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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mam represents interactions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Visualization of Iron-Binding Micelles in Acidic Recombinant Biomineralization Protein, MamC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biological macromolecules are utilized in low-temperature synthetic methods to exert precise control over nanoparticle nucleation and placement. They enable low-temperature formation of a variety of functional nanostructured materials with properties often not achieved via conventional synthetic techniques. Here we report on the in situ visualization of a novel acidic bacterial recombinant protein, MamC, commonly present in the magnetosome membrane of several magnetotactic bacteria, including Magnetococcus marinus, strain MC-1. Our findings provide an insight into the self-assembly of MamC and point to formation of the extended protein surface, which is assumed to play an important role in the formation of biotemplated inorganic nanoparticles. The self-organization of MamC is compared to the behavior of another acidic recombinant iron-binding protein, Mms6.

Kashyap, Sanjay [Ames Laboratory; Woehl, Taylor [Ames Laboratory; Valverde-Tercedor, Carmen [University of Granada; Sanchez-Quesada, Miguel [University of Granada; Lopez, Concepcion Jimenez [University of Granada; Prozorov, Tanya [Ames Laboratory

2014-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

2

Improving best-phase image quality in cardiac CT by motion correction with MAM optimization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Research in image reconstruction for cardiac CT aims at using motion correction algorithms to improve the image quality of the coronary arteries. The key to those algorithms is motion estimation, which is currently based on 3-D/3-D registration to align the structures of interest in images acquired in multiple heart phases. The need for an extended scan data range covering several heart phases is critical in terms of radiation dose to the patient and limits the clinical potential of the method. Furthermore, literature reports only slight quality improvements of the motion corrected images when compared to the most quiet phase (best-phase) that was actually used for motion estimation. In this paper a motion estimation algorithm is proposed which does not require an extended scan range but works with a short scan data interval, and which markedly improves the best-phase image quality. Methods: Motion estimation is based on the definition of motion artifact metrics (MAM) to quantify motion artifacts in a 3-D reconstructed image volume. The authors use two different MAMs, entropy, and positivity. By adjusting the motion field parameters, the MAM of the resulting motion-compensated reconstruction is optimized using a gradient descent procedure. In this way motion artifacts are minimized. For a fast and practical implementation, only analytical methods are used for motion estimation and compensation. Both the MAM-optimization and a 3-D/3-D registration-based motion estimation algorithm were investigated by means of a computer-simulated vessel with a cardiac motion profile. Image quality was evaluated using normalized cross-correlation (NCC) with the ground truth template and root-mean-square deviation (RMSD). Four coronary CT angiography patient cases were reconstructed to evaluate the clinical performance of the proposed method. Results: For the MAM-approach, the best-phase image quality could be improved for all investigated heart phases, with a maximum improvement of the NCC value by 100% and of the RMSD value by 81%. The corresponding maximum improvements for the registration-based approach were 20% and 40%. In phases with very rapid motion the registration-based algorithm obtained better image quality, while the image quality of the MAM algorithm was superior in phases with less motion. The image quality improvement of the MAM optimization was visually confirmed for the different clinical cases. Conclusions: The proposed method allows a software-based best-phase image quality improvement in coronary CT angiography. A short scan data interval at the target heart phase is sufficient, no additional scan data in other cardiac phases are required. The algorithm is therefore directly applicable to any standard cardiac CT acquisition protocol.

Rohkohl, Christopher; Bruder, Herbert; Stierstorfer, Karl [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Siemensstrasse 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Flohr, Thomas [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Siemensstrasse 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Eberhard Karls University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

3

Magnetotactic Bacteria: A Study of Mam Genes and Metabolism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, lacks several hemerythrin genes that might represent a gene island that harbors genes that encode hemerythrin island causes the non-magnetic phenotype or if deletion of magnetosome genes is involved as well

Walker, Lawrence R.

4

Improving the Educational Outcomes for Minorities: A Study of the Interactive Effects of Personnel Stability and Representative Bureacracy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IMPROVING THE EDUCATIONAL OUTCOMES FOR MINORITIES: A STUDY OF THE INTERACTIVE EFFECTS OF PERSONNEL STABILITY AND REPRESENTATIVE BUREACRACY A Dissertation by TABITHA SUSAN MARIE MORTON Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies... and personnel stability, could be used in combination with one another in order to improve the educational policy outcomes for African American and Latino students. Using data from Texas school districts from 1994-2010 and a cross-sectional longitudinal...

Morton, Tabitha Susan Marie

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

5

Department Safety Representatives Department Safety Representative  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department Safety Representatives Overview Department Safety Representative Program/Operations Guidance Document The Department Safety Representative (DSR) serves a very important role with implementation of safety, health, and environmental programs on campus. The role of the DSR is to assist

Pawlowski, Wojtek

6

MA-m & Downstream Coil I.R. with B(z) = 1.5 T at 4.2 m, 4.5 m & 5 m Bob Weggel Magnet Optimization Research Engineering (M.O.R.E.), LLC Nov. 22, 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MA-m & Downstream Coil I.R. with B(z) = 1.5 T at 4.2 m, 4.5 m & 5 m Bob Weggel Magnet Optimization, the optimization program adjusts the inner radius of the downstream coil, in order that the ramp bottom out. It uses (182+400) = 582 MA-m of conductor; the inner radius of its downstream coil is 94 cm. To increase L

McDonald, Kirk

7

Wave represents displacement Wave represents pressure Source -Sound Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wave represents displacement Wave represents pressure Source - Sound Waves Distance between crests is wavelength Number of crests passing a point in 1 second is frequency Wave represents pressure Target - Radio Waves Distance between crests is wavelength Number of crests passing a point in 1 second is frequency

Colorado at Boulder, University of

8

ESD Toxicology Laboratory Representative References  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

organisms. Trans. Amer. Fish. Soc. 113: 74-85. Stewart, A. J. 1984. Interactions between dissolved humic

9

BACHELOR THESIS The High Representative  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BACHELOR THESIS The High Representative and the Libya Crisis An Assessment Dominique Prescher 8 and the Libya Crisis 2 Table of Content 1. Summary 4 2. Introduction 4 3. Theoretical Framework 8 3.1 Neo 34 9. Bibliography 36 #12;Bachelor Thesis The High Representative and the Libya Crisis 3 List

Vellekoop, Michel

10

Representative Albert R. Public Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

billion to the authorization for the Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program. He also successfully years as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives, representing Maryland's 4th Congressional District. During the last 12 years, he served on the powerful House Energy and Commerce Committee, most

Sibille, Etienne

11

Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Media |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergy 0611__Joint_DOE_GoJ_AMS_Data_v3.pptx More Documents &DOE.F 1325.8CHANGENOT

12

General Engineer / Physical Scientist (Facility Representative)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Facility Representatives (FRs) are line management's on-site technical representative with responsibility for identifying and evaluating environmental, safety and health issues and concerns,...

13

Statistically Equivalent Representative Volume Elements for Unidirectional  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Statistically Equivalent Representative Volume Elements for Unidirectional Composite the statistically equivalent representative volume element (SERVE) are proposed for fiber-reinforced microstructures using a bilinear cohesive zone law. As introduced in the first article, a combination of statistical

Ghosh, Somnath

14

A Capital Market Test of Representativeness  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A CAPITAL MARKET TEST OF REPRESENTATIVENESS A Dissertation by MOHAMMAD URFAN SAFDAR Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR... OF PHILOSOPHY May 2012 Major Subject: Accounting A Capital Market Test of Representativeness Copyright 2012 Mohammad Urfan Safdar A CAPITAL MARKET TEST OF REPRESENTATIVENESS A Dissertation...

Safdar, Mohammad

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

15

Facility Representative Program, Criteria & Review Approach Documents  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This page provides Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADS) to assist Facility Representatives. Please submit your CRADS for posting by sending them to the HQ FR Program Manager. Please include the subject, date, and a contact person.

16

An Introduction to Venture Capital Granite representatives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

May 2006 An Introduction to Venture Capital #12;2 Granite representatives Sam Kingsland ­ Managing;3 Introduction to Granite Ventures Founded in 1992 Granite has 9 investment professionals Over $1B under

Anderson, Richard

17

General Engineer/Physical Scientist (Facility Representative)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A successful candidate in this position will serve as an on-site technical representative to identify and evaluate environmental, safety, and health issues and concerns; as well as diagnose root...

18

An iconic approach to representing climate change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 An iconic approach to representing climate change Saffron Jessica O'Neill A thesis submitted-experts to be meaningfully engaged with the issue of climate change. This thesis investigates the value of engaging non-experts with climate change at the individual level. Research demonstrates that individuals perceive climate change

Feigon, Brooke

19

FOOD SECURITY FUEL INDEPENDENCE These projects represent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FOOD SECURITY FUEL INDEPENDENCE These projects represent a huge effort to determine and improve pressing challenges. ASH 1% ASH 1% ASH 1% OTHERS 6% OTHERS 6% OTHERS 6% OIL 2% OIL 10% OIL 20% SUCROSE 45% LIPID CANE Produce and store oil in the stem in place of sugar During photosynthesis, sugarcane

Bashir, Rashid

20

The Simplicity Device: Your Personal Mobile Representative  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Simplicity Device: Your Personal Mobile Representative Giovanni Bartolomeo1, Francesca Martire1 mobile phone that stores and handles personal information about the user. The Simplicity Device can be connected (e.g. via Bluetooth) to several other devices thus allowing personalization of services

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mam represents interactions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Data structures and apparatuses for representing knowledge  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Data structures and apparatuses to represent knowledge are disclosed. The processes can comprise labeling elements in a knowledge signature according to concepts in an ontology and populating the elements with confidence values. The data structures can comprise knowledge signatures stored on computer-readable media. The knowledge signatures comprise a matrix structure having elements labeled according to concepts in an ontology, wherein the value of the element represents a confidence that the concept is present in an information space. The apparatus can comprise a knowledge representation unit having at least one ontology stored on a computer-readable medium, at least one data-receiving device, and a processor configured to generate knowledge signatures by comparing datasets obtained by the data-receiving devices to the ontologies.

Hohimer, Ryan E; Thomson, Judi R; Harvey, William J; Paulson, Patrick R; Whiting, Mark A; Tratz, Stephen C; Chappell, Alan R; Butner, Robert S

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

22

Yucca Mountain Climate Technical Support Representative  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of Project Activity ORD-FY04-012, “Yucca Mountain Climate Technical Support Representative,” was to provide the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) with expertise on past, present, and future climate scenarios and to support the technical elements of the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) climate program. The Climate Technical Support Representative was to explain, defend, and interpret the YMP climate program to the various audiences during Site Recommendation and License Application. This technical support representative was to support DOE management in the preparation and review of documents, and to participate in comment response for the Final Environmental Impact Statement, the Site Recommendation Hearings, the NRC Sufficiency Comments, and other forums as designated by DOE management. Because the activity was terminated 12 months early and experience a 27% reduction in budget, it was not possible to complete all components of the tasks as originally envisioned. Activities not completed include the qualification of climate datasets and the production of a qualified technical report. The following final report is an unqualified summary of the activities that were completed given the reduced time and funding.

Sharpe, Saxon E

2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

23

Representing the vacuum polarization on de Sitter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Previous studies of the vacuum polarization on de Sitter have demonstrated that there is a simple, noncovariant representation of it in which the physics is transparent. There is also a cumbersome, covariant representation in which the physics is obscure. Despite being unwieldy, the latter form has a powerful appeal for those who are concerned about de Sitter invariance. We show that nothing is lost by employing the simple, noncovariant representation because there is a closed form procedure for converting its structure functions to those of the covariant representation. We also present a vastly improved technique for reading off the noncovariant structure functions from the primitive diagrams. And we discuss the issue of representing the vacuum polarization for a general metric background.

Leonard, Katie E.; Woodard, Richard P. [Department of Physics, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Prokopec, Tomislav [Institute of Theoretical Physics (ITP) and Spinoza Institute, Utrecht University, Postbus 80195, 3508 TD Utrecht (Netherlands)] [Institute of Theoretical Physics (ITP) and Spinoza Institute, Utrecht University, Postbus 80195, 3508 TD Utrecht (Netherlands)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

24

3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report...

25

DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas Emissions DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas Emissions June 29, 2012 -...

26

Representative Atmospheric Plume Development for Elevated Releases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An atmospheric explosion of a low-yield nuclear device will produce a large number of radioactive isotopes, some of which can be measured with airborne detection systems. However, properly equipped aircraft may not arrive in the region where an explosion occurred for a number of hours after the event. Atmospheric conditions will have caused the radioactive plume to move and diffuse before the aircraft arrives. The science behind predicting atmospheric plume movement has advanced enough that the location of the maximum concentrations in the plume can be determined reasonably accurately in real time, or near real time. Given the assumption that an aircraft can follow a plume, this study addresses the amount of atmospheric dilution expected to occur in a representative plume as a function of time past the release event. The approach models atmospheric transport of hypothetical releases from a single location for every day in a year using the publically available HYSPLIT code. The effective dilution factors for the point of maximum concentration in an elevated plume based on a release of a non-decaying, non-depositing tracer can vary by orders of magnitude depending on the day of the release, even for the same number of hours after the release event. However, the median of the dilution factors based on releases for 365 consecutive days at one site follows a power law relationship in time, as shown in Figure S-1. The relationship is good enough to provide a general rule of thumb for estimating typical future dilution factors in a plume starting at the same point. However, the coefficients of the power law function may vary for different release point locations. Radioactive decay causes the effective dilution factors to decrease more quickly with the time past the release event than the dilution factors based on a non-decaying tracer. An analytical expression for the dilution factors of isotopes with different half-lives can be developed given the power law expression for the non-decaying tracer. If the power-law equation for the median dilution factor, Df, based on a non-decaying tracer has the general form Df=a?×t?^(-b) for time t after the release event, then the equation has the form Df=e^(-?t)×a×t^(-b) for a radioactive isotope, where ? is the decay constant for the isotope.

Eslinger, Paul W.; Lowrey, Justin D.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Miley, Harry S.; Prichard, Andrew W.

2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

27

Visualizing Scalar Fields Represented by Adaptive Square Triangulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[Sabella 88], ab­ sorption and reflection [Max 95] providing a means of representing the field by a colored

28

Student Committee Representatives Guidelines Congratulations on being selected as a student representative to a GSLIS committee! We are  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Student Committee Representatives Guidelines Congratulations on being selected as a student to your resume or CV. Your job is to represent students to committees and committees to students. You represent the student body to the committee. Your job is to advocate for your fellow students by bringing

Gilbert, Matthew

29

Student Assembly Offices Student Assembly Representatives: There are four representatives per class to the Student Assembly. Their duties are to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Student Assembly Offices Student Assembly Representatives: There are four representatives per class to the Student Assembly. Their duties are to: Represent the student body of the Medical College of Wisconsin-section of the student body. Fairly administer and distribute all funds including those designated as Student Activity

30

Simulating a Nationally Representative Housing Sample Using EnergyPlus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a new simulation tool under development at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). This tool uses EnergyPlus to simulate each single-family home in the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), and generates a calibrated, nationally representative set of simulated homes whose energy use is statistically indistinguishable from the energy use of the single-family homes in the RECS sample. This research builds upon earlier work by Ritchard et al. for the Gas Research Institute and Huang et al. for LBNL. A representative national sample allows us to evaluate the variance in energy use between individual homes, regions, or other subsamples; using this tool, we can also evaluate how that variance affects the impacts of potential policies. The RECS contains information regarding the construction and location of each sampled home, as well as its appliances and other energy-using equipment. We combined this data with the home simulation prototypes developed by Huang et al. to simulate homes that match the RECS sample wherever possible. Where data was not available, we used distributions, calibrated using the RECS energy use data. Each home was assigned a best-fit location for the purposes of weather and some construction characteristics. RECS provides some detail on the type and age of heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) equipment in each home; we developed EnergyPlus models capable of reproducing the variety of technologies and efficiencies represented in the national sample. This includes electric, gas, and oil furnaces, central and window air conditioners, central heat pumps, and baseboard heaters. We also developed a model of duct system performance, based on in-home measurements, and integrated this with fan performance to capture the energy use of single- and variable-speed furnace fans, as well as the interaction of duct and fan performance with the efficiency of heating and cooling equipment. Comparison with RECS revealed that EnergyPlus did not capture the heating-side behavior of heat pumps particularly accurately, and that our simple oil furnace and boiler models needed significant recalibration to fit with RECS. Simulating the full RECS sample on a single computer would take many hours, so we used the 'cloud computing' services provided by Amazon.com to simulate dozens of homes at once. This enabled us to simulate the full RECS sample, including multiple versions of each home to evaluate the impact of marginal changes, in less than 3 hours. Once the tool was calibrated, we were able to address several policy questions. We made a simple measurement of the heat replacement effect and showed that the net effect of heat replacement on primary energy use is likely to be less than 5%, relative to appliance-only measures of energy savings. Fuel switching could be significant, however. We also evaluated the national and regional impacts of a variety of 'overnight' changes in building characteristics or occupant behavior, including lighting, home insulation and sealing, HVAC system efficiency, and thermostat settings. For example, our model shows that the combination of increased home insulation and better sealed building shells could reduce residential natural gas use by 34.5% and electricity use by 6.5%, and a 1 degree rise in summer thermostat settings could save 2.1% of home electricity use. These results vary by region, and we present results for each U.S. Census division. We conclude by offering proposals for future work to improve the tool. Some proposed future work includes: comparing the simulated energy use data with the monthly RECS bill data; better capturing the variation in behavior between households, especially as it relates to occupancy and schedules; improving the characterization of recent construction and its regional variation; and extending the general framework of this simulation tool to capture multifamily housing units, such as apartment buildings.

Hopkins, Asa S.; Lekov, Alex; Lutz, James; Rosenquist, Gregory; Gu, Lixing

2011-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

31

4Q CY2001, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ID, seven Facility Representatives supported a two-week, around-the-clock assessment of conduct of operations at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. The assessment provided...

32

4Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

"The Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report is attached, covering the period from October to December 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered...

33

General Engineer/Physical Scientist (Senior Facility Representative)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A successful candidate in this position will serve as the Site Managers Senior Facility Representative, and responsible for program management, technical monitoring, advising and evaluating all...

34

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

A Minneapolis, Minnesota Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 6A Minneapolis, Minnesota In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly...

35

active demethylation represent: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Manager Meeting Representatives Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: with security requirements associated with imaging, use only the DP form located at either of...

36

Appointment of Contracting Officers and Contracting Officer Representatives  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order established procedures governing the selection, appointment and termination of Department of Energy contracting officers and contracting officer representatives. Cancels DOE O 541.1A.

2004-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

37

Representative well models for eight geothermal-resource areas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Representative well models have been constructed for eight major geothermal-resource areas. The models define representative times and costs associated with the individual operations that can be expected during drilling and completion of geothermal wells. The models were made for and have been used to evaluate the impacts of potential new technologies. The nature, construction, and validation of the models are presented.

Carson, C.C.; Lin, Y.T.; Livesay, B.J.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

*Official Academic Senate Representative Dean of UC Davis Extension  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

*Official Academic Senate Representative Dean of UC Davis Extension Recruitment Advisory Committee, Health Sciences, Public Policy & Business Programs, UC Davis Extension Chloe Fox Undergraduate Student, International Agricultural Development; Outreach Coordinator, Program for International Energy Technologies

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

39

Changes to the Facility Representative Program, 10/26/1999  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Effective October 1, 1999, the Deputy Secretary tasked this office to manage the Facility Representative Program. We look forward to working with you in continuing and improving this very important...

40

Appointment of Contracting Officers and Contracting Officer Representatives  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish procedures governing the selection, appointment, and termination of contracting officers and for the appointment of contracting officer representatives. Cancels DOE Order 4200.4A. Canceled by DOE O 541.1A.

1996-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mam represents interactions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1A Miami, Florida Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 1A Miami, Florida In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

42

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

B Boulder, Colorado Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5B Boulder, Colorado In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

43

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

A Chicago, Illinois Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5A Chicago, Illinois In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

44

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

B Phoenix, Arizona Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 2B Phoenix, Arizona In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

45

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7 Duluth, Minnesota Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 7 Duluth, Minnesota In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

46

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

A Baltimore, Maryland Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4A Baltimore, Maryland In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view...

47

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

C Seattle, Washington Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4C Seattle, Washington In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view...

48

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

A Atlanta, Georgia Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3A Atlanta, Georgia In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

49

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8 Fairbanks, Alaska Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 8 Fairbanks, Alaska In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

50

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

B Las Vegas, Nevada Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3B Las Vegas, Nevada In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

51

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

A Houston, Texas Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 2A Houston, Texas In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

52

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

B Helena, Montana Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 6B Helena, Montana In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

53

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

C San Francisco, California Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3C San Francisco, California In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can...

54

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

B Los Angeles, California Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3B Los Angeles, California In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can...

55

August 20, 2014 meeting with DOE representatives regarding the...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

August 20, 2014 meeting with DOE representatives regarding the remand of the DOE Direct Final Rule as it relates to efficiency standards for non-weatherized gas furnaces August 20,...

56

A representative individual from Arrovian aggregation of parametric individual utilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A representative individual from Arrovian aggregation of parametric individual utilities social choice theory Assumptions Assumption on decisive coalitions Assumptions on individual utility functions Assumptions on the social welfare function Results The socially acceptable utility function

57

Department of Defense Representatives Visit Hanford to Benchmark Safety  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

RICHLAND, Wash., December 16, 2005, Representatives of the Department of Defense's (DoD's) Voluntary Protection Program Center of Excellence (VPP CX) working to reduce injuries at selected (DoD)...

58

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

B Albuquerque, New Mexico Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4B Albuquerque, New Mexico In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can...

59

Dike/Drift Interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents and documents the model components and analyses that represent potential processes associated with propagation of a magma-filled crack (dike) migrating upward toward the surface, intersection of the dike with repository drifts, flow of magma in the drifts, and post-magma emplacement effects on repository performance. The processes that describe upward migration of a dike and magma flow down the drift are referred to as the dike intrusion submodel. The post-magma emplacement processes are referred to as the post-intrusion submodel. Collectively, these submodels are referred to as a conceptual model for dike/drift interaction. The model components and analyses of the dike/drift interaction conceptual model provide the technical basis for assessing the potential impacts of an igneous intrusion on repository performance, including those features, events, and processes (FEPs) related to dike/drift interaction (Section 6.1).

E. Gaffiney

2004-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

60

Landscape Characterization and Representativeness Analysis for Understanding Sampling Network Coverage  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Sampling networks rarely conform to spatial and temporal ideals, often comprised of network sampling points which are unevenly distributed and located in less than ideal locations due to access constraints, budget limitations, or political conflict. Quantifying the global, regional, and temporal representativeness of these networks by quantifying the coverage of network infrastructure highlights the capabilities and limitations of the data collected, facilitates upscaling and downscaling for modeling purposes, and improves the planning efforts for future infrastructure investment under current conditions and future modeled scenarios. The work presented here utilizes multivariate spatiotemporal clustering analysis and representativeness analysis for quantitative landscape characterization and assessment of the Fluxnet, RAINFOR, and ForestGEO networks. Results include ecoregions that highlight patterns of bioclimatic, topographic, and edaphic variables and quantitative representativeness maps of individual and combined networks.

Maddalena, Damian; Hoffman, Forrest; Kumar, Jitendra; Hargrove, William

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mam represents interactions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Landscape Characterization and Representativeness Analysis for Understanding Sampling Network Coverage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sampling networks rarely conform to spatial and temporal ideals, often comprised of network sampling points which are unevenly distributed and located in less than ideal locations due to access constraints, budget limitations, or political conflict. Quantifying the global, regional, and temporal representativeness of these networks by quantifying the coverage of network infrastructure highlights the capabilities and limitations of the data collected, facilitates upscaling and downscaling for modeling purposes, and improves the planning efforts for future infrastructure investment under current conditions and future modeled scenarios. The work presented here utilizes multivariate spatiotemporal clustering analysis and representativeness analysis for quantitative landscape characterization and assessment of the Fluxnet, RAINFOR, and ForestGEO networks. Results include ecoregions that highlight patterns of bioclimatic, topographic, and edaphic variables and quantitative representativeness maps of individual and combined networks.

Maddalena, Damian; Hoffman, Forrest; Kumar, Jitendra; Hargrove, William

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Wave Energy Resources Representative Sites Around the Hawaiian Islands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wave Energy Resources for Representative Sites Around the Hawaiian Islands Prepared by: Luis A. Vega Ph.D October 11, 2010 #12;Wave Power Resources off the Hawaiian Islands October 11, 2010 1 Foreword This report provides wave energy resource information required to select coastal segments

63

DATE: December 11, 2013 MEMO TO: Curricular Representative  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Instruction Modes List: This report lists sections with an Instruction Mode not set to `P' in ISIS. · Meets Attendance List: This report lists sections coded in ISIS as optional. · Curricular Representative List can be run in ISIS, and displays real-time curricular data for auditing. In ISIS: Reporting Tools

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

64

Antibiotics and access to clean water represent two major  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ABSTRACT Antibiotics and access to clean water represent two major advances for public health of clean, potable water to homes and businesses, while eliminating resulting sewage. However, today, our in spreading re- sistance. At the same time, due to growing pressure on our water resources, we are forging new

Subramanian, Venkat

65

Representing and encoding plant architecture: A review Christophe Godin*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review Representing and encoding plant architecture: A review Christophe Godin* CIRAD, Programme de and topological organisation of these components defines the plant architecture. Before the early 1970's-performance computers have become available for plant growth analysis and simulation, trig- gering the development

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

66

A Mathematical Programming Model for Scheduling Pharmaceutical Sales Representatives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

% to nearly 80,000 from 50,000, and that visits by sales representatives to doctors' offices increased ten. In the next section, we present some background material relevant to this research. Then, in Section 3, we instances in Section 4. We present concluding remarks in Section 5. 2. Background For multi

Gautam, Natarajan

67

66 Academic Nurse Program representatives assist the School  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

interviews, professional development, and dealing with the unknown. Anesthesia Program Representative: Laura of safe surgery and anesthesia practices. Since gradua- tion, he has been involved in global anesthesia also currently serves on the Anesthesia Committee for the Global Alliance for Surgical and Anesthesia

Grishok, Alla

68

Does convective aggregation need to be represented in cumulus parameterizations?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Does convective aggregation need to be represented in cumulus parameterizations? Isabelle Tobin,1 in phenomena such as ``hot spots'' or the Madden-Julian Oscillation. These findings support the need climate models lack any such representation. The ability of a cloud system- resolving model to reproduce

69

Representing Topological Relationships between Complex Regions by F-Histograms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Representing Topological Relationships between Complex Regions by F-Histograms Lukasz Wawrzyniak between two regions in terms of the thirteen Allen relations. An index to measure the complexity Work in the modeling of topological relationships often relies on an extension into the spatial domain

Matsakis, Pascal

70

Appointment of Contracting Officers and Contracting Officer's Representatives  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish procedures governing the selection, appointment, and termination of contracting officers and for the appointment of contracting officer's representatives. To ensure that only trained and qualified procurement and financial assistance professionals, within the scope of this Order, serve as contracting officers. Cancels DOE O 541.1. Canceled by DOE O 541.1B.

2000-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

71

Anthropogenic Biomes ver. 1 Anthropogenic biomes represent heterogeneous  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

defined by population density and vegetation cover. The 21 biomes are grouped into six major categoriesAnthropogenic Biomes ver. 1 Africa Anthropogenic biomes represent heterogeneous landscape mosaics: Populated irrigated cropland 34: Populated rainfed cropland 35: Remote croplands 41: Residential rangelands

Columbia University

72

US House of Representatives Appropriation Committee Report May 18, 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

US House of Representatives Appropriation Committee Report May 18, 2005 Fusion Energy Sciences The Committee recommendation for fusion energy sciences is $295,155,000, an increase of $5,605,000 over that two-thirds of the proposed increase for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER

73

Representing Abductive Practical Reasoning as an Action-Based  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Representing Abductive Practical Reasoning as an Action-Based Alternating Transition System Floris present an approach to abductive reasoning by examin- ing it in the context of an argumentation scheme to rea- son abductively about how an agent might have acted to find itself in a particular sceanrio

Atkinson, Katie

74

INTRODUCTION The mammalian hair follicle is a representative but highly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTRODUCTION The mammalian hair follicle is a representative but highly complex epithelial organ, hair follicle induction requires complex signaling between the two apposing tissue layers, which to the formation of the hair follicle, which contain the dermal papilla, proliferating matrix cells and slowly

Chuong, Cheng-Ming

75

Interactive Environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

project assignment of an interactive social space, built up from autonomously operating smart building, interactive spaces in which people and buildings engage in a mutual relationship with one other. By connecting the data and experiences that develop though this relationship between buildings and their inhabitants

76

Processes, data structures, and apparatuses for representing knowledge  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Processes, data structures, and apparatuses to represent knowledge are disclosed. The processes can comprise labeling elements in a knowledge signature according to concepts in an ontology and populating the elements with confidence values. The data structures can comprise knowledge signatures stored on computer-readable media. The knowledge signatures comprise a matrix structure having elements labeled according to concepts in an ontology, wherein the value of the element represents a confidence that the concept is present in an information space. The apparatus can comprise a knowledge representation unit having at least one ontology stored on a computer-readable medium, at least one data-receiving device, and a processor configured to generate knowledge signatures by comparing datasets obtained by the data-receiving devices to the ontologies.

Hohimer, Ryan E. (West Richland, WA); Thomson, Judi R. (Guelph, CA); Harvey, William J. (Richland, WA); Paulson, Patrick R. (Pasco, WA); Whiting, Mark A. (Richland, WA); Tratz, Stephen C. (Richland, WA); Chappell, Alan R. (Seattle, WA); Butner, R. Scott (Richland, WA)

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

77

developments. interactive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

interactive course: ffl web­pages for hyper­linked lecture notes, student exercises and projects, ffl java teachers: ffl public on the web y : lecture notes including the JBONE applet, ffl on demand: source Java

Jaun, André

78

Defining And Characterizing Sample Representativeness For DWPF Melter Feed Samples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Representative sampling is important throughout the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) process, and the demonstrated success of the DWPF process to achieve glass product quality over the past two decades is a direct result of the quality of information obtained from the process. The objective of this report was to present sampling methods that the Savannah River Site (SRS) used to qualify waste being dispositioned at the DWPF. The goal was to emphasize the methodology, not a list of outcomes from those studies. This methodology includes proven methods for taking representative samples, the use of controlled analytical methods, and data interpretation and reporting that considers the uncertainty of all error sources. Numerous sampling studies were conducted during the development of the DWPF process and still continue to be performed in order to evaluate options for process improvement. Study designs were based on use of statistical tools applicable to the determination of uncertainties associated with the data needs. Successful designs are apt to be repeated, so this report chose only to include prototypic case studies that typify the characteristics of frequently used designs. Case studies have been presented for studying in-tank homogeneity, evaluating the suitability of sampler systems, determining factors that affect mixing and sampling, comparing the final waste glass product chemical composition and durability to that of the glass pour stream sample and other samples from process vessels, and assessing the uniformity of the chemical composition in the waste glass product. Many of these studies efficiently addressed more than one of these areas of concern associated with demonstrating sample representativeness and provide examples of statistical tools in use for DWPF. The time when many of these designs were implemented was in an age when the sampling ideas of Pierre Gy were not as widespread as they are today. Nonetheless, the engineers and statisticians used carefully thought out designs that systematically and economically provided plans for data collection from the DWPF process. Key shared features of the sampling designs used at DWPF and the Gy sampling methodology were the specification of a standard for sample representativeness, an investigation that produced data from the process to study the sampling function, and a decision framework used to assess whether the specification was met based on the data. Without going into detail with regard to the seven errors identified by Pierre Gy, as excellent summaries are readily available such as Pitard [1989] and Smith [2001], SRS engineers understood, for example, that samplers can be biased (Gy?s extraction error), and developed plans to mitigate those biases. Experiments that compared installed samplers with more representative samples obtained directly from the tank may not have resulted in systematically partitioning sampling errors into the now well-known error categories of Gy, but did provide overall information on the suitability of sampling systems. Most of the designs in this report are related to the DWPF vessels, not the large SRS Tank Farm tanks. Samples from the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME), which contains the feed to the DWPF melter, are characterized using standardized analytical methods with known uncertainty. The analytical error is combined with the established error from sampling and processing in DWPF to determine the melter feed composition. This composition is used with the known uncertainty of the models in the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) to ensure that the wasteform that is produced is comfortably within the acceptable processing and product performance region. Having the advantage of many years of processing that meets the waste glass product acceptance criteria, the DWPF process has provided a considerable amount of data about itself in addition to the data from many special studies. Demonstrating representative sampling directly from the large Tank Farm tanks is a difficult, if not unsolvable enterprise due to li

Shine, E. P.; Poirier, M. R.

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

79

Facility Representative of the Year Award | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomentheATLANTA, GA5 &of EnergyOrganizationtotalFacility Representative Award

80

Greening the U.S. House of Representatives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Greening the Capitol initiative was launched in March, 2007 with the threefold goals of making the U.S. House of Representatives: 1) carbon neutral within 18 months, 2) reducing energy use by 50percent in ten years, and 3) becoming a model of sustainable operations. We report on the recommendations to meet these goals, looking at the targets of opportunity at the Capitol Power Plant, the existing buildings, and the overall operations of the complex. Our findings have shown that these goals are achievable, and that through an integrated approach the savings in carbon and energy can be met. Specific examples include the lighting retrofits in the House offices, parking areas, and the Capitol dome; the retrofits to the HVAC systems and controls, including duct sealing, improving the efficiency of the energy and water use in the food service areas; and improved operations of the steam and chilled water distribution system. A key aspect has been better tracking and feedback to the building operators of the actual energy consumption. We report on the technical opportunities presented by these historic and symbolic buildings in becoming models of sustainability.

Diamond, Rick; Diamond, Rick; Payne, Christopher

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mam represents interactions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Representing Cloud Processing of Aerosol in Numerical Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The satellite imagery in Figure 1 provides dramatic examples of how aerosol influences the cloud field. Aerosol from ship exhaust can serve as nucleation centers in otherwise cloud-free regions, forming ship tracks (top image), or can enhance the reflectance/albedo in already cloudy regions. This image is a demonstration of the first indirect effect, in which changes in aerosol modulate cloud droplet radius and concentration, which influences albedo. It is thought that, through the effects it has on precipitation (drizzle), aerosol can also affect the structure and persistence of planetary boundary layer (PBL) clouds. Regions of cellular convection, or open pockets of cloudiness (bottom image) are thought to be remnants of strongly drizzling PBL clouds. Pockets of Open Cloudiness (POCs) (Stevens et al. 2005) or Albrecht's ''rifts'' are low cloud fraction regions characterized by anomalously low aerosol concentrations, implying they result from precipitation. These features may in fact be a demonstration of the second indirect effect. To accurately represent these clouds in numerical models, we have to treat the coupled cloud-aerosol system. We present the following series of mesoscale and large eddy simulation (LES) experiments to evaluate the important aspects of treating the coupled cloud-aerosol problem. 1. Drizzling and nondrizzling simulations demonstrate the effect of drizzle on a mesoscale forecast off the California coast. 2. LES experiments with explicit (bin) microphysics gauge the relative importance of the shape of the aerosol spectrum on the 3D dynamics and cloud structure. 3. Idealized mesoscale model simulations evaluate the relative roles of various processes, sources, and sinks.

Mechem, D.B.; Kogan, Y.L.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

82

Interactive Jobs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformation for and NovelFEG-SEM with0, FirstIntelligenceInteractive

83

Method and apparatus for modeling interactions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for modeling interactions between bodies. The method comprises representing two bodies undergoing translations and rotations by two hierarchical swept volume representations. Interactions such as nearest approach and collision can be modeled based on the swept body representations. The present invention can serve as a practical tool in motion planning, CAD systems, simulation systems, safety analysis, and applications that require modeling time-based interactions. A body can be represented in the present invention by a union of convex polygons and convex polyhedra. As used generally herein, polyhedron includes polygon, and polyhedra includes polygons. The body undergoing translation can be represented by a swept body representation, where the swept body representation comprises a hierarchical bounding volume representation whose leaves each contain a representation of the region swept by a section of the body during the translation, and where the union of the regions is a superset of the region swept by the surface of the body during translation. Interactions between two bodies thus represented can be modeled by modeling interactions between the convex hulls of the finite sets of discrete points in the swept body representations.

Xavier, Patrick G. (Albuquerque, NM)

2000-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

84

Classical gravitational spin-spin interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I obtain an exact, axially symmetric, stationary solution of Einstein's equations for two massless spinning particles. The term representing the spin-spin interaction agrees with recently published approximate work. The spin-spin force appears to be proportional to the inverse fourth power of the coordinate distance between the particles.

W. B. Bonnor

2002-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

85

Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Government Reform Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Government Reform March 20, 2003 Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on...

86

China’s Military Representatives: Striving Toward Professional Contracting and Procurement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

effect of specialization could be to develop military representatives who are experts in specific areas of the weapons and

Puska, Susan M; McReynolds, Joe; Geary, Debra

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

The Allied Health Faculty Organization invited Representative Ed Bryant (7th Congressional  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Allied Health Faculty Organization invited Representative Ed Bryant (7th Congressional District) to visit the University and discuss such topics as health and education. Representative Bryant is a member Commerce Committee Prescription Drug Task Force. Prior to his service in the House, Representative Bryant

Cui, Yan

88

Facility Representatives  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPCofConstructionofFY 2011 Report toAnnuAlFaces of the

89

Facility Representatives  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPCofConstructionofFY 2011 Report toAnnuAlFaces of the063-2011

90

Interactive portraiture : designing intimate interactive experiences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis I present a set of interactive portrait experiences that strive to create an intimate connection between the viewer and the portrayed subject; an emotional experience, one of personal reflection. My interactive ...

Zuckerman, Orit

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

What every designated representative should know about Title IV and Title V enforcement provisions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Title IV of the Clean Air Act not only created a regulatory program unlike any other under the Clean Air Act, but also established a unique position--the designated representative--as an integral part of the program. The designated representative is required to meet certain basic obligations under Title IV, and a panoply of enforcement mechanisms are available to EPA in the event of noncompliance with these obligations. Also, because a designated representative may take on responsibilities under the permit provisions of Title V of the Clean Air Act, the designated representative can also be subject to an enforcement action for failure to comply with certain Title V permit requirements. This paper considers the basic definition of the designated representative under EPA`s Title IV and Title V regulations, identifies the responsibilities assigned to the designated representative, and then analyzes the enforcement mechanisms that may be applied to the designated representative if a regulatory responsibility has not been satisfied.

Bischoff, C.A. [Gallagher and Kennedy, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Dayal, P. [Tucson Electric Power Co., Tucson, AZ (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

92

Conformation changes and protein folding induced by \\phi^4 interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A model to describe the mechanism of conformational dynamics in protein based on matter interactions using lagrangian approach and imposing certain symmetry breaking is proposed. Both conformation changes of proteins and the injected non-linear sources are represented by the bosonic lagrangian with an additional \\phi^4 interaction for the sources. In the model the spring tension of protein representing the internal hydrogen bonds is realized as the interactions between individual amino acids and nonlinear sources. The folding pathway is determined by the strength of nonlinear sources that propagate through the protein backbone. It is also shown that the model reproduces the results in some previous works.

Januar, M; Handoko, L T; 10.1142/9789814335614_0047

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

PDSF Interactive Batch Jobs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Interactive Batch Jobs Running Interactive Batch Jobs You cannot login to the PDSF batch nodes directly but you can run an interactive session on a batch node using either qlogin...

94

First quantized pair interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The annihilation and creation operators of Quantum Field Theory presuppose a causality condition and so the theory cannot represent macroscopic entanglement. The multiple-particle parametrized Dirac wave equation can represent entanglement without recourse to a causality condition. It is shown here that the parametrized formalism can also represent pair annihilation and creation.

A. F. Bennett

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambassador permanent representative Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of representatives of four neighborhood organizations--Southeast University... , and Westcott East Neighborhood Association--the Fourth and Fifth District Councilors, and...

96

High Schools Served by Regional Admissions Representatives (by County) Lisa Overstreet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High Schools Served by Regional Admissions Representatives (by County) Region 1 Lisa Overstreet San Joaquin El Dorado San Mateo Fresno Sierra Kings Solano Lake Sonoma Madera Stanislaus Mariposa

Belanger, David P.

97

1Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January to March 2005. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements...

98

2Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators QuarterlyReport covering the period from April to June 2008. Data for these indicators aregathered by Field elements...

99

2Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from April to June  2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements...

100

3Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the Period July  through September 2011. Data for these indicators were gathered...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mam represents interactions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

1Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January  to March 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

102

3Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from July to September  2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

103

3Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Facility Representative Program Indicators (Pis) Quarterly Report attached, covering the period from July to September 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements...

104

3Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This memorandum summarizes the highlights of the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period of July through September 2010. Data for these...

105

4Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

"Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators QuarterlyReport covering the period from October to December 2007. Data for these indicators aregathered by Field...

106

2Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Covering the Period from April to June  2004. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements...

107

4Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (Pis) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from October to December 2002. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

108

1Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January through March 2012. Data for these indicators were...

109

2Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

"This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period April through June 20 1 1. Data for these indicators were gathered...

110

3Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Covering the Period from July to September  2004. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

111

1Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

"Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly  Report covering the period from January to March2010. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

112

3Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly  Report covering the period from July to September 2009. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

113

4Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October to December 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

114

4Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

"Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly  Report covering the period from October to December 2009. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

115

2Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by field elements...

116

3Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from July to September 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

117

4Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

"This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October through December 2011. Data for these indicators were...

118

4Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October to December 2005. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

119

4Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

"This memorandum summarizes the highlights of the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period October through December 2010. Data for these...

120

4Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Covering the Period from October to December  2004. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mam represents interactions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

3Q C&2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

"Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly  Report covering the period from July to September   2008. Data for these indicators aregathered by Field...

122

1Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

"Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly  Report covering the period from January to March 2009. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

123

2Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2005. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements...

124

4Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from October to December  2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

125

1Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January to March 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements...

126

1Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the Period January through March 2011. Data for these indicators were gathered...

127

4Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

"Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly  Report covering the period from October to December   2008. Data for these indicators are  gathered by Field...

128

2Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

"Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly  Report covering the period from April to June  2009. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements...

129

2Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements...

130

2Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This memorandum summarizes the highlight of, and announces the availablity on-line of, the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per...

131

2Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

"This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April through June 2012. Data for these indicators were...

132

1Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from January to March  2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

133

Do women represent women? : gender and policy in Argentina and Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fiscal Federalism in Argentina: Policies, Politics, andRepresent Women? Gender and Policy in Argentina and Mexico AWomen? Gender and Policy in Argentina and Mexico. by

Piscopo, Jennifer M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Representing Energy Price Variability in Long-and Medium-term Hydropower Optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Representing Energy Price Variability in Long- and Medium- term Hydropower Optimization Marcelo A Resources Planning and Management, 2012, in press ABSTRACT Representing peak and off-peak energy prices and examines the reliability of an existing approximate method to incorporate hourly energy price information

Pasternack, Gregory B.

135

A generalized 3D inverted pendulum model to represent human normal walking  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A generalized 3D inverted pendulum model to represent human normal walking Sophie Sakka IRCCy,lacouture}@univ-poitiers.fr Abstract-- This paper compares different inverted pendulum models to represent the stance phase of human adapted to pathological walking as the walking symmetry hypothesis -needed to build classical inverted

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

136

Detecting and Representing Relevant Web Deltas in Whoweda Sourav S Bhowmick1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Detecting and Representing Relevant Web Deltas in Whoweda Sourav S Bhowmick1 Sanjay Madria2 Wee given the old and new versions of a set of interlinked Web documents, retrieved in response to a user's query. In particular, we show how to detect and represent web deltas, i.e., changes in the Web documents

Bhowmick, Sourav S.

137

INTRODUCTION Yard wastes currently represent about 15% of the total municipal solid waste collected in  

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INTRODUCTION Yard wastes currently represent about 15% of the total municipal solid waste collected: Collect representative and typical yard trash samples throughout Florida; Characterize the wastes these wastes. WORK ACCOMPLISHED Visited two compost and mulch processing facilities in Gainesville on 10

Ma, Lena

138

Study of Emission TurbulenceRadiation Interaction in Hypersonic Boundary Layers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Study of Emission Turbulence­Radiation Interaction in Hypersonic Boundary Layers L. Duan and M. P of emission turbulence­radiation interaction in hypersonic turbulent boundary layers, representative interaction between turbulence and emission at the hypersonic environment under investigation. An explanation

Martín, Pino

139

A Hydro-Economic Approach to Representing Water Resources Impacts in Integrated Assessment Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Grant Number DE-FG02-98ER62665 Office of Energy Research of the U.S. Department of Energy Abstract Many Integrated Assessment Models (IAM) divide the world into a small number of highly aggregated regions. Non-OECD countries are aggregated geographically into continental and multiple-continental regions or economically by development level. Current research suggests that these large scale aggregations cannot accurately represent potential water resources-related climate change impacts. In addition, IAMs do not explicitly model the flow regulation impacts of reservoir and ground water systems, the economics of water supply, or the demand for water in economic activities. Using the International Model for Policy Analysis of Agricultural Commodities and Trade (IMPACT) model of the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) as a case study, this research implemented a set of methodologies to provide accurate representation of water resource climate change impacts in Integrated Assessment Models. There were also detailed examinations of key issues related to aggregated modeling including: modeling water consumption versus water withdrawals; ground and surface water interactions; development of reservoir cost curves; modeling of surface areas of aggregated reservoirs for estimating evaporation losses; and evaluating the importance of spatial scale in river basin modeling. The major findings include: - Continental or national or even large scale river basin aggregation of water supplies and demands do not accurately capture the impacts of climate change in the water and agricultural sector in IAMs. - Fortunately, there now exist gridden approaches (0.5 X 0.5 degrees) to model streamflows in a global analysis. The gridded approach to hydrologic modeling allows flexibility in aligning basin boundaries with national boundaries. This combined with GIS tools, high speed computers, and the growing availability of socio-economic gridded data bases allows assignment of demands to river basins to create hydro-economic zones that respect as much as possible both political and hydrologic integrity in different models. - To minimize pre-processing of data and add increased flexibility to modeling water resources and uses, it is recommended that water withdrawal demands be modeled, not consumptive requirements even though this makes the IAM more complex. - IAMs must consider changes in water availability for irrigation under climate change; ignoring them is more inaccurate than ignoring yield changes in crops under climate change. - Determining water availability and cost in river basins must include modeling streamflows, reservoirs and their operations, and ground water and its interaction with surface water. - Scale issues are important. The results from condensing demands and supplies in a large complex river basin to one node can be misleading for all uses under low flow conditions and instream flow uses under all conditions. Monthly is generally the most accurate scale for modeling river flows and demands. Challenges remain in integrating hydrologic units with political boundaries but the gridded approach to hydrologic modeling allows flexibility in aligning basin boundaries with political boundaries. - Using minimal reservoir cost data, it is possible to use basin topography to estimate reservoir storage costs. - Reservoir evaporation must be considered when assessing the usable water in a watershed. Several methods are available to estimate the relationship between aggregated storage surface area and storage volume. - For existing or future IAMs that can not use the appropriate aggregation for water, a water preprocessor may be required due the finer scale of hydrologic impacts.

Kirshen, Paul H.; Strzepek, Kenneth, M.

2004-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

140

Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.  

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Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future is a virtue ­ your insight, clarity of thought, #12;Note: This syllabus may represent

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mam represents interactions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Gregory H. Friedman: Before The U.S. House of Representatives...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Government Reform Subcommittee on the Federal Workforce and Agency Organization Gregory H. Friedman: Before The U.S. House of...

142

STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION The Student Government Association, or "SGA", has the greatest student representative  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

_____________________________________________________________________________ STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION The Student Government Association, or "SGA", has the greatest student representative authority on campus. The Student Government Association receives a $4.50 per student per quarter student-assessed fee

Selmic, Sandra

143

2Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

"The Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached, covering the period from April 2000 to June 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field...

144

Lessons Learned in Optimizing Workers' and Worker Representatives' Input to Work Planning and Control  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Slide Presentation by Tom McQuiston, Dr. P.H., United Steelworkers - Tony Mazzocchi Center for Health, Safety and Environmental Education. Lessons Learned in Optimizing Workers’ and Worker Representatives’ Input in Work Planning and Control.

145

Interaction of Polycrystalline CVD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interaction of Polycrystalline CVD Diamond Thin Films with Atomic Oxygen Ze'ev Shpilman #12;#12;Interaction of Polycrystalline CVD Diamond Thin Films with Atomic Oxygen Research thesis In Partial.................................................................... 6 1.2.1 Polycrystalline CVD diamond films: growth and structure 7 1.3. Interaction of carbon

Adler, Joan

146

Cultural values represented by Hispanic and US superheroes: a text analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CULTURAL VALUES REPRESENTED BY HISPANIC AND US SUPERHEROES: A TEXT ANALYSIS A Thesis by CLAUDIA DEL CARMEN SANCHEZ CASTILLO Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A%M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1999 Major Subject: Curriculum and Instruction CULTURAL VALUES REPRESENTED BY HISPANIC AND US SUPERHEROES: A TEXT ANALYSIS A Thesis by CLAUDIA DEL CAKvKN SANCHEZ CASTILLO Submitted to the Office of Graduate...

Sanchez Castillo, Claudia del Carmen

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Human-computer interaction task learning: an empirical investigation of interface quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This research examines learnability measures derived from the all-or-none stochastic learning model. The all-or-none model represents the paired-associate learning that occurs during the initial learning of human-computer interaction (HCI) tasks...

Packebush, Sherrill Janine

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Structure of the first representative of Pfam family PF09410 (DUF2006) reveals a structural signature of the calycin superfamily that suggests a role in lipid metabolism  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first structural representative of the domain of unknown function DUF2006 family, also known as Pfam family PF09410, comprises a lipocalin-like fold with domain duplication. The finding of the calycin signature in the N-terminal domain, combined with remote sequence similarity to two other protein families (PF07143 and PF08622) implicated in isoprenoid metabolism and the oxidative stress response, support an involvement in lipid metabolism. Clusters of conserved residues that interact with ligand mimetics suggest that the binding and regulation sites map to the N-terminal domain and to the interdomain interface, respectively.

Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Bakolitsa, Constantina; Skerra, Arne; Lomize, Andrei; Carlton, Dennis; Miller, Mitchell D.; Krishna, S. Sri; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Clayton, Thomas; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Slawomir K.; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; McMullan, Daniel; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Paulsen, Jessica; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-Andre; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A. (SLAC); (Michigan); (U. Muchen)

2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

149

A constitutive model for representing coupled creep, fracture, and healing in rock salt  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of a constitutive model for representing inelastic flow due to coupled creep, damage, and healing in rock salt is present in this paper. This model, referred to as Multimechanism Deformation Coupled Fracture model, has been formulated by considering individual mechanisms that include dislocation creep, shear damage, tensile damage, and damage healing. Applications of the model to representing the inelastic flow and fracture behavior of WIPP salt subjected to creep, quasi-static loading, and damage healing conditions are illustrated with comparisons of model calculations against experimental creep curves, stress-strain curves, strain recovery curves, time-to-rupture data, and fracture mechanism maps.

Chan, K.S.; Bodner, S.R. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States); Munson, D.E.; Fossum, A.F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Beam-Bem interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In high energy storage-ring colliders, the nonlinear effect arising from beam-beam interactions is a major source that leads to the emittance growth, the reduction of beam life time, and limits the collider luminosity. In this paper, two models of beam-beam interactions are introduced, which are weak-strong and strong-strong beam-beam interactions. In addition, space-charge model is introduced.

Kim, Hyung Jin; /Fermilab

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Is Gravity an Interaction?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider a possibility that gravity is not an interaction but a manifestation of a symmetry based on a Galois field.

Felix M. Lev

2010-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

152

Nerve-pulse interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some recent experimental and theoretical results on mechanisms through which individual nerve pulses can interact are reviewed. Three modes of interactions are considered: (1) interaction of pulses as they travel along a single fiber which leads to velocity dispersion; (2) propagation of pairs of pulses through a branching region leading to quantum pulse code transformations; and (3) interaction of pulses on parallel fibers through which they may form a pulse assembly. This notion is analogous to Hebb's concept of a cell assembly, but on a lower level of the neural hierarchy.

Scott, A.C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

University Safety Partners Mission Statement The University Safety Partners (USP) is a group of appointed representatives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the work environment at Stanford. The role of University Safety Partners is to: · Advise the UniversityUniversity Safety Partners Mission Statement The University Safety Partners (USP) is a group of appointed representatives who are responsible for the administration of the University's health and safety

154

Law School Admissions Panel Law School representatives will discuss the law school admissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Law School Admissions Panel Law School representatives will discuss the law school admissions process and talk about their respective schools in a panel discussion format. Join us and learn how in Law School Admissions Panel epresentatives will discuss the law school admissions process and talk

Brinkmann, Peter

155

Representing OGC Geospatial Web Services in OWL-S Web Service Ontologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Representing OGC Geospatial Web Services in OWL-S Web Service Ontologies Kristin Stock,1,2 Anne Robertson3 and Mark Small3 1 Centre for Geospatial Science, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD geospatial web services, most of which conform to specifications of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC

Stock, Kristin

156

Nuclear talks in Austria International representatives will meet in Vienna on Saturday to discuss a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear talks in Austria International representatives will meet in Vienna on Saturday to discuss a controversial nuclear fusion plan. The technical meeting of experts is intended to pave the way of nuclear fusion say it provides an attractive long-term energy option, because the basic materials needed

157

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY Come join us and representatives from the following Universities and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY · DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY Come join us and representatives from School of Professional PSY - PsyD University of Michigan ­ MSW & MPH Western Michigan University - MA MSU the following Universities and Professional Schools to learn about their graduate programs, admission

Liu, Taosheng

158

CO2 efflux from Amazonian headwater streams represents a significant fate for deep soil respiration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CO2 efflux from Amazonian headwater streams represents a significant fate for deep soil respiration amounts of CO2 to the atmosphere, while the magnitude of CO2 degassing from small streams remains a major was as terrestrially-respired CO2 dissolved within soils, over 90% of which evaded to the atmosphere within headwater

Lehmann, Johannes

159

Signs and Sight in Southern Uganda Representing Perception in Ordinary Conversation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

124 Signs and Sight in Southern Uganda Representing Perception in Ordinary Conversation Ben Orlove-spoken language in the East African nation of Uganda, frequently include discussions and evaluations of signs, drawn from field work that we have conducted in Uganda, centers on a set of beliefs that certain sensory

Orlove, Benjamin S.

160

Instructions to the Applicant 1. The Facility Representative shall complete a "Special Event Application &  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Application & Permit". A site and floor plan must be submitted to the Office of the State Fire Marshal with the Fire and Life Safety requirements of Title 19, Title 24, and the conditions noted on this permit. Non. The Facility Representative shall transmit the "Special Event Application & Permit" to the Office of the State

de Lijser, Peter

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mam represents interactions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Mechanism-based Representative Volume Elements (RVEs) for Predicting Property Degradations in Multiphase Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quantitative understanding of the evolving thermal-mechanical properties of a multi-phase material hinges upon the availability of quantitative statistically representative microstructure descriptions. Questions then arise as to whether a two-dimensional (2D) or a three-dimensional (3D) representative volume element (RVE) should be considered as the statistically representative microstructure. Although 3D models are more representative than 2D models in general, they are usually computationally expensive and difficult to be reconstructed. In this paper, we evaluate the accuracy of a 2D RVE in predicting the property degradations induced by different degradation mechanisms with the multiphase solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode material as an example. Both 2D and 3D microstructure RVEs of the anodes are adopted to quantify the effects of two different degradation mechanisms: humidity-induced electrochemical degradation and phosphorus poisoning induced structural degradation. The predictions of the 2D model are then compared with the available experimental measurements and the results from the 3D model. It is found that the 2D model, limited by its inability of reproducing the realistic electrical percolation, is unable to accurately predict the degradation of thermo-electrical properties. On the other hand, for the phosphorus poisoning induced structural degradation, both 2D and 3D microstructures yield similar results, indicating that the 2D model is capable of providing computationally efficient yet accurate results for studying the structural degradation within the anodes.

Xu, Wei; Sun, Xin; Li, Dongsheng; Ryu, Seun; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Representing hierarchical POMDPs as DBNs, with applications to mobile robot navigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Representing hierarchical POMDPs as DBNs, with applications to mobile robot navigation Kevin P and learning is faster than in SCFGs. In particular, inference in an HHMM can be done in O(T) time [MP01) takes O(T 3 ) time [JM00]. This also means learning, which uses inference as a subroutine, is faster. Y

Murphy, Kevin Patrick

163

DO GLOBAL WARMING AND CLIMATE CHANGE REPRESENT A SERIOUS THREAT TO OUR WELFARE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DO GLOBAL WARMING AND CLIMATE CHANGE REPRESENT A SERIOUS THREAT TO OUR WELFARE AND ENVIRONMENT? By Michael E. Mann I. Introduction The subjects of "global warming" and "climate change" have become parts of both the popular lexicon and the public discourse. Discussions of global warming often evoke passionate

164

Committee on Appropriations, Subcommittee on Energy and Water United States House of Representatives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and through job growth in the `clean energy' sector. To accomplish these goals, not only will a comprehensiveCommittee on Appropriations, Subcommittee on Energy and Water United States House of Representatives Testimony for the February 28, 2007 Hearing on: A Ten Year Outlook for Energy by Daniel M. Kammen

Kammen, Daniel M.

165

Laser Safety Web Resources The web links below represent varied resources for laser safety information and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laser Safety Web Resources The web links below represent varied resources for laser safety endorsement by Georgia Tech. Please contact the Laser Safety Officer if you know of any helpful resources of Laser Physics and Technology, http://www.rp- photonics.com/encyclopedia.html Kentek, http

Houston, Paul L.

166

INTRODUCTIONINTRODUCTION Residential landscapes represent a large percentage of urban land cover (Martin et al.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTRODUCTIONINTRODUCTION Residential landscapes represent a large percentage of urban land cover to residential landscapes, we propose a conceptual model that integrates socioeconomic factors that influence, and socioeconomic factors: Exploring the relationships in a residential landscape. Susannah B. Lerman1 and Paige S

Hall, Sharon J.

167

On the Possibility of Using Complex Values in Fuzzy Logic For Representing Inconsistencies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

applications in mind, including the idea of applying fuzzy logic to control. In surprising contrast to Zadeh's initial predictions, fuzzy control has become the most successful area of applications of fuzzy logic (seeOn the Possibility of Using Complex Values in Fuzzy Logic For Representing Inconsistencies Hung T

Kreinovich, Vladik

168

Diagnosing Abortion Problems Abortions can represent a significant loss of (potential)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diagnosing Abortion Problems Abortions can represent a significant loss of (potential) income in the investi- gation of an abortion problem. Breeding dates, parity, production information and health events and Preventing Abortion Problems Ernest Hovingh, Extension Veterinarian, Virginia-Maryland Regional College

Liskiewicz, Maciej

169

Patterns for Representing FMEA in Formal Specification of Control Systems Ilya Lopatkin, Alexei Iliasov,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Patterns for Representing FMEA in Formal Specification of Control Systems Ilya Lopatkin, Alexei, Finland {Yuliya.Prokhorova, Elena.Troubitsyna}@abo.fi Abstract -- Failure Modes and Effects analysis (FMEA) is a widely used technique for inductive safety analysis. FMEA provides engineers with valuable information

Southampton, University of

170

Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.  

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Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may;Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ

171

Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.  

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Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may to its cultural relevance and effectiveness 50% Week 9 #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past

172

Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.  

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Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may) with your progress report (PDF). (1-3 pages) #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering

173

Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.  

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Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may-class participation (required) #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course

174

Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.  

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Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may Participation 10% Major Figure 15% Group Web 25% Final Paper 40% #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past

175

Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.  

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Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may is a part of your class grade and that it includes many components. #12;Note: This syllabus may represent

176

Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.  

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Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may will design and build a #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course

177

Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.  

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Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may and prototype files can be in the format most convenient for you. #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past

178

Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.  

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Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may, #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may

179

Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.  

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Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ. Course

180

Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.  

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Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may argumentation around the concept of crowdsourcing/crowd work. #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mam represents interactions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.  

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Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may your professional identity using multiple avenues (i.e., #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past

182

Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.  

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Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may discussions): 20% #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course

183

Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.  

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Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may Course Schedule: MW, 1:30-3:20pm; or TTh, 10:30am-12:20pm *DISCLAIMER: This syllabus represents computational thinking, including: #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course

184

Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.  

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Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ. Course;Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ

185

Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.  

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Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may;Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differHutchinson Style: #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings

186

Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.  

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Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may Tuesday Introduction to course Introduction to user assistance (UA) #12;Note: This syllabus may represent: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ. Thursday

187

Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.  

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Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ. Course to Seidman, pp.7­14, Weiss, Chap.1 -- #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course

188

Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.  

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Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may Week 3 A A. Lecture: Constructive criticism & evaluation rubric #12;Note: This syllabus may represent sources #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings

189

Finite element plate formulation including transverse shear effects for representing composite shell structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For Representing Composite Shell Structures. (May 1987) Jsmil M. Hamdallah, B. S. , University of Toledo Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. John J. Engblom A finite element formulation for the analysis of thin to moderately thick lam- inated composite shell... in an analysis if delamination is to be avoided. The results obtained in this research confirm the potential use of the element presented as an accurate and eflicient tool in the analysis of thin to moderately thick laminated shell structures. To my parents...

Hamdallah, Jamil M.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

190

Solubility and freezing effects of Fe2+ solutions representative of upper tropospheric and lower  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

determined the total equilibrium metal solubility ([Fe2+ ]T and [Mg2+ ]T) in 20­90 wt % sulfuric acidSolubility and freezing effects of Fe2+ and Mg2+ in H2SO4 solutions representative of upper solutions over the temperature range 200­300 K. We have measured solubilities using samples of MgSO4, FeSO4Á

191

REPRESENTING AEROSOL DYNAMICS AND PROPERTIES IN CHEMICAL TRANSPORT MODELS BY THE METHOD OF MOMENTS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atmospheric aerosols, suspensions of solid or liquid particles, are an important multi-phase system. Aerosols scatter and absorb shortwave (solar) radiation, affecting climate (Charlson et al., 1992; Schwartz, 1996) and visibility; nucleate cloud droplet formation, modifying the reflectivity of clouds (Twomey et al., 1984; Schwartz and Slingo, 1996) as well as contributing to composition of cloudwater and to wet deposition (Seinfeld and Pandis, 1998); and affect human health through inhalation (NRC, 1998). Existing and prospective air quality regulations impose standards on concentrations of atmospheric aerosols to protect human health and welfare (EPA, 1998). Chemical transport and transformation models representing the loading and geographical distribution of aerosols and precursor gases are needed to permit development of effective and efficient strategies for meeting air quality standards, and for examining aerosol effects on climate retrospectively and prospectively for different emissions scenarios. Important aerosol properties and processes depend on their size distribution: light scattering, cloud nucleating properties, dry deposition, and penetration into airways of lungs. The evolution of the mass loading itself depends on particle size because of the size dependence of growth and removal processes. For these reasons it is increasingly recognized that chemical transport and transformation models must represent not just the mass loading of atmospheric particulate matter but also the aerosol microphysical properties and the evolution of these properties if aerosols are to be accurately represented in these models. If the size distribution of the aerosol is known, a given property can be evaluated as the integral of the appropriate kernel function over the size distribution. This has motivated the approach of determining aerosol size distribution, and of explicitly representing this distribution and its evolution in chemical transport models.

SCHWARTZ,S.E.; MCGRAW,R.; BENKOVITZ,C.M.; WRIGHT,D.L.

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Assessment of TurbulenceChemistry Interaction in Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessment of Turbulence­Chemistry Interaction in Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layers L. Duan of the turbulence­chemistry interaction are performed in hypersonic turbulent boundary layers using direct numerical simulation flowfields under typical hypersonic conditions representative of blunt-body and slender- body

Martín, Pino

193

Study of turbulence-chemistry interaction in hypersonic turbulent boundary layers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Study of turbulence-chemistry interaction in hypersonic turbulent boundary layers Lian Duan and M of the turbulence-chemistry interaction (TCI) are performed in hypersonic tur- bulent boundary layers using direct numerical simulation (DNS) flow fields under typical hypersonic conditions representative of blunt

Martín, Pino

194

Uniprocessor Performance Analysis of a Representative Workload of Sandia National Laboratories' Scientific Applications.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

UNIPROCESSOR PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF A REPRESENTATIVE WORKLOAD OF SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES' SCIENTIFIC APPLICATIONS Master of Science in Electrical Engineering New Mexico State University Las Cruces, New Mexico, 2005 Dr. Jeanine Cook, Chair Throughout the last decade computer performance analysis has become absolutely necessary to maximum performance of some workloads. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) located in Albuquerque, New Mexico is no different in that to achieve maximum performance of large scientific, parallel workloads performance analysis is needed at the uni-processor level. A representative workload has been chosen as the basis of a computer performance study to determine optimal processor characteristics in order to better specify the next generation of supercomputers. Cube3, a finite element test problem developed at SNL is a representative workload of their scientific workloads. This workload has been studied at the uni-processor level to understand characteristics in the microarchitecture that will lead to the overall performance improvement at the multi-processor level. The goal of studying vthis workload at the uni-processor level is to build a performance prediction model that will be integrated into a multi-processor performance model which is currently being developed at SNL. Through the use of performance counters on the Itanium 2 microarchitecture, performance statistics are studied to determine bottlenecks in the microarchitecture and/or changes in the application code that will maximize performance. From source code analysis a performance degrading loop kernel was identified and through the use of compiler optimizations a performance gain of around 20% was achieved.

Charles Laverty

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Strongly interacting Fermi gases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Strongly interacting gases of ultracold fermions have become an amazingly rich test-bed for many-body theories of fermionic matter. Here we present our recent experiments on these systems. Firstly, we discuss high-precision ...

Bakr, W.

196

Human-machine interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Digital technology utilizing a cognitive model based on human naturalistic decision-making processes, including pattern recognition and episodic memory, can reduce the dependency of human-machine interactions on the abilities of a human user and can enable a machine to more closely emulate human-like responses. Such a cognitive model can enable digital technology to use cognitive capacities fundamental to human-like communication and cooperation to interact with humans.

Forsythe, J. Chris (Sandia Park, NM); Xavier, Patrick G. (Albuquerque, NM); Abbott, Robert G. (Albuquerque, NM); Brannon, Nathan G. (Albuquerque, NM); Bernard, Michael L. (Tijeras, NM); Speed, Ann E. (Albuquerque, NM)

2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

197

Bonneville Purchasing Instructions. Appendix 14A, Contracting Officer`s Technical Representatives` Guide for Services Contracts.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This guide outlines the duties of BPA personnel designated as Contracting Officers Technical Representatives (COTRs). The BPA Administrator gives contracting officers (COs) in BPA responsibility and authority for awarding and administering contracts. COs are authorized to designate other BPA employees to act as their representatives for purposes of contract administration, from the time of contract award until final receipt and acceptance of the contracted services. COTRs are the individuals primarily relied upon to perform technical contract administration functions. Similar functions for supply and construction contracts are performed by engineering representatives, construction inspectors, and inspectors. Although this Guide is written primarily with the COTR in mind, the concept and operation of teamwork is essential throughout the entire process of contract administration. The CO administers the contract during performance, but rarely has expertise in all of the relevant technical areas. Therefore, CO decisions rely on input from a team. The COTR is an indispensable member of that team. The instructions in this Guide are designed to facilitate this essential CO-COTR cooperation. COTR duties are usually additional to those required of the COTR in his or her assigned line organization. The COTR is still accountable to the line supervisor for performance of regularly-assigned duties. These duties are to be reflected appropriately in performance appraisals and job descriptions. For contract administration duties, however, the COTR reports directly to, and is accountable only to, the CO. The COTR`s supervisor must allow sufficient time to ensure that the COTR can adequately monitor the contract for technical compliance. This Guide is designed for COTRs who are performing service contract (including intergovernmental contract) administration functions as an adjunct to their normal technical duties.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Florida Represented by the  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996)DecadeYear Jan Feb MarPriceRepresented by the PricePrice

199

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Florida Represented by the  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996)DecadeYear Jan Feb MarPriceRepresented by the

200

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Georgia Represented by the  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996)DecadeYear Jan Feb MarPriceRepresented by thePrice

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mam represents interactions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Georgia Represented by the  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996)DecadeYear Jan Feb MarPriceRepresented by thePricePrice

202

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Hawaii Represented by the  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996)DecadeYear Jan Feb MarPriceRepresented by

203

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Hawaii Represented by the  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996)DecadeYear Jan Feb MarPriceRepresented byPrice

204

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Idaho Represented by the  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996)DecadeYear Jan Feb MarPriceRepresented byPricePrice

205

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Idaho Represented by the  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996)DecadeYear Jan Feb MarPriceRepresented byPricePricePrice

206

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Illinois Represented by the  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996)DecadeYear Jan Feb MarPriceRepresented

207

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Illinois Represented by the  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996)DecadeYear Jan Feb MarPriceRepresentedPrice

208

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Indiana Represented by the  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996)DecadeYear Jan Feb MarPriceRepresentedPricePrice

209

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Indiana Represented by the  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996)DecadeYear Jan Feb MarPriceRepresentedPricePricePrice

210

Sampling device for withdrawing a representative sample from single and multi-phase flows  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fluid stream sampling device has been developed for the purpose of obtaining a representative sample from a single or multi-phase fluid flow. This objective is carried out by means of a probe which may be inserted into the fluid stream. Individual samples are withdrawn from the fluid flow by sampling ports with particular spacings, and the sampling parts are coupled to various analytical systems for characterization of the physical, thermal, and chemical properties of the fluid flow as a whole and also individually.

Apley, Walter J. (Pasco, WA); Cliff, William C. (Richland, WA); Creer, James M. (Richland, WA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Interacting With the Pharmaceutical Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTERACTING WITH THE PHARMACEUTICAL INDUSTRY Stephen R.to interactions with the pharmaceutical industry! This is ancome from the pharmaceutical industry. It is also reality

Hayden, Stephen R

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Surprising Quasiparticle Interactions in Graphene  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Surprising Quasiparticle Interactions in Graphene Surprising Quasiparticle Interactions in Graphene Print Wednesday, 31 October 2007 00:00 Until now, the world's electronics have...

213

Comparison of surface meteorological data representativeness for the Weldon Spring transport and dispersion modeling analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy is conducting the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project under the Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP). The major goals of the SFMP are to eliminate potential hazards to the public and the environment that associated with contamination at SFMP sites and to make surplus property available for other uses to the extent possible. This report presents the results of analysis of available meteorological data from stations near the Weldon Spring site. Data that are most representative of site conditions are needed to accurately model the transport and dispersion of air pollutants associated with remedial activities. Such modeling will assist the development of mitigative measures. 17 refs., 12 figs., 6 tabs.

Lazaro, M.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Being Interactive Services and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for engineering software and more than sufficient justification for all the inter- est in services. AlthoughBeing Interactive Services and Situations 4 SEPTEMBER · OCTOBER 2001 http the Editor in Chief ... F orget objects. The killer buzzword of our era is now services. And who isn

215

Being Interactive Health Care  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Being Interactive Treating Health Care T he numbers are staggering. In a chilling report, the U care, training staff, and accrediting staff and health-care facilities, which involve determin- ing.ahrq.gov/clinic/ptsafety/summary.htm). Pressures on Health Care To come up with a credible approach for improv- ing patient safety, we need

216

The Digital Interactive Video  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Digital Interactive Video Exploration and Reflection (Diver) system lets users create virtual pathways through existing video content using a virtual camera and an annotation window for commentary repurposing, and discussion. W ith the inexorable growth of low-cost consumer video elec- tronics

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

217

Identification and use of surrogate precursors to represent delayed neutron groups  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Time-dependent delayed neutron activities have traditionally been represented by six delayed neutron precursor groups, whose yields and decay constants are obtained from nonlinear least-squares fits to out-of-pile measurements. The group decay constants obtained in this manner are empirical. They do not coincide with decay constants of specific delayed neutron precursors. Different values are used for each fissionable nuclide, and the values used also depend on the energy spectrum of the neutrons causing fission. Having a different value of the six-group decay constants for each fissionable nuclide complicates the analysis of the dynamic behavior of fast reactors. A fast reactor containing six principal fissioning nuclides of uranium and plutonium must, in effect, be described by 36 delayed neutron groups. The use of group decay constants that depend on the neutron energy spectrum makes it difficult to select values that describe the dynamic response of epithermal systems because virtually all delayed neutron activity measurements have been performed for fast or thermal spectra. Clearly, it would be desirable to have a single set of group decay constants that could be applied to all fissionable nuclei. A set of seven fixed decay constants is associated with a specific, dominant delayed neutron precursor. In effect, each group is represented by a single surrogate precursor. Using recently measured delayed neutron activities for {sup 235}U and {sup 237}Np, the proposed set of decay constants actually improved the fit to the data. For other fissionable nuclei, a method has been devised to obtain yields consistent with the proposed set of decay constants from the traditional six-group parameters. This transformation is accomplished without altering the inferred reactivity scale.

Loaiza, D.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Haskin, F.E. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

A Subbasin-based framework to represent land surface processes in an Earth System Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Realistically representing spatial heterogeneity and lateral land surface processes within and between modeling units in earth system models is important because of their implications to surface energy and water exchange. The traditional approach of using regular grids as computational units in land surface models and earth system models may lead to inadequate representation of lateral movements of water, energy and carbon fluxes, especially when the grid resolution increases. Here a new subbasin-based framework is introduced in the Community Land Model (CLM), which is the land component of the Community Earth System Model (CESM). Local processes are represented assuming each subbasin as a grid cell on a pseudo grid matrix with no significant modifications to the existing CLM modeling structure. Lateral routing of water within and between subbasins is simulated with the subbasin version of a recently-developed physically based routing model, Model for Scale Adaptive River Routing (MOSART). As an illustration, this new framework is implemented in the topographically diverse region of the U.S. Pacific Northwest. The modeling units (subbasins) are delineated from high-resolution Digital Elevation Model while atmospheric forcing and surface parameters are remapped from the corresponding high resolution datasets. The impacts of this representation on simulating hydrologic processes are explored by comparing it with the default (grid-based) CLM representation. In addition, the effects of DEM resolution on parameterizing topography and the subsequent effects on runoff processes are investigated. Limited model evaluation and comparison showed that small difference between the averaged forcing can lead to more significant difference in the simulated runoff and streamflow because of nonlinear horizontal processes. Topographic indices derived from high resolution DEM may not improve the overall water balance, but affect the partitioning between surface and subsurface runoff. More systematic analyses are needed to determine the relative merits of the subbasin representation compared to the commonly used grid-based representation, especially when land surface models are approaching higher resolutions.

Tesfa, Teklu K.; Li, Hongyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Huang, Maoyi; Ke, Yinghai; Sun, Yu; Liu, Ying

2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

219

Method of and apparatus for modeling interactions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for modeling interactions can accurately model tribological and other properties and accommodate topological disruptions. Two portions of a problem space are represented, a first with a Lagrangian mesh and a second with an ALE mesh. The ALE and Lagrangian meshes are constructed so that each node on the surface of the Lagrangian mesh is in a known correspondence with adjacent nodes in the ALE mesh. The interaction can be predicted for a time interval. Material flow within the ALE mesh can accurately model complex interactions such as bifurcation. After prediction, nodes in the ALE mesh in correspondence with nodes on the surface of the Lagrangian mesh can be mapped so that they are once again adjacent to their corresponding Lagrangian mesh nodes. The ALE mesh can then be smoothed to reduce mesh distortion that might reduce the accuracy or efficiency of subsequent prediction steps. The process, from prediction through mapping and smoothing, can be repeated until a terminal condition is reached.

Budge, Kent G.

2004-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

220

Spatial Data Structures Spatial data structures describe the rules that are used to represent geographic data in geographic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spatial Data Structures Spatial data structures describe the rules that are used to represent depending on those beneath it: · Conceptual spatial data models describe how geographic objects (for example, rivers) or phenomena are represented in GIS. · Logical spatial data models describe how geographic data

Stock, Kristin

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mam represents interactions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may of the environmental, economic, and social impact of engineering work. #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past and project overview Syllabus introduction Introductions Assignment introductions: · Sustainability project

222

Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may management project OR 55% Due Week 8b #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course - Cultural adaptation WEEK 3A ­ JULY 5TH Localization Engineering and Tools #12;Note: This syllabus may

223

Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may with empirical research. #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course of this syllabus) and short "discussion idea" postings to the course blog in order to stimulate discussion about

224

Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may Role plays and simulations Short speeches and presentations #12;Note: This syllabus may represent Introduction to HCDE 461: syllabus, goals, rules, and tips to success Warm-up activities: Self

225

Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may.9 ­ 1.1 D 0.7 ­ 0.8 D- 0.0 E #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course

226

Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may for a small system and plan and perform a usability evaluation #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past in UCD Week 11 Project Presentations L11: Course Wrap-Up Finals Online Final Exam #12;Note: This syllabus

227

Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may%) 15% #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings Introduction, Overview Syllabus review Introductions User-Centered Design Requirements 2 Ways of Thinking About

228

Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may reading 5% Participation in discussion 10% ____________ 100% #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past (2) --- HW: Summary (2) due Mon. 9:00 a.m.; Prep. for mini-presentation (2) #12;Note: This syllabus

229

Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future/Wednesdays Course URL: http://faculty.washington.edu/farkas/TC407/syllabus.html Course Description will be deducted for not posting. #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering

230

Abstract--A study determined people's perceptions of many types of managed and unmanaged landscapes as represented on slides.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

landscapes as represented on slides. In scenes of arid lands in the western United States, most respon- dents of respondentswereshown sets of color slides that illustrated various landscape com- ponents, structures, and management actions throughout the western United States. Slide sets represented objects photographed from fixed

231

Containment and Analysis Capability Insights Gained from Drop Testing Representative Spent Nuclear Fuel Containers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP), operating from the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), developed the standardized Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) canister. This canister is designed to be loaded with DOE SNF (including other radioactive materials) and then be used during interim storage, during transportation to the nation’s repository, and for final disposal at the repository without having to be reopened. The canister has been fully designed and has completed significant testing that clearly demonstrates that it can safely achieve its intended design goals. During 1999, nine 457-mm diameter test canisters were fabricated at the INEEL to represent the standardized DOE SNF canister design. Various "worst case" internals were incorporated. Seven of the test canisters were 4.57 m long and weighed approximately 2721 kg, while two were 3.00 m long and weighed approximately 1360 kg and 1725 kg. Seven of the test canisters were dropped from 9 m onto an essentially unyielding flat surface and one of the test canisters was dropped from 1 m onto a 15-cm diameter puncture post. The final test canister was dropped from 61 cm onto a 50.8 mm thick vertically oriented steel plate, and then fell over to impact another 50.8 mm thick vertically oriented steel plate. This last test represented a canister dropping onto another larger container such as a repository disposal container or waste package. The 1999 drop testing was performed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The nine test canisters experienced varying degrees of damage to their skirts, lifting rings, and pressure boundary components (heads and main body). However, all of the canisters were shown to have maintained their pressure boundary (through pressure testing). Four heavily damaged canisters were also shown to be leaktight via helium leak testing. Pre- and post-drop finite element (FE) analyses were also performed. The results clearly indicated that accurate predictions of canister responses to the drop tests were achieved. The results achieved for the standardized canister can also be applicable to other well-constructed containers (canisters, casks, cans, vessels, etc.) subjected to similar loads. Properly designed containers can maintain a containment system after being subjected to dynamically induced high strains and FE computer analyses can accurately predict the resulting responses.

Morton, Dana Keith; Snow, Spencer David; Rahl, Tommy Ervin; Ware, Arthur Gates

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Interactive design center.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia's advanced computing resources provide researchers, engineers and analysts with the ability to develop and render highly detailed large-scale models and simulations. To take full advantage of these multi-million data point visualizations, display systems with comparable pixel counts are needed. The Interactive Design Center (IDC) is a second generation visualization theater designed to meet this need. The main display integrates twenty-seven projectors in a 9-wide by 3-high array with a total display resolution of more than 35 million pixels. Six individual SmartBoard displays offer interactive capabilities that include on-screen annotation and touch panel control of the facility's display systems. This report details the design, implementation and operation of this innovative facility.

Pomplun, Alan R. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Interactive Transportable Architecture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transportable architecture which embeds the means to communicate with real or imaginary digital information spaces in a natural fashion offers unprecedented opportunities to make multimedia experiences available to the public almost everywhere. This installation demonstrates an example of interactive transportable architecture which incorporates unencumebered real-time body tracking and gesture recognition to explore a 3-D cityscape and a brain-like web-based information space.

Oliver Irschitz; Priam Givord; Newyork Exit Newyork; Flavia Sparacino

234

ELEMENTARY PARTICLE INTERACTIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The High-Energy Elementary Particle Interactions group at UT during the last three years worked on the following directions and projects: Collider-based Particle Physics; Neutrino Physics, particularly participation in “NO?A”, “Double Chooz”, and “KamLAND” neutrino experiments; and Theory, including Scattering amplitudes, Quark-gluon plasma; Holographic cosmology; Holographic superconductors; Charge density waves; Striped superconductors; and Holographic FFLO states.

EFREMENKO, YURI; HANDLER, THOMAS; KAMYSHKOV, YURI; SIOPSIS, GEORGE; SPANIER, STEFAN

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

235

Incipient toxicity of lithium to freshwater organisms representing a salmonid habitat  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because the eventual development of fusion power reactors could increase the mining, use and disposal of lithium five-fold by the year 2000, potential effects from unusual amounts of lithium in aquatic environments were investigated. Freshwater oganisms representing a Pacific Northwest salmonid habitat were exposed to elevated conentrations of lithium. Nine parameters were used to determine the incipient toxicity of lithium to rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri), insect larvae (Chironomus sp.), and Columbia River periphyton. All three groups of biota were incipiently sensitive to lithium at concentrations ranging between 0.1 and 1 mg/L. These results correspond with the incipient toxicity of beryllium, a chemically similar component of fusion reactor cores. A maximum lithium concentration of 0.01 mg/L occurs naturally in most freshwater environments (beryllium is rarer). Therefore, a concentration range of 0.01 to 0.1 mg/L may be regarded as approaching toxic concentrations when assessing the hazards of lithium in freshwaters.

Emery, R.; Klopfer, D.C.; Skalski, J.R.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

A Control Chart Approach for Representing and Mining Data Streams with Shape Based Similarity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mining of data streams for online condition monitoring is a challenging task in several domains including (electric) power grid system, intelligent manufacturing, and consumer science. Considering a power grid application in which thousands of sensors, called the phasor measurement units, are deployed on the power grid network to continuously collect streams of digital data for real-time situational awareness and system management. Depending on design, each sensor could stream between ten and sixty data samples per second. The myriad of sensory data captured could convey deeper insights about sequence of events in real-time and before major damages are done. However, the timely processing and analysis of these high-velocity and high-volume data streams is a challenge. Hence, a new data processing and transformation approach, based on the concept of control charts, for representing sequence of data streams from sensors is proposed. In addition, an application of the proposed approach for enhancing data mining tasks such as clustering using real-world power grid data streams is presented. The results indicate that the proposed approach is very efficient for data streams storage and manipulation.

Omitaomu, Olufemi A [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Plasma-Surface Interactions on Liquids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquid plasma-facing surfaces have been suggested as an option for advanced fusion devices, particularly in regions where solid materials may not survive over long operating periods. Because liquid surfaces can be replenished, they offer the possibility of tolerating intense particle bombardment and of recovering from off-normal events. As a preliminary step in understanding the nature of plasma-surface interactions on liquids, the authors consider some of the surface processes occurring in liquids undergoing irradiation by energetic particles. These include (1) sputtering, (2) segregation of liquid component species and impurities, (3) evaporation, and (4) trapping and release of incident particles. Aspects of these processes are examined for several candidate liquids, which represent three types of low-Z liquids: pure metals (Li), metallic alloys (Sn-Li), and compound insulators (Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4}).

R. Bastasz; W. Eckstein

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Detection of molecular interactions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and assay are described for measuring the interaction between a ligand and an analyte. The assay can include a suspension of colloidal particles that are associated with a ligand of interest. The colloidal particles are maintained in the suspension at or near a phase transition state from a condensed phase to a dispersed phase. An analyte to be tested is then added to the suspension. If the analyte binds to the ligand, a phase change occurs to indicate that the binding was successful.

Groves, John T. (Berkeley, CA); Baksh, Michael M. (Fremont, CA); Jaros, Michal (Brno, CH)

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

239

BNL | ATF Interaction Chambers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone byDearTechnicalAwardssupportsBESElectron-plasma Interaction

240

PDSF Interactive Batch Jobs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratorySpeedingOptimizing I/OP-GlycoproteinInteractive Batch Jobs Running

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mam represents interactions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

PDSF Interactive Nodes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratorySpeedingOptimizing I/OP-GlycoproteinInteractive Batch Jobs

242

Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may the original total point value. Work more than 5 days late will receive zero credit. #12;Note: This syllabus

243

Alpha Hemolysin: Inventory and Record Keeping On February 9, 2006, our laboratory was represented before the Microbiological Safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Alpha Hemolysin: Inventory and Record Keeping On February 9, 2006, our laboratory was represented at all times. An accurate and up-to-date inventory of HL will be provided to EHO at least annually

Movileanu, Liviu

244

Prevalence of exposure to violence and PTSD symptoms in middle income undergraduate students representing three ethnic groups  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PREVALENCE OF EXPOSURE TO VIOLENCE AND PTSD SYMPTOMS IN MIDDLE INCOME UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS REPRESENTING THREE ETHNIC GROUPS A Thesis by ANITA KAY MCGRUDER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1995 Major Subject: Psychology PREVALENCE OF EXPOSURE TO VIOLENCE AND PTSD SYMPTOMS IN MIDDLE INCOME UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS REPRESENTING THREE ETHNIC GROUPS A Thesis by ANITA KAY...

McGruder, Anita Kay

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Development of a Future Representative Concentration Pathway for Use in the IPCC 5th Assessment Earth System Model Simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The representative concentration pathway to be delivered is a scenario of atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases and other radiatively important atmospheric species, along with land-use changes, derived from the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM). The particular representative concentration pathway (RCP) that the Joint Global Change Research Institute (JGCRI) has been responsible for is a not-to-exceed pathway that stabilizes at a radiative forcing of 4.5Wm-2 in the year 2100.

None

2010-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

246

In vivo interactions between tungsten microneedles and peripheral nerves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tungsten microneedles are currently used to insert neural electrodes into living peripheral nerves. However, the biomechanics underlying these procedures is not yet well characterized. For this reason, the aim of this work was to model the interactions between these microneedles and living peripheral nerves. A simple mathematical framework was especially provided to model both compression of the external layer of the nerve (epineurium) and the interactions resulting from penetration of the main shaft of the microneedle inside the living nerves. The instantaneous Young's modulus, compression force, the work needed to pierce the tissue, puncturing pressure, and the dynamic friction coefficient between the tungsten microneedles and living nerves were quantified starting from acute experiments, aiming to reproduce the physical environment of real implantations. Indeed, a better knowledge of the interactions between microneedles and peripheral nerves may be useful to improve the effectiveness of these insertion techniques, and could represent a key factor for designing robot-assisted procedures tailored for peripheral nerve insertion.

Pier Nicola Sergi; Winnie Jensen; Silvestro Micera; Ken Yoshida

2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

247

Cotton and Protein Interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The adsorbent properties of important wound fluid proteins and cotton cellulose are reviewed. This review focuses on the adsorption of albumin to cotton-based wound dressings and some chemically modified derivatives targeted for chronic wounds. Adsorption of elastase in the presence of albumin was examined as a model to understand the interactive properties of these wound fluid components with cotton fibers. In the chronic non-healing wound, elastase appears to be over-expressed, and it digests tissue and growth factors, interfering with the normal healing process. Albumin is the most prevalent protein in wound fluid, and in highly to moderately exudative wounds, it may bind significantly to the fibers of wound dressings. Thus, the relative binding properties of both elastase and albumin to wound dressing fibers are of interest in the design of more effective wound dressings. The present work examines the binding of albumin to two different derivatives of cotton, and quantifies the elastase binding to the same derivatives following exposure of albumin to the fiber surface. An HPLC adsorption technique was employed coupled with a colorimetric enzyme assay to quantify the relative binding properties of albumin and elastase to cotton. The results of wound protein binding are discussed in relation to the porosity and surface chemistry interactions of cotton and wound proteins. Studies are directed to understanding the implications of protein adsorption phenomena in terms of fiber-protein models that have implications for rationally designing dressings for chronic wounds.

Goheen, Steven C.; Edwards, J. V.; Rayburn, Alfred R.; Gaither, Kari A.; Castro, Nathan J.

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

248

Interactive Volume Rendering of Diffusion Tensor Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As 3D volumetric images of the human body become an increasingly crucial source of information for the diagnosis and treatment of a broad variety of medical conditions, advanced techniques that allow clinicians to efficiently and clearly visualize volumetric images become increasingly important. Interaction has proven to be a key concept in analysis of medical images because static images of 3D data are prone to artifacts and misunderstanding of depth. Furthermore, fading out clinically irrelevant aspects of the image while preserving contextual anatomical landmarks helps medical doctors to focus on important parts of the images without becoming disoriented. Our goal was to develop a tool that unifies interactive manipulation and context preserving visualization of medical images with a special focus on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data. At each image voxel, DTI provides a 3 x 3 tensor whose entries represent the 3D statistical properties of water diffusion locally. Water motion that is preferential to specific spatial directions suggests structural organization of the underlying biological tissue; in particular, in the human brain, the naturally occuring diffusion of water in the axon portion of neurons is predominantly anisotropic along the longitudinal direction of the elongated, fiber-like axons [MMM+02]. This property has made DTI an emerging source of information about the structural integrity of axons and axonal connectivity between brain regions, both of which are thought to be disrupted in a broad range of medical disorders including multiple sclerosis, cerebrovascular disease, and autism [Mos02, FCI+01, JLH+99, BGKM+04, BJB+03].

Hlawitschka, Mario; Weber, Gunther; Anwander, Alfred; Carmichael, Owen; Hamann, Bernd; Scheuermann, Gerik

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

249

MIDOS : Multimodal Interactive DialOgue System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interactions between people are typically conversational, multimodal, and symmetric. In conversational interactions, information flows in both directions. In multimodal interactions, people use multiple channels. In symmetric ...

Adler, Aaron D. (Aaron Daniel), 1979-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Theoretical studies of molecular interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research program is directed at extending fundamental knowledge of atoms and molecules including their electronic structure, mutual interaction, collision dynamics, and interaction with radiation. The approach combines the use of ab initio methods--Hartree-Fock (HF) multiconfiguration HF, configuration interaction, and the recently developed quantum Monte Carlo (MC)--to describe electronic structure, intermolecular interactions, and other properties, with various methods of characterizing inelastic and reaction collision processes, and photodissociation dynamics. Present activity is focused on the development and application of the QMC method, surface catalyzed reactions, and reorientation cross sections.

Lester, W.A. Jr. [Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Surprising Quasiparticle Interactions in Graphene  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Surprising Quasiparticle Interactions in Graphene Print Until now, the world's electronics have been dominated by silicon, whose properties, while excellent, significantly limit...

252

For the designers, nature is the nucleus represented by the pond, moving gradually away from nature leads though a large open space towards the solar field, representing man-made technology.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from nature leads though a large open space towards the solar field, representing man-made technology to technology. In our design, the pond is a representation of nature, while the solar field on the extreme side is a representation of the man-made technology. We provide a connection between these two opposite concepts and offer

Goodman, Robert M.

253

Gamow shell model and realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a new and efficient method to obtain a Gamow shell-model basis and matrix elements generated by realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions. We derive a self-consistent Hartree-Fock potential from the renormalized N3LO interaction model. The corresponding Gamow one-body eigenstates are generated in a plane wave basis in order to build a Gamow shell-model set of basis states for the closed shell nuclei 4He and 16O. We address also the problem of representing a realistic nucleon-nucleon interaction in a two-particle Berggren basis in the laboratory frame. To achieve this, an expansion of matrix elements of the residual nucleon-nucleon interaction in a finite set of harmonic oscillator wave functions is used. We show that all loosely bound and narrow resonant states converge surprisingly fast. Even broad resonances in these two-particle valence systems converge within a reasonable number of harmonic oscillator functions. Examples of 6He and 18O Gamow shell-model calculations using 4He and 16}O as closed shell cores are presented. This procedure allows Gamow shell-model calculations to be performed with all realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions and with either momentum or position space representations for the Gamow basis. The possibility to remove the center of mass spuriosity of Gamow shell-model nuclear states with this method is also discussed. Perspectives for nuclear structure calculations of dripline nuclei are outlined.

G. Hagen; M. Hjorth-Jensen; N. Michel

2006-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

254

Simulating human behavior for national security human interactions.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This 3-year research and development effort focused on what we believe is a significant technical gap in existing modeling and simulation capabilities: the representation of plausible human cognition and behaviors within a dynamic, simulated environment. Specifically, the intent of the ''Simulating Human Behavior for National Security Human Interactions'' project was to demonstrate initial simulated human modeling capability that realistically represents intra- and inter-group interaction behaviors between simulated humans and human-controlled avatars as they respond to their environment. Significant process was made towards simulating human behaviors through the development of a framework that produces realistic characteristics and movement. The simulated humans were created from models designed to be psychologically plausible by being based on robust psychological research and theory. Progress was also made towards enhancing Sandia National Laboratories existing cognitive models to support culturally plausible behaviors that are important in representing group interactions. These models were implemented in the modular, interoperable, and commercially supported Umbra{reg_sign} simulation framework.

Bernard, Michael Lewis; Hart, Dereck H.; Verzi, Stephen J.; Glickman, Matthew R.; Wolfenbarger, Paul R.; Xavier, Patrick Gordon

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

A single model of interacting dark energy: generalized phantom energy or generalized Chaplygin gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I present a model in which dark energy interacts with matter. The former is represented by a variable equation of state. It is shown that the phantom crossing takes place at zero redshift, moreover, stable scaling solution of the Friedmann equations is obtained. I show that dark energy is most probably be either generalized phantom energy or the generalized Chaplygin gas.

Mubasher Jamil

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

256

Wave Power Resources off the Hawaiian Islands luisvega@hawaii.edu Wave Resources for Representative Sites Around the Hawaiian Islands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wave Power Resources off the Hawaiian Islands luisvega@hawaii.edu 1 Wave Resources for Representative Sites Around the Hawaiian Islands Table of Contents Summary p2 Background: Wave Power Conversion p3 Licensing and Permitting p3 Challenges and Barriers p4 Wave Power Resources: Previous Work p5 Wave

257

Representing the effects of alpine grassland vegetation cover on the simulation of soil thermal dynamics by ecosystem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hourly time steps, soil surface temperature is calculated by iteratively solving the energy balanceRepresenting the effects of alpine grassland vegetation cover on the simulation of soil thermal] Soil surface temperature is a critical boundary condition for the simulation of soil temperature

Ickert-Bond, Steffi

258

Confrence TALN 1999, Cargse, 12-17 juillet 1999 1 Representing speech acts as events to treat dialogue  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conférence TALN 1999, Cargèse, 12-17 juillet 1999 1 Representing speech acts as events to treat the way in which formal semantics such as SDRT (Asher, 1993) treat dialogue. We point out that SDRT offers at a semantic level, treating dia- logue cannot be done in a context-free way. Specifically, we show how

Boyer, Edmond

259

Greening the U.S. House of Representatives Rick Diamond and Christopher Payne, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of making the U.S. House of Representatives: 1) carbon neutral within 18 months, 2) reducing energy use system. A key aspect has been better tracking and feedback to the building operators of the actual energy is under House jurisdiction #12;3 Energy Consumption for the House Buildings Energy is supplied

260

Using Representative-Based Clustering for Nearest Neighbor Dataset Editing Christoph F. Eick , Nidal Zeidat, and Ricardo Vilalta  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using Representative-Based Clustering for Nearest Neighbor Dataset Editing Christoph F. Eick, vilalta}@cs.uh.edu Abstract The goal of dataset editing in instance-based learning is to remove objects-based clustering algorithms for nearest neighbor dataset editing. We term this approach supervised clustering

Vilalta, Ricardo

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mam represents interactions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Thomas and Mack Concourse Take time before Career Day to find out which companies are represented. Go to the Career  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thomas and Mack Concourse Take time before Career Day to find out which companies are represented of attending employers. Maximize your time by planning a strategy for companies you most want to visit. Make sure you visit companies you are planning on interviewing with after Career Day. Check the websites

Hemmers, Oliver

262

Motor learning of novel dynamics is not represented in a single global coordinate system: evaluation of mixed coordinate representations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. A second experiment, in which we replicated the design of an influential study that had suggested encoding represent novel dynamics while making reaching movements in a robot-rendered force field. By proposing two categorically distinct hypotheses of extrinsic (i.e., Cartesian based) and intrinsic (i.e., joint based

Franklin, David

263

A 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and was published in 1970 as international standard ISOA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar code. International Standard Book Number From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia The International Standard Book Number (ISBN

Kraft, Hanspeter

264

Power & Promise for student aid represents the George Washington University's commitment to the power of education and the promise of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

POWER & PROMISE OVERVIEW Power & Promise for student aid represents the George Washington University's commitment to the power of education and the promise of tomorrow's leaders. Launched in 2009, Power & Promise ensures that qualified students, regardless of financial resources, can take full

Vertes, Akos

265

The Last of the Wild ver. 2 The Last of the Wild represents the least influenced (most  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Last of the Wild ver. 2 Oceania The Last of the Wild represents the least influenced (most wild) areas of major terrestrial biomes. Most wild in each biome are defined as areas with Human Footprint. The Last of the Wild Data set. Available at http://www.sedac.ciesin.columbia.edu/wildareas 0 500 Kilometers

Columbia University

266

The honey bees of Ethiopia represent a new subspecies of Apis mellifera--Apis mellifera simensis n. ssp.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The honey bees of Ethiopia represent a new subspecies of Apis mellifera--Apis mellifera simensis n bees endemic to the volcanic dome system of Ethiopia are described as a new subspecies, Apis mellifera this population. There is no indication for the presence of more than one subspecies of honey bee in Ethiopia

267

Systems Engineering-Energy Systems Technical Electives The following courses represent some of the content currently available university-wide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Systems Engineering-Energy Systems Technical Electives The following courses represent some for the Systems Engineering - Energy Systems graduate programs (provided these courses have not already been used approval, any graduate level courses that are consistent with the System Engineering-Energy Systems degree

268

Representing Process Variation with a Process Family Borislava I. Simidchieva, Lori A. Clarke, and Leon J. Osterweil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Representing Process Variation with a Process Family Borislava I. Simidchieva, Lori A. Clarke. The formalization of process definitions has been an invaluable aid in many domains. However, noticeable variations in processes start to emerge as precise details are added to process definitions. While each such variation

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

269

Interactive Video Cubism Sidney Fels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interactive Video Cubism Sidney Fels Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering University@mic.atr.co.jp ABSTRACT This paper presents an interactive video visualization system. In this visualization video data is considered to be a block of three dimensional data where frames of video data comprise the third dimension

Fels, Sidney S.

270

Representing vapor-liquid equilibrium for an aqueous MEA-CO{sub 2} system using the electrolyte nonrandom-two-liquid model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Following the work of Austgen et al., the electrolyte nonrandom-two-liquid (NRTL) model was applied in a thermodynamically consistent manner to represent the vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) of the aqueous monoethanolamine (MEA)-CO{sub 2} system with rigorous chemical equilibrium consideration. Special attention was given to the accurate VLE description of the system at both absorbing and stripping conditions relevant to most aqueous MEA absorption/stripping processes for CO{sub 2} removal. The influence from chemical equilibrium constants, Henry`s constant, experimental data, and data regression on the representation of the VLE of the system was discussed in detail. The equilibrium constant of the carbamate reversion reaction as well as important interaction parameters of the electrolyte NRTL model were carefully fitted to experimental data. A good agreement between the calculated values and the experimental data was achieved. Moreover, the model with newly fitted parameters was successfully applied to simulate three industrial cases for CO{sub 2} removal using a rate-based approach. The results from this work were compared with those using the model by Austgen et al.

Liu, Y.; Zhang, L.; Watanasiri, S. [Aspen Technology, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)] [Aspen Technology, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Interaction of "rigid" quantum systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We introduce the notion of a "rigid" quantum system as a system with constant relative positions of its nuclei and constant relative distribution of the electrons with respect to the nuclei. In accordance with this definition, a molecule which does not interact with other objects, is a "rigid" quantum system. Molecule is also "rigid" if it interacts with other objects, but the interaction does not change the intrinsic structure of the molecule (or this change can be neglected). Several "rigid" quantum systems interact one with another in the quantum manner. The interaction is ruled by the Schr{\\"o}dinger equation [1] written for all the particles of the systems under consideration. We consider the case when the external potential is zero.

A. A. Kolpakov; A. G. Kolpakov

2013-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

272

Nuclear-fuel-cycle risk assessment: descriptions of representative non-reactor facilities. Sections 1-14  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fuel Cycle Risk Assessment Program was initiated to provide risk assessment methods for assistance in the regulatory process for nuclear fuel cycle facilities other than reactors. This report, the first from the program, defines and describes fuel cycle elements that are being considered in the program. One type of facility (and in some cases two) is described that is representative of each element of the fuel cycle. The descriptions are based on real industrial-scale facilities that are current state-of-the-art, or on conceptual facilities where none now exist. Each representative fuel cycle facility is assumed to be located on the appropriate one of four hypothetical but representative sites described. The fuel cycles considered are for Light Water Reactors with once-through flow of spent fuel, and with plutonium and uranium recycle. Representative facilities for the following fuel cycle elements are described for uranium (or uranium plus plutonium where appropriate): mining, milling, conversion, enrichment, fuel fabrication, mixed-oxide fuel refabrication, fuel reprocessing, spent fuel storage, high-level waste storage, transuranic waste storage, spent fuel and high-level and transuranic waste disposal, low-level and intermediate-level waste disposal, and transportation. For each representative facility the description includes: mainline process, effluent processing and waste management, facility and hardware description, safety-related information and potential alternative concepts for that fuel cycle element. The emphasis of the descriptive material is on safety-related information. This includes: operating and maintenance requirements, input/output of major materials, identification and inventories of hazardous materials (particularly radioactive materials), unit operations involved, potential accident driving forces, containment and shielding, and degree of hands-on operation.

Schneider, K.J.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Perturbative gadgets without strong interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Perturbative gadgets are used to construct a quantum Hamiltonian whose low-energy subspace approximates a given quantum $k$-body Hamiltonian up to an absolute error $\\epsilon$. Typically, gadget constructions involve terms with large interaction strengths of order $\\text{poly}(\\epsilon^{-1})$. Here we present a 2-body gadget construction and prove that it approximates a target many-body Hamiltonian of interaction strength $\\gamma = O(1)$ up to absolute error $\\epsilon\\ll\\gamma$ using interactions of strength $O(\\epsilon)$ instead of the usual inverse polynomial in $\\epsilon$. A key component in our proof is a new condition for the convergence of the perturbation series, allowing our gadget construction to be applied in parallel on multiple many-body terms. We also show how to apply this gadget construction for approximating 3- and $k$-body Hamiltonians. The price we pay for using much weaker interactions is a large overhead in the number of ancillary qubits, and the number of interaction terms per particle, both of which scale as $O(\\text{poly}(\\epsilon^{-1}))$. Our strong-from-weak gadgets have their primary application in complexity theory (QMA hardness of restricted Hamiltonians, a generalized area law counterexample, gap amplification), but could also motivate practical implementations with many weak interactions simulating a much stronger quantum many-body interaction.

Yudong Cao; Daniel Nagaj

2014-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

274

Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ. HCDE 418: User Experience Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may the trade-offs #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course

275

Nonlinear waves in strongly interacting relativistic fluids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

During the past decades the study of strongly interacting fluids experienced a tremendous progress. In the relativistic heavy ion accelerators, specially the RHIC and LHC colliders, it became possible to study not only fluids made of hadronic matter but also fluids of quarks and gluons. Part of the physics program of these machines is the observation of waves in this strongly interacting medium. From the theoretical point of view, these waves are often treated with li-nearized hydrodynamics. In this text we review the attempts to go beyond linearization. We show how to use the Reductive Perturbation Method to expand the equations of (ideal and viscous) relativistic hydrodynamics to obtain nonlinear wave equations. These nonlinear wave equations govern the evolution of energy density perturbations (in hot quark gluon plasma) or baryon density perturbations (in cold quark gluon plasma and nuclear matter). Different nonlinear wave equations, such as the breaking wave, Korteweg-de Vries and Burgers equations, are obtained from different equations of state (EOS). In nuclear matter, the Walecka EOS may lead to a KdV equation. We explore equations of state such as those extracted from the MIT Bag Model and from QCD in the mean field theory approach. Some of these equations are integrable and have analytical solitonic solutions. We derive these equations also in spherical and cylindrical coordinates. We extend the analysis to two and three dimensions to obtain the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) equation, which is the generalization of the KdV. The KP is also integrable and presents analytical solitonic solutions. In viscous relativistic hydrodynamics we have second order patial derivatives which physically represent dissipation terms. We present numerical solutions and their corresponding algorithms for the cases where the equations are not integrable.

D. A. Fogaça; F. S. Navarra; L. G. Ferreira Filho

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

276

The impact of alternative farm policy proposals for the 1990 Farm Bill on representative beef cattle ranches in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of cows supported on 2500 acres of grass pasture and 300 acres of cropland. Alternative dairy policies analyzed were a Trigger Price, a Dairy Termination, a Production Quota, and a Fixed Price Support. The Trigger Price policy represents a continuation... purchases exceed 15. 0 billion pounds milk equivalent. The Production Quota policy requires that milk production remain at the level necessary to hold milk price at tbe 1989 level ($10. 60) per cwt by reducing cow numbers. The Fixed Price Support policy...

Hartman, David Allen

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

A global approach of the representativity concept: Application on a high-conversion light water reactor MOX lattice case  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of new types of reactor and the increase in the safety specifications and requirements induce an enhancement in both nuclear data knowledge and a better understanding of the neutronic properties of the new systems. This enhancement is made possible using ad hoc critical mock-up experiments. The main difficulty is to design these experiments in order to obtain the most valuable information. Its quantification is usually made by using representativity and transposition concepts. These theories enable to extract some information about a quantity of interest (an integral parameter) on a configuration, but generally a posteriori. This paper presents a more global approach of this theory, with the idea of optimizing the representativity of a new experiment, and its transposition a priori, based on a multiparametric approach. Using a quadratic sum, we show the possibility to define a global representativity which permits to take into account several quantities of interest at the same time. The maximization of this factor gives information about all quantities of interest. An optimization method of this value in relation to technological parameters (over-clad diameter, atom concentration) is illustrated on a high-conversion light water reactor MOX lattice case. This example tackles the problematic of plutonium experiment for the plutonium aging and a solution through the optimization of both the over-clad and the plutonium content. (authors)

Santos, N. D.; Blaise, P.; Santamarina, A. [CEA, DEN/DER/SPRC Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Succinct non-Interactive arguments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Succinct non-interactive arguments (SNARGs), also known as "CS proofs" [Micali, FOCS 1994], enable verifying NP statements with much lower complexity than required for classical NP verification (in fact, with complexity ...

Chiesa, Alessandro

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Interactive crayon rendering for animation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis describes the design and implementation of an interactive, nonphotorealistic rendering system for three-dimensional computer animation. The system provides a two-dimensional interface for coloring successive frames of animation using a...

Halstead, Howard John IV

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

280

Non-standard Neutrino Interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Theories beyond the Standard Model must respect its gauge symmetry. This implies strict constraints on the possible models of Non-Standard Neutrino Interactions (NSIs). We review here the present status of NSIs from the point of view of effective field theory. Our recent work on the restrictions implied by Standard Model gauge invariance is provided along with some examples of possible gauge invariant models featuring non-standard interactions.

D. Hernandez

2009-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mam represents interactions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Volunteer Day Countries Represented  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Haiti Iran Korea Kuwait Russia Saudi Arabia Spain Taiwan Turkey Venezuela Vietnam Manners and Culture Q's warm-weather fashion, and we have a lot of warm w

Pilyugin, Sergei S.

282

Characteristics Representative Approximately  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, these rays can be detected in other ways. X rays, for instance, change the color of photographic film. So the film. The beads in this activity work like X-ray film. They contain pigments that change color when, such as a desk lamp, an overhead projector, or fluorescent lights in the classroom. If you have a window in your

283

Representative Control Gates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

& Integrated - Operationaly Certified As-Deployed Baseline Mission Analysis Risk, Cost, etc Tools & MethodsUnderstand Customer Identify Feasible Alternatives Final Design Disposal Management Decision - System Deployed Requirements Concept Definition Analysis & Evaluation Definition Flowdown Criteria & Priorities Peer Review MCR

Rhoads, James

284

APS Division Safety Representatives  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01) (See95TI07)Operations2AP-XPS MeasuresIrradiationAdvanced

285

Volunteer Day Countries Represented  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, but it really isn't. These three recreation facilities are supported by a portion of the additional fees full Board. Retirement Home for Horses-- Help care for aging and abandoned horses in a fun environment

Pilyugin, Sergei S.

286

Climate Funding Opportunitiesi NOTE: These opportunities represent a snapshot of what is currently available (as of January 15, 2012).  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Prediction using Earth System Models Funding Opportunity Number: 12-522 This funding opportunity supports-generation" Earth System Models that include coupled and interactive representations of such things as ocean, and biological sciences). The long-term goal of this opportunity is to extend current Earth System Modeling

Sheridan, Jennifer

287

Farm-level economic impacts of the House of Representatives Farm Bill Proposal, H.R. 2646, and the Senate Farm Bill Proposal, S. 1731, for representative rice farms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements lor I he degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2002 Major Subject: Agricultural Economics FARM-LEVEL ECONOMIC IMPACTS OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES FARM BILL PROPOSAL, H. R... as to style and content by: t lc James Richardson (Chair of Co ii. ie David Anderson (Member) Clai Nix (M mber ~Gene Nelson (Head of Department] August 2002 Major Subject: Agricultural Economics ABSTRACT Farm-Iwvei Economic Impacts of the House...

Houston, Christy Michelle

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Technology Enhanced Interaction Framework Kewalin Angkananon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technology Enhanced Interaction Framework Kewalin Angkananon ECS University of Southampton interaction framework to help design technology to support communication between people and improve interactions between people, technology and objects, particularly in complex situations. A review of existing

289

Determination of capillary displacement pressure and representative average capillary pressure vs. depth in shally sandstones from well logs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research presents a method whereby the capillary displacement pressure Pcd and the representative average capillary pressure in shaly sandstone reservoirs exhibits continuous information vs. depth from well logs. By the aid of special core analysis, correlation functions were obtained that relate the capillary characteristics of the reservoir rock to its lithologic development. Since the lithologic influence factor is a well log-derived parameter the correlations then were used to determine by means of well logs the capillary displacement and average capillary pressures for borehole sections where special core analysis is not available. This technique has been developed and applied to the shaly sandstone reservoir of the Sarir oil field in Libya.

Barlai, Z.; Berruin, N.A.; Mawla, R.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Dynamical Properties of Interaction Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Network dynamics are typically presented as a time series of network properties captured at each period. The current approach examines the dynamical properties of transmission via novel measures on an integrated, temporally extended network representation of interaction data across time. Because it encodes time and interactions as network connections, static network measures can be applied to this "temporal web" to reveal features of the dynamics themselves. Here we provide the technical details and apply it to agent-based implementations of the well-known SEIR and SEIS epidemiological models.

Bramson, Aaron

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Cosmology and the weak interaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The weak interaction plays a critical role in modern Big Bang cosmology. This review will emphasize two of its most publicized cosmological connections: Big Bang nucleosynthesis and Dark Matter. The first of these is connected to the cosmological prediction of Neutrino Flavours, N{sub {nu}} {approximately} 3 which is now being confirmed at SLC and LEP. The second is interrelated to the whole problem of galaxy and structure formation in the universe. This review will demonstrate the role of the weak interaction both for dark matter candidates and for the problem of generating seeds to form structure. 87 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

Schramm, D.N. (Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA)):(Chicago Univ., IL (USA))

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

The coincidence problem in the scenario of dark energy interacting with two fluids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A cosmological model of dark energy interacting with dark matter and another general component of the universe is considered. The evolution equations for coincidence parameters r and s, which represent the ratios between the dark energy and the matter and the other cosmic fluid, respectively, are analyzed in terms of the stability of stationary solutions. The obtained general results allow to shed some light on the coincidence problem and in the equations of state of the three interacting fluids, due to the constraints imposes by the stability of the solutions. We found that for an interaction proportional to the sum of the DE density and the third fluid density, the hypothetical fluid must have positive pressure, which leads naturally to a cosmological scenario with radiation, unparticle or even some form of warm DM as the third interacting fluid.

Norman Cruz; Samuel Lepe; Francisco Pena

2009-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

293

Interpreting scattering wave functions in the presence of energy-dependent interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In scattering theory, the squared relative wave function $|\\phi({\\bf q},{\\bf r})|^2$ is often interpreted as a weight, due to final-state interactions, describing the probability enhancement for emission with asymptotic relative momentum $q$. An equivalence relation also links the integral of the squared wave function over all coordinate space to the density of states. This relation, which plays an important role in understanding two-particle correlation phenomenology, is altered for the case where the potential is energy dependent, as is assumed in various forms of reaction theory. Here, the modification to the equivalence relation is derived, and it is shown that the squared wave function should be augmented by a additional factor if it is to represent the emission enhancement for final-state interactions. Examples with relativistic vector interactions, e.g., the Coulomb interaction, are presented.

Scott Pratt

2007-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

294

Cosmological implications of interacting polytropic gas dark energy model in non-flat universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The polytropic gas model is investigated as an interacting dark energy scenario. The cosmological implications of the model including the evolution of EoS parameter $w_{\\Lambda}$, energy density $\\Omega_{\\Lambda}$ and deceleration parameter $q$ are investigated. We show that, depending on the parameter of model, the interacting polytropic gas can behave as a quintessence or phantom dark energy. In this model, the phantom divide is crossed from below to up. The evolution of $q$ in the context of polytropic gas dark energy model represents the decelerated phase at the early time and accelerated phase later. The singularity of this model is also discussed. Eventually, we establish the correspondence between interacting polytropic gas model with tachyon, K-essence and dilaton scalar fields. The potential and the dynamics of these scalar field models are reconstructed according to the evolution of interacting polytropic gas.

M. Malekjani; A. Khodam-Mohammadi; M. Taji

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

295

UBIQUITOUS COMPUTING AND INTERACTION Kaj Grnbk, Professor,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

actuator based interaction >"Gamification" of training >Performance measurement >In near future also focus

296

PHASE TRANSFORMATIONS, STABILITY AND MATERIALS INTERACTIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

engine) Environmental Interactions Ceramic Membrane Development Research Opportunities: •Fundamentals of hydrogen-

Morris, Jr., J.W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Digital Soil Mapping: Interactions with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 21 Digital Soil Mapping: Interactions with and Applications for Hydropedology J.A. Thompson,1, * S. Roecker,2 S. Grunwald3 and P.R. Owens4 ABSTRACT Spatial information on soils, particularly hydrologic and hydromorphic soil properties, is used to understand and assess soil water retention, flooding

Grunwald, Sabine

298

Rotational ratchets with dipolar interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report results from a computer simulation study on the rotational ratchet effect in systems of magnetic particles interacting via dipolar interactions. The ratchet effect consists of directed rotations of the particles in an oscillating magnetic field, which lacks a net rotating component. Our investigations are based on Brownian dynamics simulations of such many-particle systems. We investigate the influence of both, the random and deterministic contributions to the equations of motion on the ratchet effect. As a main result, we show that dipolar interactions can have an enhancing as well as a dampening effect on the ratchet behavior depending on the dipolar coupling strength of the system under consideration. The enhancement is shown to be caused by an increase in the effective field on a particle generated by neighboring magnetic particles, while the dampening is due to restricted rotational motion in the effective field. Moreover, we find a non-trivial influence of the short-range, repulsive interaction between the particles.

Sebastian Jäger; Sabine H. L. Klapp

2012-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

299

Interacting new generalized Chaplygin gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have presented a model in which the new generalized Chaplygin gas interacts with matter. We find that there exists a stable scaling solution at late times in the evolution of the universe. Moreover, the phantom crossing scenario is observed in this model.

Mubasher Jamil

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

300

Mapping Interactions Within the Evolving  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laboratory School of Library and Information Science Indiana University, Bloomington, IN http://cns.iu.edu 13 #12;Research Questions · What interactions are made visible by analysis of formal communication messages over 2 years (Jan. `09 to Jan. `11) ­ Subscription lists, retrieved toward the middle and end

Menczer, Filippo

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mam represents interactions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Numerical Modelling of Interaction between  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

plasma in arc furnace used in toxic waste destruction Plasma etching semiconductor High intensity arc lamp Electrode temperature after 1ms of arcing with power density of 3x109 W.m-2 Electrode temperatureNumerical Modelling of Interaction between the Electric Arc and Electrodes Principal researcher: W

Sóbester, András

302

Precision Tests of Electroweak Interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The status of the precision tests of the electroweak interactions is reviewed in this paper. An emphasis is put on the Standard Model analysis based on measurements at LEP/SLC and the Tevatron. The results of the measurements of the electroweak mixing angle in the NuTeV experiment and the future prospects are discussed.

Akhundov, Arif [Institute of Physics, Azerbaijan Academy of Sciences, 370143 Baku (Azerbaijan); Departamento de Fisica Teorica and IFIC, Universidad de Valencia-CSIC, 46100 Valencia (Spain)

2008-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

303

Teleportation based on control of anisotropic Ising interaction in three dimensions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Possibly, teleportation is the most representative quantum algorithm in the public domain. Nevertheless than this quantum procedure transmits only information than objects, its coverage is still very limited and easily subject to errors. Based on a fine control of quantum resources, particularly those entangled, the research to extend its coverage and flexibility is open, in particular on matter based quantum systems. This work shows how anisotropic Ising interactions could be used as natural basis for this procedure, based on a sequence of magnetic pulses driving Ising interaction, stating results in specialized quantum gates designed for magnetic systems.

Francisco Delgado

2015-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

304

A literature review of actinide-carbonate mineral interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical retardation of actinides in groundwater systems is a potentially important mechanism for assessing the performance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a facility intended to demonstrate safe disposal of transuranic waste. Rigorous estimation of chemical retardation during transport through the Culebra Dolomite, a water-bearing unit overlying the WIPP, requires a mechanistic understanding of chemical reactions between dissolved elements and mineral surfaces. This report represents a first step toward this goal by examining the literature for pertinent experimental studies of actinide-carbonate interactions. A summary of existing models is given, along with the types of experiments on which these models are based. Articles pertaining to research into actinide interactions with carbonate minerals are summarized. Select articles involving trace element-carbonate mineral interactions are also reviewed and may serve as templates for future research. A bibliography of related articles is included. Americium(III), and its nonradioactive analog neodymium(III), partition strongly from aqueous solutions into carbonate minerals. Recent thermodynamic, kinetic, and surface studies show that Nd is preferentially removed from solution, forming a Nd-Ca carbonate solid solution. Neptunium(V) is rapidly removed from solution by carbonates. Plutonium incorporation into carbonates is complicated by multiple oxidation states. Little research has been done on the radium(H) and thorium(IV) carbonate systems. Removal of uranyl ion from solution by calcite is limited to monolayer surface coverage.

Stout, D.L. [Missouri Univ., Columbia, MO (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences; Carroll, S.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Flame-wall interaction simulation in a turbulent channel flow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The interaction between turbulent premixed flames and channel walls is studied. Combustion is represented by a simple irreversible reaction with a large activation temperature. A low heat release assumption is used, but feedback to the flowfield can be allowed through viscosity changes. The effect of wall distance on local and global flame structure is investigated. Quenching distances and maximum wall heat fluxed computed in laminar cases are compared to DNS results. It is found that quenching distances decrease and maximum heat fluxes increase relative to laminar flame values, scaling with the turbulent strain rate. It is shown that these effects are due to large coherent structures which push flame elements towards the wall. The effect of wall strain in flame-wall interaction is studied in a stagnation line flow; this is used to explain the DNS results. The effects of the flame on the flow through viscosity changes is studied. It is also shown that remarkable flame events are produced by flame interaction with a horseshoe vortex: burned gases are pushed towards the wall at high speed and induce quenching and high wall heat flux while fresh gases are expelled from the wall region and form finger-like structures. Effects of the wall on flame surface density are investigated.

Bruneaux, G.; Akselvoll, K.; Poinsot, T.; Ferziger, J.H.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Accuracy of first-principles lateral interactions: Oxygen at Pd(100) Yongsheng Zhang, Volker Blum, and Karsten Reuter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a first-principles lattice-gas Hamiltonian LGH approach to determine the lateral interactions between O the finite LGH expansion and from the approximate exchange-correlation xc functional underlying the em assumption that the ordering energies can be represented by a sum of pair terms. Restricting our LGH

307

An Interacting Dark Energy Model for the Expansion History of the Universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We explore a model of interacting dark energy where the dark energy density is related by the holographic principle to the Hubble parameter, and the decay of the dark energy into matter occurs at a rate comparable to the current value of the Hubble parameter. We find this gives a good fit to the observational data supporting an accelerating Universe, and the model represents a possible alternative interpretation of the expansion history of the Universe.

Micheal S. Berger; Hamed Shojaei

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

308

Dimuon production in hadronic interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the new data submitted to the XXI International Conference on High Energy Physics on high mass dimuon production in ..pi../sup -/N and anti pN interactions by Fermilab Experiment E-537, CERN Experiment NA3 and Fermilab Experiment E-326. Successes and failures of the Drell-Yan model and low order QCD are reviewed. New results on the production of the J/psi from E-537, NA3 and CERN experiment WAll are also reported.

Cox, B.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

3 D interactive pictorial maps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of simplififcation and exaggeration.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 8 3 D polygonal text in Maya. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 9 Final 3 D model of Italy with text. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 10 Top view of 3 D model of France... the files in a format that is suitable for web viewing. 15 CHAPTER IV METHODOLOGY There are three major steps to making an interactive pictorial map. The fifrst step is to build the 3 D model using a modeling software, Maya. The second step is to apply...

Naz, Asma

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

310

Surprising Quasiparticle Interactions in Graphene  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystalline GalliumSuppression ofSurprising Quasiparticle Interactions

311

Interaction of Polar and Nonpolar Organic Pollutants with Soil Organic Matter: Sorption Experiments and Molecular Dynamics Simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The fate of organic pollutants in the environment is influenced by several factors including the type and strength of their interactions with soil components especially SOM. However, a molecular level answer to the question How organic pollutants interact with SOM? is lacking. In order to explore mechanisms of this interaction, we have developed a new SOM model followed by carrying out molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in parallel with sorption experiments. The new SOM model comprises free SOM functional groups (carboxylic acid and naphthalene) as well as SOM cavities (with two different sizes), representing the soil voids, containing the same SOM functional groups. To examine the effect of the hydrophobicity on the interaction, the organic pollutants hexachlorobenzene (HCB, non-polar) and sulfanilamide (SAA, polar) were considered. The experimental and the theoretical outcomes explored four major points regarding sorption of SAA and HCB on soil. 1. The interaction depends on the SOM chemical composition mo...

Ahmed, Ashour A; Aziz, Saadullah G; Hilal, Rifaat H; Elroby, Shaaban A; Al-Youbi, Abdulrahman O; Leinweber, Peter; Kühn, Oliver

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Interaction blending equations enhance reformulated gasoline profitability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The interaction approach to gasoline blending gives refiners an accurate, simple means of re-evaluating blending equations and increasing profitability. With reformulated gasoline specifications drawing near, a detailed description of this approach, in the context of reformulated gasoline is in order. Simple mathematics compute blending values from interaction equations and interaction coefficients between mixtures. A timely example of such interactions is: blending a mixture of catalytically cracked gasoline plus light straight run (LSR) from one tank with alkylate plus reformate from another. This paper discusses blending equations, using interactions, mixture interactions, other blending problems, and obtaining equations.

Snee, R.D. (Joiner Associates, Madison, WI (United States)); Morris, W.E.; Smith, W.E.

1994-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

313

Crystal structures of MW1337R and lin2004: Representatives of a novel protein family that adopt a four-helical bundle fold  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To extend the structural coverage of proteins with unknown functions, we targeted a novel protein family (Pfam accession number PF08807, DUF1798) for which we proposed and determined the structures of two representative members. The MW1337R gene of Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus Rosenbach (Wood 46) encodes a protein with a molecular weight of 13.8 kDa (residues 1-116) and a calculated isoelectric point of 5.15. The lin2004 gene of the nonspore-forming bacterium Listeria innocua Clip11262 encodes a protein with a molecular weight of 14.6 kDa (residues 1-121) and a calculated isoelectric point of 5.45. MW1337R and lin2004, as well as their homologs, which, so far, have been found only in Bacillus, Staphylococcus, Listeria, and related genera (Geobacillus, Exiguobacterium, and Oceanobacillus), have unknown functions and are annotated as hypothetical proteins. The genomic contexts of MW1337R and lin2004 are similar and conserved in related species. In prokaryotic genomes, most often, functionally interacting proteins are coded by genes, which are colocated in conserved operons. Proteins from the same operon as MW1337R and lin2004 either have unknown functions (i.e., belong to DUF1273, Pfam accession number PF06908) or are similar to ypsB from Bacillus subtilis. The function of ypsB is unclear, although it has a strong similarity to the N-terminal region of DivIVA, which was characterized as a bifunctional protein with distinct roles during vegetative growth and sporulation. In addition, members of the DUF1273 family display distant sequence similarity with the DprA/Smf protein, which acts downstream of the DNA uptake machinery, possibly in conjunction with RecA. The RecA activities in Bacillus subtilis are modulated by RecU Holliday-junction resolvase. In all analyzed cases, the gene coding for RecU is in the vicinity of MW1337R, lin2004, or their orthologs, but on a different operon located in the complementary DNA strand. Here, we report the crystal structures of MW1337R and lin2004, which were determined using the semiautomated, high-throughput pipeline of the Joint Center for Structural Genomics (JCSG), part of the National Institute of General Medical Sciences Protein Structure Initiative.

Kozbial, Piotr; Xu, Qingping; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; McMullan, Daniel; Krishna, S. Sri; Miller, Mitchell D.; Abdubek, Polat; Acosta, Claire; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Carlton, Dennis; Clayton, Thomas; Deller, Marc; Duan, Lian; Elias, Ylva; Elsliger, Marc-André; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grzechnik, Slawomir K.; Hale, Joanna; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Koesema, Eric; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; Morse, Andrew T.; Murphy, Kevin D.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Oommachen, Silvya; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; Spraggon, Glen; Trout, Christina V.; ban den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; White, Aprilfawn; Wolf, Guenter; Zubieta, Chloe; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A. (Scripps); (SSRL); (JCSG); (UCSD); (Burnham)

2009-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

314

Computer as a physical system: a microscopic quantum mechanical Hamiltonian model of computers represented by Turing machines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A microscopic quantum mechanical model of computers as represented by Turing machines is constructed. It is shown that for each number N and Turing machine Q there exists a Hamiltonian H/sub N//sup Q/ and a class of appropriate initial states such that, if PSI/sub Q//sup N/(0) is such an initial state, then PSI/sub Q//sup N/(t) = exp(-iH/sub N//sup Q/t) PSI/sub Q//sup N/(0) correctly describes at times t/sub 3/, t/sub 6/,..., t/sub 3N/ model states that correspond to the completion of the first, second,..., Nth computation step of Q. The model parameters can be adjusted so that for an arbitrary time interval ..delta.. around t/sub 3/, t/sub 6/,..., t/sub 3N/, the machine part of PSI/sub Q//sup N/(t) is stationary. 1 figure.

Benioff, P.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Characterization of Representative Materials in Support of Safe, Long Term Storage of Surplus Plutonium in DOE-STD-3013 Containers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Surveillance and Monitoring Program is a joint Los Alamos National Laboratory/Savannah River Site effort funded by the Department of Energy-Environmental Management to provide the technical basis for the safe, long-term storage (up to 50 years) of over 6 metric tons of plutonium stored in over 5,000 DOE-STD-3013 containers at various facilities around the DOE complex. The majority of this material is plutonium that is surplus to the nuclear weapons program, and much of it is destined for conversion to mixed oxide fuel for use in US nuclear power plants. The form of the plutonium ranges from relatively pure metal and oxide to very impure oxide. The performance of the 3013 containers has been shown to depend on moisture content and on the levels, types and chemical forms of the impurities. The oxide materials that present the greatest challenge to the storage container are those that contain chloride salts. Other common impurities include oxides and other compounds of calcium, magnesium, iron, and nickel. Over the past 15 years the program has collected a large body of experimental data on 54 samples of plutonium, with 53 chosen to represent the broader population of materials in storage. This paper summarizes the characterization data, moisture analysis, particle size, surface area, density, wattage, actinide composition, trace element impurity analysis, and shelf life surveillance data and includes origin and process history information. Limited characterization data on fourteen nonrepresentative samples is also presented.

Narlesky, Joshua E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stroud, Mary Ann [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith, Paul Herrick [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wayne, David M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mason, Richard E. [MET-1: ACTINIDE PROCESSING SUPPORT; Worl, Laura A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

316

Measuring the Monitoring User Interactive Experiences on Franklin Interactive Nodes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping the Nanoscale LandscapeImportsBG4,Measurements+ CrossInteractive

317

Introduction Counterpropagating interactions Numerical methods Co-propagating interactions A result on energy transfer Solitary water wave interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on energy transfer Solitary water wave interactions Walter Craig Department of Mathematics & Statistics (energy loss) and S (amplitude change). Walter Craig McMaster University Solitary wave interactions #12 (energy loss) and S (amplitude change). Walter Craig McMaster University Solitary wave interactions #12

Craig, Walter

318

"deinewahl02" A Demonstrator for Interactive Television  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"deinewahl02" A Demonstrator for Interactive Television Dr. Sepideh Chakaveh Olaf Geuer Fraunhofer Institute Media Communication Fraunhofer Institute Media Communication Competence Center Interactive innovation. In here we are considering to reverse this process, i.e. implementing internet type applications

Masthoff, Judith

319

Ultracold Fermi gas with repulsive interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents results from experiments of ultracold atomic Fermi gases with repulsive interaction. Itinerant ferromagnetism was studied by simulating the Stoner model with a strongly interacting Fermi gas of ultracold ...

Lee, Ye-Ryoung

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Arm-Hand-Finger Video Game Interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Despite the growing popularity and expansion of video game interaction techniques and research in the area of hand gesture recognition, the application of hand gesture video game interaction using arm, hand, and finger motion has not been...

Logsdon, Drew Anthony

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mam represents interactions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Stability Index of Interaction forms Joseph Abdou  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stability Index of Interaction forms Joseph Abdou December 15, 2008 Abstract An interaction form, 106-112 boulevard de l'H^opital 75647 Paris Cedex 13 - France; email: abdou@univ-paris1.fr 1 halshs

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

322

Africa Infrastructure Country Diagnostic Documents: Interactive...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Not Available Website: infrastructureafrica.orgdocumentstoolslistinteractive-pdf-maps Transport Toolkit Region(s): Africa & Middle East Interactive infrastructure maps by...

323

Yakima River Species Interactions Studies, Annual Report 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning, and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the eleventh of a series of progress reports that address species interactions research and supplementation monitoring of fishes in response to supplementation of salmon and steelhead in the upper Yakima River basin. This progress report summarizes data collected between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2002. These data were compared to findings from previous years to identify general trends and make preliminary comparisons. Interactions between fish produced as part of the YKFP, termed target species or stocks, and other species or stocks (non-target taxa) may alter the population status of non-target species or stocks. This may occur through a variety of mechanisms, such as competition, predation, and interbreeding. Furthermore, the success of a supplementation program may be limited by strong ecological interactions such as predation or competition. Our work has adapted to new information needs as the YKFP has evolved. Initially, our work focused on interactions between anadromous steelhead and resident rainbow trout (for explanation see Pearsons et al. 1993), then interactions between spring chinook salmon and rainbow trout, and recently interactions between spring chinook salmon and highly valued nontarget taxa (NTT; e.g., bull trout); and interactions between strong interactor taxa (e.g., those that may strongly influence the abundance of spring chinook salmon; e.g., smallmouth bass) and spring chinook salmon. The change in emphasis to spring chinook salmon has largely been influenced by the shift in the target species planned for supplementation (Bonneville Power Administration et al. 1996; Fast and Craig 1997). Originally, steelhead and spring chinook salmon were proposed to be supplemented simultaneously (Clune and Dauble 1991). However, due in part to the uncertainties associated with interactions between steelhead and rainbow trout, spring chinook and coho salmon were supplemented before steelhead. This redirection in the species to be supplemented has prompted us to prioritize interactions between spring chinook and rainbow trout, while beginning to investigate other ecological interactions of concern. Prefacility monitoring of variables such as rainbow trout density, distribution, and size structure was continued and monitoring of other NTT was initiated in 1997. This report is organized into two chapters that represent major topics associated with monitoring stewardship, utilization, and strong interactor taxa. Chapter 1 reports the results of non-target taxa monitoring after the fourth release of hatchery salmon smolts in the upper Yakima Basin. Chapter 2 describes predation on juvenile salmonids by smallmouth bass and channel catfish in the lower Yakima River.

Pearsons, Todd N.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

An Introduction to Wave-Current Interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-scale wave focusing across a storm can re-direct the wind-stress? #12;1. Adiabatic interaction StartAn Introduction to Wave-Current Interactions Jerry Smith, MPL-SIO-UCSD jasmith@ucsd.edu http just want to hold up your hand. #12;Some Questions in Wave-Current Interaction Physics 1. Adiabatic

Smith, Jerome A.

325

Multisurface Interaction in the WILD Room  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- 1 - Multisurface Interaction in the WILD Room Michel Beaudouin-Lafon, Stéphane Huot, Mathieu University Abstract The WILD room (wall-sized interaction with large datasets) serves as a testbed. (2012), "Multisurface Interaction in the WILD Room", IEEE Computer, vol 45, nº 4, pp. 48-56. DOI

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

326

Turbulence transport with nonlocal interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This preliminary report describes a variety of issues in turbulence transport analysis with particular emphasis on closure procedures that are nonlocal in wave-number and/or physical space. Anomalous behavior of the transport equations for large scale parts of the turbulence spectrum are resolved by including the physical space nonlocal interactions. Direct and reverse cascade processes in wave-number space are given a much richer potential for realistic description by the nonlocal formulations. The discussion also describes issues, many still not resolved, regarding new classes of self-similar form functions.

Linn, R.R.; Clark, T.T.; Harlow, F.H.; Turner, L.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Stochastic pump of interacting particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the overdamped motion of Brownian particles, interacting via particle exclusion, in an external potential that varies with time and space. We show that periodic potentials that maintain specific position-dependent phase relations generate time-averaged directed current of particles. We obtain analytic results for a lattice version of the model using a recently developed perturbative approach. Many interesting features like particle-hole symmetry, current reversal with changing density, and system-size dependence of current are obtained. We propose possible experiments to test our predictions.

Chaudhuri, Debasish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Stochastic pump of interacting particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the overdamped motion of Brownian particles, interacting via particle exclusion, in an external potential that varies with time and space. We show that periodic potentials that maintain specific position-dependent phase relations generate time-averaged directed current of particles. We obtain analytic results for a lattice version of the model using a recently developed perturbative approach. Many interesting features like particle-hole symmetry, current reversal with changing density, and system-size dependence of current are obtained. We propose possible experiments to test our predictions.

Debasish Chaudhuri; Abhishek Dhar

2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

329

Surprising Quasiparticle Interactions in Graphene  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystalline GalliumSuppression ofSurprising Quasiparticle Interactions in

330

Meeting the Radiative Forcing Targets of the Representative Concentration Pathways in a World with Agricultural Climate Impacts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study assesses how climate impacts on agriculture may change the evolution of the agricultural and energy systems in meeting the end-of-century radiative forcing targets of the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs). We build on the recently completed ISI-MIP exercise that has produced global gridded estimates of future crop yields for major agricultural crops using climate model projections of the RCPs from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5). For this study we use the bias-corrected outputs of the HadGEM2-ES climate model as inputs to the LPJmL crop growth model, and the outputs of LPJmL to modify inputs to the GCAM integrated assessment model. Our results indicate that agricultural climate impacts generally lead to an increase in global cropland, as compared with corresponding emissions scenarios that do not consider climate impacts on agricultural productivity. This is driven mostly by negative impacts on wheat, rice, other grains, and oil crops. Still, including agricultural climate impacts does not significantly increase the costs or change the technological strategies of global, whole-system emissions mitigation. In fact, to meet the most aggressive climate change mitigation target (2.6 W/m2 in 2100), the net mitigation costs are slightly lower when agricultural climate impacts are considered. Key contributing factors to these results are (a) low levels of climate change in the low-forcing scenarios, (b) adaptation to climate impacts, simulated in GCAM through inter-regional shifting in the production of agricultural goods, and (c) positive average climate impacts on bioenergy crop yields.

Kyle, G. Page; Mueller, C.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Thomson, Allison M.

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

331

PACAP Interactions in the Mouse Brain: Implications for Behavioral and Other Disorders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As an activator of adenylate cyclase, the neuropeptide Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase Activating Peptide (PACAP) impacts levels of cyclic AMP, a key second messenger available in brain cells. PACAP is involved in certain adult behaviors. To elucidate PACAP interactions, a compendium of microarrays representing mRNA expression in the adult mouse whole brain was pooled from the Phenogen database for analysis. A regulatory network was computed based on mutual information between gene pairs using gene expression data across the compendium. Clusters among genes directly linked to PACAP, and probable interactions between corresponding proteins were computed. Database 'experts' affirmed some of the inferred relationships. The findings suggest ADCY7 is probably the adenylate cyclase isoform most relevant to PACAP's action. They also support intervening roles for kinases including GSK3B, PI 3-kinase, SGK3 and AMPK. Other high-confidence interactions are hypothesized for future testing. This new information has implications for certain behavioral and other disorders.

Acquaah-Mensah, George; Taylor, Ronald C.; Bhave, Sanjiv V.

2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

332

Compact submanifolds supporting singular interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A quantum particle moving under the influence of singular interactions on embedded surfaces furnish an interesting example from the spectral point of view. In these problems, the possible occurrence of a bound-state is perhaps the most important aspect. Such systems can be introduced as quadratic forms and generically they do not require renormalization. Yet an alternative path through the resolvent is also beneficial to study various properties. In the present work, we address these issues for compact surfaces embedded in a class of ambient manifolds. We discover that there is an exact bound state solution written in terms of the heat kernel of the ambient manifold for a range of coupling strengths. Moreover, we develop techniques to estimate bounds on the ground state energy when several surfaces, each of which admits a bound state solution, coexist. -- Highlights: •Schrödinger operator with singular interactions supported on compact submanifolds. •Exact bound-state solution in terms of the heat kernel of the ambient manifold. •Generalization of the variational approach to a collection of submanifolds. •Existence of a lower bound for a unique ground state energy.

Kaynak, Burak Tevfik, E-mail: burak.kaynak@boun.edu.tr; Teoman Turgut, O., E-mail: turgutte@boun.edu.tr

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

333

Quantum Walk of Two Interacting Bosons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the effect of interactions on the bosonic two-particle quantum walk and its corresponding spatial correlations. The combined effect of interactions and Hanbury-Brown Twiss interference results in unique spatial correlations which depend on the strength of the interaction, but not on its sign. The results are explained in light of the two-particle spectrum and the physics of attractively and repulsively bound pairs. We experimentally measure the weak interaction limit of these effects in nonlinear photonic lattices. Finally, we discuss an experimental approach to observe the strong interaction limit using single atoms in optical lattices.

Yoav Lahini; Mor Verbin; Sebastian D. Huber; Yaron Bromberg; Rami Pugatch; Yaron Silberberg

2011-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

334

Analytic energy gradients for constrained DFT-configuration interaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The constrained density functional theory-configuration interaction (CDFT-CI) method has previously been used to calculate ground-state energies and barrier heights, and to describe electronic excited states, in particular conical intersections. However, the method has been limited to evaluating the electronic energy at just a single nuclear configuration, with the gradient of the energy being available only via finite difference. In this paper, we present analytic gradients of the CDFT-CI energy with respect to nuclear coordinates, which gives the potential for accurate geometry optimization and molecular dynamics on both the ground and excited electronic states, a realm which is currently quite challenging for electronic structure theory. We report the performance of CDFT-CI geometry optimization for representative reaction transition states as well as molecules in an excited state. The overall accuracy of CDFT-CI for computing barrier heights is essentially unchanged whether the energies are evaluated at geometries obtained from quadratic configuration-interaction singles and doubles (QCISD) or CDFT-CI, indicating that CDFT-CI produces very good reaction transition states. These results open up tantalizing possibilities for future work on excited states.

Kaduk, Benjamin; Tsuchimochi, Takashi; Van Voorhis, Troy, E-mail: tvan@mit.edu [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

335

Interactive graphical tools for three-dimensional mesh redistribution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three-dimensional meshes modeling nonlinear problems such as sheet metal forming, metal forging, heat transfer during welding, the propagation of microwaves through gases, and automobile crashes require highly refined meshes in local areas to accurately represent areas of high curvature, stress, and strain. These locally refined areas develop late in the simulation and/or move during the course of the simulation, thus making it difficult to predict their exact location. This thesis is a systematic study of new tools scientists can use with redistribution algorithms to enhance the solution results and reduce the time to build, solve, and analyze nonlinear finite element problems. Participatory design techniques including Contextual Inquiry and Design were used to study and analyze the process of solving such problems. This study and analysis led to the in-depth understanding of the types of interactions performed by FEM scientists. Based on this understanding, a prototype tool was designed to support these interactions. Scientists participated in evaluating the design as well as the implementation of the prototype tool. The study, analysis, prototype tool design, and the results of the evaluation of the prototype tool are described in this thesis.

Dobbs, L.A.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Muon collider interaction region design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Design of a muon collider interaction region (IR) presents a number of challenges arising from low {beta}* < 1 cm, correspondingly large beta-function values and beam sizes at IR magnets, as well as the necessity to protect superconducting magnets and collider detectors from muon decay products. As a consequence, the designs of the IR optics, magnets and machine-detector interface are strongly interlaced and iterative. A consistent solution for the 1.5 TeV c.o.m. muon collider IR is presented. It can provide an average luminosity of 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} with an adequate protection of magnet and detector components.

Alexahin, Y.I.; Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Mokhov, N.V.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab; Alexakhin, V.Y.; /Dubna, JINR

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

On supersymmetric Dirac delta interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we construct $\\mathcal{N}=2$ supersymmetric (SUSY) quantum mechanics over several configurations of Dirac-$\\delta$ potentials from one single delta to a Dirac " comb \\rq\\rq. We show in detail how the building of supersymmetry on potentials with delta interactions placed in two or more points on the real line requires the inclusion of quasi-square wells. Therefore, the basic ingredient of a supersymmetric Hamiltonian containing two or more Dirac-$\\delta$s is the singular potential formed by a Dirac-$\\delta$ plus a step ($\\theta$) at the same point. In this $\\delta/\\theta$ SUSY Hamiltonian there is only one singlet ground state of zero energy annihilated by the two supercharges or a doublet of ground states paired by supersymmetry of positive energy depending on the relation between the Dirac well strength and the height of the step potential. We find a scenario of either unbroken supersymmetry with Witten index one or supersymmetry breaking when there is one " bosonic\\rq\\rq and one " fermionic\\rq\\rq ground state such that the Witten index is zero. We explain next the different structure of the scattering waves produced by three $\\delta/\\theta$ potentials with respect to the eigenfunctions arising in the non-SUSY case. In particular, many more bound states paired by supersymmetry exist within the supersymmetric framework compared with the non-SUSY problem. An infinite array of equally spaced $\\delta$-interactions of the same strength but alternatively attractive and repulsive are susceptible of being promoted to a ${\\cal N}=2$ supersymmetric system...

J. Mateos Guilarte; J. M. Munoz Castaneda; A. Moreno Mosquera

2015-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

338

Budget-based Control for Interactive Services with Adaptive Execution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the problem of managing a class of interactive services to meet a response time target while achieving high service quality. We focus here on interactive services that support adaptive execution, such as web search engines and finance servers. With adaptive execution, when a request receives more processing time, its result improves, posing new challenges and opportunities for resource management. We propose a new budget-based control model for interactive services with adaptive execution. The budget represents the amount of resources assigned to all pending requests. The budgetbased control model consists of two components: (1) a hybrid control mechanism, which combines adaptive and integral controllers and controls the budget in order to meet the response time target with small steady-state error, fast settling time and little runtime overhead, and (2) an optimization procedure, which takes advantage of adaptive execution to maximize the total response quality of all pending requests under a given budget. We implement and evaluate the budget-based control model experimentally in Microsoft Bing, a commercial web search engine. The experimental results show that it achieves more accurate control of mean response time and higher response quality than traditional static and dynamic admission control techniques that control the queue length. We also apply the model to a finance server that estimates option prices, and conduct a simulation study. The simulation results show large benefits for budget-based control. For example, under the same response time and quality requirements, the budget-based model accommodates double the system throughput compared to a traditional queuebased control model. 1.

Yuxiong He; Zihao Ye; Qiang Fu; Sameh Elnikety

339

Identification of Protein-Protein Interactions and Topologies in Living Cells with Chemical Cross-linking and Mass Spectrometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present results from a novel strategy that enables concurrent identification of protein-protein interactions and topologies in living cells without specific antibodies or genetic manipulations for immuno/affinity purifications. The strategy consists of: (i) chemical cross-linking reaction: intact cell labeling with a novel class of chemical cross-linkers, protein interaction reporters (PIRs); (ii) two-stage mass spectrometric analysis: stage 1 identification of PIR-labeled proteins and construction of a restricted database by 2D-LC/MS/MS; and stage 2 analysis of PIR-labeled peptides by multiplexed LC/FTICR-MS; (iii) data analysis: identification of cross-linked peptides and proteins of origin using accurate mass and other constraints. The primary advantage of the PIR approach and distinction from current technology is that protein interactions together with topologies are detected in native biological systems by stabilizing protein complexes with new covalent bonds while the proteins are present in the original cellular environment. Thus, weak or transient interactions or interactions that require properly folded, localized, or membrane-bound proteins can be labeled and identified through the PIR approach. This strategy was applied to S. oneidensis bacterial cells and initial studies resulted in identification of a set of protein-protein interactions and their contact/binding regions. Furthermore, most identified interactions involved membrane proteins, suggesting the PIR approach is particularly suited for studies of membrane protein-protein interactions, an area under-represented with current widely-used approaches.

Zhang, Haizhen; Tang, Xiaoting; Munske, Gerhard R.; Tolic, Nikola; Anderson, Gordon A.; Bruce, James E.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Universal scaling of potential energy functions describing intermolecular interactions. II. The halide-water and alkali metal-water interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scaled forms of the newly introduced generalized potential energy functions (PEFs) describing intermolecular interactions [J. Chem. Phys. xx, yyyyy (2011)] have been used to fit the ab-initio minimum energy paths (MEPs) for the halide- and alkali metal-water systems X-(H2O), X=F, Cl, Br, I, and M+(H2O), M=Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs. These generalized forms produce fits to the ab-initio data that are between one and two orders of magnitude better in the ?2 than the original forms of the PEFs. They were found to describe both the long-range, minimum and repulsive wall of the potential energy surface quite well. Overall the 4-parameter extended Morse (eM) and generalized Buckingham exponential-6 (gB-e6) potentials were found to best fit the ab-initio data. Furthermore, a single set of parameters of the reduced form was found to describe all candidates within each class of interactions. The fact that in reduced coordinates a whole class of interactions can be represented by a single PEF, yields the simple relationship between the molecular parameters associated with energy (well depth, ?), structure (equilibrium distance, rm) and spectroscopy (anharmonic frequency, ?):€? = A? (? /?)1/ 2 /rm + B?? /rm 3 , where A and B are constants depending on the underlying PEF. This more general case of Badger’s rule has been validated using the experimentally measured frequencies of the hydrogen bonded OH stretching vibrations in the halide-water series.

Werhahn, Jasper C.; Akase, Dai; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mam represents interactions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Interacting agegraphic tachyon model of dark energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scalar-field dark energy models like tachyon are often regarded as an effective description of an underlying theory of dark energy. In this Letter, we implement the interacting agegraphic dark energy models with tachyon field. We demonstrate that the interacting agegraphic evolution of the universe can be described completely by a single tachyon scalar field. We thus reconstruct the potential as well as the dynamics of the tachyon field according to the evolutionary behavior of interacting agegraphic dark energy.

A. Sheykhi

2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

342

Quantifying turbidity current interactions with topography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis advances our understanding of how transport properties of turbidity currents are mediated by interactions with seafloor topography, specifically channelized surfaces. Turbidity currents are responsible for ...

Straub, Kyle M

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Private Interactive Communication Across an Adversarial Channel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Private Interactive Communication Across an Adversarial Channel Ran Gelles, Amit Sahai, and Akshay Wadia Department of Computer Science, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA {gelles, sahai

344

Probing Higgs Boson Interactions At Future Colliders.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??We present in this thesis a detailed analysis of Higgs boson interactions at future colliders. In particular we examine, in a model independent way, the… (more)

Biswal, Sudhansu Sekhar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Universality of conductivity in interacting graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Hubbard model on the honeycomb lattice describes charge carriers in graphene with short range interactions. While the interaction modifies several physical quantities, like the value of the Fermi velocity or the wave function renormalization, the a.c. conductivity has a universal value independent of the microscopic details of the model: there are no interaction corrections, provided that the interaction is weak enough and that the system is at half filling. We give a rigorous proof of this fact, based on exact Ward Identities and on constructive Renormalization Group methods.

A. Giuliani; V. Mastropietro; M. Porta

2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

346

INTERACTIVE COMPUTER GRAPHICS DISPLAYS FOR HIERARCHICAL DATA STRUCTURES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTERACTIVE COMPUTER GRAPHICS DISPLAYS FOR HIERARCHICAL DATAINTERACTIVE COMPUTER GRAPHICS DISPLAYS FOR HIERARCHICAL DATAtem. INTERACTIVE COMPUTER GRAPHICS DISPLAYS FOR HIERARCHICAL

Cahn, D.F.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Energy or Mass and Interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A review. Problems: 1-Many empirical parameters and large dimension number; 2-Gravitation and Electrodynamics are challenged by dark matter and energy. Energy and nonlinear electrodynamics are fundamental in a unified nonlinear interaction. Nuclear energy appears as nonlinear SU(2) magnetic energy. Gravitation and electromagnetism are unified giving Einstein's equation and a geometric energy momentum tensor. A solution energy in the newtonian limit gives the gravitational constant G. Outside of this limit G is variable. May be interpreted as dark matter or energy. In vacuum, known gravitational solutions are obtained. Electromagnetism is an SU(2) subgroup. A U(1) limit gives Maxwell's equations. Geometric fields determine a generalized Dirac equation and are the germ of quantum physics. Planck's h and of Einstein's c are given by the potential and the metric. Excitations have quanta of charge, flux and spin determining the FQHE. There are only three stable 1/2 spin fermions. Mass is a form of energy. The rest energies of the fermions give the proton/electron mass ratio. Potential excitations have energies equal to the weak boson masses allowing a geometric interpretation of Weinberg's angle. SU(2) gives the anomalous magnetic moments of proton, electron, neutron and generates nuclear range attractive potentials strong enough to produce the binding energies of the deuteron and other nuclides. Lepton and meson masses are due to topological excitations. The geometric mass spectrum is satisfactory. The proton has a triple structure. The alpha constant is a geometric number.

Gustavo R Gonzalez-Martin

2010-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

348

J. Chem. Phys., accepted for publication Theoretical investigation of the interaction of CH4 with Al2 and Al3 neutral and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and olefins in the gas phase by transition-metal ions have received a great deal of attention both active scientific research field. Through covering the range from noble gas systems held together, bonding nature, ionization potential, etc. [1, 2] and their interaction with other species represents

Pfeifer, Holger

349

Representing Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium for an Aqueous MEA-CO2 System Using the Electrolyte Nonrandom-Two-Liquid Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Massachusetts 02141 Following the work of Austgen et al., the electrolyte nonrandom-two-liquid (NRTL) model reaction as well as important interaction parameters of the electrolyte NRTL model were carefully fitted

Zhang, Luzheng

350

eschweizerbartxxx Interactions between alien species and restoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

eschweizerbartxxx Interactions between alien species and restoration of large-river ecosystems-river ecosystems that are the subject of restoration efforts also typically are heavily invaded by alien species interactions that link alien species and river restoration. Most obviously, restoration may be aimed

Pace, Michael L.

351

Lattice polymers with two competing collapse interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There have been separate studies of the polymer collapse transition, where the collapse was induced by two different types of attraction. In each case, the configurations of the polymer were given by the same subset of random walks being self-avoiding trails on the square lattice. Numerical evidence shows that when interacting via nearest-neighbour contacts, this transition is different from the collapse transition in square-lattice trails interacting via multiply visited sites. While both transitions are second-order, when interacting via nearest-neighbour contacts, the transition is relatively weak with a convergent specific heat, while when interacting via multiply visited sites, the specific heat diverges strongly. Moreover, an estimation of the crossover exponent for the nearest-neighbour contact interaction provides a value close to that of the canonical polymer collapse model of interacting self-avoiding walks, which also interact via nearest-neighbour contacts. From computer simulations using the flatPERM algorithm, we extend these studies by considering a model of self-avoiding trails on the square lattice containing both types of interaction, and which therefore contains all three of the models discussed above as special cases. We find that the strong multiply-visited site collapse is a singular point in the phase diagram and corresponds to a higher order multi-critical point separating a line of weak second-order transitions from a line of first-order transitions.

Andrea Bedini; Aleksander L Owczarek; Thomas Prellberg

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

352

AMAROK PIKAP: INTERACTIVE PERCUSSION PLAYING AUTOMOBILE*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AMAROK PIKAP: INTERACTIVE PERCUSSION PLAYING AUTOMOBILE* Selçuk ARTUT Sabanci University Faculty project utilizes an interactive system on the surface of an automobile that is specially modified of an automobile campaign: Amarok Pikap. The structure that forms the design will also be subjected to a technical

Yanikoglu, Berrin

353

DefectDomain Wall Interactions in Trigonal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Defect­Domain Wall Interactions in Trigonal Ferroelectrics Venkatraman Gopalan,1 Volkmar Dierolf,2 walls in the trigonal ferroelectrics lithium niobate and lithium tantalate. It is shown that extrinsic questions re- garding intrinsic widths, defect­domain wall interactions, and static versus dynamic wall

Gopalan, Venkatraman

354

Contagious Development Neighbor Interactions in Deforestation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contagious Development Neighbor Interactions in Deforestation Juan A. Robalino EfD Initiative-CATIE Alexander Pfaff Duke University October 2009 Abstract We estimate neighbor interactions in deforestation instrument for neighbors' deforestation using the slopes of neighbors' and neigh- bors' neighbors' parcels

Pfaff, Alex

355

PROTEIN INTERACTIONS AND DISEASE MARICEL KANN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and illnesses, including AIDS, cancer, and Alzheimer's disease. The goal of this session is to discuss interaction data to identify active pathways re- lated to HIV pathogenesis. A functional analysis for successful inference of protein interactions. Chen et al. developed a framework to mine disease

Radivojac, Predrag

356

Dynamic Positioning Systems Usability and Interaction Styles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

started offshore- drilling in search of larger deposits of oil. With this, a new generation of vessels on interaction with Dynamic Positioning Systems (DP) and how new interaction styles can be introduced to make/multi-touch combined with hand-gestures to create a new type of user-experience. The aim for this research

Dunlop, Mark D.

357

United States Department Atmospheric and Biospheric Interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

United States Department Atmospheric and Biospheric Interactions of Agriculture Forest Service coordinator. 1997. Atmospheric and biospheric interactions of gases and energy in the Pacific region century have caused a dramatic increase in global air pollution. This process has accelerated in the past

Standiford, Richard B.

358

Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Insect-Fire Interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Insect-Fire Interactions A thesis presented by Heather Joan Lynch Heather Joan Lynch Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Insect-Fire Interactions Abstract Insect outbreaks on the dynamics and composition of forest ecosystems. Although it has long been speculated that forest fires

Moorcroft, Paul R.

359

Interactive Database Access with Statistics and Graphics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DbAccess The Manual Interactive Database Access with Statistics and Graphics Version 2.1.1 D. M and graphical needs of NSTX Physicists. Flexible views and joins are possible, including options for complex SQL General Atomics (GA Plot Objects) adds extensive graphical and interactive capabilities (and documentation

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

360

Faculty and student out-of-classroom interaction: student perceptions of quality of interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; and, helpfulness of faculty. Results of their study highlighted faculty-student out-of- classroom interaction?s positive impact on collegiate satisfaction. They gathered data from the 1975 Freshman Questionnaire and the 1979 Graduating Students...FACULTY AND STUDENT OUT-OF-CLASSROOM INTERACTION: STUDENT PERCEPTIONS OF QUALITY OF INTERACTION A Dissertation by ROSALIND VERONICA ALDERMAN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

Alderman, Rosalind Veronica

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mam represents interactions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Two-Nucleon Scattering without partial waves using a momentum space Argonne V18 interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We test the operator form of the Fourier transform of the Argonne V18 potential by computing selected scattering observables and all Wolfenstein parameters for a variety of energies. These are compared to the GW-DAC database and to partial wave calculations. We represent the interaction and transition operators as expansions in a spin-momentum basis. In this representation the Lippmann-Schwinger equation becomes a six channel integral equation in two variables. Our calculations use different numbers of spin-momentum basis elements to represent the on- and off-shell transition operators. This is because different numbers of independent spin-momentum basis elements are required to expand the on- and off-shell transition operators. The choice of on and off-shell spin-momentum basis elements is made so that the coefficients of the on-shell spin-momentum basis vectors are simply related to the corresponding off-shell coefficients.

S. Veerasamy; Ch. Elster; W. N. Polyzou

2012-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

362

Reading human relationships from their interaction with an interactive humanoid robot  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are different to traditional task-oriented robots, such as industrial robots, which perform certain tasks in limited applications. Interaction-oriented robots are designed to communicate with humans and to be ableReading human relationships from their interaction with an interactive humanoid robot Takayuki

Kanda, Takayuki

363

Vol. 18, No. 3, 2008, Nuclear Physics News 3 The views expressed here do not represent the views and policies of NuPECC except where explicitly identified.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

editorial Vol. 18, No. 3, 2008, Nuclear Physics News 3 The views expressed here do not represent, nuclear physics seemed to be lacking in the theoretical tools required to go beyond a qualitative. Furthermore, rather than borrowing freely from related fields of research, nuclear physics drifted in the dol

Washington at Seattle, University of - Department of Physics, Electroweak Interaction Research Group

364

The Cornell Center for a Sustainable Future (CCSF) represents a bold commitment to develop and deploy knowledge to address some of society's most complex and press-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with CCSF. Through partnerships with Cornell's colleges, CCSF aspires to help build an even larger community#12;The Cornell Center for a Sustainable Future (CCSF) represents a bold commitment to develop and deploy knowledge to address some of society's most complex and press- ing problems. Sustainability

Angenent, Lars T.

365

Representative Syllabus for P140 Prof. Sandra Shapshay P140 M/W 11:15pm-12:05pm Woodburn Hall 009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Representative Syllabus for P140 Prof. Sandra Shapshay P140 M/W 11:15pm-12:05pm Woodburn Hall 009-10:30am, SY 021 Syllabus: P140 Introduction to Ethics Welcome to Introduction to Ethics. This is a lecture

Indiana University

366

hollow fiber represent an enormous increase in the (active) aeration surface. Thus, oxygen is not limiting to cell growth, which results in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- ditions oxygen and carbon dioxide diffuse from the hollow-fiber membrane into the cell suspensionhollow fiber represent an enormous increase in the (active) aeration surface. Thus, oxygen In controlled cultivation systems, such as common stirred tank bioreactors, an optimal oxygen supply is state

Cai, Long

367

To obtain representative temperatures, sensors were made with a length of 35 cm. The stainless steel needles have a diameter of 3 mm. Inside are five  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To obtain representative temperatures, sensors were made with a length of 35 cm. The stainless steel needles have a diameter of 3 mm. Inside are five Platinum Pt-100 sensors, that are cascaded in series to obtain a Pt-500 sensor. The sensors are calibrated to retrieve individual calibration

Haak, Hein

368

8 2168-6831/13/$31.002013IEEE ieee Geoscience and remote sensinG maGazine December 2013 Abstract--Earth observing satellites represent some  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and remote sensinG maGazine communities, and industry sectors including mining, fisheries, and transportation--Earth observing satellites represent some of the most valued components of the international Global Ocean of the Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS), required to carry out advanced coastal and ocean research

369

Representing a 3-D Environment with a 2-D Map Structure Edward H.L. Fong William Adams Frederick Crabbe Alan C. Schultz  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

planning, and localization. II. THE EVIDENCE GRID A wide variety of map representation structures (such Grid The 2-D evidence grid is one of the most popular map structures for autonomous mobile robotsRepresenting a 3-D Environment with a 2½-D Map Structure Edward H.L. Fong William Adams Frederick

Crabbe, Frederick

370

The Human Factors and Ergonomics EFA The field of Human Factors and Ergonomics (HFE) represents an increasingly important engineering specialty. The  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Human Factors and Ergonomics EFA The field of Human Factors and Ergonomics (HFE) represents cognitive characteristics and ergonomics considers physical characteristics. The HFE EFA builds allow for an emphasis in human factors (HF) or ergonomics (Ergo). Required courses: Semester Course

Kusiak, Andrew

371

Sensor networks represent new paradigm for reliable environment monitoring and infor-mation collection. They hold the promise of revolutionizing sensing in a wide range of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

computing power, scarce memory and limited battery power. For wireless micro-sensor networks, physical of wireless micro-sensor networks communication models. 2. Development of a frame-work to evaluate protocolsAbstract Sensor networks represent new paradigm for reliable environment monitoring and infor

Heinzelman, Wendi

372

The $^4$He total photo-absorption cross section with two- plus three-nucleon interactions from chiral effective field theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The total photo-absorption cross section of $^4$He is evaluated microscopically using two- (NN) and three-nucleon (NNN) interactions based upon chiral effective field theory ($\\chi$EFT). The calculation is performed using the Lorentz integral transform method along with the {\\em ab initio} no-core shell model approach. An important feature of the present study is the consistency of the NN and NNN interactions and also, through the Siegert theorem, of the two- and three-body current operators. This is due to the application of the $\\chi$EFT framework. The inclusion of the NNN interaction produces a suppression of the low-energy peak and enhancement of the high-energy tail of the cross section. We compare to calculations obtained using other interactions and to representative experiments. The rather confused experimental situation in the giant resonance region prevents discrimination among different interaction models.

S. Quaglioni; P. Navratil

2007-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

373

Quantum computing with nearest neighbor interactions and error rates over 1%  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Large-scale quantum computation will only be achieved if experimentally implementable quantum error correction procedures are devised that can tolerate experimentally achievable error rates. We describe a quantum error correction procedure that requires only a 2-D square lattice of qubits that can interact with their nearest neighbors, yet can tolerate quantum gate error rates over 1%. The precise maximum tolerable error rate depends on the error model, and we calculate values in the range 1.1--1.4% for various physically reasonable models. Even the lowest value represents the highest threshold error rate calculated to date in a geometrically constrained setting, and a 50% improvement over the previous record.

David S. Wang; Austin G. Fowler; Lloyd C. L. Hollenberg

2010-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

374

Nucleon - Nucleon Interactions at Short Distances  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Despite the progress made in understanding the NN interactions at long distances based on effective field theories, the understanding of the dynamics of short range NN interactions remains as elusive as ever. One of the most fascinating properties of short range interaction is its repulsive nature which is responsible for the stability of strongly interacting matter. The relevant distances, $\\le 0.5$ fm, in this case are such that one expects the onset of quark-gluon degrees of freedom with interaction being dominated by QCD dynamics. We review the current status of the understanding of the QCD dynamics of NN interactions at short distances, highlight outstanding questions and outline the theoretical foundation of QCD description of hard NN processes. We present examples of how the study of the hard elastic NN interaction can reveal the symmetry structure of valence quark component of the nucleon wave function and how the onset of pQCD regime is correlated with the onset of color transparency phenomena in hard $pp$ scattering in the nuclear medium. The discussions show how the new experimental facilities can help to advance the knowledge about the QCD nature of nuclear forces at short distances.

Misak M Sargsian

2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

375

Semiclassical wave-packets emerging from interaction with an environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the quantum evolution in dimension three of a system composed by a test particle interacting with an environment made of N harmonic oscillators. At time zero the test particle is described by a spherical wave, i.e., a highly correlated continuous superposition of states with well localized position and momentum, and the oscillators are in the ground state. Furthermore, we assume that the positions of the oscillators are not collinear with the center of the spherical wave. Under suitable assumptions on the physical parameters characterizing the model, we give an asymptotic expression of the solution of the Schrödinger equation of the system with an explicit control of the error. The result shows that the approximate expression of the wave function is the sum of two terms, orthogonal in L{sup 2}(R{sup 3(N+1)}) and describing rather different situations. In the first one, all the oscillators remain in their ground state and the test particle is described by the free evolution of a slightly deformed spherical wave. The second one consists of a sum of N terms where in each term there is only one excited oscillator and the test particle is correspondingly described by the free evolution of a wave packet, well concentrated in position and momentum. Moreover, the wave packet emerges from the excited oscillator with an average momentum parallel to the line joining the oscillator with the center of the initial spherical wave. Such wave packet represents a semiclassical state for the test particle, propagating along the corresponding classical trajectory. The main result of our analysis is to show how such a semiclassical state can be produced, starting from the original spherical wave, as a result of the interaction with the environment.

Recchia, Carla, E-mail: carla.recchia@libero.it [D.I.S.I.M., Università di L’Aquila, Via Vetoio - Loc. Coppito - 67010 L’Aquila (Italy)] [D.I.S.I.M., Università di L’Aquila, Via Vetoio - Loc. Coppito - 67010 L’Aquila (Italy); Teta, Alessandro, E-mail: teta@mat.uniroma1.it [Dipartimento di Matematica, “Sapienza” Università di Roma, P.le A. Moro 5, 00185 Roma (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Matematica, “Sapienza” Università di Roma, P.le A. Moro 5, 00185 Roma (Italy)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

376

A terrestrial ecotoxicological test: Impact of pollutants on plant -- Insect interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Single species toxicity tests are often criticized or doubted due to a lack of confidence in their predictive power. Single species tests cannot detect changes of interactions between species due to a pollutant. One aim of the presented project is to study what kind of new information is gained from a two species laboratory test system compared to single species test conducted with the same two species. The species used are the annual weed Polygonum convolvulus L and the leaf beetle Gastrophysa polygoni. Data from experiments with a herbicide (chlorsulfuron), a insecticide (dimethoate) and copper are presented. Compared to single species tests, the two species test not only provide dose-response data on the interactions between species, it also represents a more realistic exposure route and corn rises more complexity still being reproducible.

Kjaer, C.; Elmegaard, N. [National Environmental Research Inst., Silkeborg (Denmark). Dept. of Terrestrial Ecology

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

377

Towards Space Solar Power - Examining Atmospheric Interactions of Power Beams with the HAARP Facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the most common space solar power (SSP) system architectures, solar energy harvested by large satellites in geostationary orbit is transmitted to Earth via microwave radiation. Currently, only limited information about the interactions of microwave beams with energy densities of several tens to hundreds of W/m$^2$ with the different layers of the atmosphere is available. Governmental bodies will likely require detailed investigations of safety and atmospheric effects of microwave power beams before issuing launch licenses for SSP satellite systems. This paper proposes to collect representative and comprehensive data of the interaction of power beams with the atmosphere by extending the infrastructure of the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in Alaska, USA. Estimates of the transmission infrastructure performance as well as measurement devices and scientific capabilities of possible upgrade scenarios will be discussed. The proposed upgrade of the HAARP facility is expected to d...

Leitgab, M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Evolution of event-by-event ET fluctuations over collision centrality in RHIC interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Preliminary results are presented for two analyses of transverse energy (ET) production measured with the electromagnetic calorimeters (EMC) of the Pioneering High Energy Nuclear Interaction Experiment (PHENIX), in relativistic nuclear interactions in Au+Au heavy-ion collisions created by the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Event-by-event ET distributions made across collision centrality were used in (1) measurements of 200 GeV , and (2) measurements of 200 GeV and 62.4 GeV ET distribution relative fluctuations {sigma}/ and {sigma}2/, where {sigma} is the standard deviation, and {sigma}2 the variance of each semi-inclusive distribution. Event centrality was selected in 5% wide bins and each bin represented by a modeled mean number of participant nucleons .

Armendariz, Raul [Department of Physics, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM (United States)

2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

379

High-energy cosmic ray interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research into hadronic interactions and high-energy cosmic rays are closely related. On one hand--due to the indirect observation of cosmic rays through air showers--the understanding of hadronic multiparticle production is needed for deriving the flux and composition of cosmic rays at high energy. On the other hand the highest energy particles from the universe allow us to study the characteristics of hadronic interactions at energies far beyond the reach of terrestrial accelerators. This is the summary of three introductory lectures on our current understanding of hadronic interactions of cosmic rays.

Engel, Ralph [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Orellana, Mariana [Instituto Argentino de Radioastronomia (IAR), CCT La Plata (CONICET), C.C.5, 1894 Villa Elisa, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Facultad de Ciencias Astronomicas y Geofisicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Paseo del Bosque, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Reynoso, Matias M. [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Funes 3350, (7600) Mar del Plata (Argentina); Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicas de Mar del Plata, (UNMdP-CONICET) (Argentina); Vila, Gabriela S. [Instituto Argentino de Radioastronomia (IAR), CCT La Plata (CONICET), C.C.5, 1894 Villa Elisa, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

380

The Role of Interactions and Mergers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Galaxy evolution depends strongly on the environment. Dynamical interactions and subsequent evolution make galaxies more concentrated, with higher surface densities, and also trigger star-formation, which consumes the available cold gas. Already at z=0, a large variety of galaxy types are observed, with different evolution stages, from the unevolved gas rich dwarf irregulars, or low surface brightness galaxies, to early-type concentrated galaxies, with no remaining gas. The dynamical processes of galaxy interactions, including internal evolution, are reviewed and evidence is shown of much larger interaction/merging rate at high redshift.

F. Combes

1998-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mam represents interactions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Proton radioactivity half lives with Skyrme interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The potential barrier impeding the spontaneous emission of protons in the proton radioactive nuclei is calculated as the sum of nuclear, Coulomb and centrifugal contributions. The nuclear part of the proton-nucleus interaction potential is obtained in the energy density formalism using Skyrme effective interaction that results into a simple algebraic expression. The half-lives of the proton emitters are calculated for the different Skyrme sets within the improved WKB framework. The results are found to be in reasonable agreement with the earlier results obtained for more complicated calculations involving finite range interactions.

T. R. Routray; Abhishek Mishra; S. K. Tripathy; B. Behera; D. N. Basu

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

382

MMPerformance MM JAZZ MM Conducting MA/MS Apply to the Department and to the University. See the Yellow "Notice to Graduate Applicants" Sheet for required materials.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Oral Form All students must complete the Degree Audit Reporting System (DARS) and submit it the term before taking the Exit Exam. Submit DARS to the Music Graduate Studies Coordinator, Dr. Joel Bluestone

383

Interaction of Radiation with Matter Electrons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. #12;Module 3 Current Issues in Radiation Biophysics · The biological effect of nuclear accidents of nuclear accidents. · Chernobyl · Three Mile Island · Dirty bombs · Japanese criticality accident #12;Charged Particle Track #12;Neutron Interactions · Energy loss by elastic scattering from

Massey, Thomas N.

384

Interactive physical agents for story gathering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Robots are typically thought of as autonomous devices which require little to no human interaction to complete their goals. In this study we investigated what would happen if the success of a robot was contingent upon its ...

Reben, Alexander James

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Interacting vacuum energy in the dark sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyse three cosmological scenarios with interaction in the dark sector, which are particular cases of a general expression for the energy flux from vacuum to matter. In the first case the interaction leads to a transition from an unstable de Sitter phase to a radiation dominated universe, avoiding in this way the initial singularity. In the second case the interaction gives rise to a slow-roll power-law inflation. Finally, the third scenario is a concordance model for the late-time universe, with the vacuum term decaying into cold dark matter. We identify the physics behind these forms of interaction and show that they can be described as particular types of the modified Chaplygin gas.

L. P. Chimento; S. Carneiro

2014-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

386

Interaction of mesoscopic magnetic textures with superconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Here we report a method to calculate the vortex and magnetization arrangement for a system of interacting superconductors and ferromagnets separated in space. The method is based on static London-Maxwell equations and the corresponding energy...

Erdin, S.; Kayali, AF; Lyuksyutov, Igor F.; Pokrovsky, Valery L.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Policies of different governments : persistence and interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation consists of three chapters on persistence and interactions of policies of different governments in various settings. Chapter 1 studies government policy persistence when firms face capital installation ...

Ricka, Frantisek

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Formal Semantics for Interacting UML subsystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or attack need to exclude possible weaknesses. Problem: correctness in conflict with cost. Thorough methods, substates, internal activities. Here: simplified. Jan J¨urjens, TU Munich: Formal Semantics for Interacting

Jurjens, Jan

389

Symmetries and Interaction coefficients of Kelvin waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We considered symmetry restriction on the interaction coefficients of Kelvin waves and demonstrated that linear in small wave vector asymptotic is not forbidden, as one can expect by naive reasoning.

Vladimir V. Lebedev; Victor S. L'vov

2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

390

Statistical methods to infer biological interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biological systems are extremely complex, and our ability to experimentally measure interactions in these systems is limited by inherent noise. Technological advances have allowed us to collect unprecedented amounts of raw ...

Tucker, George Jay

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Arduino Tool: For Interactive Artwork Installations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The emergence of the digital media and computational tools has widened the doors for creativity. The cutting edge in the digital arts and role of new technologies can be explored for the possible creativity. This gives an opportunity to involve arts with technologies to make creative works. The interactive artworks are often installed in the places where multiple people can interact with the installation, which allows the art to achieve its purpose by allowing the people to observe and involve with the installation. The level of engagement of the audience depends on the various factors such as aesthetic satisfaction, how the audience constructs meaning, pleasure and enjoyment. The method to evaluate these experiences is challenging as it depends on integration between the artificial life and real life by means of human computer interaction. This research investigates "How Adriano fits for creative and interactive artwork installations?" using an artwork installation in the campus of NTNU (Norwegian University...

Shaikh, Murtaza Hussain

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Single-strips for fast interactive rendering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rendering. Most interactive render- ing packages supportIn order to correctly render such strips, non alter- natingRight: Evolution of the render front. As the interac- tive

Diaz-Gutierrez, Pablo; Bhushan, Anusheel; Gopi, M; Pajarola, Renato

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Interacting holographic generalized Chaplygin gas model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we consider a correspondence between the holographic dark energy density and interacting generalized Chaplygin gas energy density in FRW universe. Then we reconstruct the potential of the scalar field which describe the generalized Chaplygin cosmology.

M. R. Setare

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Interactive eshopping experience: an empirical investigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Utilizing an experimental design, the study investigates the effects of eshopping behavior (experiential, utilitarian, or mixed) and interactivity level (low or high) on the consequences of eshopping (site attitude and future purchase intentions...

Mahfouz, Ahmed Yousry Mohamed

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

395

The Whimsichord: a Wearable Interactive Sonic Installation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be twanged to produce sound, and each participant will become a human string instrument. RELATED WORK [1] prototyped a system using a retractable string to interact with an embedded wearable wrist device

Bryan-Kinns, Nick

396

Long range interactions in nanoscale science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Our understanding of the “long range” electrodynamic, electrostatic, and polar interactions that dominate the organization of small objects at separations beyond an interatomic bond length is reviewed. From this basic-forces ...

Rajter, Richard F.

397

Hybrid Solutions to the Feature Interaction Problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Calder,M. Kolberg,M. Magill,E. Marples,D. Reiff-Marganiec,S. Feature Interactions in Telecommunications and Software Systems VII pp 295-312 IOS Press

Calder, M.

398

Operating System Support for Mobile Interactive Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Such applications demand good interactive response. However, their environments are resource-poor and turbulent, predictive resource management, history- based demand prediction, augmented reality, machine learning #12 -- augmented reality -- has enormous potential in fields ranging from entertainment to aircraft maintenance

399

Identifying chromatin interactions at high spatial resolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents two computational approaches for identifying chromatin interactions at high spatial resolution from ChIA-PET data. We introduce SPROUT which is a hierarchical probabilistic model that discovers high ...

Reeder, Christopher Campbell

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Simulated liquid argon interactions with neutrons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The GEANT4 physics simulation program is known to have errors in how hadronic interactions are implemented. This has the potential to cause errors in the Monte Carlos used to determine the expected neutron backgrounds in ...

Harrington, Kathleen M

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mam represents interactions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Semitransparency in interaction-free measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the effect of semitransparency in a quantum-Zeno-like interaction-free measurement setup, a quantum-physics based approach that might significantly reduce sample damage in imaging and microscopy. With an emphasis on applications in electron microscopy, we simulate the behavior of probe particles in an interaction-free measurement setup with semitransparent samples, and we show that the transparency of a sample can be measured in such a setup. However, such a measurement is not possible without losing (i.e., absorbing or scattering) probe particles in general, which causes sample damage. We show how the amount of lost particles can be minimized by adjusting the number of round trips through the setup, and we explicitly calculate the amount of lost particles in measurements which either aim at distinguishing two transparencies or at measuring an unknown transparency precisely. We also discuss the effect of the sample causing phase shifts in interaction-free measurements. Comparing the resulting loss of probe particles with a classical measurement of transparency, we find that interaction-free measurements only provide a benefit in two cases: first, if two semitransparent samples with a high contrast are to be distinguished, interaction-free measurements lose less particles than classical measurements by a factor that increases with the contrast. This implies that interaction-free measurements with zero loss are possible if one of the samples is perfectly transparent. A second case where interaction-free measurements outperform classical measurements is if three conditions are met: the particle source exhibits Poissonian number statistics, the number of lost particles cannot be measured, and the transparency is larger than approximately 1/2. In all other cases, interaction-free measurements lose as many probe particles as classical measurements or more.

Sebastian Thomas; Christoph Kohstall; Pieter Kruit; Peter Hommelhoff

2014-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

402

A reduced Blade-Vortex Interaction rotor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A REDUCED BLADE - VORTEX INTERACTION ROTOR A Thesis by SOMNATH MANI . Submitted to the Offic of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1996 Major... Subject: Aerospace Engineering A REDUCED BLADE - VORTEX INTERACTION ROTOR A Thesis by SOMNATH MANI Submitted to Texas A@M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content...

Mani, Somnath

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

403

Neutron Interactions: Q-Equation, Elastic Scattering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Since a neutron has no charge it can easily enter into a nucleus and cause a reaction. Neutrons interact primarily with the nucleus of an atom, except in the special case of magnetic scattering where the interaction involves the neutron spin and the magnetic moment of the atom. Because magnetic scattering is of no interest in this class, we can neglect the interaction between neutrons and electrons and think of atoms and nuclei interchangeably. Neutron reactions can take place at any energy, so one has to pay particular attention to the energy variation of the interaction cross section. In a nuclear reactor neutrons can have energies ranging from 10-3 ev (1 mev) to 10 7 ev (10 Mev). This means our study of neutron interactions, in principle, will have to cover an energy range of 10 ten orders of magnitude. In practice we will limit ourselves to two energy ranges, the slowing down region (ev to Kev) and the thermal region (around 0.025 ev). For a given energy region – thermal, epithermal, resonance, fast – not all the possible reactions are equally important. Which reaction is important depends on the target nucleus and the neutron energy. Generally speaking the important types of interactions, in the order of increasing complexity from the standpoint of theoretical

unknown authors

404

DIP: The Database of Interacting Proteins  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The DIP Database catalogs experimentally determined interactions between proteins. It combines information from a variety of sources to create a single, consistent set of protein-protein interactions. By interaction, the DIP Database creators mean that two amino acid chains were experimentally identified to bind to each other. The database lists such pairs to aid those studying a particular protein-protein interaction but also those investigating entire regulatory and signaling pathways as well as those studying the organisation and complexity of the protein interaction network at the cellular level. The data stored within the DIP database were curated, both, manually by expert curators and also automatically using computational approaches that utilize the knowledge about the protein-protein interaction networks extracted from the most reliable, core subset of the DIP data. It is a relational database that can be searched by protein, sequence, motif, article information, and pathBLAST. The website also serves as an access point to a number of projects related to DIP, such as LiveDIP, The Database of Ligand-Receptor Partners (DLRP) and JDIP. Users have free and open access to DIP after login. [Taken from the DIP Guide and the DIP website] (Specialized Interface) (Registration Required)

405

Parametric Model for Astrophysical Proton-Proton Interactions and Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Observations of gamma-rays have been made from celestial sources such as active galaxies, gamma-ray bursts and supernova remnants as well as the Galactic ridge. The study of gamma rays can provide information about production mechanisms and cosmic-ray acceleration. In the high-energy regime, one of the dominant mechanisms for gamma-ray production is the decay of neutral pions produced in interactions of ultra-relativistic cosmic-ray nuclei and interstellar matter. Presented here is a parametric model for calculations of inclusive cross sections and transverse momentum distributions for secondary particles--gamma rays, e{sup {+-}}, {nu}{sub e}, {bar {nu}}{sub e}, {nu}{sub {mu}} and {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}--produced in proton-proton interactions. This parametric model is derived on the proton-proton interaction model proposed by Kamae et al.; it includes the diffraction dissociation process, Feynman-scaling violation and the logarithmically rising inelastic proton-proton cross section. To improve fidelity to experimental data for lower energies, two baryon resonance excitation processes were added; one representing the {Delta}(1232) and the other multiple resonances with masses around 1600 MeV/c{sup 2}. The model predicts the power-law spectral index for all secondary particle to be about 0.05 lower in absolute value than that of the incident proton and their inclusive cross sections to be larger than those predicted by previous models based on the Feynman-scaling hypothesis. The applications of the presented model in astrophysics are plentiful. It has been implemented into the Galprop code to calculate the contribution due to pion decays in the Galactic plane. The model has also been used to estimate the cosmic-ray flux in the Large Magellanic Cloud based on HI, CO and gamma-ray observations. The transverse momentum distributions enable calculations when the proton distribution is anisotropic. It is shown that the gamma-ray spectrum and flux due to a pencil beam of protons varies drastically with viewing angle. A fanned proton jet with a Gaussian intensity profile impinging on surrounding material is given as a more realistic example. As the observer is moved off the jet axis, the peak of the spectrum is moved to lower energies.

Karlsson, Niklas; /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm; ,

2008-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

406

Arnold Schwarzenegger REPRESENTING GROUNDWATER IN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: UC Davis, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Julien J. Harou and Jay R. Lund Davis, CA and friends at UC Davis and beyond who provided intellectual nourishment, companionship and comic relief IN CALIFORNIA PIERFINALPROJECTREPORT Prepared For: California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research

Lund, Jay R.

407

Engineer's Council Representatives Engineers Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-1932 Bill Belvin Lonnie Knott 1932-1933 Lonnie Knott Lamar Moss Phillip Stone 1933-1934 Philip Stone William Armstrong Chip Metheney Morris Patton Paul Bauer 1976-1977 Alan Armstrong Mark Hamner Mark Ray Paul Bauer

Velev, Orlin D.

408

Randy Hultgren Congressman Representing Illinois'...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hultgren has committed himself to working for fiscal sanity, real healthcare reform, and pro-growth policies that will put Americans back to work. In the current 114th...

409

Yale University HIPAA Representative Form  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to access to my protected health information (PHI) to assist in my care. I am also aware that I may limit separate box below is also required for HIV, psychiatric and substance abuse access. ___Other - Specify limits or specific health care incident ___________________________________________________ By checking

410

PSCAD Modules Representing PV Generator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Photovoltaic power plants (PVPs) have been growing in size, and the installation time is very short. With the cost of photovoltaic (PV) panels dropping in recent years, it can be predicted that in the next 10 years the contribution of PVPs to the total number of renewable energy power plants will grow significantly. In this project, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed a dynamic modeling of the modules to be used as building blocks to develop simulation models of single PV arrays, expanded to include Maximum Power Point Tracker (MPPT), expanded to include PV inverter, or expanded to cover an entire PVP. The focus of the investigation and complexity of the simulation determines the components that must be included in the simulation. The development of the PV inverter was covered in detail, including the control diagrams. Both the current-regulated voltage source inverter and the current-regulated current source inverter were developed in PSCAD. Various operations of the PV inverters were simulated under normal and abnormal conditions. Symmetrical and unsymmetrical faults were simulated, presented, and discussed. Both the three-phase analysis and the symmetrical component analysis were included to clarify the understanding of unsymmetrical faults. The dynamic model validation was based on the testing data provided by SCE. Testing was conducted at SCE with the focus on the grid interface behavior of the PV inverter under different faults and disturbances. The dynamic model validation covers both the symmetrical and unsymmetrical faults.

Muljadi, E.; Singh, M.; Gevorgian, V.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Representing and Modifying Complex Surfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Bernardini. Sharp features on multiresolution subdivision surfaces. In 9th Pacific Conference on Com- puter-form solids. In Proceedings of ACM SIGGRAPH 2001, Computer Graphics Proceedings, Annual Conference Series SIGGRAPH 2000, Computer Graphics Proceedings, Annual Conference Series, pages 113­ 120. ACM Press / ACM

Mohri, Mehryar

412

Home, Habits, and Energy: Examining Domestic Interactions and Energy Consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, habitual, and irrational. Implications for the design of energy-conserving interactions with technology investigate the relationships among "normal" domestic interactions with technology, energy consumptionHome, Habits, and Energy: Examining Domestic Interactions and Energy Consumption James Pierce1

Paulos, Eric

413

Proton-neutron interacting boson model under random two-body interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The low-lying states of sd-boson systems in the presence of random two-body interactions are studied in the proton-neutron interacting boson model (IBM-2). The predominance of spin-zero ground states is confirmed, and a very prominent maximum F-spin dominance in ground states is found. It turns out that the requirement of random interactions with F-spin conservation intensifies the above predominance. Collective motion in the low-lying states is discussed.

Yoshida, N.; Zhao, Y. M.; Arima, A. [Faculty of Informatics, Kansai University, Takatsuki 569-1095 (Japan); Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Science Museum, Japan Science Foundation, 2-1 Kitanomaru-koen, Chiyoda ku, Tokyo 102-0091 (Japan)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

414

Interactions of nickel/zirconia solid oxide fuel cell anodes...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Interactions of nickelzirconia solid oxide fuel cell anodes with coal gas containing arsenic. Interactions of nickelzirconia solid oxide fuel cell anodes with coal gas containing...

415

Carbon Mineralizability Determines Interactive Effects onMineralizatio...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Determines Interactive Effects onMineralization of Pyrogenic Organic Matter and Soil Organic Carbon. Carbon Mineralizability Determines Interactive Effects onMineralization...

416

Lewis Acid-Base Interactions between Polysulfides and Metal Organic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lewis Acid-Base Interactions between Polysulfides and Metal Organic Framework in Lithium Sulfur Batteries. Lewis Acid-Base Interactions between Polysulfides and Metal Organic...

417

Attractive Noncovalent Interactions inthe Mechanism ofGrubbsSecond...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Attractive Noncovalent Interactions inthe Mechanism of GrubbsSecond-Generation Ru Catalysts forOlefin Metathesis. Attractive Noncovalent Interactions inthe Mechanism of...

418

Experiment-Based Model for the Chemical Interactions between...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1) Determine what chemical interactions occur between relevant minerals and water-CO 2 fluids 2) Understand how the chemical interactions affect transition to and performance of a...

419

Wind Turbine Interactions with Birds, Bats, and their Habitats...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Wind Turbine Interactions with Birds, Bats, and their Habitats: A Summary of Research Results and Priority Questions Wind Turbine Interactions with Birds, Bats, and their Habitats:...

420

Molecular Interactions of Plutonium(VI) with SyntheticManganese...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Interactions of Plutonium(VI) with Synthetic Manganese-Substituted Goethite. Molecular Interactions of Plutonium(VI) with Synthetic Manganese-Substituted Goethite. Abstract:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mam represents interactions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Fractionation of Oxygen Isotopes in Phosphate during its Interactions...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fractionation of Oxygen Isotopes in Phosphate during its Interactions with Iron Oxides. Fractionation of Oxygen Isotopes in Phosphate during its Interactions with Iron Oxides....

422

Exploring the interaction between lithium ion and defective graphene...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Exploring the interaction between lithium ion and defective graphene surface using dispersion corrected DFT studies. Exploring the interaction between lithium ion and defective...

423

Intrinsic Spin-Orbit Interaction in Graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In graphene, we report the first theoretical demonstration of how the intrinsic spin orbit interaction can be deduced from the theory and how it can be controlled by tuning a uniform magnetic field, and/or by changing the strength of a long range Coulomb like impurity (adatom), as well as gap parameter. In the impurity context, we find that intrinsic spin-orbit interaction energy may be enhanced by increasing the strength of magnetic field and/or by decreasing the band gap mass term. Additionally, it may be strongly enhanced by increasing the impurity strength. Furthermore, from the proposal of Kane and Mele [Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 226801 (2005)], it was discussed that the pristine graphene has a quantized spin Hall effect regime where the Rashba type spin orbit interaction term is smaller than that of intrinsic one. Our analysis suggest the nonexistence of such a regime in the ground state of flat graphene.

B. S. Kandemir

2012-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

424

Axial interaction free-electron laser  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Electron orbits from a helical axial wiggler in an axial guide field are absolutely unstable as power is extracted from the particles. For off-axis beams an axial FEL mechanism exists when the axial electric field in a TM mode is wiggled to interact with the axial velocity of the electrons that form the beam. The interaction strength is comparable to that for helical FELs and is insensitive to beam orbit errors. The orbits for this mechanism are extremely stable in the absence of space charge and lead to high extraction efficiencies without particle phasing incoherence or interception. This interaction mechanism is suitable for use with intense annular electron beams for high power generation at microwave frequencies. 5 figs.

Carlsten, B.E.

1997-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

425

Techniques for interactive 3-D scientific visualization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Interest in interactive 3-D graphics has exploded of late, fueled by (a) the allure of using scientific visualization to go where no-one has gone before'' and (b) by the development of new input devices which overcome some of the limitations imposed in the past by technology, yet which may be ill-suited to the kinds of interaction required by researchers active in scientific visualization. To resolve this tension, we propose a flat 5-D'' environment in which 2-D graphics are augmented by exploiting multiple human sensory modalities using cheap, conventional hardware readily available with personal computers and workstations. We discuss how interactions basic to 3-D scientific visualization, like searching a solution space and comparing two such spaces, are effectively carried out in our environment. Finally, we describe 3DMOVE, an experimental microworld we have implemented to test out some of our ideas. 40 refs., 4 figs.

Glinert, E.P. (Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (USA). Dept. of Computer Science); Blattner, M.M. (Anderson (M.D.) Hospital and Tumor Inst., Houston, TX (USA). Dept. of Biomathematics California Univ., Davis, CA (USA). Dept. of Applied Science Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Becker, B.G. (California Univ., Davis, CA (USA). Dept. of Applied Science Lawrence Livermore National La

1990-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

426

Interaction between stainless steel and plutonium metal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Long-term storage of excess plutonium is of great concern in the U.S. as well as abroad. The current accepted configuration involves intimate contact between the stored material and an iron-bearing container such as stainless steel. While many safety scenario studies have been conducted and used in the acceptance of stainless steel containers, little information is available on the physical interaction at elevated temperatures between certain forms of stored material and the container itself. The bulk of the safety studies has focused on the ability of a package to keep the primary stainless steel containment below the plutonium-iron eutectic temperature of approximately 410 C. However, the interactions of plutonium metal with stainless steel have been of continuing interest. This paper reports on a scoping study investigating the interaction between stainless steel and plutonium metal in a pseudo diffusion couple at temperatures above the eutectic melt-point.

Dunwoody, John T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mason, Richard E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Freibert, Franz J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Willson, Stephen P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Veirs, Douglas K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Worl, Laura A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Archuleta, Alonso [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Conger, Donald J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Communication networks and loser effects interact to influence the outcome of aggressive interactions in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Communication networks and loser effects interact to influence the outcome of aggressive.P. Scott Center for Neuroscience, Mind, & Behaviour, Department of Biological Sciences, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH 43403, USA) (Accepted: 25 July 2008) Summary Dyadic interactions occur

Moore, Paul A.

428

Configuration Interactions Constrained by Energy Density Functionals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new method for constructing a Hamiltonian for configuration interaction calculations with constraints to energies of spherical configurations obtained with energy-density-functional (EDF) methods is presented. This results in a unified model that reproduced the EDF binding-energy in the limit of single-Slater determinants, but can also be used for obtaining energy spectra and correlation energies with renormalized nucleon-nucleon interactions. The three-body and/or density-dependent terms that are necessary for good nuclear saturation properties are contained in the EDF. Applications to binding energies and spectra of nuclei in the region above 208Pb are given.

B. Alex Brown; Angelo Signoracci; Morten Hjorth-Jensen

2010-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

429

A Quantum Computer Architecture using Nonlocal Interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Several authors have described the basic requirements essential to build a scalable quantum computer. Because many physical implementation schemes for quantum computing rely on nearest neighbor interactions, there is a hidden quantum communication overhead to connect distant nodes of the computer. In this paper we propose a physical solution to this problem which, together with the key building blocks, provides a pathway to a scalable quantum architecture using nonlocal interactions. Our solution involves the concept of a quantum bus that acts as a refreshable entanglement resource to connect distant memory nodes providing an architectural concept for quantum computers analogous to the von Neumann architecture for classical computers.

Gavin K. Brennen; Daegene Song; Carl J. Williams

2003-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

430

A Study of Multiplicities in Hadronic Interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using data from the SELEX (Fermilab E781) experiment obtained with a minimum-bias trigger, we study multiplicity and angular distributions of secondary particles produced in interactions in the experimental targets. We observe interactions of {Sigma}{sup -}, proton, {pi}{sup -}, and {pi}{sup +}, at beam momenta between 250 GeV/c and 650 GeV/c, in copper, polyethylene, graphite, and beryllium targets. We show that the multiplicity and angular distributions for meson and baryon beams at the same momentum are identical. We also show that the mean multiplicity increases with beam momentum, and presents only small variations with the target material.

Estrada Tristan, Nora Patricia; /San Luis Potosi U.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Interchanging Interactive 3-d Graphics for Astronomy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We demonstrate how interactive, three-dimensional (3-d) scientific visualizations can be efficiently interchanged between a variety of mediums. Through the use of an appropriate interchange format, and a unified interaction interface, we minimize the effort to produce visualizations appropriate for undertaking knowledge discovery at the astronomer's desktop, as part of conference presentations, in digital publications or as Web content. We use examples from cosmological visualization to address some of the issues of interchange, and to describe our approach to adapting S2PLOT desktop visualizations to the Web. Supporting demonstrations are available at http://astronomy.swin.edu.au/s2plot/interchange/

C. J. Fluke; D. G. Barnes; N. T. Jones

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

432

Parallel interacting edge cracks under pure bending  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Once the applicability of the Williams' equations, have been proved or disproved, the power of the singularity represented by the first term of equation 1. 1 and the polynomial expansion can be truncated in order to extract information... of Williams' approach for the case of cracked bodies under pure bending is demonstrated. Four point bending load is applied on specimens with either a vertical or a slant crack giving Mode I or Mixed Mode I ? II respectively. The existence...

Moran, Ivan

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Homogeneous Cooling with Repulsive and Attractive Long-range Interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and for not too strong interaction potential enrgy. Keywords: 1/r potentials, Molecular Dynamics, granular gases

Luding, Stefan

434

The XY model with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One can get spin-orbit interaction of the magnetic ions, besides the strong Heisenberg interaction, known as the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) interaction. We show the effect of the DM interaction on the excitation spectrum. We also show here the magnetic Susceptibility and ferroelectric polarization of the system in a longitudinal magnetic field.

D'Souza, Ransell, E-mail: ransell.d@gmail.com [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Ganeshkhind Road, Pune - 411 007 (India)

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

435

CS 4317 Human-Computer Interaction Course Number: CS4317  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

interaction. Theory of human-computer interaction. Development methods for interfaces such as user1 CS 4317 Human-Computer Interaction Course Number: CS4317 Course Title: Human-Computer Interaction Course Instructors Nigel Ward Course Description: CS4317: Models and methods of human-computer

Ward, Karen

436

Adaptive Interaction through WWW Fuyau Lin and Ron Danielson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adaptive Interaction and Instruction using the World-Wide Web. We include a brief survey of human-computer of this paper discusses human-computer interaction in the context of the WWW, factors relevant to delivering on the Web. 2. HUMAN-COMPUTER INTERACTION AND THE WWW #12;Mechanisms for Human-Computer Interaction (HCI

Danielson, Ronald

437

Interactive Termination Proofs using Termination Cores  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interactive Termination Proofs using Termination Cores Panagiotis Manolios and Daron Vroon College@ccs.neu.edu, daron.vroon@gmail.com Abstract. Recent advances in termination analysis have yielded new methods and determining how to proceed. In this paper, we address the issue of building termination analysis engines

Manolios, Panagiotis "Pete"

438

DYNAMIC INTERACTION FACTORS FOR FLOATING PILE GROUPS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-numerical formulation for two ideal- ized soil profiles (a homogeneous half-space and a half-space with modulus pro interaction factors for static deformation analysis of pile groups. INTRODUCTION Under static working loads) the sharing among individual piles of the load applied at the pile cap is generally uneven, with the corner

Entekhabi, Dara

439

OCEAN-ATMOSPHERE INTERACTION AND TROPICAL CLIMATE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

radiation is the ultimate source of energy for motions in the atmosphere and ocean. Most absorption of solar radiation takes place on the Earth surface, the majority of which is occupied by oceans. Thus oceanic modulate surface radiative flux. Thus, the ocean and atmosphere are a coupled system and their interaction

Xie, Shang-Ping

440

129A Lecture Notes Weak Interactions I  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

129A Lecture Notes Weak Interactions I 1 Nuclear -decay The nuclear -decay caused a great deal of nuclear fission, studied the spectrum and claimed that it was discrete. They argued that the spectrum may have hit upon a desperate remedy to save the "exchange theorem" of statistics and the law

Murayama, Hitoshi

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mam represents interactions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Quenching Processes in Flame-Vortex Interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Astrophysical Thermonuclear Flashes 1 , Chicago, IL 60637 y Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University-vortex interactions in order to understand quenching of thermonuclear ames. The key question is|can a ther- monuclear. If a ame encounters a 1) The Center for Astrophysical Thermonuclear Flashes is supported by the Department

Zingale, Michael

442

Gloss: interactive navigation of lexical space  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Purchase,H.C. Kennish,J.M. Proceedings of the Asia-Pacific conference on Human Computer Interaction, Yong, L.K., Herman, L., Leung, Y.K. and Moyes, J. (eds), Information Technology Institute, National Computer Board of Singapore

Purchase, H.C.

443

Investigation of electrons interaction in a superconductor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Investigating the interaction of electrons in a superconductor by means of a method of solitary waves of Korteweg - de Vries, we refute the claim of absence of "Cooper pairs" in a superconductor. We also indicate that the nondissipative transfer of energy in the superconductor is possible only with the help of a pair of electrons.

Iogann Tolbatov

2009-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

444

Interactive physically-based cloud simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of digital artistic media. Previous methods for modeling the growth of clouds do not account for the fluid interactions that are responsible for cloud formation in the physical atmosphere. We propose a model for simulating cloud formation based on a basic...

Overby, Derek Robert

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Interaction Region Issues at the NLC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two detector concepts are being investigated for the Next Linear Collider. This paper discusses the current design of the interaction region for one of them, based on a 6 Tesla solenoid and silicon based tracking. Topics include masking layout, backgrounds and the suppression of final quadrupole jitter. All calculations are based on the 1 TeV design parameters.

Markiewicz, Thomas W.; Maruyama, T.; /SLAC

2007-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

446

Species Interactions Reverse Grassland Responses to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

droughts. Eco- logical responses to climate change in regions with Mediterranean climate regimes maySpecies Interactions Reverse Grassland Responses to Changing Climate K. B. Suttle,1 * Meredith A. Thomsen,2 Mary E. Power1 Predictions of ecological response to climate change are based largely on direct

Wilmers, Chris

447

Validation and Interactivity of Web API Documentation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of APIs in the directory and shows that REST1 [3] is in the majority and is growing faster than any other validation. 1ProgrammableWeb API styles are self-reported by the API owners, and APIs reported as RESTful mayValidation and Interactivity of Web API Documentation Peter J. Danielsen and Alan Jeffrey Bell Labs

Jeffrey, Alan

448

Nonstandard neutrino interactions and transition magnetic moments  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

We constrain generic nonstandard neutrino interactions with existing experimental data on neutrino transition magnetic moments and derive strong bounds on tensorial couplings of neutrinos to charged fermions. We also discuss how some of these tensorial couplings can be constrained by other experiments, e.g., on neutrino-electron and neutrino-nucleus scattering.

Healey, Kristopher J.; Petrov, Alexey A.; Zhuridov, Dmitry

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Module name: Interactive computer graphics Abbreviation: ICG  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Module name: Interactive computer graphics Abbreviation: ICG Study semester: 2 nd semester (SS majoring in "Graphics and Visualization" Teaching methods/SWS: 2 SWS lecture with approx. 15 students 2 SWS: Computer Vision, cryptography and algorithms, computer graphics lecture in Bachelor study program Learning

Ahlers, Volker - Fakultät IV

450

Operating System Support for Mobile Interactive Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Such applications demand good interactive response. However, their environments are resource­poor and turbulent, predictive resource management, history­ based demand prediction, augmented reality, machine learning #12 --- augmented reality --- has enormous potential in fields ranging from entertainment to aircraft maintenance

451

Three Interactions between Context and Epistemic Locutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Three Interactions between Context and Epistemic Locutions Richmond H. Thomason Philosophy (1) the effects of temporal perspective on knowledge of the future, (2) the effects of perceived risk;1. Introduction From the start, philosophy has been full of arguments that start off plausibly enough

Thomason, Richmond H.

452

Interaction Sheaves on Continuous Hans Keiding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interaction Sheaves on Continuous Domains J. Abdou Hans Keiding Revised version March 2009 of game forms obtained in the finite case in Abdou and Keiding (2003). Keywords: Nash equilibrium, strong'H^opital 75647 Paris Cedex 13; email: abdou@univ-paris1.fr University of Copenhagen, Department of Economics

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

453

Ecological interactions between hatchery summer steelhead and wild Oncorhynchus mykiss in the Willamette River basin, 2014  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which juvenile hatchery summer steelhead and wild winter steelhead overlap in space and time, to evaluate the extent of residualism among hatchery summer steelhead in the South Santiam River, and to evaluate the potential for negative ecological interactions among hatchery summer steelhead and wild winter steelhead. Because it is not possible to visually discern juvenile winter steelhead from resident rainbow trout, we treated all adipose-intact juvenile O. mykiss as one group that represented juvenile wild winter steelhead. The 2014 study objectives were to 1) estimate the proportion of hatchery summer steelhead that residualized in the South Santiam River in 2014, 2) determine the extent to which hatchery and naturally produced O. mykiss overlapped in space and time in the South Santiam River, and 3) characterize the behavioral interactions between hatchery-origin juvenile summer steelhead and naturally produced O. mykiss. We used a combination of radio telemetry and direct observations (i.e., snorkeling) to determine the potential for negative interactions between hatchery summer and wild winter steelhead juveniles in the South Santiam River. Data collected from these two independent methods indicated that a significant portion of the hatchery summer steelhead released as smolts did not rapidly emigrate from the South Santiam River in 2014. Of the 164 radio-tagged steelhead that volitionally left the hatchery, only 66 (40.2%) were detected outside of the South Santiam River. Forty-four (26.8% of 164) of the radio-tagged hatchery summer steelhead successfully emigrated to Willamette Falls. Thus, the last known location of the majority of the tagged fish (98 of 164 = 59.8%) was in the South Santiam River. Thirty-three of the tagged hatchery steelhead were detected in the South Santiam River during mobile-tracking surveys. Of those, 21 were found to be alive in the South Santiam River over three months after their release, representing a residualization rate of 12.8% (21 of 164). Snorkeling revealed considerable overlap of habitat use (in space and time) by residual hatchery steelhead and naturally produced O. mykiss in the South Santiam River. Results from our study (and others) also indicated that hatchery steelhead juveniles typically dominate interactions with naturally produced O. mykiss juveniles. The overlap in space and time, combined with the competitive advantage that residual hatchery steelhead appear to have over naturally produced O. mykiss, increases the potential for negative ecological interactions that could have population-level effects on the wild winter steelhead population of the South Santiam River.

Harnish, Ryan A.; Green, Ethan D.; Vernon, Christopher R.; Mcmichael, Geoffrey A.

2014-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

454

Pseudopotentials of the particles interactions in complex plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article discusses the effective interaction potentials in a complex dusty plasma. The interaction of electrons with atoms and the interaction between dusty particles are studied by the method of the dielectric response function. In the effective interaction, potential between electron and atom the quantum effects of diffraction were taken into account. On the curve of the interaction potential between dust particles under certain conditions the oscillations can be observed.

Ramazanov, T. S.; Moldabekov, Zh. A.; Dzhumagulova, K. N.; Muratov, M. M. [Al Farabi Kazakh National University, IETP, Tole bi 96a, Almaty 050012 (Kazakhstan)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

455

Elementary Act of Consciousness or Cycle of Mind, involving Distant and Nonlocal Interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Each macroscopic process can be subdivided on the quantum and classical stages. Particularly, the quantum stages of Cycle of Mind involves:1) the stimulation of dynamic correlation between water clusters in the same and remote microtubules (MTs) in state of mesoscopic Bose condensation (mBC) by phonons (acoustic waves) and by librational IR photons (electromagnetic-EM waves) distant exchange; 2) the transition from distant EM interaction between remote MTs to nonlocal quantum interaction, induced by IR photons exchange between clusters, the clusters Virtual Replicas multiplication (VRM) and virtual guides (VirG) formation between elementary particles of remote coherent water molecules. This process represents transition from mesoscopic Bose condensation to macroscopic nonuniform semi-virtual Bose condensation (VirBC) (Kaivarainen, 2006, http://arxiv.org/abs/physics/0207027); 3) the collapsing of corresponding macroscopic wave function, as a result of the optical bistability of the entangled water clusters and their disassembly due to librational photons pumping, shifting clusters to less stable state; 4) turning the clusterphilic interaction between water clusters in the open state of cavities between alpha and beta tubulins to hydrophobic one and the in-phase shift of these cavities to the closed state due to clusters disassembly (Kaivarainen, http://arxiv.org/abs/physics/0102086). The classical stages of our Hierarchic model of elementary act of Cycle of Mind are analyzed in detail.

Alex Kaivarainen

2007-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

456

Materials of interaction : responsive materials in the design of transformable interactive surfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Materials that embody computational properties are reshaping the ways in which we design, interact and communicate. This thesis looks at the topic of form transformation and how to bring the programmability and versatility ...

Coelho, Marcelo

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Interaction Junk: User Interaction-Based Evaluation of Visual Analytic Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the growing need for visualization to aid users in understanding large, complex datasets, the ability for users to interact and explore these datasets is critical. As visual analytic systems have advanced to leverage powerful computational models and data analytics capabilities, the modes by which users engage and interact with the information are limited. Often, users are taxed with directly manipulating parameters of these models through traditional GUIs (e.g., using sliders to directly manipulate the value of a parameter). However, the purpose of user interaction in visual analytic systems is to enable visual data exploration – where users can focus on their task, as opposed to the tool or system. As a result, users can engage freely in data exploration and decision-making, for the purpose of gaining insight. In this position paper, we discuss how evaluating visual analytic systems can be approached through user interaction analysis, where the goal is to minimize the cognitive translation between the visual metaphor and the mode of interaction (i.e., reducing the “Interactionjunk”). We motivate this concept through a discussion of traditional GUIs used in visual analytics for direct manipulation of model parameters, and the importance of designing interactions the support visual data exploration.

Endert, Alexander; North, Chris

2012-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

458

Interaction between Injection Points during Hydraulic Fracturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a model of the hydraulic fracturing of heterogeneous poroelastic media. The formalism is an effective continuum model that captures the coupled dynamics of the fluid pressure and the fractured rock matrix and models both the tensile and shear failure of the rock. As an application of the formalism, we study the geomechanical stress interaction between two injection points during hydraulic fracturing (hydrofracking) and how this interaction influences the fracturing process. For injection points that are separated by less than a critical correlation length, we find that the fracturing process around each point is strongly correlated with the position of the neighboring point. The magnitude of the correlation length depends on the degree of heterogeneity of the rock and is on the order of 30-45 m for rocks with low permeabilities. In the strongly correlated regime, we predict a novel effective fracture-force that attracts the fractures toward the neighboring injection point.

Hals, Kjetil M D

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Interactions Between Evanescent Photons and Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The evanescent waves named as EW1, EW2, EW3 are described in 3 respective experimental setups: 1) total internal reflection; 2) scattering on an inhomogeneous planar target; and 3) propagation along a waveguide. Some interactions are considered between EW2 and the environment. The latter may include a beam of probing particles and/or the screen on which the EW2 are formed. Some new properties of EW are described, such as complex energy eigenvalues in case of a movable screen, and evanescence exchange between the interacting objects. This reveals the connection between evanescent states and the Gamow states of the studied system. The 4-momentum exchange between EW2 and the probe is highly selective and may collapse the superposition of studied EW2- eigenstates to a single EW-eigenstate of the probing particle. Possible imprints of EW2 in the far field are briefly discussed and a simple experiment is suggested for their observation. .

Moses Fayngold

2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

460

Fluctuation induced interactions between domains in membranes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study a model lipid bilayer composed of a mixture of two incompatible lipid types which have a natural tendency to segregate in the absence of membrane fluctuations. The membrane is mechanically characterized by a local bending rigidity $\\kappa(\\phi)$ which varies with the average local lipid composition $\\phi$. We show, in the case where $\\kappa$ varies weakly with $\\phi$, that the effective interaction between lipids of the same type can either be everywhere attractive or can have a repulsive component at intermediate distances greater than the typical lipid size. When this interaction has a repulsive component, it can prevent macro-phase separation and lead to separation in mesophases with a finite domain size. This effect could be relevant to certain experimental and numerical observations of mesoscopic domains in such systems.

D. S. Dean; M. Manghi

2006-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mam represents interactions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Atomistic modeling of dislocation-interface interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using atomic scale models and interface defect theory, we first classify interface structures into a few types with respect to geometrical factors, then study the interfacial shear response and further simulate the dislocation-interface interactions using molecular dynamics. The results show that the atomic scale structural characteristics of both heterophases and homophases interfaces play a crucial role in (i) their mechanical responses and (ii) the ability of incoming lattice dislocations to transmit across them.

Wang, Jian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Valone, Steven M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Beyerlein, Irene J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Misra, Amit [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Germann, T. C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

462

Foundation of Hydrodynamics of Strongly Interacting Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrodynamics and quantum mechanics have many elements in common, as the density field and velocity fields are common variables that can be constructed in both descriptions. Starting with the Schroedinger equation and the Klein-Gordon for a single particle in hydrodynamical form, we examine the basic assumptions under which a quantum system of particles interacting through their mean fields can be described by hydrodynamics.

Cheuk-Yin Wong

2014-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

463

On Principle of Universality of Gravitational Interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work, the experiment is discussed on the verification of the principle of universality of gravitational interactions and some related problems of gravity theory and physics of elementary particles. The meaning of this proposal lies in the fact that the self-consistency of General Relativity, as it turns out, presuppose the existence of the nongravitating form of energy. Theory predicts that electrons are particles that transfer the nongravitating form of energy.

I. B. Pestov

2001-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

464

Electromagnetic interactions at RHIC and LHC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

At LHC energies the Lorentz factor will be 3400 for the Pb + Pb collisions and the electromagnetic interactions will play important roles. Cross sections for the electromagnetic particle productions are very large and can not be ignored for the lifetimes of the beams and background. In this article, we are going to study some of the electromagnetic processes at RHIC and LHC and show the cross section calculations of the electron-positron pair production with the giant dipole resonance of the ions.

M. C. Guclu

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

465

Thermodynamics of Interacting Fermions in Atomic Traps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We calculate the entropy in a trapped, resonantly interacting Fermi gas as a function of temperature for a wide range of magnetic fields between the BCS and Bose-Einstein condensation end points. This provides a basis for the important technique of adiabatic sweep thermometry and serves to characterize quantitatively the evolution and nature of the excitations of the gas. The results are then used to calibrate the temperature in several ground breaking experiments on {sup 6}Li and {sup 40}K.

Chen Qijin; Stajic, Jelena; Levin, K. [James Franck Institute and Department of Physics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

466

Social Interactions, Ethnicity and Fertility in Kenya  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Social Interactions, Ethnicity and Fertility in Kenya#3; Sriya Iyer Faculty of Economics University of Cambridge Melvyn Weeks Faculty of Economics University of Cambridge January 2009 #3;Acknowledgements: For helpful comments and discussions we... in Microeconomics, and St. Catharine?s College, Cambridge. We are especially grateful to Mrs. Zipporah Onchari and the Director of the Kenya Meteorological Services for giving us access to their rainfall data and for patiently answering our many questions. We...

Iyer, Sriya; Weeks, Melvyn

467

Sandia National Laboratories: plasma materials interactions studies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1developmentturbine bladelifetime ismobileparallelplantplasma materials interactions

468

E-Print Network 3.0 - atomic oxygen interactions Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

interactions Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: atomic oxygen interactions...

469

E-Print Network 3.0 - atomic oxygen interaction Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

interaction Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: atomic oxygen interaction...

470

Integration of spatial datasets to suppor t the review of hydrometric networks and the identification of representative catchments Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(6), 11031117 (2004) EGU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the identification of representative catchments 1103 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(6), 11031117 (2004) © EGU of representative catchments C.L.R. Laize Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 8BB, UK E into account the reduction in hydrological uncertainty brought about by the data added since the last network

Boyer, Edmond

471

Field theoretic description of charge regulation interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In order to find the exact form of the electrostatic interaction between two proteins with dissociable charge groups in aqueous solution, we have studied a model system composed of two macroscopic surfaces with charge dissociation sites immersed in a counterion-only ionic solution. Field-theoretic representation of the grand canonical partition function is derived and evaluated within the mean-field approximation, giving the Poisson-Boltzmann theory with the Ninham-Parsegian boundary condition. Gaussian fluctuations around the mean-field are then analyzed in the lowest order correction that we calculate analytically and exactly, using the path integral representation for the partition function of a harmonic oscillator with time-dependent frequency. The first order (one loop) free energy correction gives the interaction free energy that reduces to the zero-frequency van der Waals form in the appropriate limit but in general gives rise to a mono-polar fluctuation term due to charge fluctuation at the dissociation sites. Our formulation opens up the possibility to investigate the Kirkwood-Shumaker interaction in more general contexts where their original derivation fails.

Natasa Adzic; Rudolf Podgornik

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

472

Redshift drift exploration for interacting dark energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By detecting redshift drift in the spectra of Lyman-$\\alpha$ forest of distant quasars, Sandage-Loeb (SL) test directly measures the expansion of the universe, covering the "redshift desert" of $2 \\lesssim z \\lesssim5$. Thus this method is definitely an important supplement to the other geometric measurements and will play a crucial role in cosmological constraints. In this paper, we quantify the ability of SL test signal by a CODEX-like spectrograph for constraining interacting dark energy. Four typical interacting dark energy models are considered: (\\romannumeral1) $Q=\\gamma H\\rho_c$, (\\romannumeral2) $Q=\\gamma H\\rho_{de}$, (\\romannumeral3) $Q=\\gamma H_0\\rho_c$, and (\\romannumeral4) $Q=\\gamma H_0\\rho_{de}$. The results show that for all the considered interacting dark energy models, relative to the current joint SN+BAO+CMB+$H_0$ observations, the constraints on $\\Omega_m$ and $H_0$ would be improved by about 60\\% and 30--40\\%, while the constraints on $w$ and $\\gamma$ would be slightly improved, with a 30-y...

Geng, Jia-Jia; Zhang, Jing-Fei; Zhang, Xin

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Intense Magnetized Plasma-Wall Interaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research project studied wall-plasma interactions relevant to fusion science. Such interactions are a critical aspect of Magneto-Inertial Fusion (MIF) because flux compression by a pusher material, in particular the metal for the liner approach to MIF, involves strong eddy current heating on the surface of the pusher, and probably interactions and mixing of the pusher with the interior fuel during the time when fusion fuel is being burned. When the pusher material is a metal liner, high-energy-density conditions result in fascinating behavior. For example, "warm dense matter" is produced, for which material properties such as resistivity and opacity are not well known. In this project, the transformation into plasma of metal walls subjected to pulsed megagauss magnetic fields was studied with an experiment driven by the UNR 1 MA Zebra generator. The experiment was numerically simulated with using the MHRDR code. This simple, fundamental high-energy-density physics experiment, in a regime appropriate to MIF, has stimulated an important and fascinating comparison of numerical modeling codes and tables with experiment. In addition, we participated in developing the FRCHX experiment to compress a field-reversed-configuration (FRC) plasma with a liner, in collaboration with researchers from Air Force Research Laboratory and Los Alamos National Lab, and we helped develop diagnostics for the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) at LANL. Last, but not least, this project served to train students in high-energy-density physics.

Bauer, Bruno S. [UNR] [UNR; Fuelling, Stephan [UNR] [UNR

2013-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

474

ANTENNA-COUPLED LIGHT-MATTER INTERACTIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project is focused on antenna-coupled photon emission from single quantum emitters. The properties of optical antennas are tailored to control different photophysical parameters, such as the excited state lifetime, the saturation intensity, and the quantum yield [3]. Using a single molecule coupled to an optical antenna whose position and properties can be controllably adjusted we established a detailed and quantitative understanding of light-matter interactions in nanoscale environments. We have studied various quantum emitters: single molecules [11], quantum dots [7], rareearth ions [2], and NV centers in diamond [19]. We have systematically studied the interaction of these emitters with optical antennas. The overall objective was to establish a high-level of control over the light-matter interaction. In order to eliminate the coupling to the environment, we have taken a step further and explored the possibility of levitating the quantum emitter in high vacuum. What started as a side-project soon became a main activity in our research program and led us to the demonstration of vacuum trapping and cooling of a nanoscale particle [14].

NOVOTNY, LUKAS

2014-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

475

Pseudo-interactive monitoring in distributed computing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Distributed computing, and in particular Grid computing, enables physicists to use thousands of CPU days worth of computing every day, by submitting thousands of compute jobs. Unfortunately, a small fraction of such jobs regularly fail; the reasons vary from disk and network problems to bugs in the user code. A subset of these failures result in jobs being stuck for long periods of time. In order to debug such failures, interactive monitoring is highly desirable; users need to browse through the job log files and check the status of the running processes. Batch systems typically don't provide such services; at best, users get job logs at job termination, and even this may not be possible if the job is stuck in an infinite loop. In this paper we present a novel approach of using regular batch system capabilities of Condor to enable users to access the logs and processes of any running job. This does not provide true interactive access, so commands like vi are not viable, but it does allow operations like ls, cat, top, ps, lsof, netstat and dumping the stack of any process owned by the user; we call this pseudo-interactive monitoring. It is worth noting that the same method can be used to monitor Grid jobs in a glidein-based environment. We further believe that the same mechanism could be applied to many other batch systems.

Sfiligoi, I.; /Fermilab; Bradley, D.; Livny, M.; /Wisconsin U., Madison

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Programs for attracting under-represented minority students to graduate school and research careers in computational science. Final report for period October 1, 1995 - September 30, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Programs have been established at Florida A & M University to attract minority students to research careers in mathematics and computational science. The primary goal of the program was to increase the number of such students studying computational science via an interactive multimedia learning environment One mechanism used for meeting this goal was the development of educational modules. This academic year program established within the mathematics department at Florida A&M University, introduced students to computational science projects using high-performance computers. Additional activities were conducted during the summer, these included workshops, meetings, and lectures. Through the exposure provided by this program to scientific ideas and research in computational science, it is likely that their successful applications of tools from this interdisciplinary field will be high.

Turner, James C. Jr.; Mason, Thomas; Guerrieri, Bruno

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Exploring the tug of war between positive and negative interactions among savanna trees: Competition, dispersal, and protection from fire  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Savannas are characterized by a discontinuous tree layer superimposed on a continuous layer of grass. Identifying the mechanisms that facilitate this tree-grass coexistence has remained a persistent challenge in ecology and is known as the "savanna problem". In this work, we propose a model that combines a previous savanna model (Calabrese et al., 2010), which includes competitive interactions among trees and dispersal, with the Drossel-Schwabl forest fire model, therefore representing fire in a spatially explicit manner. The model is used to explore how the pattern of fire-spread, coupled with an explicit, fire-vulnerable tree life stage, affects tree density and spatial pattern. Tree density depends strongly on both fire frequency and tree-tree competition although the fire frequency, which induces indirect interactions between trees and between trees and grass, appears to be the crucial factor controlling the tree-extinction transition in which the savanna becomes grassland. Depending on parameters, adult ...

Bacelar, Flora S; Hernández-García, Emílio

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Interfacial Interactions between Implant Electrode and Biological Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

interactions to the charge transport. The interfacial interactions of an implanted electrode with neural system will be studied in two types of electrodes: silver and graphene coated. The interfacial impedance of both samples will be studied using EIS...

Chiu, Cheng-Wei 1979-

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

479

Tissue-material interactions : bioadhesion and tissue response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diverse interactions between soft tissues and implanted biomaterials directly influence the success or failure of therapeutic interventions. The nature and extent of these interactions strongly depend on both the tissue ...

Shazly, Tarek (Tarek Michael)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

An Interactive Visual Analytics Framework for Multi-Field Data...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Interactive Visual Analytics Framework for Multi-Field Data in a Geo-Spatial Context. An Interactive Visual Analytics Framework for Multi-Field Data in a Geo-Spatial Context....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mam represents interactions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

antibody-antigen interacting associations: Topics by E-print...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

epitope-specific protein-protein interactions with computational atomistic interaction free energy remains predetermined antigen epitopes. Citation: Yu C-M, Peng H-P, Chen I-C,...

482

GENOTYPE x ENVIRONMENT INTERACTIONS (1) J. C. BOWMAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GENOTYPE x ENVIRONMENT INTERACTIONS (1) J. C. BOWMAN Department of Agriculture, University of Reading, Great Britain SUMMARY A genotype x environment interaction may be defined as a change in the relative perfor- mance of a 'environments

Boyer, Edmond

483

GEODESIC INTERACTIVE SEGMENTATION IN THE COLOR MONOGENIC SIGNAL Explora Nova,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GEODESIC INTERACTIVE SEGMENTATION IN THE COLOR MONOGENIC SIGNAL FRAMEWORK G. Demarcq Explora Nova is based on the computation of geodesic distances within color mono- genic signal (CMS) fields-- Interactive Segmentation, Clifford Alge- bra, Color Monogenic Signal, Geodesic Distances 1. INTRODUCTION

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

484

We're Data Jammin': Building Interactive Educational Materials...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

We're Data Jammin': Building Interactive Educational Materials to Teach Energy We're Data Jammin': Building Interactive Educational Materials to Teach Energy April 4, 2014 - 4:07pm...

485

Enriching personal information management with document interaction histories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Enriching personal information management with document interaction histories by Karl Gyllstrom;Abstract KARL GYLLSTROM: Enriching personal information management with document interaction histories. (Under the direction of David Stotts.) Personal information management is increasingly challenging

Whitton, Mary C.

486

Creators, Audiences, and New Media: Creativity in an Interactive Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

interact with creators. In the process, the conceptual limits of bounded roles such as "publics" and "fandoms" will be examined, and the complicating factors of new media interactivity will be established. Chapter Two, "Permeable Boundaries: The Shifting...

Bell, Isaac William

2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

487

Land-atmosphere interaction and radiative-convective equilibrium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I present work on several topics related to land-atmosphere interaction and radiative-convective equilibrium: the first two research chapters invoke ideas related to land-atmosphere interaction to better understand ...

Cronin, Timothy (Timothy Wallace)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Perceptually-Driven Decision Theory for Interactive Realistic Rendering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Perceptually-Driven Decision Theory for Interactive Realistic Rendering REYNALD DUMONT, FABIO rendering at interactive rates on commodity graphics hardware. The approach uses efficient perceptual metrics within a decision theoretic framework to optimally order rendering operations, pro- ducing images

Ferwerda, James A.

489

MSc Human-Computer Interaction with Ergonomics MSc Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MSc Human-Computer Interaction with Ergonomics MSc Project Web analytics and think aloud studies-Computer Interaction with Ergonomics) in the Faculty of Life Sciences, University College London, [2007]. NOTE

Blandford, Ann

490

Interacting populations : hosts and pathogens, prey and predators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The interactions between populations can be positive, neutral or negative. Predation and parasitism are both relationships where one species benefits from the interaction at the expense of the other. Predators kill their ...

Klepac, Petra

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Second Harmonic Generation Studies of Fe(II) Interactions with...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Second Harmonic Generation Studies of Fe(II) Interactions with Hematite (?-Fe2O3). Second Harmonic Generation Studies of Fe(II) Interactions with Hematite (?-Fe2O3)....

492

Modeling, estimation, and control of robot-soil interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents the development of hardware, theory, and experimental methods to enable a robotic manipulator arm to interact with soils and estimate soil properties from interaction forces. Unlike the majority of ...

Hong, Won, 1971-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Crack stability in a representative piping system under combined inertial and seismic/dynamic displacement-controlled stresses. Subtask 1.3 final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results from Subtask 1.3 of the International Piping Integrity Research Group (IPIRG) program. The objective of Subtask 1.3 is to develop data to assess analysis methodologies for characterizing the fracture behavior of circumferentially cracked pipe in a representative piping system under combined inertial and displacement-controlled stresses. A unique experimental facility was designed and constructed. The piping system evaluated is an expansion loop with over 30 meters of 16-inch diameter Schedule 100 pipe. The experimental facility is equipped with special hardware to ensure system boundary conditions could be appropriately modeled. The test matrix involved one uncracked and five cracked dynamic pipe-system experiments. The uncracked experiment was conducted to evaluate piping system damping and natural frequency characteristics. The cracked-pipe experiments evaluated the fracture behavior, pipe system response, and stability characteristics of five different materials. All cracked-pipe experiments were conducted at PWR conditions. Material characterization efforts provided tensile and fracture toughness properties of the different pipe materials at various strain rates and temperatures. Results from all pipe-system experiments and material characterization efforts are presented. Results of fracture mechanics analyses, dynamic finite element stress analyses, and stability analyses are presented and compared with experimental results.

Scott, P.; Olson, R.; Wilkowski, O.G.; Marschall, C.; Schmidt, R.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Discrete-element model for the interaction between ocean waves and sea ice  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a discrete element method (DEM) model to simulate the mechanical behavior of sea ice in response to ocean waves. The wave/ice interaction can potentially lead to the fracture and fragmentation of sea ice depending on the wave amplitude and period. The fracture behavior of sea ice is explicitly modeled by a DEM method, where sea ice is modeled by densely packed spherical particles with finite size. These particles are bonded together at their contact points through mechanical bonds that can sustain both tensile & compressive forces and moments. Fracturing can be naturally represented by the sequential breaking of mechanical bonds. For a given amplitude and period of incident ocean wave, the model provides information for the spatial distribution and time evolution of stress and micro-fractures and the fragment size distribution. We demonstrate that the fraction of broken bonds,, increases with increasing wave amplitude. In contrast, the ice fragment size decreases with increasing amplitude.

Xu, Zhijie; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Pan, Wenxiao

2012-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

495

Modeling aerosols and their interactions with shallow cumuli during the 2007 CHAPS field study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with chemistry (WRF-Chem) is used to simulate relationships between aerosols and clouds in the vicinity of Oklahoma City during the June 2007 Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study (CHAPS). The regional scale simulation completed using 2 km horizontal grid spacing evaluates four important relationships between aerosols and shallow cumulus clouds observed during CHAPS. First, the model reproduces the trends of higher nitrate volume fractions in cloud droplet residuals compared to interstitial non-activated aerosols, as measured using the Aerosol Mass Spectrometer. Comparing simulations with cloud chemistry turned on and off, we show that nitric acid vapor uptake by cloud droplets explains the higher nitrate content of cloud droplet residuals. Second, as documented using an offline code, both aerosol water and other inorganics (OIN), which are related to dust and crustal emissions, significantly affect predicted aerosol optical properties. Reducing the OIN content of wet aerosols by 50% significantly improves agreement of model predictions with measurements of aerosol optical properties. Third, the simulated hygroscopicity of aerosols is too high as compared to their hygroscopicity derived from cloud condensation nuclei and particle size distribution measurements, indicating uncertainties associated with simulating size-dependent chemical composition and treatment of aerosol mixing state within the model. Fourth, the model reasonably represents the observations of the first aerosol indirect effect where pollutants in the vicinity of Oklahoma City increase cloud droplet number concentrations and decrease the droplet effective radius. While previous studies have often focused on cloud-aerosol interactions in stratiform and deep convective clouds, this study highlights the ability of regional-scale models to represent some of the important aspects of cloud-aerosol interactions associated with fields of short-lived shallow cumuli.

Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Berg, Larry K.; Fast, Jerome D.; Easter, Richard C.; Laskin, Alexander; Chapman, Elaine G.; Gustafson, William I.; Liu, Ying; Berkowitz, Carl M.

2013-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

496

Experience, Engagement and Social Interaction at a Steam Locomotive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of two interactive stations (figure 2) where visitors can add coal and water to the steam engine at station 1 and regulate the steam pressure in the engine at station 2, as well as a number of visualExperience, Engagement and Social Interaction at a Steam Locomotive Multimodal Interactive Museum

Hornecker, Eva

497

World Data Center for Human Interactions in the Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

World Data Center for Human Interactions in the Environment Why Demographic Data are not Up Interactions in the Environment Introduction · AR4 (Schneider et al. 2007: 782): ­ An impact describes Interactions in the Environment Introduction (cont.) · Layers of vulnerability ­ Everyone is vulnerable

Columbia University

498

Mobile Interaction with Web Services through Associated Real World Objects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mobile Interaction with Web Services through Associated Real World Objects 1 Gregor Broll, 2 John to access and interact with Web Services through mobile interaction with real world objects. The demonstration will put a focus on the front-end of the framework that comprises augmented posters for mobile

499

Does interactivity improve exploratory data analysis of animated trend visualization?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

]. In particular, animation has become a popular method for visualizing trends in multivariate information spaces1 Does interactivity improve exploratory data analysis of animated trend visualization? Felwa A technique for data analysis of large data. We compared interactive animations with non-interactive (passive

Shaw, Chris

500

$(1+1)$ dimensional Dirac equation with non Hermitian interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study $(1+1)$ dimensional Dirac equation with non Hermitian interactions, but real energies. In particular, we analyze the pseudoscalar and scalar interactions in detail, illustrating our observations with some examples. We also show that the relevant hidden symmetry of the Dirac equation with such an interaction is pseudo supersymmetry.

A. Sinha; P. Roy

2005-11-29T23:59:59.000Z