operation of the complete cell, each user aims to maximize

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

191

Cellular burning in lean premixed turbulent hydrogen-air flames: coupling experimental and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cellular burning in lean premixed turbulent hydrogen-air flames: coupling experimental for burning the fuel-lean mixtures of hydrogen or hydrogen-rich syngas fuels obtained from the gasification, including those burning lean hydrogen at both at atmospheric and elevated pressures [6]. The low

Bell, John B.

192

The Cellular Burning Regime in Type Ia Supernova Explosions - II. Flame Propagation into Vortical Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the interaction of thermonuclear flames in Type Ia supernova explosions with vortical flows by means of numerical simulations. In our study, we focus on small scales, where the flame propagation is no longer dominated by the turbulent cascade originating from large-scale effects. Here, the flame propagation proceeds in the cellular burning regime, resulting from a balance between the Landau-Darrieus instability and its nonlinear stabilization. The interaction of a cellularly stabilized flame front with a vortical fuel flow is explored applying a variety of fuel densities and strengths of the velocity fluctuations. We find that the vortical flow can break up the cellular flame structure if it is sufficiently strong. In this case the flame structure adapts to the imprinted flow field. The transition from the cellularly stabilized front to the flame structure dominated by vortices of the flow proceeds in a smooth way. The implications of the results of our simulations for Type Ia Supernova explosion models are discussed.

F. K. Roepke; W. Hillebrandt; J. C. Niemeyer

2003-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

193

Significantly improved piezoelectric thermal stability of cellular polypropylene films by high pressure fluorination and post-treatments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cellular polypropylene (PP) films were fluorinated under a high pressure of 13 bar of the F{sub 2}/N{sub 2} mixture and were post-treated by nitrous oxide and isothermal crystallization. The fluorinated and post-treated PP films after being expanded and corona charged exhibit a significantly improved piezoelectric thermal stability. After annealing at 70 deg. C for 151 h or at 90 deg. C for 224 h, the piezoelectric d{sub 33} value of the fluorinated and post-treated piezoelectric sample still retains 58% or 45% of its initial d{sub 33} value, while the corresponding value of the virgin piezoelectric sample has decreased to 29% or 15% of the initial value. Chemical composition analysis of the cross section of the fluorinated and post-treated film by energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy indicates that the internal layers have been fluorinated, in spite of a lower degree of fluorination compared with the fluorinated surface layer. Short-circuit and open-circuit TSD current measurements reveal that the fluorinated internal layers, like the fluorinated surface layer, also have very deep charge traps, although there probably is a difference in density of the deep traps between them. The deeply trapped charge on the internal layers of the fluorinated and post-treated piezoelectric sample is responsible for its significantly improved piezoelectric thermal stability.

An Zhenlian [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Advanced Microstructure Materials, Department of Physics, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, 28 Xianning West Road, Xi'an 710049 (China); Mao Mingjun; Cang Jun; Zhang Yewen; Zheng Feihu [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Advanced Microstructure Materials, Department of Physics, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

194

Mass Market Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mass Market Demand Response Mass Market Demand Response Speaker(s): Karen Herter Date: July 24, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Demand response programs are often quickly and poorly crafted in reaction to an energy crisis and disappear once the crisis subsides, ensuring that the electricity system will be unprepared when the next crisis hits. In this paper, we propose to eliminate the event-driven nature of demand response programs by considering demand responsiveness a component of the utility obligation to serve. As such, demand response can be required as a condition of service, and the offering of demand response rates becomes a requirement of utilities as an element of customer service. Using this foundation, we explore the costs and benefits of a smart thermostat-based demand response system capable of two types of programs: (1) a mandatory,

195

Measuring Cellular-scale Nutrient Distribution in Algal Biofilms with Synchrotron Confocal Infrared Microspectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The microscope and infrared spectrometer are two of the most useful tools for the study of biological materials, and their combined analytical power far exceeds the sum of the two. Performing molecular spectroscopy through a microscope superimposes chemical information onto the physical microstructure obtained from the optical microscope when visible and infrared information are collected under the same conditions. The instrument developments that enable current infrared microspectroscopic studies began with the introduction of the first research-grade infrared microscope, patented in 1989 (1). By 1993, published reports using this method to determine macroalgae (seaweed) cell-wall composition appeared (2-4). Since these initial reports, the use of infrared microspectroscopy (IMS) in microalgal (single cells or groups of cells) research has grown. Primarily, cultured algae have been used to hone IMS methodology and evaluate its capabilities in algal research (5-8). Studies involving natural, mixed species assemblages, which can utilize the spatial resolution potential of this technique fully are rare (9-11). For instance, in a recent review of IMS microalgal ecological research (12), only 3 of the 29 peer-reviewed publications investigated natural algal assemblages. Both thermal and synchrotron infrared sources provide a resolution capable of measuring individual algae in mixed species assemblages, and each has its advantages. For example, thermal source IMS is more accessible, allowing more samples to be analyzed than synchrotron IMS. However, synchrotron IMS with confocal masking provides superior resolution, which can be critical in isolating small or contiguous cells. Algal ecology is the study of the interaction between algae and their environment. Infrared microspectroscopy addresses a major logistical problem in this field, obtaining species-specific cellular biochemical information from natural, mixed-species assemblages (11,12). Benthic (bottom-dwelling) algae, for example, grow in a three-dimensional matrix (biofilm) composed of different cell sizes, shapes, and configurations. The optical and ecological challenge of studying algae is apparent from Figure 1, which shows a photomicrograph of algal chlorophyll fluorescence on a rock. Several issues make it difficult to obtain single species measurements with standard techniques: cell sizes can vary over an order of magnitude; species can occur as single cells, long filaments, or globular colonies; a number of different species can be found within a few square millimeters; and fluorescence can vary across cells (that is, the physiological state varies across cells). Synchrotron IMS is a tool that can be used to begin to overcome these spatially related challenges by giving a species- and location-specific measurement of an individual alga's relative chemical composition and distribution. This technique enables algal ecologists to focus on new, ecologically relevant questions such as what level (that is, cell, colony, and population) best defines a species' response to environmental change. For instance, many species occur as single cells and thus can be measured as individual organisms. However, the variety of growth forms and sizes can make it difficult to define the best unit to measure multicellular groups in terms of its functional role such as primary productivity (that is, carbon incorporation) and nutrient cycling. Understanding how individual algal species within a diverse community respond to environmental changes can help predict how changes in assemblage structure will impact overall assemblage function.

J Murdock; W Dodds; J Reffner; D Wetzel

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

196

Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Demand Responsive Lighting Host: Francis Rubinstein Demand Response Research Center Technical Advisory Group Meeting August 31, 2007 10:30 AM - Noon Meeting Agenda * Introductions (10 minutes) * Main Presentation (~ 1 hour) * Questions, comments from panel (15 minutes) Project History * Lighting Scoping Study (completed January 2007) - Identified potential for energy and demand savings using demand responsive lighting systems - Importance of dimming - New wireless controls technologies * Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting (commenced March 2007) Objectives * Provide up-to-date information on the reliability, predictability of dimmable lighting as a demand resource under realistic operating load conditions * Identify potential negative impacts of DR lighting on lighting quality Potential of Demand Responsive Lighting Control

197

Electoral surveys influence on the voting processes: a cellular automata model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nowadays, in societies threatened by atomization, selfishness, shortterm thinking, and alienation from political life, there is a renewed debate about classical questions concerning the quality of democratic decisionmaking. In this work a cellular automata (CA) model for the dynamics of free elections based on the social impact theory is proposed. By using computer simulations, power law distributions for the size of electoral clusters and decision time have been obtained. The major role of broadcasted electoral surveys in guiding opinion formation and stabilizing the status quo was demonstrated. Furthermore, it was shown that in societies where these surveys are manipulated within the universally accepted statistical error bars, even a majoritary opposition could be hindered from reaching the power through the electoral path. key word: cellular automata, voting process, power laws, phase transitions 1

S. G. Alves; N. M. Oliveira; Neto M. L. Martins

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Science and Cellular Stresses | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Science and Science and Cellular Stresses News Featured Articles 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Science Headlines Presentations & Testimony News Archives Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 12.21.11 Science and Cellular Stresses Research reveals new insights into tumor suppression. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo p53 tumor suppressor Protein Databank The holiday season can be stressful with its just-missed parking spots and perfectly horrible holiday sweaters. And spending time bonding with family and friends can be a great way to relieve those stresses (while perhaps causing others!). In a sense, cells studied by the Office of Science's Brookhaven National

199

Analysis of a Cellular Automaton Model for Car Traffic with a Slow-to-Stop Rule  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a modification of the widely known Benjamin-Johnson-Hui (BJH) cellular automaton model for single-lane traffic simulation. In particular, our model includes a slow-to-stop rule that exhibits more realistic microscopic driver behaviour than the BJH model. We present some statistics related to fuel economy and pollution generation and show that our model differs greatly in these measures. We give concise results based on extensive simulations using our system.

Adam Clarridge; Kai Salomaa

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

A Hybrid Cellular Automaton Model of Solid Tumor Growth and Bioreductive Drug Transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bioreductive drugs are a class of hypoxia selective drugs that are designed to eradicate the hypoxic fraction of solid tumors. Their activity depends upon a number of biological and pharmacological factors and we used a mathematical modeling approach ... Keywords: Tumors,Biological system modeling,Drugs,Mathematical model,Electronic countermeasures,Computational modeling,Solids,microenvironment and Tirapazamine,Extra cellular matrix,Hypoxia,mathematical modeling

N. Kazmi; M. A. Hossain; R. M. Phillips

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Scaling of cell size in cellular instabilities of nonpremixed jet flames  

SciTech Connect

Systematic experiments have been undertaken to study the parameter dependence of cellular instability and in particular the scaling of the resulting cell size in CO{sub 2}-diluted H{sub 2}-O{sub 2} jet diffusion flames. Cellular flames are known to arise near the extinction limit when reactant Lewis numbers are relatively low. The Lewis numbers of the investigated near-extinction mixtures, based on the initial mixture strength {phi}{sub m} and ambient conditions, varied in the ranges [1.1-1.3] for oxygen and [0.25-0.29] for hydrogen ({phi}{sub m} is defined here as the fuel-to-oxygen mass ratio, normalized by the stoichiometric ratio). The experiments were carried out both in an axisymmetric jet (AJ) burner and in a two-dimensional slot burner known as a Wolfhard-Parker (WP) burner with an oxidizer co-flow (mostly 100% O{sub 2}) of fixed low velocity. First, the region of cellular flames adjacent to the extinction limit was characterized in terms of initial H{sub 2} concentration and fuel jet velocity, with all other parameters fixed. Then, the wavelength of the cellular instability, i.e., the cell size, was determined as a function of the fuel jet velocity and the initial mixture strength {phi}{sub m}. For conditions not too close to extinction, this wavelength is found to increase with the square root of the vorticity thickness of the jet shear layer and roughly the 1/5 power of {phi}{sub m}. Very close to extinction, this scaling breaks down and will likely switch to a scaling with the flame thickness, i.e., involving the Damkoehler number. (author)

Lo Jacono, D.; Monkewitz, P.A. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Laboratory of Fluid Mechanics, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

202

Joint Responses to Audit Response Requests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

documenting the NRC Staff s conclusions regarding a pre-application audit of Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) and Duke Energy Carolinas (Duke) combined license (COL) application preparation activities, conducted from July 30- August 3, 2007. Because TVA's Bellefonte COL application and Duke's Lee Nuclear COL application were prepared in close coordination through NuStart and the AP 1000 Design Centered Work Group (DCWG), and because these two COL applications were prepared by the same contractor, the audits were performed essentially simultaneously. The referenced audit report requested that the audit response requests (ARRs) be addressed prior to or as part of the respective COL application submittals. Responses to the ARRs are enclosed. The ARRs in the audit report did not directly impact the content of the COL applications, and the timing of the issuance of the audit report did not facilitate a response prior to the filing of the applications.

Juan Peralta Chief; Tennessee Valley

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Adaptive Response of Mouse Skin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Adaptive Response of Mouse Skin Epithelial Cells to Low Dose Adaptive Response of Mouse Skin Epithelial Cells to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation: Induction of NF-κB, MnSOD, 14-3-3ζ and Cyclin B1 Authors: Jian Jian Li, Kazi M. Ahmed, Ming Fan, Shaozhong Dong, Douglas R. Spitz, and Cheng-Rong Yu Institutions: Division of Molecular Radiobiology, Purdue University School of Health Sciences, West Lafayette, Indiana; Free Radical and Radiation Biology Program, Department of Radiation Oncology, Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa; Molecular Immunology Section, Laboratory of Immunology, National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland Gene expression profiles demonstrate that a group of key stress-responsive genes are associated with radiation exposure and may contribute to cellular

204

The Cellular Burning Regime in Type Ia Supernova Explosions - I. Flame Propagation into Quiescent Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a numerical investigation of the cellular burning regime in Type Ia supernova explosions. This regime holds at small scales (i.e. below the Gibson scale), which are unresolved in large-scale Type Ia supernova simulations. The fundamental effects that dominate the flame evolution here are the Landau-Darrieus instability and its nonlinear stabilization, leading to a stabilization of the flame in a cellular shape. The flame propagation into quiescent fuel is investigated addressing the dependence of the simulation results on the specific parameters of the numerical setup. Furthermore, we investigate the flame stability at a range of fuel densities. This is directly connected to the questions of active turbulent combustion (a mechanism of flame destabilization and subsequent self-turbulization) and a deflagration-to-detonation transition of the flame. In our simulations we find no substantial destabilization of the flame when propagating into quiescent fuels of densities down to ~10^7 g/cm^3, corroborating fundamental assumptions of large-scale SN Ia explosion models. For these models, however, we suggest an increased lower cutoff for the flame propagation velocity to take the cellular burning regime into account.

F. K. Roepke; W. Hillebrandt; J. C. Niemeyer

2003-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

205

Survival of retinal pigment epithelium after exposure to prolonged oxidative injury: a detailed gene expression and cellular analysis. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 45  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PURPOSE. To detail, by DNA microarrays and cellular structure labeling, the in vitro responses of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells to a nonlethal dose of the oxidant agent hydroquinone (HQ). METHODS. The viability of growth-quiescent ARPE-19 cells after treatment with HQ was measured by XTT conversion, 3 H-leucine incorporation, trypan blue exclusion, and the presence of DNA laddering. The effect of a nonlethal dose of HQ on the localization of apoptosis-induced factor (AIF) and phosphorylation of stress-activated kinase-2/p38 (SAPK2/p38) was detected by immunocytochemistry. Actin structures were visualized by phalloidin staining. Cell membrane blebbing was detected using GFP-membranelabeled RPE cells (ARPE-GFP-crRas). Changes in gene expression patterns of RPE cells within 48 hours of prolonged treatment with a nonlethal dose of HQ

Nataly Strunnikova; Connie Zhang; Diane Teichberg; Scott W. Cousins; Judit Baffi; Kevin G. Becker; Karl G. Csaky

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Automated Demand Response and Commissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fully-Automated Demand Response Test in Large Facilities14in DR systems. Demand Response using HVAC in Commercialof Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

F) Enhanced ACP Date RAA ACP Demand Response SpinningReserve Demonstration Demand Response Spinning Reservesupply spinning reserve. Demand Response Spinning Reserve

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

CRA Comments & Responses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 - Hanford Tank Waste (31805) 10 Response to CRA Comments (51105) Enclosure 1 - Hanford Tank Waste (51105) Enclosure 2 - K-Basin Knock-Out Pot Sludge (51105)...

209

2012 MICROBIAL STRESS RESPONSE GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, JULY 20-25, 2012  

SciTech Connect

The Gordon Research Conference on MICROBIAL STRESS RESPONSE was held at Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, Massachusetts, July 15-20, 2012. The Conference was well-attended with 180 participants. The 2012 Microbial Stress Responses Gordon Research Conference will provide a forum for the open reporting of recent discoveries on the diverse mechanisms employed by microbes to respond to stress. Approaches range from analysis at the molecular level (how are signals perceived and transmitted to change gene expression or function) to cellular and microbial community responses. Gordon Research Conferences does not permit publication of meeting proceedings.

Timothy Donohue

2012-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

210

Eastern Frequency Response Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study was specifically designed to investigate the frequency response of the Eastern Interconnection that results from large loss-of-generation events of the type targeted by the North American Electric Reliability Corp. Standard BAL-003 Frequency Response and Frequency Bias Setting (NERC 2012a), under possible future system conditions with high levels of wind generation.

Miller, N.W.; Shao, M.; Pajic, S.; D'Aquila, R.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Tidal Response in Estuaries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new general theory has been developed to determine both the tidal response of estuaries and the effects of cross-channel tidal barriers on this response. The theory is shown to be widely applicable and provides a connecting framework against ...

D. Prandle; M. Rahman

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Argonne TDC: Emergency Response Technologies  

Emergency Response Technologies. PROTECT (Program for Response Options and Technology Enhancements for Chemical/Biological Terrorism) Grid Security ...

213

Moving Cellular Structure of Fog Echoes Obtained with a Millimeter-Wave Scanning Doppler Radar at Kushiro, Japan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of fogs with a millimeter-wave scanning Doppler radar were conducted at Kushiro in Hokkaido, Japan, in the summer seasons of 1999 and 2000. Three typical types of plan position indicator (PPI) displays were observed: cellular echoes ...

Akihisa Uematsu; Hiroyuki Hashiguchi; Michihiro Teshiba; Hisamichi Tanaka; Koichi Hirashima; Shoichiro Fukao

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Carotenoids & Retinoids; Molecular Aspects and Health IssuesChapter 8 -Carotene Cleavage Products Impair Cellular and Mitochondrial Functions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carotenoids & Retinoids; Molecular Aspects and Health Issues Chapter 8 -Carotene Cleavage Products Impair Cellular and Mitochondrial Functions Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press 

215

Greystar: fast and accurate detection of SMS spam numbers in large cellular networks using grey phone space  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we present the design of Greystar, an innovative defense system for combating the growing SMS spam traffic in cellular networks. By exploiting the fact that most SMS spammers select targets randomly from the finite phone number space, ...

Nan Jiang, Yu Jin, Ann Skudlark, Zhi-Li Zhang

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

9.013J / 7.68J Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology: The Brain and Cognitive Sciences III, Spring 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Subject covers all major areas of cellular and molecular neurobiology including excitable cells and membranes, ion channels and receptors, synaptic transmission, cell type determination, axon guidance and targeting, neuronal ...

Constantine-Paton, Martha, 1947-

217

Your Records Management Responsibilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Your Records Management Your Records Management Responsibilities Table of Contents INTRODUCTION RECORDS MANAGEMENT IN THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT RECORDS MANAGEMENT IN THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY IMPORTANCE OF RECORDS MANAGEMENT YOUR RECORDS MANAGEMENT RESPONSIBILITIES RECORDS MANAGEMENT LIFE CYCLE ELECTRONIC RECORDS & RECORDKEEPING LAW, REGULATION, AND POLICY ASSISTANCE RECORDS MANAGEMENT TERMS 2 INTRODUCTION If you are a government employee or contractor working for a federal agency, records management is part of your job. This pamphlet explains your responsibilities for federal records and provides the context for understanding records management in the federal government and in the Department of Energy. TOP RECORDS MANAGEMENT IN THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT

218

Automated Demand Response Today  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response (DR) has progressed over recent years beyond manual and semi-automated DR to include growing implementation and experience with fully automated demand response (AutoDR). AutoDR has been shown to be of great value over manual and semi-automated DR because it reduces the need for human interactions and decisions, and it increases the speed and reliability of the response. AutoDR, in turn, has evolved into the specification known as OpenADR v1.0 (California Energy Commission, PIER Program, C...

2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

219

Cellular distribution of inorganic mercury and its relation to cytotoxicity in bovine kidney cell cultures  

SciTech Connect

A bovine kidney cell culture system was used to assess what relationship mercuric chloride (HgCl/sub 2/) uptake and subcellular distribution had to cytotoxicity. Twenty-four-hour incubations with 0.05-50 ..mu..M HgCl/sub 2/ elicited a concentration-related cytotoxicity. Cellular accumulation of /sup 203/Hg was also concentration-related, with 1.0 nmol/10/sup 6/ cells at the IC50. Measurement of Hg uptake over the 24-h exposure period revealed a multiphasic process. Peak accumulation was attained by 1 h and was followed by extrusion and plateauing of intracellular Hg levels. Least-squares regression analysis of the cytotoxicity and cellular uptake data indicated a potential relationship between the Hg uptake and cytotoxicity. However, the subcellular distribution of Hg was not concentration-related. Mitochondria and soluble protein fractions accounted for greater than 65% of the cell-associated Hg at all concentrations. The remaining Hg was distributed between the microsomal (6-10%) and nuclear and cell debris (11-22%) fractions at all concentrations tested. Less than 20% of the total cell-associated Hg was bound with metallothionein-like protein. 31 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

Bracken, W.M.; Sharma, R.P.; Bourcier, D.R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Demand Response Database & Demo  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Database & Demo Speaker(s): Mike Graveley William M. Smith Date: June 7, 2005 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Mary Ann Piette Infotility...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Engineering responses to pandemics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Focusing on pandemic influenza, this chapter approaches the planning for and response to such a major worldwide health event as a complex engineering systems problem. Action-oriented analysis of pandemics requires a broad inclusion of academic disciplines ...

Richard C. Larson; Karima R. Nigmatulina

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Automated Demand Response Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report includes assessments and test results of four end-use technologies, representing products in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors, each configured to automatically receive real-time pricing information and critical peak pricing (CPP) demand response (DR) event notifications. Four different vendors were asked to follow the interface requirements set forth in the Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) standard that was introduced to the public in 2008 and currently used in two ...

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

223

Automated Demand Response Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report, which is an update to EPRI Report 1016082, includes assessments and test results of four end-use vendor technologies. These technologies represent products in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors, each configured to automatically receive real-time pricing information and critical peak pricing (CPP) demand response (DR) event notifications. Four different vendors were asked to follow the interface requirements set forth in the Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) Communicat...

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

224

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oakland CA, December. PJM Demand Side Response WorkingPrice Response Program a PJM Economic Load Response ProgramLoad Response Statistics PJM Demand Response Working Group

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Dose-dependent transitions in Nrf2-mediated adaptive response and related stress responses to hypochlorous acid in mouse macrophages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is potentially an important source of cellular oxidative stress. Human HOCl exposure can occur from chlorine gas inhalation or from endogenous sources of HOCl, such as respiratory burst by phagocytes. Transcription factor Nrf2 is a key regulator of cellular redox status and serves as a primary source of defense against oxidative stress. We recently demonstrated that HOCl activates Nrf2-mediated antioxidant response in cultured mouse macrophages in a biphasic manner. In an effort to determine whether Nrf2 pathways overlap with other stress pathways, gene expression profiling was performed in RAW 264.7 macrophages exposed to HOCl using whole genome mouse microarrays. Benchmark dose (BMD) analysis on gene expression data revealed that Nrf2-mediated antioxidant response and protein ubiquitination were the most sensitive biological pathways that were activated in response to low concentrations of HOCl (< 0.35 mM). Genes involved in chromatin architecture maintenance and DNA-dependent transcription were also sensitive to very low doses. Moderate concentrations of HOCl (0.35 to 1.4 mM) caused maximal activation of the Nrf2 pathway and innate immune response genes, such as IL-1{beta}, IL-6, IL-10 and chemokines. At even higher concentrations of HOCl (2.8 to 3.5 mM) there was a loss of Nrf2-target gene expression with increased expression of numerous heat shock and histone cluster genes, AP-1-family genes, cFos and Fra1 and DNA damage-inducible Gadd45 genes. These findings confirm an Nrf2-centric mechanism of action of HOCl in mouse macrophages and provide evidence of interactions between Nrf2, inflammatory, and other stress pathways.

Woods, Courtney G. [Division of Computational Biology, Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); ExxonMobil Biomedical Sciences Incorporated, Annandale, NJ 08801 (United States); Fu Jingqi; Xue Peng; Hou Yongyong [Division of Translational Biology, Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); School of Public Health, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Pluta, Linda J.; Yang Longlong; Zhang Qiang; Thomas, Russell S.; Andersen, Melvin E. [Division of Computational Biology, Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Pi Jingbo [Division of Translational Biology, Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States)], E-mail: jpi@thehamner.org

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

A gluttonous plant reveals how its cellular power plant devours foreign DNA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

December 20, 2013 December 20, 2013 A gluttonous plant reveals how its cellular power plant devours foreign DNA Amborella trichopoda, a sprawling shrub that grows on just a single island in the remote South Pacific, is the only plant in its family and genus. It is also one of the oldest flowering plants, having branched off from others about 200 million years ago. Now, researchers from Indiana University, with the U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (DOE JGI), Penn State University, and the Institute of Research for Development in New Caledonia, have determined a remarkable expansion of the genome of the plant's critical energy-generating structures. Its mitochondria, the plant's energy-producing organelles, in an epic demonstration of horizontal gene transfer, have acquired six genome equivalents of foreign DNA -- one from a

227

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Multi-cellular Crosstalk in Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About this Project About this Project Multi-cellular Crosstalk in Radiation Damage Technical Abstracts 2006 Workshop: Low-LET Bystander Effects in Cells In Vitro Are Significantly Less Than Published For High-LET Radiation Blakely, E.A., Thompson, A.C., Chang, P., Schwarz, R.I., Bjornstad, K., Rosen, C., Wisnewski, C., and Mocherla, D. 2005 Workshop: X-ray Microbeam Bystander Studies with Human Mammary Epithelial Cells and Fibroblasts Blakely, E.A., Schwarz, R.I., Thompson, A.C., Bjornstad, K.A., Chang, P.Y., Rosen, C.J., Sudar, D., Romano, R., and Parvin, B. 2003 Workshop: 12.5 keV X-ray Microbeam Bystander Studies with Human Mammary Epithelial Cells and Fibroblasts Blakely, E.A., Schwarz, R.I., Thompson, A.C., Bjornstad, K.A., Chang, P.Y., Rosen, C.J., and Sudar, D. 2001 Workshop:

228

Cellular telephone-based radiation sensor and wide-area detection network  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A network of radiation detection instruments, each having a small solid state radiation sensor module integrated into a cellular phone for providing radiation detection data and analysis directly to a user. The sensor module includes a solid-state crystal bonded to an ASIC readout providing a low cost, low power, light weight compact instrument to detect and measure radiation energies in the local ambient radiation field. In particular, the photon energy, time of event, and location of the detection instrument at the time of detection is recorded for real time transmission to a central data collection/analysis system. The collected data from the entire network of radiation detection instruments are combined by intelligent correlation/analysis algorithms which map the background radiation and detect, identify and track radiation anomalies in the region.

Craig, William W. (Pittsburg, CA); Labov, Simon E. (Berkeley, CA)

2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

229

The insulin-RB synapse in health and disease: cellular rocket science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Time has come for a survey of our knowledge on the physical interaction between the growth-promoting insulin molecule and retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (RB). Theoretical and experimental observations over the past 15 years reviewed here indicate that the insulin-RB dimer may represent an essential molecular crossroads involved in major physiological and pathological conditions. Within this system, the putative tumor suppressor insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) should be an important modulator. Perhaps most remarkably, the abstraction of this encounter between insulin and RB, two growth-regulatory giants acting either in concert or against each other depending on the respective cellular requirements, reveals that Nature may compute in controlling cell fate and we could follow in its footsteps towards developing more efficient therapeutics as well as novel technical devices.

Razvan Tudor Radulescu

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

An ultra low-power digitally-controlled buck converter IC for cellular phone applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract This paper describes a dual-mode digitallycontrolled buck converter IC for cellular phone applications. An architecture employing internal power management is introduced to ensure voltage compatibility between a singlecell lithium-ion battery voltage and a low voltage integrated circuit technology. Special purpose analog and digital interface elements are developed. These include a ring-oscillator based ADC (ring-ADC), which is nearly entirely synthesizable, robust against switching noise, and has flexible resolution control, and a very low power ring oscillator-multiplexer based Digital PWM generation module (ring-MUX DPWM). The chip, which includes an output power stage rated for 400 mA, occupies 2mm 2 active area in 0.25-m CMOS. Very high efficiencies are achieved over a load range of 0.1 to 400 mA. Measured quiescent current in PFM mode is 4 A. I.

Jinwen Xiao; Angel Peterchev; Jianhui Zhang; Seth Sanders

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Developing an Abaqus *HYPERFOAM Model for M9747 (4003047) Cellular Silicone Foam  

SciTech Connect

This report documents work done to develop an Abaqus *HYPERFOAM hyperelastic model for M9747 (4003047) cellular silicone foam for use in quasi-static analyses at ambient temperature. Experimental data, from acceptance tests for 'Pad A' conducted at the Kansas City Plant (KCP), was used to calibrate the model. The data includes gap (relative displacement) and load measurements from three locations on the pad. Thirteen sets of data, from pads with different serial numbers, were provided. The thirty-nine gap-load curves were extracted from the thirteen supplied Excel spreadsheets and analyzed, and from those thirty-nine one set of data, representing a qualitative mean, was chosen to calibrate the model. The data was converted from gap and load to nominal (engineering) strain and nominal stress in order to implement it in Abaqus. Strain computations required initial pad thickness estimates. An Abaqus model of a right-circular cylinder was used to evaluate and calibrate the *HYPERFOAM model.

Siranosian, Antranik A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stevens, R. Robert [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

232

Towards local electromechanical probing of cellular and biomolecular systems in a liquid environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electromechanical coupling is ubiquitous in biological systems with examples ranging from simple piezoelectricity in calcified and connective tissues to voltage-gated ion channels, energy storage in mitochondria, and electromechanical activity in cardiac myocytes and outer hair cell stereocilia. Piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) has originally emerged as a technique to study electromechanical phenomena in ferroelectric materials, and in recent years, has been employed to study a broad range of non-ferroelectric polar materials, including piezoelectric biomaterials. At the same time, the technique has been extended from ambient to liquid imaging on model ferroelectric systems. Here, we present results on local electromechanical probing of several model cellular and biomolecular systems, including insulin and lysozyme amyloid fibrils, breast adenocarcinoma cells, and bacteriorhodopsin in a liquid environment. The specific features of SPM operation in liquid are delineated and bottlenecks on the route towards nanometer-resolution electromechanical imaging of biological systems are identified.

Sergei V. Kalinin; Brian J. Rodriguez; Stephen Jesse; Katyayani Seal; Roger Proksch; Sophia Hohlbauch; Irene Revenko; Gary Lee Thompson; Alexey A. Vertegel

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

233

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

No. ER06-615-000 CAISO Demand Response Resource User Guide -8 2.1. Demand Response Provides a Range of Benefits to8 2.2. Demand Response Benefits can be Quantified in Several

Heffner, Grayson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Demand Response In California  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency & Energy Efficiency & Demand Response Programs Dian M. Grueneich, Commissioner Dian M. Grueneich, Commissioner California Public Utilities Commission California Public Utilities Commission FUPWG 2006 Fall Meeting November 2, 2006 Commissioner Dian M. Grueneich November 2, 2006 1 Highest Priority Resource Energy Efficiency is California's highest priority resource to: Meet energy needs in a low cost manner Aggressively reduce GHG emissions November 2, 2006 2 Commissioner Dian M. Grueneich November 2, 2006 3 http://www.cpuc.ca.gov/PUBLISHED/REPORT/51604.htm Commissioner Dian M. Grueneich November 2, 2006 4 Energy Action Plan II Loading order continued "Pursue all cost-effective energy efficiency, first." Strong demand response and advanced metering

235

DOE Response to Japan  

SciTech Connect

DOE/NNSA NA?40 was requested to provide support with consequence management activities following the incident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. The response involved the deployment of several DOE/NNSA NA?40 assets to provide specialized capabilities analysts, scientists, doctors, nurses, specialized equipment and systems to characterize the deposition for the protection of the public and the environment. General response activities revolved around the concepts of: predictive modeling; monitoring and data collection from the air and on the ground; assessing the collected data and other relevant information; interpreting the data; and coordinating the communication of the interpreted data to the appropriate stakeholders.

Wendy Pemberton and RaJah Mena

2011-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

236

First Responder Initial Response Procedure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of this response flow chart is to provide first responders with guidance for response to a transportation accident involving radioactive material.

237

Federal Response October 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and key resources (CIKR) and the execution of the $50m per year Buffer Zone Protection grant programme. He is also responsible for developing plans to imple ment multiple CIKR national protection pro grammes for the nation's most critical CIKR. Mr Norman joined DHS in 2004 and started as the Program Manager

238

Blocking response surface designs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The design of experiments involving more than one blocking factor and quantitative explanatory variables is discussed, the focus being on two key aspects of blocked response surface designs: optimality and orthogonality. First, conditions for orthogonally ... Keywords: D-optimality, Exchange algorithm, Fixed blocks, Orthogonality, Random blocks

P. Goos; A. N. Donev

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

What's BP's social responsibility?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that help -- or hurt -- the rest of us. While BP was winning plaudits for being the first oil company spill -- Ken Salazar, the interior secretary, or Tony Hayward, the oil company's chief executive. Given would like to suggest a third, inanimate culprit: the cult of corporate social responsibility. As crude

240

Oil spill response resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pollution has become one of the main problems being faced by humanity. Preventing pollution from occurring might be the best idea but is not possible in this fast developing world. So the next best thing to do would be to respond to the pollution source in an effective manner. Oil spills are fast becoming pollution sources that are causing the maximum damage to the environment. This is owing to the compounds that are released and the way oil spreads in both water and land. Preventing the oil spill would be the best option. But once the oil has been spilled, the next best thing to do is to respond to the spill effectively. As a result, time becomes an important factor while responding to an oil spill. Appropriate response to contain and cleanup the spill is required to minimize its potential damage to the ecosystem. Since time and money play a very important role in spill response, it would be a great idea if decisions can be made in such a way that a quick response can be planned. The first part of this study deals with the formation of an 'Oil Spill Resources Handbook', which has information on all the important Oil Spill Contractors. The second and the main part of the study, deals with creating a database in Microsoft Access of the Oil Spill Contractors. The third portion of the study deals with planning an oil spill response using a systems approach.

Muthukrishnan, Shankar

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Pulsed laser microbeams for cellular manipulation : applications in cell biology and microfluidics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

130 xiii Figure 7.4: Laser microbeam-induced axotomy of ratx marking the location of laser microbeam pulse delivery. (Biophysical Response to Laser Microbeam-Induced Cell Lysis

Hellman, Amy Noel Stacy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Coordination in emergency response management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Developing a framework to analyze coordination patterns occurring in the emergency response life cycle.

Rui Chen; Raj Sharman; H. Raghav Rao; Shambhu J. Upadhyaya

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Counterterrorism and Response Technologies (CART)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and technical support on counterterrorism and response technologies, equipment ... Measurement Laboratory and the Emergency Services Division ...

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

244

Response to Request  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Booz Allen Hamilton Response to Booz Allen Hamilton Response to Department of Energy Request for Information Implementing the National Broadband Plan by Studying the Communications Requirements of Electric Utilities to Inform the Federal Smart Grid Policy Department of Energy August 9, 2010 1 Booz Allen Hamilton Introduction Booz Allen Hamilton (Booz Allen) has had an enduring relationship with the Department of Energy (DOE) for more than two decades. We are pleased to be responding to the DOE's Request for Information (RFI), Implementing the National Broadband Plan by Studying the Communcations Requirements of Electric Utilities to Inform Federal Smart Grid Policy, with our perspectives on the use of broadband communications technology to meet emerging Smart Grid requirements. In its RFI,

245

Cellular and molecular level responses after radiofrequency radiation exposure, alone or in combination with x-rays or chemicals. Final report, 1 April 1991-30 September 1994  

SciTech Connect

This project was initiated to explore the potential bioeffects of microwave radiation, alone or in combination with ionizing radiation and chemicals. Over the time period of the project, an automated thermal control system, to be used for maintaining the temperature in tissue culture medium during microwave exposures, was designed, constructed, and software was created. While this was underway during the project period, numerous positive control biological experiments were performed on two different cell types, the Epstein Barr Virus transformed 244B human lymphoblastoid cell, and the freshly isolated peripheral human lymphocyte. The 244B cells were used to address the question of whether a physical agent, ionizing radiation, at low doses where cells would predominantly remain viable, would induce the DNA binding protein NF-kB, and/or four immediate early genes (IEG) (protooncogenes).

Meltz, M.L.; Natarajan, M.; Prasad, A.V.

1995-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

246

ACCELERATION RESPONSIVE SWITCH  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An acceleration-responsive device with dual channel capabilities whereby a first circuit is actuated upon attainment of a predetermined maximum acceleration level and when the acceleration drops to a predetermined minimum acceleriltion level another circuit is actuated is described. A fluid-damped sensing mass slidably mounted in a relatively frictionless manner on a shaft through the intermediation of a ball bushing and biased by an adjustable compression spring provides inertially operated means for actuating the circuits. (AEC)

Chabrek, A.F.; Maxwell, R.L.

1963-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Load responsive hydrodynamic bearing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A load responsive hydrodynamic bearing is provided in the form of a thrust bearing or journal bearing for supporting, guiding and lubricating a relatively rotatable member to minimize wear thereof responsive to relative rotation under severe load. In the space between spaced relatively rotatable members and in the presence of a liquid or grease lubricant, one or more continuous ring shaped integral generally circular bearing bodies each define at least one dynamic surface and a plurality of support regions. Each of the support regions defines a static surface which is oriented in generally opposed relation with the dynamic surface for contact with one of the relatively rotatable members. A plurality of flexing regions are defined by the generally circular body of the bearing and are integral with and located between adjacent support regions. Each of the flexing regions has a first beam-like element being connected by an integral flexible hinge with one of the support regions and a second beam-like element having an integral flexible hinge connection with an adjacent support region. A least one local weakening geometry of the flexing region is located intermediate the first and second beam-like elements. In response to application of load from one of the relatively rotatable elements to the bearing, the beam-like elements and the local weakening geometry become flexed, causing the dynamic surface to deform and establish a hydrodynamic geometry for wedging lubricant into the dynamic interface.

Kalsi, Manmohan S. (Houston, TX); Somogyi, Dezso (Sugar Land, TX); Dietle, Lannie L. (Stafford, TX)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Lipid Analysis and Lipidomics: New Techniques & ApplicationChapter 12 Fast GC for Cellular FAME Analysis of Bacteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lipid Analysis and Lipidomics: New Techniques & Application Chapter 12 Fast GC for Cellular FAME Analysis of Bacteria Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books 1FEE4C7C73C70C0CBEFB8C79B2926801 AOCS Press

249

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 2.0 Demand ResponseFully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities,was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

A 2-Dimensional Cellular Automaton for Agents Moving from Origins to Destinations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a two-dimensional cellular automaton (CA) as a simple model for agents moving from origins to destinations. Each agent moves towards an empty neighbor site corresponding to the minimal distance to its destination. The stochasticity or noise ($p$) is introduced in the model dynamics, through the uncertainty in estimating the distance from the destination. The friction parameter $"\\mu"$ is also introduced to control the probability that the movement of all agents involved to the same site (conflict) is denied at one time step. This model displays two states; namely the freely moving and the jamming state. If $\\mu$ is large and $p$ is low, the system is in the jamming state even if the density is low. However, if $\\mu$ is large and $p$ is high, a freely moving state takes place whenever the density is low. The cluster size and the travel time distributions in the two states are studied in detail. We find that only very small clusters are present in the freely moving state while the jamming state displ...

Moussa, N

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

DOE contractors' workshop: Cellular and molecular aspects of radiation induced DNA damage and repair  

SciTech Connect

For four decades the US Department of Energy and its predecessors have been the lead federal agency in supporting radiation biology research. Over the years emphasis in this program has gradually shifted from dose-effect studies on animals to research on the effects of radiations of various qualities on cells and molecules. Mechanistic studies on the action of radiation at the subcellular level are few in number and there is a need for more research in this area if we are to gain a better understanding of how radiation affects living cells. The intent of this workshop was to bring together DOE contractors and grantees who are investigating the effects of radiation at the cellular and molecular levels. The aims were to foster the exchange of information on research projects and experimental results, promote collaborative research efforts, and obtain an overview of research currently supported by the Health Effects Research Division of the Office of Health and Environmental Research. The latter is needed by the Office for program planning purposes. This report on the workshop which took place in Albuquerque, New Mexico on March 10-11, 1987, includes an overview with future research recommendations, extended abstracts of the plenary presentations, shorter abstracts of each poster presentation, a workshop agenda and the names and addresses of the attendees.

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Cellular Systems with Full-Duplex Compress-and-Forward Relaying and Cooperative Base Stations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper the advantages provided by multicell processing of signals transmitted by mobile terminals (MTs) which are received via dedicated relay terminals (RTs) are studied. It is assumed that each RT is capable of full-duplex operation and receives the transmission of adjacent relay terminals. Focusing on intra-cell TDMA and non-fading channels, a simplified relay-aided uplink cellular model based on a model introduced by Wyner is considered. Assuming a nomadic application in which the RTs are oblivious to the MTs' codebooks, a form of distributed compress-and-forward (CF) scheme with decoder side information is employed. The per-cell sum-rate of the CF scheme is derived and is given as a solution of a simple fixed point equation. This achievable rate reveals that the CF scheme is able to completely eliminate the inter-relay interference, and it approaches a ``cut-set-like'' upper bound for strong RTs transmission power. The CF rate is also shown to surpass the rate of an amplify-and-forward scheme via ...

Somekh, Oren; Poor, H Vincent; Shamai, Shlomo

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

An iron-dependent and transferrin-mediated cellular uptake pathway for plutonium.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plutonium is a toxic synthetic element with no natural biological function, but it is strongly retained by humans when ingested. Using small-angle X-ray scattering, receptor binding assays and synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy, we find that rat adrenal gland (PC12) cells can acquire plutonium in vitro through the major iron acquisition pathway -- receptor-mediated endocytosis of the iron transport protein serum transferrin; however, only one form of the plutonium-transferrin complex is active. Low-resolution solution models of plutonium-loaded transferrins derived from small-angle scattering show that only transferrin with plutonium bound in the protein's C-terminal lobe (C-lobe) and iron bound in the N-terminal lobe (N-lobe) (Pu{sub c}Fe{sub N}Tf) adopts the proper conformation for recognition by the transferrin receptor protein. Although the metal-binding site in each lobe contains the same donors in the same configuration and both lobes are similar, the differences between transferrin's two lobes act to restrict, but not eliminate, cellular Pu uptake.

Jensen, M. P.; Gorman-Lewis, D.; Aryal, B. P.; Paunesku, T.; Vogt, S.; Rickert, P. G.; Seifert, S.; Lai, B.; Woloschak, G. E.; Soderholm, L. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division); ( XSD); (Univ. of Chicago); (Northwestern Univ.)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Electrical substation service-area estimation using Cellular Automata: An initial report  

SciTech Connect

The service areas for electric power substations can be estimated using a Cellular Automata (CA) model. The CA model is a discrete, iterative process whereby substations acquire service area by claiming neighboring cells. The service area expands from a substation until a neighboring substation service area is met or the substation`s total capacity or other constraints are reached. The CA-model output is dependent on the rule set that defines cell interactions. The rule set is based on a hierarchy of quantitative metrics that represent real-world factors such as land use and population density. Together, the metrics determine the rate of cell acquisition and the upper bound for service area size. Assessing the CA-model accuracy requires comparisons to actual service areas. These actual service areas can be extracted from distribution maps. Quantitative assessment of the CA-model accuracy can be accomplished by a number of methods. Some are as simple as finding the percentage of cells predicted correctly, while others assess a penalty based on the distance from an incorrectly predicted cell to its correct service area. This is an initial report of a work in progress.

Fenwick, J.W.; Dowell, L.J.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

A Distributed Load Balancing Algorithm for the Hot Cell Problem in Cellular Mobile Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a novel distributed load balancing algorithm (D-LBSB) for the hot cell problem in cellular mobile networks. As an underlying approach, we start with a fixed channel assignment scheme where each cell is initially allocated a set of C (local) channels, each to be assigned on demand to a user in the cell. A cell is classified as `hot', if the degree of coldness of a cell (defined as the ratio of the number of available channels to the total number of channels for that cell) is less than or equal to some threshold value, h. Otherwise the cell is `cold'. D-LBSB proposes to migrate unused channels from suitable cold cells to the hot ones through a distributed channel borrowing algorithm. A Markov model for an individual cell is developed, where the state is determined by the number of occupied channels in the cell. The probability of a cell being hot and the call blocking probability in a cell are derived. Detailed simulation experiments are carried out in order to evaluate our pr...

Sajal K. Das; Sanjoy K. Sen; Rajeev Jayaram

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Response Operations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Response Operations Response Operations Response Operations Overview The federal government primarily plays a coordinating and support role during disaster response. DOE's role is to facilitate recovery from disruptions to the energy supply. OE's capabilities and resources include personnel with emergency response and energy systems operations experience, leading-edge analytical modeling and visualization capabilities, coordination and contacts with private industry, state governments, and U.S. government agencies, and facilitation of special policy waivers or legal authorities by the Secretary of Energy. Response and Restoration State and Local Energy Assurance Planning National Response Framework ESF-12 This National Response Framework (NRF) is a guide to how the Nation conducts all-hazards response. Emergency Support Function #12 - Energy

257

Dividends with Demand Response  

SciTech Connect

To assist facility managers in assessing whether and to what extent they should participate in demand response programs offered by ISOs, we introduce a systematic process by which a curtailment supply curve can be developed that integrates costs and other program provisions and features. This curtailment supply curve functions as bid curve, which allows the facility manager to incrementally offer load to the market under terms and conditions acceptable to the customer. We applied this load curtailment assessment process to a stylized example of an office building, using programs offered by NYISO to provide detail and realism.

Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Goldman, Charles; Sezgen, O.; Pratt, D.

2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

258

Cytotoxicological Response to Engineered Nanomaterials: A Pathway-Driven Process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nanoparticles, while included in a growing number of consumer products, may pose risks to human health due to heavy metal leaching and/or the production of reactive oxygen species following exposures. Subcellular mechanisms of action triggered as a result of exposure to various nanoparticles are still largely unexplored. In this work, an effort to elucidate such toxicological parameters was accomplished by evaluating oxidative stress generation, changes in gene and protein expression, and cell cycle status after low-dose exposures to a variety of metal and carbon-based nanomaterials in primary human dermal cells. Additionally, mitigation of nanoparticle toxicity via microencapsulation was investigated to assess the feasibility of utilizing nanomaterials in dermally implantable biosensor applications. Cellular immune and inflammatory processes were measured via qPCR and immunoblotting, which revealed gene and protein expression modulation along the NF-kappaB pathway after a variety of nanoparticle exposures. The role of immunoregulatory transcription factor NF-kappaB was examined in an oxidative stress context in cells exposed to a panel of nanoparticles, whereby glutathione conversion and modulation of oxidative stress proteins in normal and NF-kappaB knockdown human dermal fibroblasts were monitored. Results revealed decreased antioxidant response and corresponding increased levels of oxidative stress and cell death in exposed normal cells, compared to NF-kappaB incompetent cells. However, reactive oxygen species production was not an absolute precursor to DNA damage, which was measured by the comet assay, gamma-H2AX expression, and flow cytometry. Protein analysis revealed that map kinase p38, rather than p53, was involved in the halting of the cell cycle in S-phase after ZnO exposures, which caused DNA double strand breaks. Microencapsulation of fluorescent quantum dot nanoparticles, specifically, was utilized as a method to improve system functionality and surrounding cellular viability for the purpose of a dermal analyte detection assay. In vitro results indicated a functional localization of nanoparticles, as well as cessation of cellular uptake. Subsequently, cellular metabolism was unaffected over the range of time and concentrations tested in comparison to unencapsulated quantum dot treatments, indicating the usefulness of this technique in developing nanoparticle-driven biomedical applications.

Romoser, Amelia Antonia

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Uncovering land-use dynamics driven by human decision-making - A combined model approach using cellular automata and system dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper introduces an enhancement of a cellular automata (CA) model by integrating system dynamics (SD) to incorporate household dynamics and housing decisions as driving forces of residential development. CA macro-models used to simulate the quantitative ... Keywords: Berlin, Cellular automata, Residential choice, Shrinkage, System dynamics, Urban land use modeling

S. Lauf; D. Haase; P. Hostert; T. Lakes; B. Kleinschmit

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Time efficient heuristics for cell-to-switch assignment in quasi-static/dynamic location area planning of mobile cellular networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a set of time efficient, sub-optimal heuristics to solve the problem of assigning cells to mobile switching centers (or, switches in short) for an effective location area (LA) planning in a mobile cellular network (MCN). A common ... Keywords: CSA, Cellular networks, Clustering and heuristics, Handoff, Hybrid cost, Load balancing, Location area partitioning, Mobile communication, Optimization

Debashis Saha; Partha S. Bhattacharjee; Amitava Mukherjee

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Demand Response | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Demand Response Demand Response Demand Response Demand response provides an opportunity for consumers to play a significant role in the operation of the electric grid by reducing or shifting their electricity usage during peak periods in response to time-based rates or other forms of financial incentives. Demand response programs are being used by electric system planners and operators as resource options for balancing supply and demand. Such programs can lower the cost of electricity in wholesale markets, and in turn, lead to lower retail rates. Methods of engaging customers in demand response efforts include offering time-based rates such as time-of-use pricing, critical peak pricing, variable peak pricing, real time pricing, and critical peak rebates. It also includes direct load control programs which provide the

262

Comprehensive functional testing and dynamic compensation techniques for Cellular Neural Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cellular Neural Networks (CNN's) are analog, non-linear, dynamic systems which are especially well suited for solving problems in the areas of image processing and pattern recognition. State of the art implementations of two-dimensional CNN's arrays are fabricated in sub-micron Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) technologies. The increase in circuit integration has driven the need to develop robust testing methods to establish baseline functionality of CNN'S. Present techniques for testing CNN hardware provide only limited capabilities, often require additional hardware, and are limited to specific topologies. The goal of this thesis is to provide a deterministic method to conduct functional testing and dynamic compensation of CNN arrays independent of the size or topology of the array. The methods provide comprehensive, non-invasive techniques for verifying the integrity of each of the functional paths as well as procedures to measure and minimize parametric faults in real CNN hardware. The functional tests consist of a sequence of inputs to the array that insure each node in the system level representation of the CNN is toggled and propagated to the output where it is compared to a known good output vector set. The dynamic compensation strategies characterize and attempt to minimize or eliminate the effect of undesirable parametric faults such as time-constant mismatches, non-linearity in the multipliers and state nodes, and system offsets. Whenever possible, the compensation techniques are carried out locally on each cell independently, otherwise a global compensation approach is used. Numerous CNN architectures had to be modeled to provide insight into different problems faced when testing a VLSI implementations of CNN arrays. For this reason, a set of software tools was developed to select CNN macromodels of different complexities, combine input stimulus files in a logical manner, and generate the necessary files for simulation. The simulation results were used to design, refine, and measure the effectiveness of the proposed testing strategies.

Grimaila, Michael Russell

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

4, 459493, 2008 Monsoon response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CPD 4, 459­493, 2008 Monsoon response to changes in Earth's orbital parametres P. Braconnot et al forum of Climate of the Past Monsoon response to changes in Earth's orbital parameters: comparisons­493, 2008 Monsoon response to changes in Earth's orbital parametres P. Braconnot et al. Title Page Abstract

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

264

Multilevel Scripting for Responsive Multimedia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Responsive multimedia refers to a melding of media forms that has the ability to react in some way to audience identity, circumstances, equipment, and actions. Cutting-edge responsive multimedia works often involve a collaboration among many people of ... Keywords: scripting languages, responsive multimedia, multilevel authoring

Stefan Agamanolis; V. Michael Bove, Jr.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Overview of Demand Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

08 PJM 08 PJM www.pjm.com ©2003 PJM Overview of Demand Response PJM ©2008 PJM www.pjm.com ©2003 PJM Growth, Statistics, and Current Footprint AEP, Dayton, ComEd, & DUQ Dominion Generating Units 1,200 + Generation Capacity 165,000 MW Peak Load 144,644 MW Transmission Miles 56,070 Area (Square Miles) 164,250 Members 500 + Population Served 51 Million Area Served 13 States and DC Generating Units 1,200 + Generation Capacity 165,000 MW Peak Load 144,644 MW Transmission Miles 56,070 Area (Square Miles) 164,250 Members 500 + Population Served 51 Million Area Served 13 States and DC Current PJM RTO Statistics Current PJM RTO Statistics PJM Mid-Atlantic Integrations completed as of May 1 st , 2005 ©2008 PJM

266

Hanford Emergency Response Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Emergency Response Plan for the US Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL), incorporates into one document an overview of the emergency management program for the Hanford Site. The program has been developed in accordance with DOE orders, and state and federal regulations to protect worker and public health and safety and the environment in the event of an emergency at or affecting the Hanford Site. This plan provides a description of how the Hanford Site will implement the provisions of DOE 5500 series and other applicable Orders in terms of overall policies and concept of operations. It should be used as the basis, along with DOE Orders, for the development of specific contractor and RL implementing procedures.

Wagoner, J.D.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

A preparative suspension culture system permitting quantitation of anchorage-independent growth by direct radiolabeling of cellular DNA  

SciTech Connect

We have developed a hybrid methylcellulose/agar suspension culture system which permits long-term colony formation of transformed mesenchymal cells. In contrast to traditional agar suspensions, our system allows for recovery of cells and direct biochemical analysis of anchorage-independent growth. The ability to readily radiolabel cellular macromolecules in these preparative cultures permits a quantitative and objective analysis of colony formation by incorporation of (/sup 3/H)thymidine into newly synthesized DNA.

Assoian, R.K.; Boardman, L.A.; Drosinos, S.

1989-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

268

DNA Damage Pathways: Low Dose Response and Cross-Talk in TGFβ and ATM  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Damage Pathways: Low Dose Response and Cross-Talk in TGFβ and ATM Damage Pathways: Low Dose Response and Cross-Talk in TGFβ and ATM Signaling Peter O'Neill University of Oxford Abstract The ATM and TGFbeta signal transduction pathways are essential to cellular and tissue control responses to ionizing radiation (IR) and aberrant modifications to these pathways are extensive in cancer. We hypothesize that the ATM and TGFbeta signaling pathways are fully induced at high doses of acute low-LET radiation, whereas only partially induced at low doses. As a consequence of partial stimulation of these pathways important questions arise not only on the validity of the linear no-threshold assumption used in radiation regulations, but also on our ability to extrapolate experimental and human epidemiology data from high to low doses. The

269

Emergency Response Guideline Development  

SciTech Connect

Task 5 of the collaborative effort between ORNL, Brazil, and Westinghouse for the International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative entitled Development of Advanced Instrumentation and Control for an Integrated Primary System Reactor focuses on operator control and protection system interaction, with particular emphasis on developing emergency response guidelines (ERGs). As in the earlier tasks, we will use the IRIS plant as a specific example of an integrated primary system reactor (IPSR) design. The present state of the IRIS plant design specifically, the lack of a detailed secondary system design precludes establishing detailed emergency procedures at this time. However, we can create a structure for their eventual development. This report summarizes our progress to date. Section 1.2 describes the scope of this effort. Section 2 compares IPSR ERG development to the recent AP1000 effort, and identifies three key plant differences that affect the ERGs and control room designs. The next three sections investigate these differences in more detail. Section 3 reviews the IRIS Safety-by-Design philosophy and its impact on the ERGs. Section 4 looks at differences between the IRIS and traditional loop PWR I&C Systems, and considers their implications for both control room design and ERG development. Section 5 examines the implications of having one operating staff control multiple reactor units. Section 6 provides sample IRIS emergency operating procedures (EOPs). Section 7 summarizes our conclusions.

Gary D. Storrick

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

270

Emergency Response Health Physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Health physics is an important discipline with regard to understanding the effects of radiation on human health; however, there are major differences between health physics for research or occupational safety and health physics during a large-scale radiological emergency. The deployment of a U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) monitoring and assessment team to Japan in the wake of the March 2011 accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant yielded a wealth of lessons on these difference. Critical teams (CMOC (Consequence Management Outside the Continental U.S.) and CMHT (Consequence Management Home Team) ) worked together to collect, compile, review, and analyze radiological data from Japan to support the response needs of and answer questions from the Government of Japan, the U.S. military in Japan, the U.S. Embassy and U.S. citizens in Japan, and U.S. citizens in America. This paper addresses the unique challenges presented to the health physicist or analyst of radiological data in a large-scale emergency. A key lesson learned was that public perception and the availability of technology with social media requires a diligent effort to keep the public informed of the science behind the decisions in a manner that is meaningful to them.

Mena, RaJah [National Security Technologies, LLC, Remote Sensing LaboratoryNellis; Pemberton, Wendy [National Security Technologies, LLC, Remote Sensing LaboratoryNellis; Beal, William [Remote Sensing Laboratory at Andrews

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

How to Get More Response from Demand Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite all the rhetoric, demand response's contribution to meet peak load will remain elusive in the absence of enabling technology and standardized business protocols. (author)

Neumann, Scott; Sioshansi, Fereidoon; Vojdani, Ali; Yee, Gaymond

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

272

Response Events | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Response Events Response Events Emergency preparedness and response activities help to facilitate recovery from disruptions to the energy supply, thereby reducing the impact of these events. As such, the ISER approach for emergency response is to leverage a coordinated integration of several DOE capabilities and resources to emergency response situations. These capabilities and resources include personnel with emergency response and/or energy systems operations experience, leading-edge analytical modeling and visualization capabilities, coordination and contacts with private industry, state governments, and U.S. government agencies, and facilitation of special policy waivers or legal authorities by the Secretary of Energy. This approach enables ISER to provide highly scalable support for a range of

273

Demand Response for Ancillary Services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many demand response resources are technically capable of providing ancillary services. In some cases, they can provide superior response to generators, as the curtailment of load is typically much faster than ramping thermal and hydropower plants. Analysis and quantification of demand response resources providing ancillary services is necessary to understand the resources economic value and impact on the power system. Methodologies used to study grid integration of variable generation can be adapted to the study of demand response. In the present work, we describe and illustrate a methodology to construct detailed temporal and spatial representations of the demand response resource and to examine how to incorporate those resources into power system models. In addition, the paper outlines ways to evaluate barriers to implementation. We demonstrate how the combination of these three analyses can be used to translate the technical potential for demand response providing ancillary services into a realizable potential.

Alkadi, Nasr E [ORNL; Starke, Michael R [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

The cellular Mre11 protein interferes with adenovirus E4 mutant DNA replication  

SciTech Connect

Adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) relocalizes and degrades the host DNA repair protein Mre11, and efficiently initiates viral DNA replication. Mre11 associates with Ad E4 mutant DNA replication centers and is important for concatenating viral genomes. We have investigated the role of Mre11 in the E4 mutant DNA replication defect. RNAi-mediated knockdown of Mre11 dramatically rescues E4 mutant DNA replication in cells that do or do not concatenate viral genomes, suggesting that Mre11 inhibits DNA replication independent of genome concatenation. The mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 (Mdc1) protein is involved in recruiting and sustaining Mre11 at sites of DNA damage following ionizing radiation. We observe foci formation by Mdc1 in response to viral infection, indicating that this damage response protein is activated. However, knockdown of Mdc1 does not prevent Mre11 from localizing at viral DNA replication foci or rescue E4 mutant DNA replication. Our results are consistent with a model in which Mre11 interferes with DNA replication when it is localized at viral DNA replication foci.

Mathew, Shomita S. [Department of Microbiology, 32 Pearson Hall, Miami University, Oxford OH 45056 (United States); Bridge, Eileen [Department of Microbiology, 32 Pearson Hall, Miami University, Oxford OH 45056 (United States)], E-mail: BridgeE@muohio.edu

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy efficiency and demand response programs and tariffs.energy efficiency and demand response program and tariffenergy efficiency and demand response programs and tariffs.

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Wireless Demand Response Controls for HVAC Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Strategies Linking Demand Response and Energy Efficiency,Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities,technical support from the Demand Response Research Center (

Federspiel, Clifford

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

their partnership in demand response automation research andand Techniques for Demand Response. LBNL Report 59975. Mayof Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities.

Kiliccote, Sila; Global Energy Partners; Pacific Gas and Electric Company

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and D. Kathan (2009). Demand Response in U.S. ElectricityEnergy Financial Group. Demand Response Research Center [2008). Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering.

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilitiesof Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities,was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and

Watson, David S.; Kiliccote, Sila; Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

23 ii Retail Demand Response in SPP List of Figures and10 Figure 3. Demand Response Resources by11 Figure 4. Existing Demand Response Resources by Type of

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table 1. Economic demand response and real time pricing (Implications of Demand Response Programs in CompetitiveAdvanced Metering, and Demand Response in Electricity

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Response Robot Evaluation Exercise (#6)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... in a series of DHS/NIST response robot evaluation exercises will be hosted at the emergency responder training facility known as Disaster City in ...

2013-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

283

Demand Response Programs, 6. edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report provides a look at the past, present, and future state of the market for demand/load response based upon market price signals. It is intended to provide significant value to individuals and companies who are considering participating in demand response programs, energy providers and ISOs interested in offering demand response programs, and consultants and analysts looking for detailed information on demand response technology, applications, and participants. The report offers a look at the current Demand Response environment in the energy industry by: defining what demand response programs are; detailing the evolution of program types over the last 30 years; discussing the key drivers of current initiatives; identifying barriers and keys to success for the programs; discussing the argument against subsidization of demand response; describing the different types of programs that exist including:direct load control, interruptible load, curtailable load, time-of-use, real time pricing, and demand bidding/buyback; providing examples of the different types of programs; examining the enablers of demand response programs; and, providing a look at major demand response programs.

NONE

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

284

Automated Demand Response and Commissioning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Commissioning Title Automated Demand Response and Commissioning Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-57384 Year of Publication 2005 Authors Piette, Mary...

285

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

xxxv Option Value of Electricity Demand Response, Osmanelasticity in aggregate electricity demand. With these newii) reduction in electricity demand during peak periods (

Heffner, Grayson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Pantex Plant Emergency Response Exercise  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assurance November 2000 Independent Oversight Evaluation of the Pantex Plant Emergency Response Exercise OVERSIGHT Table of Contents 1.0 INTRODUCTION ......

287

Biofilm Shows Spatially Stratified Metabolic Responses to Contaminant Exposure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to elucidate the spatiotemporal responses of live S. oneidensis MR-1 biofilms to U(VI) (uranyl, UO22+) and Cr(VI) (chromate, CrO42-), important environmental contaminants at DOE contaminated sites. Toward this goal, we applied noninvasive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging, diffusion, relaxation and spectroscopy techniques to monitor in situ spatiotemporal responses of S. oneidensis biofilms to U(VI) and Cr(VI) exposure in terms of changes in biofilm structures, diffusion properties, and cellular metabolism. Exposure to U(VI) or Cr(VI) did not appear to change the overall biomass distribution but caused changes in the physicochemical microenvironments inside the biofilm as indicated by diffusion measurements. Changes in the diffusion properties of the biofilms in response to U(VI) and Cr(VI) exposure imply a novel function of the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) affecting the biotransformation and transport of contaminants in the environment. In the presence of U(VI) or Cr(VI), the anaerobic metabolism of lactate was inhibited significantly, although the biofilms were still capable of reducing U(VI) and Cr(VI). Local concentrations of Cr(III)aq in the biofilm suggested relatively high Cr(VI) reduction activities at the top of the biofilm, near the medium-biofilm interface. The depth-resolved metabolic activities of the biofilm suggested higher diversion effects of gluconeogenesis and C1 metabolism pathways at the bottom of the biofilm and in the presence of U(VI). This study provides a noninvasive means to investigate spatiotemporal responses of biofilms, including surface-associated microbial communities in engineering, natural and medical settings, to various environmental perturbations including exposure to environmental contaminants and antimicrobials.

Cao, Bin; Majors, Paul D.; Ahmed, B.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Sylvia, Crystal P.; Shi, Liang; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beyenal, Haluk

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Assessing Biological Function of DNA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessing Biological Function of DNA Damage Response Genes Assessing Biological Function of DNA Damage Response Genes Larry H. Thompson Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Why This Project To understand the relative importance of individual DNA repair and DNA-damage response pathways to the recovery of mammalian cells after exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation (IR). This understanding may lead to better ways of setting limits on human exposure to IR. In spite of the discovery of many mammalian DNA repair genes, our current knowledge of how many of these genes contribute to cellular recovery from IR exposure is quite limited. Project Goals Measure cellular responses at doses in the 5-100 cGy range, which generally cause changes too small to detect in normal, repair-proficient cells Focus on DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and DNA oxidative base

289

Modern Methods for Lipid AnalysisChapter 12 Toward Total Cellular Lipidome Analysis by ESI Mass Spectrometry from a Crude Lipid Extract  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern Methods for Lipid Analysis Chapter 12 Toward Total Cellular Lipidome Analysis by ESI Mass Spectrometry from a Crude Lipid Extract Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books AOCS Press Downloadable pdf ...

290

Lipid Analysis and Lipidomics: New Techniques & ApplicationChapter 3 Global Cellular Lipidome Analyses by Shotgun Lipidomics Using Multidimensional Mass Spectrometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lipid Analysis and Lipidomics: New Techniques & Application Chapter 3 Global Cellular Lipidome Analyses by Shotgun Lipidomics Using Multidimensional Mass Spectrometry Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books 2D17DD82D1DB9F2

291

Modeling Mesoscale Cellular Structures and Drizzle in Marine Stratocumulus. Part II: The Microphysics and Dynamics of the Boundary Region between Open and Closed Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the second of two companion papers on modeling of mesoscale cellular structures and drizzle in marine stratocumulus. In the first, aerosolcloudprecipitation interactions and dynamical feedbacks were investigated to study the formation ...

Hailong Wang; Graham Feingold

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Lipid Analysis and Lipidomics: New Techniques & ApplicationChapter 13 Use of Cellular Fatty Acids to Identify Food-Borne Pathogens by Infrared Spectroscopy & Capillary GasChromatography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lipid Analysis and Lipidomics: New Techniques & Application Chapter 13 Use of Cellular Fatty Acids to Identify Food-Borne Pathogens by Infrared Spectroscopy & Capillary GasChromatography Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Bo

293

Advances in Conjugated Linoleic Acid Research, Vol 2Chapter 16 Conjugated Linoleic Acids as Anticancer Nutrients: Studies In Vivo and Cellular Mechanisms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances in Conjugated Linoleic Acid Research, Vol 2 Chapter 16 Conjugated Linoleic Acids as Anticancer Nutrients: Studies In Vivo and Cellular Mechanisms Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry AOCS Pr

294

Advances in Conjugated Linoleic Acid Research, Volume 3Chapter 8 Modulatory Properties of CLA on Inflammation and Immune Function: Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances in Conjugated Linoleic Acid Research, Volume 3 Chapter 8 Modulatory Properties of CLA on Inflammation and Immune Function: Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemist

295

Introduction to the Responsible Conduct  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, that the standards for responsible conduct can vary from field to field, and that in many situations two or more limitations. First, rules generally set minimum standards for behavior rather than strive for the ideal, but there may be situations in which you should strive for a higher standard of conduct. Responsible research

Valero-Cuevas, Francisco

296

Introduction to the Responsible Conduct  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be and is learned in different ways, that the standards for responsible conduct can vary from field to field of research, they have two important limitations. First, rules generally set minimum standards for behavior for a higher standard of conduct. Responsible research requires more than simply following rules. Second, rules

Quirk, Gregory J.

297

Mammalian comparative genomics and epigenomics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The human genome sequence can be thought of as an instruction manual for our species, written and rewritten over more than a billion of years of evolution. Taking a complete inventory of our genome, dissecting its genes ...

Mikkelsen, Tarjei Sigurd, 1978-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Mitochondrial Distribution in Mammalian Cells.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The mitochondrion is an important and essential cell organelle which provides about 90% energy for the organism and plays a number of important roles in (more)

Jiang, Lei

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices Title Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and...

300

Demand Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California Title Demand Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices Title Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices...

302

Search Response Team | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search Response Team | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

303

Process for Transition of Responsibilities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Responsibilities Process for Transition of Responsibilities Process for Transition of Responsibilities (Waste Management Conference 2006) Process for Transition of Responsibilities...

304

Demand Response Research in Spain  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Research in Spain Demand Response Research in Spain Speaker(s): Iñigo Cobelo Date: August 22, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Mary Ann Piette The Spanish power system is becoming increasingly difficult to operate. The peak load grows every year, and the permission to build new transmission and distribution infrastructures is difficult to obtain. In this scenario Demand Response can play an important role, and become a resource that could help network operators. The present deployment of demand response measures is small, but this situation however may change in the short term. The two main Spanish utilities and the transmission network operator are designing research projects in this field. All customer segments are targeted, and the research will lead to pilot installations and tests.

305

Model refinement using transient response  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A method is presented for estimating uncertain or unknown parameters in a mathematical model using measurements of transient response. The method is based on a least squares formulation in which the differences between the model and test-based responses are minimized. An application of the method is presented for a nonlinear structural dynamic system. The method is also applied to a model of the Department of Energy armored tractor trailer. For the subject problem, the transient response was generated by driving the vehicle over a bump of prescribed shape and size. Results from the analysis and inspection of the test data revealed that a linear model of the vehicle`s suspension is not adequate to accurately predict the response caused by the bump.

Dohrmann, C.R.; Carne, T.G.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Thermal Mass and Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Mass and Demand Response Speaker(s): Gregor Henze Phil C. Bomrad Date: November 2, 2011 - 12:00pm Location: 90-4133 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Janie Page The topic of...

307

Automated Demand Response and Commissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conference on Building Commissioning: May 4-6, 2005 Motegi,National Conference on Building Commissioning: May 4-6, 2005Demand Response and Commissioning Mary Ann Piette, David S.

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

12: Market Impacts of Price Responsive Load in PJM and ISO-44 Figure 15: PJM Synchronized Reserve Scheduled MW:particularly those in PJMs service territory, have begun

Heffner, Grayson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Simulating Price Responsive Distributed Resources  

SciTech Connect

Distributed energy resources (DER) include distributed generation, storage, and responsive demand. The integration of DER into the power system control framework is part of the evolutinary advances that allow these resources to actively particpate in the energy balance equation. Price can provide a powerful signal for independent decision-making in distributed control strategies. To study the impact of price responsive DER on the electric power system requires generation and load models that can capture the dynamic coupling between the energy market and the physical operation of the power system in appropriate time frames. This paper presents modeling approaches for simulating electricity market price responsive DER, and introduces a statistical mechanics approach to modeling the aggregated response of a transformed electric system of pervasive, transacting DER.

Lu, Ning; Chassin, David P.; Widergren, Steven E.

2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

310

Radiological Emergency Response Plan (Vermont)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation establishes a radiological emergency response plan fund, into which any entity operating a nuclear reactor or storing nuclear fuel and radioactive waste in this state (referred to...

311

Urgent Care/Emergency Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Urgent CareEmergency Response Jackie Cohran, RN, MSN, CIC, COHN-5, PresidentCEO Infection Control Consultation Services. Inc 301.749.9540 (p) 301.749.9714(1)...

312

Evaluation of concurrent peak responses  

SciTech Connect

This report deals with the problem of combining two or more concurrent responses which are induced by dynamic loads acting on nuclear power plant structures. Specifically, the acceptability of using the square root of the sum of the squares (SRSS) value of peak values as the combined response is investigated. Emphasis is placed on the establishment of a simplified criterion that is convenient and relatively easy to use by design engineers.

Wang, P.C.; Curreri, J.; Reich, M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Expancel Foams: Fabrication and Characterization of a New Reduced Density Cellular Material for Structural Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study was initiated to produce a low-density centering medium for use in experiments investigating the response of materials to shock-loading. While the main drivers for material selection were homogeneity, dimensional stability, performance and cost, other secondary requirements included fine cell size, the ability to manufacture 5--10 cm-sized parts and an extremely compressed development time. The authors chose a non-traditional methodology using a hollow, expandable, polymeric microballoon material system called Expancel{reg_sign}. These microballoons are made from a copolymer of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) and polymethacrylonitrile (PMAN) and use iso-pentane as the blowing agent. The average diameter (by volume) of the unexpanded powder is approximately 13 {micro}m, while the average of the expanded powder is 35--55 {micro}m, with a few large microballoons approaching 150--200 p.m. A processing method was developed that established a pre-mixed combination of unexpanded and expanded Expancel at a ratio such that the tap (or vibration) density of the mixed powders was the same as that desired of the final part. Upon heating above the tack temperature of the polymer, this zero-rise approach allowed only expansion of the unexpanded powder to fill the interstices between the pre-expanded balloons. The mechanical action of the expanding powder combined with the elevated processing temperature yielded flee-standing and mechanically robust parts. Although mechanical properties of these foams were not a key performance requirement, the data allowed for the determination of the best temperature to heat the samples. Processing the foam at higher temperatures enhanced both modulus and strength. The maximum allowable temperature was limited by dimensional stability and shrinkback considerations. Tomographic analysis of foam billets revealed very flat density profiles. Parts of any density between the low density expanded powder (approximately 0.013 g/cm{sup 3}) and the higher density unexpanded powder (approximately 0.5 g/cm{sup 3}) can be produced using this technique. The extremely wide range of accessible densities, ease of processing, relatively inexpensive materials, uniformity of the density, scaleable nature of the process should make this technology highly competitive for a variety of Defense Programs and commercial applications.

L. Whinnery; S. Goods; B. Even

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Standardized Automated Demand Response Signals. Presented atand Automated Demand Response in Industrial RefrigeratedActions for Industrial Demand Response in California. LBNL-

Mares, K.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Open Automated Demand Response Communications in Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. Barat, D. Watson. 2006 Demand Response Spinning ReserveKueck, and B. Kirby 2008. Demand Response Spinning ReserveReport 2009. Open Automated Demand Response Communications

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Distributive Subband Allocation, Power and Rate Control for Relay-Assisted OFDMA Cellular System with Imperfect System State Knowledge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we consider distributive subband, power and rate allocation for a two-hop transmission in an orthogonal frequency-division multiple-access (OFDMA) cellular system with fixed relays which operate in decode-and-forward strategy. We take into account of system fairness by considering weighted sum goodput as our optimization objective. Based on the cluster-based architecture, we obtain a fast-converging distributive solution with only local imperfect CSIT by using decomposition of the optimization problem. To further reduce the signaling overhead and computational complexity, we propose a reduced feedback distributive solution, which can achieve asymptotically optimal performance for large number of users with arbitrarily small feedback overhead per user. We also derive asymptotic average system throughput for the relay-assisted OFDMA system so as to obtain useful design insights.

Cui, Ying; Wang, Rui

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Appendix C - Comments and Responses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

C C COMMENTS AND RESPONSES This appendix contains the comments that were received during the 30-day public comment period on the draft EA (March 22 through April 22, 2002) and their responses. Comments were obtained during the public meeting held in Carlsbad, New Mexico, on April 16, 2002, as well as from letters and electronic mail messages. The comment entries are organized according to comment categories. In compliance with the provisions of the National Environmental Policy Act and Council on Environmental Quality regulations, public comments on the draft EA were assessed individually and collectively. Some comments resulted in changes or modifications that have been incorporated into the final EA. Comments not requiring modifications to the EA resulted in a response to correct the

318

Rapid Relief: A Prefabricated Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As illustrated by the aftermath of disasters such as Hurricanes Katrina, Ike and Sandy, the disaster response phases do not entail an effective or standard procedure for rebuilding damaged and destroyed residences. I propose the implementation of prefabricated construction techniques with the utilization of Building Information Modeling (BIM) technology into the rebuild phase that would proceed throughout the entire duration of disaster recovery, starting with the immediate respondents. My research provides a variation of sample projects ranging from previous buildings erected in response to a hurricane to prefabricated projects that are able to be assembled rather than constructed. With these projects, I am able to analyze their construction methods in order to determine an adequate proposal for disaster reconstruction. My belief is that a standardized procedure would allow for an expedited response time, a structured addressing of the needs of the affected residents, and a sufficient start to the reconstruction of the victims futures.

Gohmert, Brent Cole

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

AUTORADIOGRAPHIC STUDIES ON THE IMMUNE RESPONSE I. ~ KINETICS OF PLASMA CELL PROLIFERATION*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the early experiments of Fagraeus (1), the role of plasma cells in antibody formation has been extensively studied and reviewed (2-7). Plasma cells have been found to contain (8-15) and produce (16-23) antibody, and apparently are the chief mediators of a humoral immune response. After the second injection of an antigen, far more plasma cells appear than after the first; this appears to be the main reason for the characteristic booster serum antibody response (18). Burnet and Fenner (2) first suggested that the secondary response might represent the proliferation of cells specifically altered by the primary immunization. Since the development of the clonal selection theory of acquired immunity (6, 24--27), there has been renewed interest in the nature of the plasma cell ancestor, the carrier of specific immunological memory. The present experiments have used autoradiographic labeling techniques to study this question. They are predicated on the uptake of tritiated (H*-) thymidine as an index of desoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) synthesis (28-30), and the validity of our conclusions depends on a number of premises which are widely held, but still the subject of active discussion (31-33). The premises most directly relevant to our experiments are: (a) the tritium label on thymidine is stable and does not exchange; nor does thymine base exchange after incorporation into DNA; (b) DNA itself is metabolically stable and turnover is insignificant in resting mammalian cells; (c) HS-thymidine injected intravenously is rapidly distributed throughout the body, and either promptly incorporated into DNA or eliminated; (d) thymidine or H3-thymidine does not affect the normal behavior of the cells that have taken it up. This last premise has recently been challenged (34).

J Ph. D; O. Makela

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Louisiana Tech University EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/or Residential Life, whichever appropriate, after a disaster. #12;Emergency Response Plan for Students 4 CriticalLouisiana Tech University Part III EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN FOR STUDENTS JANUARY, 2013 #12;Emergency Response Plan for Students 2 SECTION I. INTRODUCTION

Selmic, Sandra

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

United States Geological Survey Geospatial Information Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

requirements, capabilities, and operations in response to a natural or man-made disaster1 United States Geological Survey Geospatial Information Response Information Response Team (GIRT) Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) contains the GIRT

Fleskes, Joe

322

Effects of chloroquine and hepatic stimulator substance on cellular accumulation and nuclear binding of sup 125 I-epidermal growth factor in primary culture of adult rat hepatocytes  

SciTech Connect

The effects of chloroquine and hepatic stimulator substance (HSS) on cellular accumulation and nuclear binding of {sup 125}I-epidermal growth factor (EGF) were examined in primary culture of adult rat hepatocytes. When intact hepatocytes were incubated at 37{degrees}C with {sup 125}I-EGF, the cellular accumulation and the nuclear binding reached a peak at 1 h and declined thereafter, where the nuclear binding was 2.49% at 1 h and 2.53% at 2 h. Chloroquine resulted in a time-dependent increase in the cellular accumulation and the nuclear binding was 3.37% at 1 h and 3.72% at 2 h. In contrast, HSS produced no change in each value, suggesting that HSS does not modulate EGF receptors in plasma membrane and nucleus.

Murawaki, Y.; Storkenmaier, R.; Fleig, W.E.; Hahn, E.G. (Tottori Univ. School of Medicine, Yonago (Japan))

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Wireless Demand Response Controls for HVAC Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Response Controls for HVAC Systems Clifford Federspiel,tests. Figure 5: Specific HVAC electric power consumptioncontrol, demand response, HVAC, wireless Executive Summary

Federspiel, Clifford

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool (DRQAT)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool (DRQAT) The opportunities for demand reduction and cost saving with building demand responsive control vary tremendously with building type...

325

Powerchoice Residential Customer Response to TOU Rates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Woods, Linda Dethman, and Rick Kunkle Institution Research Into Action Keywords behavior, demand response and distributed energy resources center, demand response research center...

326

Demand Response as a System Reliability Resource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response as a System Reliability Resource Title Demand Response as a System Reliability Resource Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2012 Authors Eto, Joseph H.,...

327

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California Long-term Energy Efficiency Strategic Plan. B-2 Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response> B-4 Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

al: Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand ResponseConference on Building Commissioning: April 22 24, 2008al: Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response

Kiliccote, Sila; Global Energy Partners; Pacific Gas and Electric Company

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Responsive design in Windows 8 applications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Responsive design is a common expression at the web today. This thesis was about learning about responsive web design in order to apply it (more)

Klockare, Sofi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

NETL: Emergency Response and Communications Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emergency Response NewsRoom Welcome to the NETL Emergency Response and Communications Page This is NETL's public website for emergency preparedness. Click here to go directly to...

331

ORISE: REAC/TS Emergency Response Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emergency Response Services Emergency Response Services The Radiation Emergency Assistance CenterTraining Site (REACTS) at the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education...

332

Radioactive Materials Transportation and Incident Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FEMA 358, 0510 Q A RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program U.S. Department of Energy TRANSPORTATION AND INCIDENT RESPONSE Q&A About Incident Response Q...

333

Pantex Plant Emergency Response Exercise  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance November 2000 Independent Oversight Evaluation of the Pantex Plant Emergency Response Exercise OVERSIGHT Table of Contents 1.0 INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................... 1 2.0 RESULTS ................................................................................................... 4 2.1 Positive Program Attributes ............................................................... 4 2.2 Weaknesses and Items Requiring Attention ..................................... 5 3.0 CONCLUSIONS ........................................................................................ 9 4.0 RATING .................................................................................................... 10

334

Priority Assignment in Emergency Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the aftermath of mass-casualty events, key resources (such as ambulances and operating rooms) can be overwhelmed by the sudden jump in patient demand. To ration these resources, patients are assigned different priority levels, a process that is called ... Keywords: dynamic programming, emergency response, stochastic orders, stochastic scheduling, triage

Evin Uzun Jacobson; Nilay Tan?k Argon; Serhan Ziya

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Interdependency modeling and emergency response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In large-scale disaster events, infrastructure owners are faced with many challenges in deciding the allocation ofresources for preparation and response actions. This decision process involves building situation awareness, evaluating course of action, ... Keywords: critical infrastructure, discrete event simulation, infrastructure interdependency analysis

Donald D. Dudenhoeffer; May R. Permann; Steven Woolsey; Robert Timpany; Chuck Miller; Anthony McDermott; Milos Manic

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Thermostat response and room temperature control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article examines the impact to thermal comfort of the operation of the room thermostat. The topics of the article include types of thermostat response, reset response, proportional response, digital systems, system response, verification of building temperatures, thermal comfort analysis, and productivity costs of implementing mandated setpoints.

Int-Hout, D. (Carrier Corp., Syracuse, NY (United States))

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Information Products Laboratory for Emergency Response (IPLER)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technology and Information Products for Emergency Response #12;2 IPLER Problem Statement · Disaster response #12;9 NSF Rapid, Google Studies · NSF RAPID: Automated Target Detection Tool for Disaster Response Support Technologies for Environmental Forecasting and Disaster Response" o Supports the national need

Zanibbi, Richard

338

Optimizing the Transportation System's Response Capabilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Capabilities 2 Abstract For the purposes of post-disaster response and recovery we view the transportation cooperation among evacuation vehicles. Keywords: Post-disaster response, controlled evacuation, transportation the Transportation System's Response Capabilities 1 Introduction For the purposes of a post-disaster response

Paschalidis, Ioannis "Yannis"

339

National Action Plan on Demand Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Action Plan on Demand National Action Plan on Demand Action Plan on Demand National Action Plan on Demand Response Response Federal Utilities Partnership Working Group Federal Utilities Partnership Working Group November 18, 2008 November 18, 2008 Daniel Gore Daniel Gore Office of Energy Market Regulation Office of Energy Market Regulation Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Federal Energy Regulatory Commission The author's views do not necessarily represent the views of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Presentation Contents Presentation Contents Statutory Requirements Statutory Requirements National Assessment [Study] of Demand Response National Assessment [Study] of Demand Response National Action Plan on Demand Response National Action Plan on Demand Response General Discussion on Demand Response and Energy Outlook

340

Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Predictive Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on AddThis.com...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Condition responsive battery charging circuit  

SciTech Connect

A battery charging circuit includes a ferroresonant transformer having a rectified output for providing a constant output voltage to be supplied to a battery to be charged. Battery temperature is sensed providing an input to a control circuit which operates a shunt regulator associated with the ferroresonant transformer to provide battery charge voltage as a function of battery temperature. In response to a high battery temperature the controller functions to lower the output voltage to the battery, and in response to a low battery temperature, operates to provide a higher output voltage, with suitable control for any battery temperature between minus 10* and plus 150* fahrenheit. As the battery approaches full charge and battery acceptance current falls below a predetermined level, a charge cycle termination control allows charging to continue for a period preset by the operator, at the end of which period, line voltage is removed from the charger thereby terminating the charge cycle.

Reidenbach, S.G.

1980-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

342

Demand Response and Risk Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For several decades, power companies have deployed various types of demand response (DR), such as interruptible contracts, and there is substantial ongoing research and development on sophisticated mechanisms for triggering DR. In this white paper, EPRI discusses the increasing use of electricity DR in the power industry and how this will affect the practice of energy risk management. This paper outlines 1) characteristics of a common approach to energy risk management, 2) the variety of types of DR impl...

2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

343

Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Demand Response Spinning Reserve project is a pioneeringdemonstration of how existing utility load-management assets can providean important electricity system reliability resource known as spinningreserve. Using aggregated demand-side resources to provide spinningreserve will give grid operators at the California Independent SystemOperator (CAISO) and Southern California Edison (SCE) a powerful, newtool to improve system reliability, prevent rolling blackouts, and lowersystem operating costs.

Eto, Joseph H.; Nelson-Hoffman, Janine; Torres, Carlos; Hirth,Scott; Yinger, Bob; Kueck, John; Kirby, Brendan; Bernier, Clark; Wright,Roger; Barat, A.; Watson, David S.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Emergency response robot evaluation exercise  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More than 60 robot test methods are being developed by a team led by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) with the sponsorship of U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS). These test methods are being specified and standardized ... Keywords: HRI, capability, emergency response, evaluation, human-robot interaction, measure, metrics, mobility, performance, power, radio communications, repetition, robot, sensor, standard, task, test, test method, test suite, trial

Adam Jacoff; Hui-Min Huang; Ann Virts; Anthony Downs; Raymond Sheh

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Cross flow heat exchange of textile cellular metal core sandwich panels , T.J. Lu b,*, H.P. Hodson a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cross flow heat exchange of textile cellular metal core sandwich panels J. Tian a , T.J. Lu b,*, H. Finally, the thermal performance of brazed woven tex- tiles is compared with other heat exchanger media be used as heat exchangers, node rotation precludes their use as structural members. In addition

Wadley, Haydn

346

Investigation of the use of fly-ash based autoclaved cellular concrete blocks in coal mines for air duct work. Final report, January 25, 1993--December 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

Coal mines are required to provide ventilation to occupied portions of underground mines. Concrete block is used in this process to construct air duct walls. However, normal concrete block is heavy and not easy to work with and eventually fails dramatically after being loaded due to mine ceiling convergence and/or floor heave. Autoclaved cellular concrete block made from (70{plus_minus}%) coal fly ash is lightweight and less rigid when loaded. It is lighter and easier to use than regular concrete block for underground mine applications. It has also been used in surface construction around the world for over 40 years. Ohio Edison along with eight other electric utility companies, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and North American Cellular Concrete constructed a mobile demonstration plant to produce autoclaved cellular concrete block from utility fly ash. To apply this research in Ohio, Ohio Edison also worked with the Ohio Coal Development Office and CONSOL Inc. to produce autoclaved cellular concrete block not only from coal ash but also from LIMB ash, SNRB ash, and PFBC ash from various clean coal technology projects sponsored by the Ohio Coal Development Office. The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the potential for beneficial use of fly ash and clean coal technology by-products in the production of lightweight block.

Horvath, M.L. [Ohio Edison Co., Akron, OH (United States)

1995-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

347

Solar mechanics thermal response capabilities.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In many applications, the thermal response of structures exposed to solar heat loads is of interest. Solar mechanics governing equations were developed and integrated with the Calore thermal response code via user subroutines to provide this computational simulation capability. Solar heat loads are estimated based on the latitude and day of the year. Vector algebra is used to determine the solar loading on each face of a finite element model based on its orientation relative to the sun as the earth rotates. Atmospheric attenuation is accounted for as the optical path length varies from sunrise to sunset. Both direct and diffuse components of solar flux are calculated. In addition, shadowing of structures by other structures can be accounted for. User subroutines were also developed to provide convective and radiative boundary conditions for the diurnal variations in air temperature and effective sky temperature. These temperature boundary conditions are based on available local weather data and depend on latitude and day of the year, consistent with the solar mechanics formulation. These user subroutines, coupled with the Calore three-dimensional thermal response code, provide a complete package for addressing complex thermal problems involving solar heating. The governing equations are documented in sufficient detail to facilitate implementation into other heat transfer codes. Suggestions for improvements to the approach are offered.

Dobranich, Dean D.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Automated Demand Response Opportunities in Wastewater Treatment Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure,study of automated demand response in wastewater treatmentopportunities for demand response control strategies in

Thompson, Lisa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Opportunities, Barriers and Actions for Industrial Demand Response in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Techniques for Demand Response, report for theand Reliability Demand Response Programs: Final Report.Demand Response

McKane, Aimee T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Report 2009. Open Automated Demand Response Communicationsand Techniques for Demand Response. California Energyand S. Kiliccote. Estimating Demand Response Load Impacts:

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Cellular differentiation in the anamniota. III. Effects of Actinomycin D and cyanide on the morphogenesis of Fundulus  

SciTech Connect

Fertilized eggs and embryos of Fundulus heteroclitus reared in solutions of Actinomycin D for 24 hr exhibited stikingly different failures of morphogenesis dependent upon the time of initiation of the treatment. While morphogenesis was irreversibly inhibited cellular differentiation occurred. These two areas of development are therefore separable in time. The most severe effects, failure of gastrulation and axiation, occurred when the incubation period began immediately upon fertilization. Failure of cephalogenesis occurred when the incubation period began 1 hr after fertilization. Incubation of later onset (2 hr) led to microcephaly. Incubation beginning at blastulation had no effect on embryogenesis. Preincubation in cyanide until high blastula (stage 9) followed by incubation in Actinomycin D, led to failure of axiation similar in all details to the effect seen with incubation in Actinomycin D which included the first hour after fertilization. The Actinomycin D sensitive period of development therefore is dependent upon aerobic metabolism. A serial order of morphogenetic effects has been demonstrated by these inhibition studies: failure of gastrulation, axiation, cephalogenesis. Incubation of sperm in Actinomycin D prior to fertilization led to a severe mortality but no effect on morphogenesis in the survivors. Incubation of eggs, or eggs and sperm, led to failure of development past the blastula. The implications of these data on the synthesis of morphogenetically meaningful macromolecules is discussed. 27 references, 14 figures.

Wilde, C.H.E. Jr.; Crawford, R.B.

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of integrating demand response and energy efficiencyand D. Kathan (2009), Demand Response in U.S. ElectricityFRAMEWORKS THAT PROMOTE DEMAND RESPONSE 3.1. Demand Response

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Building Energy Software Tools Directory : Demand Response Quick...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool Back to Tool Demand response quick assessment tool screenshot Demand response quick assessment tool screenshot Demand response quick...

354

Cellular Activities and Surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 8, 2012... Tarafder1; William Dernell1; Neal Davies2; Amit Bandyopadhyay1; Susmita Bose1; 1Washington State University; 2University of Manitoba

355

Cellular Materials in Nature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wood and cork have a honeycomb-like structure with cells that are roughly hexagonal ... Influence of Heating of Al2O3 Particle with Holding Time Variation to...

356

Furfuryl alcohol cellular product  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Self-extinguishing rigid foam products are formed by polymerization of furfuryl alcohol in the presence of a lightweight, particulate, filler, zinc chloride and selected catalysts.

Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.

1982-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

357

Response Predicting LTCC Firing Shrinkage: A Response Surface Analysis Study  

SciTech Connect

The Low Temperature Cofired Ceramic (LTCC) technology is used in a variety of applications including military/space electronics, wireless communication, MEMS, medical and automotive electronics. The use of LTCC is growing due to the low cost of investment, short development time, good electrical and mechanical properties, high reliability, and flexibility in design integration (3 dimensional (3D) microstructures with cavities are possible)). The dimensional accuracy of the resulting x/y shrinkage of LTCC substrates is responsible for component assembly problems with the tolerance effect that increases in relation to the substrate size. Response Surface Analysis was used to predict product shrinkage based on specific process inputs (metal loading, layer count, lamination pressure, and tape thickness) with the ultimate goal to optimize manufacturing outputs (NC files, stencils, and screens) in achieving the final product design the first time. Three (3) regression models were developed for the DuPont 951 tape system with DuPont 5734 gold metallization based on green tape thickness.

Girardi, Michael; Barner, Gregg; Lopez, Cristie; Duncan, Brent; Zawicki, Larry

2009-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

358

Search Response Team | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search Response Team | National Nuclear Security Administration Search Response Team | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Search Response Team Home > About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response > Responding to Emergencies > First Responders > Search Response Team Search Response Team Search Response Team logo NNSA's Search Response Team (SRT) is a national

359

Search Response Team | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Search Response Team | National Nuclear Security Administration Search Response Team | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Search Response Team Home > About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response > Responding to Emergencies > First Responders > Search Response Team Search Response Team Search Response Team logo NNSA's Search Response Team (SRT) is a national

360

Heat pipe transient response approximation.  

SciTech Connect

A simple and concise routine that approximates the response of an alkali metal heat pipe to changes in evaporator heat transfer rate is described. This analytically based routine is compared with data from a cylindrical heat pipe with a crescent-annular wick that undergoes gradual (quasi-steady) transitions through the viscous and condenser boundary heat transfer limits. The sonic heat transfer limit can also be incorporated into this routine for heat pipes with more closely coupled condensers. The advantages and obvious limitations of this approach are discussed. For reference, a source code listing for the approximation appears at the end of this paper.

Reid, R. S. (Robert Stowers)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Responsibility-Driven Explanation Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe an approach for developing explanation facilities for cognitive architectures based on techniques drawn from object- and aspect-oriented software engineering. We examine the use of responsibility-driven design augmented with scenario-based techniques and classresponsibility -collaboration (CRC) cards to identify explanation behaviors for cognitive model elements, and discuss the explanation benefits derived from encapsulating model behaviors within aspects. Soar is used an example cognitive architecture, but the methods and results as illustrated would apply to any of the other architectures commonly used to development psychologically plausible intelligent systems.

For Cognitive Models; Steven R. Haynes; Isaac G. Councill; Frank E. Ritter

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Balancing oil and environment... responsibly.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Balancing Oil and EnvironmentResponsibly As the price of oil continues to skyrocket and global oil production nears the brink, pursuing unconventional oil supplies, such as oil shale, oil sands, heavy oils, and oils from biomass and coal has become increasingly attractive. Of particular significance to the American way is that our continent has significant quantities of these resources. Tapping into these new resources, however, requires cutting-edge technologies for identification, production, processing and environmental management. This job needs a super hero or two for a job of this size and proportion

Weimer, Walter C.; Teske, Lisa

2007-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

363

Spinning Reserve from Responsive Load  

SciTech Connect

As power system costs rise and capacity is strained demand response can provide a significant system reliability benefit at a potentially attractive cost. The 162 room Music Road Hotel in Pigeon Forge Tennessee agreed to host a spinning reserve test. The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) supplied real-time metering and monitoring expertise to record total hotel load during both normal operations and testing. Preliminary testing showed that hotel load can be curtailed by 22% to 37% depending on the outdoor temperature and the time of day. The load drop was very rapid, essentially as fast as the 2 second metering could detect.

Kueck, John D [ORNL; Kirby, Brendan J [ORNL; Laughner, T [Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA); Morris, K [Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Investigating the role of intra- and extra-cellular modulators of the transcription factor NF-kappaB  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) family of transcription factors play a pivotal role in the inflammatory and immune responses, as well as cell growth and survival. Since its discovery 25 years ago, NF-kappaB has ...

Nguyen, Hung Nhat

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

The Media Spectacle of Terrorism and Response-Able Literature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A movement in literature has evolved out of the aftermath of 9/11 to confront the spectacle of terrorism perpetuated by the corporate news media and find a way to respond to terrorism in a more ethical manner. In this dissertation, I examine the influence of the media on literary production in the post-9/11 environment and how writers push back against the foreclosure of the media spectacle of terrorism. I examine a particular practice, infotainment, which crosses over from television news into literature that focuses on terrorism, and I lay out the theoretical framework for understanding literary responses to this practice. Since 9/11, the corporate media has been fixated with terrorism, and the vast amount of literature produced since the tragedy that focuses on terrorism demonstrates terrorism?s influence on literary production. I expose a theoretical basis for how literature intervenes in the spectacle of terrorism, offering a challenge to media foreclosure through an ethical engagement. Then, I examine texts in both the American and global contexts to determine how they intervene in the foreclosure and form more ethical responses. Writers like Don DeLillo and Moshin Hamid confront the unified definition of terrorism the corporate media presents by opening the subject to unanswered questions and in-depth examinations from all angles that enable responses rather than close off diverse perspectives. Literary writers strive to respond to the singular nature of each event, while positing an understanding of the plight of victims and perpetrators alike. The texts I examine each engage the foreclosure of the media spectacle of terrorism, creating a critical discourse by opening gaps, imposing ethical hesitation, reinstituting singularity, and responding to terrorism in an ethical manner. Don DeLillo posits an exemplary challenge to writers issued by terrorism in an often quoted line from Mao II: ?What terrorists gain, novelists lose. The degree to which they influence mass consciousness is the extent of our decline as shapers of sensibility and thought.? DeLillo, along with other contemporary writers, takes up this challenge in order to ethically respond to the spectacle of terrorism.

Cockley, David

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While there is general agreement that demand response (DR) is a valued component in a utility resource plan, there is a lack of consensus regarding how to value DR. Establishing the value of DR is a prerequisite to determining how much and what types of DR should be implemented, to which customers DR should be targeted, and a key determinant that drives the development of economically viable DR consumer technology. Most approaches for quantifying the value of DR focus on changes in utility system revenue requirements based on resource plans with and without DR. This ''utility centric'' approach does not assign any value to DR impacts that lower energy and capacity prices, improve reliability, lower system and network operating costs, produce better air quality, and provide improved customer choice and control. Proper valuation of these benefits requires a different basis for monetization. The review concludes that no single methodology today adequately captures the wide range of benefits and value potentially attributed to DR. To provide a more comprehensive valuation approach, current methods such as the Standard Practice Method (SPM) will most likely have to be supplemented with one or more alternative benefit-valuation approaches. This report provides an updated perspective on the DR valuation framework. It includes an introduction and four chapters that address the key elements of demand response valuation, a comprehensive literature review, and specific research recommendations.

Heffner, Grayson

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

The use of a simple cellular automata model as a testbed for kinetic theories of vehicular traffic flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The broad objective of this thesis is to explore the potential for the use of Cellular Automata (CA) models to provide a testbed for comparison of different kinetic models of vehicular traffic. We intend to develop a quantitative technique for comparing various kinetic equations that model a given CA-based microscopic model of vehicular traffic. We also plan to apply this technique to two instances of kinetic models, which are differentiated only by their assumptions regarding inter-vehicular correlation and are intended to statistically predict the behavior of ensembles of instances of the underlying CA. We apply different versions of the L? norm as a metric to compare two kinetic models within two scenarios that are representative of typical vehicular traffic problems. The kinetic models are both derived from the same simple CA traffic model, known as CA-184-CC, but they are based on different models of vehicle correlation: the modified vehicular chaos model; and the Nelson and Raney model, an ad-hoc model developed in an earlier paper by P. Nelson and the author. The traffic scenarios are "near-jam," in which a large traffic jam has a high probability of occurring in a particular location; and "pseudo-free-flow," in which vehicles have a high probability of being spaced out from one another enough to allow driving at the maximum desired speed. Results show that the L[distribution][superscript]???[w][subscript] norm produces slightly smaller values for the near-jam scenario and significantly smaller values for the pseudo-free-flow scenario. Also, the L[distribution][superscript]???[w][subscript] norm comparing the CA model to the modified vehicular chaos correlation model is smaller than that of the CA to the Nelson and Raney ad-hoc correlation model, indicating that the modified vehicular chaos model is a better fit to the ensembled CA model.

Raney, Bryan Keith

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Demand Response - Policy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

over the last 11 years when interest in demand response increased. Demand response is an electricity tariff or program established to motivate changes in electric use by end-use...

369

EMERGENCY RESPONSE ORGANIZATION TRAINING PROGRAM DESCRIPTION  

SciTech Connect

This document establishes requirements for Emergency Response Organization Training. This program description applies to all Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) contractor and subcontractor employees who are identified to fulfill Hanford Site Emergency Response Organization (ERO) positions.

MITCHELL, L.J.

2001-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

370

Adaptive Responses to Low Dose/Low Dose-Rate γ-Rays in Normal Human Fibroblasts:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Responses to Low Dose/Low Dose-Rate γ-Rays in Normal Human Fibroblasts: Responses to Low Dose/Low Dose-Rate γ-Rays in Normal Human Fibroblasts: The Role of Oxidative Metabolism Edouard I. Azzam 1 , Sonia M. de Toledo 1 , Badri N. Pandey 1 , Perumal Venkatachalam 1 , Manuela Buoannano 1 , Zhi Yang 1 , Ling Li 3 , Donna M. Gordon 2 , Roger W. Howell 1 , Debkumar Pain 2 and Douglas R. Spitz 3 1 Department of Radiology, 2 Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, UMDNJ-New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ 3 Free Radical and Radiation Biology Program, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA To investigate low dose/low dose-rate effects of low linear energy transfer ionizing radiation, we used γ-irradiated cells adapted to grow in three-dimensional architecture that mimics cell growth in vivo. We determined cellular, molecular and biochemical changes in these

371

Thermal Response Testing for Geothermal Heat Exchangers ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal Response Testing for Geothermal Heat Exchangers Begins. The Net-Zero house features a geothermal heat pump ...

2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

372

Records Management POC Responsibilities | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RespbsforHQPOCSREDESIGN.pdf More Documents & Publications POINT OF CONTACT RESPONSIBILITIES FOR RECORDS MANAGEMENT Records Management Handbook Records Management Handbook...

373

Search Response Team | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

374

Accident Response Group | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

375

NNSA conducts radiological response training in Kazakhstan |...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform...

376

NNSA Conducts Radiological Response Training in Kazakhstan |...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Radiological Response Training in Kazakhstan | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy...

377

NNSA Conducts International Radiological Response Training in...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

International Radiological Response Training in Vienna | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear...

378

Quantitative Response Measurement of Cell Substrate ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quantitative Response Measurement of Cell Substrate Interactions via RT-PCR. Matthew L. Becker, 1 LeeAnn O. Bailey ...

379

THE UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 THE UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN Revised January 2013 1 #12;Contents: Main Section: 1) Creates Emergency Response Organization 2) Establishes Principles to Guide Response Efforts Utility Disaster Plan Appendix F: p 25 Pandemic Influenza Action Plan Appendix I: p 32 Useful Contact

Oklahoma, University of

380

Middleware Support for Disaster Response Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Middleware Support for Disaster Response Infrastructure Jun Suzuki and Tatsuya Suda jsuzuki established in a disaster area to evacuate victims and aid emergency response crews. · Various devises participate in the disaster ad-hoc nets. ­ Victims carry their own devices. ­ Emergency response crews carry

Suzuki, Jun

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Emergency Response, Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emergency Response, Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery at UCAR Presented by Stephen Sadler the "university" system ·Open Campus ·Public Access-Mesa Lab #12;Emergency Response, Disaster Recovery Issues Response ·Install backup power #12;Curtailed Public Access if Necessary (3 times since 2000

382

EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN DEVINE TEST SITE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HSE MANUAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN DEVINE TEST SITE EXPLORATION GEOPHYSICS LAB FIELD SITE MEDINA THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN 1 #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS MEMORANDUM PAGE 3 MEDICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANS PAGE LIST OF CONTACTS ­ SITE MANAGERS AND EMERGENCY RESPONSE PAGE 20 CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION PAGE 21 2 #12

Texas at Austin, University of

383

Response (3/3/2010)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March: 3 March: 3 , 2010 Mr. James A. Ajello, Chair ~nviro-ental Management Advisory Board C/O Hawaiian Electric Industries, Inc. P.O. BO; 730 Honolulu, Hawaii 96808-0730 Dear Mr. Ajello: Thank you for your October 20,2009, letter and recommendations contained in the Envikonmental Management Advisory Board (EMAB) September 30,2009, Reports and Recommendations. I highly value EMAB's guidance and believe that the Office of Environmental Management (EM) will benefit from the Board's insight. I have asked Mr. Timothy Harms, Director, Office of Management Systems and Analysis, to ensure that they are implemented, as appropriate, in support of our program goals and mission. The Office of Management Systems and Analysis is responsible for assuring that recommendations by groups such as the National

384

Systems biology analysis of Zymomonas mobilis ZM4 ethanol stress responses  

SciTech Connect

Zymomonas mobilis ZM4 is a capable ethanogenic bacterium with high ethanol productivity and high level of ethanol tolerance. Previous studies indicated that several stress-related proteins and changes in the ZM4 membrane lipid composition may contribute to ethanol tolerance. However, the molecular mechanisms of ethanol stress response have not been elucidated fully. In this study, ethanol stress responses were investigated using systems biology tools. Medium supplementation with an initial 47.3 g/L (6% v/v) ethanol reduced Z. mobilis ZM4 glucose consumption, growth rate and ethanol productivity compared to that of untreated controls. Metabolomic profiling showed that ethanol-treated ZM4 cells accumulated greater amounts of glycerol during the entire fermentation process, which may indicate an important role for this metabolite. A proteomic analysis of early exponential growth identified about one thousand proteins, or approximately 56% of the predicted ZM4 proteome. Proteins related to metabolism and stress response such as chaperones and key regulators were more abundant in the early ethanol stress condition. Transcriptomic studies indicated the response of ZM4 to ethanol is dynamic, complex and involves many genes from all the different functional categories. There were fewer genes significantly differentially expressed in the exponential phase compared to that of stationary phase and early stationary phase. Most down-regulated genes were related to translation and ribosome biogenesis, while the ethanol-upregulated genes were mostly related to cellular processes and metabolism. Correlations among the transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolism were examined and among significantly expressed genes or proteins, we observe higher correlation coefficients when fold-change values are higher. This systems biology study elucidates key Z. mobilis ZM4 metabolites, genes and proteins that form the foundation of its distinctive physiology and its multifaceted response to ethanol stress.

Yang, Shihui [ORNL; Pan, Chongle [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B [ORNL; Engle, Nancy L [ORNL; Zhou, Wen [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Dam, Phuongan [ORNL; Xu, Ying [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Dice, Lezlee T [ORNL; Davison, Brian H [ORNL; Brown, Steven D [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

The human ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Cdc34 controls cellular proliferation through regulation of p27{sup Kip1} protein levels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ubiquitin-mediated degradation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27{sup Kip1} was shown to be required for the activation of key cyclin-dependent kinases, thereby triggering the onset of DNA replication and cell cycle progression. Although the SCF{sup Skp2} ubiquitin ligase has been reported to mediate p27{sup Kip1} degradation, the nature of the human ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme involved in this process has not yet been determined at the cellular level. Here, we show that antisense oligonucleotides targeting the human ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Cdc34 downregulate its expression, inhibit the degradation of p27{sup Kip1}, and prevent cellular proliferation. Elevation of p27{sup Kip1} protein level is found to be the sole requirement for the inhibition of cellular proliferation induced upon downregulation of Cdc34. Indeed, reducing the expression of p27{sup Kip1} with a specific antisense oligonucleotide is sufficient to reverse the anti-proliferative phenotype elicited by the Cdc34 antisense. Furthermore, downregulation of Cdc34 is found to specifically increase the abundance of the SCF{sup Skp2} ubiquitin ligase substrate p27{sup Kip1}, but has no concomitant effect on the level of IkB{alpha} and {beta}-catenin, which are known substrates of a closely related SCF ligase.

Butz, Nicole [Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research, Novartis Pharma AG, Disease Area Oncology, CH-4002 Basel (Switzerland); Ruetz, Stephan [Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research, Novartis Pharma AG, Disease Area Oncology, CH-4002 Basel (Switzerland); Natt, Francois [Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research, Novartis Pharma AG, Functional Genomics Area, 4002 Basel (Switzerland); Hall, Jonathan [Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research, Novartis Pharma AG, Functional Genomics Area, 4002 Basel (Switzerland); Weiler, Jan [Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research, Novartis Pharma AG, Functional Genomics Area, 4002 Basel (Switzerland); Mestan, Juergen [Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research, Novartis Pharma AG, Disease Area Oncology, CH-4002 Basel (Switzerland); Ducarre, Monique [Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research, Novartis Pharma AG, Disease Area Oncology, CH-4002 Basel (Switzerland); Grossenbacher, Rita [Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research, Novartis Pharma AG, Disease Area Oncology, CH-4002 Basel (Switzerland); Hauser, Patrick [Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research, Novartis Pharma AG, Disease Area Oncology, CH-4002 Basel (Switzerland); Kempf, Dominique [Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research, Novartis Pharma AG, Disease Area Oncology, CH-4002 Basel (Switzerland); Hofmann, Francesco [Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research, Novartis Pharma AG, Disease Area Oncology, CH-4002 Basel (Switzerland)]. E-mail: francesco.hofmann@pharma.novartis.com

2005-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

386

Regulation of mTOR complex 1 in response to growth factors and nutrients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In multicellular organisms, cells ensure the simultaneous availability of growth factors and nutrients before they invest in cellular processes that lead to growth. The TOR kinase is a master regulator of cellular growth ...

Sancak, Yasemin S. (Yasemin Shechner)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Measurement and Verification for Demand Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Measurement and Verification for Measurement and Verification for Demand Response Prepared for the National Forum on the National Action Plan on Demand Response: Measurement and Verification Working Group AUTHORS: Miriam L. Goldberg & G. Kennedy Agnew-DNV KEMA Energy and Sustainability National Forum of the National Action Plan on Demand Response Measurement and Verification for Demand Response was developed to fulfill part of the Implementation Proposal for The National Action Plan on Demand Response, a report to Congress jointly issued by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) in June 2011. Part of that implementation proposal called for a "National Forum" on demand response to be conducted by DOE and FERC. Given that demand response has matured, DOE and FERC decided that a "virtual" project

388

Induction of potent local cellular immunity with low dose X4 SHIV{sub SF33A} vaginal exposure  

SciTech Connect

Intravaginal inoculation of rhesus macaques with varying doses of the CXCR4 (X4)-tropic SHIV{sub SF33A} isolate revealed a threshold inoculum for establishment of systemic virus infection and a dose dependency in overall viral burden and CD4+ T cell depletion. While exposure to inoculum size of 1000 or greater 50% tissue infectious dose (TCID{sub 50}) resulted in high viremia and precipitous CD4+ T cell loss, occult infection was observed in seven of eight macaques exposed to 500 TCID{sub 50} of the same virus. The latter was characterized by intermittent detection of low level virus with no evidence of seroconversion or CD4+ T cell decline, but with signs of an ongoing antiviral T cell immune response. Upon vaginal re-challenge with the same limiting dose 11-12 weeks after the first, classic pathogenic X4 SHIV{sub SF33A} infection was established in four of the seven previously exposed seronegative macaques, implying enhanced susceptibility to systemic infection with prior exposure. Pre-existing peripheral SIV gag-specific CD4+ T cells were more readily demonstrable in macaques that became systemically infected following re-exposure than those that were not. In contrast, early presence of circulating polyfunctional cytokine secreting CD8+ T cells or strong virus-specific proliferative responses in draining lymph nodes and in the gut associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) following the first exposure was associated with protection from systemic re-infection. These studies identify the gut and lymphoid tissues proximal to the genital tract as sites of robust CD8 T lymphocyte responses that contribute to containment of virus spread following vaginal transmission.

Tasca, Silvana; Tsai, Lily; Trunova, Nataliya; Gettie, Agegnehu [Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Center, Rockefeller University, 455 First Ave., 7th Floor, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Saifuddin, Mohammed [CONRAD, Eastern Virginia Medical School, 1611 North Kent Street Suite 806, Arlington, VA 22209 (United States); Bohm, Rudolf [Tulane National Primate Research Center, Tulane University Medical Center, 18702 Three Rivers Road, Covington, LA 70433 (United States); Chakrabarti, Lisa [Institut Pasteur, Unite d'Immunologie Virale, 28 rue du Dr roux, 75724 Paris Cedex 15 (France); Cheng-Mayer, Cecilia [Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Center, Rockefeller University, 455 First Ave., 7th Floor, New York, NY 10016 (United States)], E-mail: cmayer@adarc.org

2007-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

389

Sunlight Responsive Thermochromic Window System  

SciTech Connect

Pleotint has embarked on a novel approach with our Sunlight Responsive Thermochromic, SRT, windows. We are integrating dynamic sunlight control, high insulation values and low solar heat gain together in a high performance window. The Pleotint SRT window is dynamic because it reversibly changes light transmission based on thermochromics activated directly by the heating effect of sunlight. We can achieve a window package with low solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC), a low U value and high insulation. At the same time our windows provide good daylighting. Our innovative window design offers architects and building designers the opportunity to choose their desired energy performance, excellent sound reduction, external pane can be self-cleaning, or a resistance to wind load, blasts, bullets or hurricanes. SRT windows would provide energy savings that are estimated at up to 30% over traditional window systems. Glass fabricators will be able to use existing equipment to make the SRT window while adding value and flexibility to the basic design. Glazing installers will have the ability to fit the windows with traditional methods without wires, power supplies and controllers. SRT windows can be retrofit into existing buildings,

Millett, F,A; Byker,H, J

2006-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

390

Riverland expedited response action proposal  

SciTech Connect

The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) recommended that the US Department of Energy (DOE) prepare an expedited response action (ERA) for the Riverland Railroad Car Wash Pit and the 600 Area Army Munitions Burial Site. A non-time-critical ERA proposal includes preparation of an engineering evaluation/cost analysis (EE/CA) section. The EE/CA is a rapid, focused evaluation of available technologies using specific screening factors to assess feasibility, appropriateness, and cost. The ERA proposal will undergo reviews by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), DOE, EPA, Ecology, and the public. Ecology and EPA will issue an Action Agreement Memorandum after resolution of all review comments. The, memorandum will authorize remediation activities. The ERA goal is to reduce the potential for any contaminant migration to the soil column, groundwater, and Columbia River. The ERA may be the final remediation of the 100-IU-1 Operable Unit. A No Action Record of Decision may be issued after cleanup completion.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Tracking Living Cells as They Differentiate in Real Time  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at the ALS, developed a new technique for monitoring protein phosphorylation inside living mammalian cells, enabling them to follow cellular chemical changes in real time,...

392

Open Access  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Genome-wide identification of functionally distinct subsets of cellular mRNAs associated with two nucleocytoplasmic-shuttling mammalian splicing factors

Margarida Gama-carvalho; Nuno L Barbosa-morais; Er S Brodsky; Pamela A Silver; Maria Carmo-fonseca

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Molecular Characterization of the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Molecular Characterization of the Roles of SOD Genes in Mammalian Molecular Characterization of the Roles of SOD Genes in Mammalian Cellular Response to Low Dose Radiation Authors: Chuan-Yuan Li, Zhanjun Guo, Zhonghui Yang, and Eric Chuang Institutions: Dept of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC Advanced Technology Center, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland Background The potential risks of exposure to low dose radiation are of major concerns to the DOE/OBER Low Dose Radiation Research Program. It has been long recognized that much of the radiation-induced genetic damage to cells are caused by secondary oxidative species. Therefore internal cellular defense systems against oxidative stress play significant roles in countering genetic damage induced by ionizing radiation. The role of the detoxifying

394

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: 2003 Molecular Characterization of the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization of the Roles of SOD Genes in Mammalian Characterization of the Roles of SOD Genes in Mammalian Cellular Response to Low Dose Radiation Authors: Chuan-Yuan Li,1 Eric Chuang2 Institutions: 1Dept of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, 2Advanced Technology Center, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland The potential risks of exposure to low dose radiation are of major concerns to the DOE/OBER Low Dose Radiation Research Program. It has been long recognized that much of the radiation-induced genetic damage to cells are caused by secondary oxidative species. Therefore, internal cellular defense systems against oxidative stress play significant roles in countering genetic damage induced by ionizing radiation. The role of the detoxifying

395

Demand Response For Power System Reliability: FAQ  

SciTech Connect

Demand response is the most underutilized power system reliability resource in North America. Technological advances now make it possible to tap this resource to both reduce costs and improve. Misconceptions concerning response capabilities tend to force loads to provide responses that they are less able to provide and often prohibit them from providing the most valuable reliability services. Fortunately this is beginning to change with some ISOs making more extensive use of load response. This report is structured as a series of short questions and answers that address load response capabilities and power system reliability needs. Its objective is to further the use of responsive load as a bulk power system reliability resource in providing the fastest and most valuable ancillary services.

Kirby, Brendan J [ORNL

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Modeling Fragility in Rapidly Evolving Disaster Response Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multi-Organizational Disaster Response Systems." Pittsburgh,in Rapidly Evolving Disaster Response Systems Louise K.capacity in an actual disaster response system to determine

Comfort, Louise K.; Ko, Kilkon; Zagorecki, Adam

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. | Department...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy....

398

Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reliability Corporation. Demand response data task force:Energy. Benefits of demand response in electricity marketsAssessment of demand response & advanced metering, staff

Cappers, Peter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

PowerChoice Residential Customer Response to TOU Rates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TOU) Pricing and Demand- Response (DR) Programs. Washington,Earle. 2006. Demand Response and Advanced Metering. on Residential Demand Response. May 11. Discussion Paper.

Peters, Jane S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Demand Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Open Automated Demand Response. In Grid Interop Forum.work was sponsored by the Demand Response Research Center (load-management.php. Demand Response Research Center (2009).

Goli, Sasank

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Results and commissioning issues from an automated demand response pilot  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities"Management and Demand Response in Commercial Buildings", L Band Commissioning Issues from an Automated Demand Response.

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, Dave; Sezgen, Osman; Motegi, Naoya

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Open Automated Demand Response for Small Commerical Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ofFullyAutomatedDemand ResponseinLargeFacilities. FullyAutomatedDemandResponseTestsinLargeFacilities. OpenAutomated DemandResponseCommunicationStandards:

Dudley, June Han

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Rates and technologies for mass-market demand response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Roger. 2002. Using Demand Response to Link Wholesale andfor advanced metering, demand response, and dynamic pricing.EPRI. 2001. Managing Demand-Response To Achieve Multiple

Herter, Karen; Levy, Roger; Wilson, John; Rosenfeld, Arthur

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing Technologies and Demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Goodin. 2009. Open Automated Demand Response Communicationsin Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services. InOpen Automated Demand Response Demonstration Project. LBNL-

Ghatikar, Girish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Robinson, Michael, 2008, "Demand Response in Midwest ISOPresentation at MISO Demand Response Working Group Meeting,Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Making the most of Responsive Electricity Customer. Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Making the most of Responsive Electricity Customer. Energy Efficiency and Demand Response: How do we make the most out of using less energy? Making the most of Responsive...

407

Direct versus Facility Centric Load Control for Automated Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure.and Techniques for Demand Response. LBNL Report 59975. Mayand Communications for Demand Response and Energy Efficiency

Piette, Mary Ann

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Linking Continuous Energy Management and Open Automated Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. Barat, D. Watson. Demand Response Spinning ReserveOpen Automated Demand Response Communication Standards:Dynamic Controls for Demand Response in a New Commercial

Piette, Mary Ann

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Scenarios for Consuming Standardized Automated Demand Response Signals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities.Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities.Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure.

Koch, Ed

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Dynamic Pricing, Advanced Metering, and Demand Response in Electricity Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the New England ISO Demand Response Collaborative, a NYSERDACEC Staff. Selected Demand Response Pilots in California:New Principles for Demand Response Planning, Electric Power

Borenstein, Severin; Jaske, Michael; Rosenfeld, Arthur

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reliability signals for demand response GTA HTTPS HVAC IT kWand Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems. and Techniques for Demand Response. California Energy

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Measurement and evaluation techniques for automated demand response demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development for Demand Response Calculation Findings andManagement and Demand Response in Commercial Buildings. of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities.

Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Sezgen, Osman; ten Hope, Laurie

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Open Automated Demand Response Communications Specification (Version 1.0)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Techniques for Demand Response. May 2007. LBNL-59975.tofacilitateautomating demandresponseactionsattheInteroperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure,

Piette, Mary Ann

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Process for Transition of Responsibilities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Process for Transition of Responsibilities Process for Transition of Responsibilities Process for Transition of Responsibilities (Waste Management Conference 2006) Process for...

415

Comprehensive Environmental Cleanup and Responsibility Act (Montana) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Comprehensive Environmental Cleanup and Responsibility Act Comprehensive Environmental Cleanup and Responsibility Act (Montana) Comprehensive Environmental Cleanup and Responsibility Act (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Institutional Fuel Distributor Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Montana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Montana Department of Environmental Quality The Comprehensive Environmental Cleanup and Responsibility Act contains general provisions (sections 705-729), along with the Voluntary Cleanup and Redevelopment Act (sections 730-738) and the Controlled Allocation of

416

Sandia National Laboratories: About Sandia: Environmental Responsibility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Responsibility Responsibility Environmental Management System Pollution Prevention About Environmental Responsibility Environmental responsibility workers at Sandia Long-term management aimed at preserving and enhancing the quality of the environment has evolved at Sandia National Laboratories for more than 50 years. Recycling, establishing community environmental partnerships, incorporating sustainable design in new and renovated facilities, and environmental restoration are all integral parts of Sandia's environmental stewardship. Sandia also partners with the Department of Energy to improve public participation in environmental issues, such as the implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and Long-term Stewardship for environmental restoration. Participation in community organizations and

417

Appendix D Draft Oil Spill Response Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

D D Draft Oil Spill Response Plan U.S. Department of the Interior Minerals Management Service MMS Cape Wind Energy Project January 2009 Final EIS Appendix D Draft Oil Spill Response Plan DRAFT Oil Spill Response Plan CAPE WIND ASSOCIATES, LLC BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS PREPARED FOR Cape Wind Associates, LLC 75 Arlington Street Boston, Massachusetts 02116 PREPARED BY ESS Group, Inc. 401 Wampanoag Trail, Suite 400 East Providence, Rhode Island 02915 Project No. E159-601 December 2005 DRAFT OIL SPILL RESPONSE PLAN Cape Wind Associates, LLC Boston, Massachusetts Prepared For: Cape Wind Associates, LLC 75 Arlington Street Boston, Massachusetts 02116 Prepared By: ESS Group, Inc. 401 Wampanoag Trail, Suite 400

418

NIST, FEMA Strengthen Disaster Response and Research ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... history of successful collaborations following disasters, it is ... of mutual interest in fire, disaster prevention and ... a need for a NIST response to extreme ...

2013-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

419

Capitalize on Existing Assets with Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industrial facilities universally struggle with escalating energy costs. EnerNOC will demonstrate how commercial, industrial, and institutional end-users can capitalize on their existing assetsat no cost and no risk. Demand response, the voluntary reduction of electric demand in response to grid instability, provides financial incentives to participating facilities that agree to conserve energy. With demand response, facilities also receive advance notice of potential blackouts and can proactively protect their equipment and machinery from sudden losses of power. A detailed case study, focusing on a sample industrial customers participation in demand response, will support the presentation.

Collins, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Optimization of Demand Response Through Peak Shaving  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jul 5, 2013 ... Optimization of Demand Response Through Peak Shaving. G. Zakeri(g.zakeri *** at*** auckland.ac.nz) D. Craigie(David.Craigie ***at***...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demonstration Project for Small and Medium Commercial Buildings Title Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project for Small and Medium Commercial Buildings...

422

NOAA's Environmental Response Management Application (ERMA),...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Ethics Health Law Manufacturing Ocean Research Safety States Supply Chain NOAA's Environmental Response Management Application (ERMA), Atlantic Ocean Data Tools Technical...

423

Home Network Technologies and Automating Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

electricity generation capacity to meet unrestrained future demand. To address peak electricity use Demand Response (DR) systems are being proposed to motivate reductions in...

424

Demand response participation in PJM wholesale markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of demand response resource participation in PJM wholesale ancillary service markets which include: Day Ahead Scheduling Reserves, Synchronized Reserves and Regulation.

Peter L. Langbein

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2. Constructing a Forward View of Energy Prices and Interest5 2.1 Energy Price Forwardin response to changing energy prices. The key uncertainties

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3 3.0 Previous Experience with Demand Responsive Lighting11 4.3. Prevalence of Lighting13 4.4. Impact of Title 24 on Lighting

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Calculating the Diffuse Responsivity of Solar Pyranometers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pyranometers are used to measure the global and diffuse components of solar irradiance. One of the methods to calculate the unshade (global) responsivity of a pyranometer is the standard shading method, described in the Annual Book of ASTM Standards, section 14, volume 14.02. In this paper, the standard method is used to calculate the shade (diffuse) responsivity of a pyranometer by accounting for the zenith and azimuth response of the pyranometer. A discussion of the effect of pyranometer offset on the calculated responsivity is also presented.

Reda, I.; Myers, D.

1999-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

428

Investment Returns from Responsible Property Investments: Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investment Returns from Responsible Property Investments: Energy Efficient, Transit-oriented and Urban Regeneration Office Properties in the US from 1998-2008 Secondary menu About...

429

NNSA Conducts International Radiological Response Training in...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our...

430

ORISE: Helping Strengthen Emergency Response Capabilities for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) helps strengthen government agencies' emergency response capabilities through a variety of exercises, from tabletop training to...

431

Institutional Controls in RCRA & CERCLA Response Actions  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Protection Agency Workgroup on Institutional Controls, Offices of General Council and Emergency and Remedial Response, March 1998. "Institutional Controls: What They Are and How...

432

Microsoft Word - RFI_Response.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Concise, High-Level Response to DOE RFI on Smart Grid Policy Santiago Grijalva, Ph.D. Associate Professor Director, Advanced Computational Electricity Systems (ACES) Laboratory...

433

Impaired Transcriptional Response of the Murine Heart to Cigarette Smoke in the Setting of High Fat Diet and Obesity  

SciTech Connect

Smoking and obesity are each well-established risk factors for cardiovascular heart disease, which together impose earlier onset and greater severity of disease. To identify early signaling events in the response of the heart to cigarette smoke exposure within the setting of obesity, we exposed normal weight and high fat diet-induced obese (DIO) C57BL/6 mice to repeated inhaled doses of mainstream (MS) or sidestream (SS) cigarette smoke administered over a two week period, monitoring effects on both cardiac and pulmonary transcriptomes. MS smoke (250 ?g wet total particulate matter (WTPM)/L, 5 h/day) exposures elicited robust cellular and molecular inflammatory responses in the lung with 1466 differentially expressed pulmonary genes (p < 0.01) in normal weight animals and a much-attenuated response (463 genes) in the hearts of the same animals. In contrast, exposures to SS smoke (85 ?g WTPM/L) with a CO concentration equivalent to that of MS smoke (250 CO ppm) induced a weak pulmonary response (328 genes) but an extensive cardiac response (1590 genes). SS smoke and to a lesser extent MS smoke preferentially elicited hypoxia- and stress-responsive genes as well as genes predicting early changes of vascular smooth muscle and endothelium, precursors of cardiovascular disease. The most sensitive smoke-induced cardiac transcriptional changes of normal weight mice were largely absent in DIO mice after smoke exposure, while genes involved in fatty acid utilization were unaffected. At the same time, smoke exposure suppressed multiple proteome maintenance genes induced in the hearts of DIO mice. Together, these results underscore the sensitivity of the heart to SS smoke and reveal adaptive responses in healthy individuals that are absent in the setting of high fat diet and obesity.

Tilton, Susan C.; Karin, Norman J.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Waters, Katrina M.; Mikheev, Vladimir B.; Lee, K. M.; Corley, Richard A.; Pounds, Joel G.; Bigelow, Diana J.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Emergency Response: Creativity and Training  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Every time emergency responders respond to an incident, they enter an ambiguous situation that is an ill-defined problem space. As the responders engage with the incident, they discover, piece by piece, the unique interlocking problems and act quickly to put form and structure onto the potential solution. In order to quickly, effectively, and safely resolve an incident, emergency responders must have depth and breadth of knowledge across responder disciplines and domains. This knowledge is acquired through both formal training courses and informal training in the station house. The ability to quickly assess a situation, accurately identify the elements as they emerge and their significance, then decide on a course of action combining a variety of domains and skill sets speaks to the creative nature of emergency responders. This study uses naturalistic inquiry to explore what it is like to be an emergency responder, describe how creativity manifests itself in a field environment, and discuss what emergency responders want in their training. This study found that being an emergency responder is emotional, exciting, stressful, challenging, full of the unexpected, and rewarding. During an incident, emergency responders are dealing with the complex interactions of various emotions while resolving difficult and often sad situations. Being an emergency responder is synonymous with being a good problem solver; they are also highly emotionally resilient. The process of creativity within an emergency response environment is seen through preparation that is, training. The consistent review and development of skills makes the skills automatic. Responders also cross-train and, often, an individual responder will have expertise in multiple areas. The improvisational skills of emergency responders to events which are often emergent and creative in their own right, demonstrate a depth of creative force through the handling of complex, high-risk situations with persistence, endurance, and determination. Finally, this study found that emergency responders are passionate about their training. They know that what they learn and practice during training evolutions forms the foundation of their professionalism, provides opportunities to learn new skills or hone already established skills, reinforces safety considerations, and will save their lives and the lives of other people.

Bastian, Marcia

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Time-course analysis of the Shewanella amazonensis SB2B proteome in response to sodium chloride shock  

SciTech Connect

Organisms in the genus Shewanella have become models for response to environmental stress. One of the most important environmental stresses is change in osmolarity. In this study, we experimentally determine the response mechanisms of Shewanella amazonensis SB2B during osmotic stress. Osmotic stress in SB2B was induced through exposure to NaCl, and the time-course proteomics response was measured using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Protein trends were qualitatively compared to gene expression trends and to phenotypic characterization. Osmotic stress affects motility, and has also been associated with a change in the membrane fatty acid composition (due to induction of branched chain amino acid degradation pathways); however, we show this is not the case for SB2B. Although proteins and genes involved with branched chain amino acid degradation are induced, fatty acid degradation pathways are not induced and no change in the fatty acid profile occurs in SB2B as a result of osmotic shock. The most extensive response of SB2B over the time course of acclimation to high salt involves an orchestrated sequence of events comprising increased expression of signal transduction associated with motility and restricted cell division and DNA replication. After SB2B has switched to increased branched chain amino acid degradation, motility, and cellular replication proteins return to pre-perturbed levels.

Parnell, John J.; Callister, Stephen J.; Rompato, Giovanni; Nicora, Carrie D.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Williamson, Ashley; Pfrender, Michael E.

2011-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

436

Upper Ocean Response to a Hurricane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The upper ocean response to a moving hurricane is studied using historical air-sea data and a three-dimensional numerical ocean model. Sea surface temperature (SST) response is emphasized. The model has a surface mixed-layer (ML) that entrains ...

James F. Price

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Linear Response of Metals Within TDCDFT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Linear Response of Metals Within TDCDFT Pina Romaniello Theoretical Chemistry, Material Science Results Conclusions #12;extended systems Emac(r, t) = 1 |r| r (Eext (r , t) + Eind (r , t)) dr Pmac(r, t) = - 1 |r| t r j(r , t )dr dt ! Macroscopic field and polarization ! Response to transverse fields

Giraud, Olivier

438

Heat Shock Response Modulators as Therapeutic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heat Shock Response Modulators as Therapeutic Tools for Diseases of Protein Conformation* Published shock tran- scription factor 1 (HSF1), the master stress-inducible regulator, and our current understanding of pharmacologically active small molecule regu- lators of the heat shock response

Morimoto, Richard

439

Your Records Management Responsibilities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » New Employee Orientation » Your Records Management Services » New Employee Orientation » Your Records Management Responsibilities Your Records Management Responsibilities As a DOE federal or contractor employee, you will create or receive official records, and you are responsible for managing those records as part of accomplishing the Department's mission and ensuring compliance with laws and regulations. Records are any recorded information relating to the work of your office -- regardless of who created it or how the information was recorded. "Your Records Management Responsibilities" explains the basic concepts of good records management, and all DOE employees and contractors are encouraged to read this pamphlet. "Your Records Management Responsibilities" < Previous Page New Employee Orientation

440

Dynamic Whitelist Generation for Automated Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Methodology Methodology Results Dynamic Whitelist Generation for Automated Response Chris Strasburg, Josh Adams Ames Laboratory, US DOE cstras@ameslab.gov, jadams@ameslab.gov The Ames Laboratory, US DOE 1 Dynamic Whitelist Generation for Automated Response Introduction Methodology Results Outline 1 Introduction About Ames Laboratory Motivation 2 Methodology Data Classifiers Experiments 3 Results The Ames Laboratory, US DOE 2 Dynamic Whitelist Generation for Automated Response Introduction Methodology Results About Ames Laboratory Motivation Ames Physical Environment The Ames Laboratory, US DOE 3 Dynamic Whitelist Generation for Automated Response Introduction Methodology Results About Ames Laboratory Motivation Ames Network Environment The Ames Laboratory, US DOE 4 Dynamic Whitelist Generation for Automated Response Introduction Methodology Results About Ames

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

National Action Plan on Demand Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

David Kathan, Ph.D David Kathan, Ph.D Federal Energy Regulatory Commission U.S. DOE Electricity Advisory Committee October 29, 2010 Demand Response as Power System Resources The author's views do not necessarily represent the views of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission 2 Demand Response * FERC (Order 719) defines demand response as: - A reduction in the consumption of electric energy by customers from their expected consumption in response to an increase in the price of electric energy or to in incentive payments designed to induce lower consumption of electric energy. * The National Action Plan on Demand Response released by FERC staff broadens this definition to include - Consumer actions that can change any part of the load profile of a utility or region, not just the period of peak usage

442

Neutrino nuclear response and photo nuclear reaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Photo nuclear reactions are shown to be used for studying neutrino/weak nuclear responses involved in astro-neutrino nuclear interactions and double beta decays. Charged current weak responses for ground and excited states are studied by using photo nuclear reactions through isobaric analog states of those states, while neutral current weak responses for excited states are studied by using photo nuclear reactions through the excited states. The weak interaction strengths are studied by measuring the cross sections of the photo nuclear reactions, and the spin and parity of the state are studied by measuring angular correlations of particles emitted from the photo nuclear reactions. Medium-energy polarized photons obtained from laser photons scattered off GeV electrons are very useful. Nuclear responses studied by photo nuclear reactions are used to evaluate neutrino/weak nuclear responses, i.e. nuclear beta and double beta matrix elements and neutrino nuclear interactions, and to verify theoretical calculation...

Ejiri, H; Boswell, M; Young, A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Neutrino nuclear response and photo nuclear reaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Photo nuclear reactions are shown to be used for studying neutrino/weak nuclear responses involved in astro-neutrino nuclear interactions and double beta decays. Charged current weak responses for ground and excited states are studied by using photo nuclear reactions through isobaric analog states of those states, while neutral current weak responses for excited states are studied by using photo nuclear reactions through the excited states. The weak interaction strengths are studied by measuring the cross sections of the photo nuclear reactions, and the spin and parity of the state are studied by measuring angular correlations of particles emitted from the photo nuclear reactions. Medium-energy polarized photons obtained from laser photons scattered off GeV electrons are very useful. Nuclear responses studied by photo nuclear reactions are used to evaluate neutrino/weak nuclear responses, i.e. nuclear beta and double beta matrix elements and neutrino nuclear interactions, and to verify theoretical calculations for them.

H. Ejiri; A. I. Titov; M. Boswell; A. Young

2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

444

POINT OF CONTACT RESPONSIBILITIES FOR RECORDS MANAGEMENT | Department...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OF CONTACT RESPONSIBILITIES FOR RECORDS MANAGEMENT More Documents & Publications Records Management POC Responsibilities Records Management Handbook Records Management Handbook...

445

Model Recovery Procedure for Response to a Radiological Transportation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for Response to a Radiological Transportation Incident Model Recovery Procedure for Response to a Radiological Transportation Incident This Transportation Emergency...

446

RA-PCR, a method for the generation of randomized promoter libraries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this RFC is to provide instructions for the synthesis of promoters in mammalian cells that are active at a desired cellular condition (where a cellular condition is specified by the activity of a set of ...

Velten, Lars

2009-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

447

The development of a fully-integrated immune response model (FIRM) simulator of the immune response through integration of multiple subset models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as differential equation models or agent-based models.Agent-based models or cellular automata models of the immunechallenges remain with agent-based models, including the

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Recovery Act  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Recovery Act (CERCLA) Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Recovery Act (CERCLA) Congress passed the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA, also known as "Superfund") in response to a growing national concern about the release of hazardous substances from abandoned waste sites. Under CERCLA Congress gave the federal government broad authority to regulate hazardous substances, to respond to hazardous substance emergencies, and to develop long-term solutions for the Nation's most serious hazardous waste problems. CERCLA also created a Hazardous Substance Response Trust Fund, supported by an excise tax on feedstock chemicals and petroleum, to pay for cleanup activities at abandoned waste sites. In 1986 CERCLA was reauthorized and amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA). SARA expanded the federal government's response authorities and clarified that federal facilities are subject to the same CERCLA requirements as private industry. The Community Environmental Response Facilitation Act of 1992 amended the CERCLA provisions dealing with federal activities on any real property owned by the government. It requires the federal government to identify those parts of that real property where no hazardous substance had been stored, released, or disposed of.

449

TEPP Training - Modular Emergency Response Radiological Transportation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Waste Management » Packaging and Transportation » Services » Waste Management » Packaging and Transportation » Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program » TEPP Training - Modular Emergency Response Radiological Transportation Training (MERRTT) TEPP Training - Modular Emergency Response Radiological Transportation Training (MERRTT) Once the jurisdiction has completed an evaluation of their plans and procedures, they will need to address any gaps in training. To assist, TEPP has developed the Modular Emergency Response Radiological Transportation Training (MERRTT) program. MERRTT provides fundamental knowledge for responding to transportation incidents involving radiological material and builds on training in existing hazardous materials curricula. MERRTT satisfies the training requirements outlined in the Waste Isolation Pilot

450

RRTT - Rapid Response Team for Transmission  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rapid Response Team- Rapid Response Team- Transmission Exploring the Business Link Opportunity: Transmission & Clean Energy Development in the West TRIBAL LEADER FORUM SERIES February 7, 2012 Laura Smith Morton Department of Energy Laura.morton@hq.doe.gov Nine Agency MOU * Improves uniformity, consistency, and transparency - Establishes the roles and responsibilities of the nine signatory agencies regarding electric transmission infrastructure project applicants * Provides single point of contact for coordinating all federal authorizations required to locate electric transmission facilities on federal land * Establishes DOE (under authority pursuant to section 216(h) of the FPA) as lead agency for coordinating all federal authorizations and related environmental

451

Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Predictive Demand Response Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently conducting research into integrated predictive demand response (IPDR) controllers. The project team will attempt to design an IPDR controller so that it can be used in new or existing buildings or in collections of buildings. In the case of collections of buildings, they may be colocated on a single campus or remotely located as long as they are served by a single utility or independent service operator. Project Description This project seeks to perform the necessary applied research, development, and testing to provide a communications interface using industry standard open protocols and emerging National Institute of Standards and Technology

452

Distributed Intelligent Automated Demand Response (DIADR) Building  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Distributed Intelligent Automated Demand Distributed Intelligent Automated Demand Response (DIADR) Building Management System Distributed Intelligent Automated Demand Response (DIADR) Building Management System The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently conducting research into distributed intelligent-automated demand response (DIADR) building management systems. Project Description This project aims to develop a DIADR building management system with intelligent optimization and control algorithms for demand management, taking into account a multitude of factors affecting cost including: Comfort Heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) Lighting Other building systems Climate Usage and occupancy patterns. The key challenge is to provide the demand response the ability to address more and more complex building systems that include a variety of loads,

453

SCE Responses to Customer Data Questions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SCE Responses to Customer Data Questions SCE Responses to Customer Data Questions 1. Who owns energy consumption data? SCE Response: Customer-specific data gathered or developed by a utility in the course of providing utility services is owned by the utility. Such data is subject to confidentiality and privacy requirements. In California, customers have the right to access their customer- specific information and can authorize third-party access to their information. 2. Who should be entitled to privacy protections relating to energy information? SCE Response: All customers receiving electric service from a utility should be entitled to privacy protections relating to their customer-specific energy information. Furthermore, utilities should not be required to enforce the compliance of customer-authorized third

454

Emergency Response | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response Emergency Response NNSA's Office of Emergency Operations is the United States government's primary capability for radiological and nuclear emergency response and for providing security to the nation from the threat of nuclear terrorism. The Office of Emergency Operations maintains a high level of readiness for protecting and serving the U.S. and its allies through the development, implementation and coordination of programs and systems designed to serve as a last line of defense in the event of a nuclear terrorist incident or other types of radiological accident. This readiness level provides the U.S. government with quickly deployable, dedicated resources capable of responding rapidly and comprehensively to nuclear or radiological incidents

455

NCEP_Demand_Response_Draft_111208.indd  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Council on Electricity Policy: Electric Transmission Series for State Offi National Council on Electricity Policy: Electric Transmission Series for State Offi cials Demand Response and Smart Metering Policy Actions Since the Energy Policy Act of 2005: A Summary for State Offi cials Demand Response and Smart Metering Policy Actions Since the Energy Policy Act of 2005: A Summary for State Offi cials Prepared by the U.S. Demand Response Coordinating Committee for The National Council on Electricity Policy Fall 2008 i National Council on Electricity Policy: Electric Transmission Series for State Offi cials Demand Response and Smart Metering Policy Actions Since the Energy Policy Act of 2005: A Summary for State Offi cials The National Council on Electricity Policy is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The views and opinions expressed herein are strictly those of the

456

Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Number of Customers Enrolled Note: Numbers in parenthesesMW 200 MW N/A Reduction N/A Number of Eligible Customers N/Customer Pricing Tariffs Response Initiatives Entities with DR Activities Number

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Demand response-enabled residential thermostat controls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from the utility. The electricity rates were generated basedat the different electricity rates and the users discomfortrates. Demand response measures have the effect of adding elasticity to the electricity

Chen, Xue; Jang, Jaehwi; Auslander, David; Peffer, Therese; Arens, Edward

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Demand Response Enabled Appliance Development at GE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Enabled Appliance Development at GE Speaker(s): David Najewicz Date: June 12, 2009 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Dave Najewicz of GE Consumer and Appliances will...

459

Automated Demand Response for Critical Peak Pricing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Automated Demand Response for Critical Peak Pricing Speaker(s): Naoya Motegi Date: June 9, 2005 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 California utilities have been exploring the use of...

460

Wireless Demand Response Controls for HVAC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wireless Demand Response Controls for HVAC Speaker(s): Clifford Federspiel Date: June 22, 2006 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3148 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Richard Diamond Peng Xu We...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Centralized and Decentralized Control for Demand Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response has been recognized as an essential element of the smart grid. Frequency response, regulation and contingency reserve functions performed traditionally by generation resources are now starting to involve demand side resources. Additional benefits from demand response include peak reduction and load shifting, which will defer new infrastructure investment and improve generator operation efficiency. Technical approaches designed to realize these functionalities can be categorized into centralized control and decentralized control, depending on where the response decision is made. This paper discusses these two control philosophies and compares their relative advantages and disadvantages in terms of delay time, predictability, complexity, and reliability. A distribution system model with detailed household loads and controls is built to demonstrate the characteristics of the two approaches. The conclusion is that the promptness and reliability of decentralized control should be combined with the predictability and simplicity of centralized control to achieve the best performance of the smart grid.

Lu, Shuai; Samaan, Nader A.; Diao, Ruisheng; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Jin, Chunlian; Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Zhang, Yu; Kirkham, Harold

2011-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

462

Software demonstration: Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Software demonstration: Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool Speaker(s): Peng Xu Date: February 4, 2008 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 The potential for utilizing building thermal...

463

Demand response-enabled residential thermostat controls.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from the utility. The electricity rates were generated basedat the different electricity rates and the users discomfortrates. Demand response measures have the effect of adding elasticity to the electricity

Chen, Xue; Jang, Jaehwi; Auslander, David M.; Peffer, Therese; Arens, Edward A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

SRPO Designation and Responsibilities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Responsibilities.pdf More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word - GRS ReviewOMB White Paper - Real Property Right-sizing and Carbon Reduction August 7 2009 2.docx FRPC...

465

Berkeley's Response to the California Energy Crisis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Berkeley's Response to the California Energy Crisis Speaker(s): Neal De Snoo Date: February 15, 2001 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg 90 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Julie Osborn The...

466

Submitter Responsibilities | Scientific and Technical Information...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Products Submitter Responsibilities Print page Print page Email page Email page AN 241.1 Users AN 241.3 Users DO NOT encrypt or password-protect STI products. Do inform...

467

Forced Stage Response to a Moving Hurricane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The upper ocean's response to three hurricanes [Norbert (1984), Josephine (1984) and Gloria (1985)] is examined using field observations and a numerical ocean model. Our goal is to describe the physical processes that determine the structure and ...

James F. Price; Thomas B. Sanford; George Z. Forristall

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Demand Response Duke Energy is using the name Save-a-Energy Efficiency Division. Duke Energy describes all of itsPresident, and C.E.O. Duke Energy Kateri Callahan President

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Photo-responsive liquid crystal block copolymers/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Photo-responsive liquid crystal polymers (LCP) which contain azobenzene moieties have gained interest for their ability to change properties by merely irradiating them with the correct wavelength of light in the appropriate ...

Petr, Michael Thomas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Land Transport Emergency Response Technology Report  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories was tasked by the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) to provide assistance in developing an emergency response plan for radioactive material transportation activities. Those tasks included compiling radioactive materials (RAM) transportation accident data from the open literature and databases, investigating emergency response plans for radioactive materials transport in the United States, and developing specific recommendations for the JNC' nuclear material transport emergency response plan, based on information gathered during the first two tasks. These recommendations include developing a RAM database, a public transparency Internet website, an emergency response infrastructure designed specifically for transportation needs, and a clear set of directives to provide authority in the case of transportation accidents or incidents involving RAM.

DOTSON, LORI J.; PIERCE, JIM D.

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Response to Electricity Real Time Prices: Short Run and LongOver-the-counter Real-time Prices Thermal Energy Storage viiare being exposed to real-time prices (RTP) in their default

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Your Records Management Responsibilities | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Department of Energy. Your RM Responsibilities Pamphlet 9.2012.pdf More Documents & Publications DOE F 243.1 DOE O 243.1B, Records Management Program Audit Report: DOEIG-0838...

473

Radiological Emergency Response Health and Safety Manual  

SciTech Connect

This manual was created to provide health and safety (H&S) guidance for emergency response operations. The manual is organized in sections that define each aspect of H and S Management for emergency responses. The sections are as follows: Responsibilities; Health Physics; Industrial Hygiene; Safety; Environmental Compliance; Medical; and Record Maintenance. Each section gives guidance on the types of training expected for managers and responders, safety processes and procedures to be followed when performing work, and what is expected of managers and participants. Also included are generic forms that will be used to facilitate or document activities during an emergency response. These ensure consistency in creating useful real-time and archival records and help to prevent the loss or omission of information.

D. R. Bowman

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Enhanced Mechanical Response of Hierarchical Mg Nano ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Enhanced Mechanical Response of Hierarchical Mg ... to the activity of non-basal slip systems and dynamic recovery at high temperature. ... of Nanostructured AZ91D Magnesium Alloy Under Oil-Lubricated Conditions.

475

Advanced Atmospheric Modeling for Emergency Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric transport and diffusion models are an important part of emergency response systems for industrial facilities that have the potential to release significant quantities of toxic or radioactive material into the atmosphere. An advanced ...

Jerome D. Fast; B. Lance O'steen; Robert P. Addis

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Measuring Student Learning With Item Response Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate short-term learning from hints and feedback in a Web-based physics tutoring system. Both the skill of students and the difficulty and discrimination of items were determined by applying item response theory ...

Lee, Young-Jin

477

Radioactive Materials Transportation and Incident Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FEMA 358, 05/10 FEMA 358, 05/10 Q A RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program U.S. Department of Energy TRANSPORTATION AND INCIDENT RESPONSE Q&A About Incident Response Q Q Law Enforcement ____________________________________ Fire ___________________________________________ Medical ____________________________________________ State Radiological Assistance ___________________________ Local Government Official ______________________________ Local Emergency Management Agency ___________________ State Emergency Management Agency ___________________ HAZMAT Team ______________________________________ Water Pollution Control ________________________________ CHEMTEL (Toll-free US & Canada) 1-800-255-3924 _________ CHEMTREC (Toll-free US & Canada) 1-800-424-9300 _______

478

AMI Cyber Security Incident Response Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is intended to be used by system and asset owners to assist in the preparation and response to AMI cyber security incidents. This document was developed by conducting interviews with EPRI members, AMI asset owners, and vendors, regarding practices involved in responding to AMI cyber security incidents and mapping the responses to requirements put forth by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Open Smart Grid (Open-SG) Working ...

2012-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

479

Measuring the capacity impacts of demand response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Critical peak pricing and peak time rebate programs offer benefits by increasing system reliability, and therefore, reducing capacity needs of the electric power system. These benefits, however, decrease substantially as the size of the programs grows relative to the system size. More flexible schemes for deployment of demand response can help address the decreasing returns to scale in capacity value, but more flexible demand response has decreasing returns to scale as well. (author)

Earle, Robert; Kahn, Edward P.; Macan, Edo

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

480

Tri-State Demand Response Framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides the results of a demand response framework development project of Tri-State Generation and Transmission, a wholesale provider to a number of rural electric associations in the Rocky Mountain west. Tri-State has developed an assortment of planned demand response and energy shaping products and services designed to both shave peak and shift consumption to off-peak hours. The applications, networks, and devices that will be needed to support these needs will involve many ...

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mammalian cellular response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Response of Desulfovibrio vulgaris to Alkaline Stress  

SciTech Connect

The response of exponentially growing Desulfovibrio vulgarisHildenborough to pH 10 stress was studied using oligonucleotidemicroarrays and a study set of mutants with genes suggested by microarraydata to be involved in the alkaline stress response deleted. The datashowed that the response of D. vulgaris to increased pH is generallysimilar to that of Escherichia coli but is apparently controlled byunique regulatory circuits since the alternative sigma factors (sigma Sand sigma E) contributing to this stress response in E. coli appear to beabsent in D. vulgaris. Genes previously reported to be up-regulated in E.coli were up-regulated in D. vulgaris; these genes included three ATPasegenes and a tryptophan synthase gene. Transcription of chaperone andprotease genes (encoding ATP-dependent Clp and La proteases and DnaK) wasalso elevated in D. vulgaris. As in E. coli, genes involved in flagellumsynthesis were down-regulated. The transcriptional data also identifiedregulators, distinct from sigma S and sigma E, that are likely part of aD. vulgaris Hildenborough-specific stress response system.Characterization of a study set of mutants with genes implicated inalkaline stress response deleted confirmed that there was protectiveinvolvement of the sodium/proton antiporter NhaC-2, tryptophanase A, andtwo putative regulators/histidine kinases (DVU0331 andDVU2580).

Stolyar, S.; He, Q.; He, Z.; Yang, Z.; Borglin, S.E.; Joyner, D.; Huang, K.; Alm, E.; Hazen, T.C.; Zhou, J.; Wall, J.D.; Arkin, A.P.; Stahl, D.A.

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

482

Multi-functional Bio-synthetic Hybrid Nanostructures for Enhanced Cellular Uptake, Endosomal Escape and Targeted Delivery Toward Diagnostics and Therapeutics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Applications of nanotechnology in medicine, also known as nanomedicine, is a rapidly growing field as it holds great potential in the development of novel therapeutics toward treatment of various diseases. Shell crosslinked knedel-like nanoparticles (SCKs) that are self assembled from amphiphilic block copolymers into polymeric micelles followed by crosslinking selectively throughout the shell domain have been investigated as theranostic agents for the delivery of nucleic acids and incorporation of imaging probes. The main focus of this dissertation is to design and develop unique multifunctional bio-synthetic hybrid nanoparticles that can carry agents for radiolabeling, moieties for inducing stealth properties to minimize protein adsorption in vivo, ligands for site-specific targeting, therapeutic payloads, and are optimized for efficient delivery of cargoes intracellularly and to the target sites toward constructing novel nanoscopic objects for therapy and diagnosis. Alteration of polymeric building blocks of the nanoparticles provides opportunities for precise control over the sizes, shapes, compositions, structures and properties of the nanoparticles. To ensure ideal performance of nanoparticles as theranostic agents, it is critical to ensure high intracellular bioavailability of the therapeutic payload conjugated to nanoparticles. Special efforts were made by employing well-defined multi-step polymerization and polymer modification reactions that involved conjugation of peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) to chain terminus of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) chain grafts such that they were presented at the outermost surface of SCKs. Additionally, chemical modification reactions were performed on the polymer backbone to integrate positive charges onto the shell of the nanoparticles to afford cationic SCKs (cSCKs) for facilitating cellular entry and electrostatic interactions with negatively charged nucleic acids. Covalent conjugation of F3, a tumor homing peptide, post-assembly of the nanoparticles enhanced cellular uptake and knockdown of nucleolin (a shuttling protein overexpressed at the sites of angiogenesis) and thus inhibiting tumor cell growth. Furthermore, these polymer precursors of the cSCKs were modified with partial to full incorporation of histamines to facilitate their endosomal escape for efficient delivery into the cytosol. The cSCKs were further templated onto high aspect ratio anionic cylinders to form hierarchically-assembled nanostructures that bring together individual components with unique functions, such as one carrying a therapeutic payload and the other with sites for radiolabeling. These higher order nanoobjects enhance circulation in vivo, have capabilities to package nucleic acids electrostatically and contain sites for radiolabeling, providing an overall advantage over the individual components, which could each facilitate only one or the other of the combined functions. Hierarchically-assembled nanostructures were investigated for their cellular uptake, transfection behavior and radiolabeling efficiency, as the next generation of theranostic agents.

Shrestha, Ritu 1984-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Foundational platform for mammalian synthetic biology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The emergent field of synthetic biology is different from many other biological engineering efforts, in that its roots, design principles, and forward engineering perspective have been adopted from electrical engineering ...

Davidsohn, Noah (Noah Justin)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Enhancing Repair of the Mammalian Heart  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Permissions: Requests for permissions to reproduce figures, tables, or portions of articles originally published in Circulation Research can be obtained via RightsLink, a service of the Copyright Clearance Center, not the Editorial Office. Once the online version of the published article for which permission is being requested is located, click Request Permissions in the middle column of the Web page under Services. Further information about this process is available in the Permissions and Rights Question and Answer document. Reprints: Information about reprints can be found online at:

Maria Paola Santini; Lana Tsao; Laurent Monassier; Catherine Theodoropoulos; Janice Carter; Enrique Lara-pezzi; Esfir Slonimsky; Ekaterina Salimova; Patrice Delafontaine; Yao-hua Song; Martin Bergmann; Christian Freund; Ken Suzuki; Nadia Rosenthal; Maria Paola Santini; Lana Tsao; Laurent Monassier; Catherine Theodoropoulos; Janice Carter; Enrique Lara-pezzi; Esfir Slonimsky; Ekaterina Salimova; Patrice Delafontaine; Yao-hua Song; Martin Bergmann; Christian Freund; Ken Suzuki; Nadia Rosenthal

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Compositions for boron delivery to mammalian tissue  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Boron neutron capture therapy can utilize X.sub.y B.sub.20 H.sub.17 L where X is an alkali metal, y is 1 to 4, and L is a two electron donor such as NH.sub.3, and Na.sub.2 B.sub.10 H.sub.9 NCO, among others. These borane salts may be used free or encapsulated in liposomes. Liposomes may also have embedded within their bilayers carboranes to increase the amount of delivered .sup.10 B and/or to increase the tumor specificity of the liposome.

Hawthorne, M. Frederick (Encino, CA); Feaks, Debra Arlene (Los Angeles, CA); Shelly, Kenneth John (Los Angeles, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Methods for boron delivery to mammalian tissue  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Boron neutron capture therapy can be used to destroy tumors. This treatment modality is enhanced by delivering compounds to the tumor site where the compounds have high concentrations of boron, the boron compounds being encapsulated in the bilayer of a liposome or in the bilayer as well as the internal space of the liposomes. Preferred compounds, include carborane units with multiple boron atoms within the carborane cage structure. Liposomes with increased tumor specificity may also be used.

Hawthorne, M. Frederick (Encino, CA); Feaks, Debra A. (Los Angeles, CA); Shelly, Kenneth J. (Los Angeles, CA)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Electrokinetic properties of the mammalian tectorial membrane  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The tectorial membrane (TM) clearly plays a mechanical role in stimulating cochlear sensory receptors, but the presence of fixed charge in TM constituents suggests that electromechanical properties also may be important. ...

Ghaffari, Roozbeh

488

Damage and repair of irradiated mammalian brain  

SciTech Connect

We have demonstrated that focal charged particle irradiation of the rabbit brain can create well-defined lesions which are observable by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMR) and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging techniques. These are similar, in terms of location and characteristic NMR and PET features, to those that occur in the brain of about 10% of clinical research human subjects, who have been treated for intracranial vascular malformations with stereotactic radiosurgery. These lesions have been described radiologically as vasogenic edema of the deep white matter,'' and the injury is of variable intensity and temporal duration, can recede or progress to serious neurologic sequelae, and persist for a considerable period of time, frequently 18 mon to 3 yr. 8 refs., 6 figs.

Frankel, K.; Lo, E.; Phillips, M.; Fabrikant, J.; Brennan, K.; Valk, P.; Poljak, A.; Delapaz, R.; Woodruff, K. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA); Stanford Univ., CA (USA). Medical Center; Brookside Hospital, San Pablo, CA (USA))

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

DNA methylation in early mammalian development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

All the cells in the body contain the same genome yet showcase drastically different phenotypes. This is the result of different transcriptional programs, which are partly controlled by epigenetic modifications, including ...

Chan, Michelle M. (Michelle Mei Wah)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Title Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Publication Type Report Refereed Designation Unknown Year of Publication 2010 Authors Goldman, Charles A., Michael Reid, Roger Levy, and Alison Silverstein Pagination 74 Date Published 01/2010 Publisher LBNL City Berkeley Keywords electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department Abstract This paper reviews the relationship between energy efficiency and demand response and discusses approaches and barriers to coordinating energy efficiency and demand response. The paper is intended to support the 10 implementation goals of the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency's Vision to achieve all cost-effective energy efficiency by 2025.1 Improving energy efficiency in our homes, businesses, schools, governments, and industries-which consume more than 70 percent of the nation's natural gas and electricity-is one of the most constructive, cost-effective ways to address the challenges of high energy prices, energy security and independence, air pollution, and global climate change. While energy efficiency is an increasingly prominent component of efforts to supply affordable, reliable, secure, and clean electric power, demand response is becoming a valuable tool in utility and regional resource plans. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) estimated the contribution from existing U.S. demand response resources at about 41,000 megawatts (MW), about 5.8 percent of 2008 summer peak demand (FERC, 2008). Moreover, FERC recently estimated nationwide achievable demand response potential at 138,000 MW (14 percent of peak demand) by 2019 (FERC, 2009).2 A recent Electric Power Research Institute study estimates that "the combination of demand response and energy efficiency programs has the potential to reduce non-coincident summer peak demand by 157 GW" by 2030, or 14-20 percent below projected levels (EPRI, 2009a). This paper supports the Action Plan's effort to coordinate energy efficiency and demand response programs to maximize value to customers. For information on the full suite of policy and programmatic options for removing barriers to energy efficiency, see the Vision for 2025 and the various other Action Plan papers and guides available at www.epa.gov/eeactionplan.

491

Response of the Toxic Dinoflagellate Karenia brevis to Current and Projected Environmental Conditions: Salinity and Global Climate Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Harmful algal blooms (HABs) are increasing in frequency and duration worldwide. Karenia brevis, the major toxic dinoflagellate in the Gulf of Mexico, produces potent neurotoxins, known as brevetoxins. For K. brevis, only minor concentrations of brevetoxins are needed to induce toxicity and environmental conditions appear to have the most direct impact on the cellular content of these toxins. A better understanding of K. brevis biology is essential to understand the mechanisms underlying toxin production and the ecology of such HABs, as well as to better anticipate and respond to such blooms. Here we present findings on the effect of salinity and availability of carbon on cellular physiology and brevetoxin and brevenal production by K. brevis. When grown at salinities of 35 and 27, but otherwise identical conditions, total brevetoxin cellular concentration varied between 0 to 18.5 pg cell-1 and brevenal varied between 0 and 1 pg cell-1. In response to hypoosmotic stress brevetoxin production was triggered, as a result, brevetoxin production increased up to 53%, while growth rates remained unchanged. A significant hypoosmotic event of >11%, was needed to trigger the response in brevetoxin production. To determine if K. brevis was sensing changes in specific ions within seawater (K+, Cl- or Ca2+), we systematically removed one ion while keeping the remaining ions at equivalent molar concentration for salinity of 35. Dilution in seawater K+ concentrations triggered the production of brevetoxins, increasing production ?44%. Ecosystem changes due to climate change have increased the production of toxins in other HAB species; here we examined the impact on K. brevis. We have shown that modification of pCO2 level and temperature did not influence brevetoxin production; however, predicted climate change scenarios (increased temperature and pCO2) did significantly increase the growth rate of K. brevis, by 60% at 25C and 55% at 30C. We suggest that K. brevis blooms could benefit from predicted increase in pCO2 over the next 100 years. Overall, our findings close a critical gap in knowledge regarding the function of brevetoxin in K. brevis by identifying a connection between brevetoxin production and osmoacclimation.

Errera, Reagan Michelle

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reviews the relationship between energy efficiency and demand response and discusses approaches and barriers to coordinating energy efficiency and demand response. The paper is intended to support the 10 implementation goals of the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency's Vision to achieve all cost-effective energy efficiency by 2025. Improving energy efficiency in our homes, businesses, schools, governments, and industries - which consume more than 70 percent of the nation's natural gas and electricity - is one of the most constructive, cost-effective ways to address the challenges of high energy prices, energy security and independence, air pollution, and global climate change. While energy efficiency is an increasingly prominent component of efforts to supply affordable, reliable, secure, and clean electric power, demand response is becoming a valuable tool in utility and regional resource plans. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) estimated the contribution from existing U.S. demand response resources at about 41,000 megawatts (MW), about 5.8 percent of 2008 summer peak demand (FERC, 2008). Moreover, FERC recently estimated nationwide achievable demand response potential at 138,000 MW (14 percent of peak demand) by 2019 (FERC, 2009).2 A recent Electric Power Research Institute study estimates that 'the combination of demand response and energy efficiency programs has the potential to reduce non-coincident summer peak demand by 157 GW' by 2030, or 14-20 percent below projected levels (EPRI, 2009a). This paper supports the Action Plan's effort to coordinate energy efficiency and demand response programs to maximize value to customers. For information on the full suite of policy and programmatic options for removing barriers to energy efficiency, see the Vision for 2025 and the various other Action Plan papers and guides available at www.epa.gov/eeactionplan.

Goldman, Charles; Reid, Michael; Levy, Roger; Silverstein, Alison

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

493

EVALUATION OF MODAL COMBINATION METHODS FOR SEISMIC RESPONSE SPECTRUM ANALYSIS.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regulatory Guide 1.92 ''Combining Modal Responses and Spatial Components in Seismic Response Analysis'' was last revised in 1976. The objective of this project was to re-evaluate the current regulatory guidance for combining modal responses in response spectrum analysis, evaluate recent technical developments, and recommend revisions to the regulatory guidance. This paper describes the qualitative evaluation of modal response combination methods.

MORANTE,R.

1999-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

494

Modeling the dynamic response of low-density, reticulated, elastomeric foam impregnated with Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engineering cellular solids, such as honeycombs and foams, are widely used in applications ranging from thermal insulation to energy absorption. Natural cellular materials, such as wood, have been used in structures for ...

Dawson, Matthew A. (Matthew Aaron), 1983-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Technology Partnership Ombudsman - Roles, Responsibilities, Authorities and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Partnership Ombudsman - Roles, Responsibilities, Technology Partnership Ombudsman - Roles, Responsibilities, Authorities and Accountabilities Technology Partnership Ombudsman - Roles, Responsibilities, Authorities and Accountabilities The purpose of this document is to provide guidance for the performance of the Technology Partnership Ombudsman function at the national laboratories and facilities within the Department of Energy, and to implement the requirements of the Technology Transfer Commercialization Act of 2000. Each national laboratory is required, and other facilities may be required, to appoint a technology partnership Ombudsman, often referred to as Technology Transfer Ombudsman, or TTO. The TTO provides a arogrammatic focal point for helping to resolve complaints and disputes in the area of technology partnerships, patents, and technology licensing at

496

Hurricane Response and Restoration | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hurricane Response and Restoration Hurricane Response and Restoration Hurricane Response and Restoration June 1, 2011 - 5:15pm Addthis Despite all of ISER's efforts to promote reliability and resiliency in the energy sector, domestic and global events will occur that will disrupt the sector and ISER must always be prepared to respond. In the face of both manmade and natural disasters, ISER applies cutting edge technical solutions and emergency management expertise to help overcome challenges inherent in quickly restoring an incredibly complex U.S. energy system. ISER plans, trains, and coordinates year round with all relevant stakeholders so that it can meet our nation's energy needs by deploying energy emergency responders to coordinate and facilitate system restoration activities with local, state, territorial, Federal, public and private

497

Kyoto Protocol Response (Alabama) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Kyoto Protocol Response (Alabama) Kyoto Protocol Response (Alabama) Kyoto Protocol