Sample records for mam represents interactions

  1. MAM-06, 28 MAY -1 JUNE, WASEDA, TOKYO, JAPAN MICRO-/NANOFLUIDIC COMPUTING AND ITS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Munakata, Toshinori

    MAM-06, 28 MAY - 1 JUNE, WASEDA, TOKYO, JAPAN Pa-098 MICRO-/NANOFLUIDIC COMPUTING AND ITS Department of Chemistry, Cleveland State University, Cleveland, OH 44115, USA. Micro-/nanofluidics control liquids on a scale in the order of microns and nanometers [1]. Because of its very small scale, micro-/nanofluidics

  2. Improving best-phase image quality in cardiac CT by motion correction with MAM optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohkohl, Christopher; Bruder, Herbert; Stierstorfer, Karl [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Siemensstrasse 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Flohr, Thomas [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Siemensstrasse 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Eberhard Karls University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Research in image reconstruction for cardiac CT aims at using motion correction algorithms to improve the image quality of the coronary arteries. The key to those algorithms is motion estimation, which is currently based on 3-D/3-D registration to align the structures of interest in images acquired in multiple heart phases. The need for an extended scan data range covering several heart phases is critical in terms of radiation dose to the patient and limits the clinical potential of the method. Furthermore, literature reports only slight quality improvements of the motion corrected images when compared to the most quiet phase (best-phase) that was actually used for motion estimation. In this paper a motion estimation algorithm is proposed which does not require an extended scan range but works with a short scan data interval, and which markedly improves the best-phase image quality. Methods: Motion estimation is based on the definition of motion artifact metrics (MAM) to quantify motion artifacts in a 3-D reconstructed image volume. The authors use two different MAMs, entropy, and positivity. By adjusting the motion field parameters, the MAM of the resulting motion-compensated reconstruction is optimized using a gradient descent procedure. In this way motion artifacts are minimized. For a fast and practical implementation, only analytical methods are used for motion estimation and compensation. Both the MAM-optimization and a 3-D/3-D registration-based motion estimation algorithm were investigated by means of a computer-simulated vessel with a cardiac motion profile. Image quality was evaluated using normalized cross-correlation (NCC) with the ground truth template and root-mean-square deviation (RMSD). Four coronary CT angiography patient cases were reconstructed to evaluate the clinical performance of the proposed method. Results: For the MAM-approach, the best-phase image quality could be improved for all investigated heart phases, with a maximum improvement of the NCC value by 100% and of the RMSD value by 81%. The corresponding maximum improvements for the registration-based approach were 20% and 40%. In phases with very rapid motion the registration-based algorithm obtained better image quality, while the image quality of the MAM algorithm was superior in phases with less motion. The image quality improvement of the MAM optimization was visually confirmed for the different clinical cases. Conclusions: The proposed method allows a software-based best-phase image quality improvement in coronary CT angiography. A short scan data interval at the target heart phase is sufficient, no additional scan data in other cardiac phases are required. The algorithm is therefore directly applicable to any standard cardiac CT acquisition protocol.

  3. Subcellular localization of the magnetosome protein MamC in the marine magnetotactic bacterium Magnetococcus marinus strain MC-1 using immunoelectron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valverde-Tercedor, C [Universidad de Granada; Abada-Molina, F [Universidad de Granada; Martinez-Bueno, M [Universidad de Granada; Pineda-Molina, Estela [Laboratorio de Estudios Cristalograficos; Chen, Lijun [Ohio State University; Oestreicher, Zachery [Ohio State University; Lower, Brian H [Ohio State University; Lower, Steven K [Ohio State University; Bazylinski, Dennis A [Ames Laboratory; Jimenez-Lopez, C [Universidad de Granada

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetotactic bacteria are a diverse group of prokaryotes that biomineralize intracellular magnetosomes, composed of magnetic (Fe3O4) crystals each enveloped by a lipid bilayer membrane that contains proteins not found in other parts of the cell. Although partial roles of some of these magnetosome proteins have been determined, the roles of most have not been completely elucidated, particularly in how they regulate the biomineralization process. While studies on the localization of these proteins have been focused solely on Magnetospirillum species, the goal of the present study was to determine, for the first time, the localization of the most abundant putative magnetosome membrane protein, MamC, in Magnetococcus marinus strain MC-1. MamC was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Monoclonal antibodies were produced against MamC and immunogold labeling TEM was used to localize MamC in thin sections of cells of M. marinus. Results show that MamC is located only in the magnetosome membrane of Mc. marinus. Based on our findings and the abundance of this protein, it seems likely that it is important in magnetosome biomineralization and might be used in controlling the characteristics of synthetic nanomagnetite.

  4. Representing Trees with Constraints 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curry, Benjamin; Wiggins, Geraint; Hayes, Gillian

    This paper presents a method for representing trees using constraint logic programming over finite domains. We describe a class of trees that is of particular interest to us and how we can represent the set of trees belonging to that class using...

  5. MA-m & Downstream Coil I.R. with B(z) = 1.5 T at 4.2 m, 4.5 m & 5 m Bob Weggel Magnet Optimization Research Engineering (M.O.R.E.), LLC Nov. 22, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    MA-m & Downstream Coil I.R. with B(z) = 1.5 T at 4.2 m, 4.5 m & 5 m Bob Weggel Magnet Optimization, the optimization program adjusts the inner radius of the downstream coil, in order that the ramp bottom out. It uses (182+400) = 582 MA-m of conductor; the inner radius of its downstream coil is 94 cm. To increase L

  6. What do kets represent?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casey Blood

    2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    It is usually assumed that a ket represents the state of an actually existing particle. But one can show there is no evidence for particles. The particle-like properties of mass, spin and charge, as well as particle-like trajectories, the photoelectric effect, and localized effects from spread-out wave functions can be explained using quantum mechanics alone. It is therefore proposed instead that kets represent particle-like solutions to a pre-representational linear partial differential equation which has Poincar\\'e and internal symmetries. This equation underlies the completely representational character, including mass, spin, charge, internal symmetries, and symmetric and antisymmetric statistics, of current quantum mechanics.

  7. What does motor efference copy represent? evidence from speech production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niziolek, CA; Nagarajan, SS; Houde, JF

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    What does motor efference copy represent? Evidence fromAbbreviated title: What does motor efference copy represent?SJ, Wang X (2003) Sensory-Motor Interaction in the Primate

  8. Wave represents displacement Wave represents pressure Source -Sound Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    Wave represents displacement Wave represents pressure Source - Sound Waves Distance between crests is wavelength Number of crests passing a point in 1 second is frequency Wave represents pressure Target - Radio Waves Distance between crests is wavelength Number of crests passing a point in 1 second is frequency

  9. Interaction Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hehner, Eric C.R.

    Interaction 1/54 #12;Interaction shared variables 2/54 #12;Interaction shared variables can be read and written by any process (most interaction) 3/54 #12;Interaction shared variables can be read and written by any process (most interaction) difficult to implement 4/54 #12;Interaction shared variables can

  10. ESD Toxicology Laboratory Representative References

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    organisms. Trans. Amer. Fish. Soc. 113: 74-85. Stewart, A. J. 1984. Interactions between dissolved humic

  11. BACHELOR THESIS The High Representative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vellekoop, Michel

    BACHELOR THESIS The High Representative and the Libya Crisis An Assessment Dominique Prescher 8 and the Libya Crisis 2 Table of Content 1. Summary 4 2. Introduction 4 3. Theoretical Framework 8 3.1 Neo 34 9. Bibliography 36 #12;Bachelor Thesis The High Representative and the Libya Crisis 3 List

  12. Representing Periodic Functions by Fourier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vickers, James

    Representing Periodic Functions by Fourier Series 23.2 Introduction In this Section we show how, then the Fourier series expansion takes the form: f(t) = a0 2 + n=1 (an cos nt + bn sin nt) Our main purpose here Fourier coefficients of a function of period 2 calculate Fourier coefficients of a function of general

  13. Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Media |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010In addition to 1 |DDOE HDBK-1113-200898Department of

  14. General Engineer / Physical Scientist (Facility Representative)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Facility Representatives (FRs) are line management's on-site technical representative with responsibility for identifying and evaluating environmental, safety and health issues and concerns,...

  15. Our goal is to develop a modeling formalism for representing state and change of state in general cyber systems, and model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Objective Our goal is to develop a modeling formalism for representing state and change of state. Approach We represent cyber systems as discrete mathematical objects interacting across hierarchically

  16. Pennsylvania House of Representatives Republican Policy Committee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Don

    Pennsylvania House of Representatives Republican Policy Committee Westmoreland County Community, Chairman Turzai and Representative Stairs, for inviting me here this morning to talk to you about funding for higher education in the Commonwealth. I would be remiss if I did not note that Representative Stairs

  17. USING GALOIS LATTICES TO REPRESENT NETWORK DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Douglas R.

    USING GALOIS LATTICES TO REPRESENT NETWORK DATA Linton C. Freeman* Douglas R. White* Galois-binary adjacency matrix,where each row and each column in the matrix represents a social actor. A cell entry is 1 to represent the networks they study. Graph theoretic representations permit the visu- *University

  18. An Introduction to Venture Capital Granite representatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Richard

    May 2006 An Introduction to Venture Capital #12;2 Granite representatives Sam Kingsland ­ Managing;3 Introduction to Granite Ventures Founded in 1992 Granite has 9 investment professionals Over $1B under

  19. Facility Representative Program, Criteria & Review Approach Documents

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADS) to assist Facility Representatives. Please submit your CRADS for posting by sending them to the HQ FR Program Manager. Please include the subject, date, and a contact person.

  20. General Engineer/Physical Scientist (Facility Representative)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A successful candidate in this position will serve as an on-site technical representative to identify and evaluate environmental, safety, and health issues and concerns; as well as diagnose root...

  1. Representing Information Collections for Visual Cognition 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koh, Eunyee

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance of digital information collections is growing. Collections are typically represented with text-only, in a linear list format, which turns out to be a weak representation for cognition. We learned this from empirical research...

  2. Technical basis document for the release from contaminated facility representative accident and associated represented hazardous conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    OBERG, B.D.

    2003-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This document supports the Tank Farms Documented Safety Analysis and describes the risk binning process and the technical basis for assigning risk bins for the release from contaminated facility representative accident and associated represented hazardous conditions. The representative accidents qualitatively considered are fires, deflagrations, and load drops in contaminated areas. The risks from a separate evaluation of compressed gas hazards are also summarized.

  3. An iconic approach to representing climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feigon, Brooke

    1 An iconic approach to representing climate change Saffron Jessica O'Neill A thesis submitted-experts to be meaningfully engaged with the issue of climate change. This thesis investigates the value of engaging non-experts with climate change at the individual level. Research demonstrates that individuals perceive climate change

  4. The Simplicity Device: Your Personal Mobile Representative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Simplicity Device: Your Personal Mobile Representative Giovanni Bartolomeo1, Francesca Martire1 mobile phone that stores and handles personal information about the user. The Simplicity Device can be connected (e.g. via Bluetooth) to several other devices thus allowing personalization of services

  5. Simulating a Nationally Representative Housing Sample Using EnergyPlus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins, Asa S.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulating a Nationally Representative Housing Sample UsingSimulating a Nationally Representative Housing Sample Usingcalibrated, nationally representative set of simulated homes

  6. Selection of bioclimatically representative biological reserve systems under climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pyke, C R; Fischer, Douglas T

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of bioclimatically representative biological reserve systemsthat are bioclimatically representative across a range ofa ?at line (i.e. a representative sample of current climate

  7. Drug representatives: Giving you lunch or stealing your soul?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Higgins, Steven P

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with pharmaceutical representatives are too useful topharmaceutical sales representatives. JAMA. 1995 Apr 26;273(Drug representatives: Giving you lunch or stealing your

  8. Examination of Hydrate Formation Methods: Trying to Create Representative Samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kneafsey, T.J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods: Trying to Create Representative Samples Timothy J.Methods: Trying to Create Representative Samples Timothy J.Introduction Forming representative gas hydrate-bearing

  9. Data structures and apparatuses for representing knowledge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hohimer, Ryan E; Thomson, Judi R; Harvey, William J; Paulson, Patrick R; Whiting, Mark A; Tratz, Stephen C; Chappell, Alan R; Butner, Robert S

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Data structures and apparatuses to represent knowledge are disclosed. The processes can comprise labeling elements in a knowledge signature according to concepts in an ontology and populating the elements with confidence values. The data structures can comprise knowledge signatures stored on computer-readable media. The knowledge signatures comprise a matrix structure having elements labeled according to concepts in an ontology, wherein the value of the element represents a confidence that the concept is present in an information space. The apparatus can comprise a knowledge representation unit having at least one ontology stored on a computer-readable medium, at least one data-receiving device, and a processor configured to generate knowledge signatures by comparing datasets obtained by the data-receiving devices to the ontologies.

  10. TECHNICAL BASIS FOR THE NUCLEAR CRITICALITY REPRESENTATIVE ACCIDENT & ASSOCIATED REPRESENTED HAZARDOUS CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GRIGSBY, J.M.

    2005-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Technical Basis Document for the Nuclear Criticality Representative Accident and Associate Represented Hazardous Conditions. Revision 2 of RPP-12371 provides accident consequence estimates for a hypothetical criticality event in an above grade facility (e.g. DBVS, CH-TRUM, and S-109 PWRS). This technical basis document was developed to support RPP-13033, ''Tank Farms Documented Safety Analysis (DSA)'', and describes the risk binning process and the technical basis for assigning risk bins for the nuclear criticality representative accident and associated hazardous conditions. The purpose of the risk binning process is to determine the need for safety-significant structures, systems, and components (SSC) and technical safety requirement (TSR)-level controls for a given representative accident or represented hazardous condition based on an evaluation of the frequency and consequence. Note that the risk binning process is not applied to facility workers, because all facility worker hazardous conditions are considered for safety-significant SSCs and/or TSR-level controls.

  11. Non-representative quantum mechanical weak values

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. E. Y. Svensson

    2015-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The operational definition of a weak value for a quantum mechanical system involves the limit of the weak measurement strength tending to zero. I study how this limit compares to the situation for the undisturbed (no weak measurement) system. Under certain conditions, which I investigate, this limit is discontinuous in the sense that it does not merge smoothly to the Hilbert space description of the undisturbed system. Hence, in these discontinuous cases, the weak value does not represent the undisturbed system. As a result, conclusions drawn from such weak values regarding the properties of the studied system cannot be upheld. Examples are given.

  12. On Positive Integers Represented as Arithmetic Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimitris Sardelis

    2008-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of the present article is to explore the possibilities of representing positive integers as sums of other positive integers and highlight certain fundamental connections between their multiplicative and additive properties. In particular, we shall be concerned with the representation of positive integers as arithmetic series of the simplest kind, i.e., either as sums of successive odd positive numbers, or as sums of successive even positive numbers (both treated as Problem 1), or as sums of consecutive positive integers (treated as Problem 2).

  13. TECHNICAL BASIS FOR THE NUCLEAR CRITICALITY REPRESENTATIVE ACCIDENT & ASSOCIATED REPRESENTED HAZARDOUS CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GOETZ, T.G.

    2003-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This document was developed to support the documented safety analysis (DSA) and describes the process and basis for assigning risk bins for the nuclear criticality representative accident and associated hazardous conditions. Revision 1 incorporates ORP IRT comments to enhance the technical presentation and also makes editorial changes. This technical basis document was developed to support the documented safety analysis (DSA), and describes the risk binning process and the technical basis for assigning risk bins for the nuclear criticality representative accident and associated hazardous conditions. The purpose of the risk binning process is to determine the need for safety-significant structures, systems, and components (SSC) and technical safety requirement (TSR)-level controls for a given representative accident or represented hazardous condition based on an evaluation of the frequency and consequence.

  14. Representing the vacuum polarization on de Sitter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonard, Katie E.; Woodard, Richard P. [Department of Physics, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Prokopec, Tomislav [Institute of Theoretical Physics (ITP) and Spinoza Institute, Utrecht University, Postbus 80195, 3508 TD Utrecht (Netherlands)] [Institute of Theoretical Physics (ITP) and Spinoza Institute, Utrecht University, Postbus 80195, 3508 TD Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous studies of the vacuum polarization on de Sitter have demonstrated that there is a simple, noncovariant representation of it in which the physics is transparent. There is also a cumbersome, covariant representation in which the physics is obscure. Despite being unwieldy, the latter form has a powerful appeal for those who are concerned about de Sitter invariance. We show that nothing is lost by employing the simple, noncovariant representation because there is a closed form procedure for converting its structure functions to those of the covariant representation. We also present a vastly improved technique for reading off the noncovariant structure functions from the primitive diagrams. And we discuss the issue of representing the vacuum polarization for a general metric background.

  15. Admixture Mapping Identified Pharmacogenetic Gene-Gene Interaction for Asthma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Giacomo, Anthony F

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    253. 2: E Esocm .m ms?mmm .mco_..m_>mEnm .6 coacumu Em5 win 57 . —. mam“ mmw .mco_=w_>mEnm_o coaccmu . _on_

  16. Technical basis for the nuclear criticality representative accident and associated represented hazardous conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CARSON, D.M.

    2003-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical basis document was developed to support the Tank Farms Documented Safety Analysis (DSA), and describes the risk binning process and the technical basis for assigning risk bins for the nuclear criticality representative accident and associated hazardous conditions. The purpose of the risk binning process is to determine the need for safety-significant structures, systems, and components (SSC) and technical safety requirement (TSR)-level controls for a given representative accident or represented hazardous condition based on an evaluation of the frequency and consequence. Note that the risk binning process is not applied to facility workers, because all facility worker hazardous conditions are considered for safety-significant SSCs and/or TSR-level controls. Determination of the need for safety-class SSCs was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, ''Preparation Guide for US Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses'', as described in this report.

  17. Greening the U.S. House of Representatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diamond,, Rick

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Officer, U.S. House of Representatives, June 21, 2007. Finalof the U.S. House of Representatives, and the Federal EnergyGreening the U.S. House of Representatives Rick Diamond and

  18. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4B Albuquerque, New Mexico Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4B Albuquerque, New...

  19. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5B Boulder, Colorado Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative...

  20. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4C Seattle, Washington Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative...

  1. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 6B Helena, Montana Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative...

  2. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 8 Fairbanks, Alaska Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative...

  3. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5A Chicago, Illinois Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative...

  4. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3B Las Vegas, Nevada Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative...

  5. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4A Baltimore, Maryland Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative...

  6. 3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report...

  7. 3Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    7 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached...

  8. Representative Atmospheric Plume Development for Elevated Releases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eslinger, Paul W.; Lowrey, Justin D.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Miley, Harry S.; Prichard, Andrew W.

    2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An atmospheric explosion of a low-yield nuclear device will produce a large number of radioactive isotopes, some of which can be measured with airborne detection systems. However, properly equipped aircraft may not arrive in the region where an explosion occurred for a number of hours after the event. Atmospheric conditions will have caused the radioactive plume to move and diffuse before the aircraft arrives. The science behind predicting atmospheric plume movement has advanced enough that the location of the maximum concentrations in the plume can be determined reasonably accurately in real time, or near real time. Given the assumption that an aircraft can follow a plume, this study addresses the amount of atmospheric dilution expected to occur in a representative plume as a function of time past the release event. The approach models atmospheric transport of hypothetical releases from a single location for every day in a year using the publically available HYSPLIT code. The effective dilution factors for the point of maximum concentration in an elevated plume based on a release of a non-decaying, non-depositing tracer can vary by orders of magnitude depending on the day of the release, even for the same number of hours after the release event. However, the median of the dilution factors based on releases for 365 consecutive days at one site follows a power law relationship in time, as shown in Figure S-1. The relationship is good enough to provide a general rule of thumb for estimating typical future dilution factors in a plume starting at the same point. However, the coefficients of the power law function may vary for different release point locations. Radioactive decay causes the effective dilution factors to decrease more quickly with the time past the release event than the dilution factors based on a non-decaying tracer. An analytical expression for the dilution factors of isotopes with different half-lives can be developed given the power law expression for the non-decaying tracer. If the power-law equation for the median dilution factor, Df, based on a non-decaying tracer has the general form Df=a?×t?^(-b) for time t after the release event, then the equation has the form Df=e^(-?t)×a×t^(-b) for a radioactive isotope, where ? is the decay constant for the isotope.

  9. Visualizing Scalar Fields Represented by Adaptive Square Triangulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    [Sabella 88], ab­ sorption and reflection [Max 95] providing a means of representing the field by a colored

  10. Simulating a Nationally Representative Housing Sample Using EnergyPlus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopkins, Asa S.; Lekov, Alex; Lutz, James; Rosenquist, Gregory; Gu, Lixing

    2011-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a new simulation tool under development at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). This tool uses EnergyPlus to simulate each single-family home in the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), and generates a calibrated, nationally representative set of simulated homes whose energy use is statistically indistinguishable from the energy use of the single-family homes in the RECS sample. This research builds upon earlier work by Ritchard et al. for the Gas Research Institute and Huang et al. for LBNL. A representative national sample allows us to evaluate the variance in energy use between individual homes, regions, or other subsamples; using this tool, we can also evaluate how that variance affects the impacts of potential policies. The RECS contains information regarding the construction and location of each sampled home, as well as its appliances and other energy-using equipment. We combined this data with the home simulation prototypes developed by Huang et al. to simulate homes that match the RECS sample wherever possible. Where data was not available, we used distributions, calibrated using the RECS energy use data. Each home was assigned a best-fit location for the purposes of weather and some construction characteristics. RECS provides some detail on the type and age of heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) equipment in each home; we developed EnergyPlus models capable of reproducing the variety of technologies and efficiencies represented in the national sample. This includes electric, gas, and oil furnaces, central and window air conditioners, central heat pumps, and baseboard heaters. We also developed a model of duct system performance, based on in-home measurements, and integrated this with fan performance to capture the energy use of single- and variable-speed furnace fans, as well as the interaction of duct and fan performance with the efficiency of heating and cooling equipment. Comparison with RECS revealed that EnergyPlus did not capture the heating-side behavior of heat pumps particularly accurately, and that our simple oil furnace and boiler models needed significant recalibration to fit with RECS. Simulating the full RECS sample on a single computer would take many hours, so we used the 'cloud computing' services provided by Amazon.com to simulate dozens of homes at once. This enabled us to simulate the full RECS sample, including multiple versions of each home to evaluate the impact of marginal changes, in less than 3 hours. Once the tool was calibrated, we were able to address several policy questions. We made a simple measurement of the heat replacement effect and showed that the net effect of heat replacement on primary energy use is likely to be less than 5%, relative to appliance-only measures of energy savings. Fuel switching could be significant, however. We also evaluated the national and regional impacts of a variety of 'overnight' changes in building characteristics or occupant behavior, including lighting, home insulation and sealing, HVAC system efficiency, and thermostat settings. For example, our model shows that the combination of increased home insulation and better sealed building shells could reduce residential natural gas use by 34.5% and electricity use by 6.5%, and a 1 degree rise in summer thermostat settings could save 2.1% of home electricity use. These results vary by region, and we present results for each U.S. Census division. We conclude by offering proposals for future work to improve the tool. Some proposed future work includes: comparing the simulated energy use data with the monthly RECS bill data; better capturing the variation in behavior between households, especially as it relates to occupancy and schedules; improving the characterization of recent construction and its regional variation; and extending the general framework of this simulation tool to capture multifamily housing units, such as apartment buildings.

  11. Well-posedness for Systems Representing Electromagnetic/Acoustic Wavefront Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    interrogation.) In one such class of electromagnetic interrogation techniques, one uses a superconductive (also and applications for techniques which employ superconductive metal backings and standing acoustic waves as re are absorbing on the left (z = 0) and superconductive on the right (z = 1). We use general initial conditions

  12. acid phosphatase representing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Manager Meeting Representatives Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: with security requirements associated with imaging, use only the DP form located at either of...

  13. ambassador permanent representative: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Manager Meeting Representatives Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: with security requirements associated with imaging, use only the DP form located at either of...

  14. alheiras represents considerable: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Manager Meeting Representatives Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: with security requirements associated with imaging, use only the DP form located at either of...

  15. alternative values representing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Manager Meeting Representatives Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: with security requirements associated with imaging, use only the DP form located at either of...

  16. active demethylation represent: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Manager Meeting Representatives Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: with security requirements associated with imaging, use only the DP form located at either of...

  17. Appointment of Contracting Officers and Contracting Officer Representatives

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order established procedures governing the selection, appointment and termination of Department of Energy contracting officers and contracting officer representatives. Cancels DOE O 541.1A.

  18. 4Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    "The Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report is attached, covering the period from October to December 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered...

  19. A Class Representative Model for Pure Parsimony Haplotyping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniele Catanzaro

    2008-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Jan 10, 2008 ... A Class Representative Model for Pure Parsimony Haplotyping. Daniele Catanzaro (dacatanz ***at*** ulb.ac.be) Alessandra Godi (godi ***at*** ...

  20. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    akfairbankspre1980v1-47-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 8 Fairbanks, Alaska Reference Buildings by Climate Zone...

  1. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    minneapolispre1980v1-47-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 6A Minneapolis, Minnesota Reference Buildings by...

  2. Accountable Property Representatives List and Property Pass Signer...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Accountable Property RepresentativesProperty Pass Authorization 1202015 Employee Authorized Organization Phone APR Primary Property Pass Signer PETEET, LISA J. ALL ORGS (202)...

  3. Representing a Robotic Domain Using Temporal Description Logics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franconi, Enrico

    Representing a Robotic Domain Using Temporal Description Logics Alessandro Artale artale@irst.itc effects; effects may not directly follow the action but more complex temporal relations may hold describes a collection of properties of the world holding at a certain time. Actions are represented through

  4. Representative well models for eight geothermal-resource areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carson, C.C.; Lin, Y.T.; Livesay, B.J.

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Representative well models have been constructed for eight major geothermal-resource areas. The models define representative times and costs associated with the individual operations that can be expected during drilling and completion of geothermal wells. The models were made for and have been used to evaluate the impacts of potential new technologies. The nature, construction, and validation of the models are presented.

  5. Department of Defense Representatives Visit Hanford to Benchmark Safety

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash., December 16, 2005, Representatives of the Department of Defense's (DoD's) Voluntary Protection Program Center of Excellence (VPP CX) working to reduce injuries at selected (DoD)...

  6. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Baltimore, Maryland Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4A Baltimore, Maryland In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view...

  7. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Chicago, Illinois Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5A Chicago, Illinois In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

  8. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    B Helena, Montana Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 6B Helena, Montana In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

  9. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    B Boulder, Colorado Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5B Boulder, Colorado In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

  10. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1A Miami, Florida Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 1A Miami, Florida In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

  11. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    7 Duluth, Minnesota Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 7 Duluth, Minnesota In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

  12. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    B Phoenix, Arizona Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 2B Phoenix, Arizona In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

  13. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    B Las Vegas, Nevada Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3B Las Vegas, Nevada In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

  14. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    B Los Angeles, California Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3B Los Angeles, California In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can...

  15. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    C San Francisco, California Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3C San Francisco, California In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can...

  16. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    A Atlanta, Georgia Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3A Atlanta, Georgia In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

  17. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    A Houston, Texas Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 2A Houston, Texas In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

  18. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    C Seattle, Washington Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4C Seattle, Washington In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view...

  19. Changes to the Facility Representative Program, 10/26/1999

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Effective October 1, 1999, the Deputy Secretary tasked this office to manage the Facility Representative Program. We look forward to working with you in continuing and improving this very important...

  20. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    new2004v1.35.0.zip refbldg3ausagaatlantanew2004v1-47-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3A Atlanta, Georgia...

  1. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    new2004v1.35.0.zip refbldg1ausaflmiaminew2004v1-47-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 1A Miami, Florida...

  2. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    new2004v1.35.0.zip refbldg2ausatxhoustonnew2004v1-47-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 2A Houston, Texas...

  3. Appointment of Contracting Officers and Contracting Officer Representatives

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish procedures governing the selection, appointment, and termination of contracting officers and for the appointment of contracting officer representatives. Cancels DOE Order 4200.4A. Canceled by DOE O 541.1A.

  4. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    B Albuquerque, New Mexico Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4B Albuquerque, New Mexico In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can...

  5. Quantum states representing perfectly secure bits are always distillable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawel Horodecki; Remigiusz Augusiak

    2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    It is proven that recently introduced states with perfectly secure bits of cryptographic key (private states representing secure bit) [K. Horodecki et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 160502 (2005)] as well as its multipartite and higher dimension generalizations always represent distillable entanglement. The corresponding lower bounds on distillable entanglement are provided. We also present a simple alternative proof that for any bipartite quantum state entanglement cost is an upper bound on distillable cryptographic key in bipartite scenario.

  6. Dike/Drift Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. Gaffiney

    2004-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents and documents the model components and analyses that represent potential processes associated with propagation of a magma-filled crack (dike) migrating upward toward the surface, intersection of the dike with repository drifts, flow of magma in the drifts, and post-magma emplacement effects on repository performance. The processes that describe upward migration of a dike and magma flow down the drift are referred to as the dike intrusion submodel. The post-magma emplacement processes are referred to as the post-intrusion submodel. Collectively, these submodels are referred to as a conceptual model for dike/drift interaction. The model components and analyses of the dike/drift interaction conceptual model provide the technical basis for assessing the potential impacts of an igneous intrusion on repository performance, including those features, events, and processes (FEPs) related to dike/drift interaction (Section 6.1).

  7. Landscape Characterization and Representativeness Analysis for Understanding Sampling Network Coverage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maddalena, Damian; Hoffman, Forrest; Kumar, Jitendra; Hargrove, William

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sampling networks rarely conform to spatial and temporal ideals, often comprised of network sampling points which are unevenly distributed and located in less than ideal locations due to access constraints, budget limitations, or political conflict. Quantifying the global, regional, and temporal representativeness of these networks by quantifying the coverage of network infrastructure highlights the capabilities and limitations of the data collected, facilitates upscaling and downscaling for modeling purposes, and improves the planning efforts for future infrastructure investment under current conditions and future modeled scenarios. The work presented here utilizes multivariate spatiotemporal clustering analysis and representativeness analysis for quantitative landscape characterization and assessment of the Fluxnet, RAINFOR, and ForestGEO networks. Results include ecoregions that highlight patterns of bioclimatic, topographic, and edaphic variables and quantitative representativeness maps of individual and combined networks.

  8. Landscape Characterization and Representativeness Analysis for Understanding Sampling Network Coverage

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Maddalena, Damian; Hoffman, Forrest; Kumar, Jitendra; Hargrove, William

    Sampling networks rarely conform to spatial and temporal ideals, often comprised of network sampling points which are unevenly distributed and located in less than ideal locations due to access constraints, budget limitations, or political conflict. Quantifying the global, regional, and temporal representativeness of these networks by quantifying the coverage of network infrastructure highlights the capabilities and limitations of the data collected, facilitates upscaling and downscaling for modeling purposes, and improves the planning efforts for future infrastructure investment under current conditions and future modeled scenarios. The work presented here utilizes multivariate spatiotemporal clustering analysis and representativeness analysis for quantitative landscape characterization and assessment of the Fluxnet, RAINFOR, and ForestGEO networks. Results include ecoregions that highlight patterns of bioclimatic, topographic, and edaphic variables and quantitative representativeness maps of individual and combined networks.

  9. 66 Academic Nurse Program representatives assist the School

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grishok, Alla

    interviews, professional development, and dealing with the unknown. Anesthesia Program Representative: Laura of safe surgery and anesthesia practices. Since gradua- tion, he has been involved in global anesthesia also currently serves on the Anesthesia Committee for the Global Alliance for Surgical and Anesthesia

  10. Does convective aggregation need to be represented in cumulus parameterizations?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Does convective aggregation need to be represented in cumulus parameterizations? Isabelle Tobin,1 in phenomena such as ``hot spots'' or the Madden-Julian Oscillation. These findings support the need climate models lack any such representation. The ability of a cloud system- resolving model to reproduce

  11. Representing Topological Relationships between Complex Regions by F-Histograms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matsakis, Pascal

    Representing Topological Relationships between Complex Regions by F-Histograms Lukasz Wawrzyniak between two regions in terms of the thirteen Allen relations. An index to measure the complexity Work in the modeling of topological relationships often relies on an extension into the spatial domain

  12. Appointment of Contracting Officers and Contracting Officer's Representatives

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish procedures governing the selection, appointment, and termination of contracting officers and for the appointment of contracting officer's representatives. To ensure that only trained and qualified procurement and financial assistance professionals, within the scope of this Order, serve as contracting officers. Cancels DOE O 541.1. Canceled by DOE O 541.1B.

  13. US House of Representatives Appropriation Committee Report May 18, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US House of Representatives Appropriation Committee Report May 18, 2005 Fusion Energy Sciences The Committee recommendation for fusion energy sciences is $295,155,000, an increase of $5,605,000 over that two-thirds of the proposed increase for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER

  14. Representing Abductive Practical Reasoning as an Action-Based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atkinson, Katie

    Representing Abductive Practical Reasoning as an Action-Based Alternating Transition System Floris present an approach to abductive reasoning by examin- ing it in the context of an argumentation scheme to rea- son abductively about how an agent might have acted to find itself in a particular sceanrio

  15. Representative Seroprevalences of Brucellosis in Humans and Livestock in Kyrgyzstan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    Representative Seroprevalences of Brucellosis in Humans and Livestock in Kyrgyzstan Bassirou Bonfoh), 60 Togolok Moldo Street, Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan 3 Veterinary Public Health Institute, Vetsuisse Faculty, Swiss Red Cross, 187/1 Sydykova Street, Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan 5 Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute

  16. Lattices which can be represented as lattices of intervals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaggelis Felouzis

    2006-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate lattices that can be represented as sublattices of the lattice of all convex subsets of a linearly ordered set $(X, \\leq)$ and as lattices of convex subsets of $(X, \\leq)$. A representation theory for general lattices is presented and also some applications in general topology are given.

  17. REPRESENTING GEO-SCIENTIFIC DOMAIN CONCEPTS Boyan Brodaric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bennett, Brandon

    1 REPRESENTING GEO-SCIENTIFIC DOMAIN CONCEPTS Boyan Brodaric Penn State Geography and Geological Survey of Canada brodaric@NRCan.gc.ca 1. Introduction The geo-sciences, including geology, ecology, soil accumulate and change, and (3) are characterized by degrees of uncertainty and granularity. This suggests

  18. Necessary and sufficient conditions for representing general distributions by Coxians

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Necessary and sufficient conditions for representing general distributions by Coxians Takayuki University Pittsburgh, PA 15213 Abstract A common analytical technique involves using a Coxian distribution to model a general distribution G, where the Coxian distribution agrees with G on the first three moments

  19. Necessary and sufficient conditions for representing general distributions by Coxians

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Necessary and sufficient conditions for representing general distributions by Coxians Takayuki University Pittsburgh, PA 15213 Abstract A common analytical technique involves using a Coxian distribution to model a general distribution ¢ , where the Coxian distribution agrees with ¢ on the first three moments

  20. Necessary and Sucient Conditions for Representing General Distributions by Coxians

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harchol-Balter, Mor

    Necessary and SuÆcient Conditions for Representing General Distributions by Coxians Takayuki involves using a Coxian dis- tribution to model a general distribution G, where the Coxian distribu- tion of the Coxian distribution. Algo- rithms for mapping an input distribution G to a Coxian distribution largely

  1. Representing Exceptional Behaviour at the earlier Phases of Software Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kent, University of

    Representing Exceptional Behaviour at the earlier Phases of Software Development Rogério de Lemos. Exception handling has been traditionally associated with the design phase of the software lifecycle, during not received enough attention /Avizienes 97/. Ideally, for each identified phase of the software lifecycle

  2. Melanoma Recognition Using Representative and Discriminative Kernel Classifiers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caputo, Barbara

    Melanoma Recognition Using Representative and Discriminative Kernel Classifiers Tatiana Tommasi1 caputo@nada.kth.se Abstract. Malignant melanoma is the most deadly form of skin lesion. Early diagnosis these algorithms against the (to our knowledge) state-of-the-art method on melanoma recognition, exploring how

  3. DATE: December 11, 2013 MEMO TO: Curricular Representative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    Instruction Modes List: This report lists sections with an Instruction Mode not set to `P' in ISIS. · Meets Attendance List: This report lists sections coded in ISIS as optional. · Curricular Representative List can be run in ISIS, and displays real-time curricular data for auditing. In ISIS: Reporting Tools

  4. INTRODUCTION The mammalian hair follicle is a representative but highly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chuong, Cheng-Ming

    INTRODUCTION The mammalian hair follicle is a representative but highly complex epithelial organ, hair follicle induction requires complex signaling between the two apposing tissue layers, which to the formation of the hair follicle, which contain the dermal papilla, proliferating matrix cells and slowly

  5. Are the TRACE-P measurements representative of the western Pacific during March 2001?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TRACE-P measurements representative of the western PacificTHE TRACE- P MEASUREMENTS REPRESENTATIVE? Pierce, R. B. , etTRACE-P measurements representative of the western Pacific

  6. Representative sampling using single-pulse laser ablation with inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Haichen; Mao, Xianglei; Russo, Richard E.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U also achieved a representative value at high irradiance.Representative sampling using single-pulse laser ablationvalue close to the representative level. Segregation during

  7. Do women represent women? : gender and policy in Argentina and Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piscopo, Jennifer M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Differences in the Representative and Policymakingaction law and their own representative mandate. Interview,States House of Representatives. ? Policy Studies Journal

  8. Conservationism is not Conservatism: Do Interest Group Endorsements Help Voters Hold Representatives Accountable?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaufman, Aaron

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    information about the representative's position on theHelp Voters Hold Representatives Accountable? ” Aaronlearn the positions their representatives take on key issue.

  9. Acceptance of human papillomavirus vaccination among Californian parents of daughters: A representative statewide analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Constantine, Norman A.; Jerman, Petra

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    parents of daughters: A representative statewide analysis.Parents of Daughters: A Representative Statewide AnalysisResistance, But Still Representative. Available at: http://

  10. Voter competency, information, and campaign effects in representative and direct democracy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burnett, Craig Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Campaign Effects in Representative and Direct Democracyand Campaign Effects in Representative and Direct Democracyand make decisions in representative and direct democracy.

  11. China’s Military Representatives: Striving Toward Professional Contracting and Procurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puska, Susan M; McReynolds, Joe; Geary, Debra

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    di- rection. Military representative reform could raise2011 China’s Military Representatives: Striving Towardreforms is the Military Representative Office (MRO) system

  12. Demographic and Psychological Predictors of Parent–Adolescent Communication About Sex: A Representative Statewide Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jerman, Petra; Constantine, Norman A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    here are not precisely representative of the full populationCommunication About Sex: A Representative Statewide Analysismore studies with representative samples are needed to

  13. Incoherence and multiple parton interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calucci, G.; Treleani, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica Teorica dell'Universita di Trieste and INFN, Sezione di Trieste, Strada Costiera 11, Miramare-Grignano, I-34151 Trieste (Italy)

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the LHC multiple parton interactions will represent an important feature of the minimum bias and of the underlying event, and will give important contributions in many channels of interest in the search for new physics. Different numbers of multiple collisions may contribute to the production of a given final state, and one should expect important interference effects in the regime where different contributions have similar rates. We show, on the contrary, that, once multiple parton interactions are identified by their different topologies, terms with different numbers of multiple parton interactions do not interfere in the final cross section.

  14. Representing cognitive activities and errors in HRA trees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gertman, D.I.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A graphic representation method is presented herein for adapting an existing technology--human reliability analysis (HRA) event trees, used to support event sequence logic structures and calculations--to include a representation of the underlying cognitive activity and corresponding errors associated with human performance. The analyst is presented with three potential means of representing human activity: the NUREG/CR-1278 HRA event tree approach; the skill-, rule- and knowledge-based paradigm; and the slips, lapses, and mistakes paradigm. The above approaches for representing human activity are integrated in order to produce an enriched HRA event tree -- the cognitive event tree system (COGENT)-- which, in turn, can be used to increase the analyst's understanding of the basic behavioral mechanisms underlying human error and the representation of that error in probabilistic risk assessment. Issues pertaining to the implementation of COGENT are also discussed.

  15. Representing cognitive activities and errors in HRA trees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gertman, D.I.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A graphic representation method is presented herein for adapting an existing technology--human reliability analysis (HRA) event trees, used to support event sequence logic structures and calculations--to include a representation of the underlying cognitive activity and corresponding errors associated with human performance. The analyst is presented with three potential means of representing human activity: the NUREG/CR-1278 HRA event tree approach; the skill-, rule- and knowledge-based paradigm; and the slips, lapses, and mistakes paradigm. The above approaches for representing human activity are integrated in order to produce an enriched HRA event tree -- the cognitive event tree system (COGENT)-- which, in turn, can be used to increase the analyst`s understanding of the basic behavioral mechanisms underlying human error and the representation of that error in probabilistic risk assessment. Issues pertaining to the implementation of COGENT are also discussed.

  16. Representing the Semantics of Geographic Information in Ontologies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ou, Yang

    2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    the semantics. This paper describes how to utilise ontologies to capture the semantics of geographic information and further presents a way to represent and store spatial data in a knowledge base within an ontology. By representing geographic information...Interoperability is a key concern in the field of Geographic Information Sciences for the sharing of geographic information and the integration of geospatial processes. Web service technology is a mainstream approach to distribute GIS functionality in the Web environment and provide syntactic interoperability for different processes, and ontologies have been considered as a significant technique to achieve interoperability on the semantic level. This paper describes how the mainstream Web technologies can be applied for interoperability of geospatial processes and implements the methodology with a use case of specific processes....

  17. Processes, data structures, and apparatuses for representing knowledge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hohimer, Ryan E. (West Richland, WA); Thomson, Judi R. (Guelph, CA); Harvey, William J. (Richland, WA); Paulson, Patrick R. (Pasco, WA); Whiting, Mark A. (Richland, WA); Tratz, Stephen C. (Richland, WA); Chappell, Alan R. (Seattle, WA); Butner, R. Scott (Richland, WA)

    2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Processes, data structures, and apparatuses to represent knowledge are disclosed. The processes can comprise labeling elements in a knowledge signature according to concepts in an ontology and populating the elements with confidence values. The data structures can comprise knowledge signatures stored on computer-readable media. The knowledge signatures comprise a matrix structure having elements labeled according to concepts in an ontology, wherein the value of the element represents a confidence that the concept is present in an information space. The apparatus can comprise a knowledge representation unit having at least one ontology stored on a computer-readable medium, at least one data-receiving device, and a processor configured to generate knowledge signatures by comparing datasets obtained by the data-receiving devices to the ontologies.

  18. Interactive Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    project assignment of an interactive social space, built up from autonomously operating smart building, interactive spaces in which people and buildings engage in a mutual relationship with one other. By connecting the data and experiences that develop though this relationship between buildings and their inhabitants

  19. Defining And Characterizing Sample Representativeness For DWPF Melter Feed Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shine, E. P.; Poirier, M. R.

    2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Representative sampling is important throughout the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) process, and the demonstrated success of the DWPF process to achieve glass product quality over the past two decades is a direct result of the quality of information obtained from the process. The objective of this report was to present sampling methods that the Savannah River Site (SRS) used to qualify waste being dispositioned at the DWPF. The goal was to emphasize the methodology, not a list of outcomes from those studies. This methodology includes proven methods for taking representative samples, the use of controlled analytical methods, and data interpretation and reporting that considers the uncertainty of all error sources. Numerous sampling studies were conducted during the development of the DWPF process and still continue to be performed in order to evaluate options for process improvement. Study designs were based on use of statistical tools applicable to the determination of uncertainties associated with the data needs. Successful designs are apt to be repeated, so this report chose only to include prototypic case studies that typify the characteristics of frequently used designs. Case studies have been presented for studying in-tank homogeneity, evaluating the suitability of sampler systems, determining factors that affect mixing and sampling, comparing the final waste glass product chemical composition and durability to that of the glass pour stream sample and other samples from process vessels, and assessing the uniformity of the chemical composition in the waste glass product. Many of these studies efficiently addressed more than one of these areas of concern associated with demonstrating sample representativeness and provide examples of statistical tools in use for DWPF. The time when many of these designs were implemented was in an age when the sampling ideas of Pierre Gy were not as widespread as they are today. Nonetheless, the engineers and statisticians used carefully thought out designs that systematically and economically provided plans for data collection from the DWPF process. Key shared features of the sampling designs used at DWPF and the Gy sampling methodology were the specification of a standard for sample representativeness, an investigation that produced data from the process to study the sampling function, and a decision framework used to assess whether the specification was met based on the data. Without going into detail with regard to the seven errors identified by Pierre Gy, as excellent summaries are readily available such as Pitard [1989] and Smith [2001], SRS engineers understood, for example, that samplers can be biased (Gy?s extraction error), and developed plans to mitigate those biases. Experiments that compared installed samplers with more representative samples obtained directly from the tank may not have resulted in systematically partitioning sampling errors into the now well-known error categories of Gy, but did provide overall information on the suitability of sampling systems. Most of the designs in this report are related to the DWPF vessels, not the large SRS Tank Farm tanks. Samples from the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME), which contains the feed to the DWPF melter, are characterized using standardized analytical methods with known uncertainty. The analytical error is combined with the established error from sampling and processing in DWPF to determine the melter feed composition. This composition is used with the known uncertainty of the models in the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) to ensure that the wasteform that is produced is comfortably within the acceptable processing and product performance region. Having the advantage of many years of processing that meets the waste glass product acceptance criteria, the DWPF process has provided a considerable amount of data about itself in addition to the data from many special studies. Demonstrating representative sampling directly from the large Tank Farm tanks is a difficult, if not unsolvable enterprise due to li

  20. Facility Representative of the Year Award | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport in RepresentativeDepartment of Energy Score Maturity Value TargetFacility

  1. developments. interactive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaun, André

    interactive course: ffl web­pages for hyper­linked lecture notes, student exercises and projects, ffl java teachers: ffl public on the web y : lecture notes including the JBONE applet, ffl on demand: source Java

  2. The Korarchaeota: Archaeal orphans representing an ancestral lineage of life

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elkins, James G.; Kunin, Victor; Anderson, Iain; Barry, Kerrie; Goltsman, Eugene; Lapidus, Alla; Hedlund, Brian; Hugenholtz, Phil; Kyrpides, Nikos; Graham, David; Keller, Martin; Wanner, Gerhard; Richardson, Paul; Stetter, Karl O.

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on conserved cellular properties, all life on Earth can be grouped into different phyla which belong to the primary domains Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukarya. However, tracing back their evolutionary relationships has been impeded by horizontal gene transfer and gene loss. Within the Archaea, the kingdoms Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota exhibit a profound divergence. In order to elucidate the evolution of these two major kingdoms, representatives of more deeply diverged lineages would be required. Based on their environmental small subunit ribosomal (ss RNA) sequences, the Korarchaeota had been originally suggested to have an ancestral relationship to all known Archaea although this assessment has been refuted. Here we describe the cultivation and initial characterization of the first member of the Korarchaeota, highly unusual, ultrathin filamentous cells about 0.16 {micro}m in diameter. A complete genome sequence obtained from enrichment cultures revealed an unprecedented combination of signature genes which were thought to be characteristic of either the Crenarchaeota, Euryarchaeota, or Eukarya. Cell division appears to be mediated through a FtsZ-dependent mechanism which is highly conserved throughout the Bacteria and Euryarchaeota. An rpb8 subunit of the DNA-dependent RNA polymerase was identified which is absent from other Archaea and has been described as a eukaryotic signature gene. In addition, the representative organism possesses a ribosome structure typical for members of the Crenarchaeota. Based on its gene complement, this lineage likely diverged near the separation of the two major kingdoms of Archaea. Further investigations of these unique organisms may shed additional light onto the evolution of extant life.

  3. Do Emergency Department Patients Receive a Pathological Diagnosis? A Nationally-Representative Sample

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wen, Leana S.; Espinola, Janice A.; Kosowsky, Joshua M.; Camargo Jr, Carlos A.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Diagnosis? A Nationally-Representative Sample Leana S. Wen,of a nationally-representative database of ED visits, manysubset of a nationally-representative database of ED visits

  4. Representing the influence of subgrid topography on hydrology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leung, L.R.; Ghan, S.J.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Estimates of the impact of global climate change on land surface hydrology require climate information on scales far smaller than those explicitly resolved by global climate models of today and the foreseeable future. To bridge the gap between what is required and what is resolved, we propose a subgrid-scale parameterization of the influence of topography on clouds, precipitation, and land surface hydrology. The parameterization represents subgrid variations in surface elevation in terms of discrete elevation classes. Separate cloud and surface processes are calculated for each elevation class. The simulated surface temperature, precipitation, snowpack, and soil moisture for each elevation class can then be distributed according to the spatial distribution of surface elevation within each grid cell. The scheme is being applied to the Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s climate version of the Penn State/NCAR Mesoscale Model. Validation is being addressed by driving the model with observed lateral boundary conditions for the Pacific Northwest and comparing with surface observations. Preliminary results from the simulation will be presented.

  5. Fluctuations, Correlation and Representative Elementary Volume (REV) in Granular Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Evesque

    2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In general, the mechanics of granular matter is described using continuum mechanics approach; this requires to introduce the concepts of stress and strain, which are averaged quantities, so that this needs also to introduce the notion of representative elementary volume (REV) above which averaged quantities have some physical meaning. As local quantities fluctuate spatially in granular matter; a local measure of stress and strain shall exhibit fluctuations too, whose typical amplitude depends on the sampling size L. This paper discusses this problem and the causes for large scale correlation. The mean stress s applied to a plane surface of size L*L is calculated and its fluctuation amplitude Ds is found when local forces are not correlated; it is found that Ds/s scales as 1/L . It is shown also that large scale fluctuations of stress can always be interpreted as an inhomogeneous stress field and that static equilibrium modifies the mean stress applied to a rod (in 2d), even if it does not perturb the contact force distribution. This last result is compared to experiment, which indicates that the number N of contacts per rod (in 2d) is 2

  6. A representative sample of Be stars III: H band spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. A. Steele; J. S. Clark

    2001-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We present H band (1.53 - 1.69 micron) spectra of 57 isolated Be stars of spectral types O9-B9 and luminosity classes III,IV & V. The HI Brackett (n-4) series is seen in emission from Br 11-18, and FeII emission is also apparent for a subset of those stars with HI emission. No emission from species with a higher excitation temperature, such as He II or CIII is seen, and no forbidden line emission is present. A subset of 12 stars show no evidence for emission from any species; these stars appear indistinguishable from normal B stars of a comparable spectral type. In general the line ratios constructed from the transitions in the range Br 11-18 do not fit case B recombination theory particularly well. Strong correlations between the line ratios with Br-gamma and spectral type are found. These results most likely represent systematic variations in the temperature and ionization of the circumstellar disc with spectral type. Weak correlations between the line widths and projected rotational velocity of the stars are observed; however no systematic trend for increasing line width through the Brackett series is observed.

  7. Examination of representative drum from 618-9 Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, D.R. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Bunnell, L.R. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work described in this report was conducted in pursuance of Task E of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Solid Waste Technology Support Program for Westinghouse Hanford Company. Task E calls for a determination of the corrosion rate of low-carbon steels under typical Hanford Site conditions. To meet this objective, Pacific Northwest Laboratory examined one intact drum that was judged to be representative of the largely intact drums excavated at the 618-9 Burial Ground located west of the 300 Area at the Hanford Site. Six samples were examined to characterize the drum, its composition, and its corrosion and corrosion products. The drum, which was found empty, was constructed of low-carbon steel. Its surface appeared relatively sound. The drum metal varied in thickness, but the minimum thickness in the samples was near 0.020 in. The corrosion corresponds to approximately 25 to 35 mils of metal loss, roughly a 1 mil/yr corrosion rate. Corrosion products were goethite and maghymite, expected products of iron buried in soil. Apparently, the drum leaked some time ago, but the cause of the leakage is unknown because records of the drums and their burial are limited. The drum was empty when found, and it is possible that it could have failed by pitting rather than by general corrosion. A pitting rate of about 3.5 mils/yr would have caused loss of drum integrity in the time since burial.

  8. 1 Ma 15200 Lesson 18 Section 1.7 I Representing an Inequality ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    charlotb

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    1. Ma 15200 Lesson 18 Section 1.7. I. Representing an Inequality. There are 3 ways to represent an inequality. (1) Using the inequality symbol (sometime.

  9. 1 Ma 15200 Lesson 18 Section 1.7 I Representing an Inequality ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    charlotb

    2010-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    1. Ma 15200 Lesson 18 Section 1.7. I. Representing an Inequality. There are 3 ways to represent an inequality. (1) Using the inequality symbol (sometime.

  10. Representing Cloud Processing of Aerosol in Numerical Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mechem, D.B.; Kogan, Y.L.

    2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The satellite imagery in Figure 1 provides dramatic examples of how aerosol influences the cloud field. Aerosol from ship exhaust can serve as nucleation centers in otherwise cloud-free regions, forming ship tracks (top image), or can enhance the reflectance/albedo in already cloudy regions. This image is a demonstration of the first indirect effect, in which changes in aerosol modulate cloud droplet radius and concentration, which influences albedo. It is thought that, through the effects it has on precipitation (drizzle), aerosol can also affect the structure and persistence of planetary boundary layer (PBL) clouds. Regions of cellular convection, or open pockets of cloudiness (bottom image) are thought to be remnants of strongly drizzling PBL clouds. Pockets of Open Cloudiness (POCs) (Stevens et al. 2005) or Albrecht's ''rifts'' are low cloud fraction regions characterized by anomalously low aerosol concentrations, implying they result from precipitation. These features may in fact be a demonstration of the second indirect effect. To accurately represent these clouds in numerical models, we have to treat the coupled cloud-aerosol system. We present the following series of mesoscale and large eddy simulation (LES) experiments to evaluate the important aspects of treating the coupled cloud-aerosol problem. 1. Drizzling and nondrizzling simulations demonstrate the effect of drizzle on a mesoscale forecast off the California coast. 2. LES experiments with explicit (bin) microphysics gauge the relative importance of the shape of the aerosol spectrum on the 3D dynamics and cloud structure. 3. Idealized mesoscale model simulations evaluate the relative roles of various processes, sources, and sinks.

  11. Examination of Hydrate Formation Methods: Trying to Create Representative Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kneafsey, T.J.; Rees, E.V.L.; Nakagawa, S.; Kwon, T.-H.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Forming representative gas hydrate-bearing laboratory samples is important so that the properties of these materials may be measured, while controlling the composition and other variables. Natural samples are rare, and have often experienced pressure and temperature changes that may affect the property to be measured [Waite et al., 2008]. Forming methane hydrate samples in the laboratory has been done a number of ways, each having advantages and disadvantages. The ice-to-hydrate method [Stern et al., 1996], contacts melting ice with methane at the appropriate pressure to form hydrate. The hydrate can then be crushed and mixed with mineral grains under controlled conditions, and then compacted to create laboratory samples of methane hydrate in a mineral medium. The hydrate in these samples will be part of the load-bearing frame of the medium. In the excess gas method [Handa and Stupin, 1992], water is distributed throughout a mineral medium (e.g. packed moist sand, drained sand, moistened silica gel, other porous media) and the mixture is brought to hydrate-stable conditions (chilled and pressurized with gas), allowing hydrate to form. This method typically produces grain-cementing hydrate from pendular water in sand [Waite et al., 2004]. In the dissolved gas method [Tohidi et al., 2002], water with sufficient dissolved guest molecules is brought to hydrate-stable conditions where hydrate forms. In the laboratory, this is can be done by pre-dissolving the gas of interest in water and then introducing it to the sample under the appropriate conditions. With this method, it is easier to form hydrate from more soluble gases such as carbon dioxide. It is thought that this method more closely simulates the way most natural gas hydrate has formed. Laboratory implementation, however, is difficult, and sample formation is prohibitively time consuming [Minagawa et al., 2005; Spangenberg and Kulenkampff, 2005]. In another version of this technique, a specified quantity of gas is placed in a sample, then the sample is flooded with water and cooled [Priest et al., 2009]. We have performed a number of tests in which hydrate was formed and the uniformity of the hydrate formation was examined. These tests have primarily used a variety of modifications of the excess gas method to make the hydrate, although we have also used a version of the excess water technique. Early on, we found difficulties in creating uniform samples with a particular sand/ initial water saturation combination (F-110 Sand, {approx} 35% initial water saturation). In many of our tests we selected this combination intentionally to determine whether we could use a method to make the samples uniform. The following methods were examined: Excess gas, Freeze/thaw/form, Freeze/pressurize/thaw, Excess gas followed by water saturation, Excess water, Sand and kaolinite, Use of a nucleation enhancer (SnoMax), and Use of salt in the water. Below, each method, the underlying hypothesis, and our results are briefly presented, followed by a brief conclusion. Many of the hypotheses investigated are not our own, but were presented to us. Much of the data presented is from x-ray CT scanning our samples. The x-ray CT scanner provides a three-dimensional density map of our samples. From this map and the physics that is occurring in our samples, we are able to gain an understanding of the spatial nature of the processes that occur, and attribute them to the locations where they occur.

  12. Improving the Educational Outcomes for Minorities: A Study of the Interactive Effects of Personnel Stability and Representative Bureacracy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morton, Tabitha Susan Marie

    2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Page 1 The Marginal Effects of Passive Representation on Black Performance ..................................................................... 34 2 The Marginal Effects of Teacher Stability on Black Performance... ...................................................................... 35 3 The Marginal Effects of Teacher Stability on Latino Performance ...................................................................... 39 4 The Marginal Effects of Passive Representation on Latino Performance...

  13. Interactive Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes | National Nuclear SecurityIntellectual PropertyIntensityInteractive

  14. Interactive Topic Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pleple, Quentin

    26 Interactive LDA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .and B. Satinoff (2011). Interactive topic modeling. InOF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Interactive Topic Modeling A thesis

  15. *Co-advised by Benoit Baudry and Arnaud Blouin Challenges of Testing for Critical Interactive Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    *Co-advised by Benoit Baudry and Arnaud Blouin Challenges of Testing for Critical Interactive.lelli_leitao_dantas@inria.fr Abstract--Interactive systems cover all systems that represent a bridge to enable the user interaction over an interface. The advance of technologies such as ubiquitous computing brings new interaction designs. The new

  16. Classical gravitational spin-spin interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. B. Bonnor

    2002-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    I obtain an exact, axially symmetric, stationary solution of Einstein's equations for two massless spinning particles. The term representing the spin-spin interaction agrees with recently published approximate work. The spin-spin force appears to be proportional to the inverse fourth power of the coordinate distance between the particles.

  17. Changes in Inflammatory Biomarkers Across Weight Classes in a Representative US Population: A Link Between Obesity and Inflammation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Xuan-Mai T.; Lane, John; Smith, Brian R.; Nguyen, Ninh T.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Weight Classes in a Representative US Population: A Linkexamines a nationally representative complex, multistageeach weight class for a representative US population. The

  18. Structures of Domains I and IV from YbbR are representative of...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Domains I and IV from YbbR are representative of a widely distributed protein family. Structures of Domains I and IV from YbbR are representative of a widely distributed protein...

  19. Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Government Reform Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Government Reform March 20, 2003 Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on...

  20. Technical basis for the aboveground structure failure and associated represented hazardous conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GOETZ, T.G.

    2003-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical basis document describes the risk binning process and the technical basis for assigning risk bins for the aboveground structure failure representative accident and associated represented hazardous conditions. This document was developed to support the documented safety analysis.

  1. China’s Military Representatives: Striving Toward Professional Contracting and Procurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puska, Susan M; McReynolds, Joe; Geary, Debra

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    effect of specialization could be to develop military representatives who are experts in specific areas of the weapons and

  2. The Allied Health Faculty Organization invited Representative Ed Bryant (7th Congressional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yan

    The Allied Health Faculty Organization invited Representative Ed Bryant (7th Congressional District) to visit the University and discuss such topics as health and education. Representative Bryant is a member Commerce Committee Prescription Drug Task Force. Prior to his service in the House, Representative Bryant

  3. Why Think Causally? Published under the title: "Why Represent Causal Relations?"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strevens, Michael

    Why Think Causally? Published under the title: "Why Represent Causal Relations?" Michael Strevens University Press, New York, 2007. A Why do we represent the world around us using causal generalizations to be an ex- cellent vehicle for representing all-important relations of manipulability. The third, based

  4. CONCURRENT CONSTRAINTS CONDITIONAL-BRANCHING TIMED INTERACTIVE SCORES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of scenarios represented by temporal objects (TOs), temporal relations (TRs) and interactive events. Examples of TOs are videos and sounds. TOs can be triggered by interactive events (usually launched by the user) and several TOs can be active simultaneously. A TO can contain other TOs. The hierarchy allows us to control

  5. Facility Representatives

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd ofEvaluations in Covered Facilities | Department of Energy

  6. Facility Representatives

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd ofEvaluations in Covered Facilities | Department of Energy063-2011

  7. What every designated representative should know about Title IV and Title V enforcement provisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bischoff, C.A. [Gallagher and Kennedy, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Dayal, P. [Tucson Electric Power Co., Tucson, AZ (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Title IV of the Clean Air Act not only created a regulatory program unlike any other under the Clean Air Act, but also established a unique position--the designated representative--as an integral part of the program. The designated representative is required to meet certain basic obligations under Title IV, and a panoply of enforcement mechanisms are available to EPA in the event of noncompliance with these obligations. Also, because a designated representative may take on responsibilities under the permit provisions of Title V of the Clean Air Act, the designated representative can also be subject to an enforcement action for failure to comply with certain Title V permit requirements. This paper considers the basic definition of the designated representative under EPA`s Title IV and Title V regulations, identifies the responsibilities assigned to the designated representative, and then analyzes the enforcement mechanisms that may be applied to the designated representative if a regulatory responsibility has not been satisfied.

  8. Conformation changes and protein folding induced by \\phi^4 interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Januar, M; Handoko, L T; 10.1142/9789814335614_0047

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A model to describe the mechanism of conformational dynamics in protein based on matter interactions using lagrangian approach and imposing certain symmetry breaking is proposed. Both conformation changes of proteins and the injected non-linear sources are represented by the bosonic lagrangian with an additional \\phi^4 interaction for the sources. In the model the spring tension of protein representing the internal hydrogen bonds is realized as the interactions between individual amino acids and nonlinear sources. The folding pathway is determined by the strength of nonlinear sources that propagate through the protein backbone. It is also shown that the model reproduces the results in some previous works.

  9. Interactive portraiture : designing intimate interactive experiences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuckerman, Orit

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis I present a set of interactive portrait experiences that strive to create an intimate connection between the viewer and the portrayed subject; an emotional experience, one of personal reflection. My interactive ...

  10. PDSF Interactive Nodes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interactive (login) Nodes Interactive (login) Nodes There are 3 interactive nodes at PDSF, pdsf6-8.nersc.gov, that should be accessed via ssh to pdsf.nersc.gov. These are the...

  11. Interactivity and Emotion Cinematography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomlinson, Bill

    Interactivity and Emotion through Cinematography by William Michael Tomlinson, Jr. M #12;Interactivity and Emotion through Cinematography by William Michael Tomlinson, Jr. Submitted cinematography system for an interactive virtual environment. This system controls a virtual camera and several

  12. PDSF Interactive Batch Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interactive Batch Jobs Running Interactive Batch Jobs You cannot login to the PDSF batch nodes directly but you can run an interactive session on a batch node using either qlogin...

  13. 2Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period April through June 20 1 1. Data for these indicators were gathered...

  14. 2Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly  Report covering the period from April to June  2009. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements...

  15. 1Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January to March 2005. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements...

  16. 2Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators QuarterlyReport covering the period from April to June 2008. Data for these indicators aregathered by Field elements...

  17. 2Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from April to June  2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements...

  18. 3Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the Period July  through September 2011. Data for these indicators were gathered...

  19. 1Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January  to March 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  20. 3Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from July to September  2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  1. 3Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Facility Representative Program Indicators (Pis) Quarterly Report attached, covering the period from July to September 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements...

  2. 3Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This memorandum summarizes the highlights of the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period of July through September 2010. Data for these...

  3. 4Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators QuarterlyReport covering the period from October to December 2007. Data for these indicators aregathered by Field...

  4. 2Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Covering the Period from April to June  2004. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements...

  5. 4Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (Pis) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from October to December 2002. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  6. 1Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January through March 2012. Data for these indicators were...

  7. 3Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Covering the Period from July to September  2004. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  8. 3Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly  Report covering the period from July to September 2009. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  9. 4Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October to December 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  10. 4Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly  Report covering the period from October to December 2009. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  11. 2Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by field elements...

  12. 3Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from July to September 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  13. 4Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October through December 2011. Data for these indicators were...

  14. 4Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October to December 2005. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  15. 4Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "This memorandum summarizes the highlights of the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period October through December 2010. Data for these...

  16. 4Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Covering the Period from October to December  2004. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  17. 3Q C&2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly  Report covering the period from July to September   2008. Data for these indicators aregathered by Field...

  18. 1Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly  Report covering the period from January to March 2009. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  19. 2Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2005. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements...

  20. 4Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from October to December  2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  1. 1Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January to March 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements...

  2. 1Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the Period January through March 2011. Data for these indicators were gathered...

  3. 4Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly  Report covering the period from October to December   2008. Data for these indicators are  gathered by Field...

  4. 2Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements...

  5. 2Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This memorandum summarizes the highlight of, and announces the availablity on-line of, the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per...

  6. 2Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April through June 2012. Data for these indicators were...

  7. 3Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from July to September 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  8. 1Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from January to March  2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  9. 1Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly  Report covering the period from January to March2010. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  10. Do women represent women? : gender and policy in Argentina and Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piscopo, Jennifer M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fiscal Federalism in Argentina: Policies, Politics, andRepresent Women? Gender and Policy in Argentina and Mexico AWomen? Gender and Policy in Argentina and Mexico. by

  11. First quantized pair interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. F. Bennett

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The annihilation and creation operators of Quantum Field Theory presuppose a causality condition and so the theory cannot represent macroscopic entanglement. The multiple-particle parametrized Dirac wave equation can represent entanglement without recourse to a causality condition. It is shown here that the parametrized formalism can also represent pair annihilation and creation.

  12. United States House of Representatives Committee on Oversight and Government Reform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    United States House of Representatives Committee on Oversight and Government Reform Testimony, and the rest of the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, I am very pleased to have the opportunity responsible way. #12;Daniel M. Kammen ­ House of Representatives Committee on Oversight and Government Reform

  13. Detecting and Representing Relevant Web Deltas in Whoweda Sourav S Bhowmick1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhowmick, Sourav S.

    Detecting and Representing Relevant Web Deltas in Whoweda Sourav S Bhowmick1 Sanjay Madria2 Wee given the old and new versions of a set of interlinked Web documents, retrieved in response to a user's query. In particular, we show how to detect and represent web deltas, i.e., changes in the Web documents

  14. Representing Energy Price Variability in Long-and Medium-term Hydropower Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    1 Representing Energy Price Variability in Long- and Medium- term Hydropower Optimization Marcelo A Resources Planning and Management, 2012, in press ABSTRACT Representing peak and off-peak energy prices and examines the reliability of an existing approximate method to incorporate hourly energy price information

  15. INTRODUCTION Yard wastes currently represent about 15% of the total municipal solid waste collected in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    INTRODUCTION Yard wastes currently represent about 15% of the total municipal solid waste collected: Collect representative and typical yard trash samples throughout Florida; Characterize the wastes these wastes. WORK ACCOMPLISHED Visited two compost and mulch processing facilities in Gainesville on 10

  16. Technical basis for the aboveground structure failure accident & associated represented hazardous conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GOETZ, T.G.

    2003-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical basis document describes the risk binning process and the technical basis for assigning risk bins for the above-ground structure failure representative accident and associated represented hazardous conditions. This document was developed to support the documented safety analysis.

  17. A Hydro-Economic Approach to Representing Water Resources Impacts in Integrated Assessment Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirshen, Paul H.; Strzepek, Kenneth, M.

    2004-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Grant Number DE-FG02-98ER62665 Office of Energy Research of the U.S. Department of Energy Abstract Many Integrated Assessment Models (IAM) divide the world into a small number of highly aggregated regions. Non-OECD countries are aggregated geographically into continental and multiple-continental regions or economically by development level. Current research suggests that these large scale aggregations cannot accurately represent potential water resources-related climate change impacts. In addition, IAMs do not explicitly model the flow regulation impacts of reservoir and ground water systems, the economics of water supply, or the demand for water in economic activities. Using the International Model for Policy Analysis of Agricultural Commodities and Trade (IMPACT) model of the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) as a case study, this research implemented a set of methodologies to provide accurate representation of water resource climate change impacts in Integrated Assessment Models. There were also detailed examinations of key issues related to aggregated modeling including: modeling water consumption versus water withdrawals; ground and surface water interactions; development of reservoir cost curves; modeling of surface areas of aggregated reservoirs for estimating evaporation losses; and evaluating the importance of spatial scale in river basin modeling. The major findings include: - Continental or national or even large scale river basin aggregation of water supplies and demands do not accurately capture the impacts of climate change in the water and agricultural sector in IAMs. - Fortunately, there now exist gridden approaches (0.5 X 0.5 degrees) to model streamflows in a global analysis. The gridded approach to hydrologic modeling allows flexibility in aligning basin boundaries with national boundaries. This combined with GIS tools, high speed computers, and the growing availability of socio-economic gridded data bases allows assignment of demands to river basins to create hydro-economic zones that respect as much as possible both political and hydrologic integrity in different models. - To minimize pre-processing of data and add increased flexibility to modeling water resources and uses, it is recommended that water withdrawal demands be modeled, not consumptive requirements even though this makes the IAM more complex. - IAMs must consider changes in water availability for irrigation under climate change; ignoring them is more inaccurate than ignoring yield changes in crops under climate change. - Determining water availability and cost in river basins must include modeling streamflows, reservoirs and their operations, and ground water and its interaction with surface water. - Scale issues are important. The results from condensing demands and supplies in a large complex river basin to one node can be misleading for all uses under low flow conditions and instream flow uses under all conditions. Monthly is generally the most accurate scale for modeling river flows and demands. Challenges remain in integrating hydrologic units with political boundaries but the gridded approach to hydrologic modeling allows flexibility in aligning basin boundaries with political boundaries. - Using minimal reservoir cost data, it is possible to use basin topography to estimate reservoir storage costs. - Reservoir evaporation must be considered when assessing the usable water in a watershed. Several methods are available to estimate the relationship between aggregated storage surface area and storage volume. - For existing or future IAMs that can not use the appropriate aggregation for water, a water preprocessor may be required due the finer scale of hydrologic impacts.

  18. Genome analysis of Elusimicrobium minutum, the first cultivated representative of the Elusimicrobia phylum (formerly Termite Group 1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herlemann, D. P. R.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the first cultivated representative of the ElusimicrobiaT , the first cultured representative of the TG1 phylum. Wefirst pure-culture representative of the TG1 phylum, from

  19. A representative particle approach to coagulation and fragmentation of dust aggregates and fluid droplets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Zsom; C. P. Dullemond

    2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Context: There is increasing need for good algorithms for modeling the aggregation and fragmentation of solid particles (dust grains, dust aggregates, boulders) in various astrophysical settings, including protoplanetary disks, planetary- and sub-stellar atmospheres and dense molecular cloud cores. Here we describe a new algorithm that combines advantages of various standard methods into one. Aims: The aim is to develop a method that 1) can solve for aggregation and fragmentation, 2) can easily include the effect and evolution of grain properties such as compactness, composition, etc., and 3) can be built as a coagulation/fragmentation module into a hydrodynamics simulations. Methods: We develop a Monte-Carlo method in which we follow the 'life' of a limited number of representative particles. Each of these particles is associated with a certain fraction of the total dust mass and thereby represents a large number of true particles which all are assumed to have the same properties as their representative particle. Under the assumption that the total number of true particles vastly exceeds the number of representative particles, the chance of a representative particle colliding with another representative particle is negligibly small, and we therefore ignore this possibility. This now makes it possible to employ a statistical approach to the evolution of the representative particles. Results: The method reproduces the known analytic solutions of simplified coagulation kernels, and compares well to numerical results for Brownian motion using other methods. For reasonably well-behaved kernels it produces good results even for moderate number of swarms.

  20. Dominant couplings in qubit networks with controlled interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ji?í Maryška; Jaroslav Novotný; Igor Jex

    2015-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems evolving under the influence of competing two-body and three-body interactions, are of particular interest in exploring the stability of equilibrium states of strongly interacting many-body system. We present a solvable model based on qubit networks, which allows us to investigate the intricate influence of these couplings on the possible asymptotic equilibrium states. We study the asymptotic evolution of finite qubit networks under two and three-qubit interactions. As representatives of three-qubit interactions we choose controlled unitary interactions (cu-interactions) with one and two control qubits. It is shown that networks with purely three-qubit interactions exhibit different asymptotic dynamics depending on whether we deal with interactions controlled by one or two qubits. However, when we allow three-qubit interactions next to two-qubit interactions, the asymptotics is dictated by two-qubit interactions only. Finally, we prove that the simultaneous presence of two types of three-qubit interactions results in the asymptotic dynamics characteristic for two-qubit cu-interactions.

  1. Interactive Software Technology 1/24 Interactive Software Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wegner, Peter

    Interactive Software Technology 1/24 Interactive Software Technology Peter Wegner, Brown University Paradigms 2. Models of Interaction 3. Software Engineering, Artificial Intelligence, and Open Systems 4. Object­oriented Design: Sequential Interaction 5. Multiple Interface Models: Concurrent Interaction 6

  2. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future is a virtue ­ your insight, clarity of thought, #12;Note: This syllabus may represent

  3. Lessons Learned in Optimizing Workers' and Worker Representatives' Input to Work Planning and Control

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Slide Presentation by Tom McQuiston, Dr. P.H., United Steelworkers - Tony Mazzocchi Center for Health, Safety and Environmental Education. Lessons Learned in Optimizing Workers’ and Worker Representatives’ Input in Work Planning and Control.

  4. 2Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "The Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached, covering the period from April 2000 to June 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field...

  5. Family ties: representing the relationships between parents and children in contemporary Irish political poetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Lori L

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    . Boland and Heaney use the idealized model of the traditional Irish family to represent the Irish nation, describing through personal experience a national significance. This is in contrast to Paul Muldoon, who was born the generation after Boland...

  6. Gregory H. Friedman: Before The U.S. House of Representatives...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Government Reform Subcommittee on the Federal Workforce and Agency Organization Gregory H. Friedman: Before The U.S. House of...

  7. U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    in innovation and clean energy to put people back to work, grow the economy, and win the future. He will be joined by U.S. Representatives John Larson and Joe Courtney for...

  8. Cultural values represented by Hispanic and US superheroes: a text analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez Castillo, Claudia del Carmen

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CULTURAL VALUES REPRESENTED BY HISPANIC AND US SUPERHEROES: A TEXT ANALYSIS A Thesis by CLAUDIA DEL CARMEN SANCHEZ CASTILLO Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A%M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1999 Major Subject: Curriculum and Instruction CULTURAL VALUES REPRESENTED BY HISPANIC AND US SUPERHEROES: A TEXT ANALYSIS A Thesis by CLAUDIA DEL CAKvKN SANCHEZ CASTILLO Submitted to the Office of Graduate...

  9. Interaction, protection and epidemics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goyal, Sanjeev; Vigier, Adrien

    2015-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    unique equilibrium: individuals who invest in protection choose to interact more relative to those who do not invest in protection. Changes in the contagiousness of the disease have non-monotonic effects: as a result interaction initially falls...

  10. Interaction of Polycrystalline CVD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Joan

    Interaction of Polycrystalline CVD Diamond Thin Films with Atomic Oxygen Ze'ev Shpilman #12;#12;Interaction of Polycrystalline CVD Diamond Thin Films with Atomic Oxygen Research thesis In Partial.................................................................... 6 1.2.1 Polycrystalline CVD diamond films: growth and structure 7 1.3. Interaction of carbon

  11. The displacement field characterization of two interacting parallel edge cracks in a finite body

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keener, Todd Whitney

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goals of this research were to: (1) develop a model to represent the displacement field surrounding two interacting, parallel edge cracks; and (2) use this model to investigate the influence of crack separation and relative crack length...

  12. Human-computer interaction task learning: an empirical investigation of interface quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Packebush, Sherrill Janine

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research examines learnability measures derived from the all-or-none stochastic learning model. The all-or-none model represents the paired-associate learning that occurs during the initial learning of human-computer interaction (HCI) tasks...

  13. Technical basis for the tank bump representative accident and associated hazardous conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WILLIAMS, J.C.

    2003-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical basis document was developed to support the Tank Farms Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) and describes the risk binning process and the technical basis for assigning risk bins for the tank bump representative accident and associated hazardous conditions. The purpose of the risk binning process is to determine the need for safety-significant structures, systems, and components (SSC) and/or technical safety requirement (TSR)-level controls for a given representative accident or represented hazardous conditions based on an evaluation of the frequency and consequence. Note that the risk binning process is not applied to facility workers, because all facility worker hazardous conditions are considered for safety-significant SSCs and/or TSR-level controls. Determination of the need for safety-class SSCs was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, ''Preparation Guide for US Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports'', as described in this report.

  14. INTERACTIVE DISPLAY OF POLYGONAL DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Peter M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    P. SEEDIS Workbook III, Interactive Polygon Mapping. LBL-August, 1974. Wood, P.M. Interactive Thematic ~mpping -- Aprivatelyownedrights. LBL-6490 INTERACTIVE DISPLAY OF

  15. AN INTERACTIVE SPIRES PLOT PROTOCOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerny, Barbara

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LBL-11068 AN INTERACTIVE SPIRES PLOT PROTOCOL Barbara Cerny,11068 PLOT PROTOCOL AN INTERACTIVE by Barbara Cerny, Geraldit gives immediate interactive plots that can be displayed

  16. The role of cholesterol in the association of endoplasmic reticulum membranes with mitochondria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujimoto, Michiko [Cellular Stress Signaling Unit, Integrative Neuroscience Branch, Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Baltimore, MD 21224 (United States)] [Cellular Stress Signaling Unit, Integrative Neuroscience Branch, Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Baltimore, MD 21224 (United States); Hayashi, Teruo, E-mail: thayashi@mail.nih.gov [Cellular Stress Signaling Unit, Integrative Neuroscience Branch, Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Baltimore, MD 21224 (United States)] [Cellular Stress Signaling Unit, Integrative Neuroscience Branch, Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Baltimore, MD 21224 (United States); Su, Tsung-Ping, E-mail: tsu@intra.nida.nih.gov [Cellular Pathobiology Section, Integrative Neuroscience Branch, Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Baltimore, MD 21224 (United States)] [Cellular Pathobiology Section, Integrative Neuroscience Branch, Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Baltimore, MD 21224 (United States)

    2012-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The endoplasmic reticulum subdomain termed MAM associates with mitochondria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The biophysical role of lipids in the MAM-mitochondria association is unknown. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The in vitro membrane association assay was used to examine the role of lipids. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cholesterol was found to negatively regulate the association. -- Abstract: The unique endoplasmic reticulum (ER) subdomain termed the mitochondria-associated ER membrane (MAM) engages the physical connection between the ER and the mitochondrial outer membrane and plays a role in regulating IP{sub 3} receptor-mediated Ca{sup 2+} influx and the phospholipid transport between the two organelles. The MAM contains certain signaling and membrane-tethering proteins but also lipids including cholesterol. The biophysical role of lipids at the MAM, specifically in the physical interaction between the MAM of the ER and mitochondria, remains not totally clarified. Here we employed the in vitro membrane association assay to investigate the role of cholesterol in the association between MAMs and mitochondria. The purified MAMs and mitochondria were mixed in vitro in a test tube and then the physical association of the two subcellular organelles was quantified indirectly by measuring the presence of the MAM-specific protein sigma-1 receptors in the mitochondria fraction. Purified MAMs contained free cholesterol approximately 7 times higher than that in microsomes. We found that depletion of cholesterol in MAMs with methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin (M{beta}C) significantly increases the association between MAMs and mitochondria, whereas M{beta}C saturated with cholesterol does not change the association. {sup 14}C-Serine pulse-labeling demonstrated that the treatment of living cells with M{beta}C decreases the level of de novo synthesized {sup 14}C-phosphatidylserine (PtSer) and concomitantly increases greatly the synthesis of {sup 14}C-phosphatidylethanolamine (PtEt). Apparently, cholesterol depletion increased the PtSer transport from MAMs to mitochondria. Our findings suggest that cholesterol is an important substrate in regulating the association between MAMs of the ER and mitochondria.

  17. Representing Instructional Material for Scenario-Based Guided-Discovery Courseware

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greitzer, Frank L.; Merrill, M. DAVID.; Rice, Douglas M.; Curtis, Darren S.

    2004-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this paper is to discuss paradigms for learning that are based on sound principles of human learning and cognition, and to discuss technical challenges that must be overcome in achieving this research goal through instructional system design (ISD) approaches that are cost-effective as well as conformant with today's interactive multimedia instruction standards. Fundamental concepts are to: engage learners to solve real-world problems (progress from simple to complex); relate material to previous experience; demonstrate what is to be learned using interactive, problem-centered activities rather than passive exposure to material; require learners to use their new knowledge to solve problems that demonstrate their knowledge in a relevant applied setting; and guide the learner with feedback and coaching early, then gradually withdraw this support as learning progresses. Many of these principles have been put into practice by employing interactive learning objects as re-usable components of larger, more integrated exercises. A challenge is to make even more extensive use of interactive, scenario-based activities within a guided-discovery framework. Because the design and construction of interactive, scenario-based learning objects and more complex integrated exercises is labor-intensive, this paper explores the use of interactive learning objects and associated representation schema for instructional content to facilitate development of tools for creating scenario-based, guided-discovery courseware.

  18. Importance of direct Coulomb d-f interaction in the relaxation of 170Yb3+ in palladium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    97 Importance of direct Coulomb d-f interaction in the relaxation of 170Yb3+ in palladium L. C-f interaction considered in refe- rence [1], we now include the direct Coulomb interaction between 4f electrons and 2 K by the law : where f (x) = xl(ex - 1). In expression (1), CK represents the coefficient

  19. Instructions to the Applicant 1. The Facility Representative shall complete a "Special Event Application &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Application & Permit". A site and floor plan must be submitted to the Office of the State Fire Marshal with the Fire and Life Safety requirements of Title 19, Title 24, and the conditions noted on this permit. Non. The Facility Representative shall transmit the "Special Event Application & Permit" to the Office of the State

  20. Representing hierarchical POMDPs as DBNs, with applications to mobile robot navigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Kevin Patrick

    Representing hierarchical POMDPs as DBNs, with applications to mobile robot navigation Kevin P and learning is faster than in SCFGs. In particular, inference in an HHMM can be done in O(T) time [MP01) takes O(T 3 ) time [JM00]. This also means learning, which uses inference as a subroutine, is faster. Y

  1. Synthesizing Representative I/O Workloads Using Iterative Distillation Zachary Kurmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurmas, Zachary

    Synthesizing Representative I/O Workloads Using Iterative Distillation Zachary Kurmas College proper- ties are "key" for a given workload and storage system. We have developed a tool, the Distiller, that automati- cally identifies the key properties ("attribute-values") of the workload. The Distiller then uses

  2. Laser Safety Web Resources The web links below represent varied resources for laser safety information and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houston, Paul L.

    Laser Safety Web Resources The web links below represent varied resources for laser safety information and equipment. The inclusion or exclusion of any given resource is not meant to reflect endorsement by Georgia Tech. Please contact the Laser Safety Officer if you know of any helpful resources

  3. Law School Admissions Panel Law School representatives will discuss the law school admissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brinkmann, Peter

    Law School Admissions Panel Law School representatives will discuss the law school admissions process and talk about their respective schools in a panel discussion format. Join us and learn how in Law School Admissions Panel epresentatives will discuss the law school admissions process and talk

  4. Representing OGC Geospatial Web Services in OWL-S Web Service Ontologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stock, Kristin

    Representing OGC Geospatial Web Services in OWL-S Web Service Ontologies Kristin Stock,1,2 Anne Robertson3 and Mark Small3 1 Centre for Geospatial Science, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD geospatial web services, most of which conform to specifications of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC

  5. CO2 efflux from Amazonian headwater streams represents a significant fate for deep soil respiration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehmann, Johannes

    CO2 efflux from Amazonian headwater streams represents a significant fate for deep soil respiration amounts of CO2 to the atmosphere, while the magnitude of CO2 degassing from small streams remains a major was as terrestrially-respired CO2 dissolved within soils, over 90% of which evaded to the atmosphere within headwater

  6. Nuclear talks in Austria International representatives will meet in Vienna on Saturday to discuss a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nuclear talks in Austria International representatives will meet in Vienna on Saturday to discuss a controversial nuclear fusion plan. The technical meeting of experts is intended to pave the way of nuclear fusion say it provides an attractive long-term energy option, because the basic materials needed

  7. DO GLOBAL WARMING AND CLIMATE CHANGE REPRESENT A SERIOUS THREAT TO OUR WELFARE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DO GLOBAL WARMING AND CLIMATE CHANGE REPRESENT A SERIOUS THREAT TO OUR WELFARE AND ENVIRONMENT? By Michael E. Mann I. Introduction The subjects of "global warming" and "climate change" have become parts of both the popular lexicon and the public discourse. Discussions of global warming often evoke passionate

  8. Mechanism-based Representative Volume Elements (RVEs) for Predicting Property Degradations in Multiphase Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Wei; Sun, Xin; Li, Dongsheng; Ryu, Seun; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantitative understanding of the evolving thermal-mechanical properties of a multi-phase material hinges upon the availability of quantitative statistically representative microstructure descriptions. Questions then arise as to whether a two-dimensional (2D) or a three-dimensional (3D) representative volume element (RVE) should be considered as the statistically representative microstructure. Although 3D models are more representative than 2D models in general, they are usually computationally expensive and difficult to be reconstructed. In this paper, we evaluate the accuracy of a 2D RVE in predicting the property degradations induced by different degradation mechanisms with the multiphase solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode material as an example. Both 2D and 3D microstructure RVEs of the anodes are adopted to quantify the effects of two different degradation mechanisms: humidity-induced electrochemical degradation and phosphorus poisoning induced structural degradation. The predictions of the 2D model are then compared with the available experimental measurements and the results from the 3D model. It is found that the 2D model, limited by its inability of reproducing the realistic electrical percolation, is unable to accurately predict the degradation of thermo-electrical properties. On the other hand, for the phosphorus poisoning induced structural degradation, both 2D and 3D microstructures yield similar results, indicating that the 2D model is capable of providing computationally efficient yet accurate results for studying the structural degradation within the anodes.

  9. Representing and Utilizing Changing Historical Places as an Ontology Time Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hyvönen, Eero

    Chapter 1 Representing and Utilizing Changing Historical Places as an Ontology Time Series Eero Hyv.g. Check Republic or Slo- vakia) or overlapping historic names of different times (e.g. Roman Empire interfaces. The system has been applied in the semantic cultural heritage portal CULTURESAMPO for semantic

  10. MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY Come join us and representatives from the following Universities and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Taosheng

    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY · DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY Come join us and representatives from School of Professional PSY - PsyD University of Michigan ­ MSW & MPH Western Michigan University - MA MSU the following Universities and Professional Schools to learn about their graduate programs, admission

  11. INTRODUCTIONINTRODUCTION Residential landscapes represent a large percentage of urban land cover (Martin et al.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    INTRODUCTIONINTRODUCTION Residential landscapes represent a large percentage of urban land cover to residential landscapes, we propose a conceptual model that integrates socioeconomic factors that influence, and socioeconomic factors: Exploring the relationships in a residential landscape. Susannah B. Lerman1 and Paige S

  12. Clemson's Logo System Any mark that is intended to represent Clemson University is the prop-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    15 3 Clemson's Logo System Any mark that is intended to represent Clemson University is the prop guidelines will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. Logos at this level must contain a wordmark or Tiger five marks preferably use level one logos (masterbrand symbols), brand fonts and Clemson Orange

  13. Patterns for Representing FMEA in Formal Specification of Control Systems Ilya Lopatkin, Alexei Iliasov,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southampton, University of

    Patterns for Representing FMEA in Formal Specification of Control Systems Ilya Lopatkin, Alexei, Finland {Yuliya.Prokhorova, Elena.Troubitsyna}@abo.fi Abstract -- Failure Modes and Effects analysis (FMEA) is a widely used technique for inductive safety analysis. FMEA provides engineers with valuable information

  14. Using Stochastically Generated Subcolumns to Represent Cloud Structure in a Large-Scale Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert, Pincus

    condensate amount and cloud fraction, has about the same effect on radiative fluxes as does the ad hoc tuning for representing cloud structure in instantaneous calculations and long-term integrations. Shortwave radiation accounting for this effect in the operational radiation scheme. Long simulations with the new model

  15. AUTOMATED TEAM PROJECT MANAGEMENT AND EVALUATION THROUGH INTERACTIVE WEB MODULES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lockwood, John W.

    AUTOMATED TEAM PROJECT MANAGEMENT AND EVALUATION THROUGH INTERACTIVE WEB MODULES John W. Lockwood lockwood@ipoint.vlsi.uiuc.edu ABSTRACT Team projects represent an important aspect of the micro- electronic in team projects. Evalu- ation of an individual's performance requires a fair compar- ison of the team

  16. DRAMBORA interactive: user guide 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donnelly, Martin; Innocenti, Perla; McHugh, Andrew; Ruusalepp, Raivo

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Developed jointly by the Digital Curation Centre (DCC) and DigitalPreservationEurope (DPE), the Digital Repository Audit Method Based on Risk Assessment (DRAMBORA) represents the main intellectual outcome of a period of ...

  17. Interactive dynamic aircraft scheduling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deckwitz, Thomas Anthony

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Introducing recent advances in computer technology to improve aircraft scheduling is investigated. Incorporating interactive graphics, modern database manipulation techniques, and decision support algorithms, the computer ...

  18. Nerve-pulse interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, A.C.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Some recent experimental and theoretical results on mechanisms through which individual nerve pulses can interact are reviewed. Three modes of interactions are considered: (1) interaction of pulses as they travel along a single fiber which leads to velocity dispersion; (2) propagation of pairs of pulses through a branching region leading to quantum pulse code transformations; and (3) interaction of pulses on parallel fibers through which they may form a pulse assembly. This notion is analogous to Hebb's concept of a cell assembly, but on a lower level of the neural hierarchy.

  19. Interaction and Intelligent Behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mataric, Maja J.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce basic behaviors as primitives for control and learning in situated, embodied agents interacting in complex domains. We propose methods for selecting, formally specifying, algorithmically implementing, ...

  20. A case-control study of Burkitt lymphoma in East Africa: are local health facilities an appropriate source of representative controls?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    appropriate source of representative controls? Baik et al.an appropriate source of representative controls? Sonya Baikattending four representative local health facilities in the

  1. The relationship of multiple aspects of stigma and personal contact with someone hospitalized for mental illness, in a nationally representative sample

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyd formerly Ritsher, Jennifer E; Katz, Emerald P; Link, Bruce G; Phelan, Jo C

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ill: results of representative surveys in the Federala model using data from a representative population survey.illness, in a nationally representative sample Jennifer E.

  2. The relationship of multiple aspects of stigma and personal contact with someone hospitalized for mental illness, in a nationally representative sample

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyd, Jennifer E.; Katz, Emerald P.; Link, Bruce G.; Phelan, Jo C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ill: results of representative surveys in the Federala model using data from a representative population survey.illness, in a nationally representative sample Jennifer E.

  3. The older the better: are elderly study participants more non-representative? A cross-sectional analysis of clinical trial and observational study samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golomb, B. A; Chan, V. T; Evans, M. A; Koperski, S.; White, H. L; Criqui, M. H

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    participants more non-representative? A cross-sectionalparticipants more non-representative? A cross-sectionalusing a national representative longitudinal survey. J

  4. Equity and the Sun Quality Health Private Provider Social Franchise: comparative analysis of patient survey data and a nationally representative TB prevalence survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montagu, Dominic; Sudhinaraset, May; Lwin, Thandar; Onozaki, Ikushi; Win, Zaw; Aung, Tin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    data and a nationally representative TB prevalence survey.data and a nationally representative TB prevalence surveys first nationally representative TB prevalence study

  5. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may;Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ

  6. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may to its cultural relevance and effectiveness 50% Week 9 #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past

  7. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may) with your progress report (PDF). (1-3 pages) #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering

  8. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may-class participation (required) #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course

  9. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may Participation 10% Major Figure 15% Group Web 25% Final Paper 40% #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past

  10. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may is a part of your class grade and that it includes many components. #12;Note: This syllabus may represent

  11. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may will design and build a #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course

  12. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may and prototype files can be in the format most convenient for you. #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past

  13. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may, #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may

  14. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ. Course

  15. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may argumentation around the concept of crowdsourcing/crowd work. #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past

  16. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may your professional identity using multiple avenues (i.e., #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past

  17. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may discussions): 20% #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course

  18. Vacation Donation Contribution Refer to the Administrative Policy: Vacation Donation Program for Civil Service and Union-Represented Staff at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    for Civil Service and Union-Represented Staff at http://www.policy.umn.edu/Policies/hr/Leaves/VACATIONDONATION.html and corresponding Procedure: Requesting/Donating Paid Leave for Civil Service/Union-Represented Staff at http

  19. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may Course Schedule: MW, 1:30-3:20pm; or TTh, 10:30am-12:20pm *DISCLAIMER: This syllabus represents computational thinking, including: #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course

  20. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ. Course;Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ

  1. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may;Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differHutchinson Style: #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings

  2. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may Tuesday Introduction to course Introduction to user assistance (UA) #12;Note: This syllabus may represent: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ. Thursday

  3. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ. Course to Seidman, pp.7­14, Weiss, Chap.1 -- #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course

  4. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may Week 3 A A. Lecture: Constructive criticism & evaluation rubric #12;Note: This syllabus may represent sources #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings

  5. Putative Zinc Finger Protein Binding Sites Are Over-Represented in the Boundaries of Methylation-Resistant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Putative Zinc Finger Protein Binding Sites Are Over- Represented in the Boundaries of Methylation that there are several over-represented putative Transcription Factor Binding Sites (TFBSs) in methylation-resistant CpG islands, and a specific group of zinc finger protein binding sites are over-represented in boundary

  6. Representing Uncertainty Do not expect to arrive at certainty in every subject which you pursue. There are a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitelson, Branden

    Chapter 2 Representing Uncertainty Do not expect to arrive at certainty in every subject which you best light and reasoning will reach no farther. --Isaac Watts How should uncertainty be represented in this chapter, I discuss some other difficulties that probability has in representing uncertainty

  7. Instructions concerning the strdent's representative The faculty of law at Philadelphia University gives a high degree of interest to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instructions concerning the strdent's representative-learning process being run perfectly,it was decided that a student should be chosen to represent all students in a class to words the teacher of the course . 2- The aim of choosing a representative . This procedure aims

  8. Interactive Multimedia Presentation Capabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boll, Susanne

    Interactive Multimedia Presentation Capabilities for an Object-Oriented DBMS Susanne Boll, Michael and Mathematics (ERCIM) Workshop Reports, 9th ERCIM Database Research Group Workshop on Multimedia Database Sys, FRANCE, 1996. #12;Interactive Multimedia Presentation Capabilities for an Object-Oriented DBMS Susanne

  9. Interactive Virtual Environments Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petriu, Emil M.

    sensor data or by animation scripts. Human users can interact and directly manipulate objects within Reality Interactive Virtual Reality Virtualized Reality Augmented Reality #12;HUMAN PERCEPTION OF REALITY REAL WORLD / ENVIRONMENT HUMAN (sentient living animal able of sensible reasoning) #12;Real

  10. Notes on representing grain size distributions obtained by electron backscatter diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toth, Laszlo S., E-mail: laszlo.metz@univ-lorraine.fr [Laboratoire d'Etude des Microstructures et de Mécanique des Matériaux (LEM3), UMR 7239, CNRS/Université de Lorraine, F-57045 Metz (France); Laboratory of Excellence on Design of Alloy Metals for low-mAss Structures (DAMAS), Université de Lorraine (France); Biswas, Somjeet, E-mail: somjeetbiswas@gmail.com [Laboratory of Excellence on Design of Alloy Metals for low-mAss Structures (DAMAS), Université de Lorraine (France); Gu, Chengfan, E-mail: chengfan.gu@unsw.edu.au [School of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Beausir, Benoit, E-mail: benoit.beausir@univ-lorraine.fr [Laboratoire d'Etude des Microstructures et de Mécanique des Matériaux (LEM3), UMR 7239, CNRS/Université de Lorraine, F-57045 Metz (France); Laboratory of Excellence on Design of Alloy Metals for low-mAss Structures (DAMAS), Université de Lorraine (France)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Grain size distributions measured by electron backscatter diffraction are commonly represented by histograms using either number or area fraction definitions. It is shown here that they should be presented in forms of density distribution functions for direct quantitative comparisons between different measurements. Here we make an interpretation of the frequently seen parabolic tales of the area distributions of bimodal grain structures and a transformation formula between the two distributions are given in this paper. - Highlights: • Grain size distributions are represented by density functions. • The parabolic tales corresponds to equal number of grains in a bin of the histogram. • A simple transformation formula is given to number and area weighed distributions. • The particularities of uniform and lognormal distributions are examined.

  11. An Agent-Environment Interaction Model Scott A. DeLoach and Jorge L. Valenzuela

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deloach, Scott A.

    An Agent-Environment Interaction Model Scott A. DeLoach and Jorge L. Valenzuela Department with objects in its environment through the use of its capabilities. Capabilities are recursively defined in terms of lower-level capabilities and actions, which represent atomic interactions with the environment

  12. QBism and the Greeks: why a quantum state does not represent an element of physical reality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher A. Fuchs; Ruediger Schack

    2015-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In QBism (or Quantum Bayesianism) a quantum state does not represent an element of physical reality but an agent's personal probability assignments, reflecting his subjective degrees of belief about the future content of his experience. In this paper, we contrast QBism with hidden-variable accounts of quantum mechanics and show the sense in which QBism explains quantum correlations. QBism's agent-centered worldview can be seen as a development of ideas expressed in Schr\\"odinger's essay "Nature and the Greeks".

  13. REPRESENTING AEROSOL DYNAMICS AND PROPERTIES IN CHEMICAL TRANSPORT MODELS BY THE METHOD OF MOMENTS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SCHWARTZ,S.E.; MCGRAW,R.; BENKOVITZ,C.M.; WRIGHT,D.L.

    2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric aerosols, suspensions of solid or liquid particles, are an important multi-phase system. Aerosols scatter and absorb shortwave (solar) radiation, affecting climate (Charlson et al., 1992; Schwartz, 1996) and visibility; nucleate cloud droplet formation, modifying the reflectivity of clouds (Twomey et al., 1984; Schwartz and Slingo, 1996) as well as contributing to composition of cloudwater and to wet deposition (Seinfeld and Pandis, 1998); and affect human health through inhalation (NRC, 1998). Existing and prospective air quality regulations impose standards on concentrations of atmospheric aerosols to protect human health and welfare (EPA, 1998). Chemical transport and transformation models representing the loading and geographical distribution of aerosols and precursor gases are needed to permit development of effective and efficient strategies for meeting air quality standards, and for examining aerosol effects on climate retrospectively and prospectively for different emissions scenarios. Important aerosol properties and processes depend on their size distribution: light scattering, cloud nucleating properties, dry deposition, and penetration into airways of lungs. The evolution of the mass loading itself depends on particle size because of the size dependence of growth and removal processes. For these reasons it is increasingly recognized that chemical transport and transformation models must represent not just the mass loading of atmospheric particulate matter but also the aerosol microphysical properties and the evolution of these properties if aerosols are to be accurately represented in these models. If the size distribution of the aerosol is known, a given property can be evaluated as the integral of the appropriate kernel function over the size distribution. This has motivated the approach of determining aerosol size distribution, and of explicitly representing this distribution and its evolution in chemical transport models.

  14. Interacting spin-2 fields in three dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Afshar, Hamid R; Merbis, Wout

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the frame formulation of multi-gravity in three dimensions, we show that demanding the presence of secondary constraints which remove the Boulware-Deser ghosts restricts the possible interaction terms of the theory and identifies invertible frame field combinations whose effective metric may consistently couple to matter. The resulting ghost-free theories can be represented by theory graphs which are trees. In the case of three frame fields, we explicitly show that the requirement of positive masses and energies for the bulk spin-2 modes in AdS$_3$ is consistent with a positive central charge for the putative dual CFT$_2$.

  15. Interacting spin-2 fields in three dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamid R. Afshar; Eric A. Bergshoeff; Wout Merbis

    2015-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the frame formulation of multi-gravity in three dimensions, we show that demanding the presence of secondary constraints which remove the Boulware-Deser ghosts restricts the possible interaction terms of the theory and identifies invertible frame field combinations whose effective metric may consistently couple to matter. The resulting ghost-free theories can be represented by theory graphs which are trees. In the case of three frame fields, we explicitly show that the requirement of positive masses and energies for the bulk spin-2 modes in AdS$_3$ is consistent with a positive central charge for the putative dual CFT$_2$.

  16. Uniprocessor Performance Analysis of a Representative Workload of Sandia National Laboratories' Scientific Applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles Laverty

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    UNIPROCESSOR PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF A REPRESENTATIVE WORKLOAD OF SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES' SCIENTIFIC APPLICATIONS Master of Science in Electrical Engineering New Mexico State University Las Cruces, New Mexico, 2005 Dr. Jeanine Cook, Chair Throughout the last decade computer performance analysis has become absolutely necessary to maximum performance of some workloads. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) located in Albuquerque, New Mexico is no different in that to achieve maximum performance of large scientific, parallel workloads performance analysis is needed at the uni-processor level. A representative workload has been chosen as the basis of a computer performance study to determine optimal processor characteristics in order to better specify the next generation of supercomputers. Cube3, a finite element test problem developed at SNL is a representative workload of their scientific workloads. This workload has been studied at the uni-processor level to understand characteristics in the microarchitecture that will lead to the overall performance improvement at the multi-processor level. The goal of studying vthis workload at the uni-processor level is to build a performance prediction model that will be integrated into a multi-processor performance model which is currently being developed at SNL. Through the use of performance counters on the Itanium 2 microarchitecture, performance statistics are studied to determine bottlenecks in the microarchitecture and/or changes in the application code that will maximize performance. From source code analysis a performance degrading loop kernel was identified and through the use of compiler optimizations a performance gain of around 20% was achieved.

  17. 100% MOX BWR experimental program design using multi-parameter representative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaise, P.; Fougeras, P.; Cathalau, S. [CEA, DEN, DER/SPRC, Cadarache F-13108 Saint Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new multiparameter representative approach for the design of Advanced full MOX BWR core physics experimental programs is developed. The approach is based on sensitivity analysis of integral parameters to nuclear data, and correlations among different integral parameters. The representativeness method is here used to extract a quantitative relationship between a particular integral response of an experimental mock-up and the same response in a reference project to be designed. The study is applied to the design of the 100% MOX BASALA ABWR experimental program in the EOLE facility. The adopted scheme proposes an original approach to the problem, going from the initial 'microscopic' pin-cells integral parameters to the whole 'macroscopic' assembly integral parameters. This approach enables to collect complementary information necessary to optimize the initial design and to meet target accuracy on the integral parameters to be measured. The study has demonstrated the necessity of new fuel pins fabrication, fulfilling minimal costs requirements, to meet acceptable representativeness on local power distribution. (authors)

  18. Technical basis for the transportation related handling representative accidents and associated hazards condition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TOMASZEWSKI, T.A.

    2003-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical basis document was developed to support the Tank Farms Documented Safety Analysis (DSA), and describes the risk binning process and the technical basis for assigning risk bins for the handling and movement of tank farm waste sample containers, and mixed, low-level, and hazardous operational waste containers incidental to onsite vehicle transportation representative accident and associated hazardous conditions. The purpose of the risk binning process is to determine the need for safety-significant structures, systems, and components (SSC) and technical safety requirement (TSR)-level controls for a given representative accident or represented hazardous conditions based on an evaluation of the frequency and consequence. Note that the risk binning process is not applied to facility workers because all facility worker hazardous conditions are considered for safety-significant SSCs and/or TSR-level controls. See RPP-14286, Facility Worker Technical Basis Document, for these considerations. Determination of the need for safety-class SSCs was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses, as described in this report.

  19. MIMESIS: Interactive Interface for Mass-Interaction Matthieu Evrard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MIMESIS: Interactive Interface for Mass-Interaction Modeling Matthieu Evrard ICA Laboratory introduces MIMESIS, a end-user software based on mass-interaction modeling. In MIMESIS, the mass-interaction-based modeling, simulation, animation, mass-interaction network, user-friendly interface, animation language. 1

  20. Twist Field as Three String Interaction Vertex in Light Cone String Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isao Kishimoto; Sanefumi Moriyama; Shunsuke Teraguchi

    2007-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been suggested that matrix string theory and light-cone string field theory are closely related. In this paper, we investigate the relation between the twist field, which represents string interactions in matrix string theory, and the three-string interaction vertex in light-cone string field theory carefully. We find that the three-string interaction vertex can reproduce some of the most important OPEs satisfied by the twist field.

  1. Bonneville Purchasing Instructions. Appendix 14A, Contracting Officer`s Technical Representatives` Guide for Services Contracts.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This guide outlines the duties of BPA personnel designated as Contracting Officers Technical Representatives (COTRs). The BPA Administrator gives contracting officers (COs) in BPA responsibility and authority for awarding and administering contracts. COs are authorized to designate other BPA employees to act as their representatives for purposes of contract administration, from the time of contract award until final receipt and acceptance of the contracted services. COTRs are the individuals primarily relied upon to perform technical contract administration functions. Similar functions for supply and construction contracts are performed by engineering representatives, construction inspectors, and inspectors. Although this Guide is written primarily with the COTR in mind, the concept and operation of teamwork is essential throughout the entire process of contract administration. The CO administers the contract during performance, but rarely has expertise in all of the relevant technical areas. Therefore, CO decisions rely on input from a team. The COTR is an indispensable member of that team. The instructions in this Guide are designed to facilitate this essential CO-COTR cooperation. COTR duties are usually additional to those required of the COTR in his or her assigned line organization. The COTR is still accountable to the line supervisor for performance of regularly-assigned duties. These duties are to be reflected appropriately in performance appraisals and job descriptions. For contract administration duties, however, the COTR reports directly to, and is accountable only to, the CO. The COTR`s supervisor must allow sufficient time to ensure that the COTR can adequately monitor the contract for technical compliance. This Guide is designed for COTRs who are performing service contract (including intergovernmental contract) administration functions as an adjunct to their normal technical duties.

  2. Interactive Holographic Cinema

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Portales, Christopher

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    computer program performs stereoscopic reconstruction in real-time during presentation. Artists and computer users could then use a hardware device, such as the Microsoft Kinect, to explore the holographic cinematic form interactively....

  3. BNL | ATF Interaction Chambers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with translation actuators. Beam profile monitors at interaction region as well as chamber entrance and exit. Available port for 200 ls turbo pump. Operates in the 10-8 Torr range...

  4. Thermal light cannot be represented as a statistical mixture of pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aurélia Chenu; Agata M. Bra?czyk; Gregory D. Scholes; J. E. Sipe

    2014-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We ask whether or not thermal light can be represented as a mixture of single broadband coherent pulses. We find that it cannot. Such a mixture of pulses is simply not rich enough to mimic thermal light; indeed, it cannot even reproduce the first-order correlation function. We show that it is possible to construct a modified mixture of single coherent pulses that does yield the correct first-order correlation function at equal space points. However, as we then demonstrate, such a mixture cannot reproduce the second-order correlation function.

  5. Comparison of Statistical Multifragmentation Model simulations with Canonical Thermodynamical Model results: a few representative cases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Botvina; G. Chaudhuri; S. Das Gupta; I. Mishustin

    2008-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The statistical multifragmentation model (SMM) has been widely used to explain experimental data of intermediate energy heavy ion collisions. A later entrant in the field is the canonical thermodynamic model (CTM) which is also being used to fit experimental data. The basic physics of both the models is the same, namely that fragments are produced according to their statistical weights in the available phase space. However, they are based on different statistical ensembles, and the methods of calculation are different: while the SMM uses Monte-Carlo simulations, the CTM solves recursion relations. In this paper we compare the predictions of the two models for a few representative cases.

  6. Sampling device for withdrawing a representative sample from single and multi-phase flows

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Apley, Walter J. (Pasco, WA); Cliff, William C. (Richland, WA); Creer, James M. (Richland, WA)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fluid stream sampling device has been developed for the purpose of obtaining a representative sample from a single or multi-phase fluid flow. This objective is carried out by means of a probe which may be inserted into the fluid stream. Individual samples are withdrawn from the fluid flow by sampling ports with particular spacings, and the sampling parts are coupled to various analytical systems for characterization of the physical, thermal, and chemical properties of the fluid flow as a whole and also individually.

  7. On the ambiguity of field correlators represented by asymptotic perturbation expansions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irinel Caprini; Jan Fischer; Ivo Vrko?

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Starting from the divergence pattern of perturbation expansions in Quantum Field Theory and the (assumed) asymptotic character of the series, we address the problem of ambiguity of a function determined by the perturbation expansion. We consider functions represented by an integral of the Laplace-Borel type along a general contour in the Borel complex plane. Proving a modified form of the Watson lemma, we obtain a large class of functions having the same asymptotic perturbation expansion. Some remarks on perturbative QCD are made, using the particular case of the Adler function.

  8. Fact #734: July 2, 2012 OPEC Countries Represent Less Than Half of U.S.

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport in RepresentativeDepartment ofDepartment ofof Energy 1:Petroleum Imports |

  9. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Florida Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear Jan Feb MarbyPriceRepresented by thePrice

  10. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Florida Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear Jan Feb MarbyPriceRepresented by

  11. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Georgia Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear Jan Feb MarbyPriceRepresented byPrice

  12. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Georgia Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear Jan Feb MarbyPriceRepresented byPricePrice

  13. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Hawaii Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear Jan Feb MarbyPriceRepresented

  14. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Hawaii Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear Jan Feb MarbyPriceRepresentedPrice

  15. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Idaho Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear Jan Feb MarbyPriceRepresentedPricePrice

  16. Multiple jet interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hehr, Roger James

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MULTIPLE JET INTERACTIONS A Thesis by ROGER JAMES HEHR Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1983 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering... MULTIPLE JET INTERACTIONS A Thesis by ROGER JAMES HEHR Approved as to style and content by: David . Norton (Chairman of Committee) raid L. orrison (Mem er) Leland A. Carlson (Member) Er est . Cross, r. (Head of Department) August 1983 ABSTRACT...

  17. Human-machine interactions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsythe, J. Chris (Sandia Park, NM); Xavier, Patrick G. (Albuquerque, NM); Abbott, Robert G. (Albuquerque, NM); Brannon, Nathan G. (Albuquerque, NM); Bernard, Michael L. (Tijeras, NM); Speed, Ann E. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Digital technology utilizing a cognitive model based on human naturalistic decision-making processes, including pattern recognition and episodic memory, can reduce the dependency of human-machine interactions on the abilities of a human user and can enable a machine to more closely emulate human-like responses. Such a cognitive model can enable digital technology to use cognitive capacities fundamental to human-like communication and cooperation to interact with humans.

  18. Modeling and Control Interactive Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    Modeling and Control of Complex Interactive Networks By Massoud Amin E nergy, telecommunications complex networks, geographi- cally dispersed, nonlinear, and interacting both among themselves, distributed, highly interactive networks, nor does any such entity have the ability to evaluate, monitor

  19. The Interactive Process: Reasonable Accommodation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsien, Roger Y.

    The Interactive Process: Reasonable Accommodation March 2009 Manager's Guide #12;Table of Contents .......................................................13 #12;3THE INTERACTIVE PROCESS: REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION MANAGER'S GUIDE--March 2009 Overview This Managers' Guide on the Interactive Process: Reasonable Accommodation provides supportive information

  20. Quasi Regular Polyhedra and Their Duals with Coxeter Symmetries Represented by Quaternions II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehmet Koca; Mudhahir Al Ajmi; Saleh Al- Shidhani

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we construct the quasi regular polyhedra and their duals which are the generalizations of the Archimedean and Catalan solids respectively. This work is an extension of two previous papers of ours which were based on the Archimedean and Catalan solids obtained as the orbits of the Coxeter groups . When these groups act on an arbitrary vector in 3D Euclidean space they generate the orbits corresponding to the quasi regular polyhedra. Special choices of the vectors lead to the platonic and Archimedean solids. In general, the faces of the quasi regular polyhedra consist of the equilateral triangles, squares, regular pentagons as well as rectangles, isogonal hexagons, isogonal octagons, and isogonal decagons depending on the choice of the Coxeter groups of interest. We follow the quaternionic representation of the group elements of the Coxeter groups which necessarily leads to the quaternionic representation of the vertices. We note the fact that the molecule can best be represented by a truncated icosahedron where the hexagonal faces are not regular, rather, they are isogonal hexagons where single bonds and double bonds of the carbon atoms are represented by the alternating edge lengths of isogonal hexagons.

  1. CO2 interaction with geomaterials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guthrie, George D. (U.S. Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA); Al-Saidi, Wissam A. (University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA); Jordan, Kenneth D. (University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA); Voora, Vamsee, K. (University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA); Romanov, Vyacheslav N. (U.S. Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA); Lopano, Christina L (U.S. Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA); Myshakin, Eugene M. (URS Corporation, Pittsburgh, PA); Hur, Tae Bong (University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA); Warzinski, Robert P. (U.S. Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA); Lynn, Ronald J. (URS Corporation, Pittsburgh, PA); Howard, Bret H. (U.S. Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA); Cygan, Randall Timothy

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work compares the sorption and swelling processes associated with CO2-coal and CO2-clay interactions. We investigated the mechanisms of interaction related to CO2 adsortion in micropores, intercalation into sub-micropores, dissolution in solid matrix, the role of water, and the associated changes in reservoir permeability, for applications in CO2 sequestration and enhanced coal bed methane recovery. The structural changes caused by CO2 have been investigated. A high-pressure micro-dilatometer was equipped to investigate the effect of CO2 pressure on the thermoplastic properties of coal. Using an identical dilatometer, Rashid Khan (1985) performed experiments with CO2 that revealed a dramatic reduction in the softening temperature of coal when exposed to high-pressure CO2. A set of experiments was designed for -20+45-mesh samples of Argonne Premium Pocahontas No.3 coal, which is similar in proximate and ultimate analysis to the Lower Kittanning seam coal that Khan used in his experiments. No dramatic decrease in coal softening temperature has been observed in high-pressure CO2 that would corroborate the prior work of Khan. Thus, conventional polymer (or 'geopolymer') theories may not be directly applicable to CO2 interaction with coals. Clays are similar to coals in that they represent abundant geomaterials with well-developed microporous structure. We evaluated the CO2 sequestration potential of clays relative to coals and investigated the factors that affect the sorption capacity, rates, and permanence of CO2 trapping. For the geomaterials comparison studies, we used source clay samples from The Clay Minerals Society. Preliminary results showed that expandable clays have CO2 sorption capacities comparable to those of coal. We analyzed sorption isotherms, XRD, DRIFTS (infrared reflectance spectra at non-ambient conditions), and TGA-MS (thermal gravimetric analysis) data to compare the effects of various factors on CO2 trapping. In montmorillonite, CO2 molecules may remain trapped for several months following several hours of exposure to high pressure (supercritical conditions), high temperature (above boiling point of water) or both. Such trapping is well preserved in either inert gas or the ambient environment and appears to eventually result in carbonate formation. We performed computer simulations of CO2 interaction with free cations (normal modes of CO2 and Na+CO2 were calculated using B3LYP / aug-cc-pVDZ and MP2 / aug-cc-pVDZ methods) and with clay structures containing interlayer cations (MD simulations with Clayff potentials for clay and a modified CO2 potential). Additionally, interaction of CO2 with hydrated Na-montmorillonite was studied using density functional theory with dispersion corrections. The sorption energies and the swelling behavior were investigated. Preliminary modeling results and experimental observations indicate that the presence of water molecules in the interlayer region is necessary for intercalation of CO2. Our preliminary conclusion is that CO2 molecules may intercalate into interlayer region of swelling clay and stay there via coordination to the interlayer cations.

  2. Surprising Quasiparticle Interactions in Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Surprising Quasiparticle Interactions in Graphene Surprising Quasiparticle Interactions in Graphene Print Wednesday, 31 October 2007 00:00 Until now, the world's electronics have...

  3. Comparison of surface meteorological data representativeness for the Weldon Spring transport and dispersion modeling analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lazaro, M.

    1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy is conducting the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project under the Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP). The major goals of the SFMP are to eliminate potential hazards to the public and the environment that associated with contamination at SFMP sites and to make surplus property available for other uses to the extent possible. This report presents the results of analysis of available meteorological data from stations near the Weldon Spring site. Data that are most representative of site conditions are needed to accurately model the transport and dispersion of air pollutants associated with remedial activities. Such modeling will assist the development of mitigative measures. 17 refs., 12 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. DOE Orders Self-Study Program - DOE-STD-1063-2011, Facility Representatives

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"WaveInteractions and Policy (2009) | DepartmentDepartment of|

  5. Identification and use of surrogate precursors to represent delayed neutron groups

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loaiza, D.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Haskin, F.E. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Time-dependent delayed neutron activities have traditionally been represented by six delayed neutron precursor groups, whose yields and decay constants are obtained from nonlinear least-squares fits to out-of-pile measurements. The group decay constants obtained in this manner are empirical. They do not coincide with decay constants of specific delayed neutron precursors. Different values are used for each fissionable nuclide, and the values used also depend on the energy spectrum of the neutrons causing fission. Having a different value of the six-group decay constants for each fissionable nuclide complicates the analysis of the dynamic behavior of fast reactors. A fast reactor containing six principal fissioning nuclides of uranium and plutonium must, in effect, be described by 36 delayed neutron groups. The use of group decay constants that depend on the neutron energy spectrum makes it difficult to select values that describe the dynamic response of epithermal systems because virtually all delayed neutron activity measurements have been performed for fast or thermal spectra. Clearly, it would be desirable to have a single set of group decay constants that could be applied to all fissionable nuclei. A set of seven fixed decay constants is associated with a specific, dominant delayed neutron precursor. In effect, each group is represented by a single surrogate precursor. Using recently measured delayed neutron activities for {sup 235}U and {sup 237}Np, the proposed set of decay constants actually improved the fit to the data. For other fissionable nuclei, a method has been devised to obtain yields consistent with the proposed set of decay constants from the traditional six-group parameters. This transformation is accomplished without altering the inferred reactivity scale.

  6. A Subbasin-based framework to represent land surface processes in an Earth System Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tesfa, Teklu K.; Li, Hongyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Huang, Maoyi; Ke, Yinghai; Sun, Yu; Liu, Ying

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Realistically representing spatial heterogeneity and lateral land surface processes within and between modeling units in earth system models is important because of their implications to surface energy and water exchange. The traditional approach of using regular grids as computational units in land surface models and earth system models may lead to inadequate representation of lateral movements of water, energy and carbon fluxes, especially when the grid resolution increases. Here a new subbasin-based framework is introduced in the Community Land Model (CLM), which is the land component of the Community Earth System Model (CESM). Local processes are represented assuming each subbasin as a grid cell on a pseudo grid matrix with no significant modifications to the existing CLM modeling structure. Lateral routing of water within and between subbasins is simulated with the subbasin version of a recently-developed physically based routing model, Model for Scale Adaptive River Routing (MOSART). As an illustration, this new framework is implemented in the topographically diverse region of the U.S. Pacific Northwest. The modeling units (subbasins) are delineated from high-resolution Digital Elevation Model while atmospheric forcing and surface parameters are remapped from the corresponding high resolution datasets. The impacts of this representation on simulating hydrologic processes are explored by comparing it with the default (grid-based) CLM representation. In addition, the effects of DEM resolution on parameterizing topography and the subsequent effects on runoff processes are investigated. Limited model evaluation and comparison showed that small difference between the averaged forcing can lead to more significant difference in the simulated runoff and streamflow because of nonlinear horizontal processes. Topographic indices derived from high resolution DEM may not improve the overall water balance, but affect the partitioning between surface and subsurface runoff. More systematic analyses are needed to determine the relative merits of the subbasin representation compared to the commonly used grid-based representation, especially when land surface models are approaching higher resolutions.

  7. Generalized interaction in multigravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duplij, Steven

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A general approach to description of multigravity models in D-dimensional space-time is presented. Different possibilities of generalization of the invariant volume are given. Then a most general form of the interaction potential is constructed, which for bigravity coincides with the Pauli-Fierz model. A thorough analysis of the model along the 3+1 expansion formalism is done. It is shown that the absence of ghosts the considered bigravity model is equivalent in the weak field limit to the massive gravity (the Pauli-Fierz model). Thus, on the concrete example it is shown, that the interaction between metrics leads to nonvanishing mass of graviton.

  8. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may of the environmental, economic, and social impact of engineering work. #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past and project overview Syllabus introduction Introductions Assignment introductions: · Sustainability project

  9. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may management project OR 55% Due Week 8b #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course - Cultural adaptation WEEK 3A ­ JULY 5TH Localization Engineering and Tools #12;Note: This syllabus may

  10. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may with empirical research. #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course of this syllabus) and short "discussion idea" postings to the course blog in order to stimulate discussion about

  11. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may Role plays and simulations Short speeches and presentations #12;Note: This syllabus may represent Introduction to HCDE 461: syllabus, goals, rules, and tips to success Warm-up activities: Self

  12. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may.9 ­ 1.1 D 0.7 ­ 0.8 D- 0.0 E #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course

  13. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may for a small system and plan and perform a usability evaluation #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past in UCD Week 11 Project Presentations L11: Course Wrap-Up Finals Online Final Exam #12;Note: This syllabus

  14. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may%) 15% #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings Introduction, Overview Syllabus review Introductions User-Centered Design Requirements 2 Ways of Thinking About

  15. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may reading 5% Participation in discussion 10% ____________ 100% #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past (2) --- HW: Summary (2) due Mon. 9:00 a.m.; Prep. for mini-presentation (2) #12;Note: This syllabus

  16. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future/Wednesdays Course URL: http://faculty.washington.edu/farkas/TC407/syllabus.html Course Description will be deducted for not posting. #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering

  17. En~lironinentand Planning A 1998, volume 30, pages 1547-1561 Visualizing georeferenced data: representing reliability of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klippel, Alexander

    of oral cancer death rates among white females in the United States prompted a study of occupation: representing reliability of health statistics A M MacEachren, C A Brewer Department of Geography, Penn State in mortality rates. A coincident visually integral depiction (using color characteristics to represent both

  18. Method of and apparatus for modeling interactions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Budge, Kent G.

    2004-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for modeling interactions can accurately model tribological and other properties and accommodate topological disruptions. Two portions of a problem space are represented, a first with a Lagrangian mesh and a second with an ALE mesh. The ALE and Lagrangian meshes are constructed so that each node on the surface of the Lagrangian mesh is in a known correspondence with adjacent nodes in the ALE mesh. The interaction can be predicted for a time interval. Material flow within the ALE mesh can accurately model complex interactions such as bifurcation. After prediction, nodes in the ALE mesh in correspondence with nodes on the surface of the Lagrangian mesh can be mapped so that they are once again adjacent to their corresponding Lagrangian mesh nodes. The ALE mesh can then be smoothed to reduce mesh distortion that might reduce the accuracy or efficiency of subsequent prediction steps. The process, from prediction through mapping and smoothing, can be repeated until a terminal condition is reached.

  19. Being Interactive Health Care

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Being Interactive Treating Health Care T he numbers are staggering. In a chilling report, the U care, training staff, and accrediting staff and health-care facilities, which involve determin- ing.ahrq.gov/clinic/ptsafety/summary.htm). Pressures on Health Care To come up with a credible approach for improv- ing patient safety, we need

  20. The Digital Interactive Video

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The Digital Interactive Video Exploration and Reflection (Diver) system lets users create virtual pathways through existing video content using a virtual camera and an annotation window for commentary repurposing, and discussion. W ith the inexorable growth of low-cost consumer video elec- tronics

  1. Containment and Analysis Capability Insights Gained from Drop Testing Representative Spent Nuclear Fuel Containers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morton, Dana Keith; Snow, Spencer David; Rahl, Tommy Ervin; Ware, Arthur Gates

    2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP), operating from the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), developed the standardized Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) canister. This canister is designed to be loaded with DOE SNF (including other radioactive materials) and then be used during interim storage, during transportation to the nation’s repository, and for final disposal at the repository without having to be reopened. The canister has been fully designed and has completed significant testing that clearly demonstrates that it can safely achieve its intended design goals. During 1999, nine 457-mm diameter test canisters were fabricated at the INEEL to represent the standardized DOE SNF canister design. Various "worst case" internals were incorporated. Seven of the test canisters were 4.57 m long and weighed approximately 2721 kg, while two were 3.00 m long and weighed approximately 1360 kg and 1725 kg. Seven of the test canisters were dropped from 9 m onto an essentially unyielding flat surface and one of the test canisters was dropped from 1 m onto a 15-cm diameter puncture post. The final test canister was dropped from 61 cm onto a 50.8 mm thick vertically oriented steel plate, and then fell over to impact another 50.8 mm thick vertically oriented steel plate. This last test represented a canister dropping onto another larger container such as a repository disposal container or waste package. The 1999 drop testing was performed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The nine test canisters experienced varying degrees of damage to their skirts, lifting rings, and pressure boundary components (heads and main body). However, all of the canisters were shown to have maintained their pressure boundary (through pressure testing). Four heavily damaged canisters were also shown to be leaktight via helium leak testing. Pre- and post-drop finite element (FE) analyses were also performed. The results clearly indicated that accurate predictions of canister responses to the drop tests were achieved. The results achieved for the standardized canister can also be applicable to other well-constructed containers (canisters, casks, cans, vessels, etc.) subjected to similar loads. Properly designed containers can maintain a containment system after being subjected to dynamically induced high strains and FE computer analyses can accurately predict the resulting responses.

  2. Radiative ages in a representative sample of low luminosity radio galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Parma; M. Murgia; R. Morganti; A. Capetti; H. R. de Ruiter; R. Fanti

    1998-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Two frequency observations, mainly at 1.4 and 5 GHz from the VLA, have been used to study spectral variations along the lobes of some nearby low luminosity radio galaxies that constitute a representative sample selected from the B2 catalogue. The variations of the spectral index have been interpreted as being due to synchrotron and inverse Compton losses and characteristic spectral ages are deduced for the relativistic electrons. The radiative ages are in the range of several 10^7 years. These ages correlate well with the source sizes. They also appear to be consistent with dynamical ages determined from ram-pressure arguments, if we make reasonable assumptions about the ambient gas density and allow for very moderate deviations from the equipartition conditions. There appears to be a significant difference between the radiative ages of sources in our sample and those of more powerful 3CR radio sources. We briefly discuss the possibility of re-acceleration processes and indicate some objects where these may occur.

  3. A Control Chart Approach for Representing and Mining Data Streams with Shape Based Similarity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omitaomu, Olufemi A [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mining of data streams for online condition monitoring is a challenging task in several domains including (electric) power grid system, intelligent manufacturing, and consumer science. Considering a power grid application in which thousands of sensors, called the phasor measurement units, are deployed on the power grid network to continuously collect streams of digital data for real-time situational awareness and system management. Depending on design, each sensor could stream between ten and sixty data samples per second. The myriad of sensory data captured could convey deeper insights about sequence of events in real-time and before major damages are done. However, the timely processing and analysis of these high-velocity and high-volume data streams is a challenge. Hence, a new data processing and transformation approach, based on the concept of control charts, for representing sequence of data streams from sensors is proposed. In addition, an application of the proposed approach for enhancing data mining tasks such as clustering using real-world power grid data streams is presented. The results indicate that the proposed approach is very efficient for data streams storage and manipulation.

  4. Interactive design center.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pomplun, Alan R. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia's advanced computing resources provide researchers, engineers and analysts with the ability to develop and render highly detailed large-scale models and simulations. To take full advantage of these multi-million data point visualizations, display systems with comparable pixel counts are needed. The Interactive Design Center (IDC) is a second generation visualization theater designed to meet this need. The main display integrates twenty-seven projectors in a 9-wide by 3-high array with a total display resolution of more than 35 million pixels. Six individual SmartBoard displays offer interactive capabilities that include on-screen annotation and touch panel control of the facility's display systems. This report details the design, implementation and operation of this innovative facility.

  5. Interactive optical panel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veligdan, J.T.

    1995-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An interactive optical panel assembly includes an optical panel having a plurality of ribbon optical waveguides stacked together with opposite ends thereof defining panel first and second faces. A light source provides an image beam to the panel first face for being channeled through the waveguides and emitted from the panel second face in the form of a viewable light image. A remote device produces a response beam over a discrete selection area of the panel second face for being channeled through at least one of the waveguides toward the panel first face. A light sensor is disposed across a plurality of the waveguides for detecting the response beam therein for providing interactive capability. 10 figs.

  6. Interactive optical panel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

    1995-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An interactive optical panel assembly 34 includes an optical panel 10 having a plurality of ribbon optical waveguides 12 stacked together with opposite ends thereof defining panel first and second faces 16, 18. A light source 20 provides an image beam 22 to the panel first face 16 for being channeled through the waveguides 12 and emitted from the panel second face 18 in the form of a viewable light image 24a. A remote device 38 produces a response beam 40 over a discrete selection area 36 of the panel second face 18 for being channeled through at least one of the waveguides 12 toward the panel first face 16. A light sensor 42,50 is disposed across a plurality of the waveguides 12 for detecting the response beam 40 therein for providing interactive capability.

  7. ELEMENTARY PARTICLE INTERACTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    EFREMENKO, YURI; HANDLER, THOMAS; KAMYSHKOV, YURI; SIOPSIS, GEORGE; SPANIER, STEFAN

    2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The High-Energy Elementary Particle Interactions group at UT during the last three years worked on the following directions and projects: Collider-based Particle Physics; Neutrino Physics, particularly participation in “NO?A”, “Double Chooz”, and “KamLAND” neutrino experiments; and Theory, including Scattering amplitudes, Quark-gluon plasma; Holographic cosmology; Holographic superconductors; Charge density waves; Striped superconductors; and Holographic FFLO states.

  8. Interactive Transportable Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver Irschitz; Priam Givord; Newyork Exit Newyork; Flavia Sparacino

    Transportable architecture which embeds the means to communicate with real or imaginary digital information spaces in a natural fashion offers unprecedented opportunities to make multimedia experiences available to the public almost everywhere. This installation demonstrates an example of interactive transportable architecture which incorporates unencumebered real-time body tracking and gesture recognition to explore a 3-D cityscape and a brain-like web-based information space.

  9. Neutrino Interactions with Nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leitner, T.; Buss, O.; Mosel, U. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Giessen (Germany); Alvarez-Ruso, L. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica and IFIC, Universidad de Valencia-CSIC (Spain)

    2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate neutrino-nucleus collisions at intermediate energies incorporating quasielastic scattering and the excitation of 13 resonances as elementary processes, taking into account medium effects such as Fermi motion, Pauli blocking, mean-field potentials and in-medium spectral functions. A coupled-channel treatment of final state interactions is achieved with the GiBUU transport model. Results for inclusive reactions, neutrino- and electron-induced, as well as for pion production and nucleon knockout are presented.

  10. Alpha Hemolysin: Inventory and Record Keeping On February 9, 2006, our laboratory was represented before the Microbiological Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Movileanu, Liviu

    Alpha Hemolysin: Inventory and Record Keeping On February 9, 2006, our laboratory was represented at all times. An accurate and up-to-date inventory of HL will be provided to EHO at least annually

  11. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may the original total point value. Work more than 5 days late will receive zero credit. #12;Note: This syllabus

  12. Plasma-Surface Interactions on Liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Bastasz; W. Eckstein

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid plasma-facing surfaces have been suggested as an option for advanced fusion devices, particularly in regions where solid materials may not survive over long operating periods. Because liquid surfaces can be replenished, they offer the possibility of tolerating intense particle bombardment and of recovering from off-normal events. As a preliminary step in understanding the nature of plasma-surface interactions on liquids, the authors consider some of the surface processes occurring in liquids undergoing irradiation by energetic particles. These include (1) sputtering, (2) segregation of liquid component species and impurities, (3) evaporation, and (4) trapping and release of incident particles. Aspects of these processes are examined for several candidate liquids, which represent three types of low-Z liquids: pure metals (Li), metallic alloys (Sn-Li), and compound insulators (Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4}).

  13. Prevalence of exposure to violence and PTSD symptoms in middle income undergraduate students representing three ethnic groups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGruder, Anita Kay

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PREVALENCE OF EXPOSURE TO VIOLENCE AND PTSD SYMPTOMS IN MIDDLE INCOME UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS REPRESENTING THREE ETHNIC GROUPS A Thesis by ANITA KAY MCGRUDER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1995 Major Subject: Psychology PREVALENCE OF EXPOSURE TO VIOLENCE AND PTSD SYMPTOMS IN MIDDLE INCOME UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS REPRESENTING THREE ETHNIC GROUPS A Thesis by ANITA KAY...

  14. Development of a Future Representative Concentration Pathway for Use in the IPCC 5th Assessment Earth System Model Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The representative concentration pathway to be delivered is a scenario of atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases and other radiatively important atmospheric species, along with land-use changes, derived from the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM). The particular representative concentration pathway (RCP) that the Joint Global Change Research Institute (JGCRI) has been responsible for is a not-to-exceed pathway that stabilizes at a radiative forcing of 4.5Wm-2 in the year 2100.

  15. Tools and Equipment Modeling for Automobile Interactive Assembling Operating Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu Dianliang; Zhu Hongmin [Shanghai Jiao Tong University (China); Shanghai Key Laboratory of Advance Manufacturing Environment (China)

    2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Tools and equipment play an important role in the simulation of virtual assembly, especially in the assembly process simulation and plan. Because of variety in function and complexity in structure and manipulation, the simulation of tools and equipments remains to be a challenge for interactive assembly operation. Based on analysis of details and characteristics of interactive operations for automobile assembly, the functional requirement for tools and equipments of automobile assembly is given. Then, a unified modeling method for information expression and function realization of general tools and equipments is represented, and the handling methods of manual, semi-automatic, automatic tools and equipments are discussed. Finally, the application in assembly simulation of rear suspension and front suspension of Roewe 750 automobile is given. The result shows that the modeling and handling methods are applicable in the interactive simulation of various tools and equipments, and can also be used for supporting assembly process planning in virtual environment.

  16. In vivo interactions between tungsten microneedles and peripheral nerves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pier Nicola Sergi; Winnie Jensen; Silvestro Micera; Ken Yoshida

    2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Tungsten microneedles are currently used to insert neural electrodes into living peripheral nerves. However, the biomechanics underlying these procedures is not yet well characterized. For this reason, the aim of this work was to model the interactions between these microneedles and living peripheral nerves. A simple mathematical framework was especially provided to model both compression of the external layer of the nerve (epineurium) and the interactions resulting from penetration of the main shaft of the microneedle inside the living nerves. The instantaneous Young's modulus, compression force, the work needed to pierce the tissue, puncturing pressure, and the dynamic friction coefficient between the tungsten microneedles and living nerves were quantified starting from acute experiments, aiming to reproduce the physical environment of real implantations. Indeed, a better knowledge of the interactions between microneedles and peripheral nerves may be useful to improve the effectiveness of these insertion techniques, and could represent a key factor for designing robot-assisted procedures tailored for peripheral nerve insertion.

  17. Detection of molecular interactions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Groves, John T. (Berkeley, CA); Baksh, Michael M. (Fremont, CA); Jaros, Michal (Brno, CH)

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and assay are described for measuring the interaction between a ligand and an analyte. The assay can include a suspension of colloidal particles that are associated with a ligand of interest. The colloidal particles are maintained in the suspension at or near a phase transition state from a condensed phase to a dispersed phase. An analyte to be tested is then added to the suspension. If the analyte binds to the ligand, a phase change occurs to indicate that the binding was successful.

  18. PDSF Interactive Batch Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding access toTest andOptimize832 2.860 2.864 2.867039 JEmailInteractive

  19. Interactive Volume Rendering of Diffusion Tensor Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hlawitschka, Mario; Weber, Gunther; Anwander, Alfred; Carmichael, Owen; Hamann, Bernd; Scheuermann, Gerik

    2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    As 3D volumetric images of the human body become an increasingly crucial source of information for the diagnosis and treatment of a broad variety of medical conditions, advanced techniques that allow clinicians to efficiently and clearly visualize volumetric images become increasingly important. Interaction has proven to be a key concept in analysis of medical images because static images of 3D data are prone to artifacts and misunderstanding of depth. Furthermore, fading out clinically irrelevant aspects of the image while preserving contextual anatomical landmarks helps medical doctors to focus on important parts of the images without becoming disoriented. Our goal was to develop a tool that unifies interactive manipulation and context preserving visualization of medical images with a special focus on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data. At each image voxel, DTI provides a 3 x 3 tensor whose entries represent the 3D statistical properties of water diffusion locally. Water motion that is preferential to specific spatial directions suggests structural organization of the underlying biological tissue; in particular, in the human brain, the naturally occuring diffusion of water in the axon portion of neurons is predominantly anisotropic along the longitudinal direction of the elongated, fiber-like axons [MMM+02]. This property has made DTI an emerging source of information about the structural integrity of axons and axonal connectivity between brain regions, both of which are thought to be disrupted in a broad range of medical disorders including multiple sclerosis, cerebrovascular disease, and autism [Mos02, FCI+01, JLH+99, BGKM+04, BJB+03].

  20. LATTICE: AN INTERACTIVE LATTICE COMPUTER CODE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Staples, John

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    4500-R65 I LATTICE AN INTERACTIVE LATTICE COMPUTER CODE Johnr LBL-4843 LATTICE An interactive lattice computer code Johncode which enables an interactive user to calculate the

  1. Interactive visual supports for children with autism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayes, Gillian R.; Hirano, Sen; Marcu, Gabriela; Monibi, Mohamad; Nguyen, David H.; Yeganyan, Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    010-0294-8 ORIGINAL ARTICLE Interactive visual supports fordesign guidelines for interactive visual supports that wouldvSked, a multi-device interactive visual schedule system.

  2. Symbiogenic Experiences in the Interactive Arts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castellanos, Carlos; Gromala, Diane

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Symbiogenic Experiences in the Interactive Arts CarlosCastellanos School of Interactive Arts and Technology SimonDiane Gromala School of Interactive Arts and Technology

  3. Torchestra : reducing interactive trac delays over Tor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gopal, Deepika

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Torchestra : Reducing interactive traffic delays over Tor ATorchestra : Reducing interactive traffic delays over Tor byon the internet including interactive traffic as well as for

  4. Non-Local Correlations and Interactive Games

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Preda, Daniel Ciprian

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and multi-prover interactive proof systems . . . . . . . .correspondence to multi-prover interactive proof systems. AWigderson. Multi-prover interactive proofs: How to remove

  5. Interactive motion planning with motion capture data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lo, Wan-Yen

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abe, and Jovan Popovi´c. Interactive simulation of stylizedc. Motion fields for interactive character locomotion. ACMon Computer graphics and interactive techniques, SIGGRAPH ’

  6. Biological Interactions and Dynamics Workshop | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biological Interactions and Dynamics Workshop Biological Interactions and Dynamics Workshop Wiley HS, Kaplan S. 2011. "Biological Interactions and Dynamics Science Theme Advisory...

  7. Non standard neutrino interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miranda, O G

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino oscillations have become well-known phenomenon; the measurements of neutrino mixing angles and mass squared differences are continuously improving. Future oscillation experiments will eventually determine the remaining unknown neutrino parameters, namely, the mass ordering, normal or inverted, and the CP-violating phase. On the other hand, the absolute mass scale of neutrinos could be probed by cosmological observations, single beta decay as well as by neutrinoless double beta decay experiments. Furthermore, the last one may shed light on the nature of neutrinos, Dirac or Majorana, by measuring the effective Majorana mass of neutrinos. However, the neutrino mass generation mechanism remains unknown. A well-motivated phenomenological approach to search for new physics, in the neutrino sector, is that of non-standard interactions. In this short review, the current constraints in this picture, as well as the perspectives from future experiments, are discussed.

  8. Weak Interaction and Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. R. Silva

    2008-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we examine the connection among the themes: the cosmological constant, the weak interaction and the neutrino mass. Our main propose is to review and modify the ideas first proposed by Hayakawa [ Prog. Theor. Phys.Suppl.,532(1965).], in the light of the new-fashioned features of contemporary physics. Assuming the pressure of a Fermi gas of neutrinos should be balanced by its gravitational attraction, we evaluate the mass of the background neutrino and its number.The neutrino mass here evaluated is compatible with the known value for the cosmological constant (or dark energy).Taking in account the role played by the weak forces experimented by the neutrinos, we also determined a value for the electroweak mixing angle. For sake of comparison, an alternative evaluation of the neutrino mass is also done.

  9. Numerical and Experimental Study of the Interaction Between Two Marine Current Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , the Scottish Government announced its approval for a 10MW tidal power array project on Scotland's west coast.rivoalen@insa-rouen.fr Abstract--The understanding of interaction effects between marine energy converters represents the next reached in the deployment of marine energy converters with the launching of several large-scale projects

  10. INTERACTIONS BETWEEN LIGHTING AND SPACE CONDITIONING ENERGY USE IN U.S. COMMERCIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .S. COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS Osman Sezgen and Jonathan G. Koomey Energy Analysis Department Environmental Energy/HVAC interactions on the annual heating/cooling requirements of prototypical U.S. commercial buildings through vintages and five climates are chosen to represent the U.S. commercial building stock. For each combination

  11. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Shock/Boundary Layer Interaction Effects of Transverse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    of Transverse Jets in Crossflow over a Body of Revolution Dean A. Dickmann* Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire 76019 Shock/boundary layer interaction present in transverse jets in supersonic crossflow alteres suggested a transverse jet in crossflow can be represented by a solid body of given length and shape

  12. FastRWeb: Fast Interactive Web Framework for Data Mining Using R

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerkmann, Ralf

    FastRWeb: Fast Interactive Web Framework for Data Mining Using R Simon Urbanek AT&T Labs hand the World Wide Web (the Web) infrastructure represents a technology for wide deployment and high on the Web. R has seen a slower adoption in this area mainly due to the lack of high-level web support

  13. Gamow shell model and realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Hagen; M. Hjorth-Jensen; N. Michel

    2006-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new and efficient method to obtain a Gamow shell-model basis and matrix elements generated by realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions. We derive a self-consistent Hartree-Fock potential from the renormalized N3LO interaction model. The corresponding Gamow one-body eigenstates are generated in a plane wave basis in order to build a Gamow shell-model set of basis states for the closed shell nuclei 4He and 16O. We address also the problem of representing a realistic nucleon-nucleon interaction in a two-particle Berggren basis in the laboratory frame. To achieve this, an expansion of matrix elements of the residual nucleon-nucleon interaction in a finite set of harmonic oscillator wave functions is used. We show that all loosely bound and narrow resonant states converge surprisingly fast. Even broad resonances in these two-particle valence systems converge within a reasonable number of harmonic oscillator functions. Examples of 6He and 18O Gamow shell-model calculations using 4He and 16}O as closed shell cores are presented. This procedure allows Gamow shell-model calculations to be performed with all realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions and with either momentum or position space representations for the Gamow basis. The possibility to remove the center of mass spuriosity of Gamow shell-model nuclear states with this method is also discussed. Perspectives for nuclear structure calculations of dripline nuclei are outlined.

  14. Simulating human behavior for national security human interactions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernard, Michael Lewis; Hart, Dereck H.; Verzi, Stephen J.; Glickman, Matthew R.; Wolfenbarger, Paul R.; Xavier, Patrick Gordon

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This 3-year research and development effort focused on what we believe is a significant technical gap in existing modeling and simulation capabilities: the representation of plausible human cognition and behaviors within a dynamic, simulated environment. Specifically, the intent of the ''Simulating Human Behavior for National Security Human Interactions'' project was to demonstrate initial simulated human modeling capability that realistically represents intra- and inter-group interaction behaviors between simulated humans and human-controlled avatars as they respond to their environment. Significant process was made towards simulating human behaviors through the development of a framework that produces realistic characteristics and movement. The simulated humans were created from models designed to be psychologically plausible by being based on robust psychological research and theory. Progress was also made towards enhancing Sandia National Laboratories existing cognitive models to support culturally plausible behaviors that are important in representing group interactions. These models were implemented in the modular, interoperable, and commercially supported Umbra{reg_sign} simulation framework.

  15. An interactive teaching device simulating intussusception reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1764-x TECHNICAL INNOVATION An interactive teaching deviceIRB. We developed an interactive teaching device to simulate

  16. Molecular conformations, interactions, and properties associated...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular conformations, interactions, and properties associated with drug efficiency and clinical performance among VEGFR TK inhibitors Molecular conformations, interactions, and...

  17. Committee on Government Reform, United States House of Representatives Testimony for the September 21, 2006 Hearing on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Committee on Government Reform, United States House of Representatives Testimony for the September Waxman, and other members of the House Committee on Government Reform, I am grateful for the opportunity on Government Reform, September 21, 2006 - 2- In July of last year the Honourable R. John Efford

  18. Curricular Representative Contact List (if more than one Curricular Rep is listed, then first one is primary)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    is primary) Subject Department FirstName LastName Phone EmailAddress SCH/COL BUS Michele Parker 5 Representative Contact List (if more than one Curricular Rep is listed, then first one is primary) Subject M E Kathie Keyes 3-3955 kekeyes@engr.wisc.edu 207 B M E Pam Peterson 3-4025 prpeters

  19. An Economic Analysis of U.S. Farm Programs Including Senate and House Farm Bills on Representative Farms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knapek, George M

    2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    and Orden (2009) investigated ACRE and its World Trade 10 Organization implications. Cooper (2009) studied corn data for Barnes County, North Dakota, and Logan County, Illinois, under both a low and high price scenarios. His study found that ACRE... .......................................................................................... 10 Simulation and Representative Farms ............................................ 12 III METHODOLOGY AND MODEL ...................................................... 15 Stochastic Simulation...

  20. Power & Promise for student aid represents the George Washington University's commitment to the power of education and the promise of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    POWER & PROMISE OVERVIEW Power & Promise for student aid represents the George Washington University's commitment to the power of education and the promise of tomorrow's leaders. Launched in 2009, Power & Promise ensures that qualified students, regardless of financial resources, can take full

  1. The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory was represented by staff from its Center for Integrating Research and Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    to drop a magnet seemingly in slow motion through a copper pipe. The USA Science and Engineering Festival and Engineering Festival National High Magnetic Field Laboratory Funding Grants: G.S. Boebinger (NSF DMR-1157490The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory was represented by staff from its Center

  2. Sulfate adsorption and its relationships with properties of representative soils of the Sa~o Paulo State, Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Sulfate adsorption and its relationships with properties of representative soils of the Sa~o Paulo 2002; accepted 25 April 2003 Abstract Relationships between sulfate adsorption and physical and mineralogical properties and for their capacities of sulfate adsorption. The experimental results were submitted

  3. The honey bees of Ethiopia represent a new subspecies of Apis mellifera--Apis mellifera simensis n. ssp.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The honey bees of Ethiopia represent a new subspecies of Apis mellifera--Apis mellifera simensis n bees endemic to the volcanic dome system of Ethiopia are described as a new subspecies, Apis mellifera this population. There is no indication for the presence of more than one subspecies of honey bee in Ethiopia

  4. Wave Power Resources off the Hawaiian Islands luisvega@hawaii.edu Wave Resources for Representative Sites Around the Hawaiian Islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wave Power Resources off the Hawaiian Islands luisvega@hawaii.edu 1 Wave Resources for Representative Sites Around the Hawaiian Islands Table of Contents Summary p2 Background: Wave Power Conversion p3 Licensing and Permitting p3 Challenges and Barriers p4 Wave Power Resources: Previous Work p5 Wave

  5. FACULTY CHECKLIST FOR RETIREMENT Your retirement represents so many things to you and to Stanford University. We want your

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zalta, Edward N.

    personal retirement project plan. Starting the process early will ensure that your retirement savings plansFACULTY CHECKLIST FOR RETIREMENT Your retirement represents so many things to you and to Stanford University. We want your retirement experience to be a positive one, but you are an important component

  6. Confrence TALN 1999, Cargse, 12-17 juillet 1999 1 Representing speech acts as events to treat dialogue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Conférence TALN 1999, Cargèse, 12-17 juillet 1999 1 Representing speech acts as events to treat the way in which formal semantics such as SDRT (Asher, 1993) treat dialogue. We point out that SDRT offers at a semantic level, treating dia- logue cannot be done in a context-free way. Specifically, we show how

  7. How might an artificial neural network represent metric space? Patricia M.Boechler and Michael R.W.Dawson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dawson, Michael

    How might an artificial neural network represent metric space? Patricia M.Boechler and Michael R.W.Dawson Department of Psychology,University of Alberta CONCLUS IONS Although this artificial neural network. + + + + + + + ABS TR ACT An artificial neural network was trained to rate the distances between pairs of cities

  8. Motor learning of novel dynamics is not represented in a single global coordinate system: evaluation of mixed coordinate representations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franklin, David

    . A second experiment, in which we replicated the design of an influential study that had suggested encoding represent novel dynamics while making reaching movements in a robot-rendered force field. By proposing two categorically distinct hypotheses of extrinsic (i.e., Cartesian based) and intrinsic (i.e., joint based

  9. A 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraft, Hanspeter

    by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and was published in 1970 as international standard ISOA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar code. International Standard Book Number From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia The International Standard Book Number (ISBN

  10. The Last of the Wild ver. 2 The Last of the Wild represents the least influenced (most

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    The Last of the Wild ver. 2 Oceania The Last of the Wild represents the least influenced (most wild) areas of major terrestrial biomes. Most wild in each biome are defined as areas with Human Footprint. The Last of the Wild Data set. Available at http://www.sedac.ciesin.columbia.edu/wildareas 0 500 Kilometers

  11. A strategic partnership with the University of Exeter A logo representing an equal partenership or collaboration should be displayed at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    Example B A strategic partnership with the University of Exeter · A logo representing an equal partenership or collaboration should be displayed at the bottom left of the letter. The logo can be smaller or equal size to the UoB logo but MUST NOT be larger (see Example A). A brief caption should also

  12. Systems Engineering-Energy Systems Technical Electives The following courses represent some of the content currently available university-wide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Systems Engineering-Energy Systems Technical Electives The following courses represent some for the Systems Engineering - Energy Systems graduate programs (provided these courses have not already been used approval, any graduate level courses that are consistent with the System Engineering-Energy Systems degree

  13. Representing Process Variation with a Process Family Borislava I. Simidchieva, Lori A. Clarke, and Leon J. Osterweil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Representing Process Variation with a Process Family Borislava I. Simidchieva, Lori A. Clarke. The formalization of process definitions has been an invaluable aid in many domains. However, noticeable variations in processes start to emerge as precise details are added to process definitions. While each such variation

  14. Interacting Multiple Model Kalman Filters (IMMKF) Interacting Multiple Model Kalman Filters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Brian C.

    Interacting Multiple Model Kalman Filters (IMMKF) Interacting Multiple Model Kalman Filters (IMMKF R.Q.A. Santana Interacting Multiple Model Kalman Filters (IMMKF) #12;Interacting Multiple Model Kalman Filters (IMMKF) Sumário 1 Introdução Abordagens de múltiplos modelos Introdução ao Interacting

  15. Representing vapor-liquid equilibrium for an aqueous MEA-CO{sub 2} system using the electrolyte nonrandom-two-liquid model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Y.; Zhang, L.; Watanasiri, S. [Aspen Technology, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)] [Aspen Technology, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Following the work of Austgen et al., the electrolyte nonrandom-two-liquid (NRTL) model was applied in a thermodynamically consistent manner to represent the vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) of the aqueous monoethanolamine (MEA)-CO{sub 2} system with rigorous chemical equilibrium consideration. Special attention was given to the accurate VLE description of the system at both absorbing and stripping conditions relevant to most aqueous MEA absorption/stripping processes for CO{sub 2} removal. The influence from chemical equilibrium constants, Henry`s constant, experimental data, and data regression on the representation of the VLE of the system was discussed in detail. The equilibrium constant of the carbamate reversion reaction as well as important interaction parameters of the electrolyte NRTL model were carefully fitted to experimental data. A good agreement between the calculated values and the experimental data was achieved. Moreover, the model with newly fitted parameters was successfully applied to simulate three industrial cases for CO{sub 2} removal using a rate-based approach. The results from this work were compared with those using the model by Austgen et al.

  16. Surprising Quasiparticle Interactions in Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Surprising Quasiparticle Interactions in Graphene Print Until now, the world's electronics have been dominated by silicon, whose properties, while excellent, significantly limit...

  17. Truck Pavement Interactions: Requisite Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monismith, C.L.; Lysmer, J.; Sousa, J.; Hedrick, J.K.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dynamic Loads on Highway Pavements - Part I Vehicle Re-of Asphalt Concrete Pavements," Paper presented at 67thregulation. or Truck Pavement Interactions: Requisite

  18. ANTswers: an interactive library FAQ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kane, Danielle A.

    2105-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ANTswers: an interactive library FAQ Danielle Kane, Researchand Service Innovation, UCI Libraries ALA Annual 2015 – Sanquestions about the UCI Libraries but to also respond to

  19. Theoretical studies of molecular interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lester, W.A. Jr. [Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research program is directed at extending fundamental knowledge of atoms and molecules including their electronic structure, mutual interaction, collision dynamics, and interaction with radiation. The approach combines the use of ab initio methods--Hartree-Fock (HF) multiconfiguration HF, configuration interaction, and the recently developed quantum Monte Carlo (MC)--to describe electronic structure, intermolecular interactions, and other properties, with various methods of characterizing inelastic and reaction collision processes, and photodissociation dynamics. Present activity is focused on the development and application of the QMC method, surface catalyzed reactions, and reorientation cross sections.

  20. Nuclear-fuel-cycle risk assessment: descriptions of representative non-reactor facilities. Sections 1-14

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, K.J.

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fuel Cycle Risk Assessment Program was initiated to provide risk assessment methods for assistance in the regulatory process for nuclear fuel cycle facilities other than reactors. This report, the first from the program, defines and describes fuel cycle elements that are being considered in the program. One type of facility (and in some cases two) is described that is representative of each element of the fuel cycle. The descriptions are based on real industrial-scale facilities that are current state-of-the-art, or on conceptual facilities where none now exist. Each representative fuel cycle facility is assumed to be located on the appropriate one of four hypothetical but representative sites described. The fuel cycles considered are for Light Water Reactors with once-through flow of spent fuel, and with plutonium and uranium recycle. Representative facilities for the following fuel cycle elements are described for uranium (or uranium plus plutonium where appropriate): mining, milling, conversion, enrichment, fuel fabrication, mixed-oxide fuel refabrication, fuel reprocessing, spent fuel storage, high-level waste storage, transuranic waste storage, spent fuel and high-level and transuranic waste disposal, low-level and intermediate-level waste disposal, and transportation. For each representative facility the description includes: mainline process, effluent processing and waste management, facility and hardware description, safety-related information and potential alternative concepts for that fuel cycle element. The emphasis of the descriptive material is on safety-related information. This includes: operating and maintenance requirements, input/output of major materials, identification and inventories of hazardous materials (particularly radioactive materials), unit operations involved, potential accident driving forces, containment and shielding, and degree of hands-on operation.

  1. Gender differences in health-related quality-of-life are partly explained by sociodemographic and socioeconomic variation between adult men and women in the US: evidence from four US nationally representative data sets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cherepanov, Dasha; Palta, Mari; Fryback, Dennis G.; Robert, Stephanie A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Report of nationally representative values for the non-from four nationally representative studies indicated thatfrom four US nationally representative data sets Dasha

  2. Two Steps Forward and One Step Back: Minority Progress and the Tyranny of the Majority: A Review-Essay Based on Lani Guinier's the Tryanny of the Majority: fundemental Fairness in Representative Democracy. N.Y.: The Free Press, 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, April Maria

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FUNDAMENTAL FAIRNESS IN REPRESENTATIVE DEMOCRACY 1, 19 (Fundamental Fairness in Representative Democracy, reveals aFUNDAMENTAL FAIRNESS IN REPRESENTATIVE DEMOCRACY xviii (

  3. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ. HCDE 418: User Experience Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may the trade-offs #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course

  4. Vacation Donation Donor/Recipient Refer to the Administrative Policy: Vacation Donation Program for Civil Service and Union-Represented Staff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    Program for Civil Service and Union-Represented Staff http://www.policy.umn.edu/Policies/hr/Leaves/VACATIONDONATION.html and corresponding Procedure: Requesting/Donating Paid Leave for Civil Service/Union-Represented Staff http

  5. HIERARCHICAL STORAGE SYSTEMS FOR INTERACTIVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobagi, Fouad

    HIERARCHICAL STORAGE SYSTEMS FOR INTERACTIVE VIDEO­ON­DEMAND Shueng­Han Gary Chan and Fouad A; Hierarchical Storage Systems for Interactive Video­On­Demand Shueng­Han Gary Chan and Fouad A. Tobagi Technical­9040 pubs@shasta.stanford.edu Abstract On­demand video servers based on hierarchical storage systems

  6. Interactive Video Cubism Sidney Fels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fels, Sidney S.

    Interactive Video Cubism Sidney Fels Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering University@mic.atr.co.jp ABSTRACT This paper presents an interactive video visualization system. In this visualization video data is considered to be a block of three dimensional data where frames of video data comprise the third dimension

  7. UAW Local 2865 Membership Election Form UAW Local 2865 is the Union representing academic student employees (ASEs) at the University of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrett, Jeffrey A.

    07/24/12 UAW Local 2865 Membership Election Form UAW Local 2865 is the Union representing academic student employees (ASEs) at the University of California (UC). As the exclusive representative, the Union representatives, and otherwise participate in the Union. Or I decline membership in UAW Local 2865. As a non

  8. BMUS PROGRAMME Each small square box represents 0.5 unit. The shaded areas are the core

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheldon, Nathan D.

    BMUS PROGRAMME Each small square box represents 0.5 unit. The shaded areas are the core component of each year. The optional component can be made up of 0.5 units or whole units of Intermediate (I unit) Core 1102 (1 unit) Core 1103 (0.5 unit) Core 1104 (0.5 unit) Core 1105 (0.5 unit) Core 1106 (0.5

  9. The impact of alternative farm policy proposals for the 1990 Farm Bill on representative beef cattle ranches in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartman, David Allen

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of simulating the macroeconomic impact of alternative farm policies (Knutson, et al). The resulting model, AG-GEM, emphasizes the U. S. livestock sector and provides the input data needed for the FLIPSIM model to enable firm level policy analysis. The AG... AND CONCLUSIONS Objectives . Methodology . Results . Need for Further Research Farm . . . . 55 62 68 68 71 76 77 81 VITA 94 LIST OF TABLES Table Alternatives for U. S. Cattle Production Page 3. 1 Resource Characteristics of the Representative...

  10. A global approach of the representativity concept: Application on a high-conversion light water reactor MOX lattice case

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santos, N. D.; Blaise, P.; Santamarina, A. [CEA, DEN/DER/SPRC Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of new types of reactor and the increase in the safety specifications and requirements induce an enhancement in both nuclear data knowledge and a better understanding of the neutronic properties of the new systems. This enhancement is made possible using ad hoc critical mock-up experiments. The main difficulty is to design these experiments in order to obtain the most valuable information. Its quantification is usually made by using representativity and transposition concepts. These theories enable to extract some information about a quantity of interest (an integral parameter) on a configuration, but generally a posteriori. This paper presents a more global approach of this theory, with the idea of optimizing the representativity of a new experiment, and its transposition a priori, based on a multiparametric approach. Using a quadratic sum, we show the possibility to define a global representativity which permits to take into account several quantities of interest at the same time. The maximization of this factor gives information about all quantities of interest. An optimization method of this value in relation to technological parameters (over-clad diameter, atom concentration) is illustrated on a high-conversion light water reactor MOX lattice case. This example tackles the problematic of plutonium experiment for the plutonium aging and a solution through the optimization of both the over-clad and the plutonium content. (authors)

  11. Perturbative gadgets without strong interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yudong Cao; Daniel Nagaj

    2014-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Perturbative gadgets are used to construct a quantum Hamiltonian whose low-energy subspace approximates a given quantum $k$-body Hamiltonian up to an absolute error $\\epsilon$. Typically, gadget constructions involve terms with large interaction strengths of order $\\text{poly}(\\epsilon^{-1})$. Here we present a 2-body gadget construction and prove that it approximates a target many-body Hamiltonian of interaction strength $\\gamma = O(1)$ up to absolute error $\\epsilon\\ll\\gamma$ using interactions of strength $O(\\epsilon)$ instead of the usual inverse polynomial in $\\epsilon$. A key component in our proof is a new condition for the convergence of the perturbation series, allowing our gadget construction to be applied in parallel on multiple many-body terms. We also show how to apply this gadget construction for approximating 3- and $k$-body Hamiltonians. The price we pay for using much weaker interactions is a large overhead in the number of ancillary qubits, and the number of interaction terms per particle, both of which scale as $O(\\text{poly}(\\epsilon^{-1}))$. Our strong-from-weak gadgets have their primary application in complexity theory (QMA hardness of restricted Hamiltonians, a generalized area law counterexample, gap amplification), but could also motivate practical implementations with many weak interactions simulating a much stronger quantum many-body interaction.

  12. Representative Control Gates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoads, James

    & Integrated - Operationaly Certified As-Deployed Baseline Mission Analysis Risk, Cost, etc Tools & MethodsUnderstand Customer Identify Feasible Alternatives Final Design Disposal Management Decision - System Deployed Requirements Concept Definition Analysis & Evaluation Definition Flowdown Criteria & Priorities Peer Review MCR

  13. PI:____________________________ EHS Representative: ____________________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Brian C.

    : ____________________________ Level I Checklist Environmental: Hazardous Waste: Satellite Accumulation Areas (SAA) Yes No N/A 1. Is all hazardous waste stored in the satellite accumulation area (SAA)? 2. Are the satellite accumulation areas (SAAs) clearly labeled? 3. Are the SAAs located at or near the point of hazardous waste generation

  14. Representing Small Group Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wormald, Nicholas

    2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the dynamics of network evolution rests in part on the representation chosen to characterize the evolutionary process. We offer a simple, three-parameter representation based on subgraphs that capture three ...

  15. Volunteer Day Countries Represented

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilyugin, Sergei S.

    , but it really isn't. These three recreation facilities are supported by a portion of the additional fees full Board. Retirement Home for Horses-- Help care for aging and abandoned horses in a fun environment

  16. Climate Funding Opportunitiesi NOTE: These opportunities represent a snapshot of what is currently available (as of January 15, 2012).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Prediction using Earth System Models Funding Opportunity Number: 12-522 This funding opportunity supports-generation" Earth System Models that include coupled and interactive representations of such things as ocean, and biological sciences). The long-term goal of this opportunity is to extend current Earth System Modeling

  17. Farm-level economic impacts of the House of Representatives Farm Bill Proposal, H.R. 2646, and the Senate Farm Bill Proposal, S. 1731, for representative rice farms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houston, Christy Michelle

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements lor I he degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2002 Major Subject: Agricultural Economics FARM-LEVEL ECONOMIC IMPACTS OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES FARM BILL PROPOSAL, H. R... as to style and content by: t lc James Richardson (Chair of Co ii. ie David Anderson (Member) Clai Nix (M mber ~Gene Nelson (Head of Department] August 2002 Major Subject: Agricultural Economics ABSTRACT Farm-Iwvei Economic Impacts of the House...

  18. Groundwater Report Goes Online, Interactive

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash. – EM’s Richland Operations Office (RL) has moved its 1,200-page annual report on groundwater monitoring to a fully online and interactive web application.

  19. Interactive crayon rendering for animation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halstead, Howard John IV

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes the design and implementation of an interactive, nonphotorealistic rendering system for three-dimensional computer animation. The system provides a two-dimensional interface for coloring successive frames of animation using a...

  20. Succinct non-Interactive arguments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiesa, Alessandro

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Succinct non-interactive arguments (SNARGs), also known as "CS proofs" [Micali, FOCS 1994], enable verifying NP statements with much lower complexity than required for classical NP verification (in fact, with complexity ...

  1. Orderly Spectra from Random Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, C.W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803-4001 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803-4001 (United States); Bertsch, G.F. [Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)] [Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Dean, D.J.; Dean, D.J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States) [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803-4001 (United States)

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the low-lying spectra of many-body systems with random two-body interactions, specifying that the ensemble be invariant under particle-hole conjugation. Surprisingly we find patterns reminiscent of more orderly interactions, such as a predominance of J=0 ground states separated by a gap from the excited states, and evidence of phonon vibrations in the low-lying spectra. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  2. Height fluctuations in interacting dimers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alessandro Giuliani; Vieri Mastropietro; Fabio Lucio Toninelli

    2015-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a non-integrable model for interacting dimers on the two-dimensional square lattice. Configurations are perfect matchings of $\\mathbb Z^2$, i.e. subsets of edges such that each vertex is covered exactly once ("close-packing" condition). Dimer configurations are in bijection with discrete height functions, defined on faces $\\boldsymbol{\\xi}$ of $\\mathbb Z^2$. The non-interacting model is "integrable" and solvable via Kasteleyn theory; it is known that all the moments of the height difference $h_{\\boldsymbol{\\xi}}-h_{\\boldsymbol{\\eta}}$ converge to those of the massless Gaussian Free Field (GFF), asymptotically as $|{\\boldsymbol{\\xi}}-{\\boldsymbol{\\eta}}|\\to \\infty$. We prove that the same holds for small non-zero interactions, as was conjectured in the theoretical physics literature. Remarkably, dimer-dimer correlation functions are instead not universal and decay with a critical exponent that depends on the interaction strength. Our proof is based on an exact representation of the model in terms of lattice interacting fermions, which are studied by constructive field theory methods. In the fermionic language, the height difference $h_{\\boldsymbol{\\xi}}-h_{\\boldsymbol{\\eta}}$ takes the form of a non-local operator, consisting of a sum of monomials along an {\\it arbitrary} path connecting $\\boldsymbol{\\xi}$ and $\\boldsymbol{\\eta}$. As in the non-interacting case, this path-independence plays a crucial role in the proof.

  3. INTERACTIVE ANALYSIS AND DISPLAY OF TABULAR DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benson, W.H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    July 1976. Kitous,B. Interactive matrix displays andSS98{~ tA(!. -3.2 . I INTERACTIVE ANALYSIS AND DISPLAY OF ·owned rights. ~j • 6 U I INTERACTIVE ANALYSIS AND DISPLAY OF

  4. Interactive Volume Rendering of Diffusion Tensor Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hlawitschka, Mario

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ller. Volumeshop: o Interactive direct volume illustration.Kin04] [KKW05] [KTW06] Interactive Volume Rendering of Di?magic volume lens: An interactive focus+context technique

  5. Single-strips for fast interactive rendering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diaz-Gutierrez, Pablo; Bhushan, Anusheel; Gopi, M; Pajarola, Renato

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the 2001 symposium on Interactive 3D graphics, pp. 49–58.of the 1997 symposium on Interactive 3D graphics, pp. 75–ff.Computer graphics and interactive techniques, pp. 199–208.

  6. Technology Enhanced Interaction Framework Kewalin Angkananon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technology Enhanced Interaction Framework Kewalin Angkananon ECS University of Southampton interaction framework to help design technology to support communication between people and improve interactions between people, technology and objects, particularly in complex situations. A review of existing

  7. 4D-Polytopes and Their Dual Polytopes of the Coxeter Group $W(A_{4})$ Represented by Quaternions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehmet Koca; Nazife Ozdes Koca; Mudhahir Al-Ajmi

    2011-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    4-dimensional $A_{4}$ polytopes and their dual polytopes have been constructed as the orbits of the Coxeter-Weyl group $W(A_{4})$ where the group elements and the vertices of the polytopes are represented by quaternions. Projection of an arbitrary $W(A_{4})$ orbit into three dimensions is made using the subgroup $W(A_{3})$. A generalization of the Catalan solids for 3D polyhedra has been developed and dual polytopes of the uniform $A_{4}$ polytopes have been constructed.

  8. Africa Infrastructure Country Diagnostic Documents: Interactive...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Interactive MAP in PDF, all Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Africa Infrastructure Country Diagnostic Documents: Interactive MAP in PDF, all...

  9. Interpreting scattering wave functions in the presence of energy-dependent interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott Pratt

    2007-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In scattering theory, the squared relative wave function $|\\phi({\\bf q},{\\bf r})|^2$ is often interpreted as a weight, due to final-state interactions, describing the probability enhancement for emission with asymptotic relative momentum $q$. An equivalence relation also links the integral of the squared wave function over all coordinate space to the density of states. This relation, which plays an important role in understanding two-particle correlation phenomenology, is altered for the case where the potential is energy dependent, as is assumed in various forms of reaction theory. Here, the modification to the equivalence relation is derived, and it is shown that the squared wave function should be augmented by a additional factor if it is to represent the emission enhancement for final-state interactions. Examples with relativistic vector interactions, e.g., the Coulomb interaction, are presented.

  10. Cosmology and the weak interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schramm, D.N. (Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA)):(Chicago Univ., IL (USA))

    1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The weak interaction plays a critical role in modern Big Bang cosmology. This review will emphasize two of its most publicized cosmological connections: Big Bang nucleosynthesis and Dark Matter. The first of these is connected to the cosmological prediction of Neutrino Flavours, N{sub {nu}} {approximately} 3 which is now being confirmed at SLC and LEP. The second is interrelated to the whole problem of galaxy and structure formation in the universe. This review will demonstrate the role of the weak interaction both for dark matter candidates and for the problem of generating seeds to form structure. 87 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. The fractional quantum Hall effect is a notable example of emergent behavior in which strong Coulomb interactions drive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    Coulomb interactions drive the existence of a correlated many-body state. Bilayer graphene represents distinct two-valued quantum numbers: layer index, electron spin, and the sublattice index of the graphene observation of fractional quantum Hall states in bilayer graphene. By placing bilayer graphene (blue in Fig. 1

  12. On time-optimal NMR control of states of qutrits represented by quadrupole nuclei with the spin I = 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zobov, V. E., E-mail: rsa@iph.krasn.ru; Shauro, V. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, L.V. Kirensky Institute of Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Elementary logical operators (selective rotation, Fourier transform, controllable phase shift, and SUM gate) are considered for a quantum computer based on three-level systems (qutrits) represented by nuclear spins I = 1 under nuclear magnetic resonance conditions. The computer simulation of the realization of these operators by means of simple and composite selective radiofrequency (RF) pulses and optimized RF pulses is performed. The time dependence of the amplitude of last pulses is found by numerical optimization at different durations. Two variants are proposed for realization of a two-qutrit SUM gate by using one-qutrit or two-qutrit optimized RF pulses. The calculated time dependences of realization errors were used to study the time optimality of different methods for obtaining gates, proposed earlier and in this paper. The advantages and disadvantages of each of the methods are evaluated for different values of physical parameters.

  13. Structure and dynamics of microbe-exuded polymers and their interactions with calcite surfaces.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cygan, Randall Timothy; Mitchell, Ralph (Harvard University, Cambridge, MA); Perry, Thomas D. (Harvard University, Cambridge, MA)

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cation binding by polysaccharides is observed in many environments and is important for predictive environmental modeling, and numerous industrial and food technology applications. The complexities of these organo-cation interactions are well suited to predictive molecular modeling studies for investigating the roles of conformation and configuration of polysaccharides on cation binding. In this study, alginic acid was chosen as a model polymer and representative disaccharide and polysaccharide subunits were modeled. The ability of disaccharide subunits to bind calcium and to associate with the surface of calcite was investigated. The findings were extended to modeling polymer interactions with calcium ions.

  14. In vitro colony interactions among species of trichoderma with inference toward biological control. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reaves, J.L.; Crawford, R.H.

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Colony of interactions among 15 isolates representing seven species of Trichoderma were evaluated in vitro interactions characterized by zones of inhibition, demarcation lines, ridges of conidia, overgrowth, intermingling, anastomosis, and hyphal coiling in self-pairings and intraspecific and interspecific pairings of the seven species were recorded. Antagnostic interactions such as zones of inhibition were prevelent in these pairings. An understanding of the compatibility between species of isolates of Trichoderma will provide information on the use of multiple species of Trichoderma as biological control agents.

  15. Use of short-term test systems for the prediction of the hazard represented by potential chemical carcinogens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glass, L.R.; Jones, T.D.; Easterly, C.E.; Walsh, P.J.

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been hypothesized that results from short-term bioassays will ultimately provide information that will be useful for human health hazard assessment. Historically, the validity of the short-term tests has been assessed using the framework of the epidemiologic/medical screens. In this context, the results of the carcinogen (long-term) bioassay is generally used as the standard. However, this approach is widely recognized as being biased and, because it employs qualitative data, cannot be used to assist in isolating those compounds which may represent a more significant toxicologic hazard than others. In contrast, the goal of this research is to address the problem of evaluating the utility of the short-term tests for hazard assessment using an alternative method of investigation. Chemicals were selected mostly from the list of carcinogens published by the International Agency for Research on Carcinogens (IARC); a few other chemicals commonly recognized as hazardous were included. Tumorigenicity and mutagenicity data on 52 chemicals were obtained from the Registry of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances (RTECS) and were analyzed using a relative potency approach. The data were evaluated in a format which allowed for a comparison of the ranking of the mutagenic relative potencies of the compounds (as estimated using short-term data) vs. the ranking of the tumorigenic relative potencies (as estimated from the chronic bioassays). Although this was a preliminary investigation, it offers evidence that the short-term tests systems may be of utility in ranking the hazards represented by chemicals which may contribute to increased carcinogenesis in humans as a result of occupational or environmental exposures. 177 refs., 8 tabs.

  16. UBIQUITOUS COMPUTING AND INTERACTION Kaj Grnbk, Professor,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Equipment (Kinesthetic Interaction) > PosLogistics (Positioning and Logistics) > VPP4SGR ­ SmartGrid project

  17. PHASE TRANSFORMATIONS, STABILITY AND MATERIALS INTERACTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, Jr., J.W.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    engine) Environmental Interactions Ceramic Membrane Development Research Opportunities: •Fundamentals of hydrogen-

  18. Cosmology constrains gravitational four-fermion interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khriplovich, I.B.; Rudenko, A.S., E-mail: khriplovich@inp.nsk.su, E-mail: a.s.rudenko@inp.nsk.su [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk State University, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    If torsion exists, it generates gravitational four-fermion interaction (GFFI). This interaction gets dominating on the Planck scale. If one confines to the regular, axial-axial part of this interaction, the results do not comply with the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) cosmology for the spatial flat or closed Universe. In principle, the anomalous, vector-vector interaction could restore the agreement.

  19. Cosmology constrains gravitational four-fermion interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. B. Khriplovich; A. S. Rudenko

    2012-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    If torsion exists, it generates gravitational four-fermion interaction (GFFI). This interaction gets dominating on the Planck scale. If one confines to the regular, axial-axial part of this interaction, the results do not comply with the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) cosmology for the spatial flat or closed Universe. In principle, the anomalous, vector-vector interaction could restore the agreement.

  20. Vacation Donation Program: Physician's StatementConfidential Information Refer to the Administrative Policy: Vacation Donation Program for Civil Service and Union-Represented Staff at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    to the Administrative Policy: Vacation Donation Program for Civil Service and Union-Represented Staff at http://www.policy.umn.edu/Policies/hr/Leaves/VACATIONDONATION.html and corresponding Procedures: Requesting/Donating Paid Leave for Civil Service/Union-Represented Staff at http

  1. Figure 3. Socioeconomics drive biomass too. Simple regression with untrans-formed variables. Solid line represents the estimated regression line, whereas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Figure 3. Socioeconomics drive biomass too. Simple regression with untrans- formed variables. Solid line represents the estimated regression line, whereas the dashed lines represent the 95% confidence metropolitan area. I hypothesized that income is the driving factor of vegetation coverage, primarily affecting

  2. Digital Soil Mapping: Interactions with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grunwald, Sabine

    Chapter 21 Digital Soil Mapping: Interactions with and Applications for Hydropedology J.A. Thompson,1, * S. Roecker,2 S. Grunwald3 and P.R. Owens4 ABSTRACT Spatial information on soils, particularly hydrologic and hydromorphic soil properties, is used to understand and assess soil water retention, flooding

  3. Rotational ratchets with dipolar interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sebastian Jäger; Sabine H. L. Klapp

    2012-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We report results from a computer simulation study on the rotational ratchet effect in systems of magnetic particles interacting via dipolar interactions. The ratchet effect consists of directed rotations of the particles in an oscillating magnetic field, which lacks a net rotating component. Our investigations are based on Brownian dynamics simulations of such many-particle systems. We investigate the influence of both, the random and deterministic contributions to the equations of motion on the ratchet effect. As a main result, we show that dipolar interactions can have an enhancing as well as a dampening effect on the ratchet behavior depending on the dipolar coupling strength of the system under consideration. The enhancement is shown to be caused by an increase in the effective field on a particle generated by neighboring magnetic particles, while the dampening is due to restricted rotational motion in the effective field. Moreover, we find a non-trivial influence of the short-range, repulsive interaction between the particles.

  4. Effective interactions between fluid membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bing-Sui Lu; Rudolf Podgornik

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A self-consistent theory is proposed for the general problem of interacting undulating fluid membranes subject to the constraint that they do not interpenetrate. The steric constraint is implemented via a representation of the Heaviside function, which enables one to transform it into a novel effective steric potential. The steric potential is found to consist of two contributions: one generated by zero mode fluctuations of the membranes, and the other by thermal bending fluctuations. For membranes of cross-sectional area $S$, we find that the bending fluctuation part scales with the inter-membrane separation $d$ as $d^{-2}$ for $d \\ll \\sqrt{S}$, but crosses over to $d^{-4}$ scaling for $d \\gg \\sqrt{S}$, whereas the zero mode part of the steric potential always scales as $d^{-2}$. For membranes interacting exclusively via the steric potential, we obtain exact nonlinear expressions for the effective interaction potential and for the rms undulation amplitude $\\sigma$, which becomes small at low temperatures $T$ and/or large bending stiffnesses $\\kappa$. Moreover, $\\sigma$ scales as $d$ for $d \\ll \\sqrt{S}$, but saturates at $\\sqrt{k_{{\\rm B}} T S/\\kappa}$ for $d \\gg \\sqrt{S}$. In addition, using variational Gaussian theory, we apply our self-consistent treatment to study inter-membrane interactions subject to three different types of potential: (i)~the Moreira-Netz potential for a pair of strongly charged membranes with an intervening solution of multivalent counterions, (ii)~an attractive square well, (iii)~the Morse potential, and (iv)~a combination of hydration and van der Waals interactions.

  5. Blended Interaction Toward a Framework for the Design of Interactive Spaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiterer, Harald

    Blended Interaction ­ Toward a Framework for the Design of Interactive Spaces Hans-Christian Jetter, Florian Geyer, Tobias Schwarz, Harald Reiterer Human-Computer Interaction Group, University of Konstanz In this paper, we propose Blended Interaction as a conceptual framework for the design of interactive spaces. We

  6. Interaction of the 4-rotational gauge field with orbital momentum, gravidiamagnetic effect, and orbital experiment ''Gravity Probe B''

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babourova, O. V.; Frolov, B. N. [Moscow State Pedagogical University, Department of Physics for Nature Sciences, Krasnoprudnaya 14, Moscow 107140 (Russian Federation)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The direct interaction of the 4-rotational (Lorentzian) gauge field with angular orbital momentum of an external field is considered. This interaction appears in a new Poincare gauge theory of gravitation, in which tetrads are not true gauge fields, but represent some functions of the translational and 4-rotational gauge fields. The given interaction leads to a new effect: the existence of an electronic orbit precession under the action of an intensive external gravitational field (gravidiamagnetic effect), and also substantiates the existence of the direct interaction of the proper angular momentum of a gyroscope with the torsion field, which theoretically can be generated by the rotational angular momentum of the planet Earth. The latter interaction can be detected by the experiment Gravity Probe B on the satellite orbit.

  7. Interaction of Polar and Nonpolar Organic Pollutants with Soil Organic Matter: Sorption Experiments and Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmed, Ashour A; Aziz, Saadullah G; Hilal, Rifaat H; Elroby, Shaaban A; Al-Youbi, Abdulrahman O; Leinweber, Peter; Kühn, Oliver

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fate of organic pollutants in the environment is influenced by several factors including the type and strength of their interactions with soil components especially SOM. However, a molecular level answer to the question How organic pollutants interact with SOM? is lacking. In order to explore mechanisms of this interaction, we have developed a new SOM model followed by carrying out molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in parallel with sorption experiments. The new SOM model comprises free SOM functional groups (carboxylic acid and naphthalene) as well as SOM cavities (with two different sizes), representing the soil voids, containing the same SOM functional groups. To examine the effect of the hydrophobicity on the interaction, the organic pollutants hexachlorobenzene (HCB, non-polar) and sulfanilamide (SAA, polar) were considered. The experimental and the theoretical outcomes explored four major points regarding sorption of SAA and HCB on soil. 1. The interaction depends on the SOM chemical composition mo...

  8. Long term out-of-pile thermocouple tests in conditions representative for nuclear gas-cooled high temperature reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laurie, M. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Inst. for Energy, P.O. Box 2, NL-1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Fourrez, S. [THERMOCOAX SAS, BP 26, Planquivon, F-61438 Flers Cedex (France); Fuetterer, M. A.; Lapetite, J. M. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Inst. for Energy, P.O. Box 2, NL-1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During irradiation tests at high temperature, failure of commercial Inconel 600 sheathed thermocouples is commonly encountered. To understand and remedy this problem, out-of-pile tests were performed with thermocouples in carburizing atmospheres which can be assumed to be at least locally representative for High Temperature Reactors. The objective was to screen those thermocouples which would consecutively be used under irradiation. Two such screening tests have been performed with a set of thermocouples embedded in graphite (mainly conventional Type N thermocouples and thermocouples with innovative sheaths) in a dedicated furnace with helium flushing. Performance indicators such as thermal drift, insulation and loop resistance were monitored and compared to those from conventional Type N thermocouples. Several parameters were investigated: niobium sleeves, bending, thickness, sheath composition, temperature as well as the chemical environment. After the tests, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) examinations were performed to analyze possible local damage in wires and in the sheath. The present paper describes the two experiments, summarizes results and outlines further work, in particular to further analyze the findings and to select suitable thermocouples for qualification under irradiation. (authors)

  9. Computer as a physical system: a microscopic quantum mechanical Hamiltonian model of computers represented by Turing machines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benioff, P.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microscopic quantum mechanical model of computers as represented by Turing machines is constructed. It is shown that for each number N and Turing machine Q there exists a Hamiltonian H/sub N//sup Q/ and a class of appropriate initial states such that, if PSI/sub Q//sup N/(0) is such an initial state, then PSI/sub Q//sup N/(t) = exp(-iH/sub N//sup Q/t) PSI/sub Q//sup N/(0) correctly describes at times t/sub 3/, t/sub 6/,..., t/sub 3N/ model states that correspond to the completion of the first, second,..., Nth computation step of Q. The model parameters can be adjusted so that for an arbitrary time interval ..delta.. around t/sub 3/, t/sub 6/,..., t/sub 3N/, the machine part of PSI/sub Q//sup N/(t) is stationary. 1 figure.

  10. Characterization of Representative Materials in Support of Safe, Long Term Storage of Surplus Plutonium in DOE-STD-3013 Containers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narlesky, Joshua E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stroud, Mary Ann [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith, Paul Herrick [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wayne, David M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mason, Richard E. [MET-1: ACTINIDE PROCESSING SUPPORT; Worl, Laura A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Surveillance and Monitoring Program is a joint Los Alamos National Laboratory/Savannah River Site effort funded by the Department of Energy-Environmental Management to provide the technical basis for the safe, long-term storage (up to 50 years) of over 6 metric tons of plutonium stored in over 5,000 DOE-STD-3013 containers at various facilities around the DOE complex. The majority of this material is plutonium that is surplus to the nuclear weapons program, and much of it is destined for conversion to mixed oxide fuel for use in US nuclear power plants. The form of the plutonium ranges from relatively pure metal and oxide to very impure oxide. The performance of the 3013 containers has been shown to depend on moisture content and on the levels, types and chemical forms of the impurities. The oxide materials that present the greatest challenge to the storage container are those that contain chloride salts. Other common impurities include oxides and other compounds of calcium, magnesium, iron, and nickel. Over the past 15 years the program has collected a large body of experimental data on 54 samples of plutonium, with 53 chosen to represent the broader population of materials in storage. This paper summarizes the characterization data, moisture analysis, particle size, surface area, density, wattage, actinide composition, trace element impurity analysis, and shelf life surveillance data and includes origin and process history information. Limited characterization data on fourteen nonrepresentative samples is also presented.

  11. Meeting the Radiative Forcing Targets of the Representative Concentration Pathways in a World with Agricultural Climate Impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyle, G. Page; Mueller, C.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Thomson, Allison M.

    2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This study assesses how climate impacts on agriculture may change the evolution of the agricultural and energy systems in meeting the end-of-century radiative forcing targets of the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs). We build on the recently completed ISI-MIP exercise that has produced global gridded estimates of future crop yields for major agricultural crops using climate model projections of the RCPs from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5). For this study we use the bias-corrected outputs of the HadGEM2-ES climate model as inputs to the LPJmL crop growth model, and the outputs of LPJmL to modify inputs to the GCAM integrated assessment model. Our results indicate that agricultural climate impacts generally lead to an increase in global cropland, as compared with corresponding emissions scenarios that do not consider climate impacts on agricultural productivity. This is driven mostly by negative impacts on wheat, rice, other grains, and oil crops. Still, including agricultural climate impacts does not significantly increase the costs or change the technological strategies of global, whole-system emissions mitigation. In fact, to meet the most aggressive climate change mitigation target (2.6 W/m2 in 2100), the net mitigation costs are slightly lower when agricultural climate impacts are considered. Key contributing factors to these results are (a) low levels of climate change in the low-forcing scenarios, (b) adaptation to climate impacts, simulated in GCAM through inter-regional shifting in the production of agricultural goods, and (c) positive average climate impacts on bioenergy crop yields.

  12. Yakima River Species Interactions Studies, Annual Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearsons, Todd N.

    2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning, and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the eleventh of a series of progress reports that address species interactions research and supplementation monitoring of fishes in response to supplementation of salmon and steelhead in the upper Yakima River basin. This progress report summarizes data collected between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2002. These data were compared to findings from previous years to identify general trends and make preliminary comparisons. Interactions between fish produced as part of the YKFP, termed target species or stocks, and other species or stocks (non-target taxa) may alter the population status of non-target species or stocks. This may occur through a variety of mechanisms, such as competition, predation, and interbreeding. Furthermore, the success of a supplementation program may be limited by strong ecological interactions such as predation or competition. Our work has adapted to new information needs as the YKFP has evolved. Initially, our work focused on interactions between anadromous steelhead and resident rainbow trout (for explanation see Pearsons et al. 1993), then interactions between spring chinook salmon and rainbow trout, and recently interactions between spring chinook salmon and highly valued nontarget taxa (NTT; e.g., bull trout); and interactions between strong interactor taxa (e.g., those that may strongly influence the abundance of spring chinook salmon; e.g., smallmouth bass) and spring chinook salmon. The change in emphasis to spring chinook salmon has largely been influenced by the shift in the target species planned for supplementation (Bonneville Power Administration et al. 1996; Fast and Craig 1997). Originally, steelhead and spring chinook salmon were proposed to be supplemented simultaneously (Clune and Dauble 1991). However, due in part to the uncertainties associated with interactions between steelhead and rainbow trout, spring chinook and coho salmon were supplemented before steelhead. This redirection in the species to be supplemented has prompted us to prioritize interactions between spring chinook and rainbow trout, while beginning to investigate other ecological interactions of concern. Prefacility monitoring of variables such as rainbow trout density, distribution, and size structure was continued and monitoring of other NTT was initiated in 1997. This report is organized into two chapters that represent major topics associated with monitoring stewardship, utilization, and strong interactor taxa. Chapter 1 reports the results of non-target taxa monitoring after the fourth release of hatchery salmon smolts in the upper Yakima Basin. Chapter 2 describes predation on juvenile salmonids by smallmouth bass and channel catfish in the lower Yakima River.

  13. Stability Index of Interaction forms Joseph Abdou

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Stability Index of Interaction forms Joseph Abdou December 15, 2008 Abstract An interaction form, 106-112 boulevard de l'H^opital 75647 Paris Cedex 13 - France; email: abdou@univ-paris1.fr 1 halshs

  14. Expressive Autonomous Cinematography for Interactive Virtual Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomlinson, Bill

    Expressive Autonomous Cinematography for Interactive Virtual Environments Bill Tomlinson Synthetic an automatic cinematography system for interactive virtual environments. This system controls a virtual camera this cinematography system with an ethologically-inspired structure of sensors, emotions, motivations, and action

  15. Ultracold Fermi gas with repulsive interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Ye-Ryoung

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents results from experiments of ultracold atomic Fermi gases with repulsive interaction. Itinerant ferromagnetism was studied by simulating the Stoner model with a strongly interacting Fermi gas of ultracold ...

  16. Sense of Place Evoked by Interactive Maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Go, Hanyoung

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    orientation, spatial imagery, and spatial presence. Responses from 211 students were analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM). The study results showed that map interfaces influence human perceptions of map interactivity. Perceived map interactivity...

  17. Arm-Hand-Finger Video Game Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logsdon, Drew Anthony

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite the growing popularity and expansion of video game interaction techniques and research in the area of hand gesture recognition, the application of hand gesture video game interaction using arm, hand, and finger motion has not been...

  18. ACCEPTED MANUSCRIPT Fold interaction and wavelength selection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaus, Boris

    simulations the lateral growth of folds is studied, in particular with respect to fold segments interactions; folding modes; fold interactions; 3D folding; numerical modelling 1 Introduction Buckling or folding

  19. Activity Recognition for Natural Human Robot Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravindran, Balaraman

    Activity Recognition for Natural Human Robot Interaction Addwiteey Chrungoo1 , SS Manimaran between humans and robots. While humans can distinguish between communicative actions and activities of daily living, robots cannot draw such inferences effectively. To allow intuitive human robot interaction

  20. PACAP Interactions in the Mouse Brain: Implications for Behavioral and Other Disorders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acquaah-Mensah, George; Taylor, Ronald C.; Bhave, Sanjiv V.

    2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    As an activator of adenylate cyclase, the neuropeptide Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase Activating Peptide (PACAP) impacts levels of cyclic AMP, a key second messenger available in brain cells. PACAP is involved in certain adult behaviors. To elucidate PACAP interactions, a compendium of microarrays representing mRNA expression in the adult mouse whole brain was pooled from the Phenogen database for analysis. A regulatory network was computed based on mutual information between gene pairs using gene expression data across the compendium. Clusters among genes directly linked to PACAP, and probable interactions between corresponding proteins were computed. Database 'experts' affirmed some of the inferred relationships. The findings suggest ADCY7 is probably the adenylate cyclase isoform most relevant to PACAP's action. They also support intervening roles for kinases including GSK3B, PI 3-kinase, SGK3 and AMPK. Other high-confidence interactions are hypothesized for future testing. This new information has implications for certain behavioral and other disorders.

  1. The Interactive Dining Table Florian Echtler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deussen, Oliver

    into the table lamp for sensing interaction and a small LED-based projector mounted on the ceiling for displaying

  2. Coulomb interactions within Halo Effective Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renato Higa

    2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    I present preliminary results of effective field theory applied to nuclear cluster systems, where Coulomb interactions play a significant role.

  3. NEW INTERNSHIP FOR WINTER Interactive Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilmers, Chris

    NEW INTERNSHIP FOR WINTER Interactive Ecology UC Santa Cruz Arboretum Internship Agency Sponsor: Brett Hall, Director of Collections and Conservation Interactive Ecology interns will work primarily, back pack tracker, GPS, google earth, etc). The Interactive Ecology internship will also explore, more

  4. Interactive Digital Photomontage Aseem Agarwala1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazhdan, Michael

    Interactive Digital Photomontage Aseem Agarwala1 Mira Dontcheva1 Maneesh Agrawala2 Steven Drucker2 of photographs into a single composite picture ---(of course with minimum visible artifacts !!!!) 2 Interactive Digital Photomontage Presented by : Gagan Bansal #12;Interactive Digital Photomontage Presented by : Gagan

  5. ON INTERACTIVE PROOFS WITH A LACONIC PROVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wigderson, Avi

    ON INTERACTIVE PROOFS WITH A LACONIC PROVER Oded Goldreich, Salil Vadhan, and Avi Wigderson Abstract. We continue the investigation of interactive proofs with bounded communication, as initiated by Goldreich and Hastad (IPL 1998). Let L be a language that has an interactive proof in which the prover sends

  6. Learning an Interactive Segmentation System Hannes Nickisch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Learning an Interactive Segmentation System Hannes Nickisch MPI for Biological Cybernetics hn@ims.tuwien.ac.at ABSTRACT Many successful applications of computer vision to image or video manipulation are interactive, interactive systems have been treated in the same manner as their fully automatic counterparts

  7. DNA: structure, dense phases, charges, interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potsdam, Universität

    DNA: structure, dense phases, charges, interactions #12;Outline 1. DNA: structure, charges, dense phases 2. Counterion and DNA condensation 3. ES DNA-DNA interactions 4. DNA toroidal structures 5. Interactions of real DNA helices 6. DNA-DNA ES recognition 7. DNA melting in aggregates 8. Azimuthal

  8. Multisurface Interaction in the WILD Room

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    - 1 - Multisurface Interaction in the WILD Room Michel Beaudouin-Lafon, Stéphane Huot, Mathieu University Abstract The WILD room (wall-sized interaction with large datasets) serves as a testbed. (2012), "Multisurface Interaction in the WILD Room", IEEE Computer, vol 45, nº 4, pp. 48-56. DOI

  9. Stochastic pump of interacting particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debasish Chaudhuri; Abhishek Dhar

    2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the overdamped motion of Brownian particles, interacting via particle exclusion, in an external potential that varies with time and space. We show that periodic potentials that maintain specific position-dependent phase relations generate time-averaged directed current of particles. We obtain analytic results for a lattice version of the model using a recently developed perturbative approach. Many interesting features like particle-hole symmetry, current reversal with changing density, and system-size dependence of current are obtained. We propose possible experiments to test our predictions.

  10. Bulk Viscosity of Interacting Hadrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Wiranata; M. Prakash

    2009-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that first approximations to the bulk viscosity $\\eta_v$ are expressible in terms of factors that depend on the sound speed $v_s$, the enthalpy, and the interaction (elastic and inelastic) cross section. The explicit dependence of $\\eta_v$ on the factor $(\\frac 13 - v_s^2)$ is demonstrated in the Chapman-Enskog approximation as well as the variational and relaxation time approaches. The interesting feature of bulk viscosity is that the dominant contributions at a given temperature arise from particles which are neither extremely nonrelativistic nor extremely relativistic. Numerical results for a model binary mixture are reported.

  11. Turbulence transport with nonlocal interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linn, R.R.; Clark, T.T.; Harlow, F.H.; Turner, L.

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This preliminary report describes a variety of issues in turbulence transport analysis with particular emphasis on closure procedures that are nonlocal in wave-number and/or physical space. Anomalous behavior of the transport equations for large scale parts of the turbulence spectrum are resolved by including the physical space nonlocal interactions. Direct and reverse cascade processes in wave-number space are given a much richer potential for realistic description by the nonlocal formulations. The discussion also describes issues, many still not resolved, regarding new classes of self-similar form functions.

  12. Stochastic pump of interacting particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Debasish

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the overdamped motion of Brownian particles, interacting via particle exclusion, in an external potential that varies with time and space. We show that periodic potentials that maintain specific position-dependent phase relations generate time-averaged directed current of particles. We obtain analytic results for a lattice version of the model using a recently developed perturbative approach. Many interesting features like particle-hole symmetry, current reversal with changing density, and system-size dependence of current are obtained. We propose possible experiments to test our predictions.

  13. Running Interactive Jobs on Carver

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements RecentlyElectronicResources ResourcesRobust,RomanRoy PrimusInteractive

  14. Running Interactive Jobs on Franklin

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements RecentlyElectronicResources ResourcesRobust,RomanRoyInteractive Jobs

  15. Running Interactive Jobs on Hopper

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements RecentlyElectronicResources ResourcesRobust,RomanRoyInteractive

  16. Interactive Poster: Visualizing Online Interaction Kimberly Tee*, Sheelagh Carpendale*, and Saul Greenberg*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenberg, Saul

    Interactive Poster: Visualizing Online Interaction Kimberly Tee*, Sheelagh Carpendale*, and Saul has no sense of whether other people in the community have interacted with it. Our goal was to make these artifact interactions explicit. To do this, we designed a compact, artifact-centered visualization

  17. MoDPepInt: An interactive webserver for prediction of modular domain-peptide interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brendel, Volker

    MoDPepInt: An interactive webserver for prediction of modular domain-peptide interactions-Supervised Prediction of SH2-Peptide Interactions from Imbalanced High-Throughput Data PLoS One, 8(5), pp. e62732, 2013-peptide interaction prediction with an application to human SH3 domains Bioinformatics, 29(13), pp. i335-i343, 2013

  18. Interactive Activation in Perception and Cognition 1 Interactive Activation and Mutual Constraint Satisfaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McClelland, James L. "Jay"

    Interactive Activation in Perception and Cognition 1 Interactive Activation and Mutual Constraint on Rumelhart's arguments, we present the Interactive Activation hypothesis ­ the idea that the mechanism used in perception and comprehension to achieve these feats exploits an interactive activation process implemented

  19. Compact submanifolds supporting singular interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaynak, Burak Tevfik, E-mail: burak.kaynak@boun.edu.tr; Teoman Turgut, O., E-mail: turgutte@boun.edu.tr

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A quantum particle moving under the influence of singular interactions on embedded surfaces furnish an interesting example from the spectral point of view. In these problems, the possible occurrence of a bound-state is perhaps the most important aspect. Such systems can be introduced as quadratic forms and generically they do not require renormalization. Yet an alternative path through the resolvent is also beneficial to study various properties. In the present work, we address these issues for compact surfaces embedded in a class of ambient manifolds. We discover that there is an exact bound state solution written in terms of the heat kernel of the ambient manifold for a range of coupling strengths. Moreover, we develop techniques to estimate bounds on the ground state energy when several surfaces, each of which admits a bound state solution, coexist. -- Highlights: •Schrödinger operator with singular interactions supported on compact submanifolds. •Exact bound-state solution in terms of the heat kernel of the ambient manifold. •Generalization of the variational approach to a collection of submanifolds. •Existence of a lower bound for a unique ground state energy.

  20. Each year, the Franklin College of Arts and Sciences recognizes a select group of outstanding alumni for their accomplishments and contributions to their professions and/or communities. Our alumni represent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    represent diverse disciplines and majors, and significant accomplishments range from early-career successes

  1. Interactive graphical tools for three-dimensional mesh redistribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobbs, L.A.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three-dimensional meshes modeling nonlinear problems such as sheet metal forming, metal forging, heat transfer during welding, the propagation of microwaves through gases, and automobile crashes require highly refined meshes in local areas to accurately represent areas of high curvature, stress, and strain. These locally refined areas develop late in the simulation and/or move during the course of the simulation, thus making it difficult to predict their exact location. This thesis is a systematic study of new tools scientists can use with redistribution algorithms to enhance the solution results and reduce the time to build, solve, and analyze nonlinear finite element problems. Participatory design techniques including Contextual Inquiry and Design were used to study and analyze the process of solving such problems. This study and analysis led to the in-depth understanding of the types of interactions performed by FEM scientists. Based on this understanding, a prototype tool was designed to support these interactions. Scientists participated in evaluating the design as well as the implementation of the prototype tool. The study, analysis, prototype tool design, and the results of the evaluation of the prototype tool are described in this thesis.

  2. INTERACTIVE COMPUTER GRAPHICS DISPLAYS FOR HIERARCHICAL DATA STRUCTURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cahn, D.F.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pittsburgh, 1980 LBL-10247 INTERACTIVE COMPUTER GRAPHICSOF THIS DKiir.KHT IS UMLIMITEO INTERACTIVE COMPUTER GRAPHICSBerkeley, CA 94720 An interactive computer graphical display

  3. Interactive focus of light fields for 3D displays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Karen A.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    4.4 Interactive Focus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .on Computer graph- ics and interactive techniques (New York,on Computer graph- ics and interactive techniques (New York,

  4. Distributome: An Interactive Web-based Resource for Probability Distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Bo

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Angeles Distributome: An Interactive Web-based Resource forThesis Distributome: An Interactive Web-based Resource fordevelopment of highly interactive programs. The Distributome

  5. Interactive, Internet Delivery of Visualization via Structured, Prerendered multiresolution Imagery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bethel, E. Wes; Yoon, Ilmi; Chen, Jerry

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I. Yoon and E. W. Bethel. “Interactive, Internet Delivery ofI. Yoon, E. W. Bethel. “Interactive, Internet Delivery ofFY 2007 Accomplishment Interactive, Internet Delivery of

  6. EMSL Biological Interactions and Dynamics Science Theme Advisory...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biological Interactions and Dynamics Science Theme Advisory Panel Workshop EMSL Biological Interactions and Dynamics Science Theme Advisory Panel Workshop "Biological Interactions...

  7. Identification of Protein-Protein Interactions and Topologies in Living Cells with Chemical Cross-linking and Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Haizhen; Tang, Xiaoting; Munske, Gerhard R.; Tolic, Nikola; Anderson, Gordon A.; Bruce, James E.

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results from a novel strategy that enables concurrent identification of protein-protein interactions and topologies in living cells without specific antibodies or genetic manipulations for immuno/affinity purifications. The strategy consists of: (i) chemical cross-linking reaction: intact cell labeling with a novel class of chemical cross-linkers, protein interaction reporters (PIRs); (ii) two-stage mass spectrometric analysis: stage 1 identification of PIR-labeled proteins and construction of a restricted database by 2D-LC/MS/MS; and stage 2 analysis of PIR-labeled peptides by multiplexed LC/FTICR-MS; (iii) data analysis: identification of cross-linked peptides and proteins of origin using accurate mass and other constraints. The primary advantage of the PIR approach and distinction from current technology is that protein interactions together with topologies are detected in native biological systems by stabilizing protein complexes with new covalent bonds while the proteins are present in the original cellular environment. Thus, weak or transient interactions or interactions that require properly folded, localized, or membrane-bound proteins can be labeled and identified through the PIR approach. This strategy was applied to S. oneidensis bacterial cells and initial studies resulted in identification of a set of protein-protein interactions and their contact/binding regions. Furthermore, most identified interactions involved membrane proteins, suggesting the PIR approach is particularly suited for studies of membrane protein-protein interactions, an area under-represented with current widely-used approaches.

  8. Interactivity vs. fairness in networked linux systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Wenji; Crawford, Matt; /Fermilab; ,

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In general, the Linux 2.6 scheduler can ensure fairness and provide excellent interactive performance at the same time. However, our experiments and mathematical analysis have shown that the current Linux interactivity mechanism tends to incorrectly categorize non-interactive network applications as interactive, which can lead to serious fairness or starvation issues. In the extreme, a single process can unjustifiably obtain up to 95% of the CPU! The root cause is due to the facts that: (1) network packets arrive at the receiver independently and discretely, and the 'relatively fast' non-interactive network process might frequently sleep to wait for packet arrival. Though each sleep lasts for a very short period of time, the wait-for-packet sleeps occur so frequently that they lead to interactive status for the process. (2) The current Linux interactivity mechanism provides the possibility that a non-interactive network process could receive a high CPU share, and at the same time be incorrectly categorized as 'interactive.' In this paper, we propose and test a possible solution to address the interactivity vs. fairness problems. Experiment results have proved the effectiveness of the proposed solution.

  9. On supersymmetric Dirac delta interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Mateos Guilarte; J. M. Munoz Castaneda; A. Moreno Mosquera

    2015-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we construct $\\mathcal{N}=2$ supersymmetric (SUSY) quantum mechanics over several configurations of Dirac-$\\delta$ potentials from one single delta to a Dirac " comb \\rq\\rq. We show in detail how the building of supersymmetry on potentials with delta interactions placed in two or more points on the real line requires the inclusion of quasi-square wells. Therefore, the basic ingredient of a supersymmetric Hamiltonian containing two or more Dirac-$\\delta$s is the singular potential formed by a Dirac-$\\delta$ plus a step ($\\theta$) at the same point. In this $\\delta/\\theta$ SUSY Hamiltonian there is only one singlet ground state of zero energy annihilated by the two supercharges or a doublet of ground states paired by supersymmetry of positive energy depending on the relation between the Dirac well strength and the height of the step potential. We find a scenario of either unbroken supersymmetry with Witten index one or supersymmetry breaking when there is one " bosonic\\rq\\rq and one " fermionic\\rq\\rq ground state such that the Witten index is zero. We explain next the different structure of the scattering waves produced by three $\\delta/\\theta$ potentials with respect to the eigenfunctions arising in the non-SUSY case. In particular, many more bound states paired by supersymmetry exist within the supersymmetric framework compared with the non-SUSY problem. An infinite array of equally spaced $\\delta$-interactions of the same strength but alternatively attractive and repulsive are susceptible of being promoted to a ${\\cal N}=2$ supersymmetric system...

  10. [Plant Signaling & Behavior 3:10, 839-841; October 2008]; 2008 Landes Bioscience The interaction between tomato plants and Clavibacter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sessa, Guido

    [Plant Signaling & Behavior 3:10, 839-841; October 2008]; ©2008 Landes Bioscience The interaction between tomato plants and Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis (Cmm) represents a model and the attempt of a crop plant to counteract pathogen invasion. To investigate plant responses activated during

  11. Interaction of Lung Surfactant Proteins with Anionic Phospholipids D. Y. Takamoto,* M. M. Lipp,* A. von Nahmen,* Ka Yee C. Lee,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zasadzinski, Joseph A.

    Interaction of Lung Surfactant Proteins with Anionic Phospholipids D. Y. Takamoto,* M. M. Lipp,* A, and atomic force microscopy were used to study lung surfac- tant specific proteins SP-B and SP are representative of the anionic lipids in native and replacement lung surfactants. Both SP-B and SP-C eliminate

  12. CORCON-MOD3: An integrated computer model for analysis of molten core-concrete interactions. User`s manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, D.R.; Gardner, D.R.; Brockmann, J.E.; Griffith, R.O. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CORCON-Mod3 computer code was developed to mechanistically model the important core-concrete interaction phenomena, including those phenomena relevant to the assessment of containment failure and radionuclide release. The code can be applied to a wide range of severe accident scenarios and reactor plants. The code represents the current state of the art for simulating core debris interactions with concrete. This document comprises the user`s manual and gives a brief description of the models and the assumptions and limitations in the code. Also discussed are the input parameters and the code output. Two sample problems are also given.

  13. Interacting agegraphic tachyon model of dark energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Sheykhi

    2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Scalar-field dark energy models like tachyon are often regarded as an effective description of an underlying theory of dark energy. In this Letter, we implement the interacting agegraphic dark energy models with tachyon field. We demonstrate that the interacting agegraphic evolution of the universe can be described completely by a single tachyon scalar field. We thus reconstruct the potential as well as the dynamics of the tachyon field according to the evolutionary behavior of interacting agegraphic dark energy.

  14. INTERACTIVE COMPUTER GRAPHICS DISPLAYS FOR HIERARCHICAL DATA STRUCTURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cahn, D.F.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INTERACTIVE COMPUTER GRAPHICS DISPLAYS FOR HIERARCHICAL DATAINTERACTIVE COMPUTER GRAPHICS DISPLAYS FOR HIERARCHICAL DATAtem. INTERACTIVE COMPUTER GRAPHICS DISPLAYS FOR HIERARCHICAL

  15. Sandia National Laboratories: material interactions with hydrogen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    material interactions with hydrogen Energy Department Awards 7M to Advance Hydrogen Storage Systems On June 12, 2014, in CRF, Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems,...

  16. Quantifying turbidity current interactions with topography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Straub, Kyle M

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis advances our understanding of how transport properties of turbidity currents are mediated by interactions with seafloor topography, specifically channelized surfaces. Turbidity currents are responsible for ...

  17. Sandia National Laboratories: complex wind plant interactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    complex wind plant interactions SWiFT Commissioned to Study Wind Farm Optimization On July 29, 2013, in Energy, Facilities, News, News & Events, Partnership, Renewable Energy,...

  18. Private Interactive Communication Across an Adversarial Channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Private Interactive Communication Across an Adversarial Channel Ran Gelles, Amit Sahai, and Akshay Wadia Department of Computer Science, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA {gelles, sahai

  19. The ecology of coral-microbe interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marhaver, Kristen Laura

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Antagonistic interactions among coral- associated bacteria.of a scleractinian coral in response to microbial biofilms.impacts, and the resilience of coral reefs. Science 301:929-

  20. Introduction Counterpropagating interactions Numerical methods Co-propagating interactions A result on energy transfer Solitary water wave interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craig, Walter

    on energy transfer Solitary water wave interactions Walter Craig Department of Mathematics & Statistics A result on energy transfer Collaborators Philippe Guyenne University of Delaware Diane Henderson-propagating interactions A result on energy transfer portrait of J. C. Maxwell (1831 - 1879) 03/10/05 http

  1. Office of Research Facili es and Administra ve (F&A) costs represent the infrastructure and opera ons costs that support the research enterprise at the University of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manchak, John

    Office of Research Facili es and Administra ve (F&A) costs represent the infrastructure and opera ons costs that support the research enterprise at the University of Washington. Similar to the overhead costs of a business, F&A costs are real costs incurred in conduc ng and running the UW's research

  2. Travel demand can be elegantly represented using an Origin-Destination (OD) matrix. The link counts observed on the network are produced by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, David M.

    Travel demand can be elegantly represented using an Origin-Destination (OD) matrix. The link counts to reconstruct the OD matrix. An offline approach to estimate a static OD matrix over the peak period for freeway optimization routine, MINOS, interfaced to estimate an OD matrix. This approach is an application

  3. This book represents a modern treatment of classical control theory and its applications. Theoretically, it is based on the state space approach, where the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gajic, Zoran

    Preface This book represents a modern treatment of classical control theory and its applications algebra. Practically, it is based on the MATLAB 1 package for computer-aided control system design, so behavior of real physical control systems, which are quite often of high dimensions. The book treats

  4. The Human Factors and Ergonomics EFA The field of Human Factors and Ergonomics (HFE) represents an increasingly important engineering specialty. The

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kusiak, Andrew

    The Human Factors and Ergonomics EFA The field of Human Factors and Ergonomics (HFE) represents cognitive characteristics and ergonomics considers physical characteristics. The HFE EFA builds allow for an emphasis in human factors (HF) or ergonomics (Ergo). Required courses: Semester Course

  5. and at Thr185 and Tyr187 for human ERK2. The CB1000 separation revealed six protein bands, representing the non-, mono-and dually

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    and at Thr185 and Tyr187 for human ERK2. The CB1000 separation revealed six protein bands, representing the non-, mono- and dually phosphorylated forms of ERK1 and ERK2. Because human ERK1 and ERK2 are distinct but similar proteins, the isoforms of both proteins are recognized by a single, pan-ERK antibody

  6. Representative Syllabus for P140 Prof. Sandra Shapshay P140 M/W 11:15pm-12:05pm Woodburn Hall 009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indiana University

    Representative Syllabus for P140 Prof. Sandra Shapshay P140 M/W 11:15pm-12:05pm Woodburn Hall 009-10:30am, SY 021 Syllabus: P140 Introduction to Ethics Welcome to Introduction to Ethics. This is a lecture

  7. Corepresentation in Joint Language: The effect of representing another’s utterance on one’s own task performance, and the mediation of friendship 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mackenzie, Anna

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ’s task, even when the coactor’s task is not relevant to achieving one’s own goal (Sebanz, Knoblich & Prinz, 2003). This is taken to suggest that individuals represent a coactor’s actions (Knoblich, Butterfill & Sebanz, 2011). It is proposed...

  8. I2S2 Idealised Scientific Research Activity Lifecycle Model The model represents the processes and phases of a typical physical science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rzepa, Henry S.

    I2S2 Idealised Scientific Research Activity Lifecycle Model The model represents the processes include: development of the research proposal; its peer-review; carrying out of the experiment; equipment configuration and calibration data; processing software and associated control parameters; wikis

  9. Representing a 3-D Environment with a 2-D Map Structure Edward H.L. Fong William Adams Frederick Crabbe Alan C. Schultz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crabbe, Frederick

    planning, and localization. II. THE EVIDENCE GRID A wide variety of map representation structures (such Grid The 2-D evidence grid is one of the most popular map structures for autonomous mobile robotsRepresenting a 3-D Environment with a 2½-D Map Structure Edward H.L. Fong William Adams Frederick

  10. Tripleclouds: An Efficient Method for Representing Horizontal Cloud Inhomogeneity in 1D Radiation Schemes by Using Three Regions at Each Height

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogan, Robin

    that a mere 4% increase in global cloud cover could counter- act the warming caused by a doubling of carbon the effect of in- homogeneity on the radiative properties of high cloud. They used cloud radar data to inferTripleclouds: An Efficient Method for Representing Horizontal Cloud Inhomogeneity in 1D Radiation

  11. Fault interaction near Hollister, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, G.M.

    1982-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A numerical model is used to study fault stress slip near Hollister, California. The geometrically complex system of interacting faults, including the San Andreas, Calaveras, Sargent, and Busch faults, is approximated with a two-dimensional distribution of short planar fault segments in an elastic medium. The steady stress and slip rate are simulated by specifying frictional strength and stepping the remote stress ahead in time. The resulting computed fault stress is roughly proportional to the observed spatial density of small earthquakes, suggesting that the distinction between segments characterized by earthquakes and those with aseismic creep results, in part, from geometry. A nonsteady simulation is made by introducing, in addition, stress drops for individual moderate earthquakes. A close fit of observed creep with calculated slip on the Calaveras and San Andreas faults suggests that many changes in creep rate (averaged over several months) are caused by local moderate earthquakes. In particular, a 3-year creep lag preceding the August 6, 1979, Coyote Lake earthquake on the Calaveras fault seems to have been a direct result of the November 28, 1974, Thanksgiving Day earthquake on the Busch fault. Computed lags in slip rate preceding some other moderate earthquakes in the area are also due to earlier earthquakes. Although the response of the upper 1 km of the fault zone may cause some individual creep events and introduce delays in others, the long-term rate appears to reflect deep slip.

  12. Energy or Mass and Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gustavo R Gonzalez-Martin

    2010-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A review. Problems: 1-Many empirical parameters and large dimension number; 2-Gravitation and Electrodynamics are challenged by dark matter and energy. Energy and nonlinear electrodynamics are fundamental in a unified nonlinear interaction. Nuclear energy appears as nonlinear SU(2) magnetic energy. Gravitation and electromagnetism are unified giving Einstein's equation and a geometric energy momentum tensor. A solution energy in the newtonian limit gives the gravitational constant G. Outside of this limit G is variable. May be interpreted as dark matter or energy. In vacuum, known gravitational solutions are obtained. Electromagnetism is an SU(2) subgroup. A U(1) limit gives Maxwell's equations. Geometric fields determine a generalized Dirac equation and are the germ of quantum physics. Planck's h and of Einstein's c are given by the potential and the metric. Excitations have quanta of charge, flux and spin determining the FQHE. There are only three stable 1/2 spin fermions. Mass is a form of energy. The rest energies of the fermions give the proton/electron mass ratio. Potential excitations have energies equal to the weak boson masses allowing a geometric interpretation of Weinberg's angle. SU(2) gives the anomalous magnetic moments of proton, electron, neutron and generates nuclear range attractive potentials strong enough to produce the binding energies of the deuteron and other nuclides. Lepton and meson masses are due to topological excitations. The geometric mass spectrum is satisfactory. The proton has a triple structure. The alpha constant is a geometric number.

  13. Soft interactions in jet quenching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlos Hidalgo-Duque; Felipe J. Llanes-Estrada

    2014-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the collisional aspects of jet quenching in a high energy nuclear collision, especially in the final state pion gas. The jet has a large energy, and acquires momentum transverse to its axis more effectively by multiple soft collisions than by few hard scatterings (as known from analogous systems such as J/\\psi production at Hera). Such regime of large E and small momentum transfer corresponds to Regge kinematics and is characteristically dominated by the pomeron. From this insight we estimate the jet quenching parameter in the hadron medium (largely a pion gas) at the end of the collision, which is naturally small and increases with temperature in line with the gas density. The physics in the quark-gluon plasma/liquid phase is less obvious, and here we revisit a couple of simple estimates that suggest indeed that the pomeron-mediated interactions are very relevant and should be included in analysis of the jet quenching parameter. Finally, the ocasional hard collisions produce features characteristic of a L\\`evy flight in the q_perp^2 plane perpendicular to the jet axis. We suggest one- and two-particle q_perp correlations as interesting experimental probes.

  14. Interactive Multimedia and Historical Chronology Page 1 A FRAMEWORK FOR DESIGNING INTERACTIVE MULTIMEDIA TO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, Yvonne

    Interactive Multimedia and Historical Chronology Page 1 A FRAMEWORK FOR DESIGNING INTERACTIVE MULTIMEDIA TO SCAFFOLD YOUNG CHILDREN'S UNDERSTANDING OF HISTORICAL CHRONOLOGY ELIZABETH MASTERMAN (Kodak/Royal Academy of Engineering Educational Technology Research Group, School of Electronic and Electrical

  15. The $^4$He total photo-absorption cross section with two- plus three-nucleon interactions from chiral effective field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Quaglioni; P. Navratil

    2007-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The total photo-absorption cross section of $^4$He is evaluated microscopically using two- (NN) and three-nucleon (NNN) interactions based upon chiral effective field theory ($\\chi$EFT). The calculation is performed using the Lorentz integral transform method along with the {\\em ab initio} no-core shell model approach. An important feature of the present study is the consistency of the NN and NNN interactions and also, through the Siegert theorem, of the two- and three-body current operators. This is due to the application of the $\\chi$EFT framework. The inclusion of the NNN interaction produces a suppression of the low-energy peak and enhancement of the high-energy tail of the cross section. We compare to calculations obtained using other interactions and to representative experiments. The rather confused experimental situation in the giant resonance region prevents discrimination among different interaction models.

  16. Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Insect-Fire Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moorcroft, Paul R.

    Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Insect-Fire Interactions A thesis presented by Heather Joan Lynch Heather Joan Lynch Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Insect-Fire Interactions Abstract Insect outbreaks on the dynamics and composition of forest ecosystems. Although it has long been speculated that forest fires

  17. DefectDomain Wall Interactions in Trigonal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gopalan, Venkatraman

    Defect­Domain Wall Interactions in Trigonal Ferroelectrics Venkatraman Gopalan,1 Volkmar Dierolf,2 walls in the trigonal ferroelectrics lithium niobate and lithium tantalate. It is shown that extrinsic questions re- garding intrinsic widths, defect­domain wall interactions, and static versus dynamic wall

  18. Interactive Database Access with Statistics and Graphics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    DbAccess The Manual Interactive Database Access with Statistics and Graphics Version 2.1.1 D. M and graphical needs of NSTX Physicists. Flexible views and joins are possible, including options for complex SQL General Atomics (GA Plot Objects) adds extensive graphical and interactive capabilities (and documentation

  19. Introducing Real-time Interactions Neil Henderson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newcastle upon Tyne, University of

    This report forms the deliverable for Activity I.35 which was to create a formal model to show University of Newcastle, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU, UK. Abstract This report introduces a new rigorous notation called Real-time Interactions that can be used to model the interactions between a system and its

  20. Abstract polymer models with general pair interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aldo Procacci

    2008-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A convergence criterion of cluster expansion is presented in the case of an abstract polymer system with general pair interactions (i.e. not necessarily hard core or repulsive). As a concrete example, the low temperature disordered phase of the BEG model with infinite range interactions, decaying polynomially as $1/r^{d+\\lambda}$ with $\\lambda>0$, is studied.