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1

Model Documentation Report: Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Model Documentation Report: Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) of the National Energy Modeling System April 2013 Independent Statistics & ...

2

Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Media |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Media Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Media The report presents information related to the development of a fundamental understanding of disposal-system performance in a range of environments for potential wastes that could arise from future nuclear fuel cycle alternatives. It addresses selected aspects of the development of computational modeling capability for the performance of storage and disposal options. Topics include radionuclide interaction with geomedia, colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport (Pu colloids), interaction between iodide (accumulate in the interlayer regions of clay minerals) and a suite of clay minerals, adsorption of uranium onto granite and bentonite,

3

Macroeconomic Activity Module (Mam) 1998 (Kernel Regression), Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) serves two functions within the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). First, it provides consistent sets of baselines macroeconomic variables (GDP and components, aggregate prices, interest rates, industrial output, housing starts, commercial floorspace, newcar sales, etc.) which are used by the supply, demand and conversion modules in reaching an energy market equilibrium. Second, it is designed to provide a feedback mechanism that alters the baseline variables during the course of an integrated NEMS run.

Ron Earley

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Representing Grass– and Shrub–Snow–Atmosphere Interactions in Climate System Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A vegetation-protruding-above-snow parameterization for earth system models was developed to improve energy budget calculations of interactions among vegetation, snow, and the atmosphere in nonforested areas. These areas include shrublands, ...

Glen E. Liston; Christopher A. Hiemstra

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Improving best-phase image quality in cardiac CT by motion correction with MAM optimization  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Research in image reconstruction for cardiac CT aims at using motion correction algorithms to improve the image quality of the coronary arteries. The key to those algorithms is motion estimation, which is currently based on 3-D/3-D registration to align the structures of interest in images acquired in multiple heart phases. The need for an extended scan data range covering several heart phases is critical in terms of radiation dose to the patient and limits the clinical potential of the method. Furthermore, literature reports only slight quality improvements of the motion corrected images when compared to the most quiet phase (best-phase) that was actually used for motion estimation. In this paper a motion estimation algorithm is proposed which does not require an extended scan range but works with a short scan data interval, and which markedly improves the best-phase image quality. Methods: Motion estimation is based on the definition of motion artifact metrics (MAM) to quantify motion artifacts in a 3-D reconstructed image volume. The authors use two different MAMs, entropy, and positivity. By adjusting the motion field parameters, the MAM of the resulting motion-compensated reconstruction is optimized using a gradient descent procedure. In this way motion artifacts are minimized. For a fast and practical implementation, only analytical methods are used for motion estimation and compensation. Both the MAM-optimization and a 3-D/3-D registration-based motion estimation algorithm were investigated by means of a computer-simulated vessel with a cardiac motion profile. Image quality was evaluated using normalized cross-correlation (NCC) with the ground truth template and root-mean-square deviation (RMSD). Four coronary CT angiography patient cases were reconstructed to evaluate the clinical performance of the proposed method. Results: For the MAM-approach, the best-phase image quality could be improved for all investigated heart phases, with a maximum improvement of the NCC value by 100% and of the RMSD value by 81%. The corresponding maximum improvements for the registration-based approach were 20% and 40%. In phases with very rapid motion the registration-based algorithm obtained better image quality, while the image quality of the MAM algorithm was superior in phases with less motion. The image quality improvement of the MAM optimization was visually confirmed for the different clinical cases. Conclusions: The proposed method allows a software-based best-phase image quality improvement in coronary CT angiography. A short scan data interval at the target heart phase is sufficient, no additional scan data in other cardiac phases are required. The algorithm is therefore directly applicable to any standard cardiac CT acquisition protocol.

Rohkohl, Christopher; Bruder, Herbert; Stierstorfer, Karl [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Siemensstrasse 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Flohr, Thomas [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Siemensstrasse 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Eberhard Karls University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

6

Facility Representatives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-STD-1063-2006 April 2006 Superseding DOE-STD-1063-2000 March 2000 DOE STANDARD FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES U.S. Department of Energy AREA MGMT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1063-2006 ii Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program web site at http://www.eh.doe.gov/techstds/ DOE-STD-1063-2006 iii FOREWORD 1. This Department of Energy standard is approved for use by all DOE Components. 2. The revision to this DOE standard was developed by a working group consisting of headquarters and field participants. Beneficial comments (recommendations, additions, deletions) and any pertinent data that may improve this document should

7

Facility Representatives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

063-2011 063-2011 February 2011 Superseding DOE-STD-1063-2006 April 2006 DOE STANDARD FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES U.S. Department of Energy AREA MGMT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1063-2011 ii Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web site at http://www.hss.doe.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/ DOE-STD-1063-2011 iii FOREWORD 1. This Department of Energy (DOE) standard is approved for use by all DOE/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Components. 2. The revision to this DOE standard was developed by a working group consisting of headquarters and field participants. Beneficial comments (recommendations,

8

An easy-to-use MATLAB program (MamLand) for the assessment of landslide susceptibility using a Mamdani fuzzy algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, landslide susceptibility mapping using a completely expert opinion-based approach was applied for the Sinop (northern Turkey) region and its close vicinity. For this purpose, an easy-to-use program, ''MamLand,'' was developed for the construction ... Keywords: Geographical Information Systems (GIS), Landslide susceptibility, Mamdani fuzzy inference system, Sinop (Turkey)

A. Akgun; E. A. Sezer; H. A. Nefeslioglu; C. Gokceoglu; B. Pradhan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Facility Representative Program: 2000 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 Facility Representative Workshop 0 Facility Representative Workshop May 16-18, 2000 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Tuesday, May 16, 2000 Theme for Day 1: Sustaining the Success of the Facility Representative Program 8:00 a.m. - Opening Remarks - Joe Arango, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:05 a.m. - Welcome - Kenneth Powers, Deputy Manager Nevada Operations Office 8:15 a.m. - Deputy Secretary Remarks - T. J. Glauthier, Deputy Secretary of Energy 8:30 a.m. - Keynote Address - Jerry Lyle, Assistant Manager for Environmental Management, Idaho Operations Office 9:00 a.m. - Facility Representative of the Year Presentation - Mark B. Whitaker, Departmental Representative 9:30 a.m. - Break 9:50 a.m. - Program Results and Goals - Joe Arango, Facility Representative Program Manager

10

Facility Representative Program: 2012 Facility Representative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

18, 2012 Las Vegas, NV Agenda | Presentations | SSO Annual Award | Pictures | Summary Report 2011 Facility Representative of the Year Award 2011 WINNER: Congratulations to Bradley...

11

Facility Representative Program: 2001 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Facility Representative Workshop 1 Facility Representative Workshop May 15 - 17, 2001 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Day 1: Tuesday, May 15, 2001 Theme: Program Successes and Challenges 8:00 a.m. - Logistics Announcements & Opening Remarks - Joe Arango, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:15 a.m. - Welcome - Debbie Monette, Assistant Manager for National Security, Nevada Operations Office 8:30 a.m. - Keynote Address - Ralph Erickson, National Nuclear Security Administration 9:00 a.m.- DOE Facility Representative of the Year Presentation - Mark B. Whitaker, Jr., Departmental Representative to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board 9:30 a.m. - Break 9:50 a.m. - Program Summary - Joe Arango 10:10 a.m. - Management Panel/Questions and Answers

12

Facility Representative Program: Facility Representative Program Sponsors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative Program Sponsors Facility Representative Program Sponsors There are 29 Facility Representative Program Sponsors Office Name Title E-Mail Phone ASO Larry Pendexter ES&H Div Dir (Argonne) larry.pendexter@ch.doe.gov 630-252-1485 BHSO Bob Desmarais Operations Management Division Director desmarai@bnl.gov 631-344-5434 CBFO Glenn Gamlin Facility Representative Supervisor glenn.gamlin@wipp.ws 575-234-8136 CBFO Casey Gadbury Operations Manager casey.gadbury@wipp.ws 575-234-7372 FSO Mark Bollinger Deputy Manager Mark.Bollinger@ch.doe.gov 630-840-8130 FSO John Scott FR Team Lead john.scott@ch.doe.gov 630-840-2250 HS-30 James O'Brien Director, Office of Nuclear Safety James.O'Brien@hq.doe.gov 301-903-1408 HS-32 Earl Hughes Facility Representative Program Manager Earl.Hughes@hq.doe.gov 202-586-0065

13

Facility Representative Program: 2010 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10 Facility Representative Workshop 10 Facility Representative Workshop May 12 - 13, 2010 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees | Summary Report Workshop Agenda and Presentations Day 1: Wednesday, May 12, 2010 8:00 a.m. Opening Remarks James Heffner, Facility Representative Program Manager Earl Hughes, Safety System Oversight Program Manager Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Assistance Office of Health, Safety and Security 8:15 a.m. Welcome from the Nevada Site Office John Mallin, Deputy Assistant Manager for Site Operations Nevada Site Office 8:30 a.m. Workshop Keynote Address Todd Lapointe Chief of Nuclear Safety Central Technical Authority Staff 9:15 a.m. Facility Representative and Safety System Oversight Award Ceremony James Heffner, Facility Representative Program Manager

14

Facility Representative Program: 2007 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Facility Representative Workshop 7 Facility Representative Workshop May 15 - 17, 2007 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Final Day 1: Tuesday, May 15, 2007 8:00 a.m. Opening Remarks Joanne Lorence, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:15 a.m. Welcome from the Nevada Site Office Gerald Talbot, Manager, Nevada Site Office 8:30 a.m. Videotaped Remarks from the Deputy Secretary The Honorable Clay Sell, Deputy Secretary of Energy 8:45 a.m. Keynote Address - Safety Oversight Perspective and Expectations Glenn Podonsky, Chief Health, Safety and Security Officer, Office of Health, Safety and Security 9:10 a.m. Facility Representative of the Year Presentation Mark B. Whitaker, Jr., Departmental Representative to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board,

15

Facility Representative Program: 2003 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Facility Representative Workshop 3 Facility Representative Workshop May 13 - 15, 2003 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Day 1: Tuesday, May 13, 2003 Theme: Program Successes and Challenges 8:00 a.m. John Evans, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:15 a.m. Welcome Kathleen Carlson Manager, Nevada Site Office 8:30 a.m. Keynote Address Savannah River Site and Facility Reps - A Shared History and Common Future Jeffrey M. Allison Manager, Savannah River Operations Office 9:00 a.m. Videotaped Remarks from the Deputy Secretary Kyle E. McSlarrow, Deputy Secretary of Energy 9:10 a.m. Facility Representative of the Year Presentation Mark B. Whitaker, Jr., Departmental Representative to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board

16

Facility Representative Program: 2000 Facility Representative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Break 10:00 a.m. - Making Your Observations CountLeading Indicators - Mike Weis, Rocky Flats Field Office 10:45 a.m. - Facility Representative PanelQuestions and Answers (Ben...

17

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Macroeconomic Activity...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Macroeconomic Activity Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Macroeconomic Activity Module The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) represents the interaction between the...

18

Facility Representative Program: 2004 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 Facility Representative Workshop 4 Facility Representative Workshop May 18 - 20, 2004 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Final Day 1: Tuesday, May 18, 2004 Theme: Program Successes and Challenges 8:00 a.m. Opening Remarks John Evans, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:15 a.m. Welcome Kathy Carlson, Nevada Site Office Manager 8:30 a.m. Videotaped Remarks from the Deputy Secretary Kyle E. McSlarrow, Deputy Secretary of Energy Deputy Secretary's Remarks 8:40 a.m. Keynote Address - NNSA Evaluation of Columbia Accident Investigation Board Report Brigadier General Ronald J. Haeckel, Principal Assistant Deputy Administrator for Military Applications, NNSA Other Information: NASAÂ’S Columbia Accident Investigation Board Report

19

Facility Representative Program: 2006 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 Facility Representative Workshop 6 Facility Representative Workshop May 16 - 19, 2006 Knoxville, Tennessee Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Final To view Pictures, scroll the mouse over the Picture icon To view Presentations, Picture Slideshows and Video, click on the icon Day 1: Tuesday, May 16, 2006 8:00 a.m. Opening Remarks John Evans, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:15 a.m. Welcome from Oak Ridge Office Gerald Boyd, Manager, Oak Ridge Office 8:25 a.m. Welcome from Y-12 Site Office Theodore Sherry, Manager, Y-12 Site Office 8:35 a.m. Videotaped Remarks from the Deputy Secretary The Honorable Clay Sell, Deputy Secretary of Energy 8:40 a.m. Keynote Address - Safety Oversight at Environmental Management Activities Dr. Inés Triay, Chief Operating Officer, Office of Environmental Management

20

Property Representatives Lists- HQ  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These are the current lists of Headquarters Property Representatives.  If you have any questions please contact:Ellen Hall, Office of Logistics Operations, (301) 903-2613.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mam represents interactions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Industry Representatives Acknowledgements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

computer science: Manitoba curriculum framework of outcomes. — Draft Includes bibliographical references. ISBN 0-7711-3122-4 1. Computer science—Curricula. 2. Computer science—Study and teaching (Secondary)—Manitoba. 3. Electronic data processing—Curricula. 4. Electronic data processing—Study and teaching (Secondary)— Manitoba. I. Manitoba. Manitoba Education and Youth. Copyright © 2003, the Crown in Right of Manitoba as represented by the Minister of Education and

Draft September Senior (s; Senior (s; Normand Châtel; Collège Béliveau; Louis Riel; School Division; Geoff Bresch; Scott Greenlay; Bruce Popham; David Tetlock

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Facility Representative Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative Facility Representative Office of Nuclear Safety Home Facility Representative Home Annual Facility Rep Workshop › 2012 › 2011 › 2010 › 2009 › 2008 › 2007 › 2006 › 2005 › 2004 › 2003 › 2002 › 2001 › 2000 DOE Safety Links › ORPS Info › Operating Experience › DOE Lessons Learned › Accident Investigation Assessment Tools › FR CRADs › Surveillance Guides › Manager's Guide for Safety and Health Subject Matter Links General Program Information › Program Mission Statement › Program Directives and Guidance › FR of the Year Award Program › FR of the Year Award › FR Program Assessment Guide (Appendix B, DOE STD 1063-2011) FR Quarterly Performance Indicators Training & Qualification Information › Qualification Standards › Energy Online Courses

23

Glossary Balancing Item: Represents  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Balancing Balancing Item: Represents differences between the sum of the components of natural gas supply and the sum of the components of natural gas disposition. These differences may be due to quantities lost or to the effects of data-report- ing problems. Reporting problems include differences due to the net result of conversions of flow data metered at varying temperature and pressure bases and converted to a standard temperature and pressure base; the effect of vari- ations in company accounting and billing practices; differ- ences between billing cycle and calendar period time frames; and imbalances resulting from the merger of data- reporting systems that vary in scope, format, definitions, and type of respondents. Biomass Gas: A medium Btu gas containing methane and carbon dioxide, resulting from the action of microorganisms on organic materials such as a landfill. British Thermal

24

Federal Interagency Chemistry Representatives (FICR) ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Federal Interagency Chemistry Representatives (FICR) Meeting 2013 - A Federal Green Chemistry Forum. ...

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

25

Facility Representative Program: Facility Representative of the Year  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative of the Year Award Facility Representative of the Year Award Annual Facility Representative Workshop Facility Representative of the Year Award Process Facility Representative of the Year Award 2012 WINNER: John C. Barnes, Savannah River Operations Office Letter from DNFSB Chairman Peter S. Winokur, Ph.D 2012 Nominees: Peter W. Kelley, Brookhaven Site Office James E. Garza, Idaho Operations Office (EM) William R. Watson, Idaho Operations Office (NE) Darlene S. Rodriguez, Los Alamos Field Office Robert R. Robb, Livermore Field Office Kenneth W. Wethington, Grand Junction Project Office's Moab site Thomas P. Denny, Nevada Field Office Michael J. Childers, NNSA Production Office Pantex Site Catherine T. Schidel, NNSA Production Office Y12 Site Chelsea D. Hubbard, Oak Ridge Operations Office (EM)

26

FAQS Reference Guide – Facility Representative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This reference guide addresses the competency statements in the October 2010 edition of DOE-STD-1151-2010, Facility Representative Functional Area Qualification Standard.

27

Finding minimum representative pattern sets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Frequent pattern mining often produces an enormous number of frequent patterns, which imposes a great challenge on understanding and further analysis of the generated patterns. This calls for finding a small number of representative patterns to best ... Keywords: frequent pattern summarization, representative patterns

Guimei Liu; Haojun Zhang; Limsoon Wong

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Facility Representative Program: Qualification Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Training & Qualification Information Training & Qualification Information Qualification Standards DOE Order Self-Study Modules DOE Fundamentals Handbooks Nuclear Safety Basis Self-Study Guide Energy Online Courses Available Link to National Training Center Basic Courses for Facility Representative Qualification Recommended Courses to Expand Facility Representative's Knowledge Base Qualification Standards General Technical Base Qualification Standard, Qualification Card & Reference Guide -- GTB Qualification Standard (DOE-STD-1146-2007), December 2007 [PDF] -- GTB Qualification Card, December 2007 [DOC] -- GTB "Gap" Qualification Card, December 2007 [DOC] -- GTB Qualification Standard Reference Guide, May 2008 [PDF] Facility Representative Qualification Standard, Qualification Card & Reference Guide

29

Facility Representative Program: Basic Courses For Facility Representative  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Training & Qualification Information Training & Qualification Information Qualification Standards DOE Order Self-Study Modules DOE Fundamentals Handbooks Nuclear Safety Basis Self-Study Guide Energy Online Courses Available Link to National Training Center Basic Courses for Facility Representative Qualification Recommended Courses to Expand Facility Representative's Knowledge Base Basic Courses For Facility Rep Qualification (These courses may be beneficial during the initial qualification of Facility Representatives.) Course Title FR FAQS CN Point of Contact Comments Applied Engineering Fundamentals 13 days * See below Mike Schoener 803-641-8166 E-mail Course description at http://ntc.doe.gov course catalog Asbestos Awareness 2 hours 2.1 Federal employees register through the CHRIS system For course details see

30

Regret-minimizing representative databases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose the k-representative regret minimization query (k-regret) as an operation to support multi-criteria decision making. Like top-k, the k-regret query assumes that users have some utility or scoring functions; however, ...

Danupon Nanongkai; Atish Das Sarma; Ashwin Lall; Richard J. Lipton; Jun Xu

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Data Visualization Perceiving and Representing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Visualization Perceiving and Representing Structured Information using Objects #12;Data #12;Data Visualization Image Based vs Structure Theories s Template theories based on 2D image processing s In structural theories we extract the structure of a scene in terms of 3D primitives #12;Data

Chi, Ed Huai-hsin

32

Facility Representative Program: Facility Representative of the Year  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative Facility Representative Office of Nuclear Safety Home Facility Representative Home Annual Facility Rep Workshop › 2012 › 2011 › 2010 › 2009 › 2008 › 2007 › 2006 › 2005 › 2004 › 2003 › 2002 › 2001 › 2000 DOE Safety Links › ORPS Info › Operating Experience › DOE Lessons Learned › Accident Investigation Assessment Tools › FR CRADs › Surveillance Guides › Manager's Guide for Safety and Health Subject Matter Links General Program Information › Program Mission Statement › Program Directives and Guidance › FR of the Year Award Program › FR of the Year Award › FR Program Assessment Guide (Appendix B, DOE STD 1063-2011) FR Quarterly Performance Indicators Training & Qualification Information › Qualification Standards › Energy Online Courses

33

Facility Representative Program: Program Mission Statement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

General Program Information Program Mission Statement Program Directives and Guidance Facility Representative of the Year Award Program Facility Representative of the Year Award FR...

34

Facility Representative of the Year Award  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REPRESENTATIVE OF THE YEAR AWARD PROGRAM REPRESENTATIVE OF THE YEAR AWARD PROGRAM OBJECTIVE The Facility Representative Award Program is a special award designed to recognize superior or exemplary service by a Facility Representative over a period of one year. This special award program has been established in accordance with the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 331.1C, Employee Performance Management and Recognition Program. FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE OF THE YEAR AWARD The Facility Representative of the Year Award is determined by a panel representing the Chief Health, Safety and Security Officer and managers from the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), the Office of Environmental Management (EM), the Office of Science (SC), and the Office of Nuclear Energy (NE). The Facility Representative Program Manager in

35

Facility Representative Program: Program Performance Indicators  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Performance Indicators DOE Corporate Reporting Data (ORPS, CAIRS, Others) Facility Representative Performance Indicator Guidance -- Appendix A in DOE-STD-1063-2011,...

36

Representativeness models of systems: smart grid example  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Given the great emphasis being placed on energy efficiency in contemporary society, in which the smart grid plays a prominent role, this is an opportune time to explore methodologies for appropriately representing system attributes. We suggest this is ... Keywords: Smart grid, System representativeness

Norman Schneidewind

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Incentives for the Department's Facility Representative Program,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Incentives for the Department's Facility Representative Program, Incentives for the Department's Facility Representative Program, 12/17/1998 Incentives for the Department's Facility Representative Program, 12/17/1998 The Department's Revised Implementation Plan for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 93-3 has once again underscored the Department's commitment to maintaining the technical capability necessary to safely manage and operate our defense nuclear facilities. Attracting and retaining highly qualified employees and placing them in our critical technical positions is vital to fi.dfilling this commitment. You have identified 95'% of your Facility Representative positions as critical technical positions. The Office of Field Management has noted a 12'?40annual attrition rate of Facility Representatives from the Facility

38

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Introduction  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) represents the interaction between the U.S. economy as a whole and energy markets. The rate of growth of the economy, measured by the growth in gross domestic product (GDP) is a key determinant of the growth in demand for energy. Associated economic factors, such as interest rates and disposable income, strongly influence various elements of the supply and demand for energy. At the same time, reactions to energy markets by the aggregate economy, such as a slowdown in economic growth resulting from increasing energy prices, are also reflected in this module. A detailed description of the MAM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-M065, (Washington, DC, February 1994), plus Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM): Kernel Regression Documentation of the National Energy Modeling System 1999, DOE/EIA-M065(99), Washington, DC, 1999).

39

Representativeness of Wind Observations at Airports  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind information for use at airports can be called representative if it provides an optimal estimate of wind variations to be expected over the runway. It is shown that a single anemometer at a nonideal but reasonable location will usually ...

J. Wieringa

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

A Practical Pyrgeometer Using the Representative Angle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple directional pyrgeometer is tested and compared with a conventional standard pyrgeometer. The system presented in this article has a narrow directional response and points to the representative zenith angle of 52.5°. Because of its ...

Satoshi Sakai; Aya Ito; Kazuhiro Umetani; Isao Iizawa; Masanori Onishi

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mam represents interactions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Finding representative workloads for computer system design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work explores how improved workload characterization can be used for a better selection of representative workloads within the computer system and processor design process. We find that metrics easily available in modern computer systems provide ...

Jan Lodewijk Bonebakker

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Facility Representative Program: Program Directives and Guidance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative of the Year Award FR Program Assessment Guide (Appendix B, DOE STD 1063-2011) Program Directives and Guidance FR Program Standard, DOE STD 1063-2011,...

43

Representing aggregate works in the digital library  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper studies the challenge of representing aggregate works such as encyclopedias, collected poems and journals in heterogenous digital library collections. Reflecting on the materials used by humanities academics, we demonstrate the varied range ... Keywords: aggregate documents, architecture, digital libraries

George Buchanan; Jeremy Gow; Ann Blandford; Jon Rimmer; Claire Warwick

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Facility Representative Program Outstanding at ID  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

protects not only the workers, but the public and the environment as well. Specifically, DOE orders say: "The purpose of the DOE Facility Representative Program is to ensure that...

45

Yucca Mountain Climate Technical Support Representative  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of Project Activity ORD-FY04-012, “Yucca Mountain Climate Technical Support Representative,” was to provide the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) with expertise on past, present, and future climate scenarios and to support the technical elements of the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) climate program. The Climate Technical Support Representative was to explain, defend, and interpret the YMP climate program to the various audiences during Site Recommendation and License Application. This technical support representative was to support DOE management in the preparation and review of documents, and to participate in comment response for the Final Environmental Impact Statement, the Site Recommendation Hearings, the NRC Sufficiency Comments, and other forums as designated by DOE management. Because the activity was terminated 12 months early and experience a 27% reduction in budget, it was not possible to complete all components of the tasks as originally envisioned. Activities not completed include the qualification of climate datasets and the production of a qualified technical report. The following final report is an unqualified summary of the activities that were completed given the reduced time and funding.

Sharpe, Saxon E

2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

46

1997 Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees Last Name First Office Location Phone E-Mail Anderson Mike ID CFATAN (208) 526-7418 andersmr@id.doe.gov Bell Bill AL LAAO (505) 665-6324 bbell@doeal.gov Biro Brian RL LABS (509) 376-7660 brian_a_biro@rl.gov Brown Mark RL TANKS (509) 373-9150 mark_c_brown@rl.gov Charboneau Briant RL 324/327 (509) 373-6137 briant_L_charboneau@rl.gov Daniels Rick OR HFIR (423) 574-9143 e29@ornl.gov Dennis Jack AL AAO (806) 477-3176 jdennis@pantex.com Dikeakos Maria CH BHG (516) 344-3950 dikeako@bnl.gov Duey Don AL AAO (806) 477-6987 dduey@pantex.com Earley Larry RL WRAP (509) 373-9388 larry_d_earley@rl.gov Eddy Doug OAK LLNL (925) 422-3379 doug.eddy@oak.doe.gov Edwards Robert SR NMSD (803) 208-2645 robert-e.edwards@srs.gov

47

1998 Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees 8 Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees Last Name First Office Location Phone Fax E-Mail Alvord Bob OAK LLNL (925) 422-0830 (925) 422-0832 robert.alvord@oak.doe.gov Barnes John SR SRTC (803) 208-2628 (803) 208-1123 johnc.barnes@srs.gov Bell Fred AL LAAO (505) 665-4856 (505) 665-9230 fbell@doeal.gov Bell Bill AL LAAO (505) 665-6324 (505) 665-9230 bbell@doeal.gov Bennett Rick RF DOE (303) 966-8155 (303) 966-7447 rick.bennett@rfets.gov Biro Brian RL LABS (509) 376-7660 (509) 376-9837 brian_a_biro@rl.gov Blanco Jose SR DWPF (803) 208-7022 (803) 557-8223 jose.blanco@srs.gov Charboneau Briant RL 324/327 (509) 373-6137 (509) 373-9839 briant_L_charboneau@rl.gov Christensen Debbie AL OMD (505) 845-5239 dschristensen@doeal.gov Clifton Gary OR ORNL (423) 576-6810 (423) 574-9275 g7y@ornl.gov

48

Laboratory or Facility Representative Email Addresses Phone #  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory or Facility Representative Email Addresses Phone # Ames Laboratory Stacy Joiner joiner@ameslab.gov 515-294-5932 Argonne National Laboratory Connie Cleary ccleary@anl.gov 630-252-8111 Brookhaven National Laboratory Walter Copan wcopan@bnl.gov 631-344-3035 Fermi National Acclerator Laboratory Bruce Chrisman chrisman@fnal.gov 630-840-6657 Idaho National Laboratory Steven McMaster steven.mcmaster@inl.gov 208-526-1340 Kansas City Plant Caron O'Dower codower@kcp.com 816-997-2645 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Viviana Wolinsky viwolinsky@lbl.gov 510-486-6463 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Roger Werne werne1@llnl.gov 925-423-9353 Los Alamos National Laboratory John Mott jmott@lanl.gov 505-665-0883 National Energy Technology Laboratory Jessica Sosenko jessica.sosenko@netl.doe.gov 412-386-7417

49

Facility Representative Functional Area Qualification Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-STD-1151-2010 October 2010 DOE STANDARD FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1151-2010 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Office of Health, Safety and Security Approved DOE Technical Standards Web Site at http://www.hss.doe.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/standard/standard.html DOE-STD-1151-2010 iii APPROVAL The Federal Technical Capability Panel consists of senior U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) managers responsible for overseeing the Federal Technical Capability Program. This Panel is

50

The underground electromagnetic pulse: Four representative models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

I describe four phenomenological models by which an underground nuclear explosion may generate electromagnetic pulses: Compton current asymmetry (or ''Compton dipole''); Uphole conductor currents (or ''casing currents''); Diamagnetic cavity plasma (or ''magnetic bubble''); and Large-scale ground motion (or ''magneto-acoustic wave''). I outline the corresponding analytic exercises and summarize the principal results of the computations. I used a 10-kt contained explosion as the fiducial case. Each analytic sequence developed an equivalent source dipole and calculated signal waveforms at representative ground-surface locations. As a comparative summary, the Compton dipole generates a peak source current moment of about 12,000 A/center dot/m in the submicrosecond time domain. The casing-current source model obtains an equivalent peak moment of about 2 /times/ 10/sup 5/ A/center dot/m in the 10- to 30-/mu/s domain. The magnetic bubble produces a magnetic dipole moment of about 7 /times/ 10/sup 6/ A/center dot/m/sup 2/, characterized by a 30-ms time structure. Finally, the magneto-acoustic wave corresponds to a magnetic dipole moment of about 600 A/center dot/m/sup 2/, with a waveform showing 0.5-s periodicities. 8 refs., 35 figs., 7 tabs.

Wouters, L.F.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

3Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the Period July through September 2011. Data for these indicators were gathered by Field Elements per Department of Energy's (DOE) Technical Standard (STD) 1063-2011, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators for July - September 2011 More Documents & Publications 3Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

52

1Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 1Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January through March 2012. Data for these indicators were gathered by Field elements per Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standarf 1063-2011, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators for January-March 2012 More Documents & Publications 1Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

53

Facility Representative Program ID Selects FR of the Year  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative Program ID Selects Facility Representative Program ID Selects FR of the Year John Martin DOE-ID Facility Representative John Martin DOE-ID Facility Representative of the Year. John Martin was selected as DOE-ID's Facility Representative of the Year and the office's nominee for the 2007 DOE Facility Representative of the Year Award. John was selected from an exceptional field of candidates to represent DOE-ID at the Facility Representative Annual Workshop in Las Vegas this May. Each year the Department of Energy recognizes the Facility Representative whose achievements during the calendar year are most exemplary. A panel of senior personnel representing the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Environmental Management (EM), Science (SC), Nuclear Energy (NE) and at least five

54

3Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from July to September 2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the facility Representative Program. 3Q CY2003, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators More Documents & Publications 2Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

55

FAQS Qualification Card - Facility Representative | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Representative Representative FAQS Qualification Card - Facility Representative A key element for the Department's Technical Qualification Programs is a set of common Functional Area Qualification Standards (FAQS) and associated Job Task Analyses (JTA). These standards are developed for various functional areas of responsibility in the Department, including oversight of safety management programs identified as hazard controls in Documented Safety Analyses (DSA). For each functional area, the FAQS identify the minimum technical competencies and supporting knowledge and skills for a typical qualified individual working in the area. FAQC-FacilityRepresentative.docx Description Facility Representative Qualification Card More Documents & Publications FAQS Gap Analysis Qualification Card - Facility Representative

56

4Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from October to December 2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the facility Representative Program. As of December 31,2003, 93% of all Facility Representatives were fully qualified, exceeding the DOE goal of 80%. Currently, 23 of 27 sites meet the goal of 80%. Currently, 23 of 27 sites meet the goal for Facility Representative

57

2Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from April to June 2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the facility Representative Program. A total of 13 Facility Representatives transferred to other positions during the quarter. Five of these accepted Facility Representative positions at other sites. Of the 8 that left the Program. 1 recieved a promotion and 7 accepted lateral positions. All of

58

2Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR program. 2Q CY2006, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators More Documents & Publications 3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

59

Greening the U.S. House of Representatives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Greening the U.S. House of Representatives Title Greening the U.S. House of Representatives Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-322E Year of Publication 2008 Authors...

60

Case Study 11 - A Collection of Homes Representing US ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... A Collection of Homes Representing US Housing Stock. [Persily AK, Musser A., Leber D. (2006)]. In order to allow nationwide ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mam represents interactions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Macroeconomic Activity Module Macroeconomic Activity Module The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) represents the interaction between the U.S. economy as a whole and energy markets. The rate of growth of the economy, measured by the growth in gross domestic product (GDP) is a key determinant of the growth in demand for energy. Associated economic factors, such as interest rates and disposable income, strongly influence various elements of the supply and demand for energy. At the same time, reactions to energy markets by the aggregate economy, such as a slowdown in economic growth resulting from increasing energy prices, are also reflected in this module. A detailed description of the MAM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-M065(2003), (Washington, DC, January 2003).

62

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Macroeconomic Activity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

macroeconomic.gif (5367 bytes) macroeconomic.gif (5367 bytes) The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) represents the interaction between the U.S. economy as a whole and energy markets. The rate of growth of the economy, measured by the growth in gross domestic product (GDP) is a key determinant of the growth in demand for energy. Associated economic factors, such as interest rates and disposable income, strongly influence various elements of the supply and demand for energy. At the same time, reactions to energy markets by the aggregate economy, such as a slowdown in economic growth resulting from increasing energy prices, are also reflected in this module. A detailed description of the MAM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-M065, (Washington, DC, February 1994).

63

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Macroeconomic Activity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Macroeconomic Activity Module Macroeconomic Activity Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Macroeconomic Activity Module The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) represents the interaction between the U.S. economy as a whole and energy markets. The rate of growth of the economy, measured by the growth in gross domestic product (GDP) is a key determinant of the growth in demand for energy. Associated economic factors, such as interest rates and disposable income, strongly influence various elements of the supply and demand for energy. At the same time, reactions to energy markets by the aggregate economy, such as a slowdown in economic growth resulting from increasing energy prices, are also reflected in this module. A detailed description of the MAM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-M065(2007), (Washington, DC, January 2007).

64

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Macroeconomic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Macroeconomic Activity Module Macroeconomic Activity Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Macroeconomic Activity Module The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) represents the interaction between the U.S. economy as a whole and energy markets. The rate of growth of the economy, measured by the growth in gross domestic product (GDP) is a key determinant of the growth in demand for energy. Associated economic factors, such as interest rates and disposable income, strongly influence various elements of the supply and demand for energy. At the same time, reactions to energy markets by the aggregate economy, such as a slowdown in economic growth resulting from increasing energy prices, are also reflected in this module. A detailed description of the MAM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Document>ation Report: Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-M065(2009), (Washington, DC, January 2009).

65

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Macroeconomic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Macroeconomic Activity Module Macroeconomic Activity Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Macroeconomic Activity Module The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) represents the interaction between the U.S. economy as a whole and energy markets. The rate of growth of the economy, measured by the growth in gross domestic product (GDP) is a key determinant of the growth in demand for energy. Associated economic factors, such as interest rates and disposable income, strongly influence various elements of the supply and demand for energy. At the same time, reactions to energy markets by the aggregate economy, such as a slowdown in economic growth resulting from increasing energy prices, are also reflected in this module. A detailed description of the MAM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-M065(2007), (Washington, DC, January 2007).

66

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Macroeconomic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Macroeconomic Activity Module Macroeconomic Activity Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Macroeconomic Activity Module The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) represents the interaction between the U.S. economy as a whole and energy markets. The rate of growth of the economy, measured by the growth in gross domestic product (GDP) is a key determinant of the growth in demand for energy. Associated economic factors, such as interest rates and disposable income, strongly influence various elements of the supply and demand for energy. At the same time, reactions to energy markets by the aggregate economy, such as a slowdown in economic growth resulting from increasing energy prices, are also reflected in this module. A detailed description of the MAM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-M065(2008), (Washington, DC, January 2008).

67

2Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2008. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 87% Fully Qualifed ( last quarter was 85%) 86% Staffing Level ( last quarter was 88%)

68

3Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from July to September 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR program. A summary of this quarters data concluded: 76% fully qualified 41% staffing level

69

2Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to impove the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 74% Fully Qualified 94% Staffing Level ( last quarter was

70

4Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October to December 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR program. A summary of this quarters data concluded: 72% Fully Qualified ( last Quarter was

71

1Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 1Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from January to March 2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the facility Representative Program. The percentage of Facility Representatives who are fully qualified reached 91% across DOE. In EM the percenage of 97%, in Sc the percentage is 95% and in NNSA the percentage is 78%. The DOE goal is 75%. Staffing levels for the three organizations continue to be below

72

1Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 1Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January to March2010. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report are presented below." 1Q CY2010, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators More Documents & Publications 1Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

73

3Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report This memorandum summarizes the highlights of the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period of July through September 2010. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD)-1063-2006, Facility Representative and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators for July - September 2010 More Documents & Publications 3Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

74

1Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 1Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "The Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached, covering the period from January 2000 to March 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements quarterly per the Facility Representatives Standard, DOE-STD-1 063, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the Facility Representative Program. The definitions of the PIs from the Standard are also attached for your use in evaluating the data." 1Q CY2000, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

75

4Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (Pis) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from October to December 2002. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the facility Representative Program. The format of the report is changed from past reports. Information will now be provided according to the major offices having field or site office Facility Representative programs: National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSSA), the Office of

76

3Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from July to September 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per Department of Energy (DOE-STD-1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR program. A summary of this quarter 's data concluded: 3Q CY2007, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators More Documents & Publications 2Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

77

Simulating a Nationally Representative Housing Sample Using EnergyPlus  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a new simulation tool under development at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). This tool uses EnergyPlus to simulate each single-family home in the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), and generates a calibrated, nationally representative set of simulated homes whose energy use is statistically indistinguishable from the energy use of the single-family homes in the RECS sample. This research builds upon earlier work by Ritchard et al. for the Gas Research Institute and Huang et al. for LBNL. A representative national sample allows us to evaluate the variance in energy use between individual homes, regions, or other subsamples; using this tool, we can also evaluate how that variance affects the impacts of potential policies. The RECS contains information regarding the construction and location of each sampled home, as well as its appliances and other energy-using equipment. We combined this data with the home simulation prototypes developed by Huang et al. to simulate homes that match the RECS sample wherever possible. Where data was not available, we used distributions, calibrated using the RECS energy use data. Each home was assigned a best-fit location for the purposes of weather and some construction characteristics. RECS provides some detail on the type and age of heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) equipment in each home; we developed EnergyPlus models capable of reproducing the variety of technologies and efficiencies represented in the national sample. This includes electric, gas, and oil furnaces, central and window air conditioners, central heat pumps, and baseboard heaters. We also developed a model of duct system performance, based on in-home measurements, and integrated this with fan performance to capture the energy use of single- and variable-speed furnace fans, as well as the interaction of duct and fan performance with the efficiency of heating and cooling equipment. Comparison with RECS revealed that EnergyPlus did not capture the heating-side behavior of heat pumps particularly accurately, and that our simple oil furnace and boiler models needed significant recalibration to fit with RECS. Simulating the full RECS sample on a single computer would take many hours, so we used the 'cloud computing' services provided by Amazon.com to simulate dozens of homes at once. This enabled us to simulate the full RECS sample, including multiple versions of each home to evaluate the impact of marginal changes, in less than 3 hours. Once the tool was calibrated, we were able to address several policy questions. We made a simple measurement of the heat replacement effect and showed that the net effect of heat replacement on primary energy use is likely to be less than 5%, relative to appliance-only measures of energy savings. Fuel switching could be significant, however. We also evaluated the national and regional impacts of a variety of 'overnight' changes in building characteristics or occupant behavior, including lighting, home insulation and sealing, HVAC system efficiency, and thermostat settings. For example, our model shows that the combination of increased home insulation and better sealed building shells could reduce residential natural gas use by 34.5% and electricity use by 6.5%, and a 1 degree rise in summer thermostat settings could save 2.1% of home electricity use. These results vary by region, and we present results for each U.S. Census division. We conclude by offering proposals for future work to improve the tool. Some proposed future work includes: comparing the simulated energy use data with the monthly RECS bill data; better capturing the variation in behavior between households, especially as it relates to occupancy and schedules; improving the characterization of recent construction and its regional variation; and extending the general framework of this simulation tool to capture multifamily housing units, such as apartment buildings.

Hopkins, Asa S.; Lekov, Alex; Lutz, James; Rosenquist, Gregory; Gu, Lixing

2011-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

78

Representing Topographic Stress for Large-Scale Ocean Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interaction of eddies with seafloor topography can exert enormous, systematic forces on the ocean circulation. This interaction has been considered previously under idealized circumstances. Theoretical results are here simplified and extended ...

Greg Holloway

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Facility Representative of the Year Award | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facility Representative of the Year Award Facility Representative of the Year Award Facility Representative of the Year Award Departmental Award Program administered by the Office of Chief Information Officer The Facility Representative Award Program is a special award designed to recognize superior or exemplary service by a Facility Representative over a period of one year. This special award program has been established in accordance with the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 331.1C, Employee Performance Management and Recognition Program. Facility Representative of the Year Award Responsible Contacts Lorrenda Buckner HUMAN RESOURCES SPECIALIST (PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT) E-mail lorrenda.buckner@hq.doe.gov Phone 202-586-8451 More Documents & Publications Safety System Oversight Annual Award

80

1Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 1Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the Period January through March 2011. Data for these indicators were gathered by Field Elements per Department of Energy's (DOE) Technical Standard (STD) 1063-2011, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. This report reflects changes in DOE STD 1063-2011 that deleted one indicator and changed the way two others are calculated. The changes are discussed below. Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators for January - March

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mam represents interactions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

3Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report The Facility Representive Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached covering the period from July to September 2002. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements quarterly per the Facility Representatives Standards , DOE-STD-1063-2000, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the Facility Representative Program. The definition of the PIs from the Standard are also attached for your use in evaluating the data. The percentage of fully qualified Facility Representatives in the DOE complex

82

Facility Representative of the Year Award | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facility Representative of the Year Award Facility Representative of the Year Award Facility Representative of the Year Award Departmental Award Program administered by the Office of Chief Information Officer The Facility Representative Award Program is a special award designed to recognize superior or exemplary service by a Facility Representative over a period of one year. This special award program has been established in accordance with the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 331.1C, Employee Performance Management and Recognition Program. Facility Representative of the Year Award Responsible Contacts Lorrenda Buckner HUMAN RESOURCES SPECIALIST (PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT) E-mail lorrenda.buckner@hq.doe.gov Phone 202-586-8451 More Documents & Publications Safety System Oversight Annual Award

83

1999 FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE CONFERENCE June 21 - 25, 1999 | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1999 FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE CONFERENCE June 21 - 25, 1999 1999 FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE CONFERENCE June 21 - 25, 1999 1999 FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE CONFERENCE June 21 - 25, 1999 The Department of Energy will host the Facility Representative Annual Meeting on June 21-25, 1999 at the Alexis Park Hotel in Las Vegas, Nevada. The meeting will give Facility Representatives and line management the opportunity to share lessons learned, and to discuss upcoming program improvements. There is no cost for the meeting, however, rooms reserved at the government rate are limited so if you are planning on attending, please make reservations as soon as possible. The hotel phone number is 1-800-453-8000. For more information, please contact Joe Hassenfeldt, Facility Representative Program Manager, FM-10, at 202-586-1643." Microsoft Word - Document1

84

2Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report The Facility Representive Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached covering the period from April to June 2002. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements quarterly per the Facility Representatives Standards , DOE-STD-1063-2000, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the Facility Representative Program. The definition of the PIs from the Standard are also attached for your use in evaluating the data. Overall, the percentage of fully qualified Facility Representatives increased to 80% last quarter, from 78% the previous quarter , and

85

1Q CY2000, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May May 9,2000 MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION FROM: .yc,..,%$'! L.W.T oseph Arango, Facl ity Representative Program Manager (S-3.1) SUBJECT: Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report The Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached, covering the period from January 2000 to March 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements quarterly per the Facility Representatives Standard, DOE-STD-1 063, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the Facility Representative Program. The definitions of the PIs from the Standard are also attached for your use in evaluating the data. You will note that the indicators show the attrition of five Facility Representatives from the program during this reporting period. Of those five, two were promoted

86

4Q CY2001 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4Q CY2001 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2001 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2001 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report The Facility Representive Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached covering the period from October to December 2001. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements quarterly per the Facility Representatives Standards , DOE-STD-1063, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the Facility Representative Program. The definition of the PIs from the Standard are also attached for your use in evaluating the data 4Q CY2001, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators More Documents & Publications

87

2Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2005. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. As of June 30,2005, 97% of all FRs were fully qualified, down from 88% the previous quarter, but exceeding the DOE goal of 80%. Eighteen of 27 reporting sites meet the goal of FR qualifications. 2Q CY2005, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

88

October 2010, Facility Representative Qualification Standard Reference Guide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facility Facility Representative Qualification Standard Reference Guide OCTOBER 2010 Table of Contents i LIST OF FIGURES ..................................................................................................................... iii LIST OF TABLES ........................................................................................................................ v ACRONYMS ................................................................................................................................ vi PURPOSE ...................................................................................................................................... 1 SCOPE ........................................................................................................................................... 1

89

Herbert Richardson: Before The U.S. House of Representatives...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Richardson: Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Herbert Richardson: Before The U.S. House of...

90

Statement of Patricia Hoffman Before the US House of Representatives...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

on Energy and Power (May 9, 2012) Statement of Patricia Hoffman Before the US House of Representatives Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Energy and Power (May 9, 2012)...

91

Statement of Patricia Hoffman Before the US House of Representatives...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Water Development (March 27, 2012) Statement of Patricia Hoffman Before the US House of Representatives Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development (March...

92

Microsoft Word - 2.24 Safety Advisory Committee Representative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The SAC Representative is expected to: * Possess an understanding of Integrated Safety Management. * Communicate regularly with senior division management and other division...

93

Economic Analysis of a Representative Deep-Water Gas Production ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration Natural Gas 1998: Issues and Trends 181 Appendix C Economic Analysis of a Representative Deep-Water Gas Production Project

94

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

& Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 2A Houston, Texas Reference Buildings by Building Type: Small Hotel Reference Buildings by Climate Zone...

95

Model Documentation Report: Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) of ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

3. IHS Global Insight’s Industrial Output and Employment by Industry Models Industrial Output Model Overview ...

96

Model Documentation Report: Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) of ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

facilitates continuity in model development by providing documentation from which energy analysts can ... Business spending includes nine fixed investment categories for

97

Representative well models for eight geothermal-resource areas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Representative well models have been constructed for eight major geothermal-resource areas. The models define representative times and costs associated with the individual operations that can be expected during drilling and completion of geothermal wells. The models were made for and have been used to evaluate the impacts of potential new technologies. The nature, construction, and validation of the models are presented.

Carson, C.C.; Lin, Y.T.; Livesay, B.J.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Representing a robotic domain using temporal description logics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A temporal logic for representing and reasoning on a robotic domain is presented. Actions are represented by describing what is true while the action itself is occurring, and plans are constructed by temporally relating actions and world states. The ... Keywords: Action Representation, Description Logic, Robotics, Temporal Logic

Alessandro Artale; Enrico Franconi

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Representing natural and manmade drainage systems in an earth system modeling framework  

SciTech Connect

Drainage systems can be categorized into natural or geomorphological drainage systems, agricultural drainage systems and urban drainage systems. They interact closely among themselves and with climate and human society, particularly under extreme climate and hydrological events such as floods. This editorial articulates the need to holistically understand and model drainage systems in the context of climate change and human influence, and discusses the requirements and examples of feasible approaches to representing natural and manmade drainage systems in an earth system modeling framework.

Li, Hongyi; Wu, Huan; Huang, Maoyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

100

1Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 1Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January to March 2005. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives. and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the FR Program. As of March 31st, 2005, 88% of all FRs were fully qualified, up from 86% the previous quarter, and exceeding the DOE goal of 80%. Several of the new FRs hired recently completed qualifications. Eighteen of 27 reporting sites meet the goal of FR qualifications

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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101

4Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Covering the Period from October to December 2004. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the FR program. As of December 31, 2004, 86% of all FRs were fully qualified,down from 89% the previous quarter, and exceeding the DOE goal of 80%. Several sites added new FRs or switched FRs from their exisiting facilities to new facilities, reducing the overall qualification rate.

102

2Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Covering the Period from April to June 2004. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the FR program. As of June 30, 2004, 89% of all FRs were fully qualified , exceeding the DOE goal of 80%, but down slightly from the previous quarter. Twenty of 28 reporting sites meet the goal for FR qualifications. Overall FR staffing is at 85% of the levels needed per the staffing

103

3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from July to September 2005. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR program. As of September 30,2005, 84% of all FRs were fully qualified , down from 87% the previous quarter, but exceeding the DOE goal of 80%. Several sites shifted fully-qualifed FRs to new facilities, thus requiring new qualifications. Although the overall percentage of fully qualified FRS

104

3Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Covering the Period from July to September 2004. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the FR program. As of September 30, 2004, 89% of all FRs were fully qualified, the same as last quarter, and exceeding the DOE goal of 80%. Twenty of 28 reporting sites meet the goal for FR qualifications. Overall FR stadding is at 85% of the levels needed per the staffing analysis methodology in

105

2Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2009. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 77% Fully Qualified (last quarter was 78%) 90% Staffing Level ( last Quarter was 90%); 45% Time Spent in the Field (DOE goal is>40%); and 73% Time Spent in Oversight Activites (DOE Goal is > 65%)"

106

4Q CY2000, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 February 26,2001 MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION FROM: seph Arango, Facility Representative Program Manager (S-3.1) SUBJECT: Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report The Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report is attached, covering the period from October to December 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements quarterly per the Facility Representatives Standard, 063, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the Facility Representative Program. The definitions of the PIs from the Standard are also attached for your use in evaluating the data. I intend to continue to provide this summary information to you quarterly. These provide

107

4Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "This memorandum summarizes the highlights of the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period October through December 2010. Data for these indicators were gathered by Field Elements quarterly per Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD)-1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report are presented below: FR Staffing/Qualification/Oversight Data * DOE was staffed at 184 FR Full Time Equivalents (FTEs) which is 92

108

4Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October to December 2008. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 76% Fully Qualified ( last Quarter was 80%) 89% Staffing Level (last Quarter was 89%) 44% Time Spent in the Field ( Department of Energy)(DOE) goal is > 40%) 73% Time Spent in Oversight Activites (DOE Goal is> 65%)"

109

4Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October through December 2011. Data for these indicators were gathered by field elements per Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standard 1063-2011 , Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report include: FR Staffing/Qualification/Oversight Data: * DOE was staffed at 179 FR Full Time Equivalents (FTE), which is 92 percent of the full staffing level (DOE goal is 100 percent). Four FRs left due to transfer,

110

4Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October to December 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 83% Fully Qualified (last Quarter was 82%) 85% Staffing Level (last Quarter was 93%) 45% Time Spent in the Field (DOE goal is >40%) 73% Time Spent in Oversight Activities (DOE Goal is> 65%)"

111

1Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 6 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January to March 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR program. As of March 31,2006 81% of all FRs were fully qualified,up from 78% the previous quarter, and just above the DOE goal of 80%. To assist site offices in continuing to meet the qualification goal, there will be two focused training sessions for FR candidates in the coming months. These

112

2Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period April through June 20 1 1. Data for these indicators were gathered by Field Elements per Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standard (STD) 1063-20 1 1, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report: FR Staffing/Qualification/Oversight data DOE was staffed at 180 FR Full Time Equivalents (FTEs), which is 9 1 percent of the full staffing level (DOE goal is 100 percent).

113

2Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report This memorandum summarizes the highlight of, and announces the availablity on-line of, the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD)-1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. This memorandum also announces that Mr. James Heffner has turned over FR Program Manager duties to Mr. Earl Huges. Mr. Heffner is assuming expanded team leader duties over several additional programs within the

114

4Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October to December 2005. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR program. As of December 31, 2005 78% of all FRs were fully qualified , down from the 84% the previous quarter, and below the DOE goal of 80%. Site offices hired 11 new FRs in the quarter and several sites moved FRs to new facilities, thus requiring new qualifications.

115

1Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 1Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January to March 2009. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 78% Fully Qualified ( last Quarter was 76%) 90% Staffing Level ( last Quarter was 89%) 47% Time Spent in the Field (DOE goal is>40%) 74% Time Spent in Oversight Activites (DOE Goal is>65%)"

116

Fluid Flow Model Development for Representative Geologic Media | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fluid Flow Model Development for Representative Geologic Media Fluid Flow Model Development for Representative Geologic Media Fluid Flow Model Development for Representative Geologic Media Clay and granitic geologic rock units are potential host media for future repositories for used nuclear fuel and high level waste. This report addresses the representation of flow in these two media within numerical process models. Discrete fracture network (DFNs) models are an approach to representing flow in fractured granite that explicitly represents the geometry and flow properties of individual fractures. New DFN generation and computational grid generation methods have been developed and tested. Mesh generation and the generation of flow streamlines within the DFN are also included. Traditional form of Darcy's law is not adequate

117

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 8 Fairbanks,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Climate Zone and Representative City: 8 Climate Zone and Representative City: 8 Fairbanks, Alaska Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 8 Fairbanks, Alaska In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included. refbldg_8a_usa_ak_fairbanks_post1980_v1.3_5.0.zip refbldg_8a_usa_ak_fairbanks_post1980_v1-4_7-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3A Atlanta, Georgia Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 6B Helena, Montana Reference Buildings by Building Type: Secondary school

118

2Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April through June 2012. Data for these indicators were gathered by field elements per Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standard 1063-2011, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report include: FR Staffing/Qualification/Oversight Data * DOE was staffed at 176 FR Full Time Equivalents (FTE), which is 95 percent of the full staffing level (DOE goal is 100 percent). This staff reflects a

119

Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators for October - December 2010  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FOR DISTRIBUTION FOR DISTRIBUTION FROM: ANDREW C. LAWRENCE DIRECTOR OFFICE OF NUCLEAR SAFETY, QUALITY ASSURANCE AND ENVIRONMENT OFFICE OF HEALTH, SAFETY AND SECURITY SUBJECT: Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report, October-December (Fourth Quarter Calendar Year 2010) This memorandum summarizes the highlights of the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period October through December 2010. Data for these indicators were gathered by Field Elements quarterly per Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD)-1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report are presented below:

120

WIPP Representative Selected For National Environmental Justice Advisory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Representative Selected For National Environmental Justice Representative Selected For National Environmental Justice Advisory Board WIPP Representative Selected For National Environmental Justice Advisory Board March 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Rose Scott, a governmental affairs specialist with URS Washington TRU Solutions LLC, the DOE Waste Isolation Pilot Plant management and operating contractor, was selected for the National Environmental Justice Advisory Board. Rose Scott, a governmental affairs specialist with URS Washington TRU Solutions LLC, the DOE Waste Isolation Pilot Plant management and operating contractor, was selected for the National Environmental Justice Advisory Board. CARLSBAD, N.M. - Organizers say no similar opportunity or conference exists in America. In April, representatives from federal and state

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mam represents interactions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas Emissions DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas Emissions June 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Secretary Chu presents the Secretary of Energy's Appreciation Award to Judy A. McLemore. Secretary Chu presents the Secretary of Energy's Appreciation Award to Judy A. McLemore. WASHINGTON, D.C. - A representative of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, N.M., on Tuesday received the Secretary of Energy's Appreciation Award for her efforts to improve sustainability and reduce travel costs and the number of fleet vehicles. Judy A. McLemore, who works for URS Regulatory and Environmental Services, based in Carlsbad, was honored for helping advance DOE's management and

122

2Q CY2007, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0,2007 0,2007 M E M 0 R A N D ; p s ' X Z FROM: M RK B. WHI DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVE TO THE DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES SAFETY BOARD OFFICE OF HEALTH, SAFETY AND SECURITY SUBJECT: Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report, April - June (2nd Quarter CY2007) Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 74% Fully Qualified (last Quarter was 72%) 94% Staffing Level (last Quarter was 9 1 %)

123

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 7 Duluth,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 Duluth, Minnesota Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 7 Duluth, Minnesota In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included. refbldg_7a_usa_mn_duluth_pre1980_v1.3_5.0.zip refbldg_7a_usa_mn_duluth_pre1980_v1-4_7-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3B Los Angeles, California Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3C San Francisco, California Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5A Chicago, Illinois

124

WIPP Representative Selected For National Environmental Justice Advisory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WIPP Representative Selected For National Environmental Justice WIPP Representative Selected For National Environmental Justice Advisory Board WIPP Representative Selected For National Environmental Justice Advisory Board March 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Rose Scott, a governmental affairs specialist with URS Washington TRU Solutions LLC, the DOE Waste Isolation Pilot Plant management and operating contractor, was selected for the National Environmental Justice Advisory Board. Rose Scott, a governmental affairs specialist with URS Washington TRU Solutions LLC, the DOE Waste Isolation Pilot Plant management and operating contractor, was selected for the National Environmental Justice Advisory Board. CARLSBAD, N.M. - Organizers say no similar opportunity or conference exists in America. In April, representatives from federal and state

125

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 6A  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A A Minneapolis, Minnesota Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 6A Minneapolis, Minnesota In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included. refbldg_6a_usa_mn_minneapolis_post1980_v1.3_5.0.zip refbldg_6a_usa_mn_minneapolis_post1980_v1-4_7-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 7 Duluth, Minnesota Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5A Chicago, Illinois Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5B Boulder,

126

Representing Drag on Unresolved Terrain as a Distributed Momentum Sink  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In numerical weather prediction models, drag on unresolved terrain is usually represented by augmenting the boundary drag on the model atmosphere, in terms of an effective surface roughness length. But as is shown here, if a terrain-following ...

John D. Wilson

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Houston, Texas Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 2A Houston, Texas In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

128

Secretary Chu: China's Clean Energy Successes Represent a New...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

at the National Press Club, U.S Energy Secretary Steven Chu said that the success of China and other countries in clean energy industries represents a new "Sputnik Moment" for...

129

Quantum states representing perfectly secure bits are always distillable  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is proven that recently introduced states with perfectly secure bits of cryptographic key (private states representing secure bit) [K. Horodecki et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 160502 (2005)] as well as its multipartite and higher dimension generalizations always represent distillable entanglement. The corresponding lower bounds on distillable entanglement are provided. We also present a simple alternative proof that for any bipartite quantum state entanglement cost is an upper bound on distillable cryptographic key in bipartite scenario.

Pawel Horodecki; Remigiusz Augusiak

2006-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

130

<interaction num ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... interaction> gun powder wiki ... num="4"> Guinness sales per day ... num="5"> Guinness sale of pints ...

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

131

Interactive Jobs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs Interactive Batch Jobs The login nodes on Genepool should not be used for heavy interactive work. These login nodes are shared amoungst all Genepool users so heavy CPU or memory usage will affect other Genepool users. 10 nodes have been reserved on Genepool for high priority and interactive work. Each user can use up to 2 slots at a time in the high priority queue. Use the qlogin command to run jobs interactively. The example below shows how to request an interactive session on Genepool . genepool:$~> qlogin -l high.c This will put you directly onto a node where you can do interactive work. kmfagnan@genepool01:~$ qlogin -l high.c Your job 1459021 ("QLOGIN") has been submitted waiting for interactive job to be scheduled ......

132

Simulating a Nationally Representative Housing Sample Using EnergyPlus  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Simulating a Nationally Representative Housing Sample Using EnergyPlus Simulating a Nationally Representative Housing Sample Using EnergyPlus Title Simulating a Nationally Representative Housing Sample Using EnergyPlus Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-4420E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Hopkins, Asa S., Alexander B. Lekov, James D. Lutz, and Gregory J. Rosenquist Subsidiary Authors Energy Analysis Department Pagination 55 Date Published March 1 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley ISBN Number LBNL-4420E Abstract This report presents a new simulation tool under development at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). This tool uses EnergyPlus to simulate each single-family home in the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), and generates a calibrated, nationally representative set of simulated homes whose energy use is statistically indistinguishable from the energy use of the single-family homes in the RECS sample. This research builds upon earlier work by Ritchard et al. for the Gas Research Institute and Huang et al. for LBNL. A representative national sample allows us to evaluate the variance in energy use between individual homes, regions, or other subsamples; using this tool, we can also evaluate how that variance affects the impacts of potential policies.

133

DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas Emissions DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas Emissions June 29, 2012 - 12:19pm Addthis Judy McLemore from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant led efforts to reduce the DOE’s vehicle fleet by 20 percent, improving sustainability and saving money. Under her leadership, greenhouse gas emissions associated with business travel were reduced by 63 percent and travel costs were reduced by greater than 60 percent. Judy McLemore from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant led efforts to reduce the DOE's vehicle fleet by 20 percent, improving sustainability and saving money. Under her leadership, greenhouse gas emissions associated with business travel were reduced by 63 percent and travel costs were

134

Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators for April - June 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 , 2011 MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION FROM: JAMES B. O'BRIEN SUBJECT: Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report, April - June 20 1 I This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period April through June 20 1 1. Data for these indicators were gathered by Field Elements per Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standard (STD) 1063-20 1 1, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report: FR Staffin~/Qualification/Oversi~ht Data DOE was staffed at 180 FR Full Time Equivalents (FTEs), which is 9 1 percent of the full staffing level (DOE goal is 100 percent).

135

4Q CY2007, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6, 2008 6, 2008 MEMORANDUM FROM: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATNE TO THE DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES SAFETY BOARD OFFICE OF HEALTH, SAFETY AND SECURITY SUBJECT: Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report, October - December (4th Quarter CY2007) Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October to December 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 83% Fully Qualified (last Quarter was 82%) 85% Staffing Level (last Quarter was 93%) 45% Time Spent in the Field (DOE goal is >40%)

136

June 21, 1999 Memo, Facility Representative Program Status  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June June 21, 1999 MEMORANDUM FOR: Assistant Secretary for Defense Programs Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management Director, Office of Science Director, Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology FROM: John Wilcynski, Director, Office of Field Integration SUBJECT: FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE PROGRAM STATUS Since September, 1993, the Office of Field Management has served as the Department's corporate advocate for the Facility Representative Program. The Facility Representative (FR) is a critical technical position serving as line management's "eyes and ears" for operational safety in our contractor-operated facilities. I recognize the importance of the FR Program, and commit the Office of Field Integration (FI) to its continued crosscutting support. The FI staff continues to work with your staff members and with the Defense Nuclear Facilities

137

Electrical Safety Assessment Plan--NNSA/NSO IOD Facility Representative,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electrical Safety Assessment Plan--NNSA/NSO IOD Facility Electrical Safety Assessment Plan--NNSA/NSO IOD Facility Representative, 12/03 Electrical Safety Assessment Plan--NNSA/NSO IOD Facility Representative, 12/03 An assessment of the Electrical Safety (ES) program at XXXX was conducted during the week of December XX-XX, 2003. The assessment team evaluated the program using the programmatic areas and specific Lines of Inquiry (LOI) contained in the approved Assessment plan provided. The team consisted of the Facility Representative from National Nuclear Security Administration, as well as ES, Subject Matter Expert support. The assessment plan identified 5 areas of review for Electrical Safety. An integrated process has been established to ensure electrical safety hazards are identified and that adequate controls are defined and

138

DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas Emissions DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas Emissions June 29, 2012 - 12:19pm Addthis Judy McLemore from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant led efforts to reduce the DOE’s vehicle fleet by 20 percent, improving sustainability and saving money. Under her leadership, greenhouse gas emissions associated with business travel were reduced by 63 percent and travel costs were reduced by greater than 60 percent. Judy McLemore from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant led efforts to reduce the DOE's vehicle fleet by 20 percent, improving sustainability and saving money. Under her leadership, greenhouse gas emissions associated with business travel were reduced by 63 percent and travel costs were

139

DOE Order Self Study Modules - DOE STD 1063, Facility Representatives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

63-2011 63-2011 FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES DOE-STD-1063-2011 Familiar Level August 2011 1 DOE-STD-1063-2011 FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES FAMILIAR LEVEL OBJECTIVES Given the familiar level of this module and the resources listed below, you will be able to answer the following questions: 1. What are the purpose and scope of DOE-STD-1063-2011? 2. What are the definitions of the terms listed in section 3 of DOE-STD-1063-2011? 3. What are the duties, responsibilities, and authorities of facility representatives (FRs) and other key personnel? 4. What are the requirements of the FR program? 5. What are the Department of Energy (DOE)-wide FR performance indicators (PIs)? 6. How are DOE-wide FR PIs calculated? 7. What are the FR program objectives that should be measured by an FR program

140

SUBJECT: Guidance on Retention of Facility Representative Technical  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SUBJECT: Guidance on Retention of Facility Representative Technical SUBJECT: Guidance on Retention of Facility Representative Technical Competence during Reductions in Force, 4/21/1998 SUBJECT: Guidance on Retention of Facility Representative Technical Competence during Reductions in Force, 4/21/1998 The Department's Revised Implementation Plan (IP) for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 93-3 renews the Department's commitment to maintaining the technical capability necessary to safely manage and operate defense nuclear facilities. Retaining highly qualified employees in critical technical skills areas is vital to the maintenance of these technical capabilities. The Department has therefore committed in the revised R? to the development of a model that offices can use to proactively manage and preserve critical technical capabilities. During the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mam represents interactions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators for October-December 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2012 2012 MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION FROM: JAMES B. O'BRIEN DIRECTOR ~ OFFICE OF :-IDC~AR AFETY OFFICE OF HEAL 'l;H, AFETY AND SECURITY SUBJECT: Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report, October- December 20 ll This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October through December 2011. Data for these indicators were gathered by field elements per Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standard 1063-2011 , Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report include: FR Staffing/Qualification/Oversight Data * DOE was staffed at 179 FR Full Time Equivalents (FTE), which is 92 percent of the full

142

Fuel options from microalgae with representative chemical compositions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Representative species of microalgae are examined with respect to their reported chemical compositions. Each species is analyzed under a variety of culture conditions, with the objective being to characterize an optimum mixture of fuel products (e.g., methane, ethanol, methylester) which should be produced by the particular species. Historically the emphasis has been on the entire algal cell mass. Using the reported chemical composition for the representative species under specific sets of growth conditions, some conclusions can be drawn about the preferred fuel product conversion routes that could be employed. 10 references, 7 figures, 12 tables.

Feinberg, D. A.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

On the construction of generalized Grassmann representatives of state vectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Generalized $Z_k$-graded Grassmann variables are used to label coherent states related to the nilpotent representation of the q-oscillator of Biedenharn and Macfarlane when the deformation parameter is a root of unity. These states are then used to construct generalized Grassmann representatives of state vectors.

M. El Baz; Y. Hassouni

2004-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

144

Can Regional Climate Models Represent the Indian Monsoon?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability of four regional climate models (RCMs) to represent the Indian monsoon was verified in a consistent framework for the period 1981–2000 using the 45-yr European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Re-Analysis (ERA-40) as ...

Philippe Lucas-Picher; Jens H. Christensen; Fahad Saeed; Pankaj Kumar; Shakeel Asharaf; Bodo Ahrens; Andrew J. Wiltshire; Daniela Jacob; Stefan Hagemann

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Identifying and representing elements of local contexts in namibia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In an attempt to represent local context in a 3D visualisation for rural elders in Namibia we have found major differences in the conceptualization of this context between external and local partners in the co-creation process. Through the evaluation ... Keywords: context, context-aware, indigenous knowledge, participatory design, re-contextualization

Kasper Rodil, Kasper Løvborg Jensen, Matthias Rehm, Heike Winschiers-Theophilus

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Representing digital assets usingMPEG-21 Digital Item Declaration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Various XML-based approaches aimed at representing compound digital assets have emerged over the last several years. Approaches that are of specific relevance to the digital library community include the Metadata Encoding and Transmission Standard (METS), ... Keywords: Digital Item, Digital asset, MPEG-21 DID, OAI-PMH, OpenURL

Jeroen Bekaert; Emiel De Kooning; Herbert de Sompel

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Responses to Questions from the Texas House of Representatives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Texas. However, several specific factors place the future of transportation in the state at risk. Given1 Responses to Questions from the Texas House of Representatives Select Committee on Transportation Funding Prepared for The Honorable Eddie Rodriguez Vice Chair Select Committee on Transportation Funding

148

Livermore Site Office Facility Representative Program Self-Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ARPT-LSO-2011-001 ARPT-LSO-2011-001 Site: Livermore Site Office Subject: Office of Independent Oversight's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations Activity Report for the Livermore Site Office Facility Representative Program Self-Assessment Dates of Activity 01/24/2011 - 01/28/2011 Report Preparer Robert Freeman Activity Description/Purpose: This activity report documents the results of the Office of Health, Safety and Security's (HSS) review of and participation in the Livermore Site Office Self-Assessment of the Facility Representative (FR) Program. This self-assessment was led by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Livermore Site Office (LSO) and conducted by LSO staff, HSS staff, National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of the Chief of Defense Nuclear Safety (CDNS) staff, a peer from Los Alamos Site

149

Processes, data structures, and apparatuses for representing knowledge  

SciTech Connect

Processes, data structures, and apparatuses to represent knowledge are disclosed. The processes can comprise labeling elements in a knowledge signature according to concepts in an ontology and populating the elements with confidence values. The data structures can comprise knowledge signatures stored on computer-readable media. The knowledge signatures comprise a matrix structure having elements labeled according to concepts in an ontology, wherein the value of the element represents a confidence that the concept is present in an information space. The apparatus can comprise a knowledge representation unit having at least one ontology stored on a computer-readable medium, at least one data-receiving device, and a processor configured to generate knowledge signatures by comparing datasets obtained by the data-receiving devices to the ontologies.

Hohimer, Ryan E. (West Richland, WA); Thomson, Judi R. (Guelph, CA); Harvey, William J. (Richland, WA); Paulson, Patrick R. (Pasco, WA); Whiting, Mark A. (Richland, WA); Tratz, Stephen C. (Richland, WA); Chappell, Alan R. (Seattle, WA); Butner, R. Scott (Richland, WA)

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

150

DOE | Office of Health, Safety and Security | 2012 Facility Representative,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative Facility Representative Office of Nuclear Safety Home Facility Representative Home Annual Facility Rep Workshop › 2012 › 2011 › 2010 › 2009 › 2008 › 2007 › 2006 › 2005 › 2004 › 2003 › 2002 › 2001 › 2000 DOE Safety Links › ORPS Info › Operating Experience › DOE Lessons Learned › Accident Investigation Assessment Tools › FR CRADs › Surveillance Guides › Manager's Guide for Safety and Health Subject Matter Links General Program Information › Program Mission Statement › Program Directives and Guidance › FR of the Year Award Program › FR of the Year Award › FR Program Assessment Guide (Appendix B, DOE STD 1063-2011) FR Quarterly Performance Indicators Training & Qualification Information › Qualification Standards › Energy Online Courses

151

Domain assignments for FSSP representative set using DomainParser  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Domain assignments for the FSSP representative set Domain assignments for the FSSP representative set The following are the domain assignments for the FSSP representative set (released on January 31, 2000, 1987 chains in total) using DomainParser. Each line shows a PDB entry (with a chain identifier if any), total number of residues, number of domains, and domain assignments. The result is obtained fully automatically without manual editing. 12asa 327 2 (33-86; 271-288) (4-32; 87-270; 289-330) 153l 185 1 16pk 415 2 (5-205; 409-419) (206-408) 16vpa 311 2 (47-130; 164-233; 324-349) (131-163; 234-323; 395-402) 1914 171 1 19hca 292 2 (45-107) (1-44; 108-292) 1a02f 53 1 1a02j 52 1 1a02n 280 2 (399-569) (570-678) 1a04a 205 2 (5-126) (127-216) 1a0aa 63 1 1a0ca 437 1 1a0fa 201 2 (1-81) (82-201) 1a0ha 159 1 1a0i 332 2 (2-239) (240-349)

152

Representative element modeling of fracture systems based on stochastic analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An important task associated with reservoir simulation is the development of a technique to model a large number of fractures with a single description. Representative elements must be developed before reservoir scale simulations can adequately address the effects of intersecting fracture systems on fluid migration. An effective element model will sharply reduce the cost and complexity of large scale simulations to bring these to manageable levels. Stochastic analysis is a powerful tool which can determine the hydraulic and transport characteristics of intersecting sets of statistically defined fractures. Hydraulic and transport characteristics are required to develop representative elements. Given an assumption of fully developed laminar flow, the net fracture conductivities and hence flow velocities can be determined from descriptive statistics of fracture spacing, orientation, aperture, and extent. The distribution of physical characteristics about their mean leads to a distribution of the associated conductivities. The variance of hydraulic conductivity induces dispersion into the transport process. The simplest of fracture systems, a single set of parallel fractures, is treated to demonstrate the usefulness of stochastic analysis. Explicit equations for conductivity of an element are developed and the dispersion characteristics are shown. The analysis reveals the dependence of the representative element properties on the various parameters used to describe the fracture system. 10 refs., 3 figs.

Clemo, T.M.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Dike/Drift Interactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents and documents the model components and analyses that represent potential processes associated with propagation of a magma-filled crack (dike) migrating upward toward the surface, intersection of the dike with repository drifts, flow of magma in the drifts, and post-magma emplacement effects on repository performance. The processes that describe upward migration of a dike and magma flow down the drift are referred to as the dike intrusion submodel. The post-magma emplacement processes are referred to as the post-intrusion submodel. Collectively, these submodels are referred to as a conceptual model for dike/drift interaction. The model components and analyses of the dike/drift interaction conceptual model provide the technical basis for assessing the potential impacts of an igneous intrusion on repository performance, including those features, events, and processes (FEPs) related to dike/drift interaction (Section 6.1).

E. Gaffiney

2004-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

154

Facility Representative Program: Criteria Review and Approach Document  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessment Tools Assessment Tools Surveillance Guides Manager's Guide for Safety and Health Walkthroughs Criteria Review and Approach Document This page provides Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADS) to assist Facility Representatives. Please submit your CRADS for posting by sending them to the HQ FR Program Manager. Please include the subject, date, and a contact person. Communications NASA Benchmarks Communications Assessment Plan Configuration Management Configuration Management Assessment Plan Confined Space Confined Spaces Assessment Plan Conduct of Operations Conduct of Operations Assessment Plan Electrical Assessment Electrical Safety Assessment Plan Facility Procedures Verification and Validation of Facility Procedures Assessment Plan Hoisting and Rigging

155

Consumption Externalities: A Representative Consumer Model when Agents are Heterogeneous *  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: We examine a growth model with consumption externalities where agents differ in their initial capital endowment and their reference group. We show under which conditions the aggregate equilibrium with heterogeneous agents replicates that obtained with a representative consumer, despite the fact that different individuals have different consumption levels. Next we consider the implications of the presence of consumption externalities for the long-run distributions of income and wealth. We find that, in a growing economy, “keeping up with the Joneses ” results in less inequality than would prevail in an economy with no consumption externalities.

Cecilia García-peñalosa; Stephen J. Turnovsky

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

M.: An Ontology-Based Framework for Representing Organizational Knowledge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: This paper describes an ontology-based organizational knowledge representation framework focused on the specification of a two kinds of ontologies: the top level ontology containing concepts characterizing the typical organizational background and COKE ontologies representing so called core organizational knowledge entities. The framework constitutes an abstract representation of organizational knowledge providing a semantic support for designing knowledge management infrastructure able to interoperate with systems already existing in an organization. Moreover, the annotation of COKE w.r.t. the top level ontology allowed by the framework facilitates their semi-automatic handling, retrieval and evolution monitoring.

Andrea Gualtieri; Massimo Ruffolo

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Fatigue of Composite Material Beam Elements Representative of Wind Turbine Blade Substructure  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The database and analysis methods used to predict wind turbine blade structural performance for stiffness, static strength, dynamic response,and fatigue lifetime are validated through the design, fabrication, and testing of substructural elements. We chose a test specimen representative of wind turbine blade primary substructure to represent the spar area of a typical wind turbine blade. We then designed an I-beam with flanges and web to represent blade structure, using materials typical of many U.S.-manufactured blades. Our study included the fabrication and fatigue testing of 52 beams and many coupons of beam material. Fatigue lifetimes were consistent with predictions based on the coupon database. The final beam specimen proved to be a very useful tool for validating strength and lifetime predictions for a variety of flange and web materials, and is serving as a test bed to ongoing studies of structural details and the interaction between manufacturing and structural performance. Th e beam test results provide a significant validation of the coupon database and the methodologies for predicting fatigue of composite material beam elements.

Mandell, J. F.; Samborsky, D. D.; Combs, D. W.; Scott, M. E.; Cairns, D. S. (Department of Chemical Engineering, Montana State University)

1998-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

158

4Q CY2008, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Http//www.hss.energy.gov/deprep/facrep/ Http//www.hss.energy.gov/deprep/facrep/ ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SITES Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (4QCY2008) Field or Ops Office Staffing Analysis FTEs Actual Staffing % Staffing Attrition % Core Qualified % Fully Qualified % Field Time * % Oversight Time ** CBFO 1 3 1 100 1 100 100 70 86 ID (EM) 13 12 11 85 0 82 82 43 84 OR (EM) 19 18 18 95 0 72 72 44 66 ORP 15 15 14 93 0 79 64 43 72 PPPO 6 5 5 83 0 80 80 44 70 RL 19 18 18 95 1 84 84 45 70 SPRU 1 1 1 100 0 100 0 30 80 SR 32 24 24 75 2 71 67 45 74 WVDP 2 2 2 100 0 50 50 42 70 EM Totals 108 98 94 87 4 77 72 44 72 DOE GOALS - - - 100 - - >80 >40 >65 * % Field Time is defined as the number of hours spent in the plant/field divided by the number of available work hours in the quarter. The number of available work hours is the actual number of hours a Facility Representative works in a calendar quarter, including overtime hours. It does not include

159

2Q CY2004, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Attachment Attachment Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report September 20, 2004 Distribution: Kyle McSlarrow, S-2 Bruce Carnes, S-2 Les Novitsky, S-2 David Garman, S-3 Linton Brooks, NA-1 Tyler Przybylek, NA-1 Everet Beckner, NA-10 James Mangeno, NA-3.6 Glenn Podonsky, SP-1 Mike Kilpatrick, OA-1 Patricia Worthington, OA-40 Paul Golan, EM-1 Inés Triay, EM-3 Patty Bubar, EM-3.2 Raymond Orbach, SC-1 Milt Johnson, SC-3 William Magwood, NE-1 Manager, Ames Site Office Manager, Argonne Site Office Manager, Brookhaven Site Office Manager, Carlsbad Field Office Manager, Fermi Site Office Manager, Idaho Operations Office Manager, Livermore Site Office Manager, Los Alamos Site Office Manager, Nevada Site Office Manager, Oak Ridge Operations Office Manager, Office of River Protection

160

1Q CY2010, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Http: Http: OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT (EM) Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (1QCY2010) Field or Ops Office Staffing Analysis FTEs Actual Staffing % Staffing Attrition % Core Qualified % Fully Qualified % Field Time * % Oversight Time ** CBFO 3 3 3 100 0 100 33 50 78 ID (EM) 13 13 12 92 0 100 100 50 91 OR (EM) 18 17 18 100 0 100 81 45 67 ORP 15 15 14 93 1 93 80 51 81 PPPO 6 6 6 100 0 100 100 43 68 RL 19 19 19 100 0 95 95 43 69 SPRU 1 1 1 100 0 100 0 50 75 SR 32 29 29 91 1 69 69 43 76 WVDP 2 2 2 100 0 50 50 37 60 EM Totals 109 105 104 95 2 89 81 45 75 DOE GOALS - - - 100 - - >80 >40 >65 * Field or Ops Office Key:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mam represents interactions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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161

DOE-STD-1063-2000 - Facility Representatives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NOT MEASUREMENT NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1063-2000 March 2000 Superseding DOE-STD-1063-97 October 1997 DOE STANDARD FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES U.S. Department of Energy AREA MGMT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-STD-1063-2000 iii FOREWORD 1. This Department of Energy standard is approved for use by all DOE Components. 2. The Revision to this DOE standard was developed by a working group consisting of

162

SIGNATURE O F AGENCY REPRESENTATIVE NATIONAL ENERGY STRATEGY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MINOR SUBDIVISION MINOR SUBDIVISION Jeff Martus 01-903-3481 SIGNATURE O F AGENCY REPRESENTATIVE NATIONAL ENERGY STRATEGY See attached. National Energy Strategy The Department of Energy (DOE) was directed by President Bush on July 26, 1989 to begin the development of a comprehensive National Energy Strategy (NES). Published in February 1991, the NES provides the foundation for a more efficient, less vulnerable, and environmentally sustainable energy future. The NES defines international, commercial, regulatory, and technological policy tools that diversify U.S. resources of energy supplies and offers more flexibility and efficiency in the way energy is transformed and used. This proposed schedule provides for the disposition of records that have been created or received by DOE in connection with the

163

3Q CY2007, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SITES ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SITES Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (3QCY2007) Field or Ops Office Staffing Analysis FTEs Actual Staffing % Staffing Attrition % Core Qualified % Fully Qualified % Field Time * % Oversight Time ** CBFO 1 2 2 200 0 100 50 66 86 ID (ICP) 13 12 11 85 1 100 100 40 65 OR (EM) 19 17 16 84 0 94 88 47 71 ORP 14 14 14 100 0 100 93 46 74 PPPO 4 4 4 100 0 100 100 42 75 RL 19 19 19 100 0 100 95 73 69 SR 31 31 25 81 2 88 80 40 79 WVDP 2 2 2 100 0 100 100 43 65 EM Totals 103 101 93 90 3 96 89 50 73 DOE GOALS - - - 100 - - >80 >40 >65 * % Field Time is defined as the number of hours spent in the plant/field divided by the number of available work hours in the quarter. The number of

164

Facility Representative Program Assessment Criteria, Review, and Approach Document (CRAD)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

STD-1063-2011 STD-1063-2011 Appendix B B-1 FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE PROGRAM ASSESSMENT GUIDE The DOE has implemented its FR Program, and is looking to continuously improve the program's effectiveness DOE-wide. An effective FR Program has many elements, as described in this Standard. These elements are intended to yield a program that provides DOE facilities with well-trained FRs who spend appropriate amounts of time in their facilities and can work effectively with their contractor management counterparts. The program, to be effective, needs the functional support of management. To maintain the continued support of DOE management, the FR program needs to demonstrate its continued performance and effectiveness, which is to be assessed periodically using

165

A BRIEF REVIEW OF MODELS REPRESENTING CREEP OF ALLOY 617  

SciTech Connect

Alloy 617 is being considered for the construction of components to operate in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). Service temperatures will range from 650 to 1000 C. To meet the needs of the conceptual designers of this plant, a materials handbook is being developed that will provide information on alloy 617, as well as other materials of interest. The database for alloy 617 to be incorporated into the handbook was produced in the 1970s and 1980s, while creep and damage models were developed from the database for use in the design of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. In the work reported here, the US database and creep models are briefly reviewed. The work reported represents progress toward a useful model of the behavior of this material in the temperature range of 650 to 1000 C.

Swindeman, Robert W [ORNL; Swindeman, Michael [University of Dayton Research Institute; Ren, Weiju [ORNL

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

2Q CY2009, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Http//www.hss.energy.gov/deprep/facrep/ Http//www.hss.energy.gov/deprep/facrep/ OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (2QCY2009) Field or Ops Office * Staffing Analysis FTEs Actual Staffing % Staffing Attrition % Core Qualified % Fully Qualified % Field Time ** % Oversight Time *** CBFO 3 3 2 67 0 50 50 46 76 ID 13 13 11 85 0 100 100 49 90 OR 19 18 17 89 1 71 71 42 57 ORP 15 15 15 100 0 73 73 53 77 PPPO 6 6 6 100 0 67 67 42 70 RL 19 19 19 100 0 84 84 45 69 SR 32 28 28 88 0 64 64 47 73 WVDP 2 2 2 100 0 50 50 37 70 EM Totals 109 104 100 92 1 74 74 46 72 DOE GOALS - - - 100 - - >80 >40 >65 * Field or Ops Office Key CBFO = Carlsbad Field Office; ID = Idaho Operations Office; OR = Oak Ridge Office; ORP = Office of River Protection; PPPO = Portsmouth/Paducah

167

Greening the U.S. House of Representatives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Greening the Capitol initiative was launched in March, 2007 with the threefold goals of making the U.S. House of Representatives: 1) carbon neutral within 18 months, 2) reducing energy use by 50percent in ten years, and 3) becoming a model of sustainable operations. We report on the recommendations to meet these goals, looking at the targets of opportunity at the Capitol Power Plant, the existing buildings, and the overall operations of the complex. Our findings have shown that these goals are achievable, and that through an integrated approach the savings in carbon and energy can be met. Specific examples include the lighting retrofits in the House offices, parking areas, and the Capitol dome; the retrofits to the HVAC systems and controls, including duct sealing, improving the efficiency of the energy and water use in the food service areas; and improved operations of the steam and chilled water distribution system. A key aspect has been better tracking and feedback to the building operators of the actual energy consumption. We report on the technical opportunities presented by these historic and symbolic buildings in becoming models of sustainability.

Diamond, Rick; Diamond, Rick; Payne, Christopher

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Exclusivity structures and graph representatives of local complementation orbits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a construction that maps any connected graph G on three or more vertices into a larger graph, H(G), whose independence number is strictly smaller than its Lov\\'asz number which is equal to its fractional packing number. The vertices of H(G) represent all possible events consistent with the stabilizer group of the graph state associated with G, and exclusive events are adjacent. Mathematically, the graph H(G) corresponds to the orbit of G under local complementation. Physically, the construction translates into graph-theoretic terms the connection between a graph state and a Bell inequality maximally violated by quantum mechanics. In the context of zero-error information theory, the construction suggests a protocol achieving the maximum rate of entanglement-assisted capacity, a quantum mechanical analogue of the Shannon capacity, for each H(G). The violation of the Bell inequality is expressed by the one-shot version of this capacity being strictly larger than the independence number. Finally, given the correspondence between graphs and exclusivity structures, we are able to compute the independence number for certain infinite families of graphs with the use of quantum non-locality, therefore highlighting an application of quantum theory in the proof of a purely combinatorial statement.

Adan Cabello; Matthew G. Parker; Giannicola Scarpa; Simone Severini

2012-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

169

Geometry of interactions in complex bodies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze geometrical structures necessary to represent bulk and surface interactions of standard and substructural nature in complex bodies. Our attention is mainly focused on the influence of diffuse interfaces on sharp discontinuity surfaces. In analyzing this phenomenon, we prove the covariance of surface balances of standard and substructural interactions.

Chiara de Fabriitis; Paolo Maria Mariano

2004-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

170

Method and apparatus for modeling interactions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a method and apparatus for modeling interactions that overcomes drawbacks. The method of the present invention comprises representing two bodies undergoing translations by two swept volume representations. Interactions such as nearest approach and collision can be modeled based on the swept body representations. The present invention is more robust and allows faster modeling than previous methods.

Xavier, Patrick G. (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Examination of Hydrate Formation Methods: Trying to Create Representative Samples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Forming representative gas hydrate-bearing laboratory samples is important so that the properties of these materials may be measured, while controlling the composition and other variables. Natural samples are rare, and have often experienced pressure and temperature changes that may affect the property to be measured [Waite et al., 2008]. Forming methane hydrate samples in the laboratory has been done a number of ways, each having advantages and disadvantages. The ice-to-hydrate method [Stern et al., 1996], contacts melting ice with methane at the appropriate pressure to form hydrate. The hydrate can then be crushed and mixed with mineral grains under controlled conditions, and then compacted to create laboratory samples of methane hydrate in a mineral medium. The hydrate in these samples will be part of the load-bearing frame of the medium. In the excess gas method [Handa and Stupin, 1992], water is distributed throughout a mineral medium (e.g. packed moist sand, drained sand, moistened silica gel, other porous media) and the mixture is brought to hydrate-stable conditions (chilled and pressurized with gas), allowing hydrate to form. This method typically produces grain-cementing hydrate from pendular water in sand [Waite et al., 2004]. In the dissolved gas method [Tohidi et al., 2002], water with sufficient dissolved guest molecules is brought to hydrate-stable conditions where hydrate forms. In the laboratory, this is can be done by pre-dissolving the gas of interest in water and then introducing it to the sample under the appropriate conditions. With this method, it is easier to form hydrate from more soluble gases such as carbon dioxide. It is thought that this method more closely simulates the way most natural gas hydrate has formed. Laboratory implementation, however, is difficult, and sample formation is prohibitively time consuming [Minagawa et al., 2005; Spangenberg and Kulenkampff, 2005]. In another version of this technique, a specified quantity of gas is placed in a sample, then the sample is flooded with water and cooled [Priest et al., 2009]. We have performed a number of tests in which hydrate was formed and the uniformity of the hydrate formation was examined. These tests have primarily used a variety of modifications of the excess gas method to make the hydrate, although we have also used a version of the excess water technique. Early on, we found difficulties in creating uniform samples with a particular sand/ initial water saturation combination (F-110 Sand, {approx} 35% initial water saturation). In many of our tests we selected this combination intentionally to determine whether we could use a method to make the samples uniform. The following methods were examined: Excess gas, Freeze/thaw/form, Freeze/pressurize/thaw, Excess gas followed by water saturation, Excess water, Sand and kaolinite, Use of a nucleation enhancer (SnoMax), and Use of salt in the water. Below, each method, the underlying hypothesis, and our results are briefly presented, followed by a brief conclusion. Many of the hypotheses investigated are not our own, but were presented to us. Much of the data presented is from x-ray CT scanning our samples. The x-ray CT scanner provides a three-dimensional density map of our samples. From this map and the physics that is occurring in our samples, we are able to gain an understanding of the spatial nature of the processes that occur, and attribute them to the locations where they occur.

Kneafsey, T.J.; Rees, E.V.L.; Nakagawa, S.; Kwon, T.-H.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Macroeconomic Activity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Macroeconomic Activity Module Macroeconomic Activity Module The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) represents the interaction between the U.S. economy as a whole and energy markets. The rate of growth of the economy, measured by the growth in gross domestic product (GDP) is a key determinant of the growth in demand for energy. Associated economic factors, such as interest rates and disposable income, strongly influence various elements of the supply and demand for energy. At the same time, reactions to energy markets by the aggregate economy, such as a slowdown in economic growth resulting from increasing energy prices, are also reflected in this module. A detailed description of the MAM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: Macroeconomic Activity Module

173

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Macroeconomic Activity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Macroeconomic Activity Module The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) represents the interaction between the U.S. economy as a whole and energy markets. The rate of growth of the economy, measured by the growth in gross domestic product (GDP) is a key determinant of the growth in demand for energy. Associated economic factors, such as interest rates and disposable income, strongly influence various elements of the supply and demand for energy. At the same time, reactions to energy markets by the aggregate economy, such as a slowdown in economic growth resulting from increasing energy prices, are also reflected in this module. A detailed description of the MAM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: Macroeconomic Activity Module

174

Facility Representatives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Industry Documents ... 3 2.1.1 DOE Directives (Polices, Orders, Manuals, Guides) ... 3 2.1.2 DOE...

175

Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Government Reform Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Government Reform March 20, 2003 Before the...

176

U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Courtney to Visit Research Center in East Hartford U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Courtney to Visit...

177

A Nonhydrostatic Mesoscale Model Designed to Simulate Scale Interaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three-dimensional nonhydrostatic mesoscale model is presented that is designed to optimally represent the scale-interaction process among inertially balanced and unbalanced modes occurring within convective weather systems. Because scale-...

Gregory J. Tripoli

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4C Seattle,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4C Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4C Seattle, Washington Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4C Seattle, Washington In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included. refbldg_4c_usa_wa_seattle_new2004_v1.3_5.0.zip refbldg_4c_usa_wa_seattle_new2004_v1-4_7-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4C Seattle, Washington Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4C Seattle, Washington Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 2B Phoenix,

179

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5A Chicago,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5A Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5A Chicago, Illinois Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5A Chicago, Illinois In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included. refbldg_5a_usa_il_chicago-ohare_post1980_v1.3_5.0.zip refbldg_5a_usa_il_chicago-ohare_post1980_v1-4_7-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5B Boulder, Colorado Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 6A Minneapolis, Minnesota Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 6B Helena,

180

Selection of a representative set of parameters for robust ordinal regression outranking methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We introduce the concept of a representative set of parameters for multiple criteria outranking methods: ELECTRE^G^K^M^S and PROMETHEE^G^K^S which apply the principle of robust ordinal regression. We exploit the necessary and the possible results provided ... Keywords: ELECTRE-like method, Outranking relation, PROMETHEE-like method, Representative preference model, Representative set of parameters, Robust ordinal regression

Mi?osz Kadzi?ski; Salvatore Greco; Roman S?owi?ski

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mam represents interactions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and...

182

Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House Of Representatives...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House Of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and...

183

4Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

"The Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report is attached, covering the period from October to December 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field...

184

An architecture for component-based design of representative-based clustering algorithms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose an architecture for the design of representative-based clustering algorithms based on reusable components. These components were derived from K-means-like algorithms and their extensions. With the suggested clustering design architecture, ... Keywords: Architecture, Generic algorithm, K-means, Representative-based clustering algorithms, Reusable component

Boris Delibaši?; Milan Vuki?evi?; Miloš Jovanovi?; Kathrin Kirchner; Johannes Ruhland; Milija Suknovi?

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

3Q C&2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q C&2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q C&2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q C&2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from July to September 2008. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 80% Fully Qualified ( last Quarter was 87%) 89% Staffing Level ( last Quarter was 86%) 45% Time Spent in the Field (DOE goal is > 40%) 76% Time Spent in Oversight Activites (DOE Goal is >

186

FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE PROGRAM STATUS, 6/21/1999 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE PROGRAM STATUS, 6/21/1999 FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE PROGRAM STATUS, 6/21/1999 FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE PROGRAM STATUS, 6/21/1999 Since September, 1993, the Office of Field Management has served as the Department's corporate advocate for the Facility Representative Program. The Facility Representative (FR) is a critical technical position serving as line management's "eyes and ears" for operational safety in our contractor-operated facilities. I recognize the importance of the FR Program, and commit the Office of Field Integration (FI) to its continued crosscutting support. The FI staff continues to work with your staff members and with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) staff on FR Program issues, including staffing, training and qualification, recruitment, and retention. The Board is clearly interested in the

187

Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Representatives of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations February 26, 2003 Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Statement of Gregory H. Friedman, Inspector General U.S. Department of Energy Testify on the Office of Inspector General's recent inquiry concerning Los Alamos National Laboratory. STATEMENT OF GREGORY H. FRIEDMAN INSPECTOR GENERAL U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY BEFORE THE U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES COMMITTEE ON ENERGY AND COMMERCE SUBCOMMITTEE ON OVERSIGHT AND INVESTIGATIONS, February 26, 2003

188

Modelling protocols for multiagent interaction by F-logic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a method to represent agent Unified Modelling Language (AUML) in logic form using F-logic that provides deductive capability and uniform knowledge integration base. The AUML is used to differentiate relevant interaction more precisely ... Keywords: AUML, F-logic, interaction protocols, message route, multiagent system

Hong Feng Lai

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Prognosis for Mammographically Occult, Early-Stage Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Breast-Conservation Therapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To compare mammographically occult (MamOcc) and mammographically positive (MamPos) early-stage breast cancer patients treated with breast-conservation therapy (BCT), to analyze differences between the two cohorts. Methods and Materials: Our two cohorts consisted of 214 MamOcc and 2168 MamPos patients treated with BCT. Chart reviews were conducted to assess mammogram reports and method of detection. All clinical-pathologic and outcome parameters were analyzed to detect differences between the two cohorts. Results: Median follow-up was 7 years. There were no differences in final margins, T stage, nodal status, estrogen/progesterone receptor status, or 'triple-negative' status. Significant differences included younger age at diagnosis (p < 0.0001), more positive family history (p = 0.0033), less HER-2+ disease (p = 0.0294), and 1{sup o} histology (p < 0.0001). At 10 years, the differences in overall survival, cause-specific survival, and distant relapse between the two groups did not differ significantly. The MamOcc cohort had more breast relapses (15% vs. 8%; p = 0.0357), but on multivariate analysis this difference was not significant (hazard ratio 1.0, 95% confidence interval 0.993-1.007, p = 0.9296). Breast relapses were mammographically occult in 32% of the MamOcc and 12% of the MamPos cohorts (p = 0.0136). Conclusions: Although our study suggests that there are clinical-pathologic variations for the MamOcc cohort vs. MamPos patients that may ultimately affect management, breast relapse after BCT was not significantly different. Breast recurrences were more often mammographically occult in the MamOcc cohort; consideration should be given to closer follow-up and alternative imaging strategies (ultrasound, breast MRI) for routine posttreatment examination. To our knowledge, this represents the largest series addressing the prognostic significance of MamOcc cancers treated with BCT.

Yang, Tzu-I. J. [Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Yang Qifeng [Department of Radiation Oncology, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson School of Medicine, and Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Department of Breast Surgery, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan (China); Haffty, Bruce G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson School of Medicine, and Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Moran, Meena S., E-mail: meena.moran@yale.ed [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

190

U.S. Representative Cleaver congratulates KCP employees for safety record  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Representative Cleaver congratulates KCP employees for safety record Representative Cleaver congratulates KCP employees for safety record during big move | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > U.S. Representative Cleaver congratulates KCP employees for ... U.S. Representative Cleaver congratulates KCP employees for safety record

191

Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House Of Representatives Committee on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Of Representatives Of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House Of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations May 1, 2003 Before the U.S. House Of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Statement of Gregory H. Friedman, Inspector General U.S. Department of Energy Request to testify on the Office of Inspector General's (OIG) reviews of management practices at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (Laboratory). In February of this year, I testified before this Subcommittee regarding our Special Inquiry report on Operations at Los Alamos National Laboratory (DOE/IG-0584, January 2003). That report noted a series of actions taken by

192

Order Module--DOE-STD-1063-2011, FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-STD-1063-2011, FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES DOE-STD-1063-2011, FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES Order Module--DOE-STD-1063-2011, FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES The familiar level of this module is divided into three sections. The first section addresses the purpose and scope of DOE-STD-1063-2011, the purpose of the FR program, and the duties, responsibilities, and authorities of FRs and other key personnel. In the second section, the requirements of the FR program are discussed. The third section covers the three appendices of this standard: FR performance indicators, an FR program assessment guide, and the process to determine FR staffing. We have provided examples and a practice to help familiarize you with the material. The practice will also help prepare you for the criterion test. DOE Order Self Study Modules - DOE STD 1063, Facility Representatives

193

Selecting Representative Days for More Efficient Dynamical Climate Downscaling: Application to Wind Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a new computationally efficient and statistically robust sampling method for generating dynamically downscaled climatologies. It is based on a Monte Carlo method coupled with stratified sampling. A small yet representative set ...

Daran L. Rife; Emilie Vanvyve; James O. Pinto; Andrew J. Monaghan; Christopher A. Davis; Gregory S. Poulos

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Secretary Chu to Join Representatives Lofgren and Honda at the SLAC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Representatives Lofgren and Honda at the SLAC Representatives Lofgren and Honda at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Secretary Chu to Join Representatives Lofgren and Honda at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory August 13, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - On Monday, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu will visit the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory in Menlo Park, California. Secretary Chu will join Representatives Zoe Lofgren and Mike Honda and Stanford University President John Hennessy at a dedication ceremony for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). The Recovery Act-funded LCLS produces x-ray pulses millions of times brighter than the world's most powerful synchrotron sources, capable of capturing images of atoms and molecules in motion. The LCLS is led by SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC). Operated by

195

U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Courtney  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Courtney to Visit Research Center in East Hartford U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Courtney to Visit Research Center in East Hartford February 3, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Tomorrow, Friday, February 4, U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu will travel to East Hartford, Conn. to visit United Technologies Research Center, which has received funding from the Department for several transformational clean energy research projects. The Secretary is visiting UTC to highlight the importance of investing in innovation and clean energy to put people back to work, grow the economy, and win the future. He will be joined by U.S. Representatives John Larson and Joe Courtney for a tour

196

Secretary Chu: China's Clean Energy Successes Represent a New "Sputnik  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chu: China's Clean Energy Successes Represent a New Chu: China's Clean Energy Successes Represent a New "Sputnik Moment" for America Secretary Chu: China's Clean Energy Successes Represent a New "Sputnik Moment" for America November 29, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - In a speech at the National Press Club, U.S Energy Secretary Steven Chu said that the success of China and other countries in clean energy industries represents a new "Sputnik Moment" for the United States, and requires a similar mobilization of America's innovation machine so that we can compete in the global race for the jobs of the future. Secretary Chu outlined efforts underway at the Department to give America's entrepreneurs and manufacturers an edge through investments in clean energy innovation.

197

Gregory H. Friedman: Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The U.S. House of Representatives The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Government Reform Subcommittee on the Federal Workforce and Agency Organization Gregory H. Friedman: Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Government Reform Subcommittee on the Federal Workforce and Agency Organization April 5 2005 Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Government Reform Subcommittee on the Federal Workforce and Agency Organization Statement of Gregory H. Friedman, Inspector General U.S. Department of Energy Testify regarding recent allegations of misconduct involving documents associated with the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. Disposal of the Nation's high-level nuclear waste and spent nuclear fuel is one of the most sensitive and complex challenges facing the U.S.

198

Herbert Richardson: Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Herbert Richardson: Before The U.S. House of Representatives Herbert Richardson: Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Herbert Richardson: Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations March 4, 2004 Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Statement of Herbert Richardson, Principal Deputy Inspector General U.S. Department of Energy Testify regarding physical security at the Department of Energy's facilities. The Department's activities range from nuclear nonproliferation, to cutting edge research and development, to weapons programs. The sensitive and critical nature of the Department's work

199

On the Use of Multi-dimensional Dynamic Logic Programming to Represent Societal Agents' Viewpoints  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explores the applicability of the new paradigm of Multi-dimensional Dynamic Logic Programming to represent an agent's view of the combination of societal knowledge dynamics. The representation of a dynamic society of agents is the core of ...

João Alexandre Leite; José Júlio Alferes; Luís Moniz Pereira

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Gregory H. Friedman: Before The U.S. House of Representatives...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Government Reform Subcommittee on the Federal Workforce and Agency Organization Gregory H. Friedman: Before The U.S. House of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mam represents interactions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Weather pattern classification to represent the urban heat island in present and future climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A classification of weather patterns (WP) is derived that is tailored to best represent situations relevant for the urban heat island (UHI). Three different types of k-means-based cluster methods are conducted. The explained cluster variance is ...

Peter Hoffmann; K. Heinke Schlünzen

202

Can Satellite Sampling of Offshore Wind Speeds Realistically Represent Wind Speed Distributions?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind speeds over the oceans are required for a range of applications but are difficult to obtain through in situ methods. Hence, remote sensing tools, which also offer the possibility of describing spatial variability, represent an attractive ...

R. J. Barthelmie; S. C. Pryor

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

An abstract schema for representing semantic roles and modelling the syntax-semantics interface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a novel approach to semantic role annotation implementing an entailment-based view of the concept of semantic role. I propose to represent arguments of predicates with grammatically relevant primitive properties entailed by the semantics ...

Voula Gotsoulia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Oil Bodies and Oleosins in Physcomitrella Possess Characteristics Representative of Early Trends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil Bodies and Oleosins in Physcomitrella Possess Characteristics Representative of Early Trends oleosin genes. Microscopy examination of Physcomitrella revealed that oil bodies (OBs) were abundant in the photosynthetic vegetative gametophyte and the reproductive spore. Chromatography illustrated the neutral lipids

Gent, Universiteit

205

MamMoeT: An intelligent agent-based communication support platform for multimodal transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, an intelligent agent-based communication support platform for multimodal transport is developed. The rationale for doing so is found in the potential of such a system to increase cost efficiency, service and safety for different transport-related ... Keywords: Agent-based approach, Expert communication platform, ICT, Multimodal transport

Wout Dullaert; Tijs Neutens; Greet Vanden Berghe; Tijs Vermeulen; Bert Vernimmen; Frank Witlox

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Simplicity in interaction design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Attaining simplicity is a key challenge in interaction design. Our approach relies on a minimalist design exercise to explore the communication capacity for interaction components. This approach results in expressive design solutions, useful perspectives ... Keywords: expressiveness, interface design, simplicity, usability

Angela Chang; James Gouldstone; Jamie Zigelbaum; Hiroshi Ishii

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations April 5, 2005 Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Statement of Gregory H. Friedman, Inspector General U.S. Department of Energy Request to testify on the results of our work at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, one of the Department of Energy's most prominent facilities. STATEMENT OF GREGORY H. FRIEDMAN INSPECTOR GENERAL U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY BEFORE THE U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES COMMITTEE ON ENERGY AND COMMERCE SUBCOMMITTEE ON OVERSIGHT AND INVESTIGATIONS, May 5, 2005

208

WHAT THE SMART GRID MEANS TO YOU AND THE PEOPLE YOU REPRESENT. | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REPRESENT. REPRESENT. WHAT THE SMART GRID MEANS TO YOU AND THE PEOPLE YOU REPRESENT. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is charged under the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA 2007) with modernizing the nation's electricity grid to improve its reliability and efficiency. As part of this effort, DOE is also responsible for increasing awareness of our nation's Smart Grid. Building upon The Smart Grid: An Introduction, a DOE-sponsored publication released in 2008 and available online at www.smartgrid.gov, this publication is one in a series of books designed to better acquaint discrete stakeholder groups with the promise and possibilities of the Smart Grid. Stakeholder groups include Utilities, Regulators, Policymakers, Technology Providers, Consumer Advocates and Environmental Groups.

209

On April 25, 2013, several representatives of energy efficiency advocacy organiz  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

April 25, 2013, several representatives of energy efficiency advocacy organizations met with staff April 25, 2013, several representatives of energy efficiency advocacy organizations met with staff and members of the Compressed Air and Gas Institute (CAGI) along with some compressed air experts at the offices of the Alliance to Save Energy to explore and discuss a consensus approach to advancing energy efficiency of compressed air systems within the context of the DOE's potential rulemaking on compressors. The group discussed the need to assemble the relevant data and technical content that will be valuable in identifying possible pathways to achieve a meaningful and appropriate compressor standard that maximizes energy savings potential without creating an undue burden on the market. Representing the energy efficiency advocacy organizations were Tracy Kohler of the Compressed Air

210

December 17, 1998 Memo, Incentives for the Department's Facility Representative Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

mE mE F 1325.8 (a89) EFG (U7-W) United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: December 17, 1998 REPLY TO ATTN OF: FM- 10(J. Hassenfeldt, 202 586-1643) SUBJECT Incentives for the Department's Facility Representative Program TO:Distribution The Department's Revised Implementation Plan for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 93-3 has once again underscored the Department's commitment to maintaining the technical capability necessary to safely manage and operate our defense nuclear facilities. Attracting and retaining highly qualified employees and placing them in our critical technical positions is vital to fi.dfilling this commitment. You have identified 95'% of your Facility Representative positions as critical technical positions. The Office of Field Management has noted a 12'?40 annual attrition rate of Facility Representatives

211

How Representative are the Cloud Regimes at the TWP Sites? Â… An ISCCP Perspective  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How Representative are the Cloud Regimes at the How Representative are the Cloud Regimes at the TWP Sites? - An ISCCP Perspective C. Jakob Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre Melbourne, Australia G. Tselioudis National Aeronautic and Space Administration Goddard Institute for Space Studies Columbia University New York Introduction The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has established comprehensive cloud and radiation observatories in various locations across the globe with the aim of collecting measurements and developing models to better understand the processes that control solar and thermal infrared radiative transfer in clouds and at the surface. The locales of the individual ARM sites were chosen because they represent typical cloud regimes occurring in various climate regimes (Stokes and Schwartz

212

Interactive Intelligent Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... in applying interactive system utility measurements against some hard problems in both the intelligence community (IC) and the military (DARPA). ...

2011-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

213

Representing Instructional Material for Scenario-Based Guided-Discovery Courseware  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The focus of this paper is to discuss paradigms for learning that are based on sound principles of human learning and cognition, and to discuss technical challenges that must be overcome in achieving this research goal through instructional system design (ISD) approaches that are cost-effective as well as conformant with today's interactive multimedia instruction standards. Fundamental concepts are to: engage learners to solve real-world problems (progress from simple to complex); relate material to previous experience; demonstrate what is to be learned using interactive, problem-centered activities rather than passive exposure to material; require learners to use their new knowledge to solve problems that demonstrate their knowledge in a relevant applied setting; and guide the learner with feedback and coaching early, then gradually withdraw this support as learning progresses. Many of these principles have been put into practice by employing interactive learning objects as re-usable components of larger, more integrated exercises. A challenge is to make even more extensive use of interactive, scenario-based activities within a guided-discovery framework. Because the design and construction of interactive, scenario-based learning objects and more complex integrated exercises is labor-intensive, this paper explores the use of interactive learning objects and associated representation schema for instructional content to facilitate development of tools for creating scenario-based, guided-discovery courseware.

Greitzer, Frank L.; Merrill, M. DAVID.; Rice, Douglas M.; Curtis, Darren S.

2004-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

214

Is interactivity actually important?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It appears that it is a well-accepted assumption that interactivity will improve the entertainment and/or learning value of a media. This paper reviews various studies exploring the role of interactivity and reports on a study conducted to see whether ... Keywords: game engine, interactivity, learning, simulation, training

Debbie Richards

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Water and Energy Interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

water and wasted embodied energy. While 5% of California'senergy intensive (94). Water- inefficient fixtures and fittings (toilets, showerheads, urinals, faucets) represent both wasted

McMahon, James E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Nuclear talks in Austria International representatives will meet in Vienna on Saturday to discuss a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear talks in Austria International representatives will meet in Vienna on Saturday to discuss a controversial nuclear fusion plan. The technical meeting of experts is intended to pave the way of nuclear fusion say it provides an attractive long-term energy option, because the basic materials needed

217

Texas A&M University System Chancellor's Diversity Council Representatives from Texas AgriLife  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas A&M University System Chancellor's Diversity Council Representatives from Texas AgriLife Facilitator Joni E. Baker, Ph.D. Director of Equal Opportunity and Diversity The Texas A&M University System 200 Technology Way, Suite 1281 College Station, Texas 77845-3424 979-458-6203 979-458-6206 (fax

218

Review of the Facility Representative Program at the Idaho Site, March 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the Facility Representative Program at the Idaho Site March 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose.................................................................................................................................................. ! 2.0 Scope ..................................................................................................................................................... ! 3.0 Background ........................................................................................................................................... 1 4.0 Results ..................................................................................................................................................

219

Review of the Facility Representative Program at the Idaho Site, March 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of the Facility Representative Program at the Idaho Site March 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose.................................................................................................................................................. ! 2.0 Scope ..................................................................................................................................................... ! 3.0 Background ........................................................................................................................................... 1 4.0 Results ..................................................................................................................................................

220

Texas Revolution Introduction: In this lesson, students will play a game to represent the Texas Revolution.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas Revolution Introduction: In this lesson, students will play a game to represent the Texas to use in conjunction with teaching the battles of the Texas Revolution. A large area is needed the students into two teams: the Mexican Army and the Texas Army. Line each team up, shoulder to shoulder

Wilkins, Neal

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mam represents interactions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Representative Air Temperature of Thermally Heterogeneous Urban Areas Using the Measured Pressure Gradient  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method to measure an area-averaged ground air temperature based on the hydrostatic equation is shown. The method was devised to overcome the problem of finding the most representative surface air temperature over a wide region, a problem that ...

Hirofumi Sugawara; Ken-ichi Narita; Takehiko Mikami

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

SphereAvatar: a situated display to represent a remote collaborator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An emerging form of telecollaboration utilizes situated or mobile displays at a physical destination to virtually represent remote visitors. An example is a personal telepresence robot, which acts as a physical proxy for a remote visitor, and uses cameras ... Keywords: avatars, mixed reality, remote collaboration, spherical displays, telepresence, telerobotics

Oyewole Oyekoya; William Steptoe; Anthony Steed

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

PDSF Interactive Nodes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interactive (login) Nodes Interactive (login) Nodes Interactive (login) Nodes There are 4 interactive nodes at PDSF, pdsf[1-4].nersc.gov, that should be accessed via ssh to pdsf.nersc.gov. These are the gateways to accessing the rest of PDSF. Users can submit batch jobs as well as view and manipulate their files and directories from the interactive nodes. The configuration of the interactive nodes is shown in the table below. Processor Clock Speed (GHz) Architecture Cores Total Memory (GB) Scratch Space (GB) Intel Xeon X5650 2.67 x86_64 12 47 184 Because these nodes are shared by many users anything disruptive you might do affects not only your work but their work, too. Please take a look at the Best Practices page for guidance about what you should and should not do on the interactive nodes.

224

Image Bank from Interactions.org  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Interactions.org is designed to serve as a central resource for communicators of particle physics. The site is updated daily with news, information, images and links from the world of particle physics. It provides links to current particle physics news from the world's press, links to education and outreach programs; information about science policy and funding; links to universities; a glossary; and a conference calendar. The Image Bank provides high-resolution photos and graphics from the particle physics laboratories of the world, including Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), and Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The Interactions.org website was developed and is jointly maintained by the InterAction collaboration, whose members represent the world's particle physics laboratories in Europe, North America and Asia, with funding provided by science funding agencies of many nations. See also the videos and animations available at this site.

225

On October 20, 2011, representatives of Howe Corporation, Gade Environmental, an  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 20, 2011, representatives of Howe Corporation, Gade Environmental, and Beecon ProfServe October 20, 2011, representatives of Howe Corporation, Gade Environmental, and Beecon ProfServe met with DOE to discuss the proposed rules EERE-2010 BT-TP-0036 RIN 1904-AC38 Energy Efficiency Program for Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Test Procedures for Commercial Ice Makers. The meeting was held at the request of Howe Corporation at the DOE offices in Washington DC. In attendance: Ari Altman, DOE Ashley Armstrong, DOE Robert Bittner, Beecon ProfServe John Cymbalsky, DOE Mary Gade, Gade Environmental Group Mary Howe, Howe Corporation Charles Llenza, DOE Jeff Mackowiak, Howe Corporation Mark O'Malley, Gade Environmental Group Howe Corporation introduced and discussed the following concerns regarding the NOPR. For reference,

226

Registering for DAU Online Course CLC 222, Contracting Officer's Representative Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Registering for DAU Online Course CLC 222, Contracting Officer's Representative Training Registering for DAU Online Course CLC 222, Contracting Officer's Representative Training To register for this, and any other DAU online course, you must first register in the Federal Acquisition Institute's Training Application System (FAITAS). Steps to register in FAITAS and to register for the course are below. Please note, you are required to provide your Social Security Number (SSN) to complete registration. This is the only time the SSN is required; this information is restricted and not available to unauthorized personnel. Please contact Linda Ott (linda.ott@hq.doe.gov, 202-287-5310) if you have any questions or concerns. If you encounter problems with

227

Facility Representative Performance Indicator Report for for Jan-Mar 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative Performance Indicators January-March 2013 Facility Representative Performance Indicators January-March 2013 Staffing, Qualification, and Utilization Data OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT (EM) Location Analysis FTE Approved FTE Actual Staff % Staff * Gains / Losses % Core Qualified * % Fully Qualified * % Oversight Time ** CBFO 3 3 4 100 0 100 100 63 ID (EM) 1 7 7 6 86 0 71 71 90 OR (EM) 14 14 13 93 0 86 86 75 ORP 13 13 13 100 0 100 100 90 PPPO 2 6 6 6 100 ±1 100 100 74 RL 17 15 15 88 0 88 82 70 SPRU 3 2 2 2 100 0 100 0 90 SR 4 31 31 27 87 -1 87 87 86 WVDP 2 2 2 100 0 100 100 75 EM Totals 95 93 88 93 +1, -2 89 86 79 DOE GOALS - - - 100 - - >80 >65 Location Key: CBFO = Carlsbad Field Office ORP = Office of River Protection SPRU = Separations Process Research Unit

228

2012 Facility Representative/Safety System Oversight/Fire Safety Workshop - Registrants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative / Safety System Oversight Workshop Facility Representative / Safety System Oversight Workshop DOE Fire Safety Workshop Federal Technical Capability Panel (FTCP) Meeting May 14 - 18, 2012, at the Alexis park Resort Hotel, Las Vegas, NV Registrants As of 5/15/2012 Total Number: 218 First Name Last Name Government /Contractor Agency Secretarial Office Site Position Training Course FTCP FS 5/15 FS 5/16 FR/SSO Plenary FR Track SSO Track Fire Safety Training Tour Ron Alderson Government Employee DOE NNSA Nevada SSO SAF-271 No No No Yes No Yes No No Josh Allen Government Employee DOE EM Richland FR No No No No Yes Yes No No No Mark Alsdorf Government Employee DOE HSS Headquarters NTC Safety Training Manager SAF-271 Yes No No Yes No No No No Xavier Aponte Government Employee

229

WHAT THE SMART GRID MEANS TO YOU AND THE PEOPLE YOU REPRESENT.  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REPRESENT. REPRESENT. regulators consumer advocates environmental groups technology providers policymakers ONE of SIX SMART GRID STAKEHOLDER BOOKS A smarter grid can work harder and more efficiently to respond to the needs of all consumers, contain costs and enable clean-energy solutions at scale. regulators utilities 2 DISCLAIMER PRINTED IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor Litos Strategic Communication, nor any of their employees, make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information apparatus, product,

230

PDSF Interactive Batch Jobs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interactive Batch Jobs Interactive Batch Jobs Running Interactive Batch Jobs You cannot login to the PDSF batch nodes directly but you can run an interactive session on a batch node using either qlogin or qsh. This can be useful if you are doing something that is potentially disruptive or if the interactive nodes are overloaded. qlogin will give you an interactive session in the same window as your original session on PDSF, however, you must have your ssh keys in place. Due to system limitations there is a small (but important) difference in the user environment you get when you use qlogin. When you receive a shell prompt with qlogin, your CHOS environment is not set up for you. In order to set up the CHOS environment of your choice you will need to manually chos into the chos environment of your choice:

231

ridges represent an enormous infrastructure invest-ment across the nation. Maintenance, repair, upgrade,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

can be based around fiber-optic systems. Initially a spin-off of optical telecommuni- cation of constructability, system identification, data acquisition, information technologies, and field studies [6]. Fiber-Optic. The characteristics of a fiber-optic sensor system are determined by the physical interaction, the sensor design

Ragsdell, Kenneth M.

232

Is Gravity an Interaction?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider a possibility that gravity is not an interaction but a manifestation of a symmetry based on a Galois field.

Felix M. Lev

2009-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

233

PIA - Industry Interactive Procurement System (IIPS) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industry Interactive Procurement System (IIPS) PIA - Industry Interactive Procurement System (IIPS) PIA - Industry Interactive Procurement System (IIPS) PIA - Industry Interactive...

234

Gregory H. Friedman: Provided for The Committee on Oversight and Government Reform U.S. House of Representatives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Gregory H. Friedman: Provided for The Committee on Oversight and Government Reform U.S. House of Representatives

235

Verifying Interactive Web Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Web programs are important, increasingly representing the primary public interfaces of commercial organizations. Unfortunately, Web programs also exhibit numerous flaws. In addition to the usual correctness problems faced by software, Web programs must ...

Daniel R. Licata; Shriram Krishnamurthi

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

An Interactive Derivation Viewer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work describes the Interactive Derivation Viewer (IDV) tool for graphical rendering of derivations that are written in the TPTP language. IDV provides an interactive interface that allows the user to quickly view various features of the derivation. ... Keywords: Derivation viewer, Proof synopsis

Steven Trac; Yury Puzis; Geoff Sutcliffe

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Foldable interactive displays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern computer displays tend to be in fixed size, rigid, and rectilinear rendering them insensitive to the visual area demands of an application or the desires of the user. Foldable displays offer the ability to reshape and resize the interactive surface ... Keywords: augmented reality, foldable displays, interactive, mobile, orientation sensitivity, privacy, projection

Johnny C. Lee; Scott E. Hudson; Edward Tse

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Handheld Projector Interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recent trend towards miniaturization of projection technology indicates that handheld devices will soon have the ability to project information onto any surface, thus enabling interaction and applications that are not possible with current handheld devices. This opens up an emerging research area on interaction using handheld projectors. With the ability to project information, a handheld device can surmount the limitations of its small internal screen by creating a larger information display on an external surface. By doing so, the display and interaction space can be expanded to cover almost an entire physical environment. Large amounts of data can be displayed, a rich interaction vocabulary can be supported, and multiple co-located people can share the viewing experience at the same time. In this thesis, I investigate research issues involved in the design, implementation, and user performance and behaviors regarding the usage of interactive handheld projectors. I create a handheld projector interaction prototype platform, and explore interaction concepts and techniques to support both single and multi-user interaction using one or several handheld projectors. I also empirically investigate the user behaviors

Xiang Cao

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Equipment and Piping Labeling Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EQUIPMENT AND PIPING LABELING EQUIPMENT AND PIPING LABELING Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: To verify that facility equipment and piping are labeled in a manner such that facility personnel are able to positively identify equipment they operate. To ensure that an effective labeling program is in effect to reduce operator and maintenance errors from incorrect identification of equipment, to increase training effectiveness by tracing the actual facility system as opposed to tracing its schematic, and to reduce personnel exposure to radiation and hazardous materials. This assessment provides a basis for evaluating the effectiveness of the contractor's program for labeling equipment and piping and for establishing compliance

240

Maintenance Assessment Plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MAINTENANCE MAINTENANCE Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: An effective facilities maintenance program should optimize the material condition of components and equipment to support safe and effective operations and ensure the peak performance and reliability of those systems and equipment important to operations. Criteria: The program, facility or operation has a Maintenance Implementation Plan (MIP), or equivalent document, which defines and documents the approach to conduct of maintenance. The maintenance organization structure is well defined and understood. Responsibilities, organizational interfaces, and administrative activities are adequately defined and implemented to provide timely availability of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mam represents interactions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Statistical description of heavy truck accidents on representative segments of interstate highway  

SciTech Connect

Any quantitative analysis of the risk of transportation accidents requires the use of many different statistical distributions. Included among these are the types of accidents which occur and the severity of these when they do occur. Several previous studies have derived this type of information for truck traffic over U. S. highways in general; these data are not necessarily applicable for the anticipated LMFBR spent fuel cask routes. This report presents data for highway segments representative of the specific LMFBR cask routes which are anticipated. These data are based upon a detailed record-by-record review of filed reports for accidents which occurred along the specified route segments.

Hartman, W.F.; Davidson, C.A.; Foley, J.T.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Strain rate, temperature and representative length scale influence on plasticity and yield stress in copper  

SciTech Connect

Shock compression of materials constitutes a complex process involving high strain rates, elevated temperatures and compression of the lattice. Materials properties are greatly affected by temperature, the representative length scale and the strain rate of the deformation. Experimentally, it is difficult to study the dynamic microscopic mechanisms that affect materials properties following high intensity shock loading, but they can be investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Moreover, MD allows a better control over some parameters. We are using MD simulations to study the effect of the strain rate, representative length scale and temperature on the properties of metals during compression. A half-million-atom Cu sample is subjected to strain rates ranging from 10{sup 7} s{sup -1} to 10{sup 12} s{sup -1} at different temperatures ranging from 50K to 1500K. Single crystals as well as polycrystals are investigated. Plasticity mechanisms as well as the evolution of the micro- and macro-yield stress are observed. Our results show that the yield stress increases with increasing strain rate and decreasing temperature. We also show that the strain rate at which the transition between constant and increasing yield stress as a function of the temperature occurs increases with increasing temperature. Calculations at different grain sizes will give an insight into the grain size effect on the plasticity mechanisms and the yield stress.

Dupont, Virginie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Germann, Timothy C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

243

2012 Facility Representative/Safety System Oversight/Fire Safety Workshop Agenda  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative ï‚· Safety System Oversight ï‚· Fire Safety Facility Representative ï‚· Safety System Oversight ï‚· Fire Safety Overall Workshop Agenda May 14-18, 2012 ï‚· Alexis Park Hotel ï‚· Las Vegas, Nevada Monday, May 14, 2012 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SAF-271, SSO Assessments (Day 1) Zeus B Quality Assurance Overview for FR/SSO Personnel Zeus A 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. Workshop Registration Zeus Foyer Tuesday, May 15, 2012 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Fire Safety Workshop Track Begins (see track agenda) Parthenon 4 SAF-271, SSO Assessments (Day 2) Zeus B . Safety Culture Workshop Zeus A Federal Technical Capability Panel Parthenon 2 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. Workshop Registration Zeus Foyer Wednesday, May 16, 2012 6:30 a.m. - 7:45 a.m. Workshop Registration Zeus Foyer 8:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. FR/SSO Tracks Begin; Plenary session with Fire Safety Track Parthenon 2 & 4

244

Census Bureau. Field Experiences 2 Field Representative Experiences with the Current Population Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In September 2007, U.S. Census Bureau researchers completed a third pilot study on factors that contribute to gaining cooperation and successfully completing survey interviews. This pilot study was part of a larger effort to systematically study interview dynamics and how they affect respondent cooperation with Census Bureau surveys. The results of this study will add to extant data on two previous pilot studies on gaining cooperation behavior (Beck, Wright, & Petkunas, 2007). In 2006, we collected data from Program Coordinators, Program Supervisors, and Senior Field Representatives (SFRs) working on (Beck, Wright, & Petkunas, 2007). The current pilot study involved collecting information from a sample of Census Bureau survey interviewers, called Field Representatives (FRs), throughout the United States. Like these other “field ” employees, FRs work from one of the twelve Census Bureau Regional Offices, which are responsible for the management of field data collection. The FRs filled out a brief questionnaire asking them to list practices, techniques, and recommendations they felt were either successful or unsuccessful at gaining respondent cooperation with Current Population Survey (CPS) interviews. The CPS is a panel survey involving eight monthly interviews with each sampled household. Respondents complete four consecutive monthly interviews, rotate out

Jennifer Beck; Jennifer Beck

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Temporal and Spatial Deployment of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Technologies across the Representative Concentration Pathways  

SciTech Connect

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s (IPCC) Fifth Assessment (to be published in 2013-2014) will to a significant degree be built around four Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) that are intended to represent four scenarios of future development of greenhouse gas emissions, land use, and concentrations that span the widest range of potential future atmospheric radiative forcing. Under the very stringent climate policy implied by the 2.6 W/m2 overshoot scenario, all electricity is eventually generated from low carbon sources. However, carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies never comprise more than 50% of total electricity generation in that very stringent scenario or in any of the other cases examined here. There are significant differences among the cases studied here in terms of how CCS technologies are used, with the most prominent being is the significant expansion of biomass+CCS as the stringency of the implied climate policy increases. Cumulative CO2 storage across the three cases that imply binding greenhouse gas constraints ranges by nearly an order of magnitude from 170GtCO2 (radiative forcing of 6.0W/m2 in 2100) to 1600GtCO2 (2.6W/m2 in 2100) over the course of this century. This potential demand for deep geologic CO2 storage is well within published estimates of total global CO2 storage capacity.

Dooley, James J.; Calvin, Katherine V.

2011-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

246

Spatially-encoded far-field representations for interactive walkthroughs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We introduce the notion of spatially encoded video and use it for efficiently representing image-based impostors for interactive walkthroughs. As part of a pre-process, we automatically decompose the model and compute the far-fields. The resulting texture ... Keywords: MPEG, image databases, image-based rendering, rendering systems, spatial data structures

Andrew Wilson; Ketan Mayer-Patel; Dinesh Manocha

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Token+constraint systems for tangible interaction with digital information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We identify and present a major interaction approach for tangible user interfaces based upon systems of tokens and constraints. In these interfaces, tokens are discrete physical objects which represent digital information. Constraints are confining regions ... Keywords: Tangible interfaces, token+constraint interfaces

Brygg Ullmer; Hiroshi Ishii; Robert J. K. Jacob

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Interactions V3 Composite  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Physics Physics The science of matter, space and time INTERACTIONS The science of matter, space and time High Energy Physics is the Science of Interactions s "Since we (and everything in the universe) are made mostly of empty space, and even particles of matter are just vibrating chunks of energy, what is it that makes us essentially us? It's all about relationships-the way the particles and forces interact. It's all of a piece, a tapestry of relationships woven in space and time." -K.C. Cole, science writer, Los Angeles Times " Every cubic inch of space is a miracle." -Walt Whitman The deepest secrets of the universe The science of matter, space and time INTERACTIONS: Unlocking the deepest secrets of the universe s What is the universe made of ?

249

Electrical Safety Assessment Plan - Developed By NNSA/NSO IOD Facility Representative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 2003 December 2003 An assessment of the Electrical Safety (ES) program at XXXX was conducted during the week of December XX-XX, 2003. The assessment team evaluated the program using the programmatic areas and specific Lines of Inquiry (LOI) contained in the approved Assessment plan provided. The team consisted of the Facility Representative from National Nuclear Security Administration, as well as ES, Subject Matter Expert support. The assessment plan identified 5 areas of review for Electrical Safety. An integrated process has been established to ensure electrical safety hazards are identified and that adequate controls are defined and implemented. The M&O contractor and other NTS Users management actively participate in the ES program. An implemented Work Control process is in place that ensures

250

Confined Spaces Assessment Plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CONFINED SPACES CONFINED SPACES Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: This assessment provides a basis for evaluating the safety effectiveness of the contractor's confined or enclosed spaces procedure, and for establishing compliance with DOE and OSHA requirements. Specifically, this assessment is to verify the information and findings of the BN Management Self Assessment Report on "Confined Space", ES&H-MSA-03-13, dated December 31, 2003. Criteria: Practices and procedures are in place to protect employees in general industry from the hazards of entry into permit-required confined spaces. 29 CFR 1910.146 (a) Each employee is instructed in the recognition and avoidance of unsafe conditions and the regulations applicable to his work environment to

251

NASA Benchmarks Safety Functions Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SAFETY FUNCTIONS SAFETY FUNCTIONS Assessment Plan Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: Management should be proactive in addressing safety-related issues. Management should have an established system to provide a ranking of safety considerations founded upon risk-based priorities. Criteria: A system is in place to provide a ranking of safety considerations founded upon risk-based priorities. (DOE/EH-0135) Procedures clearly define management's responsibility for safety- related decisions and provide for the escalation of matters in an appropriate time frame. (DOE/EH-0135) Management promotes safety programs and the organization's safety culture through sponsoring and attending safety meetings. (DOE/EH- 0135) Management encourages and supports effective programs for reporting

252

DOE-STD-1151-2002; Facility Representative Functional Area Qualification Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1151-2002 1151-2002 April 2002 DOE STANDARD FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-STD-1151-2002 iii APPROVAL The Federal Technical Capability Panel consists of senior Department of Energy managers

253

NASA Benchmarks Communications Assessment Plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COMMUNICATIONS COMMUNICATIONS Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: Lines of authority are clearly defined with clear and open communications existing between all departments and all levels. Criteria: Dialogue exists between personnel involved in engineering/design, operations, maintenance, safety issues, and remedial actions. Personnel within the departments are promptly informed on issues as they occur on a need-to-know basis. Lessons Learned and feedback is encouraged inter-departmentally regarding safety, adequate resources, and processes to enable prompt and effective corrective actions and resolutions for mission accomplishment. Management has an effective and specified chain of communication in both directions between corporate and facility management. (DOE/EH-0135)

254

NASA Benchmarks Lessons Learned Assessment Plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LESSONS LEARNED LESSONS LEARNED Assessment Plan Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: Management should have an established Lessons Learned Program with an effective system to continuously distribute information of improvement in safe operations to all affected personnel. Criteria: Timely and effective action is taken to track and correct identified deficiencies and to prevent their recurrence by addressing their basic causes and related generic problems. (DOE/EH-0135) Management installs an effective corrective action program (caWeb) for safety-related issues, wherein records are updated and actions are tracked through completion. (DOE/EH-0135) Management uses the corrective action program (caWeb) as the database to analyze safety issues, implement corrective actions, and define

255

Facility Representatives, DOE-STD-1063-2011, Change Notice 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STD-1063-2011 STD-1063-2011 February 2011 Change Notice 1 March 2012 DOE STANDARD FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES U.S. Department of Energy AREA MGMT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1063-2011 ii Change Notice No. 1 March 2012 Table of Changes Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web site at http://www.hss.doe.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/ Page/Section Change Foreword Update contact information and internet address. Page 20/ Section 5.4.8 Edited the discussion of Interim Qualification to match the language in the Definition section and deleted a redundant word. Page 20/ Section 5.4.10 Clarified qualification requirements for

256

Selection of respirator test panels representative of U.S. adult facial sizes  

SciTech Connect

As requested by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory Respirator Research and Development Section, Industrial Hygiene Group, has prepared anthropometric specifications for subjects to test the fit of half-mask, quarter-mask, and full- facepiece respirators. A facial survey of 200 males was conducted, with results similar to those of a recent survey of some 4000 U. S. airmen. Subjects were selected on the basis of face length and face width to wear full-face masks in tests. For testing halfand quarter-masks, face length and lip length were used. Test panels containing 25 male-and-female subjects were used to represent a majority of the working population. A sequential sampling scheme was developed to reduce the amount of testing required to determine if a mask provides adequate protection for diffurent facial sizes. Examples of man test results are given. (auth)

Hack, A.; Hyatt, E.C.; Held, B.J.; Moore, T.O.; Richards, C.P.; McConville, J.T.

1973-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Human-machine interactions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Digital technology utilizing a cognitive model based on human naturalistic decision-making processes, including pattern recognition and episodic memory, can reduce the dependency of human-machine interactions on the abilities of a human user and can enable a machine to more closely emulate human-like responses. Such a cognitive model can enable digital technology to use cognitive capacities fundamental to human-like communication and cooperation to interact with humans.

Forsythe, J. Chris (Sandia Park, NM); Xavier, Patrick G. (Albuquerque, NM); Abbott, Robert G. (Albuquerque, NM); Brannon, Nathan G. (Albuquerque, NM); Bernard, Michael L. (Tijeras, NM); Speed, Ann E. (Albuquerque, NM)

2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

258

Product placement in interactive games  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern computer and video games offer a dynamic means of interactive advertising for a wide range of commercial products. This article details an exploratory study in the area of interactive, in-game advertising. Various key forms of interactive advertising ... Keywords: computer games, interactive advertising, interactive media, product placement, video games

Barry Ip

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

HQFMSP Chapter 6, Foreign Interaction | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6, Foreign Interaction 6, Foreign Interaction HQFMSP Chapter 6, Foreign Interaction October 2013 2013 Headquarters Facilities Master Security Plan - Chapter 6, Foreign Interaction DOE has adopted significant controls over the interaction of its employees and contractors with foreign nationals. When authorized by a treaty or international agreement, some DOE classified information can be shared with foreign government representatives. Unclassified information can be shared with foreign nationals only after a senior DOE official has approved that exchange. No foreign national can be admitted to a HQ facility without the approval of a senior HQ official and then only when required information is placed in the Foreign Access Central Tracking System (FACTS). There are also controls over some foreign travel performed by

260

Experimental and Modeling Investigation of Radionuclide Interaction and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Experimental and Modeling Investigation of Radionuclide Interaction Experimental and Modeling Investigation of Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Media Experimental and Modeling Investigation of Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Media The natural system is an integral part of a geologic nuclear waste repository; it extends from the disturbed rock zone (DRZ) around a disposal room, created by mechanical, thermal and chemical perturbations due to underground excavation or waste emplacement, to the surrounding geologic media, and out to a specified repository boundary. The natural system evaluation and tool development work supports anticipated future site screening, site selection, site characterization, and site suitability. This work is conducted to reduce uncertainty in natural system performance

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mam represents interactions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Statement of Patricia Hoffman Before the US House of Representatives Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development (March 27, 2012)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Statement of Assistant Secretary Patricia Hoffman Before the US House of Representatives Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development to discuss the President's FY13 budget for the...

262

How well do time-integrated K{sub {alpha}} images represent hot electron spatial distributions?  

SciTech Connect

A computational study is described, which addresses how well spatially resolved time-integrated K{sub {alpha}} images recorded in intense laser-plasma experiments correlate with the distribution of ''hot'' (>1 MeV) electrons as they propagate through the target. The hot electron angular distribution leaving the laser-plasma region is critically important for many applications such as Fast Ignition or laser based x-ray sources; and K{sub {alpha}} images are commonly used as a diagnostic. It is found that K{sub {alpha}} images can easily mislead due to refluxing and other effects. Using the particle-in-cell code LSP, it is shown that a K{sub {alpha}} image is not solely determined by the initial population of forward directed hot electrons, but rather also depends upon ''delayed'' hot electrons, and in fact continues to evolve long after the end of the laser interaction. Of particular note, there is a population of hot electrons created during the laser-plasma interaction that acquire a velocity direction opposite that of the laser and subsequently reflux off the front surface of the target, deflect when they encounter magnetic fields in the laser-plasma region, and then traverse the target in a wide spatial distribution. These delayed fast electrons create significant features in the K{sub {alpha}} time-integrated images. Electrons refluxing from the sides and the back of the target are also found to play a significant role in forming the final K{alpha} image. The relative contribution of these processes is found to vary depending on depth within target. These effects make efforts to find simple correlations between K{alpha} images and, for example, Fast Ignition relevant parameters prone to error. Suggestions for future target design are provided.

Ovchinnikov, V. M.; Kemp, G. E.; Schumacher, D. W.; Freeman, R. R.; Van Woerkom, L. D. [Physics Department, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

263

Fundamental Symmetries and Interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In nuclear physics numerous possibilities exist to investigate fundamental symmetries and interactions. In particular, the precise measurements of properties of fundamental fermions, searches for new interactions in ?-decays, and violations of discrete symmeties offer possibilities to search for physics beyond standard theory. Precise measurements of fundamental constants can be carried out. Low energy experiments allow to probe New Physics at mass scales far beyond the reach of present accelerators or such planned for the future and at which predicted new particles could be produced directly. 1. Fundamental Forces and Symmetries Symmetries play an important and crucial role in physics. Global symmetries give rise to conservation laws and local symmetries yield forces [ 1]. To date we know four fundamental interactions: (i) Electromagnetism, (ii) Weak Interactions, (iii) Strong Interactions, and (iv) Gravitation. These four forces are fundamental in the sense that all observed dynamical processes in physics can be traced back to one or a combination of them. Together with fundamental symmetries they from a framework on which all physical descriptions ultimately rest.

Klaus P. Jungmann A; Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

NVLAP Interactive Web Site (NIWS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Welcome to the NVLAP Interactive Web Site (NIWS). ... The URL for the NVLAP Interactive Web Site (NIWS) is: https://www-s.nist.gov/niwsapp. ...

2012-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

265

Atomic data for controlled fusion research. Volume III. Particle interactions with surfaces  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides a handbook of data concerning particle solid interactions that are relevant to plasma-wall interactions in fusion devices. Published data have been collected, assessed, and represented by a single functional relationship which is presented in both tabular and graphical form. Mechanisms reviewed here include sputtering, secondary electron emission, particle reflection, and trapping.

Thomas, E.W.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

CO2 interaction with geomaterials.  

SciTech Connect

This work compares the sorption and swelling processes associated with CO2-coal and CO2-clay interactions. We investigated the mechanisms of interaction related to CO2 adsortion in micropores, intercalation into sub-micropores, dissolution in solid matrix, the role of water, and the associated changes in reservoir permeability, for applications in CO2 sequestration and enhanced coal bed methane recovery. The structural changes caused by CO2 have been investigated. A high-pressure micro-dilatometer was equipped to investigate the effect of CO2 pressure on the thermoplastic properties of coal. Using an identical dilatometer, Rashid Khan (1985) performed experiments with CO2 that revealed a dramatic reduction in the softening temperature of coal when exposed to high-pressure CO2. A set of experiments was designed for -20+45-mesh samples of Argonne Premium Pocahontas No.3 coal, which is similar in proximate and ultimate analysis to the Lower Kittanning seam coal that Khan used in his experiments. No dramatic decrease in coal softening temperature has been observed in high-pressure CO2 that would corroborate the prior work of Khan. Thus, conventional polymer (or 'geopolymer') theories may not be directly applicable to CO2 interaction with coals. Clays are similar to coals in that they represent abundant geomaterials with well-developed microporous structure. We evaluated the CO2 sequestration potential of clays relative to coals and investigated the factors that affect the sorption capacity, rates, and permanence of CO2 trapping. For the geomaterials comparison studies, we used source clay samples from The Clay Minerals Society. Preliminary results showed that expandable clays have CO2 sorption capacities comparable to those of coal. We analyzed sorption isotherms, XRD, DRIFTS (infrared reflectance spectra at non-ambient conditions), and TGA-MS (thermal gravimetric analysis) data to compare the effects of various factors on CO2 trapping. In montmorillonite, CO2 molecules may remain trapped for several months following several hours of exposure to high pressure (supercritical conditions), high temperature (above boiling point of water) or both. Such trapping is well preserved in either inert gas or the ambient environment and appears to eventually result in carbonate formation. We performed computer simulations of CO2 interaction with free cations (normal modes of CO2 and Na+CO2 were calculated using B3LYP / aug-cc-pVDZ and MP2 / aug-cc-pVDZ methods) and with clay structures containing interlayer cations (MD simulations with Clayff potentials for clay and a modified CO2 potential). Additionally, interaction of CO2 with hydrated Na-montmorillonite was studied using density functional theory with dispersion corrections. The sorption energies and the swelling behavior were investigated. Preliminary modeling results and experimental observations indicate that the presence of water molecules in the interlayer region is necessary for intercalation of CO2. Our preliminary conclusion is that CO2 molecules may intercalate into interlayer region of swelling clay and stay there via coordination to the interlayer cations.

Guthrie, George D. (U.S. Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA); Al-Saidi, Wissam A. (University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA); Jordan, Kenneth D. (University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA); Voora, Vamsee, K. (University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA); Romanov, Vyacheslav N. (U.S. Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA); Lopano, Christina L (U.S. Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA); Myshakin, Eugene M. (URS Corporation, Pittsburgh, PA); Hur, Tae Bong (University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA); Warzinski, Robert P. (U.S. Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA); Lynn, Ronald J. (URS Corporation, Pittsburgh, PA); Howard, Bret H. (U.S. Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA); Cygan, Randall Timothy

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Inquiry into School Libraries and Teacher Librarians in Australian Schools QCEC submission to the House of Representatives Standing Committee on Education and Training  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Queensland Catholic Education Commission (QCEC) welcomes the opportunity to make this submission to the House of Representatives Inquiry into school libraries and teacher librarians in Australian Schools, which will inquire into and report on the role, adequacy and resourcing of school libraries and teacher librarians in Australia’s public and private schools. This submission is made on behalf of the 22 Catholic school employing authorities and the 288 Catholic schools in Queensland. Some of the individual schooling authorities and teacher librarians may choose to make separate submissions. Background Teaching and learning in schools is achieved through the complex interaction of people and physical structures. School libraries are included in this. As there is the tendency to variously term school libraries as ‘resource centre’, ‘information service centre ’ a statement of what is meant by a ‘school library ’ in this submission becomes necessary.

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Interactions in the air: adding further depth to interactive tabletops  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although interactive surfaces have many unique and compelling qualities, the interactions they support are by their very nature bound to the display surface. In this paper we present a technique for users to seamlessly switch between interacting on the ... Keywords: 3D, 3D graphics, computer vision, depth-sensing cameras, holoscreen, interactive surfaces, surfaces, switchable diffusers, tabletop

Otmar Hilliges; Shahram Izadi; Andrew D. Wilson; Steve Hodges; Armando Garcia-Mendoza; Andreas Butz

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Fundamental Symmetries and Interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Nuclear Physics numerous possibilities exist to investigate fundamental symmetries and interactions. In particular, the precise measurements of properties of fundamental fermions, searches for new interactions in $\\beta$-decays, and violations of discrete symmeties offer possibilities to search for physics beyond Standard Theory. Precise measurements of fundamental constants can be carried out. Low energy experiments allow to probe New Physics at mass scales far beyond the reach of present accelerators or such planned for the future and at which predicted new particles could be produced directly.

Klaus P. Jungmann

2005-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

270

Facility Representative Program: 2009 Facility Representative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Address Shane Johnson, Acting Assistant Secretary Office of Nuclear Energy 9:00 a.m. ORPS Causal Analysis Tree Training Ed Sierra Quality Management Office Brookhaven National...

271

Facility Representative Program: 2011 Facility Representative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 DOE Safety Links ORPS Info Operating Experience DOE Lessons Learned Accident Investigation...

272

Facility Representative Program: DOE Facility Representatives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WIPP PADU PORTS ANL WVDP MOAB SFO LFO LAFO NFO SRFO RL PNSO ORP ID NPO-PX FSO NBL NPO-Y12 ORO OSO SPRU BHSO PSO SR SR NA26 DOE Facility Site Map Please help keep this...

273

Facility Representative Program: 2002 Facility Representative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

McLaughlin, LANL Root Cause Analysis Course - Marke LaneKen Albers Honeywell Kansas City Plant 10:30 a.m. Leadership Development Panel Moderator: Emil Morrow, Senior Technical...

274

Facility Representative Program: 2012 Facility Representative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lead to Electrical Shock, Michael Hanson, BHSO Lessons and Recommendations from the Fukushima Daiichi Event, Kevin Gray, SSO References Separations Process Research Unit Spill,...

275

Facility Representative Program: 2008 Facility Representative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sherman Chao, LSO Conduct of Operations Improvements at K Basins Dennis Humphreys, RL Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) facility lessons learned Charlie Wright, ORO...

276

Facility Representative Program: 2005 Facility Representative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sharing of Good Practices and Lessons Learned (4) Inadvertent Startup of Electric Centrifuge at the Weapon Evaluation Test Lab Joyce Arviso-Benally, SSO Facility Rep...

277

Analyzing interacting BPEL processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper addresses the problem of analyzing the interaction between BPEL processes. We present a technology chain that starts out with a BPEL process and transforms it into a Petri net model. On the model we decide controllability of the process ... Keywords: business process modeling and analysis, formal models in business process management, petri nets, process verification and validation

Niels Lohmann; Peter Massuthe; Christian Stahl; Daniela Weinberg

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Interactive geometry remeshing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a novel technique, both flexible and efficient, for interactive remeshing of irregular geometry. First, the original (arbitrary genus) mesh is substituted by a series of 2D maps in parameter space. Using these maps, our algorithm is then able ...

Pierre Alliez; Mark Meyer; Mathieu Desbrun

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Interactive reflection editing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effective digital content creation tools must be both efficient in the interactions they provide but also allow full user control. There may be occasions, when art direction requires changes that contradict physical laws. In particular, it is known that ... Keywords: graphics hardware, intuitive editing, lighting design, non-photorealistc rendering, perception, post-production

Tobias Ritschel; Makoto Okabe; Thorsten Thormählen; Hans-Peter Seidel

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Interaction with William Carnall  

SciTech Connect

A personal account is given of interaction with William T. Carnall during the period 1977-1988, when I made regular visits to the Argonne National Laboratory to discuss the theoretical background to the spectroscopic work he was carrying out on the lanthanides and actinides.

Judd, Brian R. [Henry A. Rowland Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg Center, Baltimore, MD 21218-2686 (United States)]. E-mail: juddbr@pha.jhu.edu

2005-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mam represents interactions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Interacting with human physiology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a novel system that incorporates physiological monitoring as part of the human-computer interface. The sensing element is a thermal camera that is employed as a computer peripheral. Through bioheat modeling of facial imagery almost the full ... Keywords: Blood flow, Breath rate, Cardiac pulse, Facial tracking, Human-computer interaction, Sleep apnea, Stress, Thermal imaging

I. Pavlidis; J. Dowdall; N. Sun; C. Puri; J. Fei; M. Garbey

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Fundamental Interaction Mechanisms of Engineered ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fundamental Interaction Mechanisms of Engineered Nanomaterials with DNA. Summary: We utilized isotope-dilution liquid ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Steven Weinberg, Weak Interactions, and Electromagnetic Interactions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Steven Weinberg and Steven Weinberg and Weak and Electromagnetic Interactions Resources with Additional Information Steven Weinberg Courtesy Dr. Steven Weinberg Steven "Weinberg is a professor of physics and astronomy at UT [The University of Texas] Austin and is founding director of the Theory Group in the College of Natural Sciences. [He is] well known for his development of a field theory that unifies the electromagnetic and weak nuclear forces, and for other major contributions to physics and cosmology ... Weinberg's work has been honored with numerous prizes, including the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1979 and the National Medal of Science in 1991. Weinberg is the author of the prize-winning book The First Three Minutes: A Modern View of the Origin of the Universe (which has been translated into 22 foreign languages) as well as Gravitation and Cosmology, The Discovery of Subatomic Particles, Dreams of a Final Theory and The Quantum Theory of Fields. ... Weinberg was the recipient of the Scientist as Poet prize from Rockefeller University for "extraordinary achievements in conveying - with passionate clarity - the ideas, history, explanatory power and aesthetic dimensions of fundamental physics." The citation mentioned two of Weinberg's books.

284

USING SURFACE PARTICLES TO INTERACT WITH COMPLEX EVERYDAY SURFACES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tomorrow’s display and interaction technology will go beyond standard computer monitors, television and mobile screens and will enable projecting digital content onto any complex physical surface. While devices like the IPod and IPad have received tremendous commercial success, the interaction capabilities for users are still limited to a small mobile screen. As projectors continue to decrease in size, cost and power consumption, projection technology has the potential to become as ubiquitous as the standard television or digital cameras in our mobile devices. With this potential comes the opportunity to transform everyday passive objects into interactive display surfaces, freeing content from the confines of a flat monitor display. In this thesis, I explore interacting with everyday objects by representing content as interactive surface particles. Users can build their own physical world, map virtual content onto their physical construction and interact directly with surface using a stylus. While researchers have explored using projectors for interacting with surfaces in our environment, many of these displays are still relegated to walls, tabletop surfaces or simplistic scenes. Furthermore, even fewer research projects describe methods for content creation on complex physical objects. By using a surface particle representation, interaction designers can create programmed

Rajinder Singh Sodhi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Life Cycle Assessment Applied to 95 Representative U.S. Farms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since World War II, concern for the environmental impacts of human activities has grown. Agriculture plays a significant role in several impact categories including global warming. Governments, including the U.S., have recently begun or are considering the regulation of greenhouse gas (GHG) emission to mitigate the global warming effect. Because agriculture accounts for a large portion of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions, it is necessary to establish a baseline measure of the GHG emission of U.S. agriculture at the farm level. The objective of this research is to estimate the GHG emission levels for multicrop farms in the U.S. and identify the major sources of GHG emissions in their supply chains. To accomplish the objective, a partial life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology is used to establish a GHG baseline for the representative farms. LCA as defined by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) includes four phases: goal and scope definition, inventory, impact assessment, and interpretation. It is a holistic approach that catalogues environmental impacts of all relevant processes at all stages of production, from raw material extraction to disposal. However, this study only catalogues impacts up to the farm gate. Partial LCAs are common in agriculture. Emissions of three GHGs, CO2, CH4, and N2O, are inventoried for 95 U.S. farms. The results are characterized using their 100-year global warming potentials into CO2 equivalents. The CO2 equivalents are then normalized over four functional units: enterprises, acres or head, harvest units, and pounds of production. The variation of GHG intensity between crops and farms is very large. However, it is clear that GHG intensity is affected by three characteristics: location, size, and irrigation practice. Crops grown in their associated regions tend to be more GHG efficient than those grown outside their associated regions. Also, crops grown on large farms tend to be more GHG efficient than the same crop grown on a small farm in the same area. Lastly, with the exceptions of cotton and soybeans, irrigated crops tend to be more GHG intensive than non-irrigated crops. These results combine to suggest that there may be a correlation between production efficiency and carbon efficiency.

Rutland, Christopher T.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Eastward propagating intraseasonal oscillation represented by Chikira-Sugiyama cumulus parameterization. Part I: Comparison with observation and reanalysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The eastward propagating intraseasonal oscillation represented by the Chikira-Sugiyama cumulus parameterization in an atmospheric general circulation model is compared with observations and reanalyses. The scheme is characterized by state-...

Minoru Chikira; Masahiro Sugiyama

287

Interaction Region Papers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IR (Interaction Region) Magnets with Ramesh Gupta IR (Interaction Region) Magnets with Ramesh Gupta as the major author (unless noted): R. Gupta, et. al, "React & Wind Nb3Sn Common Coil Dipole", ASC 2006, August 27- September 1, 2006 in Seattle, WA, USA . *** Click Here for Talk ***. R. Gupta, "Modular Design and Modular Program for High Gradient Quadrupoles", ASC 2006, August 27- September 1, 2006 in Seattle, WA, USA. *** Click Here for Poster ***. Racetrack Magnet Designs and Technologies, WAMDO@CERN, April 2-6, 2006 (Click here for the oral presentation). R. Gupta, et. al, "Optimization of Open Midplane Dipole Design for LHC IR Upgrade," Presented at the 2005 Particle Accelerator Conference, Knoxville, TN, USA (2005). *** Click Here for Poster *** R. Gupta, et al., “Open Midplane Dipole Design for LHC IR

288

Interactive optical panel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An interactive optical panel assembly 34 includes an optical panel 10 having a plurality of ribbon optical waveguides 12 stacked together with opposite ends thereof defining panel first and second faces 16, 18. A light source 20 provides an image beam 22 to the panel first face 16 for being channeled through the waveguides 12 and emitted from the panel second face 18 in the form of a viewable light image 24a. A remote device 38 produces a response beam 40 over a discrete selection area 36 of the panel second face 18 for being channeled through at least one of the waveguides 12 toward the panel first face 16. A light sensor 42,50 is disposed across a plurality of the waveguides 12 for detecting the response beam 40 therein for providing interactive capability.

Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

1995-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

289

Ligand-Receptor Interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The formation and dissociation of specific noncovalent interactions between a variety of macromolecules play a crucial role in the function of biological systems. During the last few years, three main lines of research led to a dramatic improvement of our understanding of these important phenomena. First, combination of genetic engineering and X ray cristallography made available a simultaneous knowledg of the precise structure and affinity of series or related ligand-receptor systems differing by a few well-defined atoms. Second, improvement of computer power and simulation techniques allowed extended exploration of the interaction of realistic macromolecules. Third, simultaneous development of a variety of techniques based on atomic force microscopy, hydrodynamic flow, biomembrane probes, optical tweezers, magnetic fields or flexible transducers yielded direct experimental information of the behavior of single ligand receptor bonds. At the same time, investigation of well defined cellular models raised the ...

Bongrand, Pierre

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Electron: Cluster interactions  

SciTech Connect

Beam depletion spectroscopy has been used to measure absolute total inelastic electron-sodium cluster collision cross sections in the energy range from E {approximately} 0.1 to E {approximately} 6 eV. The investigation focused on the closed shell clusters Na{sub 8}, Na{sub 20}, Na{sub 40}. The measured cross sections show an increase for the lowest collision energies where electron attachment is the primary scattering channel. The electron attachment cross section can be understood in terms of Langevin scattering, connecting this measurement with the polarizability of the cluster. For energies above the dissociation energy the measured electron-cluster cross section is energy independent, thus defining an electron-cluster interaction range. This interaction range increases with the cluster size.

Scheidemann, A.A. [Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Kresin, V.V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Knight, W.D. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Development of a Future Representative Concentration Pathway for Use in the IPCC 5th Assessment Earth System Model Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The representative concentration pathway to be delivered is a scenario of atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases and other radiatively important atmospheric species, along with land-use changes, derived from the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM). The particular representative concentration pathway (RCP) that the Joint Global Change Research Institute (JGCRI) has been responsible for is a not-to-exceed pathway that stabilizes at a radiative forcing of 4.5Wm-2 in the year 2100.

None

2010-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

292

The Resonant Interaction of a Tropical Cyclone and a Tropopause Front in a Barotropic Model. Part I: Zonally Oriented Front  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interaction of a tropical cyclone and a zonally aligned tropopause front is investigated in an idealized framework. A nondivergent barotropic model is used in which the front is represented by a vorticity step, giving a jetlike velocity ...

Leonhard Scheck; Sarah C. Jones; Martin Juckes

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Interaction walkthrough: evaluation of safety critical interactive systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Usability evaluation methods are a battery of techniques for assessing the usability of interactive systems or of proposed interactive systems. This paper describes a new evaluation method, particularly appropriate for evaluating safety critical and ...

Harold Thimbleby

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Bose-Einstein-condensed gases with arbitrary strong interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bose-condensed gases are considered with an effective interaction strength varying in the whole range of the values between zero and infinity. The consideration is based on the usage of a representative statistical ensemble for Bose systems with broken global gauge symmetry. Practical calculations are illustrated for a uniform Bose gas at zero temperature, employing a self-consistent mean-field theory, which is both conserving and gapless.

V. I. Yukalov; E. P. Yukalova

2007-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

295

Interactive fracture design model  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A computer program is described that can be used to design a fracture stimulation treatment for a geothermal reservoir. The program uses state-of-the-art methods to calculate the temperature of the fracture fluid as a function of time and distance in the fracture. This information is used to determine the temperature dependent properties of the fracture fluid. These fluid properties are utilized to calculate the fracture geometry as a function of time. The fracture geometry and temperature distribution of the fracture fluid are coupled so the subroutines that calculate these distributions have been made interactive.

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Detection of molecular interactions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and assay are described for measuring the interaction between a ligand and an analyte. The assay can include a suspension of colloidal particles that are associated with a ligand of interest. The colloidal particles are maintained in the suspension at or near a phase transition state from a condensed phase to a dispersed phase. An analyte to be tested is then added to the suspension. If the analyte binds to the ligand, a phase change occurs to indicate that the binding was successful.

Groves, John T. (Berkeley, CA); Baksh, Michael M. (Fremont, CA); Jaros, Michal (Brno, CH)

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

297

Refining interaction designs through simplicity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With more and more devices in our surroundings, users increasingly-consume applications and digital services which compete for their attention. Therefore, users appreciate simplicity when they interact with them because a less intrusive interaction allows ... Keywords: interaction, mobile devices, simplicity, user-centered design

Pablo Muñoz; Pau Giner; Vicente Pelechano

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Programming Languages For Interactive Computing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditional programming languages are algorithmic: they are best suited to writing programs that acquire all their inputs before executing and only produce a result on termination. By contrast most applications are interactive: they maintain ongoing ... Keywords: declarative concurrency, incremental computation, interaction, interactive programming languages, modal languages, persistent computation, retroactive data structures, semantic computing, transactional concurrency

Roly Perera

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Moveable Interactive Projected Displays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Video projectors have typically been used to display images on surfaces whose geometric relationship to the projector remains constant, such as walls or pre-calibrated surfaces. In this paper, we present a technique for projecting content onto moveable surfaces that adapts to the motion and location of the surface to simulate an active display. This is accomplished using a projector based location tracking techinque. We use light sensors embedded into the moveable surface and project low-perceptibility Graycoded patterns to first discover the sensor locations, and then incrementally track them at interactive rates. We describe how to reduce the perceptibility of tracking patterns, achieve interactive tracking rates, use motion modeling to improve tracking performance, and respond to sensor occlusions. A group of tracked sensors can define quadrangles for simulating moveable displays while single sensors can be used as control inputs. By unifying the tracking and display technology into a single mechanism, we can substantially reduce the cost and complexity of implementing applications that combine motion tracking and projected imagery.

Using Projector Based; Johnny C. Lee; Scott E. Hudson; Jay W. Summet; Paul H. Dietz

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Interaction of DOE SNF and Packaging Materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A sensitivity analysis was conducted to identify and evaluate potential destructive interactions between the materials in US Department of Energy (USDOE) spent nuclear fuels (SNFs) and their storage/disposal canisters. The technical assessment was based on the thermodynamic properties as well as the chemical and physical characteristics of the materials expected inside the canisters. No chemical reactions were disclosed that could feasibly corrode stainless steel canisters to the point of failure. However, the possibility of embrittlement (loss of ductility) of the stainless steel through contact with liquid metal fission products or hydrogen inside the canisters cannot be dismissed. Higher-than-currently-permitted internal gas pressures must also be considered. These results, based on the assessment of two representative 90-year-cooled fuels that are stored at 200°C in stainless steel canisters with internal blankets of helium, may be applied to most of the fuels in the USDOE's SNF inventory.

P. A. Anderson

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mam represents interactions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Running Interactive Jobs on Hopper  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs To run an interactive job on Hopper's compute nodes you must request the number of nodes you want and have the system allocate resources from the pool of free nodes. The following command requests 2 nodes using the interactive queue. hopper% qsub -I -V -q interactive -l mppwidth=48 The -I flag specifies an interactive job. The -V flag passes your current environment variable settings to the compute environment. The -q flag specifies the name of the queue and -l mppwidth determines the number of nodes to allocate for your job, but not as you might expect. The number of nodes given to your job (remember, the system allocates nodes, not cores), is the value of mppwidth divided by the umber of cores per node. On Hopper, with 24 cores per node, the number of nodes is mppwidth/24 plus one more if

302

Running Interactive Jobs on Carver  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs Overview There are two types of interactive jobs. The first type runs on a login node. These applications are typically pre- and post-processing jobs, data management programs, or some other type of "tool". Note that it is not possible to run any MPI application on Carver login nodes. The second type of interactive job runs on one or more Carver compute nodes. Because the only way to gain access to the compute nodes is through the batch system, these types of jobs may more accurately be called "interactive batch" jobs. The remainder of this section focuses on these types of jobs. Usage Basic usage: carver% qsub -I The above command creates an interactive shell on a compute node, in the user's home directory. As a batch job, it has default values for batch

303

Hadron nucleus interactions  

SciTech Connect

The elastic and inelastic scattering of intermediate energy (less than or equal to 1 GeV) protons by nuclei is considered first. The discussion focuses on the determination of the proton-nucleus optical potential in terms of the elementary nucleon-nucleon scattering amplitudes and the properties of the target and residual nucleus. The result is a series of terms for the optical potential. Then the interaction of pions with nuclei for energies in the neighborhood of the ..delta..-resonance is discussed. In this energy domain an incident pion will with high probability be absorbed by a nucleon to produce the ..delta..-resonance and thus form a ..delta..-particle hole state in the nucleus. Next, the subject of hypernuclei is taken up. The ..lambda.. hypernuclei and a recently observed ..sigma.. hypernuclei comprise situations in which the core nucleus can be probed by a baryon of roughly the same mass as a nucleon, with similar albeit not identical interactions with nucleons. But the ..lambda.. (or ..sigma..) does not need to satisfy the Pauli exclusion principle with respect to the nucleons, and therefore can be in orbits forbidden to it if it were a nucleon. As the energy of the projectile increases, it becomes correspondingly more important to take relativistic effects into account. The importance of these effects is strikingly revealed by experiments involving the collision of ultrarelativistic hadrons, protons, pions, kaons (up to Fermilab energies) with nuclei. This phenomenon forms part of the final topic, which includes as well as the collision of relativistic heavy ion projectiles with nuclei. A nuclear Weiszaecker-Williams method developed for dealing with peripheral collisions is described. 32 figures, 10 tables. (RWR)

Feshbach, H.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Investigation of Soil Moisture - Vegetation Interactions in Oklahoma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and-atmosphere interactions are an important component of climate, especially in semi-arid regions such as the Southern Great Plains. Interactions between soil moisture and vegetation modulate land-atmosphere coupling and thus represent a crucial, but not well understood climate factor. This study examines soil moisture-vegetation health interactions using both in situ observations and land surface model simulations. For the observational study, soil moisture is taken from 20 in situ Oklahoma Mesonet soil moisture observation sites, and vegetation health is represented by MODIS-derived normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). For the modeling study, the variable infiltration capacity (VIC) hydrologic model is employed with two different vegetation parameterizations. The first is the model default vegetation parameter which is interannually-invariant leaf area index (LAI). This parameter is referred to as the control parameter. The second is MODIS-derived LAI, which captures interannual differences in vegetation health. Soil moisture simulations from both vegetation parameterizations are compared and the VIC-simulated soil moisture’s sensitivity to the vegetation parameters is also examined. Correlation results from the observation study suggest that soil moisture-vegetation interactions in Oklahoma are inconsistent, varying both in space and time. The modeling results show that using a vegetation parameterization that does not capture interannual vegetation health variability could potentially result in dry or wet biased soil moisture simulations.

Ford, Trenton W.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Research and implementation of the virtual exhibit system of historical sites base on multi-touch interactive technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the help of multi-touch interactive technology, we build up a virtual exhibit system for Mogao Grottoes, Dunhuang in China to represent the carved murals, ancient scriptures and Dunhuang historical culture. We analyze the theory of multi-touch and ... Keywords: interactive technology, multi-touch, virtools, virtual reality

Yi Lin; Yue Liu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Introduction to Solar Energy Conversion Solar energy represents the largest energy input into the terrestrial system. Despite its  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the resource to allow supply to meet demand at all times. Photovoltaic energy conversion efficiency hasIntroduction to Solar Energy Conversion Solar energy represents the largest energy input the global energy demand on its own. The challenges that need to be addressed to make solar energy viable

Nur, Amos

307

INTRODUCTION In 1997,The Louisiana House of Representatives passed Bill Number 1698, which addresses warranties in state contracts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for state highway infrastructure construction projects that are in compliance with FHWA requirements with DOTD archives being utilized to establish distress thresholds. At least five representative projects from each of the eight warranty areas that shared similar characteristics (age, construction type

Harms, Kyle E.

308

Sulfate adsorption and its relationships with properties of representative soils of the Sa~o Paulo State, Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

State, Brazil M.E. Alves, A. Lavorenti* Departamento de Cie^ncias Exatas, Escola Superior de Agricultura ``Luiz de Queiroz''--ESALQ/USP, Caixa Postal 09, 13418-900, Piracicaba (SP), Brazil Received 27 August, electrochemical and mineralogical properties of representative soils of the Sa~o Paulo State, Brazil, were

Sparks, Donald L.

309

Tools and Equipment Modeling for Automobile Interactive Assembling Operating Simulation  

SciTech Connect

Tools and equipment play an important role in the simulation of virtual assembly, especially in the assembly process simulation and plan. Because of variety in function and complexity in structure and manipulation, the simulation of tools and equipments remains to be a challenge for interactive assembly operation. Based on analysis of details and characteristics of interactive operations for automobile assembly, the functional requirement for tools and equipments of automobile assembly is given. Then, a unified modeling method for information expression and function realization of general tools and equipments is represented, and the handling methods of manual, semi-automatic, automatic tools and equipments are discussed. Finally, the application in assembly simulation of rear suspension and front suspension of Roewe 750 automobile is given. The result shows that the modeling and handling methods are applicable in the interactive simulation of various tools and equipments, and can also be used for supporting assembly process planning in virtual environment.

Wu Dianliang; Zhu Hongmin [Shanghai Jiao Tong University (China); Shanghai Key Laboratory of Advance Manufacturing Environment (China)

2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

310

Nuclear-fuel-cycle risk assessment: descriptions of representative non-reactor facilities. Sections 1-14  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fuel Cycle Risk Assessment Program was initiated to provide risk assessment methods for assistance in the regulatory process for nuclear fuel cycle facilities other than reactors. This report, the first from the program, defines and describes fuel cycle elements that are being considered in the program. One type of facility (and in some cases two) is described that is representative of each element of the fuel cycle. The descriptions are based on real industrial-scale facilities that are current state-of-the-art, or on conceptual facilities where none now exist. Each representative fuel cycle facility is assumed to be located on the appropriate one of four hypothetical but representative sites described. The fuel cycles considered are for Light Water Reactors with once-through flow of spent fuel, and with plutonium and uranium recycle. Representative facilities for the following fuel cycle elements are described for uranium (or uranium plus plutonium where appropriate): mining, milling, conversion, enrichment, fuel fabrication, mixed-oxide fuel refabrication, fuel reprocessing, spent fuel storage, high-level waste storage, transuranic waste storage, spent fuel and high-level and transuranic waste disposal, low-level and intermediate-level waste disposal, and transportation. For each representative facility the description includes: mainline process, effluent processing and waste management, facility and hardware description, safety-related information and potential alternative concepts for that fuel cycle element. The emphasis of the descriptive material is on safety-related information. This includes: operating and maintenance requirements, input/output of major materials, identification and inventories of hazardous materials (particularly radioactive materials), unit operations involved, potential accident driving forces, containment and shielding, and degree of hands-on operation.

Schneider, K.J.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

TIDAL INTERACTIONS IN MERGING WHITE DWARF BINARIES  

SciTech Connect

The recently discovered system J0651 is the tightest known detached white dwarf (WD) binary. Since it has not yet initiated Roche-lobe overflow, it provides a relatively clean environment for testing our understanding of tidal interactions. I investigate the tidal heating of each WD, parameterized in terms of its tidal Q parameter. Assuming that the heating can be radiated efficiently, the current luminosities are consistent with Q {sub 1} {approx} 7 x 10{sup 10} and Q {sub 2} {approx} 2 x 10{sup 7}, for the He and C/O WDs, respectively. Conversely, if the observed luminosities are merely from the cooling of the WDs, these estimated values of Q represent the upper limits. A large Q {sub 1} for the He WD means its spin velocity will be slower than that expected if it was tidally locked, which, since the binary is eclipsing, may be measurable via the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect. After one year, gravitational wave emission shifts the time of eclipses by 5.5 s, but tidal interactions cause the orbit to shrink more rapidly, changing the time by up to an additional 0.3 s after a year. Future eclipse timing measurements may therefore infer the degree of tidal locking.

Piro, Anthony L., E-mail: piro@caltech.edu [Theoretical Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, M/C 350-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

312

Collective behavior in random interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent investigations have looked at the many-body spectra of random two-body interactions. In fermion systems, such as the interacting shell model, one finds pairing-like spectra, while in boson systems, such as IBM-1, one finds rotational and vibrational spectra. We discuss the search for random ensembles of fermion interactions that yield rotational and vibrational spectra, and in particular present results from a new ensemble, the ``random quadrupole-quadrupole ensemble''

Johnson, C W; Johnson, Calvin W.; Nam, Hai Ah

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Collective behavior in random interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent investigations have looked at the many-body spectra of random two-body interactions. In fermion systems, such as the interacting shell model, one finds pairing-like spectra, while in boson systems, such as IBM-1, one finds rotational and vibrational spectra. We discuss the search for random ensembles of fermion interactions that yield rotational and vibrational spectra, and in particular present results from a new ensemble, the ``random quadrupole-quadrupole ensemble''

Calvin W. Johnson; Hai Ah Nam

2006-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

314

The Four Interactions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cuatro Interacciones Cuatro Interacciones Avanzar Volver Principal ESTOY PERDIDO! El universo que conocemos y amamos existe debido a que las partículas fundamentales interactúan, ya sea porque decaen o se aniquilan, o bien porque responden a una fuerza debida a la presencia de otra partícula (por ejemplo, durante una colisión). Hay cuatro interacciones entre partículas: Fuerte, débil, gravitatoria, electromagnética Para aclarar las cosas, damos a continuación dos definiciones: Fuerza: El efecto que aparece sobre una partícula debido a la presencia de otra partícula. Interacción: Las fuerzas y los decaimientos que afectan a una partícula dada. Una Interacción no es lo mismo que una fuerza dado que a la palabra "interacción" se le asigna un significado más amplio. A pesar que los dos

315

Industry Interactive Procurement System (IIPS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industry Interactive Industry Interactive Industry Interactive Industry Interactive Procurement System Procurement System (IIPS) (IIPS) Douglas Baptist, Project Manager Information Management Systems Division US Department of Energy IIPS Functions Issue synopses, solicitations and related documents via the Internet Receive and Respond to Solicitation Specific Questions Receive proposal, bid or application information electronically Provide access to proposal information to authorized personnel through a web browser Conduct negotiations or obtain clarifications Issue award documents IIPS Security Security Plan in place and approved by DOE's Chief Information Officer System security tested by DOE's Computer Incident Advisory Capability team Security measures include: - Encryption on the IIPS server

316

Surprising Quasiparticle Interactions in Graphene  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Surprising Quasiparticle Interactions in Graphene Print Until now, the world's electronics have been dominated by silicon, whose properties, while excellent, significantly limit...

317

Light-matter Interactions in Semiconductor Nanostructures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Light-matter interactions in Semiconductor Nanostructures. ... We investigate the interaction of light with semiconductor-based nanostructures. ...

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

318

Molecular conformations, interactions, and properties associated...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Molecular conformations, interactions, and properties associated with drug efficiency and clinical performance among VEGFR TK inhibitors Molecular conformations, interactions, and...

319

Preservation of interactive multimedia performances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Preservation of Interactive Multimedia Performances (IMPs) is becoming important, as they are getting more and more popular in the performing arts communities. Preservation requires keeping not only all the necessary components for the production ... Keywords: IMP, cataloguing, digital preservation, interactive multimedia performances, ontologies, performing arts, querying, search, semantic processing

Kia Ng; Tran Vu Pham; Bee Ong; Alexander Mikroyannidis; David Giaretta

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Persuasive interaction for collectivist cultures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Persuasive technology is defined as "any interactive product designed to change attitudes or behaviours by making desired outcomes easier to achieve". It can take the form of interactive web applications, hand held devices, and games. To date there has ... Keywords: culture, games, persuasive technology

Rilla Khaled; Robert Biddle; James Noble; Pippin Barr; Ronald Fischer

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mam represents interactions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Multiple Partonic Interactions in Herwig++  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review the implementation of a model for multiple partonic interactions in Herwig++. Moreover, we show how recent studies on the colour structure of events in Herwig++ led to a significant improvement in the description of soft inclusive observables in pp interactions at the LHC.

Stefan Gieseke; Christian Rohr; Andrzej Siodmok

2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

322

Sketching interactive systems with sketchify  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent discussions in the interaction design community have called attention to sketching as an omnipresent element of any disciplined activity of design, and have pointed out that sketching should be extended beyond the simple creation of a pencil trace ... Keywords: Sketching, design process, interaction design, rapid prototyping, user interface software tools

Željko Obrenovic; Jean-Bernard Martens

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Multimodal feedback for tabletop interactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a study into the use of different modalities in providing per contact feedback for interactions on tabletop computers. We replicate the study by Wigdor et al. [3] and confirm their results, and extend the study to examine not ... Keywords: audio, mobile phone, multimodal, tabletop interaction, tactile

Christopher McAdam; Stephen Brewster

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Running Interactive Jobs on Edison  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs To run an interactive job on Edison's compute nodes you must request the number of nodes you want and have the system allocate resources from the pool of free nodes. The following command requests 2 nodes using the debug queue. edison% qsub -I -V -q debug -l mppwidth=48 The -I flag specifies an interactive job. The -V flag passes your current environment variable settings to the compute environment. The -q flag specifies the name of the queue and -l mppwidth determines the number of nodes to allocate for your job, but not as you might expect. The number of nodes given to your job (remember, the system allocates nodes, not cores), is the value of mppwidth divided by the number of cores per node. On Edison, with 24 cores per node, the number of nodes is mppwidth/24 plus one

325

Running Interactive Jobs on Edison  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs To run an interactive job on Edison's compute nodes you must request the number of nodes you want and have the system allocate resources from the pool of free nodes. The following command requests 2 nodes using the debug queue. edison% qsub -I -V -q debug -l mppwidth=32 The -I flag specifies an interactive job. The -V flag passes your current environment variable settings to the compute environment. The -q flag specifies the name of the queue and -l mppwidth determines the number of nodes to allocate for your job, but not as you might expect. The number of nodes given to your job (remember, the system allocates nodes, not cores), is the value of mppwidth divided by the number of cores per node. On Edison, with 16 cores per node, the number of nodes is mppwidth/16 plus one

326

A linear discrete dynamic system model for temporal gene interaction and regulatory network influence in response to bioethanol conversion inhibitor HMF for ethanologenic yeast  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A linear discrete dynamic system model is constructed to represent the temporal interactions among significantly expressed genes in response to bioethanol conversion inhibitor 5-hydroxymethylfurfural for ethanologenic yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. ...

Mingzhou Joe Song; Z. Lewis Liu

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Simulating human behavior for national security human interactions.  

SciTech Connect

This 3-year research and development effort focused on what we believe is a significant technical gap in existing modeling and simulation capabilities: the representation of plausible human cognition and behaviors within a dynamic, simulated environment. Specifically, the intent of the ''Simulating Human Behavior for National Security Human Interactions'' project was to demonstrate initial simulated human modeling capability that realistically represents intra- and inter-group interaction behaviors between simulated humans and human-controlled avatars as they respond to their environment. Significant process was made towards simulating human behaviors through the development of a framework that produces realistic characteristics and movement. The simulated humans were created from models designed to be psychologically plausible by being based on robust psychological research and theory. Progress was also made towards enhancing Sandia National Laboratories existing cognitive models to support culturally plausible behaviors that are important in representing group interactions. These models were implemented in the modular, interoperable, and commercially supported Umbra{reg_sign} simulation framework.

Bernard, Michael Lewis; Hart, Dereck H.; Verzi, Stephen J.; Glickman, Matthew R.; Wolfenbarger, Paul R.; Xavier, Patrick Gordon

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Work Controls Assessment Plan Assessment Plan Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WORK CONTROLS WORK CONTROLS Assessment Plan Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: Management should have an established work control process in place with authorized, controlled and documented methods that provide an accurate status of the work to be performed. Criteria: Work planning addresses applicable laws, codes and regulations. Work planning includes operational configuration constraints; material, tool, and manpower requirements; inter-organizational coordination; operational history; special training; safety considerations; hazards protection requirements; post-maintenance testing; quality control requirements; and other considerations as necessary. The work to be accomplished is defined by identifying the existing

329

This paper represent the views of the author and does not necessarily reflect the opinions of Statistics Canada.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction: In the current economic context, all partners in health care delivery systems, be they public or private, are obliged to identify the factors that influence the utilization of health care services. To improve our understanding of the phenomena that underlie these relationships, Statistics Canada and the Manitoba Centre for Health Policy and Evaluation have just set up a new database. For a representative sample of the population of the province of Manitoba, cross-sectional microdata on individuals ’ health and socio-economic characteristics were

Christian Houle; Jean-marie Berthelot; Pierre David; Cam Mustard; D. Sc; Roos L; M. C. Wolfson

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Dissipative particle dynamics with attractive and repulsive particle-particle interactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In molecular dynamics simulations, a combination of short-range repulsive and long-range attractive interactions allows the behavior of gases, liquids, solids, and multiphase systems to be simulated. We demonstrate that dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations with similar pairwise particle-particle interactions can also be used to simulate the dynamics of multiphase fluids. In these simulations, the positive, short-range, repulsive part of the interaction potentials were represented by polynomial spline functions such as those used as smoothing functions in smoothed particle hydrodynamics, and the negative long-range part of the interaction has the same form but a different range and amplitude. If a single spline function corresponding to a purely repulsive interaction is used, the DPD fluid is a gas, and we show that the Poiseuille flow of this gas can be described accurately by the Navier-Stokes equation at low Reynolds numbers. In a two-component system in which the purely repulsive interactions between different components are substantially larger than the purely repulsive intracomponent interactions, separation into two gas phases occurs, in agreement with results obtained using DPD simulations with standard repulsive particle-particle interactions. Finally, we show that a combination of short-range repulsive interactions and long-range attractive interactions can be used to simulate the behavior of liquid drops surrounded by a gas. Similar models can be used to simulate a wide range of processes such as multiphase fluid flow through fractures and porous media with complex geometries and wetting behaviors.

Paul Meakin; Moubin Liu; Hai Huang

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Proceedings of the 2006 symposium on Interactive 3D graphics and games  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These proceedings represent the technical program for the "second annual" ACM SIGGRAPH Symposium on Interactive 3D Graphics and Games, held in Redwood City, California, March 14-17, 2006. I3D started as a workshop in 1986 and was held roughly bi-annually ...

Marc Olano; Carlo Séquin

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

A single model of interacting dark energy: generalized phantom energy or generalized Chaplygin gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I present a model in which dark energy interacts with matter. The former is represented by a variable equation of state. It is shown that the phantom crossing takes place at zero redshift, moreover, stable scaling solution of the Friedmann equations is obtained. I show that dark energy is most probably be either generalized phantom energy or the generalized Chaplygin gas.

Mubasher Jamil

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

333

Proceedings of the 2013 ACM international conference on Interactive tabletops and surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Welcome to the ACM International Conference on Interactive Tabletops and Surfaces (ITS 2013) in St Andrews, Scotland. This year ITS received a total of 121 valid submissions including 86 papers and 35 notes; this represents an increase of 16% over last ...

Aaron Quigley, Giulio Jacucci, Michael Horn, Miguel Nacenta

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Interactive Data Map from JGI's Microbial Earth Project  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Microbial Earth Project's interactive data map is a graphical representation of the NCBI taxonomy tree for 7623 type strains from DSMZ culture collection. Each leaf represents a type strain. Colors denote stains with or without genome projects (red vs green). Internal nodes (transparent) denote higher taxonomic ranks. Branch lengths are not meaningful. A selection of named taxonomic groups are shown in yellow. Note the highly uneven coverage of the type strain material by genome sequencing projects. For example, groups such as the families Halobacteriaceae and Coriobacteriaceae are well represented by sequencing projects whereas other groups such as the genera Streptomyces and Pseudomonas are largely untouched. The figure was generated by mapping NCBI taxonomic information to DSMZ type strains. Information about genome projects was obtained from the GOLD database. The Guess visualization program was used for rendering with the 'gem' layout. [Copied from http://genome.jgi-psf.org/programs/bacteria-archaea/MEP/index.jsf

335

Running Interactive Jobs on Dirac  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

requests 8 cores on one node using the interactive queue (and you will run on either Tesla or Fermi nodes): % qsub -I -V -q diracint -l nodes1:ppn8 If you want to request...

336

Magical experiences in interaction design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is a description of design experiments performed to investigate the use of magical experiences in interaction design of consumer electronics. Magical experiences are usually associated with a passive audience watching a magician, but it is ...

Sam de Jongh Hepworth

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Interactions of the Tropical Oceans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors have investigated the interactions of the tropical oceans on interannual timescales by conducting a series of uncoupled atmospheric and oceanic general circulation experiments and hybrid-coupled model simulations. The results ...

M. Latif; T. P. Barnett

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Running Interactive Jobs on Edison  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the pool of free nodes. The following command requests 2 nodes using the debug queue. edison% qsub -I -V -q debug -l mppwidth32 The -I flag specifies an interactive job. The -V...

339

Designing with interactive example galleries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Designers often use examples for inspiration; examples offer contextualized instances of how form and content integrate. Can interactive example galleries bring this practice to everyday users doing design work, and does working with examples help the ... Keywords: design thinking, examples

Brian Lee; Savil Srivastava; Ranjitha Kumar; Ronen Brafman; Scott R. Klemmer

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

CAT: an interactive graphics code  

SciTech Connect

CAT is an interactive graphics code available on the Cray machine. In addition to plotting, it can manipulate data in many ways, including performing arithmetic operations, rearranging data, and interpolating.

Holian, K.S.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mam represents interactions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

DOE-STD-1063-97; DOE Standard Establishing and Maintaining a Facility Representative Program at DOE Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3-97 3-97 October 1997 Supersedes DOE-STD-1063-93 DOE STANDARD ESTABLISHING AND MAINTAINING A FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE PROGRAM AT DOE FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA FACR Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 37831; (423) 576-8401. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 487-4650. Order No. DE98001286 DOE-STD-1063-97 iii FOREWORD 1. This Department of Energy standard is approved for use by all DOE Components.

342

Welding Cutting and Brazing Assessment Plan Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WELDING, CUTTING AND BRAZING WELDING, CUTTING AND BRAZING Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: This assessment is to verify hot work requirements associated with welding, cutting, burning, brazing, grinding and other spark- or flame-producing operations have been implemented. Verify that the requirements implemented are appropriate for preventing loss of life and property from fire, and personal injury from contact with or exposure to molten metals, vapors, radiant energy, injurious rays and sparks. Criteria: Establish designated area in which routine and repetitive welding, cutting, and other spark- or flame producing operations are conducted [1910.252(a)(2)(iv),1910.252(a)(2)(vi)(A), 1910.252(a)(2)(xv), General Requirements].

343

Use of short-term test systems for the prediction of the hazard represented by potential chemical carcinogens  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has been hypothesized that results from short-term bioassays will ultimately provide information that will be useful for human health hazard assessment. Historically, the validity of the short-term tests has been assessed using the framework of the epidemiologic/medical screens. In this context, the results of the carcinogen (long-term) bioassay is generally used as the standard. However, this approach is widely recognized as being biased and, because it employs qualitative data, cannot be used to assist in isolating those compounds which may represent a more significant toxicologic hazard than others. In contrast, the goal of this research is to address the problem of evaluating the utility of the short-term tests for hazard assessment using an alternative method of investigation. Chemicals were selected mostly from the list of carcinogens published by the International Agency for Research on Carcinogens (IARC); a few other chemicals commonly recognized as hazardous were included. Tumorigenicity and mutagenicity data on 52 chemicals were obtained from the Registry of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances (RTECS) and were analyzed using a relative potency approach. The data were evaluated in a format which allowed for a comparison of the ranking of the mutagenic relative potencies of the compounds (as estimated using short-term data) vs. the ranking of the tumorigenic relative potencies (as estimated from the chronic bioassays). Although this was a preliminary investigation, it offers evidence that the short-term tests systems may be of utility in ranking the hazards represented by chemicals which may contribute to increased carcinogenesis in humans as a result of occupational or environmental exposures. 177 refs., 8 tabs.

Glass, L.R.; Jones, T.D.; Easterly, C.E.; Walsh, P.J.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Macroeconomic Activity Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 19 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook2011 Macroeconomic Activity Module The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) represents the interaction between the U.S. economy as a whole and energy markets. The rate of growth of the economy, measured by the growth in gross domestic product (GDP) is a key determinant of the growth in demand for energy. Associated economic factors, such as interest rates and disposable income, strongly influence various elements of the supply and demand for energy. At the same time, reactions to energy markets by the aggregate economy, such as a slowdown in economic growth resulting from increasing energy prices, are also reflected in this module.

345

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Macroeconomic Activity Module Macroeconomic Activity Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 17 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Macroeconomic Activity Module The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) represents interactions between the U.S. economy and energy markets. The rate of growth of the economy, measured by the growth in gross domestic product (GDP), is a key determinant of growth in the demand for energy. Associated economic factors, such as interest rates and disposable income, strongly influence various elements of the supply and demand for energy. At the same time, reactions to energy markets by the aggregate economy, such as a slowdown in economic growth resulting from increasing energy prices, are also reflected

346

Gregory H. Friedman: Provided for the Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Committee on Energy and Commerce U.S. House of Representatives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Statement of Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General U.S. Department of Energyon Oversight and Investigations Committee on Energy and Commerce U.S. House of Representatives

347

Running Interactive Jobs on Franklin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs Serial Code or Commands Franklin is a massively parallel high-performance computing platform and is intended and designed to run large parallel codes. While it is possible to run serial jobs on Franklin, it is discouraged. Any code or command that is not preceeded by the aprun command will execute serially on a service (usually login) node. The login nodes are for executing general UNIX shell commands, building code, and submitting jobs intended to run on the compute nodes. The service nodes are shared by many users, so. please do not run your compute- or memory-intensive jobs on these nodes. NERSC may kill running processes that severely degrade service node performance. If your job will run for more than 5 minutes, or use more than 1 GB of memory it should not

348

From interaction to participation: configuring space through embodied interaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When computation moves off the desktop, how will it transform the new spaces that it comes to occupy? How will people encounter and understand these spaces, and how will they interact with each other through the augmented capabilities of such spaces? ...

Amanda Williams; Eric Kabisch; Paul Dourish

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Evaluation of mixing downstream of tees in duct systems with respect to single point representative air sampling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air duct systems in nuclear facilities must meet the requirements of ANSI N13.1-1999 and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) that the exhaust airflow be monitored with continuous sampling in case of an accidental release of airborne radionuclides. The continuous air sampling in a duct system is based on the concept of single point representative sampling at the sampling location where the velocity and contaminant profiles are nearly uniform. Sampling must be at a location where there is a uniform distribution via mixing in accordance with ANSI N13.1-1999. The purpose of this work is to identify the sampling locations where the velocity, momentum and contaminant concentrations fall below the 20% coefficient of variation (COV) requirements of ANSI N13.1-1999. Four sets of experiments were conducted on a generic 'T' mixing system. Measurements were made of the velocity, tracer gas concentration, ten micrometer particles and average flow swirl angle. The generic 'T' mixing system included three different combinations of sub duct sizes (6"x6", 9"x9" and 12"x12"), one main duct size (12"x12") and five air velocities (0, 100, 200, 300, and 400 fpm). An air blender was also introduced in some of the tests to promote mixing of the air streams from the main duct and sub duct. The experimental results suggested a turbulent mixing provided the accepted velocity COVs by 6 hydraulic diameters downstream. For similar velocity in the main duct and sub duct, an air blender provided the substantial improvement in 3 hydraulic diameters needed to achieve COVs below 10%. Without an air blender, the distance downstream of the T-junction for the COVs below 20% increased as the velocity of the sub duct airflow increased. About 95% of the cases achieved COVs below 10%. With the air blender, most of the cases with the air blender had the lower COVs than without the blender. However, at an area ratio (sub duct area / main duct area) of 0.25 and above a velocity ratio (velocity in the sub duct / velocity in the main duct) of 3, the air blender proved to be less beneficial for mixing. These results can apply to other duct systems with similar geometries and, ultimately, be a basis for selecting a proper sampling location under the requirements of the single point representative sampling.

Kim, Taehong

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

BNL | Aerosol, Cloud, Precipitation Interactions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Atmospheric aerosols exert important "indirect effects" on clouds and climate by serving as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei that affect cloud radiative and microphysical properties. For example, an increase in CCN increases the number concentration of droplets enhances cloud albedo, and suppresses precipitation that alters cloud coverage and lifetime. However, in the case of moist and strong convective clouds, increasing aerosols may increase precipitation and enhance storm development. Although aerosol-induced indirect effects on climate are believed to have a significant impact on global climate change, estimating their impact continues to be one of the most uncertain climate forcings.

351

Characterization of representative materials in support of safe, long term storage of surplus plutonium in DOE-STD-3013 containers  

SciTech Connect

The Surveillance and Monitoring Program (SMP) is a joint LANL/SRS effort funded by DOE/EM to provide the technical basis for the safe, long-term storage (up to 50 years) of over 6 metric tons of plutonium stored in over 5000 DOE-STD-3013 containers at various facilities around the DOE complex. The majority of this material is plutonium that is surplus to the nuclear weapons program, and much of it is destined for conversion to mixed oxide fuel for use in US nuclear power plants. The form of the plutonium ranges from relatively pure metal and oxide to very impure oxide. The performance of the 3013 containers has been shown to depend on moisture content and on the levels, types and chemical forms of the impurities. The oxide materials that present the greatest challenge to the storage container are those that contain chloride salts. The chlorides (NaCl, KCl, CaCl{sub 2}, and MgCl{sub 2}) range from less than half of the impurities present to nearly all the impurities. Other common impurities include oxides and other compounds of calcium, magnesium, iron, and nickel. Over the past 15 years the program has collected a large body of experimental data on over 60 samples of plutonium chosen to represent the broader population of materials in storage. This paper will summarize the characterization data, including the origin and process history, particle size, surface area, density, calorimetry, chemical analysis, moisture analysis, prompt gamma, gas generation and corrosion behavior.

Smith, Paul H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Narlesky, Joshua E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Worl, Laura A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gillispie, Obie W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

The genus Nocardiopsis represents a phylogenetically coherent taxon and a distinct actinomycete lineage: proposal of Nocardiopsaceae fam. nov  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The genus Nocardiopsis was shown to be phylogenetically coherent and to represent a distinct lineage within the radiation of the order Actinomycetales. The closest relatives of the genus Nocardiopsis are members of the genera Actinomadura, Thermomonospora, Streptosporangium, and Microtetraspora. The intrageneric structure of the genus Nucardiupsis is shown to consist of a highly related species group containing Nucardiupsis dassonvillei, Nocardiopsis alborubida, and Nocardiopsis antarctica and a second group of less highly related species comprising Nocardiopsis alba subs p. alba, Nocardiopsis alba subs p. prasina, and Nocardiopsis listeri. Nocardiopsis lucentensis occupies a position intermediate between the two species groups. The results of a 16s ribosomal DNA sequence analysis are generally consistent with the available chemotaxonomic, phenotypic, and DNA-DNA hybridization data. The phylogenetic position and the morpho- and chemotaxonomic properties of Nocardiopsis species support the creation of a family for the genus Nocardiopsis, Nocardiopsaceae fam. nov. Meyer described the genus Nocardiopsis for the species Actinomadura dassonvillei in 1976 on the basis of the morphological characteristics and cell wall type of this organism (21). The genus Nocardiopsis currently comprises seven validly described species, Nocardiopsis alborubidus, Nocardiopsis albus, Nocardiopsis antarcticus, Nocardiopsis dassonvillei, Nocardiopsis halophila,

Fred A. Rainey; Naomi Ward-rainey; Reiner M. Kroppenstedt

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

APPOINTMENT TERMS A basic appointment term represents the length of an appointment, in months and the dates. Each of these terms is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

05/21/07 APPOINTMENT TERMS A basic appointment term represents the length of an appointment, in months and the dates. Each of these terms is represented by a code. Standard appointment terms range from 9 to 12 months. A 9 month term may be used to indicate that entire length of time or a portion

Thomas, David D.

354

INTERACTIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The Exxon Research and Engineering Company is a member of the Participating Research Team (PRT) that operates, maintains, and conducts ...

1999-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

355

Multimodal smart interactive presentation system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors propose a system that allows presenters to control presentations in a natural way by their body gestures and vocal commands. Thus a presentation no longer follows strictly a rigid sequential structure but can be delivered in various flexible ... Keywords: gesture recognition, natural interaction, presentation system, smart environment, speech recognition

Hoang-An Le, Khoi-Nguyen C. Mac, Truong-An Pham, Vinh-Tiep Nguyen, Minh-Triet Tran

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Precision Tests of Electroweak Interactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The status of the precision tests of the electroweak interactions is reviewed in this paper. An emphasis is put on the Standard Model analysis based on measurements at LEP/SLC and the Tevatron. The results of the measurements of the electroweak mixing angle in the NuTeV experiment and the future prospects are discussed.

Akhundov, Arif [Institute of Physics, Azerbaijan Academy of Sciences, 370143 Baku (Azerbaijan); Departamento de Fisica Teorica and IFIC, Universidad de Valencia-CSIC, 46100 Valencia (Spain)

2008-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

357

Interacting new generalized Chaplygin gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have presented a model in which the new generalized Chaplygin gas interacts with matter. We find that there exists a stable scaling solution at late times in the evolution of the universe. Moreover, the phantom crossing scenario is observed in this model.

Mubasher Jamil

2009-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

358

Personalization for unobtrusive service interaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasingly, mobile devices play a key role in the communication between users and the services embedded in their environment. With ever greater number of services added to our surroundings, there is a need to personalize services according to the user ... Keywords: Context-awareness, Feature modeling, Interaction adaptation, Obtrusiveness adaptation, Personalization

Miriam Gil; Pau Giner; Vicente Pelechano

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Interaction between economic dynamical systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper considers economic dynamical systems, the state spaces being the Riemannian manifolds. Between two economic dynamical systems, global feedforward and the feedback interaction is defined and the connection between their linearization and prolongation ... Keywords: economic dynamical system, economic flow, feedback, feedforward, linearization, prolongation by derivation

Constantin Patrascoiu

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Audio interaction with multimedia information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interacting with multimedia information stored in systems or on the web points up several difficulties inherent in the signal nature of such information. These difficulties are especially evident when palmtop devices are used for such purposes. Developing ... Keywords: audio features, audio-to-score, digital audio processing, multimedia information, pattern matching, score-to-audio, softcomputing, speech-to-text, text-to-speech

Mario Malcangi

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mam represents interactions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Interactive anonymization of sensitive data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There has been much recent work on algorithms for limiting disclosure in data publishing, however they have not been put to use in any toolkit for practicioners. We will demonstrate CAT, the Cornell Anonymization Toolkit, designed for interactive anonymization. ... Keywords: data anonymization, l-diversity

Xiaokui Xiao; Guozhang Wang; Johannes Gehrke

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Crystal structures of MW1337R and lin2004: Representatives of a novel protein family that adopt a four-helical bundle fold  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To extend the structural coverage of proteins with unknown functions, we targeted a novel protein family (Pfam accession number PF08807, DUF1798) for which we proposed and determined the structures of two representative members. The MW1337R gene of Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus Rosenbach (Wood 46) encodes a protein with a molecular weight of 13.8 kDa (residues 1-116) and a calculated isoelectric point of 5.15. The lin2004 gene of the nonspore-forming bacterium Listeria innocua Clip11262 encodes a protein with a molecular weight of 14.6 kDa (residues 1-121) and a calculated isoelectric point of 5.45. MW1337R and lin2004, as well as their homologs, which, so far, have been found only in Bacillus, Staphylococcus, Listeria, and related genera (Geobacillus, Exiguobacterium, and Oceanobacillus), have unknown functions and are annotated as hypothetical proteins. The genomic contexts of MW1337R and lin2004 are similar and conserved in related species. In prokaryotic genomes, most often, functionally interacting proteins are coded by genes, which are colocated in conserved operons. Proteins from the same operon as MW1337R and lin2004 either have unknown functions (i.e., belong to DUF1273, Pfam accession number PF06908) or are similar to ypsB from Bacillus subtilis. The function of ypsB is unclear, although it has a strong similarity to the N-terminal region of DivIVA, which was characterized as a bifunctional protein with distinct roles during vegetative growth and sporulation. In addition, members of the DUF1273 family display distant sequence similarity with the DprA/Smf protein, which acts downstream of the DNA uptake machinery, possibly in conjunction with RecA. The RecA activities in Bacillus subtilis are modulated by RecU Holliday-junction resolvase. In all analyzed cases, the gene coding for RecU is in the vicinity of MW1337R, lin2004, or their orthologs, but on a different operon located in the complementary DNA strand. Here, we report the crystal structures of MW1337R and lin2004, which were determined using the semiautomated, high-throughput pipeline of the Joint Center for Structural Genomics (JCSG), part of the National Institute of General Medical Sciences Protein Structure Initiative.

Kozbial, Piotr; Xu, Qingping; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; McMullan, Daniel; Krishna, S. Sri; Miller, Mitchell D.; Abdubek, Polat; Acosta, Claire; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Carlton, Dennis; Clayton, Thomas; Deller, Marc; Duan, Lian; Elias, Ylva; Elsliger, Marc-André; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grzechnik, Slawomir K.; Hale, Joanna; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Koesema, Eric; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; Morse, Andrew T.; Murphy, Kevin D.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Oommachen, Silvya; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; Spraggon, Glen; Trout, Christina V.; ban den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; White, Aprilfawn; Wolf, Guenter; Zubieta, Chloe; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A. (Scripps); (SSRL); (JCSG); (UCSD); (Burnham)

2009-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

363

Brain-computer interaction: can multimodality help?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is a short introduction to a special ICMI session on brain-computer interaction. During this paper, we first discuss problems, solutions, and a five-year view for brain-computer interaction. We then talk further about unique issues with multimodal ... Keywords: bandwidth, brain-computer interaction, hybrid BCIs, multimodal interaction

Anton Nijholt; Brendan Z. Allison; Rob J.K. Jacob

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Evaluation of Dosimetric Consequences of Seroma Contour Variability in Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using a Constructed Representative Seroma Contour  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Contouring variability of the seroma can have important implications in the planning and delivery of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). This study aimed to quantify the dosimetric impact of these interobserver and intraobserver contouring variations by construction of a representative seroma contour (RSC). Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients with a seroma suitable for APBI underwent four computed tomography (CT) scans: one planning CT and three additional CTs on the first, third, and fifth days of treatment. Three radiation oncologists contoured the seroma on each CT scan. For 3 patients, oncologists repeated contouring twice to assess intraobserver variations. Seroma contour variability was quantified by construction of an RSC. In addition, the percent volume overlap (PVO) was calculated. Root-mean-square (RMS) differences in seroma volume, size, and center of mass position compared to those of the RSC were calculated. Treatment fields from the original plan were applied to the repeated CTs by using the same isocenter shifts as the original plan. The dosimetric impact of the contour variations was assessed using V{sub 95} (volume receiving at least 95% of the prescribed dose) and equivalent uniform dose (EUD). Results: Interobserver RMS volume differences were, on average, 5.6 times larger than intraobserver differences. The median interobserver RMS seroma volume difference was 1.48 cm{sup 3}. The median PVO was 51.6%. V{sub 95} and EUD of the seroma contours were similar for all patients. The median RMS differences of the seroma V{sub 95} and EUD were 0.01% (range, 0%-3.99%) and 0.05 Gy (range, 0-0.98 Gy). Conclusions: Construction of the RSC showed that interobserver variations were most responsible for contour variations of the seroma. Current planning margins provided adequate dose coverage of the seroma despite these contour variations.

Kosztyla, Robert, E-mail: rkosztyla@bccancer.bc.ca [Department of Medical Physics, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada) [Department of Medical Physics, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Olson, Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada) [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Centre for the North, Prince George, British Columbia (Canada); Division of Radiation Oncology and Developmental Radiotherapeutics, Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Carolan, Hannah [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada) [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Division of Radiation Oncology and Developmental Radiotherapeutics, Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Balkwill, Susan [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Fraser Valley Centre, Surrey, British Columbia (Canada) [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Fraser Valley Centre, Surrey, British Columbia (Canada); Division of Radiation Oncology and Developmental Radiotherapeutics, Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Moiseenko, Vitali [Department of Medical Physics, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada) [Department of Medical Physics, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Kwan, Winkle [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Fraser Valley Centre, Surrey, British Columbia (Canada) [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Fraser Valley Centre, Surrey, British Columbia (Canada); Division of Radiation Oncology and Developmental Radiotherapeutics, Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

The coincidence problem in the scenario of dark energy interacting with two fluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A cosmological model of dark energy interacting with dark matter and another general component of the universe is considered. The evolution equations for coincidence parameters r and s, which represent the ratios between the dark energy and the matter and the other cosmic fluid, respectively, are analyzed in terms of the stability of stationary solutions. The obtained general results allow to shed some light on the coincidence problem and in the equations of state of the three interacting fluids, due to the constraints imposes by the stability of the solutions. We found that for an interaction proportional to the sum of the DE density and the third fluid density, the hypothetical fluid must have positive pressure, which leads naturally to a cosmological scenario with radiation, unparticle or even some form of warm DM as the third interacting fluid.

Norman Cruz; Samuel Lepe; Francisco Pena

2009-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

366

Chapter_6_Foreign_Interaction  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Foreign Interaction Foreign Interaction This chapter describes the security procedures adopted by DOE HQ to implement the requirements of the following Executive Order and DOE directives: * Executive Order 12344 (as prescribed by 42 U.S.C. 7158) * DOE Oder 142.3A, Unclassified Foreign Visits and Assignments Program * DOE Order 470.4B, Safeguards and Security Program, Appendix B, Section 4 * DOE Order 475.1, Counterintelligence Program * DOE Order 551.1C, Official Foreign Travel * DOE Manual 552.1-1A, U.S. Department of Energy Travel Manual * DOE Order 552.1A, Change 1, Travel Policy and Procedures The directives have two objectives: the first objective is to protect DOE sensitive and classified information from being disclosed to foreign nationals, except when authorized by international

367

Structural Interactions in Spatial Panels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; Pesaran et al., 2004, Holly et al., 2008), socio-cultural distance (Conley and Topa, 2002; Bhattacharjee and Jensen-Butler, 2005), and transportation costs and time (Gibbons and Machin, 2005; Bhattacharjee and Jensen-Butler, 2005) have been highlighted... at higher lags in the dynamic panel data model), who are correlated with the above set of endogenous variables, but not with the idiosyncratic errors ?1?? ?2?? ? ? ? ? ??? from the interaction error equation (2). In social networks agents who have weak ties...

Bhattacharjee, Arnab; Holly, Sean

368

Strongly interacting parton matter equilibration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study the kinetic and chemical equilibration in 'infinite' parton matter within the Parton-Hadron-String Dynamics transport approach. The 'infinite' matter is simulated within a cubic box with periodic boundary conditions initialized at different energy densities. Particle abundances, kinetic energy distributions, and the detailed balance of the off-shell quarks and gluons in the strongly-interacting quarkgluon plasma are addressed and discussed.

Ozvenchuk, V., E-mail: ozvenchuk@fias.uni-frankfurt.de [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies (Germany); Linnyk, O. [Goethe-Universitaet, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik (Germany); Bratkovskaya, E. [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies (Germany); Gorenstein, M. [NAS Ukraine, Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics (Ukraine); Cassing, W. [Justus-Liebig Universitaet, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik (Germany)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

369

Pokey: Interaction Through Covert Structured  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we describe a method to support interaction with a cellphone based projectorcamera system. We describe a novel approach that uses a technique known in Computer Vision as structured light. It is based on projecting a pattern of light with known geometric properties onto a scene while imaging it with a camera. The distortions of the known pattern in the resulting image are due to the scene geometry which can be readily estimated. The main contribution of this paper is that the structure is created as consequence of the way raster-scan, laser-based microprojectors operate, and is in fact invisible to the user. The structure of the projected light is sensed through careful synchronization within the camera-projector system and is imperceptible to the user. In this paper we describe the technique, and test it with a cell-phone based application that exploits this method while providing a natural interactive environment with no additional special equipment. The system enables manual interaction with a projected application using only the rasterizing projector and camera that will be part of next generation cell phones.

Paul Beardsley; Yui Ivanov; Biliana Kaneva; Shoji Tanaka; Christopher Wren; Paul Beardsley; Yuri Ivanov; Biliana Kaneva; Shoji Tanaka; Christopher R. Wren

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Surprising Quasiparticle Interactions in Graphene  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Surprising Quasiparticle Interactions in Graphene Print Surprising Quasiparticle Interactions in Graphene Print Until now, the world's electronics have been dominated by silicon, whose properties, while excellent, significantly limit the size and power consumption of today's computer chips. In order to develop ever smaller and more efficient devices, scientists have turned their attention to carbon, which can be formed into nanostructures like nanotubes, whose properties can be tuned from metallic to semiconducting. However, using carbon nanotubes for complex circuits is nearly impossible because their location and functionality in devices cannot be controlled at will, making them a poor substitute for silicon. Graphene, however, does not have these limitations. This single sheet of carbon atoms that is the building block of carbon nanotubes, C60 molecules, and graphite turns out to have similar functionality but with the added benefit that it can be grown with conventional methods and patterned into devices. Now, a group of scientists from Germany and the ALS, using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) at ALS Beamine 7.0.1, have succeeded in making the first measurement of the carrier lifetime in graphene over a wide energy scale and have found surprising new interactions that suggest new kinds of devices.

371

Surprising Quasiparticle Interactions in Graphene  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Surprising Quasiparticle Surprising Quasiparticle Interactions in Graphene Surprising Quasiparticle Interactions in Graphene Print Wednesday, 31 October 2007 00:00 Until now, the world's electronics have been dominated by silicon, whose properties, while excellent, significantly limit the size and power consumption of today's computer chips. In order to develop ever smaller and more efficient devices, scientists have turned their attention to carbon, which can be formed into nanostructures like nanotubes, whose properties can be tuned from metallic to semiconducting. However, using carbon nanotubes for complex circuits is nearly impossible because their location and functionality in devices cannot be controlled at will, making them a poor substitute for silicon. Graphene, however, does not have these limitations. This single sheet of carbon atoms that is the building block of carbon nanotubes, C60 molecules, and graphite turns out to have similar functionality but with the added benefit that it can be grown with conventional methods and patterned into devices. Now, a group of scientists from Germany and the ALS, using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) at ALS Beamine 7.0.1, have succeeded in making the first measurement of the carrier lifetime in graphene over a wide energy scale and have found surprising new interactions that suggest new kinds of devices.

372

Gauge Interaction as Periodicity Modulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper is devoted to a geometrical interpretation of gauge invariance in terms of the formalism of field theory in compact space-time dimensions [arXiv:0903.3680]. In this formalism, the kinematic information of an interacting elementary particle is encoded on the relativistic geometrodynamics of the boundary of the theory through local transformations of the underlying space-time coordinates. Therefore, gauge interaction is described as invariance of the theory under local deformations of the boundary, the resulting local variations of field solution are interpreted as internal transformations, and the internal symmetries of the gauge theory turn out to be related to corresponding local space-time symmetries. In the case of local infinitesimal isometric transformations, Maxwell's kinematics and gauge invariance are inferred directly from the variational principle. Furthermore we explicitly impose periodic conditions at the boundary of the theory as semi-classical quantization condition in order to investigate the quantum behavior of gauge interaction. In the abelian case the result is a remarkable formal correspondence with scalar QED.

Donatello Dolce

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

373

EIA - The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003-Macroeconomic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Macroeconomic Activity Module Macroeconomic Activity Module The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003 Macroeconomic Activity Module The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) links NEMS to the rest of the economy by providing projections of economic driver variables for use by the supply, demand, and conversion modules of NEMS. The derivation of the baseline macroeconomic forecast lays a foundation for the determination of the energy demand and supply forecast. MAM is used to present alternative macroeconomic growth cases to provide a range of uncertainty about the growth potential for the economy and its likely consequences for the energy system. MAM is also able to address the macroeconomic impacts associated with changing energy market conditions, such as alternative world oil price assumptions. Outside of the Annual Energy Outlook setting, MAM represents a system of linked modules which can assess the potential impacts on the economy of changes in energy events or policy proposals. These economic impacts then feed back into NEMS for an integrated solution. MAM consists of five modules:

374

Interfacial Interactions between Implant Electrode and Biological Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electrodes implanted into neural systems are known to degrade due to encapsulation by surrounding tissues. The mechanisms of electrode-tissue interactions and prediction of the behavior of electrode are yet to be achieved. This research will aim at establishing the fundamental knowledge of interfacial interactions between the host biological environment and an implanted electrode. We will identify the dynamic mechanisms of such interfacial interactions. Quantitative analysis of the electrical properties of interface will be conducted using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS). Results will be used to develop a general model to interpret electrical circuitry of the interface. This is expected to expand our understanding in the effects of interfacial interactions to the charge transport. The interfacial interactions of an implanted electrode with neural system will be studied in two types of electrodes: silver and graphene coated. The interfacial impedance of both samples will be studied using EIS. The development of the cellular interaction will be investigated using histological procedure. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) will be employed to study the chemical effects on the silver electrodes. Atomic force microscopy and Raman spectroscopy will be used for material characterization of graphene-coated electrodes. In the study of silver electrode, two mechanisms affecting the interfacial impedance are proposed. First is the formation of silver oxide. The other is the immuno-response of tissue encapsulation. Histological results suggest that higher cell density cause higher impedance magnitude at the interface. It is also found that the cellular encapsulation dominates the increase in impedance for longer implanted time. In the study of graphene-coated electrode, it is found that the graphene can strongly prevent the metal substrate from being oxidized. It not only provides good electrical conductivity for signal transport, but also reduces the speed of the accumulation of tissue around the electrode. Such characteristics of graphene have great potential in the application of neural implant. Finally, the dynamic mechanisms of biological interaction are proposed. A model is also developed to represent the general circuitry of the interface between an implanted electrode and the neural system. The model has three major components, which are interfacial double layer, cellular encapsulation, and the substrate. The model presented in this study can compensate for selection and prediction of materials and their behaviors.

Chiu, Cheng-Wei 1979-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Statement of Patricia Hoffman Before the US House of Representatives Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Energy and Power (May 9, 2012)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Statement of Assistant Secretary Patricia Hoffman Before the U.S. House of Representatives Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Energy and Power to discuss DOE’s emergency authority under section...

376

Can Satellite Sampling of Offshore Wind Speeds Realistically Represent Wind Speed Distributions? Part II: Quantifying Uncertainties Associated with Distribution Fitting Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Remote sensing tools represent an attractive proposition for measuring wind speeds over the oceans because, in principle, they also offer a mechanism for determining the spatial variability of flow. Presented here is the continuation of research ...

S. C. Pryor; M. Nielsen; R. J. Barthelmie; J. Mann

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Eastward propagating intraseasonal oscillation represented by Chikira-Sugiyama cumulus parameterization. Part II: Understanding moisture variation under weak temperature gradient balance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Eastward propagating intraseasonal oscillation represented by the Chikira-Sugiyama cumulus scheme in a general circulation model was investigated focusing on the variation of the free-tropospheric humidity. The net effect of the vertical advection ...

Minoru Chikira

378

Analyzing Interaction Orderings with Model Checking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) systems control an ongoing interaction between end-users and computer-based systems. For software-intensive systems, a Graphic User Interface (GUI) is often employed for enhanced usability. Traditional approaches to validation ...

Matthew B. Dwyer; Robby; Oksana Tkachuk; Willem Visser

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Interaction of Ekman Layers and Islands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The circulation induced by the interaction of surface Ekman transport with an island is considered using both numerical models and linear theory. The basic response is similar to that found for the interaction of Ekman layers and an infinite ...

Michael A. Spall; Joseph Pedlosky

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Multimodal human computer interaction: a survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we review the major approaches to multimodal human computer interaction from a computer vision perspective. In particular, we focus on body, gesture, gaze, and affective interaction (facial expression recognition, and emotion in audio). ...

Alejandro Jaimes; Nicu Sebe

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mam represents interactions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

An Interacting Dark Energy Model for the Expansion History of the Universe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore a model of interacting dark energy where the dark energy density is related by the holographic principle to the Hubble parameter, and the decay of the dark energy into matter occurs at a rate comparable to the current value of the Hubble parameter. We find this gives a good fit to the observational data supporting an accelerating Universe, and the model represents a possible alternative interpretation of the expansion history of the Universe.

Micheal S. Berger; Hamed Shojaei

2006-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

382

Dynamic positioning systems: usability and interaction styles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the first steps of a research project directed towards human computer interaction (HCI) within the maritime environment and on maritime equipment. The focus is at this stage mainly on interaction with Dynamic Positioning Systems ... Keywords: bi-manual interaction, dynamic positioning, gestures, graphical user interface, maritime environment, multi-touch, safety critical situations

Frøy Birte Bjørneseth; Mark D. Dunlop; Jann Peter Strand

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Interactivity dimension: media, contents, and user perception  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research explores interactivity dimension in the portal media (such as Yahoo, Naver, Daum, Paran, and Nate). The research is designed to measure user's perception of interactivity in the portal site at the three levels including 1) media 2) contents, ... Keywords: CMC, HCI, communication, community, hypertext, interactivity, interface

Sang Hee Kweon; Eun Joung Cho; Eun Mee Kim

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Interaction Comparison among Media Internet Genre  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research explores interactivity dimension in the portal media (such as Yahoo, Naver, Daum, Paran, and Nate). The research is designed to measure user's perception of interactivity in the portal site at the three levels including 1) media 2) contents, ... Keywords: CMC, Communication, Community, HCI, Hypertext, Interactivity, Interface

Sang Hee Kweon; Eun Joung Cho; Ae Jin Cho

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Investigation of sorption interactions between organic and mineral phases of processed oil shale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Minerals and organic compounds representative of oil shale processing wastes were analyzed for potential sorption interactions. The analysis consisted of Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy, high performance liquid chromatography, thermogravimetric and differential scanning calorimetry, and laser Raman spectroscopy. Montmorillonite clay was used as a representative of the smectites found in raw and spent shales, and hematite was used as a representative of iron oxide found in spent shales. Benzene, 2,2,4-trimethylpentane, benzoic acid, sodium benzoate, and pyridine were used as representatives of oil shale process organic wastes. In addition, isopropylamine and dimethyl methylphosphonate, a pesticide model, were studied. A preparation methods comparison study was performed and established the validity of the solid state KBr sample preparation technique upon FTIR spectral quality. The results of this study illustrate the utility of fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analysis to establish and describe the potential for sorption interactions between inorganic and organic phases of oil shale processing wastes. Experimentation with the laser remain system shows promise for significant contributions in this field of research. 43 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

Blanche, M. S.; Bowen, J. M.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

An interactive parallel programming environment applied in atmospheric science  

SciTech Connect

This article introduces an interactive parallel programming environment (IPPE) that simplifies the generation and execution of parallel programs. One of the tasks of the environment is to generate message-passing parallel programs for homogeneous and heterogeneous computing platforms. The parallel programs are represented by using visual objects. This is accomplished with the help of a graphical programming editor that is implemented in Java and enables portability to a wide variety of computer platforms. In contrast to other graphical programming systems, reusable parts of the programs can be stored in a program library to support rapid prototyping. In addition, runtime performance data on different computing platforms is collected in a database. A selection process determines dynamically the software and the hardware platform to be used to solve the problem in minimal wall-clock time. The environment is currently being tested on a Grand Challenge problem, the NASA four-dimensional data assimilation system.

Laszewski, G. von

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

387

Interactive montages of sprites for indexing and summarizing security video  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this video we present a new model of interaction for indexing and visualizing video in the context of security applications. We wish to index security video that contains relatively rare but important events, such as security video taken from large public or industrial facilities (e.g. a nuclear power plant) or exterior home security video from a residential neighborhood. We present a method of indexing video by arranging irregularly shaped icons or sprites into a montage representing motion events or security events within the original video scene. The sprites in the montage are used as an index into the original video. We also generate video montages to summarize video in which motion events are compressed and overlayed in a video of shorter time duration. This summary video also acts as an index into the original video stream.

Chris Pal; Nebojsa Jojic

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Communicating art through interactive technology: new approaches for interaction design in art museums  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses new approaches to interaction design for communication of art in the physical museum space. In contrast to the widespread utilization of interactive technologies in cultural heritage and natural science museums it is generally a ... Keywords: art museums, audio augmentation, body as an interaction device, communicating art, interaction design, user experience

Karen Johanne Kortbek; Kaj Grønbæk

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Identification of Anonymous Endogenous Interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction In theoretical studies of social interactions, we hypothesize a process and seek to deduce the implied outcomes. In inferential studies, we face an inverse logical problem. Given observations of outcomes and maintained assumptions, we seek to deduce the actual process generating the observations. Econometricians have long found it useful to separate inferential problems into statistical and identification components (see Koopmans, 1949). Studies of identification seek to characterize the conclusions that could be drawn if one could use a given sampling process to obtain an unlimited number of observations. Studies of statistical inference seek to characterize the generally weaker conclusions that can be drawn from a finite number of observations. Analysis of identification logically comes first. Negative identification findings imply that statistical inference is fruitless: it makes no sense to try to use a sample of finite size to infer something that could not be learned

Charles F. Manski

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Interactive troubleshooting guide for accelerators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern accelerators face the challenge of supporting increased machine complexity and higher levels of utilization while relying on downsized maintenance and support groups. To improve system availability, reduce reliance on system experts and provide a systematic approach to problem solving, an interactive troubleshooting guide has been implemented for the CEBAF injector at Jefferson lab. This guide, which uses a tree structure with appropriate hypertext links, traces problems from a set of symptoms, through a series of diagnostic tests, to a specific corrective action. This guide is used in conjunction with an active parameter monitoring system that is part of the EPICS control system tool kit. The monitoring system generates operator alarms when injector RF or magnet parameters fall outside pre-set windows. Operators receive immediate feedback when injector components vary from their standard values and the troubleshooting guide provides a systematic means to identify and ultimately correct the problem.

Legg, R.; Dunham, B.; Higgins, S.; Kazimi, R.; Kehne, D.; Oren, T.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Compact submanifolds supporting singular interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A quantum particle moving under the influence of singular interactions on embedded surfaces furnish an interesting example from the spectral point of view. In these problems, the possible occurrence of a bound state is perhaps the most important aspect. Such systems can be introduced as quadratic forms and generically they do not require renormalization. Yet an alternative path through the resolvent is also beneficial to study various properties. In the present work, we address these issues for compact surfaces embedded in a class of ambient manifolds. We discover that there is an exact bound state solution written in terms of the heat kernel of the ambient manifold for a range of coupling strengths. Moreover, we develop techniques to estimate bounds on the ground state energy when several surfaces, each of which admits a bound state solution, coexist.

Kaynak, Burak Tevfik

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Dynamics of interacting dark energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dark energy and dark matter are only indirectly measured via their gravitational effects. It is possible that there is an exchange of energy within the dark sector, and this offers an interesting alternative approach to the coincidence problem. We consider two broad classes of interacting models where the energy exchange is a linear combination of the dark sector densities. The first class has been previously investigated, but we define new variables and find a new exact solution, which allows for a more direct, transparent and comprehensive analysis. The second class has not been investigated in general form before. We give general conditions on the parameters in both classes to avoid unphysical behavior (such as negative energy densities).

Caldera-Cabral, Gabriela; Urena-Lopez, L Arturo

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Dynamics of interacting dark energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dark energy and dark matter are only indirectly measured via their gravitational effects. It is possible that there is an exchange of energy within the dark sector, and this offers an interesting alternative approach to the coincidence problem. We consider two broad classes of interacting models where the energy exchange is a linear combination of the dark sector densities. The first class has been previously investigated, but we define new variables and find a new exact solution, which allows for a more direct, transparent and comprehensive analysis. The second class has not been investigated in general form before. We give general conditions on the parameters in both classes to avoid unphysical behavior (such as negative energy densities).

Gabriela Caldera-Cabral; Roy Maartens; L. Arturo Urena-Lopez

2008-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

394

Compact submanifolds supporting singular interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A quantum particle moving under the influence of singular interactions on embedded surfaces furnish an interesting example from the spectral point of view. In these problems, the possible occurrence of a bound state is perhaps the most important aspect. Such systems can be introduced as quadratic forms and generically they do not require renormalization. Yet an alternative path through the resolvent is also beneficial to study various properties. In the present work, we address these issues for compact surfaces embedded in a class of ambient manifolds. We discover that there is an exact bound state solution written in terms of the heat kernel of the ambient manifold for a range of coupling strengths. Moreover, we develop techniques to estimate bounds on the ground state energy when several surfaces, each of which admits a bound state solution, coexist.

Burak Tevfik Kaynak; O. Teoman Turgut

2013-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

395

Energy and water development appropriations for 1986. Part 7. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session  

SciTech Connect

Part 7 of the hearing record covers three areas of the DOE appropriations: Atomic Energy Defense activities, power marketing administrations, and departmental administration. Representatives of DOE and the US Army reviewed the nuclear defense mission and activities under the defense and arms control programs. The administrators of the Alaska, Bonneville, Southeastern, Southwestern, and Western Power Administrations and a representative of the Conservation and Renewable Energy division described programs and budget requirements, as well as estimates of power demands for their regions. Administrative personnel described DOE procedures and explained the budget requests. Supporting documentation accompanies the testimony of the 16 witnesses.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Industry InteractiveProcurement System PIA, Office of Management...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industry InteractiveProcurement System PIA, Office of Management Industry InteractiveProcurement System PIA, Office of Management Industry InteractiveProcurement System PIA, Office...

397

Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - Fundamental Interactions Images  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fundamental Interactions Images Fundamental Interactions Images These images may be used freely as long as they are accompanied by a statement that they were used "Courtesy of Argonne National Laboratory" (see disclaimer). To download a larger or high-resolution version of each picture, right-click on the "Download high-resolution image" text beneath the picture and select "Save Link/Image As..." from the resulting pop-up menu. Shock Tube with Joe Michael and Raghu Sivaramakrishnan Joe Michael (left) and Raghu Sivaramakrishnan stand in front of a shock tube developed for the study of the kinetics of chemical reactions at the high temperatures relevant for combusion. Download high resolution image. Thermochemical subnetwork diagram Shown is a thermochemical subnetwork relevant to the determination of the heat of formation of the OH radical. Vertices of the graph indicate thermochemical quantities, such as the heats of formation, while the lines of the graph represent the measurements connecting these quantities for different species. The Active Tables approach developed by Branko Ruscic at Argonne simultaneously optimizes the thermochemical quantities for all species in the graph, taking into account all of the existing experimental and theoretical results, and weighting them by their uncertainties. Download high resolution image.

398

Interactive graphical tools for three-dimensional mesh redistribution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three-dimensional meshes modeling nonlinear problems such as sheet metal forming, metal forging, heat transfer during welding, the propagation of microwaves through gases, and automobile crashes require highly refined meshes in local areas to accurately represent areas of high curvature, stress, and strain. These locally refined areas develop late in the simulation and/or move during the course of the simulation, thus making it difficult to predict their exact location. This thesis is a systematic study of new tools scientists can use with redistribution algorithms to enhance the solution results and reduce the time to build, solve, and analyze nonlinear finite element problems. Participatory design techniques including Contextual Inquiry and Design were used to study and analyze the process of solving such problems. This study and analysis led to the in-depth understanding of the types of interactions performed by FEM scientists. Based on this understanding, a prototype tool was designed to support these interactions. Scientists participated in evaluating the design as well as the implementation of the prototype tool. The study, analysis, prototype tool design, and the results of the evaluation of the prototype tool are described in this thesis.

Dobbs, L.A.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Energy and water-development appropriations for 1983. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, Ninety-Seventh Congress, Second Session. Part 3  

SciTech Connect

Secretary of the Interior James Watt's testimony in support of water-development projects opened part three of the hearing record. Also seeking funds to develop both needed water supplies and hydropower were representatives of the Bureau of Reclamation, the Corps of Engineers, the Tennessee Valley Authority, and the Appalachian Regional Commission. (DCK)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Energy and water development appropriations for 1999: Part 1. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, One Hundred Fifth Congress, Second Session  

SciTech Connect

This is part 1 of the hearings before the subcommittee on energy and water development of the committee on appropriations, House of Representatives. This includes statements of witnesses from the Department of the Army, the Corps of Engineers, Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Army (Civil Works) and Chief of Engineers on topics of funding for the activities of these departments.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mam represents interactions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Energy and water development appropriations for 1999: Part 3. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, On Hundred Fifth Congress, Second Session  

SciTech Connect

These are the hearings before the subcommittee on energy and water development of the committed on appropriations, House of Representatives. The topics include the Bureau of Reclamation, testimony of the Secretary of the Interior, Appalachian Regional Commission, and the Tennessee Valley Authority. The discussion is related to the funding of activities in these areas.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

402

Energy and water development appropriations for 1999: Part 7. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, One Hundred Fifth Congress, Second Session  

SciTech Connect

These are the hearings before the subcommittee on energy and water development of the committee on appropriations, House of Representatives. This is part 7 which includes the testimony of members of congress and other interested individuals and organizations. Discussion includes funding of various US DOE programs and projects relating to energy efficiency and other topics.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

403

This book represents a modern treatment of classical control theory and its applications. Theoretically, it is based on the state space approach, where the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Preface This book represents a modern treatment of classical control theory and its applications behavior of real physical control systems, which are quite often of high dimensions. The book treats motivation for writing this book is twofold: (1) Undergraduate students usually take only one control systems

Gajic, Zoran

404

CO2 Emissions Determined by HadGEM2-ES to be Compatible with the Representative Concentration Pathway Scenarios and Their Extensions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the fossil fuel–derived CO2 emissions simulated by the Hadley Centre Global Environmental Model, version 2, Earth System (HadGEM2-ES) to be compatible with four representative concentration pathways (RCPs) from 2006 to 2100. ...

Spencer Liddicoat; Chris Jones; Eddy Robertson

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Representing Twentieth-Century Space–Time Climate Variability. Part I: Development of a 1961–90 Mean Monthly Terrestrial Climatology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The construction of a 0.5° lat × 0.5° long surface climatology of global land areas, excluding Antarctica, is described. The climatology represents the period 1961–90 and comprises a suite of nine variables: precipitation, wet-day frequency, mean ...

Mark New; Mike Hulme; Phil Jones

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Interacting agegraphic tachyon model of dark energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scalar-field dark energy models like tachyon are often regarded as an effective description of an underlying theory of dark energy. In this Letter, we implement the interacting agegraphic dark energy models with tachyon field. We demonstrate that the interacting agegraphic evolution of the universe can be described completely by a single tachyon scalar field. We thus reconstruct the potential as well as the dynamics of the tachyon field according to the evolutionary behavior of interacting agegraphic dark energy.

A. Sheykhi

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

407

Energy or Mass and Interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A review. Problems: 1-Many empirical parameters and large dimension number; 2-Gravitation and Electrodynamics are challenged by dark matter and energy. Energy and nonlinear electrodynamics are fundamental in a unified nonlinear interaction. Nuclear energy appears as nonlinear SU(2) magnetic energy. Gravitation and electromagnetism are unified giving Einstein's equation and a geometric energy momentum tensor. A solution energy in the newtonian limit gives the gravitational constant G. Outside of this limit G is variable. May be interpreted as dark matter or energy. In vacuum, known gravitational solutions are obtained. Electromagnetism is an SU(2) subgroup. A U(1) limit gives Maxwell's equations. Geometric fields determine a generalized Dirac equation and are the germ of quantum physics. Planck's h and of Einstein's c are given by the potential and the metric. Excitations have quanta of charge, flux and spin determining the FQHE. There are only three stable 1/2 spin fermions. Mass is a form of energy. The rest energies of the fermions give the proton/electron mass ratio. Potential excitations have energies equal to the weak boson masses allowing a geometric interpretation of Weinberg's angle. SU(2) gives the anomalous magnetic moments of proton, electron, neutron and generates nuclear range attractive potentials strong enough to produce the binding energies of the deuteron and other nuclides. Lepton and meson masses are due to topological excitations. The geometric mass spectrum is satisfactory. The proton has a triple structure. The alpha constant is a geometric number.

Gustavo R Gonzalez-Martin

2010-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

408

Designing Interactive Mathematics - CECM - Simon Fraser University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

internet, but also by the production of educational CDs and in-classroom software ... idiosyncratic exploration of what makes onscreen mathematical interactivity.

409

EMSL: Science: Biological Interactions and Dynamics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biological Interactions and Dynamics Cryo-transmission electron microscope image of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Understanding and optimizing the response of organisms and...

410

Probing Higgs Boson Interactions At Future Colliders.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??We present in this thesis a detailed analysis of Higgs boson interactions at future colliders. In particular we examine, in a model independent way, the… (more)

Biswal, Sudhansu Sekhar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Rotor interaction in the annulus billiard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introducing the rotor interaction in the integrable system of the annulus billiard produces a variety of dynamical phenomena, from integrability to ergodicity.

Péter Bálint; Serge Troubetzkoy

2004-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

412

Glass-water Interactions - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Glass and Optical Materials: Glass-water Interactions ... Corrosion of Photomultiplier Tube Glasses in High Purity Water : Ruhil Dongol1; S. K. Sundaram1; Milind ...

413

Interactive Graphics Developments in Energy Exploration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changing world conditions have brought about new economic rules for energy exploration¿rules that are helping bring interactive computer graphics into the search for fossil fuels.

Thomas Gardner; H. Nelson

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

INTERACTIVE COMPUTER GRAPHICS DISPLAYS FOR HIERARCHICAL DATA STRUCTURES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INTERACTIVE COMPUTER GRAPHICS DISPLAYS FOR HIERARCHICAL DATAINTERACTIVE COMPUTER GRAPHICS DISPLAYS FOR HIERARCHICAL DATAtem. INTERACTIVE COMPUTER GRAPHICS DISPLAYS FOR HIERARCHICAL

Cahn, D.F.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Facility Representative Program: Surveillance Guides  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessment Tools Assessment Tools CRADs Manager's Guide for Safety and Health Walkthroughs Surveillance Guides CMS 3.1 Configuration Management Implementation CMS 3.2 Change Control CMS 3.3 Verification of System Configuration and Operations CMS 3.4 Temporary Changes CPS 8.1 Hoisting and Rigging CPS 8.2 Trenching and Excavation EMS 21.1 Emergency Preparedness ENS 7.1 Definition of Design Requirements ERS 14.1 Satellite Accumulation Ares (RCRA Compliance) ERS 14.2 Emmissions Monitoring ERS 14.3 Underground and Above Ground Diesel Fuel Storage Tanks FPS 12.1 Life Safety FPS 12.2 Fire Protection and Prevention MAS 10.1 Maintenance Activities MAS 10.2 Control of Measuring and Test Equipment MAS 10.3 Seasonal Preparation MSS 1.1 Corrective Action/Issue Management NSS 18.1 Criticality Safety

416

PSCAD Modules Representing PV Generator  

SciTech Connect

Photovoltaic power plants (PVPs) have been growing in size, and the installation time is very short. With the cost of photovoltaic (PV) panels dropping in recent years, it can be predicted that in the next 10 years the contribution of PVPs to the total number of renewable energy power plants will grow significantly. In this project, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed a dynamic modeling of the modules to be used as building blocks to develop simulation models of single PV arrays, expanded to include Maximum Power Point Tracker (MPPT), expanded to include PV inverter, or expanded to cover an entire PVP. The focus of the investigation and complexity of the simulation determines the components that must be included in the simulation. The development of the PV inverter was covered in detail, including the control diagrams. Both the current-regulated voltage source inverter and the current-regulated current source inverter were developed in PSCAD. Various operations of the PV inverters were simulated under normal and abnormal conditions. Symmetrical and unsymmetrical faults were simulated, presented, and discussed. Both the three-phase analysis and the symmetrical component analysis were included to clarify the understanding of unsymmetrical faults. The dynamic model validation was based on the testing data provided by SCE. Testing was conducted at SCE with the focus on the grid interface behavior of the PV inverter under different faults and disturbances. The dynamic model validation covers both the symmetrical and unsymmetrical faults.

Muljadi, E.; Singh, M.; Gevorgian, V.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

ESD Toxicology Laboratory Representative References  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

., et al. 1984. Comparative acute toxicity of components of coal-derived synthetic products to aquatic:709-724. Mesocosm Testing Giddings, J. M., et al. 1984. Effects of chronic exposure to coal-derived oil of chronic exposure to coal-derived oil on freshwater ecosystems. II. Experimental ponds. Environ. Toxicol

418

Interactive stories and the audience: Why empathy is important  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interactive narratives have long been advocated as having the potential to create more immersive and transformative experiences for audiences by adding the pleasure of agency. In practice, however, finding the balance between sufficient interactivity ... Keywords: Interactive stories, audience entertainment, empathy and interactivity, interactive advertisements, interactive drama for television

Stacey Hand; Duane Varan

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Emotion induction during human-robot interaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of the presented study was to measure physiological correlates of emotions that are of particular interest in the field of human-robot interaction (HRI). Therefore, we did not focus on self-induced basic emotions but rather evoked states that ... Keywords: emotion recognition, human-robot interaction, joint construction, stress induction

Cornelia Wendt; Michael Popp; Berthold Faerber

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Lattice polymers with two competing collapse interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There have been separate studies of the polymer collapse transition, where the collapse was induced by two different types of attraction. In each case, the configurations of the polymer were given by the same subset of random walks being self-avoiding trails on the square lattice. Numerical evidence shows that when interacting via nearest-neighbour contacts, this transition is different from the collapse transition in square-lattice trails interacting via multiply visited sites. While both transitions are second-order, when interacting via nearest-neighbour contacts, the transition is relatively weak with a convergent specific heat, while when interacting via multiply visited sites, the specific heat diverges strongly. Moreover, an estimation of the crossover exponent for the nearest-neighbour contact interaction provides a value close to that of the canonical polymer collapse model of interacting self-avoiding walks, which also interact via nearest-neighbour contacts. From computer simulations using the flatPERM algorithm, we extend these studies by considering a model of self-avoiding trails on the square lattice containing both types of interaction, and which therefore contains all three of the models discussed above as special cases. We find that the strong multiply-visited site collapse is a singular point in the phase diagram and corresponds to a higher order multi-critical point separating a line of weak second-order transitions from a line of first-order transitions.

Andrea Bedini; Aleksander L Owczarek; Thomas Prellberg

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mam represents interactions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Mobile camera-based user interaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present an approach for facilitating user interaction on mobile devices, focusing on camera-enabled mobile phones. A user interacts with an application by moving their device. An on-board camera is used to capture incoming video and the scrolling ...

Antonio Haro; Koichi Mori; Tolga Capin; Stephen Wilkinson

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

A New Algorithm for Service Interaction Detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a new formal method for telephony services engineering allowing feature interactions detection. System and service specifications are provided using the specification language SDL. These specifications are simulated in order to obtain ... Keywords: feature interaction, finite state machine, intelligent network, telecommunication service

Ana R. Cavalli; Stéphane Maag

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

An architecture for interactive raster graphics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A radical reappraisal of the 3-D Interactive raster graphics pipeline has resulted In an experimental architecture for a workstation which is currently being evaluated at the CWI. The principal features of this architecture are that It: - concentrates ... Keywords: angular Interpolation, architecture, display controller, interactive, object space hidden surface removal, raster graphics, systolic array

A. A. M. Kuijk; E. H. Blake; P. J. W. ten Hagen

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Human-computer interaction for hybrid carving  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we explore human-computer interaction for carving, building upon our previous work with the FreeD digital sculpting device. We contribute a new tool design (FreeD V2), with a novel set of interaction techniques for the fabrication of static ... Keywords: carving, computer-aided design (cad), craft, digital fabrication, milling.

Amit Zoran, Roy Shilkrot, Joseph Paradiso

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Automatic verification for interactive graphical programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern software applications come with interactive graphical displays. In the past, verification efforts for such programs have usually ignored the I/O aspects of programs and focused instead on their core functionality. This approach leaves open the ... Keywords: ACL2, Dracula, interactive graphical programs

Carl Eastlund; Matthias Felleisen

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Mining from protein–protein interactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proteins are important cellular molecules, and interacting protein pairs provide biologically important information, such as functional relationships. We focus on the problem of predicting physically interacting protein pairs. This is an important problem ... Keywords: Biological Data Mining, Industry Specific Applications, Machine Learning

Hiroshi Mamitsuka

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Templates for pre-grasp sliding interactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In manipulation tasks that require object acquisition, pre-grasp interaction such as sliding adjusts the object in the environment before grasping. This change in object placement can improve grasping success by making desired grasps reachable. However, ... Keywords: Humanoid robotics, Object manipulation, Pre-grasp interaction, Pushing, Sliding

Daniel Kappler; Lillian Y. Chang; Nancy S. Pollard; Tamim Asfour; Rüdiger Dillmann

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Effective pairing interactions with isospin density dependence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We perform Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) calculations for semi-magic calcium, nickel, tin, and lead isotopes and N=20,28,50, and 82 isotones using density-dependent pairing interactions recently derived from a microscopic nucleon-nucleon interaction. These interactions have an isovector component so that the pairing gaps in symmetric and neutron matter are reproduced. Our calculations well account for the experimental data for the neutron number dependence of binding energy, two-neutron separation energy, and odd-even mass staggering of these isotopes. This result suggests that by introducing the isovector term in the pairing interaction, one can construct a global effective pairing interaction that is applicable to nuclei in a wide range of the nuclear chart. It is also shown with the local density approximation that the pairing field deduced from the pairing gaps in infinite matter reproduces qualitatively well the pairing field for finite nuclei obtained with the HFB method.

Margueron, J. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, IN2P3-CNRS and Universite Paris-Sud, F-91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Center for Mathematical Sciences, University of Aizu, Aizu-Wakamatsu, 965-8580 Fukushima (Japan); Sagawa, H. [Center for Mathematical Sciences, University of Aizu, Aizu-Wakamatsu, 965-8580 Fukushima (Japan); Hagino, K. [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Sendai, 980-8578 (Japan)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

429

The unity of the fundamental interactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book offers a collection of authoritative papers which provides the reader with a plenary survey of some of the latest developments in the field of high-energy interactions. The contributing physicists offer a comprehensive review of recent significant findings from both theoretical and experimental studies in high-energy interactions. Topics include the end of the high-energy frontier, monopoles, numerical studies of gauge field theories, expectations for the next generation of experiments, unified models, cosmology, supersymmetry, neutrino physics at Fermilab, heavy flavor production in the highest-energy (pp) interactions, b-quark physics, hadron production in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation, the search for new particles and electroweak interference effects in e/sup +/e/sup -/ interactions, CP violation, and high-energy soft (pp) interactions. Includes essays by Edward Teller and P.A.M. Dirac on their lives as physicists, and one by E.P. Wigner on ''the glorious days of physics.''

Zichichi, A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

INTERACTION BETWEEN PRISMATIC AND GLISSILE DISLOCATIONS  

SciTech Connect

A theoretical study is made of the interaction between moving dislocations and large point defect clusters in the form of Frank sessile loops and perfect prismatic loops. Long-range interactions are shown to be negligible. The contact interaction depends on the type and orientation of the loops relative to the glide plane and Burgers vector of the gliding dislocation. It is noted that perfect prismatic loops can interact with moving dislocations in four different ways, These cases are analyzed in detail. The interaction with a Frank sessile loop depends on its size. However, even loops possibly too small to be visible by transmission electron microscopy can form strong locking points on a moving dislocation. (auth)

Saada, G.; Washburn, J.

1962-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Experience, engagement and social interaction at a steam locomotive multimodal interactive museum exhibit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the on-going study of an interactive multimodal museum exhibit about a steam-powered locomotive at the Riverside Transport Museum in Glasgow, UK. We examine the role of multimodal interaction relating to effects on (1) visitors' ... Keywords: collaboration, edutainment, installation, multimodal interaction, museum

Loraine Clarke; Eva Hornecker

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

CORCON-MOD3: An integrated computer model for analysis of molten core-concrete interactions. User`s manual  

SciTech Connect

The CORCON-Mod3 computer code was developed to mechanistically model the important core-concrete interaction phenomena, including those phenomena relevant to the assessment of containment failure and radionuclide release. The code can be applied to a wide range of severe accident scenarios and reactor plants. The code represents the current state of the art for simulating core debris interactions with concrete. This document comprises the user`s manual and gives a brief description of the models and the assumptions and limitations in the code. Also discussed are the input parameters and the code output. Two sample problems are also given.

Bradley, D.R.; Gardner, D.R.; Brockmann, J.E.; Griffith, R.O. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Quantum exchange interaction of spherically symmetric plasmoids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study nano-sized spherically symmetric plasma structures which are radial nonlinear oscillations of electrons in plasma. The effective interaction of these plasmoids via quantum exchange forces between ions is described. We calculate the energy of this interaction for the case of a dense plasma. The conditions when the exchange interaction is attractive are examined and it is shown that separate plasmoids can form a single object. The application of our results to the theoretical description of stable atmospheric plasma structures is considered.

Maxim Dvornikov

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

High-energy cosmic ray interactions  

SciTech Connect

Research into hadronic interactions and high-energy cosmic rays are closely related. On one hand--due to the indirect observation of cosmic rays through air showers--the understanding of hadronic multiparticle production is needed for deriving the flux and composition of cosmic rays at high energy. On the other hand the highest energy particles from the universe allow us to study the characteristics of hadronic interactions at energies far beyond the reach of terrestrial accelerators. This is the summary of three introductory lectures on our current understanding of hadronic interactions of cosmic rays.

Engel, Ralph [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Orellana, Mariana [Instituto Argentino de Radioastronomia (IAR), CCT La Plata (CONICET), C.C.5, 1894 Villa Elisa, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Facultad de Ciencias Astronomicas y Geofisicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Paseo del Bosque, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Reynoso, Matias M. [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Funes 3350, (7600) Mar del Plata (Argentina); Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicas de Mar del Plata, (UNMdP-CONICET) (Argentina); Vila, Gabriela S. [Instituto Argentino de Radioastronomia (IAR), CCT La Plata (CONICET), C.C.5, 1894 Villa Elisa, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

435

Three-body interactions in colloidal systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the first direct measurement of three-body interactions in a colloidal system comprised of three charged colloidal particles. Two of the particles have been confined by means of a scanned laser tweezers to a line-shaped optical trap where they diffused due to thermal fluctuations. Upon the approach of a third particle, attractive three-body interactions have been observed. The results are in qualitative agreement with additionally performed nonlinear Poissson-Boltzmann calculations, which also allow us to investigate the microionic density distributions in the neighborhood of the interacting colloidal particles.

J. Dobnikar; M. Brunner; H. H. von Grünberg; C. Bechinger

2008-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

436

Two-Nucleon Scattering without partial waves using a momentum space Argonne V18 interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We test the operator form of the Fourier transform of the Argonne V18 potential by computing selected scattering observables and all Wolfenstein parameters for a variety of energies. These are compared to the GW-DAC database and to partial wave calculations. We represent the interaction and transition operators as expansions in a spin-momentum basis. In this representation the Lippmann-Schwinger equation becomes a six channel integral equation in two variables. Our calculations use different numbers of spin-momentum basis elements to represent the on- and off-shell transition operators. This is because different numbers of independent spin-momentum basis elements are required to expand the on- and off-shell transition operators. The choice of on and off-shell spin-momentum basis elements is made so that the coefficients of the on-shell spin-momentum basis vectors are simply related to the corresponding off-shell coefficients.

S. Veerasamy; Ch. Elster; W. N. Polyzou

2012-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

437

Energy and water development appropriations for 1985. Part 6. Hearings before the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, Second Session  

SciTech Connect

Part 6 of the hearing record covers testimony by representatives of DOE and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) which was given in Executive Session over four days because of the sensitive nature of some of the information. The DOE witnesses discussed the design, testing, and manufacture of nuclear weapons and described DOE support for military applications of inertial fusion. Other responsibilities include the production, verification and monitoring of nuclear materials, and the dissemination of classified information. Chairman Nunzio Palladino and other officials of the NRC were asked to include comments on the licensing problems at the Byron and Zimmer plants in their review of the NRC budget requirements and program plans.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Energy and water development appropriations for 1986. Part 3. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session  

SciTech Connect

Part 3 of the hearing record covers testimony given by the Director and managers of the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), the chairman and advisors of the Appalachian Regional Commission, the Secretary of the Interior, and representatives of the Bureau of Reclamation. The witnesses presented the administration's budget requests for fiscal year 1986, described the anticipated income and expenditures of their programs, and presented details of specific projects. The administration's proposals were significantly reduced over previous funding levels, and termination was the recommendation for the Appalachian Regional Commission. Supporting documentation accompanies the testimony of the 18 witnesses.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Energy and water development appropriations for 1986. Part 1. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session  

SciTech Connect

Part 1 of the hearing record covers the testimony of witnesses from the Corps of Engineers before the House Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development on appropriations for Corps activities in 1986. The first section of the record gives an overview of civil works programs in the context of the 1986 budget of $2.34 billion. Particular emphasis is on 60 proposed water projects. Separate sections cover testimony by the divisional representatives of the Missouri River, Ohio River, North Central, North Atlantic, New England, and Southwestern Divisions. Their testimony includes details of specific projects and supporting documentation for the projects as well as proposals for cost sharing and user fees.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Energy and water development appropriations for 1985. Part 2. Hearings before the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, Second Session  

SciTech Connect

Part 2 of the hearing record covers testimony given by the Corps of Engineers on the Lower Mississippi Valley, Southwestern, North Pacific, South Pacific, and Pacific Ocean Divisions, and by the Delaware and Susquehanna River Basin Commissions and the Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin. Representatives of the Corps' engineering, planning, and program development offices described projects in each of the divisions which relate to navigation, flood control, job development, and other matters. The Committee reviewed appropriation levels for each of the projects. The hearing record includes background and supporting documentation as well as the statements and testimony of the witnesses.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mam represents interactions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Nanophotonics for tailoring light-matter interaction/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, we will theoretically explore three nanophotonics phenomena which enable strong light-matter interaction. The first phenomenon is plasmonic resonance, where the surface plasmon mode at metal and dielectric ...

Qiu, Wenjun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Long range interactions in nanoscale science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Our understanding of the “long range” electrodynamic, electrostatic, and polar interactions that dominate the organization of small objects at separations beyond an interatomic bond length is reviewed. From this basic-forces ...

Rajter, Richard F.

443

An Analysis of Wave-Turbulence Interaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the results of an analytical and numerical calculation of the interaction between an internal gravity wave and a wave-induced turbulence. The initial atmospheric state, assumed horizontally homogeneous, is statically and dynamically ...

D. Fua; G. Chimonas; F. Einaudi; O. Zeman

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Apogee Interactive Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Apogee Interactive Inc Apogee Interactive Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Apogee Interactive, Inc. Place Tucker, Georgia Zip GE 30084 Sector Services Product Apogee Interactive provides a full-service of online technology solutions and consulting services to the energy industry Coordinates 33.854351°, -84.212033° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.854351,"lon":-84.212033,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

445

Simulated liquid argon interactions with neutrons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The GEANT4 physics simulation program is known to have errors in how hadronic interactions are implemented. This has the potential to cause errors in the Monte Carlos used to determine the expected neutron backgrounds in ...

Harrington, Kathleen M

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Hadron interactions from SU(2) lattice QCD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We evaluate interhadron interactions in quenched two-color lattice QCD from Bethe-Salpeter amplitudes, concentrating on S-wave scattering states of two scalar diquarks (uC{gamma}5d). Between two identical scalar diquarks, we observe repulsion in short-range region. We define and evaluate the 'quark-exchange part' in the interaction, which is induced by adding quark-exchange diagrams, or equivalently, by introducing Pauli blocking among some of quarks. The repulsive force in short-distance region arises only from the 'quark-exchange part', and disappears when quark-exchange diagrams are omitted, which is qualitatively consistent with the constituent-quark model picture that a color-magnetic interaction among quarks is the origin of repulsion. We also find a universal long-range attractive force, which enters in any flavor channels of two scalar diquarks and whose interaction range and strength are quark-mass independent.

Takahashi, Toru T. [Gunma National College of Technology, Maebashi, Gunma 371-8530 (Japan); Kanada-En'yo, Yoshiko [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

447

Exploration of Climate Data Using Interactive Visualization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In atmospheric and climate research, the increasing amount of data available from climate models and observations provides new challenges for data analysis. The authors present interactive visual exploration as an innovative approach to handle ...

Florian Ladstädter; Andrea K. Steiner; Bettina C. Lackner; Barbara Pirscher; Gottfried Kirchengast; Johannes Kehrer; Helwig Hauser; Philipp Muigg; Helmut Doleisch

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Tropical-Extratropical Interactions of Intraseasonal Oscillations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tropical-extratropical interactions of intraseasonal oscillations (ISOs), based on 30 yr (1979-2009) of northern winter observations and theory, are compared. The phase relationships between the tropical signal of the leading theoretical ISO for a ...

Jorgen S. Frederiksen; Hai Lin

449

Interactive physical agents for story gathering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Robots are typically thought of as autonomous devices which require little to no human interaction to complete their goals. In this study we investigated what would happen if the success of a robot was contingent upon its ...

Reben, Alexander James

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Anisotropy in the Interaction of Ultracold Dysprosium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nature of the interaction between ultracold atoms with a large orbital and spin angular momentum has attracted considerable attention. It was suggested that such interactions can lead to the realization of exotic states of highly correlated matter. Here, we report on a theoretical study of the competing anisotropic dispersion, magnetic dipole-dipole, and electric quadrupole-quadrupole forces between two dysprosium atoms. Each dysprosium atom has an orbital angular momentum L=6 and magnetic moment $\\mu=10\\mu_B$. We show that the dispersion coefficients of the ground state adiabatic potentials lie between 1865 a.u. and 1890 a.u., creating a non-negligible anisotropy with a spread of 25 a.u. and that the electric quadrupole-quadrupole interaction is weak compared to the other interactions. We also find that for interatomic separations $Rrates that are the same order of magnitude as the experimental value.

Svetlana Kotochigova; Alexander Petrov

2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

451

PHASE TRANSFORMATIONS, STABILITY AND MATERIALS INTERACTIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IV); Fuel stability *(N) Fossil Energy Complex Spec. ComplexInteraction 11-2 Fossil Energy Chairman: R. Jaffee Members:that programming in fossil energy research supported by the

Morris, Jr., J.W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

PAPILLON: expressive eyes for interactive characters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PAPILLON is a technology for designing highly expressive animated eyes for interactive characters, robots and toys. Expressive eyes are essential in any form of face-to-face communication [2] and designing them has been a critical challenge in ...

Eric Brockmeyer; Ivan Poupyrev; Moshe Mahler; Joanne Dauner; James Krahe

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Interactive Cloud Formation and Climatic Temperature Perturbations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A one-dimensional climate model with an interactive cloud formation program is developed to investigate its effects on temperature perturbations due to various radiative forcings including doubling of CO2, a 2% increase of the solar constant and ...

Kuo-Nan Liou; S. C. S. Ou; P. J. Lu

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Inconsistences in Interacting Agegraphic Dark Energy Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is found that the origin agegraphic dark energy tracks the matter in the matter-dominated epoch and then the subsequent dark-energy-dominated epoch becomes impossible. It is argued that the difficulty can be removed when the interaction between the agegraphic dark energy and dark matter is considered. In the note, by discussing three different interacting models, we find that the difficulty still stands even in the interacting models. Furthermore, we find that in the interacting models, there exists the other serious inconsistence that the existence of the radiation/matter-dominated epoch contradicts the ability of agegraphic dark energy in driving the accelerated expansion. The contradiction can be avoided in one of the three models if some constraints on the parameters hold.

C. Y. Sun; Yu Song

2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

455

Tile-based methods for interactive applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the last years, several techniques have been demonstrated that rely on tile-based methods. A lot of interactive applications could potentially benefit from these techniques. However, the state-of-the-art is scattered over several publications, and ...

Ares Lagae; Craig S. Kaplan; Chi-Wing Fu; Victor Ostromoukhov; Oliver Deussen

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

The lightspeed automatic interactive lighting preview system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an automated approach for high-quality preview of feature-film rendering during lighting design. Similar to previous work, we use a deep-framebuffer shaded on the GPU to achieve interactive performance. Our first ...

Ragan-Kelley, Jonathan Millard

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Enhancing E-Learning with Interactive Multimedia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nowadays, multimedia-based e-Learning systems have become widely available. Many systems, however, provide little interactivity to learners. E-Learners do not have much control over learning content and process to meet their individual needs. Therefore, ...

Dongsong Zhang; Lina Zhou

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Resonant Wave Interactions in the Equatorial Waveguide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Weakly nonlinear interactions among equatorial waves have been explored in this paper using the adiabatic version of the equatorial ?-plane primitive equations in isobaric coordinates. Assuming rigid lid vertical boundary conditions, the ...

Carlos F. M. Raupp; Pedro L. Silva Dias; Esteban G. Tabak; Paul Milewski

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Policies of different governments : persistence and interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation consists of three chapters on persistence and interactions of policies of different governments in various settings. Chapter 1 studies government policy persistence when firms face capital installation ...

Ricka, Frantisek

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Semiclassical wave-packets emerging from interaction with an environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the quantum evolution in dimension three of a system composed by a test particle interacting with an environment made of $N$ harmonic oscillators. At time zero the test particle is described by a spherical wave, i.e. a highly correlated continuous superposition of states with well localized position and momentum, and the oscillators are in the ground state. Under suitable assumptions on the physical parameters characterizing the model, we give an asymptotic expression of the solution of the Schr\\"odinger equation of the system with an explicit control of the error. The result shows that the approximate expression of the wave function is the sum of two terms, orthogonal in $L^2(\\erre^{3(N+1)})$ and describing rather different situations. In the first one all the oscillators remain in their ground state and the test particle is described by the free evolution of a slightly deformed spherical wave. The second one consists of a sum of $N$ terms where in each term there is only one excited oscillator and the test particle is correspondingly described by the free evolution of a wave packet, well concentrated in position and momentum. Moreover the wave packet emerges from the excited oscillator with an average momentum parallel to the line joining the oscillator with the center of the initial spherical wave. Such wave packet represents a semiclassical state for the test particle, propagating along the corresponding classical trajectory. The main result of our analysis is to show how such a semiclassical state can be produced, starting from the original spherical wave, as a result of the interaction with the environment.

Carla Recchia; Alessandro Teta

2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mam represents interactions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Image manipulation in the SIGGRAPH Interactive Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

We built a multimedia document system for the SIGGRAPH Interactive Proceedings to demonstrate the potentials and challenges in using technology to capture better the essence of SIGGRAPH conferences. The prototype system uses the NeXT computer system to present textual, mathematical, illustrative, colorful, audio, video and animated material. Special attention was given to including tools for interactive manipulation of images included in typical SIGGRAPH papers. 6 refs., 6 figs.

Phillips, R.L. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Beach, R.J. (Xerox Palo Alto Research Center, CA (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Avian Interactions with Wind Power Structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In October of 2002, in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, EPRI held a conference on avian interactions with wind power structures. Previous EPRI conferences on this same topic have focused on various aspects of the topic; the focus areas in 2002 were 1) assessing the state of knowledge with respect to avian interactions with wind powered generation facilities, and 2) providing a context for future research and development efforts. This report is an abbreviated version of the complete proceedings, which will be poste...

2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

463

Interactions and Focusing of Nonlinear Water Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The coupled cubic nonlinear Schr\\"odinger (CNLS) equations are used to study modulational instabilities of a pair of nonlinearly interacting two-dimensional waves in deep water. It has been shown that the full dynamics of these interacting waves gives rise to localized large-amplitude wavepackets (wave focusing). In this short letter we attempt to verify this result numerically using a Fourier spectral method for the CNLS equations.

Harihar Khanal; Stefan C. Mancas; Shahrdad Sajjadi

2013-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

464

Social Interactions, Ethnicity and Fertility in Kenya  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are grateful to Wiji Arulampalam, Ethan Cohen-Cole, Partha Dasgupta, Gernot Doppelhofer, Steven Durlauf, Timothy Guinnane, Andrew Harvey, Larry Iannaccone, Hashem Pesaran, Richard Smith, and Chander Velu. We acknowledge funding from the Centre for Research... of the group is small, such as interaction e¤ects within extended families of small communities. 3 Overview of ethnic groups in Kenya Social interactions and channels of message transmission about fertility behaviour are important at the level of ethnicity...

Iyer, Sriya; Weeks, Melvyn

465

A taxonomy for identifying requirement interactions in software systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an interaction taxonomy for classifying and identifying requirement interactions in software systems. The proposed taxonomy is in the form of a four-layered pyramid that defines 6 Main Interaction Categories in the first layer, 17 ... Keywords: Interaction scenarios, Requirement engineering, Requirement interaction taxonomy

Mohamed Shehata; Armin Eberlein; Abraham O. Fapojuwo

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

DIP: The Database of Interacting Proteins  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The DIP Database catalogs experimentally determined interactions between proteins. It combines information from a variety of sources to create a single, consistent set of protein-protein interactions. By interaction, the DIP Database creators mean that two amino acid chains were experimentally identified to bind to each other. The database lists such pairs to aid those studying a particular protein-protein interaction but also those investigating entire regulatory and signaling pathways as well as those studying the organisation and complexity of the protein interaction network at the cellular level. The data stored within the DIP database were curated, both, manually by expert curators and also automatically using computational approaches that utilize the knowledge about the protein-protein interaction networks extracted from the most reliable, core subset of the DIP data. It is a relational database that can be searched by protein, sequence, motif, article information, and pathBLAST. The website also serves as an access point to a number of projects related to DIP, such as LiveDIP, The Database of Ligand-Receptor Partners (DLRP) and JDIP. Users have free and open access to DIP after login. [Taken from the DIP Guide and the DIP website] (Specialized Interface) (Registration Required)

International Molecular Interaction Exchange (IMEx) Consortium

467

delta. -nucleus interactions. CTP No. 887  

SciTech Connect

The theoretical description of pion-nucleus interactions, specifically in the intermediate-energy region dominated ..delta..-excitation, is discussed. Attention is focused on the interaction with and propagation through the nucleus of pions and ..delta..'s. The approach followed basically consists of viewing the ..delta..-nucleus system, formed by pion excitation of a nucleon, as a doorway for the pion-nucleus reaction. Analysis of the interacting ..delta..-nucleus system then leads to new dynamical information summarized in a complex ..delta..-nucleus interaction potential. The associated nuclear medium corrections to ..delta.. propagation, related in more conventional language to higher-order corrections in the pion optical potential, are so large as to demand consideration in quantitative studies of nuclear structure with pions. After a discussion of the basic scale parameters characterizing intermediate-energy pion-nucleus interactions, the author discusses the theoretical framework and the extraction of ..delta.. interaction parameters from inclusive pion-nucleus cross sections. More detailed tests of the picture, such as elastic scattering angular distributions, are then discussed. Finally, some implications for intermediate-energy photoreactions are outlined. 11 figures. (RWR)

Moniz, E.J.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Canonical quantization of a dissipative system interacting with an anisotropic non-linear absorbing environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A canonical quantization scheme is represented for a quantum system interacting with a nonlinear absorbing environment. The environment is taken anisotropic and the main system is coupled to its environment through some coupling tensors of various ranks. The nonlinear response equation of the environment against the motion of the main system is obtained. The nonlinear Langevin-schr\\"{o}dinger equation is concluded as the macroscopic equation of motion of the dissipative system. The effect of nonlinearity of the environment is investigated on the spontaneous emission of an initially excited two level-atom imbedded in such an environmrnt.

M. Amooshahi; E. Amooghorban

2009-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

469

PROJECT SHEET SUBCOMMITTEE: Food Residues Subcommittee PROJECT TITLE: Expansion, Development and Harmonization of Crop Groups With Specified Representative Crops for Field Crop Residues Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GOAL/OBJECTIVE: To further develop and implement Crop groups utilized by NAFTA and based on representative commodities to foster worldwide harmonization of Crop groups and commodity terminology which will help remove trade irritants due to differences in commodity tolerance levels or MRLs for minor and specialty crops. PROJECT DESCRIPTION/PROCEDURE The Chairperson (Hong Chen) of the International Crop Grouping Consulting Committee (ICGCC) forwards the Symposium proposal for a particular crop group to the appropriate workgroup of the ICGCC via emails and requests the workgroup members to provide input on crop information and maximum residue limit (MRL) information (includes U.S., NAFTA, Codex and EU) on the commodities. Growers and commodity experts also provide valuable input on commodities. International members provide specific information on the commodities grown in their countries and regions which provides perspectives on harmonization approaches. Based on the input, the ICGCC Chairperson will prepare commodity monographs, divide subgroups, select representative crops and draft new crop group petitions. The draft petitions will be forwarded to the workgroup for review and comments before being finalized, and the

unknown authors

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Higher order terms of radiative damping in extreme intense laser-matter interaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The higher order terms of the Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac equation have been derived, and their effects are studied via a relativistic collisional particle-in-cell simulation. The dominant group of terms up to the fourth order of the Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac equation is identified for ultra-intense laser-matter interactions. The second order terms are found to be the damping terms of the Lorentz force while the first order terms represent friction in the equation of motion. Because the second order terms restrict electron acceleration during the laser interaction, electrons/ions are prevented from over-accelerating. Radiative damping becomes highly significant when I{>=} 10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2} while Bremsstrahlung will be saturated, thus radiative damping will be a dominant source of hard x-rays in regimes at extreme intensities.

Pandit, Rishi R.; Sentoku, Yasuhiko [Department of Physics, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

471

Performing electroacoustic music: a wider view of interactivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For most electroacoustic composers, ‘interactivity’ refers to technology which responds to input from a performer. For performers, in contrast, performance may be described as ‘interactive’ on many levels: interacting with acoustic ...

Elizabeth McNutt

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Implications of mercury interactions with band-gap semiconductor oxides  

SciTech Connect

Titanium dioxide is a well-known photooxidation catalyst. It will oxidize mercury in the presence of ultraviolet light from the sun and oxygen and/or moisture to form mercuric oxide. Several companies manufacture self-cleaning windows. These windows have a transparent coating of titanium dioxide. The titanium dioxide is capable of destroying organic contaminants in air in the presence of ultraviolet light from the sun, thereby keeping the windows clean. The commercially available self-cleaning windows were used to sequester mercury from oxygen–nitrogen mixtures. Samples of the self-cleaning glass were placed into specially designed photo-reactors in order to study the removal of elemental mercury from oxygen–nitrogen mixtures resembling air. The possibility of removing mercury from ambient air with a self-cleaning glass apparatus is examined. The intensity of 365-nm ultraviolet light was similar to the natural intensity from sunlight in the Pittsburgh region. Passive removal of mercury from the air may represent an option in lieu of, or in addition to, point source clean-up at combustion facilities. There are several common band-gap semiconductor oxide photocatalysts. Sunlight (both the ultraviolet and visible light components) and band-gap semiconductor particles may have a small impact on the global cycle of mercury in the environment. The potential environmental consequences of mercury interactions with band-gap semiconductor oxides are discussed. Heterogeneous photooxidation might impact the global transport of elemental mercury emanating from flue gases.

Granite, E.J.; King, W.P.; Stanko, D.C.; Pennline, H.W.

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Enhanced dispersion interaction between quasi-one dimensional conducting collinear structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent investigations have highlighted the failure of a sum of $R^{-6}$ terms to represent the dispersion interaction in parallel metallic, anisotropic, linear or planar nanostructures [J. F. Dobson, A. White, and A. Rubio, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 073201 (2006) and references therein]. By applying a simple coupled plasmon approach and using electron hydrodynamics, we numerically evaluate the dispersion (non-contact van der Waals) interaction between two conducting wires in a collinear pointing configuration. This case is compared to that of two insulating wires in an identical geometry, where the dispersion interaction is modelled both within a pairwise summation framework, and by adding a pinning potential to our theory leading to a standard oscillator-type model of insulating dielectric behavior. Our results provide a further example of enhanced dispersion interaction between two conducting nanosystems compared to the case of two insulating ones. Unlike our previous work, this calculation explores a region of relatively close coupling where, although the electronic clouds do not overlap, we are still far from the asymptotic region where a single power law describes the dispersion energy. We find that strong differences in dispersion attraction between metallic and semiconducting / insulating cases persist into this non-asymptotic region. While our theory will need to be supplemented with additional short-ranged terms when the electronic clouds overlap, it does not suffer from the short-distance divergence exhibited by purely asymptotic theories, and gives a natural saturation of the dispersion energy as the wires come into contact.

Angela White; John F. Dobson

2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

474

Interaction of eta mesons with nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Back in the mid eighties, a new branch of investigation which was related to the interaction of eta mesons with nuclei came into existence. It started with the theoretical prediction of possible exotic states of eta mesons and nuclei bound by the strong interaction and later developed into an extensive experimental program to search for such unstable states as well as understand the underlying interaction via eta meson producing reactions. The vast literature of experimental as well as theoretical works which studied various aspects of eta producing reactions such as the $\\pi ^+$ $n$ $\\to \\eta p$, $p d \\to ^3$He $\\eta$, $p \\,^6$Li $\\to ^7$Be $\\eta$ and $\\gamma ^3$He $\\to \\eta$ X, to name a few, had but one objective in mind: to understand the eta - nucleon ($\\eta N$) and hence the $\\eta$-nucleus interaction which could explain the production data and confirm the existence of some $\\eta$-mesic nuclei. In spite of these efforts, there remain uncertainties in the knowledge of the $\\eta N$ and hence the $\\eta$-nucleus interaction. The present review is hence an attempt to bind together the findings in these works and draw some global and specific conclusions which can be useful for future explorations.

N. G. Kelkar; K. P. Khemchandani; N. J. Upadhyay; B. K. Jain

2013-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

475

Spin-string interaction in QCD strings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

I consider the question of the interaction between a QCD string and the spin of a quark or an antiquark on whose worldline the string terminates. The problem is analyzed from the point of view of a string representation for the expectation value of a Wilson loop for a spin-half particle. A string representation of the super Wilson loop is obtained starting from an effective string representation of a Wilson Loop. The action obtained in this manner is invariant under a worldline supersymmetry and has a boundary term which contains the spin-string interaction. For rectangular loops the spin-string interaction vanishes and there is no spin-spin term in the resulting heavy quark potential. On the other hand if an allowance is made for the finite intrinsic thickness of the flux tube by assuming that the spin-string interaction takes place not just at the boundary of the string world sheet but extends to a distance of the order of the intrinsic thickness of the flux tube then we do obtain a spin-spin interaction which falls as the fifth power of the distance. Such a term was previously suggested by Kogut and Parisi in the context of a flux-tube model of confinement.

Vyas, Vikram [Physics Department St. Stephen's College, Delhi University, Delhi (India)

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

476

OmniTouch: wearable multitouch interaction everywhere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figure 1. OmniTouch is a wearable depth-sensing and projection system that allows everyday surfaces- including a wearer’s own body- to be appropriated for graphical multitouch interaction. OmniTouch is a wearable depth-sensing and projection system that enables interactive multitouch applications on everyday surfaces. Beyond the shoulder-worn system, there is no instrumentation of the user or environment. Foremost, the system allows the wearer to use their hands, arms and legs as graphical, interactive surfaces. Users can also transiently appropriate surfaces from the environment to expand the interactive area (e.g., books, walls, tables). On such surfaces- without any calibration- OmniTouch provides capabilities similar to that of a mouse or touchscreen: X and Y location in 2D interfaces and whether fingers are “clicked” or hovering, enabling a wide variety of interactions. Reliable operation on the hands, for example, requires buttons to be 2.3cm in diameter. Thus, it is now conceivable that anything one can do on today’s mobile devices, they could do in the palm of their hand. ACM Classification: H.5.2 [Information interfaces and

Chris Harrison; Hrvoje Benko; Andrew D. Wilson

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Correlated interaction fluctuations in photosynthetic complexes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The functioning and efficiency of natural photosynthetic complexes is strongly influenced by their embedding in a noisy protein environment, which can even serve to enhance the transport efficiency. Interactions with the environment induce fluctuations of the transition energies of and interactions between the chlorophyll molecules, and due to the fact that different fluctuations will partially be caused by the same environmental factors, correlations between the various fluctuations will occur. We argue that fluctuations of the interactions should in general not be neglected, as these have a considerable impact on population transfer rates, decoherence rates and the efficiency of photosynthetic complexes. Furthermore, while correlations between transition energy fluctuations have been studied, we provide the first quantitative study of the effect of correlations between interaction fluctuations and transition energy fluctuations, and of correlations between the various interaction fluctuations. It is shown that these additional correlations typically lead to changes in interchromophore transfer rates, population oscillations and can lead to a limited enhancement of the light harvesting efficiency.

Sebastiaan M. Vlaming; Robert J. Silbey

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

478

Improvisational interaction : a framework for structural exploration of media.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Whenever we use computers to interact with media, our experience is that of direct control, and the goal of our interactions is either artifact-production (the… (more)

Nemirovsky, Paul, 1975-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

The Interaction of Water and Energy in California: Climate Change...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Us Department Contacts Media Contacts The Interaction of Water and Energy in California: Climate Change and Price Impacts Title The Interaction of Water and Energy in California:...

480

The Office of Inspector General (OIG) has identified nine issue areas which, in our judgment, represent the most significant challenges facing the Department of Energy (Department)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Investigations and Investigations of the Committee on Energy and Commerce U.S. House of Representatives FOR RELEASE ON DELIVERY 10:00 AM Friday, June 9, 2006 Mr. Chairman and members of the Subcommittee, I am pleased to be here at your request to testify on cyber security issues at the Department of Energy. The Department of Energy, which spends over $2 billion each year on information technology (IT), has a current inventory of approximately 800 information systems, including up to 115,000 personal computers; many powerful supercomputers; numerous servers; and, a broad array of related peripheral equipment. These systems process operational, financial, and highly classified national security data. The need to protect this data and the related systems is of paramount concern to the Department and to the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mam represents interactions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

PARTICLE IMAGE VELOCIMETRY MEASUREMENTS IN A REPRESENTATIVE GAS-COOLED PRISMATIC REACTOR CORE MODEL: FLOW IN THE COOLANT CHANNELS AND INTERSTITIAL BYPASS GAPS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Core bypass flow is one of the key issues with the prismatic Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor, and it refers to the coolant that navigates through the interstitial, non-cooling passages between the graphite fuel blocks instead of traveling through the designated coolant channels. To determine the bypass flow, a double scale representative model was manufactured and installed in the Matched Index-of-Refraction flow facility; after which, stereo Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was employed to measure the flow field within. PIV images were analyzed to produce vector maps, and flow rates were calculated by numerically integrating over the velocity field. It was found that the bypass flow varied between 6.9-15.8% for channel Reynolds numbers of 1,746 and 4,618. The results were compared to computational fluid dynamic (CFD) pre-test simulations. When compared to these pretest calculations, the CFD analysis appeared to under predict the flow through the gap.

Thomas E. Conder; Richard Skifton; Ralph Budwig

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of National Security Interest Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PACKAGING AND TRANSFER PACKAGING AND TRANSFER OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND MATERIALS OF NATIONAL SECURITY INTEREST Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: Verify that packaging and transportation safety requirements of hazardous materials and materials of national security interest have been established and are in compliance with DOE Orders 461.1 and 460.1B Criteria: Verify that safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of DOE/NNSA offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport have been established [DOE O 460.1B, 1, "Objectives"]. Verify that the contractor transporting a package of hazardous materials is in compliance with the requirements of the Hazardous Materials Regulations

483

Suspect Counterfeit Items Criteria Review and Approach Document , Phase 1 - Management - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Suspect/Counterfeit Items Suspect/Counterfeit Items Criteria Review and Approach Document (CRAD) NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Phase 1 - Management Performance Objective: Management should have a formal system under Quality Assurance with adequate controls defined and implemented to identify and preclude Suspect/Counterfeit Items (S/CI) from being introduced into safety systems and applications that create potential hazards. CRITERIA: Management should have a formal system of controls in place for assurance that all items procured meet the requirements for their intended use. Management should have a system of mechanisms to continuously maintain current, accurate, updated information on SC/Is and associated suppliers using all available sources. Management should have a training program with detailed records that

484

Clinch River: an alternate financing plan. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Energy Conservation and Power, House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, first session, 20 Sep 1983  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Representatives of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) project, the nuclear industry, taxpayers, the financial community, and legislators testified at a hearing held to review administration plans for completing the CRBR by attaching its financing to a continuing resolution and avoiding the legislative process. A Congressional Budget Office report noted that the administration's financing proposal will generate up to 37% return on investment from tax relief alone, which is more appropriate for high-risk than government-backed investment. The Congressional Research Service challenged that the plant's power production capacity was overstated and its price overvalued. Of concern to the committee was the fairness of asking taxpayers to share in the $2.5 billion needed to complete the project. Additional material submitted for the record follows the testimony of 20 witnesses.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Mobil/Marathon takeover. Hearing before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Government Operations, House of Representatives, Ninety-Seventh Congress, First Session, November 19, 1981  

SciTech Connect

The exercise of corporate power and money as well as the effect on energy policy were the underlying issues in a hearing on the proposed merger of Mobil and Marathon oil companies. The use of capital in this way would deny funds for economic recovery and energy development at a time when the oil companies complain that they need more financial incentives. The companies' response in the direction of mergers suggest that deregulation and tax incentives are not developing solutions to energy supply, but are creating new problems. The witnesses included representatives of Ohio, DOE's Office of Competition, and independent oil jobbers and distributors, who argued against the merger. Additional letters and statement from the witnesses follow their testimony. (DCK)

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z