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1

CO2 Emissions - Malta  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Western Europe Malta CO2 Emissions from Malta Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Malta image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Malta...

2

Malta: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Malta: Energy Resources Malta: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"390px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.9166667,"lon":14.4333333,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

3

Kingsnorth PF Flow Meter Demonstration Trials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three-month demonstration project at PowerGen's Kingsnorth Power Station tested several new pulverized fuel (PF) flow measurement technologies in the harsh environment of an operational power station. Although further development may be warranted, current on-line PF flow measurement technologies already meet the basic requirements of coal fired boiler operators.

1999-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

4

TPX: Contractor preliminary design review. Volume 2, PF systems engineering  

SciTech Connect

This system development specification covers the Poloidal Field (PF) Magnet System, WBS 14 in the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory TPX Program to build a tokamak fusion reactor. This specification establishes the performance, design, development and test requirements of the PF Magnet System.

Calvin, H.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1995-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

5

Thermal Stability of LiPF6 Salt and Li-ion Battery ElectrolytesContaining LiPF6  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermal stability of the neat LiPF6 salt and of 1 molal solutions of LiPF6 in prototypical Li-ion battery solvents was studied with thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and on-line FTIR. Pure LiPF6 salt is thermally stable up to 380 K in a dry inert atmosphere, and its decomposition path is a simple dissociation producing LiF as solid and PF5 as gaseous products. In the presence of water (300 ppm) in the carrier gas, its decomposition onset temperature is lowered as a result of direct thermal reaction between LiPF6 and water vapor to form POF3 and HF. No new products were observed in 1 molal solutions of LiPF6 in EC, DMC and EMC by on-line TGA-FTIR analysis. The storage of the same solutions in sealed containers at 358 K for 300 420 hrs. did not produce any significant quantity of new products as well. In particular, noalkylflurophosphates were found in the solutions after storage at elevated temperature. In the absence of either an impurity like alcohol or cathode active material that may (or may not) act as a catalyst, there is no evidence of thermally induced reaction between LiPF6 and the prototypical Li-ion battery solvents EC, PC, DMC or EMC.

Yang, Hui; Zhuang, Guorong V.; Ross Jr., Philip N.

2006-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

6

Kingsnorth PS Unit 3: Boiler Demonstration of TR-Tech ECT STAR PF Flow Meters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Following an earlier demonstration at Kingsnorth of five pulverized fuel (PF) flow technologies, Power Technology undertook a full boiler demonstration of the TR-Tech ECT STAR system. This was an internationally funded project with contributions from TXU Europe, EPRI, Hongkong Electric Corporation, and assistance and research funds from PowerGen's Strategic Technology Plan (STP). The project assessed the suitability of long-term operation of a PF flow measurement system's ultimate inclusion in a control ...

2002-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

7

The mechanism of HF formation in LiPF6 based organic carbonate electrolytes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The mechanism of HF formation in LiPF6 based organic carbonate electrolytes The mechanism of HF formation in LiPF6 based organic carbonate electrolytes Title The mechanism of HF formation in LiPF6 based organic carbonate electrolytes Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Lux, Simon F., Ivan T. Lucas, Elad Pollak, Stefano Passerini, Martin Winter, and Robert Kostecki Journal Electrochemistry Communications Volume 14 Start Page 47 Issue 1 Pagination 47-50 Date Published 01/2012 Keywords Hydrofluoric acid, LiPF6 degradation, Lithium ion batteries, spectroscopic ellipsometry Abstract Spectroscopic ellipsometry was used to study the time-dependent formation of HF upon the thermal degradation of LiPF6 at 50 °C in a lithium ion battery electrolyte containing ethylene carbonate and diethyl carbonate. The generated HF was monitored by following the etching rate of a 300 nm thick SiO2 layer, grown on both sides of a silicon wafer substrate, as a function of the immersion time in the electrolyte at 50 °C. It was found that the formation of HF starts after 70 h of exposure time and occurs following several different phases. The amount of generated HF was calculated using an empirical formula correlating the etching rate to the temperature. Combining the results of the HF formation with literature data, a simplified mechanism for the formation of the HF involving LiPF6 degradation, and a simplified catalytical reaction pathway of the formed HF and silicon dioxide are proposed to describe the kinetics of HF formation.

8

TREC-Il Routing Experiments with the TRW/Paracel Fast Data ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 0 19 12 B~nk Failures 87 151 75 42 2 42 36 S&L Prosecutions 88 32 29 21 0 11 26 Crude Oil Price Trends 89 17 8 2 0 3 7 OPEC Investments 90 ...

1998-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

9

A Stochastic Version of the Brass PF Ratio Adjustment of Age-Specific Fertility Schedules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimates of age-specific fertility rates based on survey data are known to suffer down-bias associated with incomplete reporting. Previously, William Brass (1964, 1965, 1968) proposed a series of adjustments of such data to reflect more appropriate levels of fertility through comparison with data on children-ever-born by age, a measure of cohort-specific cumulative fertility. His now widely-used Parity/Fertility or PF ratio method makes a number of strong assumptions, which have been the focus of an extended discussion in the literature on indirect estimation. However, while it is clear that the measures used in making adjusted age-specific fertility estimates with this method are captured with statistical uncertainty, little discussion of the nature of this uncertainty around PF-ratio based estimates of fertility has been entertained in the literature. Since both age-specific risk of childbearing and cumulative parity (children ever born) are measured with statistical uncertainty, an unknown credibility interval must surround every PF ratio-based estimate. Using the standard approach, this is unknown, limiting the ability to make statistical comparisons of fertility between groups or to understand stochasticity in population dynamics. This paper makes use of approaches applied to similar problems in engineering, the natural sciences, and decision analysisoften discussed under the title of uncertainty analysis or stochastic modelingto characterize this uncertainty and to present a new method for making PF ratio-based fertility estimates with 95 percent uncertainty intervals. The implications for demographic analysis, between-group comparisons of fertility, and the field of statistical demography are explored.

Jack Baker; Adlamar Alcantara; Xiaomin Ruan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

ORIGINAL PAPER Initial characterization of Pf62, a novel protein of Plasmodium falciparum identified by immunoscreening  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

# The Author(s) 2009. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com Abstract In order to find new antigens from Plasmodium falciparum, a complementary DNA (cDNA) library was constructed and screened. The study of expression library of P. falciparum was performed in an attempt to identify new antigens that could have potential relevance for the falciparum-malaria diagnosis and/or protection. Between the positive clones detected (ring erythrocyte surface antigen, merozoite erythrocyte surface antigen, RHOP H3, CSP, LSA), a new gene that correspond to a new protein (Pf62) was isolated and characterized. This antigen was useful for the diagnosis of malaria in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay tests. The cDNA corresponding to this antigen and structure of the gene were characterized. Pf62 is a single copy gene that contains one exon. The Pf62 cDNA has an open reading frame of 1,599 nucleotides that code for a putative protein of 532 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 62 kDa. The polypeptide contains in the central section two regions of repeats of 21 and 19 amino Nucleotide sequence data reported in this paper are available in the Genbank database under the accession number AJ 493426.

Eva M. Moyano; Luis Miguel Gonzlez; Estrella Montero; Laureano Cuevas; Esperanza Perez-pastrana; Ysmael Santa-maria; Agustn Benito; E. Montero

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

GRR/Section 3-AK-g - Utility Permit to Construct on ADOT&PF ROW | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 3-AK-g - Utility Permit to Construct on ADOT&PF ROW GRR/Section 3-AK-g - Utility Permit to Construct on ADOT&PF ROW < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-AK-g - Utility Permit to Construct on ADOT&PF ROW 03AKGUtilityPermitToConstructOnADOTROW (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities U S Army Corps of Engineers United States Coast Guard Bureau of Indian Affairs Bureau of Land Management Federal Aviation Administration Alaska Department of Natural Resources Regulations & Policies 11 AAC 195.010: Anadromous Fish 17 AAC 15.021: Application for Utility Permit Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03AKGUtilityPermitToConstructOnADOTROW (1).pdf

12

An overview of the TA-55, Building PF-4 ventilation system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An overview of the TA-55, Building PF-4 ventilation system is provided in the following sections. Included are descriptions of the zone configurations, equipment-performance criteria, ventilation support systems, and the ventilation-system evaluation criteria. Section 4.2.1.1 provides a brief discussion of the ventilation system function. Section 4.2.1.2 provides details on the overall system configuration. Details of system interfaces and support systems are provided in Section 4.2.1.3. Section 4.2.1.4 describes instrumentation and control needed to operate the ventilation system. Finally, Sections 4.2.1.5 and 4.2.1.6 describe system surveillance/maintenance and Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) Limitations, respectively. Note that the numerical parameters included in this description are considered nominal; set points and other specifications actually fall within operational bands.

NONE

1994-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

13

03/10/2006 09:02 AMFusion power gets slammed Page 1 of 2http://www.nature.com/news/2006/060306/pf/060306-13_pf.html  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the reactor would have to be so large that this alone would cost more than a conventional nuclear fission/060306-13_pf.html ITER: arguments fly over cost of fusion reactors. Credit: ITER consortium It's time But supporters say arguments about reactor costs are old hat. Mark Peplow Fusion reactors are an expensive dream

14

Thickness-dependent changes in the optical properties of PPV-and PF-based polymer light emitting diodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the thickness-dependent optical properties of single layer polymer light emitting diodes for two materials, poly the electronic and optical properties of these materials in light emitting diode LED structures.2 OurThickness-dependent changes in the optical properties of PPV- and PF-based polymer light emitting

Carter, Sue

15

Electrochemical Investigation of Li-Al Anodes in Oligo (ethylene glycol) Dimethyl ether/LiPF6  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

LiPF{sub 6} dissolved in oligo(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ether with a molecular weight 5 g mol{sup -1} was investigated as a new electrolyte (OEGDME5, 1 M LiPF{sub 6}) for metal deposition and battery applications. At 25 C a conductivity of .48 x 1{sup -3} S cm{sup -1} was obtained and at 85 C, 3.78 x 1{sup -3} S cm{sup -1}. The apparent activation barrier for ionic transport was evaluated to be 3.7 kJ mol{sup -1}. OEGDME5, 1 M LiPF{sub 6} allows operating temperature above 1 C with very attractive conductivity. The electrolyte shows excellent performance at negative and positive potentials. With this investigation, we report experimental results obtained with aluminum electrodes using this electrolyte. At low current densities lithium ion reduction and re-oxidation can be achieved on aluminum electrodes at potentials about 28 mV more positive than on lithium electrodes. In situ X-ray diffraction measurements collected during electrochemical lithium deposition on aluminum electrodes show that the shift to positive potentials is due to the negative Gibbs free energy change of the Li-Al alloy formation reaction.

Y Zhou; X Wang; H Lee; K Nam; X Yang; O Haas

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

16

Electrochemical Investigation of LiAl Anodes in Oligo(ethylene glycol) Dimethyl Ether/LiPF6  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

1 M LiPF{sub 6} dissolved in oligo(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ether with a molecular weight 500 g mol{sup -1} was investigated as a new electrolyte (OEGDME500, 1 M LiPF{sub 6}) for metal deposition and battery applications. At 25 C a conductivity of 0.48 x 10{sup -3} S cm{sup -1} was obtained and at 85 C, 3.78 x 10{sup -3} S cm{sup -1}. The apparent activation barrier for ionic transport was evaluated to be 30.7 kJ mol{sup -1}. OEGDME500, 1 M LiPF{sub 6} allows operating temperature above 100 C with very attractive conductivity. The electrolyte shows excellent performance at negative and positive potentials. With this investigation, we report experimental results obtained with aluminum electrodes using this electrolyte. At low current densities lithium ion reduction and re-oxidation can be achieved on aluminum electrodes at potentials about 280 mV more positive than on lithium electrodes. In situ X-ray diffraction measurements collected during electrochemical lithium deposition on aluminum electrodes show that the shift to positive potentials is due to the negative Gibbs free energy change of the Li-Al alloy formation reaction.

Zhou, Y.N.; Yang, X.; Wang, X.J.; Lee, H.S.; Nam, K.W.; Haas, O.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Independent code assessment at BNL in FY 1982. [TRAC-PF1; RELAP5/MOD1; TRAC-BD1  

SciTech Connect

Independent assessment of the advanced codes such as TRAC and RELAP5 has continued at BNL through the Fiscal Year 1982. The simulation tests can be grouped into the following five categories: critical flow, counter-current flow limiting (CCFL) or flooding, level swell, steam generator thermal performance, and natural circulation. TRAC-PF1 (Version 7.0) and RELAP5/MOD1 (Cycle 14) codes were assessed by simulating all of the above experiments, whereas the TRAC-BD1 (Version 12.0) code was applied only to the CCFL tests. Results and conclusions of the BNL code assessment activity of FY 1982 are summarized below.

Saha, P.; Rohatgi, U.S.; Jo, J.H.; Neymotin, L.; Slovik, G.; Yuelys-Miksis, C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Motor Gasoline Blending Components Imports from Malta  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: *Countries listed under ...

19

Cranked Nilsson-Strutinsky vs the spherical shell model: A comparative study of pf-shell nuclei  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comparative study is performed of a deformed mean field theory, represented by the cranked Nilsson-Strutinsky (CNS) model and the spherical shell model. Energy spectra, occupation numbers, B(E2) values, and spectroscopic quadrupole moments in the light pf-shell nuclei are calculated in the two models and compared. The result is also compared to available experimental data which are generally well described by the shell model. Although the Nilsson-Strutinsky calculation does not include pairing, both the subshell occupation numbers and quadrupole properties are found to be rather similar in the two models. It is also shown that 'unpaired' shell model calculations produce energies similar to those from the CNS. The role of the pairing energy in the description of backbending and signature splitting in odd-mass nuclei is also discussed.

Juodagalvis, Andrius [Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astronomy, A. Gostauto St. 12, LT-01108 Vilnius (Lithuania); Ragnarsson, Ingemar; Angstromberg, Sven [Mathematical Physics, Lund Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 118, S-22100 Lund (Sweden)

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

20

A Plan for Nuclear Waste http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/01/29/AR2006012900719_pf.html  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mountain in Nevada -- adjacent to the nuclear weapons test site -- was subsequently chosen by CongressA Plan for Nuclear Waste http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/01/29/AR2006012900719_pf.html A Plan for Nuclear Waste By John Deutch and Ernest J. Moniz U.S. policy for managing

Deutch, John

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "malta pf paracel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Synthesis and structural investigation of the compounds containing HF{sub 2}{sup -} anions: Ca(HF{sub 2}){sub 2}, Ba{sub 4}F{sub 4}(HF{sub 2})(PF{sub 6}){sub 3} and Pb{sub 2}F{sub 2}(HF{sub 2})(PF{sub 6})  

SciTech Connect

Three new compounds Ca(HF{sub 2}){sub 2}, Ba{sub 4}F{sub 4}(HF{sub 2})(PF{sub 6}){sub 3} and Pb{sub 2}F{sub 2}(HF{sub 2})(PF{sub 6}) were obtained in the system metal(II) fluoride and anhydrous HF (aHF) acidified with excessive PF{sub 5}. The obtained polymeric solids are slightly soluble in aHF and they crystallize out of their aHF solutions. Ca(HF{sub 2}){sub 2} was prepared by simply dissolving CaF{sub 2} in a neutral aHF. It represents the second known compound with homoleptic HF environment of the central atom besides Ba(H{sub 3}F{sub 4}){sub 2}. The compounds Ba{sub 4}F{sub 4}(HF{sub 2})(PF{sub 6}){sub 3} and Pb{sub 2}F{sub 2}(HF{sub 2})(PF{sub 6}) represent two additional examples of the formation of a polymeric zigzag ladder or ribbon composed of metal cation and fluoride anion (MF{sup +}){sub n} besides PbF(AsF{sub 6}), the first isolated compound with such zigzag ladder. The obtained new compounds were characterized by X-ray single crystal diffraction method and partly by Raman spectroscopy. Ba{sub 4}F{sub 4}(HF{sub 2})(PF{sub 6}){sub 3} crystallizes in a triclinic space group P1-bar with a=4.5870(2) A, b=8.8327(3) A, c=11.2489(3) A, {alpha}=67.758(9){sup o}, {beta}=84.722(12), {gamma}=78.283(12){sup o}, V=413.00(3) A{sup 3} at 200 K, Z=1 and R=0.0588. Pb{sub 2}F{sub 2}(HF{sub 2})(PF{sub 6}) at 200 K: space group P1-bar , a=4.5722(19) A, b=4.763(2) A, c=8.818(4) A, {alpha}=86.967(10){sup o}, {beta}=76.774(10){sup o}, {gamma}=83.230(12){sup o}, V=185.55(14) A{sup 3}, Z=1 and R=0.0937. Pb{sub 2}F{sub 2}(HF{sub 2})(PF{sub 6}) at 293 K: space group P1-bar, a=4.586(2) A, b=4.781(3) A, c=8.831(5) A, {alpha}=87.106(13){sup o}, {beta}=76.830(13){sup o}, {gamma}=83.531(11){sup o}, V=187.27(18) A{sup 3}, Z=1 and R=0.072. Ca(HF{sub 2}){sub 2} crystallizes in an orthorhombic Fddd space group with a=5.5709(6) A, b=10.1111(9) A, c=10.5945(10) A, V=596.77(10) A{sup 3} at 200 K, Z=8 and R=0.028. - Graphical abstract: Three new compounds Ca(HF{sub 2}){sub 2}, Ba{sub 4}F{sub 4}(HF{sub 2})(PF{sub 6}){sub 3} and Pb{sub 2}F{sub 2}(HF{sub 2})(PF{sub 6}) were obtained in the system metal(II) fluoride and anhydrous HF acidified with excessive PF{sub 5} and characterized by X-ray single crystal diffraction method and partly by Raman spectroscopy. Ca(HF{sub 2}){sub 2} represents the second known compound with homoleptic HF{sub 2}{sup -} environment of the central atom. Display Omitted.

Bunic, Tina; Tramsek, Melita [Department of Inorganic Chemistry and Technology, Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Goreshnik, Evgeny [Department of Inorganic Chemistry and Technology, Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)], E-mail: evgeny.goreshnik@ijs.si; Zemva, Boris [Department of Inorganic Chemistry and Technology, Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)], E-mail: boris.zemva@ijs.si

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

22

Crystal structure of a novel non-Pfam protein PF2046 solved using low resolution B-factor sharpening and multi-crystal averaging methods  

SciTech Connect

Sometimes crystals cannot diffract X-rays beyond 3.0 {angstrom} resolution due to the intrinsic flexibility associated with the protein. Low resolution diffraction data not only pose a challenge to structure determination, but also hamper interpretation of mechanistic details. Crystals of a 25.6 kDa non-Pfam, hypothetical protein, PF2046, diffracted X-rays to 3.38 {angstrom} resolution. A combination of Se-Met derived heavy atom positions with multiple cycles of B-factor sharpening, multi-crystal averaging, restrained refinement followed by manual inspection of electron density and model building resulted in a final model with a R value of 23.5 (R{sub free} = 24.7). The asymmetric unit was large and consisted of six molecules arranged as a homodimer of trimers. Analysis of the structure revealed the presence of a RNA binding domain suggesting a role for PF2046 in the processing of nucleic acids.

Su, Jing; Li, Yang; Shaw, Neil; Zhou, Weihong; Zhang, Min; Xu, Hao; Wang, Bi-Cheng; Liu, Zhi-Jie (Ankara); (Nankai); (Chinese Aca. Sci.); (Georgia)

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

23

Temperature effects on the performance of PMAN-derived carbon anodes in 1M LiPF{sub 6}/EC-DMC solution  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effect of temperature on the reversible and irreversible capacities of disordered carbons derived from polymethacryonitrile (PMAN) and divinylbenzene (DVB) copolymers was studied in 1 M LiPF{sub 6}/ethylene carbonate (EC)-dimethyl carbonate (DMC) (1:1 v/v) solution by galvanostatic cycling. The kinetics of passive film formation were examined by complex-impedance spectroscopy. Temperatures of 5, 21, and 35 C were used in the study.

Guidotti, R.A.; Johnson, B.J.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Electrochemical Investigation of AlLi/LixFePO4 Cells in Oligo(ethylene glycol) Dimethyl Ether/LiPF6  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

1 M LiPF{sub 6} dissolved in oligo(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ether with a molecular weight, 500 g mol{sup -1} (OEGDME500, 1 M LiPF{sub 6}), was investigated as an electrolyte in experimental Al-Li/LiFePO{sub 4} cells. More than 60 cycles were achieved using this electrolyte in a Li-ion cell with an Al-Li alloy as an anode sandwiched between two Li x FePO{sub 4} electrodes (cathodes). Charging efficiencies of 96-100% and energy efficiencies of 86-89% were maintained during 60 cycles at low current densities. A theoretical investigation revealed that the specific energy can be increased up to 15% if conventional LiC{sub 6} anodes are replaced by Al-Li alloy electrodes. The specific energy and the energy density were calculated as a function of the active mass per electrode surface (charge density). The results reveal that for a charge density of 4 mAh cm{sup -2} about 160 mWh g{sup -1} can be reached with Al-Li/LiFePO{sub 4} batteries. Power limiting diffusion processes are discussed, and the power capability of Al-Li/LiFePO{sub 4} cells was experimentally evaluated using conventional electrolytes.

Wang, X.J.; Zhou, Y.N.; Lee, H.S.; Nam, K.W.; Yang, X.Q.; Haas, O.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Simulation of LOFT anticipated-transient experiments L6-1, L6-2, and L6-3 using TRAC-PF1/MOD1  

SciTech Connect

Anticipated-transient experiments L6-1, L6-2, and L6-3, performed at the Loss-of-fluid Test (LOFT) facility, are analyzed using the latest released version of the Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC-PF1/MOD1). The results are used to assess TRAC-PF1/MOD1 trip and control capabilities, and predictions of thermal-hydraulic phenomena during slow transients. Test L6-1 simulated a loss-of-stream load in a large pressurized-water reactor (PWR), and was initiated by closing the main steam-flow control valve (MSFCV) at its maximum rate, which reduced the heat removal from the secondary-coolant system and increased the primary-coolant system pressure that initiated a reactor scram. Test L6-2 simulated a loss-of-primary coolant flow in a large PWR, and was initiated by tripping the power to the primary-coolant pumps (PCPs) allowing the pumps to coast down. The reduced primary-coolant flow caused a reactor scram. Test L6-3 simulated an excessive-load increase incident in a large PWR, and was initiated by opening the MSFCV at its maximum rate, which increased the heat removal from the secondary-coolant system and decreased the primary-coolant system pressure that initiated a reactor scram. The TRAC calculations accurately predict most test events. The test data and the calculated results for most parameters of interest also agree well.

Sahota, M.S.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Effects of partial oxidation of PMAN carbon on their performance as anodes in 1M LiPF{sub 6}/EC-DMC solutions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study was undertaken to examine the effects of partial oxidation on the electrochemical performance of carbons derived from poly(methylacrylonitrile) (PMAN)-divinylbenzene (DVB) co-polymers. Mild oxidation was examined as a possible technique to increase the reversible capacity, improve cycleability, and reduce the amount of irreversible capacity associated with the formation of the passivation layer during the first reduction. Oxidizing conditions involved treatment of the PMAN carbon prepared at 700 C with dry CO{sub 2} or with steam at 600 C for one hour. The effects on the performance in 1M LiPF{sub 6}/ethylene carbonate (EC)-dimethyl carbonate (DMC) solutions were evaluated by galvanostatic cycling tests, complex-impedance spectroscopy, and, to a more limited extent, cyclic voltammetry. Partial oxidation of PMAN carbon showed little or no overall beneficial effects in performance relative to the control.

Guidotti, R.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Battery Development Dept.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

27

Effect of solution additives on the performance of PMAN carbon anodes in 1M LiPF{sub 6}/EC-DMC solutions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study was undertaken to examine the use of a number of solution additives in 1M LiPF{sub 6}/ethylene carbonate (EC)-dimethyl carbonate (DMC) solutions to improve the performance of carbon anodes derived from polymethylacrylonitrile (PMAN)-divinylbenzene (DVB) copolymers. The study goals were to improve the cycle life and reduce the formation of the passivation layer during the first reduction, thereby minimizing the irreversible-capacity losses. Additives studied were 12-crown-4 (12-Cr-4) ether, decalin, and dilithium phthalocyanine (Li{sub 2}Pc). The carbon performance was characterized by galvanostatic cycling, cyclic voltammetry, and complex-impedance spectroscopy. Limited success was obtained with 12-Cr-4 ether at 0.25 M and decalin at 1 v/o. Poor results were noted with Li{sub 2}Pc at 0.025 M and 0.5 M.

Guidotti, R.A.; Johnson, B.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Battery Development Dept.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

28

Three prominent figures (3PF)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three Prominent Figures, a sub-group of the VOLT Collective (http://www.voltcollective.com) is a performance piece combining live DJ-ing, video art, and physical computing to explore non-invasive musical expression. Three Prominent Figures will be presented ...

Roberto Osorio-Goenaga; Gregory Boland; Nathaniel Weiner

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Lithium Ethylene Dicarbonate Identified as the Primary Product ofChemical and Electrochemical Reduction of EC in EC:EMC/1.2M LiPF6Electrolyte  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lithium ethylene dicarbonate (CH2OCO2Li)2 was chemically synthesized and its Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrum was obtained and compared with that of surface films formed on Ni after cyclic voltammetry (CV) in 1.2M lithium hexafluorophosphate(LiPF6)/ethylene carbonate (EC): ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC) (3:7, w/w) electrolyte and on metallic lithium cleaved in-situ in the same electrolyte. By comparison of IR experimental spectra with that of the synthesized compound, we established that the title compound is the predominant surface species in both instances. Detailed analysis of the IR spectrum utilizing quantum chemical (Hartree-Fock) calculations indicates that intermolecular association through O...Li...O interactions is very important in this compound. It is likely that the title compound in passivation layer has a highly associated structure, but the exact intermolecular conformation could not be established based on analysis of the IR spectrum.

Zhuang, Guorong V.; Xu, Kang; Yang, Hui; Jow, T. Richard; RossJr., Philip N.

2005-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

30

Microsoft Word - PF Training Final 0624051.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Inspections and Special Inquiries Inspection Report Protective Force Training at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Reservation DOE/IG-0694 June 2005 PROTECTIVE FORCE TRAINING AT THE DEPARMENT OF ENERGY'S OAK RIDGE RESERVATION TABLE OF CONTENTS OVERVIEW Introduction and Objective 1 Observations and Conclusions 1 DETAILS OF FINDINGS Combat Readiness Training 3 Protective Force Overtime 6 On-the-Job Training 7 RECOMMENDATIONS 8 MANAGEMENT COMMENTS 9 INSPECTOR COMMENTS 10 APPENDICES A. Scope and Methodology 12 B. Prior OIG Reports 13 C. Management Comments 14 Overview Page 1 Protective Force Training at the Department

31

Microsoft Word - S04617_PF.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

in the Plowshare Program, which was designed to develop peaceful uses for nuclear energy. On September 10, 1969, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, a predecessor agency of...

32

Pf/Zeolite Catalyst for Tritium Stripping  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report described promising hydrogen (protium and tritium) stripping results obtained with a Pd/zeolite catalyst at ambient temperature. Preliminary results show 90-99+ percent tritium stripping efficiency may be obtained, with even better performance expected as bed configuration and operating conditions are optimized. These results suggest that portable units with single beds of the Pd/zeolite catalyst may be utilized as ''catalytic absorbers'' to clean up both tritium gas and tritiated water. A cart-mounted prototype stripper utilizing this catalyst has been constructed for testing. This portable stripper has potential applications in maintenance-type jobs such as tritium line breaks. This catalyst can also potentially be utilized in an emergency stripper for the Replacement Tritium Facility.

Hsu, R.H.

2001-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

33

Residual Fuel Oil, Greater than 1.00% Sulfur Imports from Malta  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

34

The managed entry of new drugs into a National Health Service: a case study for Malta.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The research question was to determine if it is possible to develop a systematic approach to the managed entry of new drugs into a National (more)

Bonanno, Patricia Vella

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Trade, piracy, and naval warfare in the central Mediterranean: the maritime history and archaeology of Malta  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Located approximately in the middle of the central Mediterranean channel, the Maltese Archipelago was touched by the historical events that effected the political, economic and cultural environment of Europe, North Africa, and the Middle East. The islands were close to the major maritime routes throughout history and they were often on the border between clashing military, political, religious, and cultural entities. For these reasons, the islands were presumed to have been strategically and economically important, and, thus, frequented by ships. An underwater archaeological survey around the archipelago revealed the scarcity of submerged cultural remains, especially pertaining to shipping and navigation. Preliminary findings elucidate a story that contrasts with the picture presented by modern history and historiography. In this sense, a comparison of the underwater archaeological data with the information gathered through a detailed study of Maltese maritime history clearly shows that the islands were attributed an exaggerated importance in historical texts, due to political and religious trends that are rooted in the period during which the islands were under the control of the Order of Saint John. An objective investigation of the historical and archaeological material provides a more balanced picture, and places the islands in a Mediterranean-wide historical framework from the first colonization of the archipelago eight thousands years ago to the twentieth century.

Atauz, Ayse Devrim

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

U.S. Exports to Malta of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

241: 206: 196: 90: 311: 128: 2008: 328: 0: 241: 0: 215: 2009: 400: 300: 201: 89: 2010: 195: 271: 68: 375: 916: 625: 929: 558: 179: 214: 2011: 226: 226: 225: 486: 226 ...

37

Half-ordered State in the Anisotropic Haldane-gap Antiferromagnet Ni(C5D14N2)2N3(PF6)  

SciTech Connect

Neutron diffraction experiments performed on the Haldane gap material Ni(C{sub 5}D{sub 14}N{sub 2}){sub 2}N{sub 3}(PF{sub 6}) in high magnetic fields applied at an angle to the principal anisotropy axes reveal two consecutive field-induced phase transitions. The low-field phase is the gapped Haldane state, while at high fields the system exhibits a three-dimensional long-range Neel order. In a peculiar phase found in intermediate fields only half of all the spin chains participate in the long-range ordering, while the other half remain disordered and gapped.

Zheludev, Andrey I [ORNL; Grenier, B. [CEA, Grenoble, France; Ressouche, E. [CEA, Grenoble, France; Regnault, L.-P. [CEA, Grenoble, France; Honda, Z. [Saitama University, Japan; Katsumada, K. [RIKEN, Japan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Total All Countries Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Destination: Total All Countries Afghanistan Albania Algeria Andora Angola Anguilla Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahama Islands Bahrain Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Burma Bermuda Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cayman Islands Chad Chile China Colombia Congo (Brazzaville) Congo (Kinshasa) Costa Rica Croatia Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djbouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Pacific Islands Gabon Georgia, Republic of Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guinea Guyana Haiti Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran Iraq Ireland Israel Italy Ivory Coast Jamaica Japan Jordon Kazakhstan Kenya Korea, South Korea, North Kyrgyzstan Kutubu Kuwait Latvia Lebanon Liberia Libya Lithuania Macau S.A.R. Macedonia Madagascar Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Marshall Islands Mauritania Mauritius Mexico Micronesia, Federated States of Midway Islands Moldova Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Namibia Nepal Netherlands Netherlands/Antilles New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norway Oman Pakistan Panama Papau New Guinea Paracel Islands Paraguay Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Romania Russia St. Kitts and Nevis St. Lucia St. Pierre and Miquelon St. Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia and Montenegro Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia Slovenia Soloman Islands South Africa Spain Spratly Islands Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syria Taiwan Tanzania Thailand Tonga Togo Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela Vietnam Virgin Islands (British) Virgin Islands (U.S.) Yemen Yugoslavia Zambia Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

39

Total Net Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the U.S.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Country: Total All Countries Persian Gulf OPEC Algeria Angola Ecuador Iran Iraq Kuwait Libya Nigeria Qatar Saudi Arabia United Arab Emirates Venezuela Non OPEC Afghanistan Albania Andora Anguilla Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Burma Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cayman Islands Chad Chile China Colombia Congo (Brazzaville) Congo (Kinshasa) Cook Islands Costa Rica Croatia Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djbouti Dominica Dominican Republic Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Ethiopia Eritrea Estonia Fiji Finland France French Pacific Islands French Guiana Gabon Georgia, Republic of Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guinea Guyana Haiti Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Ireland Israel Italy Ivory Coast Jamaica Japan Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Korea, South Kutubu Kyrgyzstan Latvia Lebanon Liberia Lithuania Macau S.A.R. Macedonia Madagascar Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Marshall Islands Mauritania Mauritius Mexico Micronesia, Federated States of Midway Islands Moldova Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Namibia Nepal Netherlands Netherlands Antilles New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Niue Norway Oman Pakistan Panama Papau New Guinea Paracel Islands Paraguay Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Romania Russia St. Kitts and Nevis St. Lucia St. Pierre and Miquelon St. Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Senegal Serbia and Montenegro Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia Slovenia South Africa Spain Spratly Islands Sri Lanka Suriname Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syria Taiwan Tanzania Thailand Togo Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Uganda Ukraine United Kingdom Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Vietnam Virgin Islands (British) Virgin Islands (U.S.) Yemen Yugoslavia Other Non OPEC Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

40

Pseudo-Symmetry and Majorana Operators in pf-Shell  

SciTech Connect

The Majorana operator of the pseudo ds-shell preserves the SU-tilde(4) symmetry, and in a unified manner it reproduces reasonably well the ground state energies of the nine nuclei in this shell. The study of {beta} decay in the same shell provides further support for the SU-tilde(4) symmetry.

Valencia, J. P.; Wu, H. C. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Antioquia, Medellin (Colombia)

2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "malta pf paracel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

PF Coil System Comparisons for a Compact Ignition Device  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Compact Ignition Tokamak Program / Proceedings of the Seveth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (Reno, Nevada, June 1519, 1986)

R.D. Pillsbury; Jr.; J.H. Schultz; R.J. Thome

42

Microsoft Word - S09IS004 _LLNL_PF_Authority_08262009a FINAL.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AAAAAAAAAAAAAAA AAAAAAAAAAAAAAA U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Inspections Inspection Report Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Protective Force Authority DOE/IG-0820 September 2009 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 4, 2009 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Inspection Report on "Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Protective Force Authority" BACKGROUND The Department of Energy's (Department) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Livermore) is a premier research and development institution supporting the Department's scientific, engineering, environmental, and national security activities. Livermore is

43

JB RISOE 20-05-2003 Advanced 700C PF Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

competitiveness; · New boiler concepts, which reduces the amount of superalloys. #12;JB RISOE 20-05-2003 AD 700 Boiler by ALSTOM. #12;JB RISOE 20-05-2003 Compact Design. HF Boiler by Siemens #12;JB RISOE 20-05-2003 AD

44

CONCEPTS FOR SMART PROTECTIVE HIGH-TEMPERATURE COATINGS P.F. Tortorelli  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in oxidizing-sulfidizing and sulfidizing environments and in air/oxygen at very high temperatures.3 the formation of a protective borosilicate or silica layer that grows laterally to seal the remaining Mo

45

Assessment of environmental impact of oil shale fly ash from PF and CFB combustion.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Kesoleva doktorit eesmrgiks oli uurida plevkivielektrijaamast prinevate tahkete osakeste ehk tuha mju keskkonnale vrreldes omavahel tolmpletus- ja keevkihtpletustehnoloogiat. T kigus teostati uuringud, mis kirjeldavad lendtuha (more)

Urb, Gary

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Racial geopolitics : interrogating Caribbean cultural discourse in the era pf globalization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dominicans in Puerto Rico . . . . . . . 82 Colonialism andde la esclavitud en Puerto Rico y el gobierno radical yEl prejuicio racial en Puerto Rico. 7th ed. Ro Piedras:

Reyes-Santos, Irmary

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Physical and Mechanical Properties of Sugarcane Rind and Mixed Hardwood Oriented Strandboard Bonded with PF Resin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

consists of an outer waxy layer, rind fibers, and inner pith. Rind fiber cell walls are thicker than those. Boards were manufactured by hot pressing at 190o C for 4 min with an additional 40 seconds press closing, and inner pith (Figure1 A). The stem's outermost layer is composed of epidermal cells that contain a waxy

48

Major Sponsors International Motorcycle Exhibition Milan,Italy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Belgium, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Cyprus, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, the Netherlands,...

49

Going Beyond 10,000 Years at Yucca Mountain P.F. Peterson, W.E. Kastenberg  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wastes; coal ash; deep-well injected hazardous liquid waste; and solid wastes such as lead, mercury in a 100- year flood plain, or if they do, be designed to resist washout by a 100-year flood (15). Coal for base-load electricity production--nuclear and coal. U.S. utility executives uniformly maintain that YM

50

Preliminary aerothermal design of axial compressors.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The research work disclosed in this publication is partially funded by the Strategic Educational Pathways Scholarship Scheme (Malta). The scholarship is part-financed by the European (more)

Piscopo, Giovanni

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

The power of the family  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

australia russian federation azerbaijan india italy latviachile algeria armenia azerbaijan spain moldova republic ofrepublic of korea armenia azerbaijan turkey algeria malta

Alesina, Alberto; Giuliano, Paola

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

U.S. Imports from All Countries  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Kong Hungary India Indonesia Ireland Israel Italy Ivory Coast Jamaica Japan Kazakhstan Korea, South Kyrgyzstan Latvia Liberia Lithuania Malaysia Malta Mauritania Mexico Midway...

53

International Services, Human Resources, Brookhaven National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Denmark Estonia Finland France Germany Greece Hungary Iceland Ireland Italy Japan Korea, Republic of Latvia Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Malta Monaco Netherlands New...

54

NDP-030/R6 (Table 6)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Denmark Malta Macedonia Faeroe Islands Monaco United Kingdom Finland Netherlands Yugoslavia France Norway Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Gibraltar Portugal Greece San Marino...

55

the atlas of ECONOMIC COMPLEXITY Hausmann, Hidalgo et al.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Croatia 490 New Zealand 486 Spain 482 Romania 482 Poland 481 Turkey 469 Azerbaijan 463 Chile 462 Thailand Chile 480 Thailand 472 Turkey 463 Georgia 455 Iran, Islamic Rep. of 453 Bahrain 449 Malta 446 Azerbaijan Centerpoint 500 Georgia 488 Malta 477 Trinidad and Tobago 471 Azerbaijan 462 Iran, Islamic Rep. of 457

Heller, Eric

56

Commissioning of a Soft X-ray Beamline PF-BL-16A with a Variable-Included-Angle Varied-Line-Spacing Grating Monochromator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The design and commissioning of a new soft X-ray beamline, BL-16A, at the Photon Factory is presented. The beamline consists of a pre-focusing mirror, an entrance slit, a variable-included-angle varied-line-spacing plane grating monochromator, and a post-focusing system as usual, and provides circularly and linearly polarized soft X rays in the energy range 200-1500 eV with an APPLE-II type undulator. The commissioning procedure for the beamline optics is described in detail, especially the check of the focal position for the zero-th order and diffracted X rays.

Amemiya, Kenta; Toyoshima, Akio; Kikuchi, Takashi; Kosuge, Takashi; Nigorikawa, Kazuyuki; Sumii, Ryohei; Ito, Kenji [Institute of Materials Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

57

Down-regulation of four putative arabinoxylan feruloyl transferase genes from family PF02458 reduces ester-linked ferulate content in rice cell walls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

materials for ef?cient bioethanol production. In: Olsson L,BE (2004) Global potential bioethanol production from wasted

Piston, Fernando; Uauy, Cristobal; Fu, Lianhai; Langston, James; Labavitch, John; Dubcovsky, Jorge

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Lithium Ethylene Dicarbonate Identified as the Primary Product of Chemical and Electrochemical Reduction of EC in EC:EMC/1.2M LiPF6 Electrolyte  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chem. 2005, 102, 724. 20. (a) Fukushima, T. ; Matsuda, Y. ;4, A127; (b) Matsuda, Y. ; Fukushima, T. ; Hashimoto, H. ;

Zhuang, Guorong V.; Xu, Kang; Yang, Hui; Jow, T. Richard; Ross Jr., Philip N.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Lithium Ethylene Dicarbonate Identified as the Primary Product of Chemical and Electrochemical Reduction of EC in EC:EMC/1.2M LiPF6 Electrolyte  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

spectrum of synthetic lithium ethylene dicarbonate. Figureformula and structure of lithium ethylene dicarbonate (A)efficiency (Q a /Q c ) for lithium deposition on the Ni

Zhuang, Guorong V.; Xu, Kang; Yang, Hui; Jow, T. Richard; Ross Jr., Philip N.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

New effective interaction for 0({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){omega} shell-model calculations in the sd-pf valence space  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The neutron-rich isotopes with Z{Shell-model calculations using the effective interaction SDPF-NR were able to predict or to explain most of the properties featured by these nuclei. Prominent among them is the disappearance of the N=28 shell closure for Z{<=}16. We have incorporated into SDPF-NR some modifications, either on purely theoretical grounds or guided by new experimental information. The proposed interaction SDPF-U offers enhanced reliability with respect to the earlier version.

Nowacki, F. [IPHC, IN2P3-CNRS et Universite Louis Pasteur, F-67037 Strasbourg (France); Poves, A. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica e IFT-UAM/CSIC, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "malta pf paracel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Down-regulation of four putative arabinoxylan feruloyl transferase genes from family PF02458 reduces ester-linked ferulate content in rice cell walls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

feedstock for biofuel production. It has been estimated thatcell walls, both for biofuel production or to improve the

Piston, Fernando; Uauy, Cristobal; Fu, Lianhai; Langston, James; Labavitch, John; Dubcovsky, Jorge

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Down-regulation of four putative arabinoxylan feruloyl transferase genes from family PF02458 reduces ester-linked ferulate content in rice cell walls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cell wall in grasses. Keywords Biofuels Digestibility a broader adaptation of biofuels. One of the limitations foryield and composition for biofuels. Crop Sci 47:22112227

Piston, Fernando; Uauy, Cristobal; Fu, Lianhai; Langston, James; Labavitch, John; Dubcovsky, Jorge

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Pierre S. Farrugia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PhD student in the Department of Physics at the University of Malta. He holds an M.Sc. in Physics, specializing in the statistics of wind directions. After his Master's, he studied...

64

Perfusion-based High-Resolution Functional Imaging in the Human Brain at 7 Tesla J. Pfeuffer, G. Adriany, A. Shmuel, E. Yacoub, P.-F. van de Moortele, X. Hu, K. Ugurbil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Perfusion-based High-Resolution Functional Imaging in the Human Brain at 7 Tesla J. Pfeuffer, G was made possible by signal-to-noise gains at the high magnetic field of 7 Tesla and by using a novel RF

65

05/24/2006 11:52 AMNations Agree to Build Fusion Reactor Page 1 of 2http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/05/24/AR2006052401048_pf.html  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that the expense would result in a commercially viable energy source. "Investment in energy efficiency and renewables is the only reliable way to guarantee energy security," said Silvia Hermann, from Friends fusion project they hope will lead to a cheaper, safer, cleaner and endless source of energy. The seven

66

VOLUME 83, NUMBER 18 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 1 NOVEMBER 1999 Continued Fractions Hierarchy of Rotation Numbers in Planar Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382 428, India b Institute of Physics, University of Potsdam, PF

Maryland at College Park, University of

67

Physics Letters A 364 (2007) 227230 www.elsevier.com/locate/pla  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382 428, India b Institute of Physics, University of Potsdam, PF

68

International Maritime Law Institute (IMLI) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maritime Law Institute (IMLI) Maritime Law Institute (IMLI) Jump to: navigation, search Name International Maritime Law Institute (IMLI) Address University of Malta Campus,University Heights,Tal-Qroqq,Msida, MALTA MSD2080 Place Msida, Malta Phone number +356 21319343 Website http://www.imli.org/ Coordinates 35.8977778°, 14.4894444° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.8977778,"lon":14.4894444,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

69

Business is humming  

SciTech Connect

The paper discusses the outlook for Western European gas and oil industries. Renewed interest in older producing areas, plus plenty of frontier license awards combine to keep UK and Norway drillers hopping. Production rates hold steady despite softer prices. Separate evaluations are given for United Kingdom, Norway, Netherlands, Denmark, Germany, Ireland, Italy, France, Austria, and briefly for Greece, Spain, Portugal, and Malta.

Barker, C.; Gregory, R.; Purdy, M. [Arthur Andersen, London (United Kingdom). Petroleum Services Dept.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

J U N E 2 0 1 2 c o N v o c a t i o N The skirling of the pipes, the procession across the pond, the conferring of degrees  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mkrstic@ucsd.edu Hernandez Jason Allan Abedania Juan Lasheras jlasheras@ucsd.edu Hernandez Mary Azucena Raymond De Callafon callafon@ucsd.edu Hernandez-Ibarra David Robert Bitmead rbitmead@ucsd.edu Hinden Name Mentor Mentor Email Malcolm Dustin Lee Hidenori Murakami hmurakami@ucsd.edu Malta Ramon Keiko

Sahinalp, S. Cenk

71

Faculty Mentor Assignments for Aerospace Engineering Students Last Name First Name Mentor Mentor Email  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mkrstic@ucsd.edu Hernandez Jason Allan Abedania Juan Lasheras jlasheras@ucsd.edu Hernandez Mary Azucena Raymond De Callafon callafon@ucsd.edu Hernandez-Ibarra David Robert Bitmead rbitmead@ucsd.edu Hinden Name Mentor Mentor Email Malcolm Dustin Lee Hidenori Murakami hmurakami@ucsd.edu Malta Ramon Keiko

Krstic, Miroslav

72

Game 2 Carnegie Mellon at Allegheny September 8, 2012 UAA Champions '90, '91, '93, '94, '95, '96, '97, '06 NCAA Playoffs '38, '78, '79, '83, '85, '90, '06 ECAC Champs '99, '07  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mkrstic@ucsd.edu Hernandez Jason Allan Abedania Juan Lasheras jlasheras@ucsd.edu Hernandez Mary Azucena Raymond De Callafon callafon@ucsd.edu Hernandez-Ibarra David Robert Bitmead rbitmead@ucsd.edu Hinden Name Mentor Mentor Email Malcolm Dustin Lee Hidenori Murakami hmurakami@ucsd.edu Malta Ramon Keiko

McGaughey, Alan

73

Student Name Advisor Abdellah-El-Hadj, Amine Feng Liu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mkrstic@ucsd.edu Hernandez Jason Allan Abedania Juan Lasheras jlasheras@ucsd.edu Hernandez Mary Azucena Raymond De Callafon callafon@ucsd.edu Hernandez-Ibarra David Robert Bitmead rbitmead@ucsd.edu Hinden Name Mentor Mentor Email Malcolm Dustin Lee Hidenori Murakami hmurakami@ucsd.edu Malta Ramon Keiko

Mease, Kenneth D.

74

Electrically heated particulate filter using catalyst striping  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An exhaust system that processes exhaust generated by an engine is provided. The system generally includes a particulate filter (PF) that filters particulates from the exhaust wherein an upstream end of the PF receives exhaust from the engine. A grid of electrically resistive material is applied to an exterior upstream surface of the PF and selectively heats exhaust passing through the grid to initiate combustion of particulates within the PF. A catalyst coating is applied to the PF that increases a temperature of the combustion of the particulates within the PF.

Gonze, Eugene V; Paratore, Jr., Michael J; Ament, Frank

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

75

Zone heated diesel particulate filter electrical connection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrical connection system for a particulate filter is provided. The system includes: a particulate filter (PF) disposed within an outer shell wherein the PF is segmented into a plurality of heating zones; an outer mat disposed between the particulate filter and the outer shell; an electrical connector coupled to the outer shell of the PF; and a plurality of printed circuit connections that extend along the outer surface of the PF from the electrical connector to the plurality of heating zones.

Gonze, Eugene V. (Pinckney, MI); Paratore, Jr., Michael J. (Howell, MI)

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

76

Electrically heated particulate filter enhanced ignition strategy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An exhaust system that processes exhaust generated by an engine is provided. The system generally includes a particulate filter (PF) that filters particulates from the exhaust wherein an upstream end of the PF receives exhaust from the engine. A grid of electrically resistive material is applied to an exterior upstream surface of the PF and selectively heats exhaust passing through the grid to initiate combustion of particulates within the PF. A catalyst coating applied to at least one of the PF and the grid. A control module estimates a temperature of the grid and controls the engine to produce a desired exhaust product to increase the temperature of the grid.

Gonze, Eugene V; Paratore, Jr., Michael J

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

77

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

51 - 10260 of 26,764 results. 51 - 10260 of 26,764 results. Download CX-004766: Categorical Exclusion Determination State Energy Program - Administration CX(s) Applied: A1, A9 Date: 12/22/2010 Location(s): Maryland Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-004766-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-002376: Categorical Exclusion Determination Advancing Plug-In Hybrid Technology and Flex Fuel Application on a Chrysler Minivan - Malta CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 05/24/2010 Location(s): Malta, New York Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-002376-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-004767: Categorical Exclusion Determination

78

Model 220 Programmable Current Source Instruction Manual-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OLCF-3 / DARPA 20 PF Future system 100­250 PF Cray XT4 119 TF Cray XT3 Dual-core 54 TF Cray XT4 Quad 2015 2018 Cray "Baker" 6-core, dual- socket SMP ~1000 TF 100TB, 2.5PB OLCF-3 / DARPA 20 PF Future larger memory · 3x larger and 4x faster file system · 10 MW of power Potential OLCF-3 system description

McCombe, Bruce D.

79

Dynamical inverse problem for the Schrdinger equation (the BC-method)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this paper we use important results by R. Triggiani and P.-F. Yao [12] on the exact boundary controllability of the Schrodinger system

S. A. Avdonin; M. I. Belishev

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Reflfit - Gj2 io  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... LPC Load parameters from file entered using PF ... SLP Generate and print layer profile. ... separate magnetic and chemical profiles before their ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "malta pf paracel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Microsoft Word - S07409_2010_SER  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

5 Record of Decision PCB polychlorinated biphenyl PF Parshall Flume RCRA Resource Conservation and Recovery Act SARA Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 SSOD...

82

TABLE OF CONTENTS New Developments on Metallurgy and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DEVELOPMENT OF A PF FIRED HIGH EFFICIENCY POWER PLANT (AD700) AN .... NEW GENERATION OF HIGH STRENGTH BAINITIC STEELS (HSBS) FOR .

83

CURRICULUM VITAE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Meeting of the IUCNSSC Crocodile Specialist Group, Gainesville, Florida. 11-30. IUCN, Gland, Switzerland. Groffman, PM, GJ House, PF Hendrix, DE Scott, and DA Crossley. 1986....

84

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY LOUISIANA PACIFIC CORPORATION...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PF resin formulations, demonstrate these formulations in processes to manufacture plywood and OSB structural panels, and certify those wood panel products for use in the U.S....

85

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS CLASS ADVANCE WAIVER OF THE GOVERNMENT...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

le - 003 STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS CLASS ADVANCE WAIVER ASCI RP No. PF-01 high performance computing technologies that would subaoquantly be economically sustained in the...

86

The Limitations of CFD Modeling for Furnace Atmosphere ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 1, 2002 ... The Limitations of CFD Modeling for Furnace Atmosphere Troubleshooting by P.F. Stratton, N. Saxena and M. Huggahalli...

87

NIST Part 3.pmd  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... GA Accumulation of Metals, Trace Elements and Semi-Volatile Organic Compounds in ... Ondov, JM, Caffrey, PF, Suarez, AE, Borgoul, PV, Holsen, T ...

2003-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

88

PJM Presentation- The Silver Bullet: Storage! (July 12, 2011)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation by Terry Boston, President and CEO pf PJM Interconnection before the ElectricityAdvisorty Committee, July 12, 2011,on storage for the smart grid.

89

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... P. Jones, PF, Jones, P. Jones, WW, Jong, S. Josen, Y. Joseph ... B. Lange, DA, Laramee, S. Larin, IK, Latimer, DT, Latimer, DT, IV. Latimer ...

90

Identification of three single nucleotide polymorphisms in Anopheles gambiae immune signaling genes that are associated with natural Plasmodium falciparum infection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gambiae as determined by Pf CSP ELISA. Population Ninfectedcircum- sporozoite protein (CSP)-based ELISA [18,19]. Allcurve of recombinant CSP to estimate relative infection

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for employing solid phase supported PF for field measurement of specific ROS in other combustion systems i e biomass burning candles and diesel exhaust and environmental...

92

Solid-phase supported profluorescent nitroxide probe for the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for employing solid-phase supported PF for field measurement of specific ROS in other combustion systems (i.e. biomass burning, candles, and diesel exhaust) and environmental...

93

NISTIR 6991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 187-207 (1992). [18] B. Bedal and H. Nguyen, Advances in Part Accuracy, in: Stereolithography and Other RP&M Processes, PF Jacobs, American ...

2013-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

94

NCNR Laboratory E137  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Isolation: Dynamic 1 Hz to 200 Hz - Passive beyond 200 HZ; ... Analysis software : PF (in-house for graphical peak analysis, fitting, stress calculation ...

95

Topological Dependency Analysis of the Dutch Verb Cluster Denys Duchier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mf df mf pf vrf In the LP tree, we say that a node is the topo- logical host of its immediate the set FG of edge la- bels guest fields and the set FH of node labels host fields. FG = {df, mf, vrf, vlf, pf} FH = {n, v} df is the determiner field, mf the Mittelfeld, vrf the verbal right field (canonical

Duchier, Denys

96

Design, implementation and validation of a Europe-wide pedagogical framework for e-Learning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Within the context of a Europe-wide project UNITE, a number of European partners set out to design, implement and validate a pedagogical framework (PF) for e- and m-Learning in secondary schools. The process of formulating and testing the PF was an evolutionary ... Keywords: Cross-cultural projects, Interactive learning environments, Pedagogical issues, Secondary education, Teaching/learning strategies

Andrina Grani?; Charles Mifsud; Maja ukui?

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Work Approval Form (WAF) Cost Center: 9417  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and near the eletrical leads Function is to control the3 4 5 1204 PF5 Leads, PF4/5 Radial Support 6 7 8 9 eletrical leads. Function is to control the shape and centering when under thermal g 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

98

Surveillance coverage of sensor networks under a random mobility strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) to simultaneous tracking of multiple targets and dis- tributed identification of their co-ordinated movement moving ones). Ex- ample targets range from individual humans roaming through a crowd to platoons of tanks), acoustic microphones, seismic or radiation meters, UPf9gPfU and h fgPf9U . The sensor nodes themselves

Kesidis, George

99

July 2012, Work Force Retention Work Group Status Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Work Force Retention Work Group Status Overview Work Force Retention Work Group Status Overview Accomplishments: 1. Progress on the completion of the 10 CFR 1046 modifications to address barriers to workforce retention. Written response to public comment is being drafted by HS-51. 2. Pro-Force (PF) union representative, Randy Lawson, identified this accomplishment as the single most significant step toward PF workforce retention in over 20 years. 3. Draft re-charter of PF Career Options Committee (PFCOC) to establish a PF Working Group approved by GC-63 and GC NNSA. Near Term Goals and Activities: 1. Publish 1046 as a final rule - anticipated completion no later than September, assuming timely OMB review and approval. 2. Draft PF Working Group charter final review by senior management to be

100

Evaluation of the role of location and distance in recruitment in respondent-driven sampling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of recruitment may there- fore be more complex in urban settings. They are never- theless likely to include many of the same basic patterns (eg recruiters recruiting contacts who are geographically more accessible to them in some way), and so the con- clusions... , 37 :151-207. 6. Volz E, Heckathorn D: Probability Based Estimation Theory for Respondent Driven Sampling. Journal of Official Statistics 2008, 24 :79-97. 7. Toledo L, Codeo CT, Bertoni N, Albuquerque E, Malta M, Bastos FI, Misuse obotBMSGoD: Putting...

McCreesh, Nicky; Johnston, Lisa G; Copas, Andrew; Sonnenberg, Pam; Seeley, Janet; Hayes, Richard J; Frost, Simon DW; White, Richard G

2011-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "malta pf paracel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Pending Long-Term Applications to Export LNG to Non-FTA Countries - Listed in Order DOE Will Commence Processing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Long-Term Applications to Export LNG to Non-FTA Countries - Listed in Order DOE Will Commence Processing Long-Term Applications to Export LNG to Non-FTA Countries - Listed in Order DOE Will Commence Processing Order to Be Processed Company DOE/FE Docket No. Date DOE Application Filed FERC Pre-Filing Docket No. Date Applicant Received FERC Approval to Begin Pre-Filing Process 1 Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. and FLNG Liquefaction, LLC 10-161-LNG 12/17/2010 PF11-2 1/5/2011 2 Lake Charles Exports, LLC 11-59-LNG 5/6/2011 PF12-8 4/6/2012 3 Dominion Cove Point LNG, LP 11-128-LNG 10/3/2011 PF12-16 6/26/2012 4 Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. and FLNG Liquefaction, LLC 11-161-LNG 12/19/2011 PF11-2 1/5/2011 5 Cameron LNG, LLC 11-162-LNG 12/21/2011 PF12-13 5/9/2012 6 Jordan Cove Energy Project, L.P. 12-32-LNG 3/23/2012 PF12-7 3/6/2012 7 LNG Development Company, LLC (d/b/a Oregon LNG) 12-77-LNG 7/16/2012 PF12-18

102

Volatility Effects on the Escape Time in Financial Market Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We shortly review the statistical properties of the escape times, or hitting times, for stock price returns by using different models which describe the stock market evolution. We compare the probability function (PF) of these escape times with that obtained from real market data. Afterwards we analyze in detail the effect both of noise and different initial conditions on the escape time in a market model with stochastic volatility and a cubic nonlinearity. For this model we compare the PF of the stock price returns, the PF of the volatility and the return correlation with the same statistical characteristics obtained from real market data.

Spagnolo, Bernardo

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

September 2012, Work Force Retention Work Group Status Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Work Force Retention Work Group Status Overview Work Force Retention Work Group Status Overview 2 Subgroups: Pro-Force and Non-Pro-Force Pro-Force Subgroup: Accomplishments: 1. Completion of 10 CFR 1046 [Protective Force Personnel Medical, Physical Readiness, Training, and Access Authorization Standards] as a final rule that includes modification efforts to address barriers to workforce retention. 2. Pro-Force (PF) union representative, Randy Lawson, identified this accomplishment as the single most significant step toward PF workforce retention in over 20 years. 3. Draft re-charter of PF Career Options Committee (PFCOC) to establish a PF Working Group approved by GC-63 and GC NNSA. Near Term Goals and Activities: 1. Publish 1046 as a final rule - publication anticipated this month.

104

Electron and hole transport to trap groups at the ends of conjugated  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and hole transport to trap groups at the ends of conjugated and hole transport to trap groups at the ends of conjugated polyfluorenes Sadayuki Asaoka, Norihiko Takeda, Tornokazu Lyoda, Andrew R. Cook and John R. Miller J. Am. Chem. Soc. 130, 11912-11920 (2008). [Find paper at ACS Publications] Abstract: Electrons and holes were injected selectively into poly-2,7-(9,9-dihexylfluorene) (pF) dissolved in a tetrahydrofuran (THF) and a 1,2-dichloroethane (DCE) solution, respectively, using pulse radiolysis. Transient absorption spectra of monoions of both signs revealed two bands attributable to formation of polarons, one in the visible region (pF+* at 580 nm, pF-* at 600 nm) and another in the near-IR region. Polyfluorenes (pF) were synthesized having anthraquinone (AQ) or naphtylimide (NI) end caps that trap electrons or di-p-tolylaminophenyl

105

On Thurston's pullback map  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Let f: P^1 \\to P^1 be a rational map with finite postcritical set P_f. Thurston showed that f induces a holomorphic map \\sigma_f of the Teichmueller space T modelled on P_f to itself fixing the basepoint corresponding to the identity map (P^1, P_f) \\to (P^1, P_f). We give explicit examples of such maps f showing that the following cases may occur: (1) the basepoint is an attracting fixed point, the image of \\sigma_f is open and dense, and the map \\sigma_f is a covering map onto its image; (2) the basepoint is a superattracting fixed point, \\sigma is surjective, and \\sigma is a ramified Galois covering, (3) \\sigma_f is constant.

Buff, Xavier; Koch, Sarah; Pilgrim, Kevin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

A framework for verifying service-oriented software systems using message sequence charts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

within the Feature Driven Development (FDD) Process [PF02].FDD is a sequential, five activity process composed ofThe final activity of the FDD process, building by feature,

Morales-Perea, Ernesto Emiliano

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Development of a Coupled GroundwaterAtmosphere Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Complete models of the hydrologic cycle have gained recent attention as research has shown interdependence between the coupled land and energy balance of the subsurface, land surface, and lower atmosphere. PF.WRF is a new model that is a ...

Reed M. Maxwell; Julie K. Lundquist; Jeffrey D. Mirocha; Steven G. Smith; Carol S. Woodward; Andrew F. B. Tompson

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Local Low Dimensionality of Atmospheric Dynamics D. J. Patila?, Brian R. Hunta, Eugenia Kalnayb, James A. Yorkea, and Edward Ottc  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Gautam Chand Sethia, PhD Corresponding Author's Institution: Institute for Plasma Research First AuthorInstitute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382 428, India bInstitute of Physics, University of Potsdam, PF 601553

Maryland at College Park, University of

109

Laboratory Safety Issued by the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Gautam Chand Sethia, PhD Corresponding Author's Institution: Institute for Plasma Research First AuthorInstitute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382 428, India bInstitute of Physics, University of Potsdam, PF 601553

Beaumont, Christopher

110

Elsevier Editorial System(tm) for Physics Letters A Manuscript Draft  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Gautam Chand Sethia, PhD Corresponding Author's Institution: Institute for Plasma Research First AuthorInstitute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382 428, India bInstitute of Physics, University of Potsdam, PF 601553

111

Laboratory Equipment Donation Program - Administrative Login  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Please Log in User Name: Password: Logon Reset Forgot your username or password or need to change your e-mail address? Send e-mail to pf-lepd@osti.gov. Need to change OPMO contact...

112

Location of the Antarctic Polar Front from AMSR-E Satellite Sea Surface Temperature Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The location of the Southern Ocean polar front (PF) is mapped from the first 3 yr of remotely sensed Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for the Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) sea surface temperature (SST) measurements. In agreement with ...

Shenfu Dong; Janet Sprintall; Sarah T. Gille

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Design and Implementation of High Speed Memory in 130 nm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper deals with the design and analysis of high speed SRAM memory using ATD (Address Transition Detector) technique in 130 nm with the capacitive load of the memory is 5pF

Sampath Kumar; Arti Noor; Sanjay Kr. Singh

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

NATIONAL LEAD COMPANY OF OHIO ANILYTICAL OEPT. - HEALTH AND SAFETY...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

background samples. On No3 Ra sample Nos. 9998. 9997 the box of U-tubing was wen. This oil PH ma -jXncrease- the--ajrborne contamination ink-this-areai Be --Th---- d5 Pf N?...

115

Storm Morphology and Rainfall Characteristics of TRMM Precipitation Features  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar (PR), TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI), and Visible and Infrared Scanner (VIRS) observations within the Precipitation Feature (PF) database have been analyzed to examine regional ...

Stephen W. Nesbitt; Robert Cifelli; Steven A. Rutledge

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

REMF*??*??a b?|>5.PYT*??X\\?6Y?-?[!K**n ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... ?H:H?vl32???*qOq??z?Bn?J3Pf(**. ?.ja?wmo**ePW*. IG?*?Y?? *??*M*?E/2h???*n{]??I ...

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

117

Design and Transient Analysis of Passive Safety Cooling Systems for Advanced Nuclear Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

H. G. MacPherson The molten salt adventure Nuclear Scienceand P.F. Peterson, Molten-Salt-Cooled Advanced High-Clarno Assessment of candidate molten salt coolants for the

Galvez, Cristhian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

NON-LINEAR DIFFUSION IN HAMILTONIAN SYSTEMS EXHIBITING CHAOTIC MOTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

e,t) Pf which defines the projection operator P. Since P isthe Liouville equation using projection operator techniques.we will employ the projection operator method of Zwanzig to

Abarbanel, Henry D.I.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL AND INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) o Light emitting diodes (LEDs): principles and characteristics o field effect transistors (MOSFETs) Knowledge of principles and characteristics pf light emitting diodes

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

120

Investigation of the effect of a circular patch of vegetation on turbulence generation and sediment deposition using four case studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study describes the spatial distribution of sediment deposition in the wake of a circular patch of model vegetation and the effect of the patch on turbulence and mean flow. Two difference types pf vegetation were used ...

Ortiz, Alejandra C

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "malta pf paracel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

A. M. Khounsa ry, T. M. Kuz ay and G. A. Forster  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

beam has a spa tial power distribution which is Gaussian along I -direction and parabolic along xl-direction. The power contained in an elemental area d'df is given by p(f...

122

Mesoscale Subduction at the Antarctic Polar Front Driven by Baroclinic Instability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study of mesoscale subduction at the Antarctic Polar Front (PF) is conducted by use of hydrographic data from a high-resolution, quasi-synoptic survey of the front. The geostrophic velocity and isopycnal potential vorticity (PV) fields are ...

Alberto C. Naveira Garabato; Harry Leach; John T. Allen; Raymond T. Pollard; Volker H. Strass

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Fall/Winter 2005 Center for Photochemical Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Gautam Chand Sethia, PhD Corresponding Author's Institution: Institute for Plasma Research First AuthorInstitute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382 428, India bInstitute of Physics, University of Potsdam, PF 601553

Moore, Paul A.

124

Microsoft PowerPoint - IPRC 2012 oral presentation CEA E Mendes...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

450-500 C Precipitation Conversion 700 C ZrF 4 An PF An Cs, Rb Distillation Used Fuel Zn Digestion 830 C Platinodes Metallic waste Distillation LiF-AlF 3...

125

EIS-0489-ScopingExtension-2012.pdf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Jordan Cove Energy Project LP Docket No. PF12-7-000 Pacific Connector Gas Pipeline LP Docket No. PF12-17-000 NOTICE OF EXTENSION OF COMMENT PERIOD AND ADDITIONAL PUBLIC SCOPING MEETINGS FOR THE JORDAN COVE LIQUEFACTION AND PACIFIC CONNECTOR PIPELINE PROJECTS (August 28, 2012) This notice announces the extension of the public scoping process and comment period for Jordan Cove Energy Project LP's (Jordan Cove) proposed liquefaction project in Coos County, Oregon, in Docket No. PF12-7-000, and Pacific Connector Gas Pipeline LP's (Pacific Connector) proposed pipeline project crossing portions of Klamath, Jackson, Douglas, and Coos Counties, Oregon, in Docket No. PF12-17-000. In addition

126

Estimating the Permafrost-Carbon Climate Response in the CMIP5 Climate Models Using a Simplified Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under climate change, thawing permafrost may cause a release of carbon, which has a positive feedback on the climate. The permafrost-carbon climate response (?PF) is the additional permafrost-carbon made vulnerable to decomposition per degree of ...

Eleanor J. Burke; Chris D. Jones; Charles D. Koven

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

TPX: Contractor preliminary design review. Volume 3, Design and analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several models have been formed for investigating the maximum electromagnetic loading and magnetic field levels associated with the Tokamak Physics eXperiment (TPX) superconducting Poloidal Field (PF) coils. The analyses have been performed to support the design of the individual fourteen hoop coils forming the PF system. The coils have been sub-divided into three coil systems consisting of the central solenoid (CS), PF5 coils, and the larger radius PF6 and PF7 coils. Various electromagnetic analyses have been performed to determine the electromagnetic loadings that the coils will experience during normal operating conditions, plasma disruptions, and fault conditions. The loadings are presented as net body forces acting individual coils, spatial variations throughout the coil cross section, and force variations along the path of the conductor due to interactions with the TF coils. Three refined electromagnetic models of the PF coil system that include a turn-by-turn description of the fields and forces during a worst case event are presented in this report. A global model including both the TF and PF system was formed to obtain the force variations along the path of the PF conductors resulting from interactions with the TF currents. In addition to spatial variations, the loadings are further subdivided into time-varying and steady components so that structural fatigue issues can be addressed by designers and analysts. Other electromagnetic design issues such as the impact of the detailed coil designs on field errors are addressed in this report. Coil features that are analyzed include radial transitions via short jogs vs. spiral type windings and the effects of layer-to-layer rotations (i.e clocking) on the field errors.

NONE

1995-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

128

Sandvik sharpens in-pit crushing focus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Major mining equipment supplier Sandvik Mining and Construction has announced a full-fledged fully mobile crushing plant, the PF300. This is shaping up to be the decade's major addition to the large scale open-cut mining toolkit. The PF300 can be connected to a face conveyor by a loading bridge as well as by belt wagon or transfer conveyor. The article describes design features. 2 figs.

Casteel, K.

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

129

Zone heated inlet ignited diesel particulate filter regeneration  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An exhaust system that processes exhaust generated by an engine is provided. The system includes: a particulate filter (PF) that is disposed downstream of the engine and that filters particulates from the exhaust; and a grid that includes electrically resistive material that is segmented by non-conductive material into a plurality of zones and wherein the grid is applied to an exterior upstream surface of the PF.

Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI; Ament, Frank [Troy, MI

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

130

Simulations of ionic liquids near charged walls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and anions (cf molten NaCl). Electrostatic interactions are very important. The liquid is easily polarised But solvent cations and anions are larger than Na+ or Cl?, so dispersion interactions are also important They are interesting solvents as well... as being important. examples - dimethylimidazolium salts [dmim][Cl] and [dmim][PF6] butylmethylimidazolium salts [bmim][Cl], [bmim][N(SO2CF3)2], [bmim][PF6], tetraalkyl ammonium salts, tetraalkylphosphonium salts. [dmim]+ 22. Computer simulation of liquids...

Lynden-Bell, Ruth

2011-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

131

Verwaltungshandbuch Ausfhrungsbestimmungen fr den  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2V K 0,24 Natural Gas Storage in Porous Media 2 4 WPF 2V K 0,24 Natural Gas Storage in Rock Caverns in Porous Media (C) 19 20 Natural Gas Storage in Rock Caverns (V) Adv.Transp. & Stor'e Topics (S) 21 22,22 Natural Gas Storage in Porous Media 2 4 PF 2V K 0,25 Natural Gas Storage in Rock Caverns 2 4 PF 2V K 0

Angermann, Lutz

132

A fluorophosphate-based inverse Keggin structure  

SciTech Connect

An unusual PFO(3)(2-)-templated "inverse Keggin" polyanion, [Mo(12)O(46)(PF)(4)](4-), has been isolated from the degradation reaction of an {Mo(132)}-type Keplerate to [PMo(12)O(40)](3-) by [Cu(MeCN)(4)](PF(6)) in acetonitrile. (31)P-NMR studies suggest a structure-directing role for [Cu(MeCN)(4)](+) in the formation of the highly unusual all-inorganic inverse Keggin structure.

Fielden, John; Quasdorf, Kyle; Cronin, Leroy; Kogerler, Paul

2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

133

Structural Plasticity of Malaria Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase Allows Selective Binding of Diverse Chemical Scaffolds  

SciTech Connect

Malaria remains a major global health burden and current drug therapies are compromised by resistance. Plasmodium falciparum dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (PfDHODH) was validated as a new drug target through the identification of potent and selective triazolopyrimidine-based DHODH inhibitors with anti-malarial activity in vivo. Here we report x-ray structure determination of PfDHODH bound to three inhibitors from this series, representing the first of the enzyme bound to malaria specific inhibitors. We demonstrate that conformational flexibility results in an unexpected binding mode identifying a new hydrophobic pocket on the enzyme. Importantly this plasticity allows PfDHODH to bind inhibitors from different chemical classes and to accommodate inhibitor modifications during lead optimization, increasing the value of PfDHODH as a drug target. A second discovery, based on small molecule crystallography, is that the triazolopyrimidines populate a resonance form that promotes charge separation. These intrinsic dipoles allow formation of energetically favorable H-bond interactions with the enzyme. The importance of delocalization to binding affinity was supported by site-directed mutagenesis and the demonstration that triazolopyrimidine analogs that lack this intrinsic dipole are inactive. Finally, the PfDHODH-triazolopyrimidine bound structures provide considerable new insight into species-selective inhibitor binding in this enzyme family. Together, these studies will directly impact efforts to exploit PfDHODH for the development of anti-malarial chemotherapy.

Deng, Xiaoyi; Gujjar, Ramesh; El Mazouni, Farah; Kaminsky, Werner; Malmquist, Nicholas A.; Goldsmith, Elizabeth J.; Rathod, Pradipsinh K.; Phillips, Margaret A.; (UWASH); (UTSMC)

2010-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

134

Healthy sweet inhibitor of Plasmodium falciparum aquaglyceroporin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plasmodium falciparum aquaglyceroporin (PfAQP) is a multifunctional channel protein in the plasma membrane of the malarial parasite that causes the most severe form of malaria infecting more than a million people a year. Finding a novel way to inhibit PfAQP, I conducted 3+ microseconds in silico experiments of an atomistic model of the PfAQP-membrane system and computed the chemical-potential profiles of six permeants (erythritol, water, glycerol, urea, ammonia, and ammonium) that can be efficiently transported across P. falciparum's plasma membrane through PfAQP's conducting pore. The profiles show that, with all the existent in vitro data being supportive, erythritol, a permeant of PfAQP itself having a deep ditch in its permeation passageway, strongly inhibits PfAQP's functions of transporting water, glycerol, urea, ammonia, and ammonium (The IC50 is in the range of high nanomolars). This suggests the possibility that erythritol, a sweetener generally considered safe, may be the drug needed to kill the malarial parasite in vivo without causing serious side effects.

Liao Y. Chen

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

135

Synthesis and electrochemical and spectroscopic properties of a series of binuclear and trinuclear ruthenium and palladium complexes based on a new bridging ligand containing terpyridyl and catechol binding sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ligand 4{prime}-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-2,2{prime}:6{prime},2{double_prime}-terpyridine (L{sup 2}), containing a terpyridyl binding site and a masked catechol binding site, was prepared by a standard Kroehnke-type synthesis. From this the complexes [Ru(terpy)-(L{sup 2})][PF{sub 6}]{sub 2} (1) and [Ru(L{sup 2}){sub 2}][PF{sub 6}]{sub 2} (2), containing one and two dimethoxyphenyl substituents, were prepared: demethylation with BBr{sub 3} afforded [Ru(terpy)(H{sub 2}L{sup 1})][PF{sub 6}]{sub 2} (3) and [Ru(H{sub 2}L{sup 1}){sub 2}][PF{sub 6}]{sub 2} (4), respectively, which have one or two free catechol binding sites pendant from the [Ru(terpy){sub 2}]{sup 2+} core. Binuclear complexes (based on 3) and trinuclear complexes (based on 4) were then prepared by attachment of other metal fragments at the catechol sites. In [Ru(terpy)({mu}-L{sup 1})Ru(bipy){sub 2}][PF{sub 6}]{sub 3} (5) and [Ru({mu}-L{sup 1}){sub 2}(Ru(bipy){sub 2}){sub 2}][PF{sub 6}]{sub 4} (6) the pendant (Ru(bipy){sub 2}(O-O)){sup n+} sites (O-O = catecholate, n = 0; o-benzosemiquinone, n = 1; o-benzoquinone, n = 2) are redox active and may be reversibly interconverted between the three oxidation levels. In [Ru(terpy)({mu}-L{sup 1})Pd(bipy)][PF{sub 6}]{sub 2} (7), [Ru({mu}-L{sup 1}){sub 2}(Pd(bipy)){sub 2}][PF{sub 6}]{sub 2} (8), [Ru(terpy)({mu}-L{sup 1})Pd(4,4{prime}-{sup t}Bu{sub 2}-bipy)][PF{sub 6}]{sub 2} (9), and [Ru({mu}-L{sup 1}){sub 2}(Pd(4,4{prime}-{sup t}Bu{sub 2}-bipy)){sub 2}][PF{sub 6}]{sub 2} (10) the pendant (Pd(bipy)(catecholate)) fragments are known to be photocatalysts for production of {sup 1}O{sub 2} in their own right. Electrochemical and UV/vis studies were performed on all complexes and consistently indicate the presence of interactions between the components in 5-10. The EPR spectrum of 6 (which contains two semiquinone radicals) shows that the two spins are coupled by an exchange interaction.

Whittle, B.; Everest, N.S.; Howard, C.; Ward, M.D. [Univ. of Bristol (United Kingdom)

1995-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

136

Tokamak reactor poloidal field system study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors examined the poloidal field (PF) system, including plasma magnetics, magnet design, and electrical energy conversion systems. An overall PF system tradeoff study was carried out taking into account the reactor design constraints and the plasma requirements. The plasma requirements on PF coil currents and configurations are estimated by MHD equilibrium calculations over the ranges of beta ({bar {beta}}) current and shape of interest, e.g., {bar {beta}} < 10%, Ip {le} 4-5 MA, and D-shape with elongation up to 1.6. These ranges are consistent with the latest results in MHD stability and 1-D transport calculations. Critical physics variations in the study include whether electron preheating is successful and whether the plasma current buildup time can be increased from 1 second to 6 seconds. Important engineering options occur in PF coil configurations, coil conductors, coil-supply connection schemes, and power supply configurations. Important engineering concerns include device assembly/disassembly, machine access, remote maintenance requirements, systems integration and the ability to minimize the effect of major plasma disruptions. More than 60 PF system cases are examined with the help of PF system computer design codes. The resulting cost and technology requirements are compared. The findings include: (1) discovery of ways to preheat the plasma electrons so that the plasma permits a buildup time above 6 seconds, substantially reduces cost and technology requirements; (2) a hybrid PF coil system with major, slow, exterior superconducting coils and minor, fast, interior copper coils represents the best compromise between engineering and physics requirements; and (3) Motor-Generator-Flywheel (MGF) sets with 12 pulse thyristor bridges are found to be more economic and technically feasible than homopolar generators, superconducting energy storage coils and DC generators, for all startup cases (1-6 seconds).

Brown, T. G. [Grumman Aerospace; Peng, Yueng Kay Martin [ORNL

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Ecofys-Country Fact Sheets | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ecofys-Country Fact Sheets Ecofys-Country Fact Sheets Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Ecofys Country Fact Sheets Agency/Company /Organization: Ecofys Sector: Energy, Land Topics: Background analysis, Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Policies/deployment programs Website: www.ecofys.com/files/files/ecofys_2011_country_factsheets_update.pdf Country: Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belarus, Belgium, Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, China, Colombia, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, European Union, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Kazakhstan, South Korea, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malaysia, Malta, Mexico, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nigeria, Norway, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States, Venezuela

138

Renewable Energy Projections as Published in the National Renewable Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Energy Projections as Published in the National Renewable Energy Renewable Energy Projections as Published in the National Renewable Energy Action Plans of the European Member States Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Renewable Energy Projections as Published in the National Renewable Energy Action Plans of the European Member States Agency/Company /Organization: European Environment Agency, Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Market analysis, Resource assessment, Background analysis Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.ecn.nl/docs/library/report/2010/e10069.pdf Country: Austria, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Germany, Denmark, Greece, Spain, Finland, France, Ireland, Italy, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, the Netherlands, Portugal, Sweden, Slovenia, United Kingdom

139

Interpretation of electromagnetic soundings in the Raft River geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Interpretation of electromagnetic soundings in the Raft River geothermal Interpretation of electromagnetic soundings in the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Interpretation of electromagnetic soundings in the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: An electromagnetic (EM) controlled source survey was conducted in the Raft River Valley, near Malta, Idaho. The purpose of the survey was: to field test U.S. Geological Survey extra-low-frequency (ELF) equipment using a grounded wire source and receiver loop configuration (which is designed to measure the vertical magnetic field (Hz) at the loop center for various frequencies); to present an example of the EM sounding data and interpretations using a previously developed inversion program; and (3) to

140

Action Plan for Forest Law Enforcement Governance and Trade (FLEGT) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plan for Forest Law Enforcement Governance and Trade (FLEGT) Plan for Forest Law Enforcement Governance and Trade (FLEGT) Jump to: navigation, search Name Action Plan for Forest Law Enforcement Governance and Trade (FLEGT) Agency/Company /Organization European Union Sector Land Focus Area Forestry Topics Policies/deployment programs Resource Type Lessons learned/best practices Website http://eur-lex.europa.eu/smart Country Belgium, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Denmark, Germany, Estonia, Ireland, Greece, Spain, France, Italy, Cyprus, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Hungary, Malta, Netherlands, Austria, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovenia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Finland, Sweden, United Kingdom Western Europe, Eastern Europe, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Western Europe, Northern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Southern Europe, Western Asia, Northern Europe, Northern Europe, Western Europe, Eastern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Western Europe, Eastern Europe, Southern Europe, Eastern Europe, Southern Europe, Eastern Europe, Southern Europe, Northern Europe, Northern Europe, Northern Europe

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "malta pf paracel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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141

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Regional Definitions Regional Definitions The six basic country groupings used in this report (Figure J1) are defined as follows: *OECD (18 percent of the 2006 world population): North America-United States, Canada, and Mexico; OECD Europe-Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Luxem- bourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, and the United Kingdom. OECD Asia-Japan, South Korea, Australia, and New Zealand. *Non-OECD (82 percent of the 2006 world popula- tion): - Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia (5 percent of the 2006 world population)-Albania, Armenia, Azer- baijan, Belarus, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Estonia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lithuania, Macedonia, Malta, Moldova, Romania, Russia, Serbia and Montenegro, Slovenia,

142

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Materials Science  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Q R S Q R S T U V W X Y Z Pace, Gordon J. (Gordon J. Pace) - Department of Computer Science, University of Malta Pach, János (János Pach) - Department of Mathematics, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University Padawitz, Peter (Peter Padawitz) - Fachbereich Informatik, Universität Dortmund Padgham, Lin (Lin Padgham) - School of Computer Science and Information Technology, RMIT University Padmanabhan, Venkata N. (Venkata N. Padmanabhan) - Microsoft Research Padó, Sebastian (Sebastian Padó) - Institut für Maschinelle Sprachverarbeitung, Universität Stuttgart Padua, David (David Padua) - Siebel Center for Computer Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Paech, Barbara (Barbara Paech) - Interdisziplinäres Zentrum für

143

Greenhouse Gas Emission Trends and Projections in Europe 2009 | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas Emission Trends and Projections in Europe 2009 Greenhouse Gas Emission Trends and Projections in Europe 2009 Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Greenhouse Gas Emission Trends and Projections in Europe 2009 Agency/Company /Organization: European Environment Agency Topics: Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Background analysis Resource Type: Maps Website: www.eea.europa.eu/publications/eea_report_2009_9 Country: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Ireland, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, United Kingdom UN Region: "Western & Eastern Europe" is not in the list of possible values (Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America, Central Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property.

144

Ecofys-Country Fact Sheets | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ecofys-Country Fact Sheets Ecofys-Country Fact Sheets (Redirected from Ecofys Country Fact Sheets) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Ecofys Country Fact Sheets Agency/Company /Organization: Ecofys Sector: Energy, Land Topics: Background analysis, Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Policies/deployment programs Website: www.ecofys.com/files/files/ecofys_2011_country_factsheets_update.pdf Country: Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belarus, Belgium, Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, China, Colombia, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, European Union, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Kazakhstan, South Korea, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malaysia, Malta, Mexico, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nigeria, Norway, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States, Venezuela

145

Appendix K: Regional Definitions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

K K Regional Definitions The six basic country groupings used in this report (Figure K1) are defined as follows: *OECD (18 percent of the 2008 world population): North America-United States, Canada, and Mexico; OECD Europe-Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Luxem- bourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, and the United Kingdom. OECD Asia-Japan, South Korea, Australia, and New Zealand. *Non-OECD (82 percent of the 2008 world popula- tion): - Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia (5 percent of the 2008 world population)-Albania, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Estonia, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lithuania, Macedonia, Malta, Moldova, Montenegro, Romania, Russia, Serbia, Slovenia,

146

International Energy Outlook 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

K K Regional Definitions The six basic country groupings used in this report (Figure K1) are defined as follows: *OECD (18 percent of the 2007 world population): North America-United States, Canada, and Mexico; OECD Europe-Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Luxem- bourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, and the United Kingdom. OECD Asia-Japan, South Korea, Australia, and New Zealand. *Non-OECD (82 percent of the 2007 world popula- tion): - Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia (5 percent of the 2007 world population)-Albania, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Estonia, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lithuania, Macedonia, Malta, Moldova, Montenegro, Romania, Russia, Serbia, Slovenia,

147

UNFCCC-Global Map-Annex 1 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UNFCCC-Global Map-Annex 1 UNFCCC-Global Map-Annex 1 Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Global Map-Annex 1 Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, United Nations Environment Programme Sector: Climate Topics: Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, GHG inventory Resource Type: Maps, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: maps.unfccc.int/di/map/ Country: Australia, Austria, Belarus, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States

148

Total Crude Oil and Products Imports from All Countries  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Country: All Countries Persian Gulf OPEC Algeria Angola Ecuador Iraq Kuwait Libya Nigeria Qatar Saudi Arabia United Arab Emirates Venezuela Non OPEC Albania Argentina Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bolivia Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Burma Cameroon Canada Chad Chile China Colombia Congo (Brazzaville) Congo (Kinshasa) Cook Islands Costa Rica Croatia Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Dominican Republic Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Estonia Finland France Gabon Georgia, Republic of Germany Ghana Gibralter Greece Guatemala Guinea Hong Kong Hungary India Indonesia Ireland Israel Italy Ivory Coast Jamaica Japan Kazakhstan Korea, South Kyrgyzstan Latvia Liberia Lithuania Malaysia Malta Mauritania Mexico Midway Islands Morocco Namibia Netherlands Netherlands Antilles New Zealand Nicaragua Niue Norway Oman Pakistan Panama Papua New Guinea Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Romania Russia Senegal Singapore Slovakia South Africa Spain Spratly Islands Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syria Taiwan Thailand Togo Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Ukraine United Kingdom Uruguay Uzbekistan Vietnam Virgin Islands (U.S.) Yemen

149

Five-megawatt geothermal-power pilot-plant project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is a report on the Raft River Geothermal-Power Pilot-Plant Project (Geothermal Plant), located near Malta, Idaho; the review took place between July 20 and July 27, 1979. The Geothermal Plant is part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) overall effort to help commercialize the operation of electric power plants using geothermal energy sources. Numerous reasons were found to commend management for its achievements on the project. Some of these are highlighted, including: (a) a well-qualified and professional management team; (b) effective cost control, performance, and project scheduling; and (c) an effective and efficient quality-assurance program. Problem areas delineated, along with recommendations for solution, include: (1) project planning; (2) facility design; (3) facility construction costs; (4) geothermal resource; (5) drilling program; (6) two facility construction safety hazards; and (7) health and safety program. Appendices include comments from the Assistant Secretary for Resource Applications, the Controller, and the Acting Deputy Director, Procurement and Contracts Management.

Not Available

1980-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

150

Agency datasets monthly list | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1992 Private Foundations Study Forms 990-PF by IRC Section 501(c)(3) private foundations and Section 4947(a)(1) nonexempt charitable trusts for Tax Year 1992 TREAS IRS Social Insurance and Human Services 2013-06-12 13:53:12 1992 Private Foundations Study Forms 990-PF by IRC Section 501(c)(3) private foundations and Section 4947(a)(1) nonexempt charitable trusts for Tax Year 1992 TREAS IRS Social Insurance and Human Services 2013-06-12 13:53:12 Tax Year 1993 Private Foundations Study Forms 990-PF by IRC Section 501(c)(3) private foundations and Section 4947(a)(1) nonexempt charitable trusts for Tax Year 1993 TREAS IRS Social Insurance and Human Services 2013-06-12 13:53:12 Tax Year 1994 Private Foundations Study Forms 990-PF by IRC Section 501(c)(3) private foundations and Section 4947(a)(1) nonexempt charitable trusts for Tax Year 1994 TREAS IRS Social Insurance and Human Services 2013-06-12 13:53:12 Tax Year 1995 Private Foundations Study Forms 990-PF by IRC Section 501(c)(3) private foundations and Section 4947(a)(1) nonexempt charitable trusts for Tax Year 1995 TREAS IRS Social Insurance and Human Services 2013-06-12 13:53:12

151

Concurrent cisplatin, 5-FU, paclitaxel, and radiation therapy in patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Phase I-II data regarding neoadjuvant cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), paclitaxel, and radiation (PFT-R) from our institution demonstrated encouraging pathologic complete response (pCR) rates. This article updates our experience with PFT-R, and compares these results to our experience with cisplatin, 5-FU, and radiation therapy (PF-R) in locally advanced esophageal cancer. Patients and Methods: We searched the Massachusetts General Hospital cancer registry for esophageal cancer patients treated with radiation therapy and chemotherapy between 1994-2002. Records of patients treated with curative, neoadjuvant therapy were examined for chemotherapeutic regimen. Outcomes of patients treated with PF-R or PFT-R were assessed for response to therapy, toxicity, and survival. Results: A total of 177 patients were treated with neoadjuvant therapy with curative intent; 164 (93%) received PF-R (n = 81) or PFT-R (n = 83). Median overall survival was 24 months. After a median follow-up of 54 months for surviving patients, 3-year overall survival was 40% with no significant difference between PF-R (39%) and PFT-R (42%). Conclusions: Our findings failed to demonstrate an improvement in pCR or survival with PFT-R vs. PF-R. These results do not support this regimen of concurrent neoadjuvant PFT-R in esophageal cancer, and suggest that further investigations into alternative regimens and novel agents are warranted.

Roof, Kevin S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)]. E-mail: kroof@sero.net; Coen, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Lynch, Thomas J. [Department of Medical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Wright, Cameron [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Fidias, Panos [Department of Medical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Willett, Christopher G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Choi, Noah C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

152

Atomistic simulation of damage production by atomic and molecular ion irradiation in GaN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have studied defect production during single atomic and molecular ion irradiation having an energy of 50 eV/amu in GaN by molecular dynamics simulations. Enhanced defect recombination is found in GaN, in accordance with experimental data. Instantaneous damage shows non-linearity with different molecular projectile and increasing molecular mass. Number of instantaneous defects produced by the PF{sub 4} molecule close to target surface is four times higher than that for PF{sub 2} molecule and three times higher than that calculated as a sum of the damage produced by one P and four F ion irradiation (P+4 Multiplication-Sign F). We explain this non-linearity by energy spike due to molecular effects. On the contrary, final damage created by PF{sub 4} and PF{sub 2} shows a linear pattern when the sample cools down. Total numbers of defects produced by Ag and PF{sub 4} having similar atomic masses are comparable. However, defect-depth distributions produced by these species are quite different, also indicating molecular effect.

Ullah, M. W.; Kuronen, A.; Nordlund, K.; Djurabekova, F. [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 64, FIN-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Karaseov, P. A.; Titov, A. I. [St. Petersburg State Polytechnic University, 195251 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

153

Permafrost and organic layer interactions over a climate gradient in a discontinuous permafrost zone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Permafrost is tightly coupled to the organic layer, an interaction that mediates permafrost degradation in response to regional warming. We analyzed changes in permafrost occurrence (PF) and organic layer thickness (OLT) in more than 3000 soil pedons across a mean annual temperature (MAT) gradient. Cause and effect relationships between PF, OLT, and other topographic factors were investigated using structural equation modeling in a multi-group analysis. Groups were defined by slope, soil texture type, and shallow v. deep organic layers. Permafrost probability sharply increased by 0.32 for every 10-cm OLT increase in shallow OLT soils (OLTs) due to an insulation effect, but PF decreased in deep OLT soils (OLTd) by 0.06 for every 10-cm increase. As temperature warmed, sandy soils varied little in PF or OLT, but PF in loamy and sandy soils decreased substantially. The change in OLT was more heterogeneous across soil types in some there was no change while in others OLTs soils thinned and/or OLTd soils thickened as temperature warmed. Furthermore, the rate of thickening with warming for OLTd soils was on average almost 4 times greater than the rate of thinning for OLTs soils across all soil types. If soils follow a trajectory of warming that mimics the spatial gradients found today, then heterogeneities of permafrost degradation and organic layer thinning and thickening should be considered in the regional carbon balance.

Johnson, Kristopher D [University of Alaska, Fairbanks; Harden, Jennifer [United States Geological Service (USGS), Menlo Park; McGuire, A. David [University of Alaska; Clark, Mark [United Stated Department of Agriculture (USDA), Natural Resources Conservation Service; Yuan, Fengming [ORNL; Finley, Andrew [Michigan State University, East Lansing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

EIS-0489-NoticeofAdditionalScopingMeetings-2012.pdf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Jordan Cove Energy Project LP Docket No. PF12-7-000 Jordan Cove Energy Project LP Docket No. PF12-7-000 Pacific Connector Gas Pipeline LP Docket No. PF12-17-000 NOTICE OF ADDITIONAL PUBLIC SCOPING MEETINGS FOR THE JORDAN COVE LIQUEFACTION AND PACIFIC CONNECTOR PIPELINE PROJECTS (September 21, 2012) On October 9, 10, and 11, 2012, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC or Commission) Office of Energy Projects staff, in cooperation with representatives of the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service (Forest Service) and the U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Land Management (BLM), will hold three additional public scoping meetings to take comments on Jordan Cove Energy Project LP's (Jordan Cove) proposed liquefaction project in Coos County, Oregon, in Docket No.

155

SASSI Subtraction Method Effects at Various DOE projects  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Subtraction Method Effects Subtraction Method Effects at Various DOE projects U.S. Department of Energy Natural Phenomena Hazards Workshop October 25-26, 2011 Greg E. Mertz, Michael C. Costantino, Thomas W. Houston, Andrew S. Maham CJCAssociates 2 Outline  PF-4  CMRR  UPF  Generic Study  Lessons Learned Note: Project results represent work-in-progress and do imply regulatory acceptance CJCAssociates 3 SASSI Solution Methods for Embedded Structures CJCAssociates 4 PF-4 Two story Box-type RC Structure 284'x265'x39' Embedded ~18' 1970's construction Thin basement floor with spread footings Flat slab interior floor supported by columns with capitals CJCAssociates 5 TA-55 Soil Profile Surface Control Motion LANL PC-3 Free-Field Input PF-4 SSI Analysis

156

Statistical characterization of the reproducibility of neutron emission of small plasma focus devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this work is to discuss the techniques related to the detection of fast pulsed neutrons produced in plasma focus (PF) devices, the statistical analysis of the corresponding data, and the methodologies for evaluation of the device performance in low emission neutron sources. A general mathematical framework is presented for the assessment of the reproducibility of the neutron emission of small PF devices given the shot-to-shot distribution and detector efficiency. The effect on the reproducibility in case of using two independent detectors is also discussed. The analysis is applied to the neutron emission of the plasma focus device PF-50J operating in repetitive mode (0.1-0.5 Hz and 65 J bank energy).

Tarifeno-Saldivia, Ariel; Soto, Leopoldo [Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear (CCHEN), Casilla 188-D, Santiago (Chile); Center for Research and Applications in Plasma Physics and Pulsed Power, P4 (Chile) and Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Republica 220, Santiago (Chile)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

157

Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) power supply design and development  

SciTech Connect

The Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) is an advanced tokamak project aimed at the production of quasi-steady state plasmas with advanced shape, heating, and particle control. TPX is to be built at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) using many of the facilities from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). TPX will be the first tokamak to utilize superconducting (SC) magnets in both the toroidal field (TF) and poloidal field (PF) systems. This new feature requires a departure from the traditional tokamak power supply schemes. This paper describes the plan for the adaptation of the PPPL/FTR power system facilities to supply TPX. Five major areas are addressed, namely the AC power system, the TF, PF and Fast Plasma Position Control (FPPC) power supplies, and quench protection for the TF and PF systems. Special emphasis is placed on the development of new power supply and protection schemes.

Neumeyer, C. [Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, Princeton, NJ (United States). EBASCO Div.; Bronner, G.; Lu, E.; Ramakrishnan, S. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Bonneville Power Admin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Admin Power Admin Jump to: navigation, search Name Bonneville Power Admin Place Oregon Utility Id 1738 Utility Location Yes Ownership F NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png IP - 12 Industrial NR - 12 Industrial PF - 12 Exchange Residential PF - 12 Public - Average Tier 1 + Tier 2 rate Residential PF - 12 Public - Average Tier 1 rate Residential

159

Firearms Qualifications Courses | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Firearms Qualifications Courses Firearms Qualifications Courses Firearms Qualifications Courses PURPOSE. To describe the process by which U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) protective force (PF) firearms qualification courses are developed, reviewed, revised, validated, and approved. SCOPE. The process described herein applies to all PF firearms policy development participants; notably, the staff of the DOE Office of Security (HS-50), the DOE National Training Center (NTC) (HS-70), the DOE Firearms Policy Panel (FPP), the DOE Protective Forces Safety Committee (PFSC), the DOE Training Managers' Working Group (TMWG), the DOE Training Advisory Committee (TAC), and any program office or site firearms subject matter experts that desire to contribute to any

160

Protective Force Firearms Qualifications Courses, July 2011 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Protective Force Firearms Qualifications Courses, July 2011 Protective Force Firearms Qualifications Courses, July 2011 Protective Force Firearms Qualifications Courses, July 2011 July 2011 Firearms Qualifications Courses To describe the process by which U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) protective force (PF) firearms qualification courses are developed, reviewed, revised,validated, and approved. The process described herein applies to all PF firearms policy development participants; notably, the staff of the DOE Office of Security (HS-50), the DOE National Training Center (NTC) (HS-70), the DOE Firearms Policy Panel (FPP), the DOE Protective Forces Safety Committee (PFSC), the DOE Training Managers' Working Group (TMWG), the DOE Training Advisory Committee

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "malta pf paracel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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161

Environmentally Safe Control of Zebra Mussel Fouling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The two primary objectives of this USDOE-NETL contract were successfully achieved during the project: (1) to accelerate research on the development of the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CL145A (Pf-CL145A) as a biocontrol agent for zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) and quagga mussels (Dreissena rostriformis bugensis)--two invasive freshwater bivalve species that are infesting water pipes in power plants; and (2) to identify a private-sector company that would move forward to commercialize Pf-CL145A as a substitute for the current polluting use of biocide chemicals for control of these dreissenid mussels in power plant pipes.

Daniel Molloy

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

162

Unified Model for the Heat Transfer Processes that Occur During  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A unified general model for the heat transfer processes that occur within a food product subjected to canning or aseptic thermal treatment, is presented. Two principles are extensively used in the model building process: system segregation and energy balancing. The model is summarized in an algorithm, whose specification is showed for different combinations of processing system type (PST) and product formulation (PF) with a single particle type. A discussion on the practical relevance of proper product identification in the case of aseptic processing, is included. Finally, an illustration is given on the results that can be obtained from the model algorithm application, in a comparative study of different PST-PF combinations.

Jose F. Pastrana; Harvey J. Gold; Kenneth R. Swanzel; Pastrana Gold; Jose F. Pastrana; Harvey J. Gold; Kenneth R. Swartzel

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

! " $#&% ')( 1 0 ( 2 23& %" 45 0" ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... i{e 'tvrs0z xgpff)hp"pfr p'm 4w rsp"tvuwyxgiml {rF fDwspI tvrWtfDt{fDiml'~ umlDim|W} iml fDwsp pf0}gp" ifDp' fl4{k ...

2009-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

164

Linear versus Nonlinear Filtering with Scale-Selective Corrections for Balanced Dynamics in a Simple Atmospheric Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates the role of the linear analysis step of the ensemble Kalman filters (EnKF) in disrupting the balanced dynamics in a simple atmospheric model and compares it to a fully nonlinear particle-based filter (PF). The filters have ...

Aneesh C. Subramanian; Ibrahim Hoteit; Bruce Cornuelle; Arthur J. Miller; Hajoon Song

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

{VERSION 5 0 "SGI MIPS UNIX" "5.0" } {USTYLETAB {CSTYLE ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

... $Fiao$!3H(4#[+P%*)=#F47$F^bo$!3#y'>s8Hu)=#F47$Fcbo$!31Pg() ewf$=#F 47$Fhbo$!3[isVU#\\\\5;#F47$F]co$!3=U`m*zN47#F47$Fado$!3;tiB36Oc?

166

Roles of polarization force and nonthermal electron on dust-acoustic waves in an inhomogeneous dusty plasma with positively charged dust  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of polarization force (PF) (arises due to dust density inhomogeneity), nonthermal electrons, and dust density inhomogeneity associated with positively charged dust on linear dust-acoustic (DA) waves in an inhomogeneous unmagnetized dusty plasma are investigated. By taking the normal mode analysis, the dispersion relation in such a non-Maxwellian inhomogeneous plasma is obtained, and that the dispersion properties of the DA waves are significantly modified by the presence of PF and nonthermal electrons. The PF is increased with the increase of nonthermal electrons. It is found that the phase speed of the DA waves is significantly decreased with the presence of PF and nonthermal electrons. The potential associated with the DA waves is de-enhanced with the increase of equilibrium dust number density. The role of positive dust number density on dispersion properties is also shown. The present findings relevant to different scenarios in laboratory and space dusty plasma, such as Martian ionosphere, solar flares, TEXTOR-94 tokamak plasmas, rf excited argon magnetoplasma, etc., can be useful to understand the properties of localized electrostatic disturbances in those dusty plasma system, are also briefly addressed.

Asaduzzaman, M.; Mamun, A. A. [Department of Physics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka 1342 (Bangladesh)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

167

A PRECISION ANALOG FIBER OPTIC TRANSMISSION SYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5M Hz pi us 10% overrange One TTL load Positive pulse; 30nslemA sink current 10 TTL loads 50pF lor rated performanceI I I I I I I I "' U " E U ttl I I I I ..c QJ I I I I I I I

Stover, G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS LOUISIANA TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH CENTER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS LOUISIANA TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH CENTER LTRC PROJECT NO. 14-3PF, SIO NO. 30001422 SOUTHEASTERN TRANSPORTATION CONSORTIUM SYNTHESES OF STATE-OF-PRACTICE Transportation Funding Sources and Alternatives in the Southeastern States Now and in the Future PROBLEM STATEMENT According

Harms, Kyle E.

169

Mr. Joseph M. Fallon Director, Engineering Services Slater Steels...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Protection, D;SC-Q I TTir * . - . R. li, jpf-fJiyT S' ,"JFL IEDIANA (-0; &AX;1 ) jy)l

170

Early Experience on the Blue Gene/Q Supercomputing System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) is home to Mira, a10 PF Blue Gene/Q (BG/Q) system. The BG/Q system is the third generation in Blue Gene architecture from IBM and like its predecessors combines system-on-chip technology with a proprietary ... Keywords: supercomputing, performance, multi-core, scalability, applications

Vitali Morozov, Kalyan Kumaran, Venkatram Vishwanath, Jiayuan Meng, Michael E. Papka

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Checking Inevitability and Invariance Using Description Logic Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, http://www.alcf.anl.gov/resources. [9] NCCS Jaguar and JaguarPF, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, http://www.nccs.gov/computing-resources /jaguar/ [10] HPCT MPI Profiling and Tracing Library, https://wiki.alcf.anl.gov/index.php/HPCT_MPITRACE. [11] Universal Performance Counter (UPC) Unit and HPM library for BG/P, https://wiki.alcf

Waterloo, University of

172

MULTIPLE CRITERIA GENETIC ALGORITHMS IN ENGINEERING DESIGN AND OPERATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tsks TD where they hve een reported to e superior to the use of hndErfted feture sets for lssi suh s hulin gore nd models suh s the puntionl equirements for filiogrphi eords @pfA to orgnise tlogue

Coello, Carlos A. Coello

173

Extrapolating Impingement and Entrainment Losses to Equivalent Adults and Production Foregone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides guidance on the use of two types of fish loss extrapolation models: equivalent adult (EA) and production foregone (PF) models. The report is a companion to EPRI report 1007821, which summarizes impingement survival information and EPRI report 1000757, which summarizes entrainment survival information. It complements EPRI reports TR-112013 and 1005176, which review fish population assessment methods in general.

2004-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

174

Gyrgy Babnigg's Curriculum Vitae  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

P., Day, B.W., Friedman, D.B., Garland , D., Gutstein, H.B., Hoogland, C., Jones, N.A., Khan, A., Klose, J., Lamond, A.I., Lemkin, P.F., Lilley, K.S., Minden, J., Morris, N.J.,...

175

Compatibility of Lithium Salts with Solvent of the Non-Aqueous Electrolyte in LiO2 Batteries  

SciTech Connect

The stability of lithium salts, especially in the presence of reduced oxygen species, O2 and H2O (even in a small amount), plays an important role in the cyclability and capacity of LiO2 cells. This combined experimental and computational study provides evidence that the stability of the electrolyte used in LiO2 cells strongly depends on the compatibility of lithium salts with solvent. In the case of the LiPF61NM3 electrolyte, the decomposition of LiPF6 occurs in the cell as evidenced by in situ XRD, FT-IR and XPS analysis, which triggers the decomposition of 1NM3 solvent due to formation of HF from the decomposition of LiPF6. These reactions lead to degradation of the electrolyte and cause poor cyclability of the cell. The same reactions are not observed when LiTFSI and LiCF3SO3 are used as the lithium salts in 1NM3 solvent, or LiPF6 is used in TEGDME solvent.

Du, Peng; Lu, Jun; Lau, Kah Chun; Luo, Xiangyi; Bareno, Javier; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Ren, Yang; Zhang, Zhengcheng; Curtiss, Larry A.; Sun, Yang-Kook; Amine, Khalil

2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

176

OUOTAIOS Cathy Brewer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- balanced model of this organism is of direct relevance to the ongoing search to identify new therapeutic- mine the stoichiometry of most reactions. To produce a functional reconstruction, we also searched Glycolysis Schnick et al (2009) PF14_0425* Fructose-bisphosphate aldolase 4.1.2.13 Pfal NLe,q NLc Glycolysis

O'Laughlin, Jay

177

Drake Passage oceanic pCO2: Evaluating CMIP5 Coupled Carbon/Climate Models using in-situ observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface water partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) variations in Drake Passage are examined using decade-long underway shipboard measurements. North of the Polar Front (PF), the observed pCO2 shows a seasonal cycle that peaks annually in August, and ...

ChuanLi Jiang; Sarah T. Gille; Janet Sprintall; Colm Sweeney

178

Final_Tech_Session_Schedule_and_Location.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R 1 C 6 H 13 hmmim: R 1 C 6 H 13 , R 2 CH 3 N R 1 NO 3 O N O O BF 4 F B F F F DCA C N C N N TFO F 3 C S O O O methide F 3 CO 2 S C SO 2 CF 3 SO 2 CF 3 PF...

179

Note: A portable pulsed neutron source based on the smallest sealed-type plasma focus device  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Development and operation of a portable and compact pulsed neutron source based on sealed-type plasma focus (PF) device are reported. The unit is the smallest sealed-type neutron producing PF device. The effective volume of the PF unit is 33 cm{sup 3} only. A compact size single capacitor (4 {mu}F) is used as the energy driver. A battery based power supply unit is used for charging the capacitor and triggering the spark gap. The PF unit is operated at 10 kV (200 J) and at a deuterium gas filling pressure of 8 mb. The device is operated over a time span of 200 days and the neutron emissions have been observed for 200 shots without changing the gas in between the shots. The maximum yield of this device is 7.8 x 10{sup 4} neutrons/pulse. Beyond 200 shots the yield is below the threshold (1050 neutrons/pulse) of our {sup 3}He detector. The neutron energy is evaluated using time of flight technique and the value is (2.49 {+-} 0.27) MeV. The measured neutron pulse width is (24 {+-} 5) ns. Multishot and long duration operations envisage the potentiality of such portable device for repetitive mode of operation.

Niranjan, Ram; Rout, R. K.; Srivastava, Rohit; Rawool, A. M.; Kaushik, T. C.; Gupta, Satish C. [Applied Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Mishra, Prabhat [Materials Processing Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

180

Limited Nuclear War and U.S. Bases in the Philippines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

h a t U. S. bases and nuclear weapons i n the P h i l i p pf o r U. S. nuclear arms and weapons. The present paper w iby the U. S. nuclear arms and weapons stored on the bases i

Schirmer, Daniel Boone

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "malta pf paracel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

GENERAL CATALOG 20102011 20112012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from TA-55 Plutonium Facility Building (PF-4). This new waste stream is explained in detail in Section Volume Estimate on an Annual Basis ................... 81 Table 12. Average Isotopic Content of Plutonium Plutonium QA Quality Assurance R&D Research and Development R/hr Roentgen per hour RCRA Resource

California at Davis, University of

182

Draft Environmental Impact Report LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from TA-55 Plutonium Facility Building (PF-4). This new waste stream is explained in detail in Section Volume Estimate on an Annual Basis ................... 81 Table 12. Average Isotopic Content of Plutonium Plutonium QA Quality Assurance R&D Research and Development R/hr Roentgen per hour RCRA Resource

Knowles, David William

183

1:30PM, EE1+ Interface Roughness Broadening of Intersubband ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Growth of InGaAsP on InP DFB Laser Gratings by Solid Source Molecular Beam Epitaxy: W.-Y. HWANG, J.N. Baillargeon, A.Y. Cho, S.N.G. Chu, P.F. Jr. Sciortino

184

A Very Low Power Consumption, Low Noise Analog Readout Chip for Capacitive Detectors with a Power Supply of 3.3 V  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analog frontend block of a VLSI readout chip, dedicated to high spatial resolution X or beta ray imaging, using capacitive silicon detectors, is described. In the present prototype, an ENC noise of 343 electrons at 0 pF with a noise slope of 28 electrons/pF ... Keywords: low noise amplifiers, low voltage/low power analog IC design

Y. Hu; J. D. Berst; M. Schaeffer

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

ST0202 Statistikk for samfunnsvitere Kapittel 13: Liner regresjon og korrelasjon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TA-55 PF-4 2012 LANL Plutonium-Processing Facilities National Security At the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), virtually all plutonium operations occur within the Plutonium Facility at Technical Area 55 (TA-55). TA-55 is the nation's most modern plutonium science and manufacturing facility

Langseth, Helge

186

Actinide Research Quarterly Number 1 October 2012Number 1 October 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Turnings and Chips 4 U.S. High-energy Density Welding 6 Plutonium Science and Manufacturing 8 RLUOB. Yarbrough 12 Evaluating Fluids for Plutonium Component Manufacturing 14 Direct Casting is the Future for the U.S. stockpile. When the Plutonium Facility at Technical Area 55, PF-4, was given the mission

187

Inhibition of Plasmodium falciparum proliferation in vitro by double-stranded RNA directed against malaria histone deacetylase  

SciTech Connect

Acetylation and deacetylation of histones play important roles in transcription regulation, cell cycle progression and development events. The steady state status of histone acetylation is controlled by a dynamic equilibrium between competing histone acetylase and deacetylase (HDAC). We have used long PfHDAC-1 double-stranded (ds)RNA to interfere with its cognate mRNA expression and determined the effect on malaria parasite growth and development. Chloroquine- and pyrimethamine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum K1 strain was exposed to 1-25 {mu}g of dsRNA/ml of culture for 48 h and growth was determined by [{sup 3}H]-hypoxanthine incorporation and microscopic examination. Parasite culture treated with 10 {mu}g/ml pfHDAC-1 dsRNA exhibited 47% growth inhibition when compared with either untreated control or culture treated with an unrelated dsRNA. PfHDAC-1 dsRNA specifically blocked maturation of trophozoite to schizont stages and decreased PfHDAC-1 transcript 44% in treated trophozoites. These results indicate the potential of HDAC-1 as a target for development of novel antimalarials.

Sriwilaijaroen, N. [Faculty of Medicine, Thammasat University (Rangsit Campus), Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand); Boonma, S. [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Attasart, P. [Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Mahidol University, Salaya, Nakornpathom 73170 (Thailand); Pothikasikorn, J. [Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Panyim, S. [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Mahidol University, Salaya, Nakornpathom 73170 (Thailand); Noonpakdee, W. [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)], E-mail: scwnp@mahidol.ac.th

2009-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

188

Forecast Technical Document Forecast Types  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forecast Technical Document Forecast Types A document describing how different forecast types are implemented in the 2011 Production Forecast system. Tom Jenkins Robert Matthews Ewan Mackie Lesley Halsall #12;PF2011 ­ Forecast Types Background Different `types' of forecast are possible for a specified area

189

Forecast Technical Document Felling and Removals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forecast Technical Document Felling and Removals Forecasts A document describing how volume fellings and removals are handled in the 2011 Production Forecast system. Tom Jenkins Robert Matthews Ewan Mackie Lesley Halsall #12;PF2011 ­ Felling and removals forecasts Background A fellings and removals

190

Forecast Technical Document Volume Increment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forecast Technical Document Volume Increment Forecasts A document describing how volume increment is handled in the 2011 Production Forecast. Tom Jenkins Robert Matthews Ewan Mackie Lesley Halsall #12;PF2011 ­ Volume increment forecasts Background A volume increment forecast is a fundamental output of the forecast

191

Forecast Technical Document Tree Species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forecast Technical Document Tree Species A document listing the tree species included in the 2011 Production Forecast Tom Jenkins Justin Gilbert Ewan Mackie Robert Matthews #12;PF2011 ­ List of tree species The following is the list of species used within the Forecast System. Species are ordered alphabetically

192

Forecast Technical Document Growing Stock Volume  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forecast Technical Document Growing Stock Volume Forecasts A document describing how growing stock (`standing') volume is handled in the 2011 Production Forecast. Tom Jenkins Robert Matthews Ewan Mackie Lesley Halsall #12;PF2011 ­ Growing stock volume forecasts Background A forecast of standing volume (or

193

Identifying Software Usage at HPC Centers with the Automatic Library Tracking Database  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) and the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) and address the needs above, an Automatic Library that are compiled and executed on the NICS and OLCF HPC systems. Supercomputing centers like NICS and OLCF maintain is the two Cray XT5s located at NICS and the OLCF, Kraken and JaguarPF. On these systems, the staff supports

Singh, Jaswinder Pal

194

Occam's razor and petascale visual data analysis E. W. Bethel1, C. Johnson2, S. Ahern3, J. Bell1, P.-T. Bremer5, H.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's datasets. (a) Isocontouring of two trillion zones on 32,000 Opteron cores of JaguarPF, a Cray XT5 at OLCF on on Crays (OLCF/ORNL's Jaguar & NERSC/LBNL's Franklin), a Sun Linux machine (TACC's Ranger), a CHAOS Linux

Potter, Kristin

195

The Astrophysical Journal, 704:196210, 2009 October 10 doi:10.1088/0004-637X/704/1/196 C 2009. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's datasets. (a) Isocontouring of two trillion zones on 32,000 Opteron cores of JaguarPF, a Cray XT5 at OLCF on on Crays (OLCF/ORNL's Jaguar & NERSC/LBNL's Franklin), a Sun Linux machine (TACC's Ranger), a CHAOS Linux

Bell, John B.

196

Occam's razor and petascale visual data analysis E. W. Bethel1, C. Johnson2, S. Ahern3, J. Bell1, P.-T. Bremer5, H.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Isocontouring of two trillion zones on 32,000 Opteron cores of JaguarPF, a Cray XT5 at OLCF/ORNL. (b) Volume on on Crays (OLCF/ORNL's Jaguar & NERSC/LBNL's Franklin), a Sun Linux machine (TACC's Ranger), a CHAOS Linux

Bell, John B.

197

Occam's razor and petascale visual data analysis This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's datasets. (a) Isocontouring of two trillion zones on 32,000 Opteron cores of JaguarPF, a Cray XT5 at OLCF on on Crays (OLCF/ORNL's Jaguar & NERSC/LBNL's Franklin), a Sun Linux machine (TACC's Ranger), a CHAOS Linux

Utah, University of

198

16.810 (16.682)16.810 (16.682) Engineering Design and Rapid PrototypingEngineering Design and Rapid Prototyping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to reconfigure the plant? #12;16.810 (16.682) 5 Life Cycle: Conceive, Design, Implement 1 Beginning of Lifecycle Manufacturing Plant Warehouse PF1 ... PFn QA1 ... QAn Parts Buffer Supplier Buffer Assembly Final Inspection cool Injection Molding - mainly polymers Layup ­ e.g. Pre-preg composite manufacturing Sintering - form

de Weck, Olivier L.

199

FRP Retrofit of the Ring-Beam of a Nuclear Reactor Containment Structure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to reconfigure the plant? #12;16.810 (16.682) 5 Life Cycle: Conceive, Design, Implement 1 Beginning of Lifecycle Manufacturing Plant Warehouse PF1 ... PFn QA1 ... QAn Parts Buffer Supplier Buffer Assembly Final Inspection cool Injection Molding - mainly polymers Layup ­ e.g. Pre-preg composite manufacturing Sintering - form

200

Embedded Electronics for Intelligent Structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to reconfigure the plant? #12;16.810 (16.682) 5 Life Cycle: Conceive, Design, Implement 1 Beginning of Lifecycle Manufacturing Plant Warehouse PF1 ... PFn QA1 ... QAn Parts Buffer Supplier Buffer Assembly Final Inspection cool Injection Molding - mainly polymers Layup ­ e.g. Pre-preg composite manufacturing Sintering - form

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "malta pf paracel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

KING FAHAD UNIVERSITY OF PETROLEUM AND MIERALS ELECTRICAL ENGENEERING DEPARTMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to reconfigure the plant? #12;16.810 (16.682) 5 Life Cycle: Conceive, Design, Implement 1 Beginning of Lifecycle Manufacturing Plant Warehouse PF1 ... PFn QA1 ... QAn Parts Buffer Supplier Buffer Assembly Final Inspection cool Injection Molding - mainly polymers Layup ­ e.g. Pre-preg composite manufacturing Sintering - form

Al-Ghadhban, Samir

202

Fueling Program Review May 2000 LRB 1 Fueling Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fueling? Fusion power is a strong function of density ­ Pf = nDnTWDT Gas puffing has limited ability at high density e ne-1 (Alcator C, DIII, TFTR) Density Limits Exceeded ­ Gas fueled density limits proposed as improvement mechanism. · Similar scaling seen on DIII with multiple centrifuge pellet injection

203

Reconstruction and flux-balance analysis of the Plasmodium falciparum metabolic network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- balanced model of this organism is of direct relevance to the ongoing search to identify new therapeutic- mine the stoichiometry of most reactions. To produce a functional reconstruction, we also searched Glycolysis Schnick et al (2009) PF14_0425* Fructose-bisphosphate aldolase 4.1.2.13 Pfal NLe,q NLc Glycolysis

Vitkup, Dennis

204

Systems code development and analysis for ETR-class concepts  

SciTech Connect

Viewgraphs are presented that describe the following topics: (1) scope of ETR/TIBER/INTOR systems analysis, (2) general structure of a flexible systems code, (3) example of modules: MHD EQ. plus PF coils, (4) preliminary results on TIBER-II test run case, and (5) anticipated contribution of systems analysis. (MOW)

Peng, M.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Two-pulse rapid remote surface contamination measurement.  

SciTech Connect

This project demonstrated the feasibility of a 'pump-probe' optical detection method for standoff sensing of chemicals on surfaces. Such a measurement uses two optical pulses - one to remove the analyte (or a fragment of it) from the surface and the second to sense the removed material. As a particular example, this project targeted photofragmentation laser-induced fluorescence (PF-LIF) to detect of surface deposits of low-volatility chemical warfare agents (LVAs). Feasibility was demonstrated for four agent surrogates on eight realistic surfaces. Its sensitivity was established for measurements on concrete and aluminum. Extrapolations were made to demonstrate relevance to the needs of outside users. Several aspects of the surface PF-LIF physical mechanism were investigated and compared to that of vapor-phase measurements. The use of PF-LIF as a rapid screening tool to 'cue' more specific sensors was recommended. Its sensitivity was compared to that of Raman spectroscopy, which is both a potential 'confirmer' of PF-LIF 'hits' and is also a competing screening technology.

Headrick, Jeffrey M.; Kulp, Thomas J.; Bisson, Scott E.; Reichardt, Thomas A.; Farrow, Roger L.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Salvage treatment for childhood ependymoma after surgery only: Pitfalls of omitting 'at once' adjuvant treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To discuss the results obtained by giving adjuvant treatment for childhood ependymoma (EPD) at relapse after complete surgery only. Methods and Materials: Between 1993 and 2002, 63 children older than 3 years old entered the first Italian Association for Pediatric Hematology and Oncology protocol for EPD (group A), and another 14 patients were referred after relapsing after more tumor excisions only (group B). Prognostic factors were homogeneously matched in the two groups. We report on the outcome of group B. Results: Mean time to first local progression in group B had been 14 months. Tumors originated in the posterior fossa (PF) in 10 children and were supratentorial (ST) in 4; 11 had first been completely excised (NED) and 3 had residual disease (ED). Diagnoses were classic EPD in 9 patients, anaplastic in 5. Eight children were referred NED and 6 ED after two or more operations, 5 had cranial nerve palsy, 1 had recurrent meningitis, and 2 had persistent hydrocephalus. All received radiotherapy (RT) to tumor bed and 5 also had pre-RT chemotherapy. Six of 14 patients (6/10 with PF tumors) had a further relapse a mean 6 months after the last surgery; 4 of 6 died: progression-free survival and overall survival at 4 years after referral were 54.4% and 77%, respectively. Considering only PF tumors and setting time 0 as at the last surgery for group B, progression-free survival and overall survival were 32% and 50% for group B and 52% (p < 0.20)/70% (p < 0.29) for the 46 patients in group A with PF tumors. Local control was 32% in group B and 70.5% in group A (p = 0.02). Conclusions: Relapsers after surgery only, especially if with PF-EPD, do worse than those treated after first diagnosis; subsequent surgery for tumor relapse has severe neurologic sequelae.

Massimino, Maura [Department of Pediatric Oncology, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan (Italy)]. E-mail: maura.massimino@istitutotumori.mi.it; Giangaspero, Felice [Department of Experimental Medicine and Pathology, University of Rome 'La Sapienza', Rome (Italy); INM Neuromed, Pozzilli (Italy); Garre, Maria Luisa [Neurosurgery Unit, Istituto Giannina Gaslini, Genova (Italy); Genitori, Lorenzo [Neurosurgery Unit, Ospedale Meyer, Florence (Italy); Perilongo, Giorgio [Pediatric Department, University of Padova, Padova (Italy); Collini, Paola [Department of Pathology, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milano (Italy); Riva, Daria [Development Pediatric Neurology Unit, Istituto Neurologico Carlo Besta, Milan (Italy); Valentini, Laura [Neurosurgery II Unit, Istituto Neurologico Carlo Besta, Milan (Italy); Scarzello, Giovanni [Radiotherapy Department, University of Padova, Padova (Italy); Poggi, Geraldina [Research Unit, Istituto Eugenio Medea, Bosisio Parini (Italy); Spreafico, Filippo [Department of Pediatric Oncology, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan (Italy); Peretta, Paola [Neurosurgery Unit, Ospedale Infantile Santa Regina Margherita, Torino (Italy); Mascarin, Maurizio [Radiotherapy Unit, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, Aviano (Italy); Modena, Piergiorgio; Sozzi, Gabriella [Department of Cytogentics, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan (Italy); Bedini, Nice [Department of Radiotherapy Unit, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan (Italy); Biassoni, Veronica [Department of Pediatric Oncology, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan (Italy); Urgesi, Alessandro [Radiotherapy Unit, Ospedale Infantile Santa Regina Margherita, Torino (Italy); Balestrini, Maria Rosa [Neurooncology Unit, Istituto Neurologico Carlo Besta, Milan (Italy); Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Sandri, Alessandro [Pediatrics Unit, Ospedale Infantile Regina Margherita, Turin (Italy); Gandola, Lorenza [Department of Radiotherapy Unit, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan (Italy)

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

East Coast (PADD 1) Imports from All Countries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Import Area: East Coast (PADD 1) Midwest (PADD 2) Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) West Coast (PADD 5) Period/Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Import Area: East Coast (PADD 1) Midwest (PADD 2) Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) West Coast (PADD 5) Period/Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Country: All Countries Persian Gulf OPEC Algeria Angola Ecuador Iraq Kuwait Libya Nigeria Qatar Saudi Arabia United Arab Emirates Venezuela Non OPEC Argentina Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Barbados Belarus Belgium Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Cameroon Canada Chad Chile China Colombia Congo (Brazzaville) Congo (Kinshasa) Costa Rica Croatia Cyprus Denmark Dominican Republic Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Estonia Finland France Gabon Georgia, Republic of Germany Ghana Gibralter Greece Guatemala Guinea Hong Kong Hungary India Indonesia Ireland Israel Italy Ivory Coast Jamaica Japan Kazakhstan Korea, South Kyrgyzstan Latvia Liberia Lithuania Malaysia Malta Mauritania Mexico Morocco Namibia Netherlands Netherlands Antilles Niue Norway Oman Pakistan Panama Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Romania Russia Senegal Singapore South Africa Spain Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syria Taiwan Thailand Togo Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Ukraine United Kingdom Uruguay Vietnam Virgin Islands (U.S.) Yemen

208

Catalyzed steam gasification of biomass. Phase II. Final research report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Wright-Malta gasification process is characterized by low-temperature, catalyzed steam gasification in a pressurized rotary kiln. Fresh biomass moves slowly and continuously through the kiln, where it is gradually heated to around 1200/sup 0/F in an atmosphere of 300 psi steam. During its traverse, pyrolysis and reaction of steam with the nascent char convert nearly all of the organic solids to the gaseous phase. The volatile pyrolysis products pass through the kiln co-currently with the solids and are similarly cracked and steam-reformed within the kiln to fixed gases. Heat for the gasification process is provided by sensible heat recovered from the product gas and the wood decomposition exotherm, making the process inherently very energy-efficient. This report summarizes the work done during the experimental, laboratory-scale phase of development of the W-M biomass gasification process. Two bench-scale experimental gasifiers were constructed and tested: the ''minikiln'', a batch-feed, rotating autoclave; and the ''biogasser'', a stationary, continuous-feed, tubular reactor with zone heating and auger transport. Studies were carried out in these reactors to determine the extent of conversion of biomass solids to gas, and the makeup of the product gas, over a wide range of process conditions. The process variables that were investigated included reactor pressure and temperature, catalyst type and concentration, moisture content and type of biomass feed.

Hooverman, R.H.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

West Europe: U. K. North Sea oil coming despite political problems  

SciTech Connect

Extensive information is furnished for all drilling activities in the North Sea, Ireland's interests, and onshore U.K. drilling activities. Norway has more oil than is needed for her domestic consumption and oil developments in the North Sea are described. Gas from The Netherlands' L/10 field has been piped to shore. In West Germany, onshore drilling around Groningen gas field has been successful and a gas field southeast of Ekofisk was found offshore. Denmark is expanding its Dan field oil facilities. A well drilled around Gotland Island, Sweden has tested over 600 bopd. Drilling in Austria in 1974 was the most extensive since 1967 and oil and gas discoveries boosted reserves slightly. France began offshore drilling, while onshore oil and gas production continued to decline. In Italy, 2 tcf gas and over 300 million barrels of oil were confirmed in the Malossa field. Oil was discovered on the Adriatic coast. Greece faces border disputes disrupting its exploration. Spain revised oil laws in 1974. Portugal has encouraged offshore drilling and drilling has started in Malta. Seismic investigations are taking place in Switzerland. (MCW)

Rogers, F.W.

1975-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

210

Internal Technical Report, Safety Analysis Report 5 MW(e) Raft River Research and Development Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Raft River Geothermal Site is located in Southern Idaho's Raft River Valley, southwest of Malta, Idaho, in Cassia County. EG and G idaho, Inc., is the DOE's prime contractor for development of the Raft River geothermal field. Contract work has been progressing for several years towards creating a fully integrated utilization of geothermal water. Developmental progress has resulted in the drilling of seven major DOE wells. Four are producing geothermal water from reservoir temperatures measured to approximately 149 C (approximately 300 F). Closed-in well head pressures range from 69 to 102 kPa (100 to 175 psi). Two wells are scheduled for geothermal cold 60 C (140 F) water reinjection. The prime development effort is for a power plant designed to generate electricity using the heat from the geothermal hot water. The plant is designated as the ''5 MW(e) Raft River Research and Development Plant'' project. General site management assigned to EG and G has resulted in planning and development of many parts of the 5 MW program. Support and development activities have included: (1) engineering design, procurement, and construction support; (2) fluid supply and injection facilities, their study, and control; (3) development and installation of transfer piping systems for geothermal water collection and disposal by injection; and (4) heat exchanger fouling tests.

Brown, E.S.; Homer, G.B.; Shaber, C.R.; Thurow, T.L.

1981-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

211

Internal Technical Report, Safety Analysis Report 5 MW(e) Raft River Pilot Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Raft River Geothermal Site is located in Southern Idaho's Raft River Valley, southwest of Malta, Idaho, in Cassia County. EG and G idaho, Inc., is the DOE's prime contractor for development of the Raft River geothermal field. Contract work has been progressing for several years towards creating a fully integrated utilization of geothermal water. Developmental progress has resulted in the drilling of seven major DOE wells. Four are producing geothermal water from reservoir temperatures measured to approximately 149 C (approximately 300 F). Closed-in well head pressures range from 69 to 102 kPa (100 to 175 psi). Two wells are scheduled for geothermal cold 60 C (140 F) water reinjection. The prime development effort is for a power plant designed to generate electricity using the heat from the geothermal hot water. The plant is designated as the ''5 MW(e) Raft River Research and Development Plant'' project. General site management assigned to EG and G has resulted in planning and development of many parts of the 5 MW program. Support and development activities have included: (1) engineering design, procurement, and construction support; (2) fluid supply and injection facilities, their study, and control; (3) development and installation of transfer piping systems for geothermal water collection and disposal by injection; and (4) heat exchanger fouling tests.

Brown, E.S.; Homer, G.B.; Spencer, S.G.; Shaber, C.R.

1980-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

212

Fast Curing of Composite Wood Products  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this program is to develop low temperature curing technologies for UF and PF resins. This will be accomplished by: Identifying the rate limiting UF and PF curing reactions for current market resins; Developing new catalysts to accelerate curing reactions at reduced press temperatures and times. In summary, these new curing technologies will improve the strength properties of the composite wood products and minimize the detrimental effects of wood extractives on the final product while significantly reducing energy costs for wood composites. This study is related to the accelerated curing of resins for wood composites such as medium density fiberboard (MDF), particle board (PB) and oriented strandboard (OSB). The latter is frequently manufactured with a phenol-formaldehyde resin whereas ureaformaldehyde (UF) resins are usually used in for the former two grades of composite wood products. One of the reasons that hinder wider use of these resins in the manufacturing of wood composites is the slow curing speed as well as inferior bondability of UF resin. The fast curing of UP and PF resins has been identified as an attractive process development that would allow wood to be bonded at higher moisture contents and at lower press temperatures that currently employed. Several differing additives have been developed to enhance cure rates of PF resins including the use of organic esters, lactones and organic carbonates. A model compound study by Conner, Lorenz and Hirth (2002) employed 2- and 4-hydroxymethylphenol with organic esters to examine the chemical basis for the reported enhanced reactivity. Their studies suggested that the enhance curing in the presence of esters could be due to enhanced quinone methide formation or enhanced intermolecular SN2 reactions. In either case the esters do not function as true catalysts as they are consumed in the reaction and were not found to be incorporated in the polymerized resin product. An alternative approach to accelerated PF curing can be accomplished with the addition amines or amides. The later functionality undergoes base catalyzed hydrolysis yielding the corresponding carboxyl ate and free amine which rapidly reacts with the phenolic methylol groups facilitating polymerization and curing of the PF resin (Pizzi, 1997).

Dr. Arthur J. Ragauskas

2006-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

213

Adaptive and Efficient Computing for Subsurface Simulation within ParFlow  

SciTech Connect

This project is concerned with the PF.WRF model as a means to enable more accurate predictions of wind fluctuations and subsurface storage. As developed at LLNL, PF.WRF couples a groundwater (subsurface) and surface water flow model (ParFlow) to a mesoscale atmospheric model (WRF, Weather Research and Forecasting Model). It was developed as a unique tool to address coupled water balance and wind energy questions that occur across traditionally separated research regimes of the atmosphere, land surface, and subsurface. PF.WRF is capable of simulating fluid, mass, and energy transport processes in groundwater, vadose zone, root zone, and land surface systems, including overland flow, and allows for the WRF model to both directly drive and respond to surface and subsurface hydrologic processes and conditions. The current PF.WRF model is constrained to have uniform spatial gridding below the land surface and matching areal grids with the WRF model at the land surface. There are often cases where it is advantageous for land surface, overland flow and subsurface models to have finer gridding than their atmospheric counterparts. Finer vertical discretization is also advantageous near the land surface (to properly capture feedbacks) yet many applications have a large vertical extent. However, the surface flow is strongly dependent on topography leading to a need for greater lateral resolution in some regions and the subsurface flow is tightly coupled to the atmospheric model near the surface leading to a need for finer vertical resolution. In addition, the interactions (e.g. rain) will be highly variable in space and time across the problem domain so an adaptive scheme is preferred to a static strategy to efficiently use computing and memory resources. As a result, this project focussed on algorithmic research required for development of an adaptive simulation capability in the PF.WRF system and its subsequent use in an application problem in the Central Valley of California. This report documents schemes of use for a future implementation of an adaptive grid capability within the ParFlow subsurface flow simulator in PF.WRF. The methods describe specific handling of the coarse/fine boundaries within a cell-centered discretization of the nonlinear parabolic Richards equation model for variable saturated flow. In addition, we describe development of a spline fit and table lookup method implemented within ParFlow to enhance computational efficiency of variably saturated flow calculations.

Tiedeman, H; Woodward, C S

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

214

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY SOLAR TURBINES INCORPORATED (SOLAR) FOR  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

23 3 9 10:39 FRO DOE-IPC-CHICAGO TO PGCP-HQ PfGE.002 23 3 9 10:39 FRO DOE-IPC-CHICAGO TO PGCP-HQ PfGE.002 STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY SOLAR TURBINES INCORPORATED (SOLAR) FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS UNDER DOE CONTRACT NO: DE-AC02-92CE40960; W(A)-93-004; CH-0755 Solar Turbines Incorporated (Solar), a wholly owned subsidiary of Caterpillar Inc., has requested a waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights for all subject inventions of its employees under this contract. In response to an RFP, Solar was awarded a letter contract on September 25, 1992. It is anticipated that the letter contract will be definitized by the end of March 1993. Solar's obligation to continue performance under the contract is contingent upon DOE granting a waiver of rights to subject inventions in

215

Plasma Focusing & Dielectric Wakefield Acceleration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

pf pf Sign In Launch the Developer Dashboard SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory DOE | Stanford | SLAC | SSRL | LCLS | AD | PPA | Photon Science | PULSE | SIMES FACET User Facility : FACET An Office of Science User Facility Search this site... Search Help (new window) Top Link Bar FACET User Facility FACET Home About FACET FACET Experimental Facilities FACET Users Research at FACET SAREC Expand SAREC FACET FAQs FACET User Facility Quick Launch FACET Users Home FACET Division ARD Home About FACET FACET News FACET Users FACET Experimental Facilities FACET Research Expand FACET Research FACET Images Expand FACET Images SAREC Expand SAREC FACET Project Site (restricted) FACET FAQs FACET Site TOC All Site Content Department of Energy Page Content Plasma Focusing & Dielectric Wakefield Acceleration

216

M & O Contract Recompete Site -- Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Announcements Announcements August 13, 2012 The National Nuclear Security Administration intends to issue an amendment within the next two weeks to the Y-12 National Security Complex, Pantex Plant, and Savannah River Tritium Operations Management and Operating (M&O) Contract Request for Proposal. The amendment will be issued to existing Offerors only. The purpose of the forthcoming amendment will be to include Protective Force (PF) services in the Statement of Work to be performed under Contract Line Item 0001, Management and Operation of Pantex/Y-12 and to extend the due date for revised proposals. PF services may not be subcontracted March 1, 2012 The tenth set of questions and answers to the Final RFP can be found under the Questions & Answers link on the left launch bar. Historical functional

217

Hypersensitivity of human and rodent Fanconi anemia (FA) cells to bystander  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

P.F. Wilson P.F. Wilson Brookhaven National Laboratory Abstract Fanconi anemia (FA) is a chromosomal instability and cancer predisposition syndrome characterized by developmental defects, progressive bone marrow failure, and cellular hypersensitivity to agents that induce DNA interstrand crosslinks and oxidative stress, including IR [1]. The disease is transmitted either as an autosomal-recessive or X-linked trait, and hypomorphic biallelic mutations in 15 FA and homologous recombinational repair (HRR) genes have been identified in FA patients (with more likely to be discovered). We have previously reported hypersensitivity of the isogenic fancg Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) mutant KO40 for sister chromatid exchange (SCE) induction following low-dose (<3 mGy) 3.86-MeV plutonium-238

218

No I .+,o L  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

pf- ,'46-G pf- ,'46-G 1 No I .+,o L ---+-~"~----* ARMY SERVICE FORCES UNITED STATES ENGINEER OFFICE if?GFERGaD L~'Z EID.u CGA 3ll MANHATTAN DISTRJCT D0uMm-l CHlMOO AllU orncz P. 0. BOX 6140 A CHICAGO 80. tLLlNOlS 17 October 1945 Subject: The l24th F'ield Artillery Anmy Building, Chicago, Illinois '1 \ To: The District Zugiaeer, U. S. Engineer Office, b&n&tan District, Oak Eidge, Tennessee . "-2 -\, - Attention: Contract Section Q? ( sip ( Uhder date of 15 September 1943, The University,of Chicago

219

EA-1942-FERC-NOI-2012.pdf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dominion Cove Point LNG, LP Docket No. PF12-16-000 Dominion Cove Point LNG, LP Docket No. PF12-16-000 NOTICE OF INTENT TO PREPARE AN ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE PLANNED COVE POINT LIQUEFACTION PROJECT, REQUEST FOR COMMENTS ON ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES, NOTICE OF ON-SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW, AND NOTICE OF PUBLIC SCOPING MEETINGS (September 24, 2012) The staff of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC or Commission) will prepare an environmental assessment (EA) that will discuss the environmental impacts of the Cove Point Liquefaction Project (Project) involving construction and operation of facilities by Dominion Cove Point LNG, LP (Dominion) in Maryland and Virginia. This EA will be used by the Commission in its decision-making process to determine whether the construction and operation of the proposed facilities is in the

220

United States Announces New Bilateral Partnership with Ghana | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United States Announces New Bilateral Partnership with Ghana United States Announces New Bilateral Partnership with Ghana United States Announces New Bilateral Partnership with Ghana March 16, 2012 - 2:16pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - The United States announced today that it has formed a new bilateral partnership with Ghana that will build on the strong bilateral ties between the two countries and support further cooperation on a range of economic development issues. On March 9, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu and Ghana Finance Minister Kwabena Duffuor signed a Statement of Principles reaffirming our bilateral commitment to supporting President Obama's Partnership for Growth (PfG) Initiative. Ghana is one of the first four countries globally - including El Salvador, Tanzania, and the Philippines - to participate in the interagency PfG Initiative.

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221

High Voltage CMOS Control Interface for Astronomy - Grade Charged Coupled Devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Pan-STARRS telescope consists of an array of smaller mirrors viewed by a Gigapixel arrays of CCDs. These focal planes employ Orthogonal Transfer CCDs (OTCCDs) to allow on-chip image stabilization. Each OTCCD has advanced logic features that are controlled externally. A CMOS Interface Device for High Voltage has been developed to provide the appropiate voltage signal levels from a readout and control system designated STARGRASP. OTCCD chip output levels range from -3.3V to 16.7V, with two different output drive strenghts required depending on load capacitance (50pF and 1000pF), with 24mA of drive and a rise time on the order of 100ns. Additional testing ADC structures have been included in this chip to evaluate future functional additions for a next version of the chip.

Martin, Elena; Koga, Aaron; Ruckman, Larry; Onaka, Peter; Tonry, John; Lee, Aaron

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Electrochemical Stability of Carbon Fibers Compared to Metal Foils as Current Collectors for Lithium-Ion Batteries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electrochemical behaviors of highly conductive, fully-graphitic, semi-graphitic and non-graphitic carbon fibers were studied as the cathode current collectors of lithium batteries in standard electrolyte (alkyl carbonate/LiPF6) solutions and compared to bare aluminum (Al). All of these current collectors demonstrate a stable electrochemical behavior within the potential range of 2.5 to 5 V, due to passivation by surface films. Carbon fibers have comparable electrochemical stability of Al and may be used in place Al foil. While the carbon fibers do not contribute any irreversible or extra capacity when they are cycled below 4.5 V, for fully-graphitic and semi-graphitic fibers PF6 intercalation and deintercalation into the carbon fiber may occur when they are cycled at high potentials >4.5 V.

Martha, Surendra K [ORNL; Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL; Kiggans, Jim [ORNL; Nanda, Jagjit [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Impact of tripropyl borate on life and impedance of lithium-ion cells.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Tripropyl borate was investigated as a low cost anion receptor to improve the performance of lithium-ion cells. The impact of tripropyl borate was examined using lithium-ion cells comprising a negative electrode of mesocarbon microbeads, a positive electrode of Li{sub 1.1}[Mn{sub 1/3}Ni{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}]{sub 0.9}O{sub 2} and an LiPF{sub 6}-based electrolyte. It was found that the performance of the cells was improved by adding a proper amount of tripropyl borate ({le} 0.1 wt%) to the LiPF{sub 6}-based electrolyte. However, a small amount of gas was observed from cells with high contents of tripropyl borate when cycled at 55 C, and as a result, the performance of the cells deteriorated.

Chen, Z.; Liu, J.; Amine, K.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

2008-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

224

United States Announces New Bilateral Partnership with Ghana | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United States Announces New Bilateral Partnership with Ghana United States Announces New Bilateral Partnership with Ghana United States Announces New Bilateral Partnership with Ghana March 16, 2012 - 2:16pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - The United States announced today that it has formed a new bilateral partnership with Ghana that will build on the strong bilateral ties between the two countries and support further cooperation on a range of economic development issues. On March 9, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu and Ghana Finance Minister Kwabena Duffuor signed a Statement of Principles reaffirming our bilateral commitment to supporting President Obama's Partnership for Growth (PfG) Initiative. Ghana is one of the first four countries globally - including El Salvador, Tanzania, and the Philippines - to participate in the interagency PfG Initiative.

225

Eeffect of electrolyte composition on initial cycling and impedance characteristics of lithium-ion-cells.  

SciTech Connect

Hybrid-electric vehicles require lithium-battery electrolytes that form stable, low impedance passivation layers to protect the electrodes, while allowing rapid lithium-ion transport under high current charge/discharge pulses. In this article, we describe data acquired on cells containing LiNi{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.15}Al{sub 0.05}O{sub 2}-based positive electrodes, graphite-based negative electrodes, and electrolytes with lithium hexafluorophosphate (LiPF{sub 6}), lithium tetrafluoroborate (LiBF{sub 4}), lithium bis(oxalato)borate (LiBOB) and lithium difluoro(oxalato) borate (LiF{sub 2}OB) salts. The impedance data were collected in cells containing a Li-Sn reference electrode to determine effect of electrolyte composition and testing temperature on individual electrode impedance. The full cell impedance data showed the following trend: LiBOB > LiBF{sub 4} > LiF{sub 2}OB > LiPF{sub 6}. The negative electrode impedance showed a trend similar to that of the full cell; this electrode was the main contributor to impedance in the LiBOB and LiBF{sub 4} cells. The positive electrode impedance values for the LiBF{sub 4}, LiF{sub 2}OB, and LiPF{sub 6} cells were comparable; the values were somewhat higher for the LiBOB cell. Cycling and impedance data were also obtained for cells containing additions of LiBF{sub 4}, LiBOB, LiF{sub 2}OB, and vinylene carbonate (VC) to the EC:EMC (3:7 by wt.) + 1.2 M LiPF{sub 6} electrolyte. Our data indicate that the composition and morphology of the graphite SEI formed during the first lithiation cycle is an important determinant of the negative electrode impedance, and hence full cell impedance.

Abraham, D. P.; Furczon, M. M.; Kang, S.-H.; Dees, D. W.; Jansen, A. N.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Smarandache Type Function Obtained by Duality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we extend the Smarandache function from the set $N*$ of positive integers to the set $Q$ pf rational numbers. Using the inverse formula, this function is also regarded as a generating function. We put in evidence a procedure to construct a (numerical) function starting from a given function in two particular cases. Also, connections between this function and Euler totient function as well as with Riemann zeta function are established.

C. Dumitrescu; N. Virlan; St. Zamfir; E. Radescu; N. Radescu; F. Smarandache

2007-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

227

Abstract--This paper determines if Li/CFx or LiFePO4 is beneficial for State of Charge Indicator (SOCI) design for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;Lithium-ion battery Modern Li-ion Battery Cathode:Anode: e-e- u o b e y e- Electrolyte LiPF6 in Ethylene Goals lithium-ion #12;Electric-Vehicle BatteriesHigh voltage cathodes Alloy anodes Li l d 2 4 6 1000 /kg Electronic Li-ion Batteries Theoretical Energy Density Source: TIAX, LLC #12;Lithium-ion battery Battery

Manic, Milos

228

Instability of Polyvinylidene Fluoride-Based Polymeric Binder in Lithium-Ion Cells: Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal instabilities were identified in SONY-type lithium-ion cells and correlated with interactions of cell constituents and reaction products. Three temperature regions of interaction were identified and associated with the state of charge (degree of Li intercalation) of the cell. Anodes were shown to undergo exothermic reactions as low as 100 degree C involving the solid electrolyte interface (SEI) layer and the LiPF(6) salt in the electrolyte (EC-PC:DEC/IM LiPF(6)). These reactions could account for the thermal runaway observed in these cells beginning at 100 degree C. Exothermic reactions were also observed in the 200 degree C to 300 degree C region between the intercalated lithium anodes, the LiPF(6) salt, and the PVDF. These reactions were followed by a high-temperature reaction region, 300 degree C to 400 degree C, also involving the PVDF binder and the intercalated lithium anodes. The solvent was not directly involved in these reactions but served as a moderator and transport medium. Cathode exothermic reactions with the PVDF binder were observed above 200 degree C and increased with the state of charge (decreasing Li content). The stability of the PVDF binder as a function of electrochemical cycling was studied using FTIR. The infrared spectra from the extracts of both electrodes indicate that PVDF is chemically modified by exposure to the lithium cell electrolyte (as well as electrochemical cycling) in conjunction with NMP extraction. Preconditioning of PVDF to dehydrohalogenation, which may be occurring by reaction with LiPf(6), makes the PVDF susceptible to attack by a range of nucleophiles.

Garcia, M.; Nagasubramanian, G.; Tallant, D.R.; Roth, E.P.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Fish Life History Parameter Values for Equivalent Adult and Production Foregone Models: Comprehensive Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A previous Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) report (1008471) provided guidance on the use of two types of extrapolation models used in economic benefits analyses related to entrainment and impingement at power plant intake structures: equivalent adult (EA) models and production foregone (PF) models. To facilitate applications of these models by EPRI members, a follow-on report (1008832) provided estimates of species-specific mortality and growth rate parameters for 25 fish and macroinvertebrate s...

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

230

Exact Solution of the Isovector Neutron-Proton Pairing Hamiltonian  

SciTech Connect

The complete exact solution of the T=1 neutron-proton pairing Hamiltonian is presented in the context of the SO(5) Richardson-Gaudin model with nondegenerate single-particle levels and including isospin symmetry-breaking terms. The power of the method is illustrated with a numerical calculation for {sup 64}Ge for a pf+g{sub 9/2} model space which is out of reach of modern shell-model codes.

Dukelsky, J.; Errea, B.; Lerma, S.H. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC. Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Gueorguiev, V.G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California (United States); Institute of Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, BAS, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); Van Isacker, P. [Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds, BP 55027, F-14076 Caen Cedex 5 (France); Dimitrova, S. [Institute of Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, BAS, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria)

2006-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

231

NUMERICAL ANALYSIS OF FLOW FIELDS GENERATED BY ACCELERATING FLAMES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TR=D60*1 pf'o/nf>o/I GF-I '+UfO*.2/0f C. *2/2. ' C-----A(CTC SC=INITIAL STEP ~IZE C A"UFO=SPtC VOL "ATIC FCI' CCNST PRE=CFI". ~1 $ UPCCl,I,::UFO',O) EPC(I,I'=EP(M,O' $ PPC(I, II=

Kurylo, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Interactions of Ionic Liquids with Uranium and its Bioreduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigated the influence of ionic liquids (ILs) 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate [BMIM]{sup +}[PF{sub 6}]{sup -}, N-ethylpyridinium trifluoroacetate [EtPy]{sup +}[CF{sub 3}COO]{sup -} and N-ethylpyridinium tetrafluoroborate [Et-Py]{sup +}[BF{sub 4}]{sup -} on uranium reduction by Clostridium sp. under anaerobic conditions. Potentiometric titration, UV-vis spectrophotometry, LC-MS and EXAFS analyses showed monodentate complexation between uranyl and BF{sub 4}{sup -} PF{sub 6}{sup -}; and bidentate complexation with CF{sub 3}COO{sup -}. Ionic liquids affected the growth of Clostridium sp. as evidenced by decrease in optical density, changes in pH, gas production, and the extent of U(VI) reduction and precipitation of U(IV) from solution. Reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) was observed in the presence of [EtPy][BF{sub 4}] and [BMIM][PF{sub 6}] but not with [EtPy][CF{sub 3}COO].

Zhang, C.; Francis, A.

2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

233

TPX power systems design overview  

SciTech Connect

The power systems for the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) supply the Toroidal Field (TF). Poloidal Field (PF), Field Error Correction (FEC), and Fast Vertical Position Control (FVPC) coil systems, the Neutral Beam (NB), Ion Cyclotron (IC), Lower Hybrid (LH) and Electron Cyclotron (EC) heating and current drive systems, and all balance of plant loads. Existing equipment from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), including the motor-generator (MG) sets and the rectifiers, can be adapted for the supply of the TPX PF systems. A new TF power supply is required. A new substation is required for the heating and current drive systems (NB, IC, LH, and EC). The baseline TPX load can be taken directly from the grid without special provision, whereas if all upgrade options are undertaken, a modest amount of reactive compensation will be required. This paper describes the conceptual design of the power systems, with emphasis on the AC, TF, and PF Systems, and the quench protection of the superconducting coils.

Neumeyer, C. [Ebasco Services, Inc., New York, NY (United States); Bronner, G.; Lu, E.; Ramakrishnan, S. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Jackson, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Power supplies and quench protection for the Tokamak Physics Experiment  

SciTech Connect

The Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) is an advanced tokamak project aimed at the production of quasi-steady state plasmas with advanced shape, heating, and particle control. TPX is to be built at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) using many of the facilities from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). First plasma is scheduled for the year 2000. TPX will be the first tokamak to utilize superconducting (SC) magnets in both the toroidal field (TF) and poloidal field (PF) systems. This is a new feature which requires not only a departure from the traditional tokamak power supply schemes but also that ultra-reliable quench protection devices be used to rapidly discharge the stored energy from the magnets in the event of a quench. This paper describes the plan and basis for the adaptation and augmentation of the PPPL/TFTR power system facilities to supply TPX. Following a description of the basic operational requirements, four major areas are addressed, namely the AC power system, the TF power supply, the PF power supply, and quench protection for the TF and PF systems.

Neumeyer, C.L. [Raytheon Engineers & Constructors, Princeton, NJ (United States). EBASCO Div.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Degradation Reactions in SONY-Type Li-Ion Batteries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal instabilities were identified in SONY-type lithium-ion cells and correlated with interactions of cell constituents and reaction products. Three temperature regions of interaction were identified and associated with the state of charge (degree of Li intercalation) of the cell. Anodes were shown to undergo exothermic reactions as low as 100C involving the solid electrolyte interface (SEI) layer and the LiPF6 salt in the electrolyte (EC: PC: DEC/LiPF6). These reactions could account for the thermal runaway observed in these cells beginning at 100C. Exothermic reactions were also observed in the 200C-300C region between the intercalated lithium anodes, the LiPF6 salt and the PVDF. These reactions were followed by a high- temperature reaction region, 300C-400C, also involving the PVDF binder and the intercalated lithium anodes. The solvent was not directly involved in these reactions but served as a moderator and transport medhun. Cathode exotherrnic reactions with the PVDF binder were observed above 200oC and increased with the state of charge (decreasing Li content). This offers an explanation for the observed lower thermal runaway temperatures for charged cells.

Nagasubramanian, G.; Roth, E. Peter

1999-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

236

Internal Technical Report, Management Plan for Fluid Supply and Injection System for the Raft River 5 MW(e) Pilot Power Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report details a plan for developing a fluid supply system for the First 5 MW(e) Pilot Power Plant at Raft River. The pilot plant has been specifically designed to use the medium-temperature geothermal water so common throughout the West. EG and G Idaho, Inc., the Department of Energy Raft River Rural Electric Co-op, the US Geological Survey (USGS) and the State of Idaho have worked together to develop a facility that will use an organic liquid as the working fluid. Four wells have been drilled in the Raft River Valley, about ten miles South of Malta, in southern Idaho. The completed well system will consist of seven wells: two conventional injection wells, three production wells, and a standby reserve well of each type. The additional three wells are to be drilled in FY-1978, in order to complete a coordinated test program before the First Pilot Power Plant is ready for operation. The system has been designed to meet the test-loop pilot plant's basic requirement: a 2450 gpm supply of geothermal fluid, at a nominal temperature of 290 F and with salinity of less than 5000 ppm. Injection of cooled geothermal fluid into the Raft River reservoir will also require a network of monitor wells. The Idaho Department of Water Resources (IDWR), USGS, EG and G Idaho, and the Department of Energy will jointly select sites for two 1500-foot and five 500-foot monitoring wells. This plan considers the work required to complete construction of the fluid supply system and obtain a preliminary check of its performance capability; the plan will discuss project management, costs, schedules, drilling, testing, environmental monitoring, and safety.

None

1978-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

237

Cavity method for force transmission in jammed disordered packings of hard particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The force distribution of jammed disordered packings has always been considered a central object in the physics of granular materials. However, many of its features are poorly understood. In particular, analytic relations to other key macroscopic properties of jammed matter, such as the contact network and its coordination number, are still lacking. Here we develop a mean-field approach to this problem, based on the consideration of the contact network as a random graph where the force transmission becomes a constraint optimization problem. We can thus use the cavity method developed in the last decades within the statistical physics of spin glasses and hard computer science problems. This method allows us to compute the force distribution $\\text P(f)$ for random packings of hard particles of any shape, with or without friction. We find a new signature of jamming in the small force behavior $\\text P(f) \\sim f^{\\theta}$, whose exponent has attracted recent active interest. We find a finite value for $\\text P(f=0)$, along with $\\theta=0$ over an unprecedented six decades of force data, which agrees with experimental measurements on emulsion droplets. Furthermore, we relate the force distribution to a lower bound of the average coordination number ${\\bar z}_{\\rm c}^{\\rm min}(\\mu)$ of jammed packings of frictional spheres with coefficient $\\mu$. This bridges the gap between the two known isostatic limits ${\\bar z}_c(\\mu=0)=2D$ (in dimension $D$) and ${\\bar z}_c(\\mu \\to \\infty)=D+1$ by extending the naive Maxwell's counting argument to frictional spheres. The framework describes different types of systems, such as non-spherical objects and dimensions, providing a common mean-field scenario to investigate force transmission, contact networks and coordination numbers of jammed disordered packings.

Lin Bo; Romain Mari; Chaoming Song; Hernan A. Makse

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

238

Thermal stability of electrodes in Lithium-ion cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis was used to identify thermal reactions in Sony-type lithium-ion cells and to correlate these reactions with interactions of cell constituents and reaction products. An electrochemical half-cell was used to cycle the anode and cathode materials and to set the state-of-charge (SOC). Three temperature regions of interaction were identified and associated with the SOC (degree of Li intercalation) of the cell. Anodes were shown to undergo exothermic reactions as low as 80 C involving decomposition of the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer. The LiPF{sub 6} salt in the electrolyte (EC:PC:DEC/1M LiPF{sub 6}) was seen to play an essential role in this reaction. DSC analysis of the anodes from disassembled Sony cells showed similar behavior to the half-cell anodes with a strong exotherm beginning in the 80 C--90 C range. Exothermic reactions were also observed in the 200 C--300 C region between the intercalated lithium anodes, the LiPF{sub 6} salt, and the PVDF binder. These reactions were followed by a high-temperature reaction region, 300 C--400 C, also involving the PVDF binder and the intercalated lithium anodes. Cathode exothermic reactions with the PVDF binder were observed above 200 C and increased with the SOC (decreasing Li content in the cathode). No thermal reactions were seen at lower temperatures suggesting that thermal runaway reactions in this type of cell are initiated at the anode. An Accelerating Rate Calorimeter (ARC) was used to perform measurements of thermal runaway on commercial Sony Li-ion cells as a function of SOC. The cells showed sustained thermal output as low as 80 C in agreement with the DSC observations of anode materials but the heating rate was strongly dependent on the SOC.

ROTH,EMANUEL P.; NAGASUBRAMANIAN,GANESAN

2000-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

239

An analysis of muscle fatigue due to complex tasks and its relation to the strain index  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Strain Index was originally designed to analyze mono-task jobs. An experiment using a grip dynamometer was used to simulate six multiple task jobs to study the effect of complex tasks on localized muscle fatigue and to evaluate six different models used to calcula te a Complex Strain Index score. These models included average Strain Index score, unadjusted summation, duration adjusted summation, complex equation, minimum intensity, and peak intensity. Two methods of calculating a continuous Strain Index score were also analyzed. Ratings of perceived exertion, hand and forearm fatigue and discomfort, Difficulty Rating, maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), and percent strength loss were recorded for each of the six treatments. Electromyography (EMG) was also recorded for the 24 subjects (12 males and females) who completed the experiment. The EMG signal was analyzed using root mean square (RMS), initial mean power frequency (IMnPF), and slope of the mean power frequency (MnPF). Each treatment, lasting one hour each, contained a primary exertion (Task 1) of either 10% or 40% MVC for three seconds and a secondary exertion (Task 2) of either 10% or 40% MVC for one or three seconds. Subjective variables linearly increased (R2 > 0.88) over the duration of the treatments and significantly differed between treatments (p 0.05). A significant difference was found for MnPF slope pre and post treatment, but no treatment effect was found (p > 0.05). The complex equation method of calculating a Strain Index score was the only model of the six evaluated that met all criteria for being an acceptable method of calculating a Complex Strain Index score. The two continuous methods presented for calculating a Strain Index score should not be used for job analysis until further research evaluates their reliability, validity, and critical scores for Hazard Classification.

Stephens, John-Paul

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Enhancement of thermopower of TAGS-85 high-performance thermoelectric materials by doping with the rare earth Dy  

SciTech Connect

Enhancement of thermopower is achieved by doping the narrow-band semiconductor Ag{sub 6.52}Sb{sub 6.52}Ge{sub 36.96}Te{sub 50} (acronym TAGS-85), one of the best p-type thermoelectric materials, with 1 or 2% of the rare earth dysprosium (Dy). Evidence for the incorporation of Dy into the lattice is provided by X-ray diffraction and increased orientation-dependent local fields detected by {sup 125}Te NMR spectroscopy. Since Dy has a stable electronic configuration, the enhancement cannot be attributed to 4f-electron states formed near the Fermi level. It is likely that the enhancement is due to a small reduction in the carrier concentration, detected by {sup 125}Te NMR spectroscopy, but mostly due to energy filtering of the carriers by potential barriers formed in the lattice by Dy, which has large both atomic size and localized magnetic moment. The interplay between the thermopower, the electrical resistivity, and the thermal conductivity of TAGS-85 doped with Dy results in an enhancement of the power factor (PF) and the thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT) at 730 K, from PF = 28 ?W cm{sup ?1} K{sup ?2} and ZT ? 1.3 in TAGS-85 to PF = 35 ?W cm{sup ?1} K{sup ?2} and ZT ? 1.5 in TAGS-85 doped with 1 or 2% Dy for Ge. This makes TAGS-85 doped with Dy a promising material for thermoelectric power generation.

Levin, Evgenii; Budko, Serfuei; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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241

Does Plasmodium falciparum have an Achilles' heel?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plasmodium falciparum is the parasite that causes the most severe form of malaria. Currently, science has been established about its cellular structures, its metabolic processes, and even the molecular structures of its intrinsic membrane proteins responsible for transporting water, nutrient, and waste molecules across the parasite plasma membrane (PPM). I hypothesize that Plasmodium falciparum has an Achilles' heel that can be attacked with erythritol, the well-known sweetener that is classified as generally safe. Most organisms have in their cell membrane two types of water-channel proteins: aquaporins to maintain hydro-homeostasis across the membrane and aquaglyceroporins to uptake glycerols etc. In contrast, P. falciparum has only one type of such proteins---the multi-functional aquaglyceroporin (PfAQP) expressed in the PPM---to do both jobs. Moreover, the parasite also uses PfAQP to excrete its metabolic wastes (ammonia included) produced at a very high rate in the blood stage. This extremely high efficiency of the bug using one protein for multiple essential tasks makes the parasite fatally vulnerable. Erythritol in the blood stream can kill the parasite by clogging up its PfAQP channel that needs to be open for maintaining hydro-homeostasis and for excreting toxic wastes across the bug's PPM. In vitro tests are to measure the growth/death rate of P. falciparum in blood with various erythritol concentrations. In vivo experiments are to administer groups of infected mice with various doses of erythritol and monitor the parasite growth levels from blood samples drawn from each group. Clinic trials can be performed to observe the added effects of administering to patients erythritol along with the known drugs because erythritol was classified as a safe food ingredient.

Liao Y Chen

2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

242

Microsoft Word - Honeywell_Metropolis Final EA 9-1-10  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 Final Environmental Assessment For Honeywell International Inc Electric Drive Vehicle Battery and Component Manufacturing Initiative Project Massac County, IL September 2010 Prepared for: Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Electric Drive Vehicle Battery and DOE/EA-1716 Component Manufacturing Initiative Project Environmental Assessment Honeywell International Inc. September 2010 National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Cover Sheet Proposed Action: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes, through a cooperative agreement with Honeywell International Inc. (Honeywell), to partially fund the construction of a manufacturing plant to produce a critical battery material, lithium hexafluorophosphate (LiPF

243

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Trunkline LNG Company, LLC Docket No. PF12-8-000 Trunkline LNG Export, LLC Trunkline Gas Company, LLC SUPPLEMENTAL NOTICE OF INTENT TO PREPARE AN ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT FOR THE PLANNED LAKE CHARLES LIQUEFACTION PROJECT AND REQUEST FOR COMMENTS ON ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES (March 21, 2013) As previously noticed on September 14, 2012, and supplemented herein, the staff of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC or Commission) will prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) that will discuss the environmental impacts of the Lake Charles Liquefaction Project involving construction and operation of facilities by Trunkline LNG Company, LLC; Trunkline LNG Export, LLC; and Trunkline Gas

244

INSTRUCTIONS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INSTRUCTIONS" INSTRUCTIONS" "* Spreadsheet is protected without a password. To unprotect, go to ." "* Project characteristic factors are listed at the end of this spreadsheet, and its values can be modified. If modified, please document accordingly." "* Spreadsheet is protected for entry only in the yellow highlighted cells allowing for up to 10 projects and/or a project with 10 FY spend profiles." "* For project characteristics except PV and PF, please select from the cell's pull down list." "* The general outputs are in the gray highlighted cells." "INPUT (instructions - enter data only in yellow highlighted cells)" "general information",,,,"project characteristics",,,,,,,,,,"comments"

245

EA-1837: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1837: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1837: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1837: Finding of No Significant Impact Performance Verification Laboratory, Morgantown, West Virginia Based on the analyses in the environmental assessment, DOE determined that its proposed action - to design, construct, and make operational a DOE Performance Verification Laboratory facility for verifying the energy performance pf appliances and equipment to facilitiate improved enforcement of energy conservation standards and ENERGY STAR programs - would result in no significant adverse impacts. Finding of No Significant Impact and Final Environmental Assessment for National Energy Technology Laboratory Performance Verification Laboratory, Morgantown, West Virginia More Documents & Publications EA-1837: Final Environmental Assessment

246

EA-1837: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1837: Finding of No Significant Impact Performance Verification Laboratory, Morgantown, West Virginia Based on the analyses in the environmental assessment, DOE determined that its proposed action - to design, construct, and make operational a DOE Performance Verification Laboratory facility for verifying the energy performance pf appliances and equipment to facilitiate improved enforcement of energy conservation standards and ENERGY STAR programs - would result in no significant adverse impacts. Finding of No Significant Impact and Final Environmental Assessment for National Energy Technology Laboratory Performance Verification Laboratory, Morgantown, West Virginia More Documents & Publications EA-1837: Final Environmental Assessment

247

EA-1716: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1716: Finding of No Significant Impact Honeywell International, Inc., Electric Drive Vehicle Battery and Component Manufacturing Initiative Project Massac County, Illinois Based on the analyses in the Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE determined that its proposed action-awarding a federal greant to Honeywell International Inc. (Honeywell) for the construction of a manufacturing plant to produce a critical battery material, lithium hexafluorophosphate (LiPF6)- would result in no significant adverse impacts. FInding of No Significant Impact for Electric Drive Vehicle Battery and Component Manufacturing Initiative Project, Honeywell International, Inc, Massac County, Illinois, DOE/EA-1716, September 2010 More Documents & Publications

248

Past:  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

z!_NEEiS1 z!_NEEiS1 Past: -iRAm E ---------------^--- ---- Owner contacted q yes Pf current: ------------_-------______ "a; if yea, date contacted -----0----_-- TYPE OF OPERATION ---------------__ ' 0 Research & Develapment Cl Facility Type 0 Manufactuiing 0 Bench Scale Process : Theoretical Stu$ies Sample & Analysis 0 Production Cl Disposal/Storage 0 University 0 Research Organization 0 Government Sponsored Facility Cl Other -----------------_--- TYPE OF CONTRACT ---_------------ q Prime 0 Subcontractbr 0 Purchase Order cl Other information (i.e., cost +, fi,xed fee, unit price, time 81 material, e,tc) ------- ---------------------------- Contract/Purchase Order #-- _C~NIE~_CIL!K!EEL!3: -------------------------------------- OWNERSHiP: flEWWED PECIMED

249

Enhanced Career Longevity and Retirement Options for DOE Protective Force Personnel - Recommendations from the Protective Force Career Options Initiative Study Group dated June 30, 2009  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 ENHANCED CAREER LONGEVITY AND RETIREMENT OPTIONS FOR DOE PROTECTIVE FORCE PERSONNEL Recommendations from the Protective Force Career Options Initiative Study Group EXECUTIVE SUMMARY On March 31, 2009, the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), the Office of Environmental Management, the Office of Nuclear Energy, the Office of Fossil Energy, and the National Council of Security Police (NCSP) came together in a joint effort to examine "realistic and reasonable options for improving the career opportunities and retirement prospects of protective force (PF) members while maintaining, within current and anticipated budgetary constraints, a robust and effective security posture."

250

Signature of a Pairing Transition in the Heat Capacity of Finite Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The heat capacity of iron isotopes is calculated within the interacting shell model using the complete $(pf+0g_{9/2})$-shell. We identify a signature of the pairing transition in the heat capacity that is correlated with the suppression of the number of spin-zero neutron pairs as the temperature increases. Our results are obtained by a novel method that significantly reduces the statistical errors in the heat capacity calculated by the shell model Monte Carlo approach. The Monte Carlo results are compared with finite-temperature Fermi gas and BCS calculations.

S. Liu; Y. Alhassid

2000-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

251

Positional Games on Random Graphs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce and study Maker/Breaker-type positional games on random graphs. Our main concern is to determine the threshold probability pF for the existence of Maker's strategy to claim a member of in the unbiased game played on the edges of random graph G(n, p), for various target families of winning sets. More generally, for each probability above this threshold we study the smallest bias b such that Maker wins the (1: b) biased game. We investigate these functions for a number of basic games, like the connectivity game, the perfect matching game, the clique game and the Hamiltonian cycle game.

Milos Stojakovic; Tibor Szabo

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Modelling of the internal dynamics and density in a tens of joules plasma focus device  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using MHD theory, coupled differential equations were generated using a lumped parameter model to describe the internal behaviour of the pinch compression phase in plasma focus discharges. In order to provide these equations with appropriate initial conditions, the modelling of previous phases was included by describing the plasma sheath as planar shockwaves. The equations were solved numerically, and the results were contrasted against experimental measurements performed on the device PF-50J. The model is able to predict satisfactorily the timing and the radial electron density profile at the maximum compression.

Marquez, Ariel [CNEA and Instituto Balseiro, 8402 Bariloche (Argentina); Gonzalez, Jose [INVAP-CONICET and Instituto Balseiro, 8402 Bariloche, Argentina. (Argentina); Tarifeno-Saldivia, Ariel; Pavez, Cristian; Soto, Leopoldo [CCHEN, Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, Casilla 188-D, Santiago (Chile); Center for Research and Applications in Plasma Physics and Pulsed Power, P4 (Chile); Clausse, Alejandro [CNEA-CONICET and Universidad Nacional del Centro, 7000 Tandil (Argentina)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

253

Extrapolation method in the Monte Carlo Shell Model and its applications  

SciTech Connect

We demonstrate how the energy-variance extrapolation method works using the sequence of the approximated wave functions obtained by the Monte Carlo Shell Model (MCSM), taking {sup 56}Ni with pf-shell as an example. The extrapolation method is shown to work well even in the case that the MCSM shows slow convergence, such as {sup 72}Ge with f5pg9-shell. The structure of {sup 72}Se is also studied including the discussion of the shape-coexistence phenomenon.

Shimizu, Noritaka; Abe, Takashi [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Hongo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Utsuno, Yutaka [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Mizusaki, Takahiro [Institute of Natural Sciences, Senshu University, Tokyo, 101-8425 (Japan); Otsuka, Takaharu [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Hongo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Center for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo, Hongo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan (United States); Honma, Michio [Center for Mathematical Sciences, Aizu University, Aizu-Wakamatsu, Fukushima 965-8580 (Japan)

2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

254

Structure of unstable nuclei around N = 28 described by a shell model with the monopole-based universal interaction  

SciTech Connect

The structure of exotic nuclei around N = 28 is investigated in the sd-pf shell-model space using a new effective interaction. The cross-shell part of the interaction is provided by the monopole-based universal interaction which has been successful in accounting for single-particle evolution in several mass regions. Focusing on the nuclear structure that is sensitive to the shell evolution, we show successful results for the proton-hole states in K isotopes and large deformation in {sup 42}Si. The results demonstrate that the present scheme may be a promising way for constructing an effective interaction for other mass regions.

Utsuno, Yutaka [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan); Otsuka, Takaharu [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo (Japan); National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing MI 48824 (United States); Brown, B. Alex [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing MI 48824 (United States); National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing MI 48824 (United States); Honma, Michio [Center for Mathematical Sciences, University of Aizu, Ikki-machi, Aizu-Wakamatsu, Fukushima 965-8580 (Japan); Mizusaki, Takahiro [Institute for National Sciences, Senshu University, Tokyo, 101-8425 (Japan)

2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

255

xyxEssevs hi ysx hi riiqxi xyxEssevs yp riiqxi ysx  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) E une prmétristion moE dulireD K un orps qudrtique imginire dns lequel tous les fteurs premiers de N théorie de l multiplition omplexe montre qu9il est dé(ni sur K[c]D le orps d9ordre de onduteur c de KF PF oit p N un nomre premier etD pour n 0D xn = [C/Opn C/N-1 pn ] X0(N)(K[pn ])F ve orps K[p ] = n0K

Cornut, Christophe - Institut de Mathématiques de Jussieu, Université Paris 7

256

Excitation spectra from angular momentum projection of Hartree-Fock states and the configuration-interaction shell-model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We make numerical comparison of spectra from angular-momentum projection on Hartree-Fock states with spectra from configuration-interaction nuclear shell-model calculations, all carried out in the same model spaces (in this case the sd, lower pf, and p-sd_5/2 shells) and using the same input Hamiltonians. We find, unsurprisingly, that the low-lying excitation spectra for rotational nuclides are well reproduced, but the spectra for vibrational nuclides, and more generally the complex specta for odd-A and odd-odd nuclides are less well reproduced in detail.

Joshua T. Staker; Calvin W. Johnson

2013-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

257

Multicore and Accelerator Development for a Leadership-Class Stellar Astrophysics Code  

SciTech Connect

We describe recent development work on the core-collapse supernova code CHIMERA. CHIMERA has consumed more than 100 million cpu-hours on Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) platforms in the past 3 years, ranking it among the most important applications at the OLCF. Most of the work described has been focused on exploiting the multicore nature of the current platform (Jaguar) via, e.g., multithreading using OpenMP. In addition, we have begun a major effort to marshal the computational power of GPUs with CHIMERA. The impending upgrade of Jaguar to Titan a 20+ PF machine with an NVIDIA GPU on many nodes makes this work essential.

Messer, Bronson [ORNL; Harris, James A [ORNL; Parete-Koon, Suzanne T [ORNL; Chertkow, Merek A [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

TRAC analyses for CCTF and SCTF tests and UPTF design/operation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2D/3D Program is a multinational (Germany, Japan, and the United States) experimental and analytical nuclear reactor safety research program. The Los Alamos analysis effort is functioning as a vital part of the 2D/3D program. The CCTF and SCTF analyses have demonstrated that TRAC-PF1 can correctly predict multidimensional, nonequilibrium behavior in large-scale facilities prototypical of actual PWR's. Through these and future TRAC analyses the experimental findings can be related from facility to facility, and the results of this research program can be directly related to licensing concerns affecting actual PWR's.

Williams, K.A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

A Study of Electrochemical Reduction of Ethylene and PropyleneCarbonate Electrolytes on Graphite Using ATR-FTIR Spectroscopy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We present results testing the hypothesis that there is a different reaction pathway for the electrochemical reduction of PC versus EC-based electrolytes at graphite electrodes with LiPF6 as the salt in common. We examined the reduction products formed using ex-situ Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy in attenuated total reflection (ATR) geometry. The results show the pathway for reduction of PC leads nearly entirely to lithium carbonate as the solid product (and presumably ethylene gas as the co-product) while EC follows a path producing a mixture of organic and inorganic compounds. Possible explanations for the difference in reaction pathway are discussed.

Zhuang, Guorong V.; Yang, Hui; Blizanac, Berislav; Ross Jr.,Philip N.

2005-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

260

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

SENECA ARMY DEPOT SENECA ARMY DEPOT ROMULUS, NEW YORK Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and kaste Technology. Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects INTRODUCTION t3ACKGROUND CONTENTS . -Page Site Function Site Description Radiological History and Status ELIMINATION ANALYSIS REFERENCES 1 4 ii .___ -_-_..--. ._.".. ELIMINATION REPORT SENECA ARMY DEPOT ROMULUS, NEW YORK . INTRODUCTION The Department pf Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy, Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology, Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects (and/or predecessor agencies, offices, and divisions) has reviewed the past activities of the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) at Seneca Army Depot, Romulus, hew York. Based on the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "malta pf paracel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 Project_!.!!formatlon Doll!r Reseed~ ~u.pment and Ol.mp lludts The table below Ia to be completed by the Project Lead and ,.vi-ed by the Envwonmental Spec1ull.r ao\d the DOll NEPA Compliance Officer. NOTE, If Ch *r :,r· ol .ir.Uf · OC" '" , PtOjPfOjeet .,......; ~1*1 for lmpaeta I Does the propoMd PfOject llffec:t groundwllter quantity I or quality under both normal o.,.t11tlona lind accident conditions? Will t,_ profec:t ar- Include "Water. of the State?" r Will the profec:t - rwqulre a Corpa of l!nglneef-s permit? 0 Impacts Anllc lpatadt No I NA I 0 0 jo o (8] 0 j r!l o I ~ 0 Impacts Antle ted? Yea No NA

262

REQUEST BY THE TRANE COMPANY, INC. FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TRANE COMPANY, INC. FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF TRANE COMPANY, INC. FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN RIGHTS IN SUBJECT INVENTIONS MADE IN THE COURSE OF OR UNDER SUBCONTRACT NO. PF11413 WITH GAS TECHNOLOGY INCORPORATED UNDER UT-BATTELLE, LLC SUBCONTRACT NO. 4000009522 UNDER DOE PRIME CONTRACT DE-AC05-00OR22725; DOE WAIVER DOCKET W(A)-02-028; [ORO-772] The Trane Company (Trane) has made a request for an advance waiver to worldwide rights in Subject Inventions made in the course of or under Subcontract No. PF11413 under Gas Technology Incorporated (GTI) Subcontract No. 4000009522 with UT-Battelle, LLC under Department of Energy (DOE) Contract DE-AC05-00OR22725. The scope of work of this project is to design, build, and verify the performance of a single-effect absorption chiller with capacity of approximately 100 tons. Trane will also provide input to and work with the other

263

Development of high energy density fuels from mild gasification of coal. Final report  

SciTech Connect

METC has concluded that MCG technology has the potential to simultaneously satisfy the transportation and power generation fuel needs in the most cost-effective manner. MCG is based on low temperature pyrolysis, a technique known to the coal community for over a century. Most past pyrolysis developments were aimed at maximizing the liquids yield which results in a low quality tarry product requiring significant and capital intensive upgrading. By properly tailoring the pyrolysis severity to control the liquid yield-liquid quality relationship, it has been found that a higher quality distillate-boiling liquid can be readily ``skimmed`` from the coal. The resultant liquids have a much higher H/C ratio than conventional pyrolytic tars and therefore can be hydroprocessed at lower cost. These liquids are also extremely enriched in l-, 2-, and 3-ring aromatics. The co-product char material can be used in place of coal as a pulverized fuel (pf) for power generation in a coal combustor. In this situation where the original coal has a high sulfur content, the MCG process can be practiced with a coal-lime mixture and the calcium values retained on the char can tie up the unconverted coal sulfur upon pf combustion of the char. Lime has also been shown to improve the yield and quality of the MCG liquids.

Not Available

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Failure modes in high-power lithium-ion batteries for use inhybrid electric vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Advanced Technology Development (ATD) Program seeks to aid the development of high-power lithium-ion batteries for hybrid electric vehicles. Nine 18650-size ATD baseline cells were tested under a variety of conditions. The cells consisted of a carbon anode, LiNi{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.2}O{sub 2} cathode and DEC-EC-LiPF{sub 6} electrolyte, and they were engineered for high-power applications. Selected instrumental techniques such as synchrotron IR microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, gas chromatography, etc. were used to characterize the anode, cathode, current collectors and electrolyte from these cells. The goal was to identify detrimental processes which lead to battery failure under a high-current cycling regime as well as during storage at elevated temperatures. The diagnostic results suggest that the following factors contribute to the cell power loss: (a) SEI deterioration and non-uniformity on the anode, (b) morphology changes, increase of impedance and phase separation on the cathode, (c) pitting corrosion on the cathode Al current collector, and (d) decomposition of the LiPF{sub 6} salt in the electrolyte at elevated temperature.

Kostecki, R.; Zhang, X.; Ross Jr., P.N.; Kong, F.; Sloop, S.; Kerr, J.B.; Striebel, K.; Cairns, E.; McLarnon, F.

2001-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

265

Electrophysiological properties of the L-type Ca2+ current in cardiomyocytes from Pacific mackerel and bluefin tuna  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tunas are capable of exceptionally high maximum metabolic rates, which requires rapid delivery of oxygen and metabolic substrate to the tissues. This requirement is met, in part, by exceptionally high maximum cardiac outputs, opening the possibility that myocardial Ca 2+ delivery is enhanced in tuna myocytes compared with other fish. In this study, we investigated the electrophysiological properties of the cardiac L-type Ca 2+ channel current (ICa) to test the hypothesis that Ca 2+ influx would be larger and have faster kinetics in cardiomyocytes from Pacific bluefin tuna (Thunnus orientalis) compared with those of its sister taxa, the Pacific mackerel (Scomber japonicus). In accordance with this hypothesis, ICa in atrial myocytes from bluefin tuna had significantly greater peak current amplitudes and faster fast inactivation kinetics (-4.40.2 pA pF-1 and 25.91.6 ms, respectively) compared with mackerel (-2.70.5 pA pF-1 and 32.33.8 ms, respectively). Steady-state activation, inactivation and recovery from inactivation were also faster in atrial myocytes from tuna compared with mackerel. In ventricular myocytes, current amplitude and activation and inactivation rates were

H. A. Shiels; J. M. Blank; A. P. Farrell; B. A. Block

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

of Defense signed out DoD Directive (DoDD) 8115.01, Information Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

established policy and assigned responsibilities for the management of DoD IT investments as portfolios that focus on improving DoD capabilities and mission outcomes. Under the directive, the responsibility of establishing guidance for managing portfolios was placed with the ASD[NII]/DoD CIO. Individual portfolios manage their investments using strategic plans, GIG architecture, risk management techniques, and capability goals, objectives, and performance measures. As the benefits of PfM have become more widely recognized, the DoD is moving toward the management of all investments (not just IT) as portfolios. The 2005 Quadrennial Defense Review initiated a process that has piloted Capability Portfolio Management (CPM) and specified a structure whereby capabilities will be managed in a series of portfolios. The DoD is preparing to issue an overarching policy to formalize a comprehensive DoD CPM framework based on the Joint Capability Area taxonomy. To avoid the confusion of having two portfolio processes within the DoD, the DoDD 8115.01, Information Technology PfM, will be canceled when the new CPM policy is issued. The policies currently contained in DoD Instruction 8115.02,

Portfolio Management

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Use of bark-derived pyrolysis oils ass a phenol substitute in structural panel adhesives  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The main objective of this program was to pilot the world's first commercial-scale production of an acceptable phenol formaldehyde (PF) resin containing natural resin (NR) ingredients, for use as an adhesive in Oriented-Strand Board (OSB) and plywood panel products. Natural Resin products, specifically MNRP are not lignin ''fillers''. They are chemically active, natural phenolics that effectively displace significant amounts of phenol in PF resins, and which are extracted from bark-derived and wood-derived bio-oils. Other objectives included the enhancement of the economics of NR (MNRP) production by optimizing the production of certain Rapid Thermal Processing (RTP{trademark}) byproducts, particularly char and activated carbon. The options were to activate the char for use in waste-water and/or stack gas purification. The preliminary results indicate that RTP{trademark} carbon may ultimately serve as a feedstock for activated carbon synthesis, as a fuel to be used within the wood product mill, or a fuel for an electrical power generating facility. Incorporation of the char as an industrial heat source for use in mill operations was L-P's initial intention for the carbon, and was also of interest to Weyerhaeuser as they stepped into in the project.

Louisiana Pacific Corp

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

The upgrade project for the RF system for the Brookhaven AGS  

SciTech Connect

The AGS operates a varied program of proton, heavy ion, and polarized proton acceleration for fixed-target experiments and will soon serve as the injector of these beams into the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, RHIC. The new Booster synchrotron extends the range of intensities and masses that can be accelerated. The 1.5 GeV injection energy increases the space charge limit by a factor of four to more than 6 {times} 10{sup 13} protons per pulse. To accommodate the increased beam current the rf system will be upgraded to provide more power and lower impedance to the beam. The flexibility of the rf system will also be enhanced by virtue of a new rf beam control system and installation of individual tuning servos for the ten rf cavities. The fundamental necessity for upgrading the rf system is to deliver more power to the accelerating beam. Three key ingredients of the upgrade project addressing this problem is (1) new power amplifiers provide the necessary power, and are closely coupled to the cavities, (2) wideband rf feedback reduces the effective impedance by a factor of 10, and (3) the capacitors loading the acceleration gaps (four per cavity) are increased from 275 pF to 600 pF.

Brennan, J.M.; Ciardullo, D.J.; Hayes, T.; Meth, M.; McNerney, A.J.; Otis, A.; Pirkl, W.; Sanders, R.; Spitz, R.; Toldo, F.; Zaltsman, A.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Fluoro-Carbonate Solvents for Li-Ion Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A number of fluoro-carbonate solvents were evaluated as electrolytes for Li-ion cells. These solvents are fluorine analogs of the conventional electrolyte solvents such as dimethyl carbonate, ethylene carbonate, diethyl carbonate in Li-ion cells. Conductivity of single and mixed fluoro carbonate electrolytes containing 1 M LiPF{sub 6} was measured at different temperatures. These electrolytes did not freeze at -40 C. We are evaluating currently, the irreversible 1st cycle capacity loss in carbon anode in these electrolytes and the capacity loss will be compared to that in the conventional electrolytes. Voltage stability windows of the electrolytes were measured at room temperature and compared with that of the conventional electrolytes. The fluoro-carbon electrolytes appear to be more stable than the conventional electrolytes near Li voltage. Few preliminary electrochemical data of the fluoro-carbonate solvents in full cells are reported in the literature. For example, some of the fluorocarbonate solvents appear to have a wider voltage window than the conventional electrolyte solvents. For example, methyl 2,2,2 trifluoro ethyl carbonate containing 1 M LiPF{sub 6} electrolyte has a decomposition voltage exceeding 6 V vs. Li compared to <5 V for conventional electrolytes. The solvent also appears to be stable in contact with lithium at room temperature.

NAGASUBRAMANIAN,GANESAN

1999-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

270

X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of negative electrodes from high-power lithium-ion cells showing various levels of power fade  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

High-power lithium-ion cells for transportation applications are being developed and studied at Argonne National Laboratory. The current generation of cells containing LiNi{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.15}Al{sub 0.05}O{sub 2}-based cathodes, graphite-based anodes, and LiPF6-based electrolytes show loss of capacity and power during accelerated testing at elevated temperatures. Negative electrode samples harvested from some cells that showed varying degrees of power and capacity fade were examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The samples exhibited a surface film on the graphite, which was thicker on samples from cells that showed higher fade. Furthermore, solvent-based compounds were dominant on samples from low power fade cells, whereas LiPF{sub 6}-based products were dominant on samples from high power fade cells. The effect of sample rinsing and air exposure is discussed. Mechanisms are proposed to explain the formation of compounds suggested by the XPS data.

Herstedt, Marie; Abraham, Daniel P.; Kerr, John B.

2004-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

271

Cray XE6 Architecture John Shalf NERSC XE6 User Training  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

XE6 Architecture XE6 Architecture John Shalf NERSC XE6 User Training Feb 7, 2011 2 NERSC-6 Grace "Hopper" Cray XE6 Performance 1.2 PF Peak 1.05 PF HPL (#5) Processor AMD MagnyCours 2.1 GHz 12-core 8.4 GFLOPs/core 24 cores/node 32-64 GB DDR3-1333 per node System Gemini Interconnect (3D torus) 6392 nodes 153,408 total cores I/O 2PB disk space 70GB/s peak I/O Bandwidth Potential System Architectures What is Possible Systems 2009 2015 +1/-0 2018 +1/-0 System peak 2 Peta 100-300 Peta 1 Exa Power 6 MW ~15 MW ~20 MW System memory 0.3 PB 5 PB 64 PB (+) Node performance 125 GF 0.5 TF or 7 TF 2 TF or 10TF Node memory BW 25 GB/s 0.2TB/s or 0.5TB/s 0.4TB/s or 1TB/s Node concurrency 12 O(100) O(1k) or 10k Total Node Interconnect BW 3.5 GB/s 100-200 GB/s

272

Newsletter Signup Form  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EETD NEWSLETTER - MANAGE SUBSCRIPTIONS EETD NEWSLETTER - MANAGE SUBSCRIPTIONS (red fields are required) Manage subscriptions: Subscribe Unsubscribe Name E-Mail Affiliation Address Address (line 2) City State/Province Zip/Postal Code Country (please select a country) none Afghanistan Albania Algeria American Samoa Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegowina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d'Ivoire Croatia (Hrvatska) Cuba Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic East Timor Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France France, Metropolitan French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guam Guatemala Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard and Mc Donald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran (Islamic Republic of) Iraq Ireland Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People's Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macau Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Marshall Islands Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Micronesia, Federated States of Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands Netherlands Antilles New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Northern Mariana Islands Norway Oman Pakistan Palau Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint LUCIA Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia (Slovak Republic) Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands Spain Sri Lanka St. Helena St. Pierre and Miquelon Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Islands Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan, Province of China Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States United States Minor Outlying Islands Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela Viet Nam Virgin Islands (British) Virgin Islands (U.S.) Wallis and Futuna Islands Western Sahara Yemen Yugoslavia Zambia Zimbabwe

273

GAS DISTRIBUTION, KINEMATICS, AND EXCITATION STRUCTURE IN THE DISKS AROUND THE CLASSICAL Be STARS {beta} CANIS MINORIS AND {zeta} TAURI  

SciTech Connect

Using CHARA and VLTI near-infrared spectro-interferometry with hectometric baseline lengths (up to 330 m) and with high spectral resolution (up to {lambda}/{Delta}{lambda} = 12, 000), we studied the gas distribution and kinematics around two classical Be stars. The combination of high spatial and spectral resolution achieved allows us to constrain the gas velocity field on scales of a few stellar radii and to obtain, for the first time in optical interferometry, a dynamical mass estimate using the position-velocity analysis technique known from radio astronomy. For our first target star, {beta} Canis Minoris, we model the H+K-band continuum and Br{gamma}-line geometry with a near-critical rotating stellar photosphere and a geometrically thin equatorial disk. Testing different disk rotation laws, we find that the disk is in Keplerian rotation (v(r){proportional_to}r{sup -0.5{+-}0.1}) and derive the disk position angle (140 Degree-Sign {+-} 1.{sup 0}7), inclination (38.{sup 0}5 {+-} 1 Degree-Sign ), and the mass of the central star (3.5 {+-} 0.2 M{sub Sun }). As a second target star, we observed the prototypical Be star {zeta} Tauri and spatially resolved the Br{gamma} emission as well as nine transitions from the hydrogen Pfund series (Pf 14-22). Comparing the spatial origin of the different line transitions, we find that the Brackett (Br{gamma}), Pfund (Pf 14-17), and Balmer (H{alpha}) lines originate from different stellocentric radii (R{sub cont} < R{sub Pf} < R{sub Br{gamma}} {approx} R{sub H{alpha}}), which we can reproduce with an LTE line radiative transfer computation. Discussing different disk-formation scenarios, we conclude that our constraints are inconsistent with wind compression models predicting a strong outflowing velocity component, but support viscous decretion disk models, where the Keplerian-rotating disk is replenished with material from the near-critical rotating star.

Kraus, S.; Monnier, J. D.; Che, X.; Baron, F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 918 Dennison Building, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1090 (United States); Schaefer, G.; Ten Brummelaar, T. A.; McAlister, H. A.; Turner, N. H.; Sturmann, J.; Sturmann, L. [CHARA Array, Georgia State University, P.O. Box 3965, Atlanta, GA 30302-3965 (United States); Touhami, Y.; Gies, D. R. [Center for High Angular Resolution Astronomy and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, P.O. Box 4106, Atlanta, GA 30302-4106 (United States); Aufdenberg, J. P. [Department of Physical Sciences, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, 600 S. Clyde Morris Blvd., Daytona Beach FL 32114 (United States); Thureau, N., E-mail: stefankr@umich.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of St. Andrews (United Kingdom)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Structure, function, and inhibition of enoyl reductases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Malaria and tuberculosis constitute two of the worlds deadliest infectious diseases. Together, they afflict over one third of the worlds population. Once thought of as one of a group of nearly vanquished diseases only 50 years ago, malaria and tuberculosis have experienced renewed prominence due to issues such as multi-drug resistance and a lack of responsiveness by the global community. Fatty acid biosynthesis has been shown to be an essential pathway to the causative organisms of malaria and tuberculosis. One integral component of the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway, enoyl acyl-carrier-protein (ACP) reductase, has repeatedly been validated as an appropriate drug target in other organisms. The 2.4 crystal structure of the enoyl-ACP reductase from the human parasite Plasmodium falciparum (PfENR) reveals a nucleotide-binding Rossmann fold, as well as the identity of several active site residues important for catalysis. The 2.43 crystal structure of PfENR bound with triclosan, a widely utilized anti-bacterial compound, provides new information concerning key elements of inhibitor binding. Applying knowledge attained from these initial crystal structures, several triclosan derivatives were synthesized, and subsequently PfENR:inhibitor co-crystal structures were determined to extend our knowledge of protein:inhibitor interactions within the active site. Additionally, the crystal structures of the enoyl-ACP reductase from the mouse parasite Plasmodium berghei (PbENR), in apo-form and in complex with triclosan, were refined to 2.9 and 2.5 resolution, respectively. These structures confirm the structural and active site conservation between the human and mouse parasite enoyl-ACP reductases, suggesting that utilizing a murine model for in vivo testing of promising inhibitors is viable. The 2.6 crystal structure of the enoyl-ACP reductase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (InhA) in complex with triclosan reveals a novel configuration of triclosan binding, where two molecules of triclosan are accommodated within the InhA active site. Finally, high-throughput screening approaches using enoyl acyl-carrier-protein reductases as the targets were utilized to identify new lead compounds for future generations of drugs. The 2.7 crystal structure of InhA bound with Genz-10850 confirms the value of this technique.

Kuo, Mack Ryan

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

SHARP Assembly-Scale Multiphysics Demonstration Simulations | Argonne  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SHARP Assembly-Scale Multiphysics Demonstration Simulations SHARP Assembly-Scale Multiphysics Demonstration Simulations Title SHARP Assembly-Scale Multiphysics Demonstration Simulations Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2013 Authors Tautges, TJ, Fischer, PF, Grindeanu, I, Jain, R, Mahajan, A, Obabko, AV, Smith, MA, Merzari, E, Ferencz, R Document Number ANL/MCS-NE-13-9 Abstract The NEAMS Reactor Product Line effort aims to develop an integrated multiphysics simulation capability for the design and analysis of future generations of nuclear power plants. The Reactor Product Line code suite's multi-resolution hierarchy is being designed to ultimately span the full range of length and time scales present in relevant reactor design and safety analyses, as well as scale from desktop to petaflop computing platforms.

276

OneTouch 4.0 Scanned Documents  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

59 59 Project Tltle: Nalco /Total Flow Loop Polymer Test Dam: 2fT/fl013 DOE Cod9: 673002 - 51160 Project OwfvNlw l. Snet PfOiect descnpuon (include anything that cou 1m~ct the e ironment) 2. L!gal location 3. Duration of the project 4. Major equipment to be used The objective of the test at RMOTC is to acquire data about pre$$Ure drop and degradation for dilute polymer solutiOn in a continuous long distance pipeline. Tests will be performed with a representative pipeline diameter operated In turbulent flow. *Representative" diameter means cfiameter large enough to allow up scanng to Industrial conditions (at least 6"). The final objectives of the tesu are: L To provide reliable and test data to be used In a foreign Partner study for EOR pipeHne.

277

MEMORANDUM TO: FILE SITE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

SITE SITE NAME: /+%&'&&c /-i-QS~,~~-L ALTERNATE ------------ -------------------------- NAME: - -------------------___ C 1 T-f: -~~~~~L--~-----_--___,TATE: '"' y-/ OWNER ('=I B-----Z- Past: L?!lc~i&~~~~-~-~ Cut-rent: - Owner cnntacted q yes q:no; i,f yes, dats-c~~Fact,d------------- TYPE OF OPESATION ---------m-L----- @Research & Develapment & Facility Type 0 Production scale testing 0 Pilot Scale a bnch scale ~~~~~~~ 0 Theoretical Studies G Sample 84 Analysis 0 Production G Disposal/Storage Manufacturing University Research Organization Government Sponsored Facility llther +r.PfTzK-- --------------------- TYPZ OF CONTRACT ~~__----__------ q Prime E SubccntractkrT u&lv.$Ch,ck>b 0 Purchase Order 0 Other information

278

Preliminary Notice of Violation, Los Alamos National Laboratory -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2-05 2-05 Preliminary Notice of Violation, Los Alamos National Laboratory - EA-2002-05 December 17, 2002 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to University of California related to the Unauthorized Storage of Transuranic Waste at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, December 17, 2002 (EA-2002-05) This letter refers to the recent investigation by the Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) of the unauthorized staging and storage of transuranic (TRU) waste in PF-185 from March 1996 until June 2001. Preliminary Notice of Violation, Los Alamos National Laboratory - EA-2002-05 More Documents & Publications Preliminary Notice of Violation, Los Alamos National Laboratory - EA-2003-02 Fact Sheet, Preliminary Notice of Violation: Four Hazardous Energy Control

279

quark-web.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FREE FREE QUARK SEARCHES The basis for much of the theory of particle scattering and hadron spectroscopy is the construction of the hadrons from a set of fractionally charged constituents (quarks). A central but unproven hypothesis of this theory, Quantum Chromodynamics, is that quarks cannot be observed as free particles but are confined to mesons and baryons. Experiments show that it is at best difficult to "unglue" quarks. Accelerator searches at increasing energies have pro- duced no evidence for free quarks, while only a few cosmic-ray and matter searches have produced uncorroborated events. This compilation is only a guide to the literature, since the quoted experimental limits are often only indicative. Reviews can be found in Refs. 1-4. References 1. M.L. Perl, E.R. Lee, and D. Lomba, Mod. Phys. Lett. A19, 2595 (2004). 2. P.F. Smith, Ann. Rev. Nucl. and Part. Sci. 39,

280

Edison Configuration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Configuration Configuration Configuration NERSC's newest supercomputer, named Edison after U.S. inventor and businessman Thomas Alva Edison, will have a peak performance of more than 2 petaflops (PF, or 1015 floating point operations per second) when fully installed in 2013. The integrated storage system will have more than 6 petabytes (PB) of storage with a peak I/O bandwidth of 140 gigabytes (GB) per second. The product is known as a Cray XC30 (internal name "Cascade"), and the NERSC acquistion project is known as "NERSC 7." Edison will be installed in two phases. Phase I Installation: 4Q 2012 Early User Access: Started in February 2013. All users were enabled March 2, 2013. System Overview Cray Cascade supercomputer 664 computes nodes with 64 GB memory per node

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281

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

91 - 24200 of 26,764 results. 91 - 24200 of 26,764 results. Download Before the House Science, Space, and Technology Subcommittee on Investigations and Oversight Subject: Rare Earth Elements By: David Sandalow, Assistant Secretary Office of Policy and International Affairs http://energy.gov/congressional/downloads/house-science-space-and-technology-subcommittee-investigations-and-oversight Download PJM Presentation- The Silver Bullet: Storage! (July 12, 2011) Presentation by Terry Boston, President and CEO pf PJM Interconnection before the Electricity Advisorty Committee, July 12, 2011, on storage for the smart grid. http://energy.gov/oe/downloads/pjm-presentation-silver-bullet-storage-july-12-2011 Download Secretary of Energy Advisory Board- July 20, 2011 Meeting Minutes SEAB members heard opening remarks from Chairman Perry and Secretary Chu.

282

Slide 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

So Now, What? So Now, What? Collaborative Pathways Forward P.F. Tortorelli Oak Ridge National Laboratory Ferritic ODS Alloys Workshop November 18, 2010 Disclaimer 2 Time Is Right to Advance ODS Alloys as Part of Push for Higher Temperature Materials * Energy efficiency imperative * Existence of foundational knowledge and experience * Recent progress - Joining - Processing know-how available for producing powder, tubes, sheet, and near net shaped products - Understanding of scale failure modes and credible prediction methodologies for oxidation lifetimes - Abilities to design, control, characterize at smaller length scales so as to impact macroscopic behaviors 3 Fully Cognizant of the Problems, Pathways for Moving ODS Alloys Forward * More and more integrated R&D

283

City of St James, Missouri (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

James, Missouri (Utility Company) James, Missouri (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of St James Place Missouri Utility Id 17877 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Industrial service (L-2009) Industrial Large commercial service. (LC-2009) Commercial Residential electric service (R-2009) Residential Security lighting service (PF-2009) Lighting Small commercial electric service. (SC-2009) Commercial Average Rates Residential: $0.0971/kWh Commercial: $0.0826/kWh Industrial: $0.0769/kWh References

284

PJ,,!C·  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PJ,,!C· PJ,,!C· .'FZ. RECI PI ENT:City of Columbus u.s. DEPARTI\IFN T OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAG EM ENT CENTER NEPA DETERi\IINATION STATE: OH PROJ~:CT TITLE: Columbus City ARRA· EECBG (S) Act8-Home Energy Efficiency 8aseload Reduction Program funding 0pfJOrtunity Announcement Number Procuremtnt Instrument Number OE-EEOOOO706 NEPA Control Number ell) Number o Based on my review or the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authoriud under DOE Order 451.IA). I have made the following determination: ex, EA , [IS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A11 Technical advice and planning assistance to international , national , stale, and local organizations. A9 Information gathering (including, but nollimited 10, literature surveys, inventories, audits), data analysis (induding

285

MEMORANDUM  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

c4 c4 TO: FILE -___ mm4: L!!4Goti-QktiEZ SUBJECT: ,.. I ",;;' ,: d*s. (3-ew m----e-' ------ ---bLo _____________ ----STATE: -?!S& G o+J CITY: Rcno RcSe=udi OWNER(S) ; if yes, date contacted ,, ~I+*4 ## AJPUA - ?OJ -534 I 1 , TYPE OF OPERATION ----------------- Pf Research 81 Development 0 Facility Type .. 0 Production scale testinq Cl Pilot Scale 0 Bench Scale Process i Theoretical Studies Sample SC Analysis * Manuf acturinq 0 University 0 Research Organization 0 Government Sponsored Facility 0 Other --------------------- 0 Production 0 Disposal /Storage TYPE OF CONTRACT -__------------- c] Prime Q Subcontract& Cl Purchase Order q Other information (i.e., cost + fixed fee, unit price, time & material, etc:) _------ ~----__--______---__________

286

TY JOUR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solid phase supported profluorescent nitroxide probe for the determination Solid phase supported profluorescent nitroxide probe for the determination of aerosol borne reactive oxygen species JF Talanta A1 Mohamad Sleiman A1 Hugo Destaillats A1 Lara A Gundel KW Freeradicals Proxyl fluorescamine Dichlorofluorescin Cigarettesmoke Ozone NOx AB div class abstract svAbstract p id sp0035 Reactive oxygen species ROS and free radicals play important roles in the chemical transformation and adverse health effects of environmental aerosols This work presents a simple and sensitive method for sampling and analysis of ROS using a packed column coated with a profluorescent nitroxide scavenger proxyl fluorescamine PF Quantification was performed by extraction and analysis using HPLC with fluorescence detection For comparison the conventional

287

Criteria for Selection of Seed Motions to Envelop Design Response Spectra  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Selection of Seed Selection of Seed Motions to Envelop Design Response Spectra DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards Workshop October 25, 2011 Michael Costantino, Thomas Houston, Greg Mertz, Andrew Maham CJCAssociates Introduction * Recently, CJC&A has performed several studies regarding seed record selection used in the development of acceleration time histories for input into seismic analyses. - Primary issue - how does the seed record affect computed structural response. * This presentation is the result of two publications, as well as insights developed from the following DOE projects: - SSI analysis of the Uranium Processing Facility (Y12) - Probabilistic SSI analysis of PF4 (LANL) - Preliminary SSI analysis of CMRR (LANL) 2 CJCAssociates Background * Current design procedures used to develop synthetic time histories for the

288

Enforcement Action 2002-05  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Nuclear Security Administration National Nuclear Security Administration Washington, DC 20585 December 17, 2002 Dr. John Browne [ ] Los Alamos National Laboratory P.O. Box 1663 Los Alamos, NM 87545 EA-2002-05 Subject: Preliminary Notice of Violation and Proposed Civil Penalty $220,000 (Waived by Statute) Dear Dr. Browne: This letter refers to the recent investigation by the Department of Energy (DOE)/ National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) of the unauthorized staging and storage of transuranic (TRU) waste in PF-185 from March 1996 until June 2001. Following consultation with my office, the Department's Office of Price-Anderson Enforcement (OE) initiated an investigation in March 2002. The scope of the investigation included: (1) failures leading to the establishment of an unauthorized

289

WHC-SA-1619-FP  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

WHC-SA-1619-FP WHC-SA-1619-FP Stress Analysis and Evaluation of a Rectangular Pressure Vessel Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy '"^pf^. Office of Environmental {Restoration and ^''l^prf ^ Waste Management O^Q "'-^ (/^ Westinghouse HanfOrd Company Plchland, Washington Hanford Operations and Engineenng Contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC06-87RL10930 Copyright LICSnso By acceptance of this article, the publisher and/or recipient acknowledges the U.S Government's nght to retain a nonexclusive, royalty-free license in and to any copyright covering this paper. Approved for Public Release OfSTRtBUTTON OF THIS DOCUMENT IS UNLIMITED LEGAL DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government Neither the

290

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41 - 5150 of 9,640 results. 41 - 5150 of 9,640 results. Download EIS-0361: Final Environmental Impact Statement Western Greenbrier Co-Production Demonstration Project http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0361-final-environmental-impact-statement Download Microsoft PowerPoint- DOE O 413 3B Brief v9 with key points in notes [Read-Only] http://energy.gov/management/downloads/microsoft-powerpoint-doe-o-413-3b-brief-v9-key-points-notes-read-only Download A:REPORT96.PDF http://energy.gov/management/downloads/areport96pdf Download B:REPORT97.PDF http://energy.gov/management/downloads/breport97pdf Download PJM Presentation- The Silver Bullet: Storage! (July 12, 2011) Presentation by Terry Boston, President and CEO pf PJM Interconnection before the Electricity Advisorty Committee, July 12, 2011, on storage for

291

EIS-0487-NOI-2012.pdf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

89 Federal Register 89 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 143 / Wednesday, July 25, 2012 / Notices 1 The appendices referenced in this notice are not being printed in the Federal Register. Copies of appendices were sent to all those receiving this notice in the mail and are available at www.ferc.gov using the link called ''eLibrary'' or from the Commission's Public Reference Room, 888 First Street NE., Washington, DC 20426, or call (202) 502-8371. For instructions on connecting to eLibrary, refer to the last page of this notice. Staple or Tape Here [FR Doc. 2012-18102 Filed 7-24-12; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6717-01-P DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. PF11-2-000] Freeport LNG Development, L.P., Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P., FLNG Liquefaction LLC; Supplemental Notice

292

Memorandum, Protective Force Law Enforcement Authority - May 1, 2009 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Protective Force Law Enforcement Authority - May 1, Protective Force Law Enforcement Authority - May 1, 2009 Memorandum, Protective Force Law Enforcement Authority - May 1, 2009 May 1, 2009 Investigation allegations that contractor procetive force personnel at a DOE site exceeded their legistative ,regulatory, and policy-based authority by providing on-duty, armed off-site assistance to local law enforcement authorites during other than recapture/recovery operations, and by accessing the local law enforcement database for background checks during the course of on-site administrative traffic stops. It has come to our attention that the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Imspector General (OIG) has investigated allegations that conctractor protective force (PF) personnel at a DOE site exceeded their legistative

293

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 , 1 , W(A) 2010-035, CH-1572 . . . The Petitioner, General Electric Global Research (GE) was awarded the subject cooperative agreement with DOE for the performance of work entitled, "Optimized Phosphors for Warm White LED Engines". Under this agreement, GE will develop new phosphor materials and optimized LED packages. The waiver will apply only to inventions made by GE employees. . The work under this agreement Is expected to take place from March 16, ~W1 0 through March 15,2012. The total amount ofthe contract is $2,480,393, with GE cost-sharing $744,121 or 30%. and DOE providing the remaining cost-share pf $1,736.272 or 70%. hi its response to questions 5 and 6 of the attached waiver petition GE has . described its technical competence in the field of LED lighting. GEstates that It is a world leader

294

EA-1716: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Assessment Final Environmental Assessment EA-1716: Final Environmental Assessment Honeywell International Inc Electric Drive Vehicle Battery and Component Manufacturing Initiative Project Massac County, IL The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes, through a cooperative agreement with Honeywell International Inc. (Honeywell), to partially fund the construction of a manufacturing plant to produce a critical battery material, lithium hexaflurophosphate (LiPF6). The plant would be located on a 10-acre parcel, within a 1,010-acre tract of land owned by Honeywell, in an unincorporated area of Massac County, near the City of Metropolis, Illinois. THis facility would support the anticipated growth int he Li-ion battery industry and, more specifically, the electric drive vehicle (EDV)

295

Data:C658e468-a7af-40c6-ae00-429e13ef346c | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8e468-a7af-40c6-ae00-429e13ef346c 8e468-a7af-40c6-ae00-429e13ef346c No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Bonneville Power Admin Effective date: 2011/10/01 End date if known: 2013/09/30 Rate name: PF - 12 Exchange Sector: Residential Description: This schedule is available for the contract purchase of Firm Requirements Power pursuant to section 5(b) of the Northwest Power Act. Firm Requirements Power may be purchased for use within the Pacific Northwest by public bodies, cooperatives, and Federal agencies for resale to ultimate consumers, for direct consumption, and for Construction, Test and Start- Up, and Station Service.

296

2012 SG Peer Review - Smart Inverter Controls and Microgrid Interoperation at DECC - Tom Rizy, ORNL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

g g Peer Review Meeting Smart Inverter Controls & Microgrid Interoperation at the Distributed Energy Communications & Controls (DECC) Lab ( ) D. Tom Rizy Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) June 7 th 2012 June 7 th , 2012 Smart Inverter (SI) Controls and Microgrid (MG) Interoperation Microgrid (MG) Interoperation Objectives * D l d SI l f l i l DECC Microgrid * Develop and test SI controls for multiple renewable/nonrenewable DER. * Develop MG controls and communication requirements for high penetration DER. * I l t MG t DECC L b Technical Scope * Implement MG at DECC Lab. * Transfer technology to industry. Life-cycle Funding Summary ($K) Prior to FY12 FY13 Out- Technical Scope * Develop advanced smart inverter control consisting of local droop (P-f, Q-V) control integrated with secondary closed

297

Triplet Transport to and Trapping by Acceptor End Groups on Conjugated  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Triplet Transport to and Trapping by Acceptor End Groups on Conjugated Triplet Transport to and Trapping by Acceptor End Groups on Conjugated Polyfluorene Chains Paiboon Sreearunothai, Alexis Estrada, Sadayuki Asaoka, Marta Kowalczyk, Seogjoo Jang, Andrew R. Cook, Jack M. Preses and John R. Miller J. Phys. Chem. C 115, 19569-19577 (2011). [Find paper at ACS Publications] Abstract: Triplet excited states created in polyfluorene (pF) molecules having average lengths up to 170 repeat units were transported to and captured by trap groups at the ends in less ~40 ns. Almost all of the triplets attached to the chains reached the trap groups, ruling out the presence of substantial numbers of defects that prevent transport. The transport yields a diffusion coefficient D of at least 3 x 10-4 cm2 s-1, which is 30 times typical molecular diffusion and close to a value for triplet transport

298

Preliminary Notice of Violation, Los Alamos National Laboratory -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Los Alamos National Laboratory - Los Alamos National Laboratory - EA-2002-05 Preliminary Notice of Violation, Los Alamos National Laboratory - EA-2002-05 December 17, 2002 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to University of California related to the Unauthorized Storage of Transuranic Waste at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, December 17, 2002 (EA-2002-05) This letter refers to the recent investigation by the Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) of the unauthorized staging and storage of transuranic (TRU) waste in PF-185 from March 1996 until June 2001. Preliminary Notice of Violation, Los Alamos National Laboratory - EA-2002-05 More Documents & Publications Preliminary Notice of Violation, Los Alamos National Laboratory - EA-2003-02 Fact Sheet, Preliminary Notice of Violation: Four Hazardous Energy Control

299

Publications - FEERC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications Publications Alternative Power & Energy Conversion Emissions & Emission Controls Engine Combustion & Efficiency Fuels Technology Vehicle Research Miscellaneous Alternative Power & Energy Conversion Z. Gao, The Impact of TXV Heating on the Performance of Air-Source Heat Pumps in Heating Mode, submitted to Energy Conversion and Management (Journal). Emissions & Emission Controls T.J. Toops, N.A. Ottinger, C. Liang, J.A. Pihl, A. Payzant, "Impact of lattice substitution in Ba-based NOx storage reduction catalysts on sulfation, desulfation and NOx reduction performance", Catalysis Today 160:1 (2011) 131. T.J. Toops, M.P. Brady, P.F. Tortorelli, J.A. Pihl, F. Estevez, D. Connors, F. Garzon, T. Rockward, D. Gervasio, W. Mylan and S.H. Kosaraju, "Pre-Oxidized and Nitrided Stainless Steel Alloy Foil for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Bipolar Plates: Part 2- Single-Cell Fuel Cell Evaluation of Stamped Plates", Journal of Power Sources 195:17 (2010) 5619.

300

Sandia National Laboratories: Z Pulsed Power Facility: Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications Publications *only first authors listed 2013 Author Title Journal Volume RE Falcon An experimental platform for creating white dwarf photospheres in the laboratory High Energy Density Physics 9 TA Haill Mesoscale simulation of mixed equations of state with application to shocked platinum-doped PMP foams Procedia Engineering 58 SB Hansen Testing the reliability of Non-LTE Spectroscopic Models for Complex Ions High Energy Density Physics 9 B Jones Basis set expansion for inverse problems in plasma diagnostic analysis Review of Scientific Instruments 84 PF Knapp Diagnosing suprathermal ion populations in Z-pinch plasmas using fusion neutron spectra Physics of Plasmas 20 MD Knudson Shock response of low-density silica aerogel in the multi-Mbar regime Journal of Applied Physics

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301

Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 results: 3 results: BibTex RIS RTF XML Sort by: Author Title Type [ Year (Desc) ] Filters: Author is Ivan T. Lucas [Clear All Filters] 2012 Lux, Simon F., Ivan T. Lucas, Elad Pollak, Stefano Passerini, Martin Winter, and Robert Kostecki. "The mechanism of HF formation in LiPF6 based organic carbonate electrolytes." Electrochemistry Communications 14, no. 1 (2012): 47-50. 2011 He, Qinggang, Ahmet Kusoglu, Ivan T. Lucas, Kyle Clark, Adam Z. Weber, and Robert Kostecki. "Correlating Humidity-Dependent Ionically Conductive Surface Area with Transport Phenomena in Proton-Exchange Membranes." J. Phys. Chem. B. 115, no. 40 (2011): 11650-11657. 2009 Hardwick, Laurence J., Juliette A. Saint, Ivan T. Lucas, Marca M. Doeff, and Robert Kostecki. "FTIR and Raman Study of LixTiyMn1-y2(y=0,0.11)

302

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Respiratory Protection Respiratory Protection Study Guide 2.07-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Respiratory Protection Module Number: 2.07 Objectives: 2.07.01 Explain the purpose of respiratory protection standards and regulations. 2.07.02 Identify the OSHA, ANSI, and DOE respiratory protection program requirements. 2.07.03 Identify the standards which regulate respiratory protection. 2.07.04 Describe the advantages and disadvantages (limitations) of each of the following respirators: a. Air purifying, particulate removing filter respirators b. Air purifying, Chemical Cartridge and Canister respirators for Gases and Vapors c. Full-face, supplied-air respirators d. Self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) e. Combination atmosphere supplying respirators 2.07.05 Define the term protection factor (PF).

303

To the leaders of the Physics First movement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the leaders of the Physics First movement: the leaders of the Physics First movement: I have been following the post SLC meeting discussions with interest. Here I would like to restate my position. PF (I called it ARISE) is much more than a revision of the sequence from BCP to PCB. It is much more than a change in the curriculum generated by starting with conceptual physics, ending with "capstone" biology (Bybee's term at BSCS - new biology for all students who have had a year of chemistry and a year of physics). It is, if we do it right, a true revolution in science education. The integrity of the three core disciplines is preserved, but now with the disciplines correctly organized, they can be connected to form a coherent and overarching wholeness which we call science. The disciplines support each other. There are many possible variations to this revision but the

304

2007 Wholesale Power Rate Case Initial Proposal : Market Price Forecast Study.  

SciTech Connect

This chapter presents BPA's market price forecasts, which are based on AURORA modeling. AURORA calculates the variable cost of the marginal resource in a competitively priced energy market. In competitive market pricing, the marginal cost of production is equivalent to the market-clearing price. Market-clearing prices are important factors for informing BPA's rates. AURORA is used as the primary tool for (a) calculation of the demand rate, (b) shaping the PF rate, (c) estimating the forward price for the IOU REP settlement benefits calculation for fiscal years 2008 and 2009, (d) estimating the uncertainty surrounding DSI payments, (e) informing the secondary revenue forecast and (f) providing a price input used for the risk analysis.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Calorimeter Preamplifier Hybrid Circuit Test Jig  

SciTech Connect

There are two ways in which the testing may be initiated, remotely or locally. If the remote operation is desired, an external TTL level signal must be provided to the test jig with the remotellocal switch on the side of the test jig switched to remote. A logic high will initiate the test. A logic low will terminate the test. In the event that an external signal is connected to the test jig while local operation occurs, the local control takes precedence over remote control. Once a DVT has been locked in the ZIF socket and the DIP switches are selected, the Push-to-Test button may be depressed. Momentarily depressing the button will initiate a test with a minimum 400 ms duration. At the same time a PBCLOCK and PBLATCH pulses will be initiated and the power rails +12V, +8V, and -6V will be ramped to full voltage. The time at which the power rails reach the full voltage is about 13 ms and it is synchronized with bypass capacitors placed on COMP input of U20 and U22 and on the output of U23 voltage regulators. The voltage rails are supplied to a {+-}10% window comparator. A red LED indicates the rail is below or above 10% of the design value. A green LED indicates the rail is within acceptable limits. For DDT with a 5 pF and 10 pF feed back capacitor, the +12V and +8V rails are current-regulated to 19rnA and 22 rnA respectively and the -6V rail is short-circuit protected within the regulator. For DUT with a 22 pF feed back capacitor the current regulation is the same as above except that the +8V rail is current regulated to 43 rnA. The power rails are supplied to the DUT via a 10 {Omega} resistor. The voltage drop across this resistor is sensed by a differential amplifier AD620 and amplified by a gain of 10. An external BNC connection is provided from this point to allow for current measurements by the vendor. The current value for each rail is calculated by measuring the voltage value at this point and divided by (10*10{Omega}). The next stage inverts and amplifies the voltage signal by a factor of 5 for + 12V and -6V rails and by a factor of 1 for +8V rail. For DUT with 22 pF feed back capacitor the amplification factors are same as above except that the amplification factor for +8V rail is a gain of 2. An offset null potentiometer is provided between the AD620 and the inverting stage which eliminates device offset current errors. The inverted and amplified voltage is presented to two window comparators. One of them compares the inverted and amplified voltage to the low threshold point and the other one compares the inverted and amplified voltage to the high threshold point. If the inverted and amplified voltage is within the low and high threshold points, both the low and the high current LEDs illuminate green indicating the current is within acceptable limits. If the inverted and amplified voltage is below the low threshold point or above the high threshold point, the low current LED or the high current LED illuminates red, respectively, indicating the current is outside acceptable limits.

Abraham, B.M.; /Fermilab

1999-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

306

Fast photo-switchable surfaces for boiling heat transfer applications  

SciTech Connect

Several milligrams of the ruthenium-centered organometallic complex, ruthenium bis-4,4 Prime -di(thiomethyl)-2,2 Prime -bipyridine, mono-2 -(2-pyridyl)-1,3-oxathiane ([Ru{l_brace}(HS-CH{sub 2}){sub 2}-bpy{r_brace}{sub 2}{l_brace}pox{r_brace}](PF{sub 6}){sub 2}) were synthesized and used to produce a self assembled monolayer film on a gold substrate. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of the film detected the presence of bound thiolate, which is an indication of a chemisorbed film. Water contact angle measurements were performed before and after 5 min of visible light irradiation using an ozone-free 1000 W Xe(Hg) arc source with a 425-680 nm long pass mirror. The contact angle changed from 52 Degree-Sign pre-irradiation (hydrophilic state) to 95 Degree-Sign post-irradiation (hydrophobic state).

Hunter, C. N.; Glavin, N. R.; Voevodin, A. A. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, 2941 Hobson Way, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States); Turner, D. B.; Check, M. H. [Universal Technology Corporation, 1270 North Fairfield Road, Dayton, Ohio 45532 (United States); Jespersen, M. L.; Borton, P. T. [University of Dayton Research Institute, 300 College Park, Dayton, Ohio 45469 (United States)

2012-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

307

Verification Of The Defense Waste Processing Facility's (DWPF) Process Digestion Methods For The Sludge Batch 8 Qualification Sample  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the results and comparison of data generated from inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analysis of Aqua Regia (AR), Sodium Peroxide/Sodium Hydroxide Fusion Dissolution (PF) and Cold Chem (CC) method digestions and Cold Vapor Atomic Absorption analysis of Hg digestions from the DWPF Hg digestion method of Sludge Batch 8 (SB8) Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) Receipt and SB8 SRAT Product samples. The SB8 SRAT Receipt and SB8 SRAT Product samples were prepared in the SRNL Shielded Cells, and the SRAT Receipt material is representative of the sludge that constitutes the SB8 Batch or qualification composition. This is the sludge in Tank 51 that is to be transferred into Tank 40, which will contain the heel of Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b), to form the SB8 Blend composition.

Click, D. R.; Edwards, T. B.; Wiedenman, B. J.; Brown, L. W.

2013-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

308

Characterization of high-power lithium-ion cells during constant current cycling. Part I. Cycle performance and electrochemical diagnostics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Twelve-cm{sup 2} pouch type lithium-ion cells were assembled with graphite anodes, LiNi{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.15}Al{sub 0.05}O{sub 2} cathodes and 1M LiPF{sub 6}/EC/DEC electrolyte. These pouch cells were cycled at different depths of discharge (100 percent and 70 percent DOD) at room temperature to investigate cycle performance and pulse power capability. The capacity loss and power fade of the cells cycled over 100 percent DOD was significantly faster than the cell cycled over 70 percent DOD. The overall cell impedance increased with cycling, although the ohmic resistance from the electrolyte was almost constant. From electrochemical analysis of each electrode after cycling, structural and/or impedance changes in the cathode are responsible for most of the capacity and power fade, not the consumption of cycleable Li from side-reactions.

Shim, Joongpyo; Striebel, Kathryn A.

2003-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

309

Development of a 2-kilowatt high-reliability wind machine. Phase I. Design and analysis. Volume II. Technical report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high reliability wind machine rated for 2 kW at 9 m/s has been designed to be cost-effective for remote site use. To meet or exceed environmental conditions as specified in Contract PF64410F, the resulting design defines a rugged, relatively simple wind machine. Rigorous fatigue analysis for structural components and development of redundant systems for electrical components led to an expected mean time between failures of 12.35 years. Approximately one year into the research and development program a completed design meeting contract stipulations is being submitted to the contract buyer. The design is for a horizontal axis, down-wind machine with two wooden blades spanning 5 meters diameter. Positive rotor speed control is accomplished through a centrifugally governed variable pitch stalling rotor. Design merits have been confirmed through dynamic truck testing.

Drake, W.; Clews, H.; Cordes, J.; Johnson, B.; Murphy, P.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Development of a 2-kilowatt high-reliability wind machine. Phase I. Design and analysis. Volume I. Executive summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high reliability wind machine rated for 2 kW at 9 m/s has been designed to be cost-effective for remote site use. To meet or exceed environmental conditions as specified in Contract PF64410F, the resulting design defines a rugged, relatively simple wind machine. Rigorous fatigue analysis for structural components and development of redundant systems for electrical components led to an expected mean time between failures of 12.35 years. Approximately one year into the research and development program, a completed design meeting contract stipulations is being submitted to the contract buyer. The design is for a horizontal axis, down-wind machine with two wooden blades spanning 5 meters diameter. Positive rotor speed control is accomplished through a centrifugally governed variable pitch, stalling rotor. Design merits have been confirmed through dynamic truck testing.

Drake, W.; Clews, H.; Cordes, J.; Johnson, B.; Murphy, P.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

ON INTERNATIONAL CRITICALITY CODES FOR FUEL PELLETS IN FISSILE SOLUTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The reference calculations, based on the APOLLO-Pic method implemented in the framework of this study, demonstrated that the actual reactivity variation (benchmark no 20) is a monotonic decrease with pellet "dissolution". At the opposite of the contributor's results, based on the international criticality code SCALE, the reactivity loss with dissolution is weak: bfref =- 3000 pcm compared to hpde =- 25 000 pcm (50 %; P.F = 0.6) The discrepancy is mainly due to 238v resonant absorption which can induce, in this fuel double heterogenity problem no 20, as much as- 30 000 pcm KQ underestimation. It was pointed out that design-oriented transport codes must be improved by accurate deterministic formalisms: PIC equivalence method, subgroup theory (WIMSE), ultrafine slowing-down calculation (ROWDS). Ultimate confirmation of the reference results presented in this paper should be provided by a set of critical experiments which mock-up hypothetical dissolver geometries.

A. Santamarina; H. J. Smith; Cea Drn/der/sprc Cadarache; A. Santamarina; H. J. Smith; Cea Drn/der/sprc Cadarache; Hj. Smith

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

TRAC large-break loss-of-coolant accident analysis for the AP600 design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses a TRAC model of the Westinghouse AP600 advanced reactor design which has been developed for analyzing large-break loss-of-coolant accident (LBLOCA) transients. A preliminary LBLOCA calculation of a 80% cold-leg break has been performed with TRAC-PF1/MOD2. The 80% break size was calculated by Westinghouse to be the most severe large-break size. The LBLOCA transient was calculated to 92 s. Peak clad temperatures (PCT) were well below the Appendix K limit of 1478 K (2200{degrees}F). Transient event times and PCT for the TRAC calculation were in reasonable agreement with those calculated by Westinghouse using their WCOBRA/TRAC code.

Lime, J.F.; Boyack, B.E.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Intrinsic Surface Stability in LiMn2-xNix04-s (x = 0.45, 0.5) High Voltage Spinel Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This work reports the surface stability of the high voltage Li ion cathode LiMn{sub 2x}Ni{sub x}O{sub 4?} (x = 0.5, 0.45) by comparing thin film and powder composite electrodes after cycling using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The thin film electrodes offer the ability to probe the surface of the material without the need of a conductive agent and polymer binder typically used in composite electrodes. The results suggest that neither oxidation of PF{sub 6} to POF{sub 3} nor the decomposition of ethylene carbonate or dimethylene carbonate occurs on the surface of the spinel material. These results confirm the enhanced cycling stability and rate capability associated with the high voltage spinel material and suggests that the SEI layer forms due to the reaction of electrochemically inactive components in composite electrodes with the electrolyte.

Carroll, Kyler J.; Yang, Ming-Che; Veith, G. M.; Dudney, N. J.; Meng, Ying Shirley

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Influence of a Weak Field of Pulsed DC Electricity on the Behavior and Incidence of Injury in Adult Steelhead and Pacific Lamprey, Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Predation by pinnipeds, such as California sea lions Zalophus californianus, Pacific harbor seals Phoca vitulina, and Stellar sea lions Eumetopias jubatus on adult Pacific salmon Oncorhynchus spp in the lower Columbia River has become a serious concern for fishery managers trying to conserve and restore runs of threatened and endangered fish. As a result, Smith-Root, Incorporated (SRI; Vancouver, Washington), manufacturers of electrofishing and closely-related equipment, proposed a project to evaluate the potential of an electrical barrier to deter marine mammals and reduce the amount of predation on adult salmonids (SRI 2007). The objectives of their work were to develop, deploy, and evaluate a passive, integrated sonar and electric barrier that would selectively inhibit the upstream movements of marine mammals and reduce predation, but would not injure pinnipeds or impact anadromous fish migrations. However, before such a device could be deployed in the field, concerns by regional fishery managers about the potential effects of such a device on the migratory behavior of Pacific salmon, steelhead O. mykiss, Pacific lampreys Entoshpenus tridentata, and white sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus, needed to be addressed. In this report, we describe the results of laboratory research designed to evaluate the effects of prototype electric barriers on adult steelhead and Pacific lampreys. The effects of electricity on fish have been widely studied and include injury or death (e.g., Sharber and Carothers 1988; Dwyer et al. 2001; Snyder 2003), physiological dysfunction (e.g., Schreck et al. 1976; Mesa and Schreck 1989), and altered behavior (Mesa and Schreck 1989). Much of this work was done to investigate the effects of electrofishing on fish in the wild. Because electrofishing operations would always use more severe electrical settings than those proposed for the pinniped barrier, results from these studies are probably not relevant to the work proposed by SRI. Field electrofishing operations typically use high voltage and amperage settings and a variety of waveforms, pulse widths (PW), and pulse frequencies (PF), depending on conditions and target species. For example, when backpack electrofishing for trout in a small stream, one might use settings such as 500 V pulsed DC, a PW of 1 ms, and a PF of 60 Hz. In contrast, the electrical barrier proposed by SRI will produce electrical conditions significantly lower than those used in electrofishing, particularly for PW and PF (e.g., PW ranging from 300-1,000 {micro}s and PF from 2-3 Hz). Further, voltage gradients (in V/cm) are predicted to be lower in the electric barrier than those produced during typical electrofishing. Although the relatively weak, pulsed DC electric fields to be produced by the barrier may be effective at deterring pinnipeds, little, if anything, is known about the effects of such low intensity electrical fields on fish behavior. For this research, we evaluated the effects of weak, pulsed DC electric currents on the behavior of adult steelhead and Pacific lamprey and the incidence of injury in steelhead only. In a series of laboratory experiments, we: (1) documented the rate of passage of fish over miniature, prototype electric barriers when they were on and off; (2) determined some electric thresholds beyond which fish would not pass over the barrier; and (3) assessed the incidence and severity of injury in steelhead exposed to relatively severe electrical conditions. The results of this study should be useful for making decisions about whether to install electrical barriers in the lower Columbia River, or elsewhere, to reduce predation on upstream migrating salmonids and other fishes by marine pinnipeds.

Mesa, Matthew

2009-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

315

Polarization charges and electric quadrupole transitions of yrast terminating bands in {sup 44,46,48}Ti  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The polarization charges in {sup 44,46,48}Ti are studied by the microscopic particle-vibration model and used to investigate the electric quadrupole transitions of the yrast terminating bands. The validity of the commonly used empirical effective charges in the pf shell-model calculations is confirmed. The quadrupole transition probabilities B(E2,I{yields}I-2) and electromagnetic moments are reasonably well reproduced compared with experimental results. It is found that a globally decreasing B(E2) is accompanied with convergence of valence particles into the 1f{sub 7/2} shell when approaching the terminating states. The I=6{sup +} state in {sup 48}Ti shows an exotic behavior with an irregularity of B(E2) and sign change of electromagnetic moments, which is related to a neutron-dominant prolate shape.

Ma Hailiang; Yan Yuliang; Zhang Xizhen [Department of Nuclear Physics, China Institute of Atomic Energy, Post Office Box 275(18), Beijing 102413 (China); Dong Baoguo [Department of Nuclear Physics, China Institute of Atomic Energy, Post Office Box 275(18), Beijing 102413 (China); Center of Theoretical Nuclear Physics, National Laboratory of Heavy Ion Collision, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

316

Radiofrequency attenuator and method  

SciTech Connect

Radiofrequency attenuator and method. The attenuator includes a pair of transparent windows. A chamber between the windows is filled with molten salt. Preferred molten salts include quarternary ammonium cations and fluorine-containing anions such as tetrafluoroborate (BF.sub.4.sup.-), hexafluorophosphate (PF.sub.6.sup.-), hexafluoroarsenate (AsF.sub.6.sup.-), trifluoromethylsulfonate (CF.sub.3SO.sub.3.sup.-), bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF.sub.3SO.sub.2).sub.2N.sup.-), bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF.sub.3CF.sub.2SO.sub.2).sub.2N.sup.-) and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide ((CF.sub.3SO.sub.2).sub.3 C.sup.-). Radicals or radical cations may be added to or electrochemically generated in the molten salt to enhance the RF attenuation.

Warner, Benjamin P. (Los Alamos, NM); McCleskey, T. Mark (Los Alamos, NM); Burrell, Anthony K. (Los Alamos, NM); Agrawal, Anoop (Tucson, AZ); Hall, Simon B. (Palmerston North, NZ)

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

317

PROCESS OF PREPARING A FLUORIDE OF TETRAVLENT URANIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for producing a fluoride salt pf tetravalent uranium suitable for bomb reduction to metallic uranium. An aqueous solution of uranyl nitrate is treated with acetic acid and a nitrite-suppressor and then contacted with metallic lead whereby uranium is reduced from the hexavalent to the tetravalent state and soluble lead acetate is formed. Sulfate ions are then added to the solution to precipitate and remove the lead values. Hydrofluoric acid and alkali metal ions are then added causing the formation of an alkali metal uranium double-fluoride in which the uranium is in the tetravalent state. After recovery, this precipitate is suitable for using in the limited production of metallic uranium.

Wheelwright, E.J.

1959-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

318

Radiofrequency attenuator and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Radiofrequency attenuator and method. The attenuator includes a pair of transparent windows. A chamber between the windows is filled with molten salt. Preferred molten salts include quarternary ammonium cations and fluorine-containing anions such as tetrafluoroborate (BF.sub.4.sup.-), hexafluorophosphate (PF.sub.6.sup.-), hexafluoroarsenate (AsF.sub.6.sup.-), trifluoromethylsulfonate (CF.sub.3SO.sub.3.sup.-), bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF.sub.3SO.sub.2).sub.2N.sup.-), bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF.sub.3CF.sub.2SO.sub.2).sub.2N.sup.-) and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide ((CF.sub.3SO.sub.2).sub.3C.sup.-). Radicals or radical cations may be added to or electrochemically generated in the molten salt to enhance the RF attenuation.

Warner, Benjamin P. (Los Alamos, NM); McCleskey, T. Mark (Los Alamos, NM); Burrell, Anthony K. (Los Alamos, NM); Agrawal, Anoop (Tucson, AZ); Hall, Simon B. (Palmerston North, NZ)

2009-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

319

Characterization of a ballistic supermirror neutron guide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe the beam characteristics of the first ballistic supermirror neutron guide H113 that feeds the neutron user facility for particle physics PF1B of the Institute Laue-Langevin, Grenoble (ILL). At present, the neutron capture flux density of H113 at its 20x6cm2 exit window is 1.35x10^10/cm^2/s, and will soon be raised to above 2x10^10/cm^2/s. Beam divergence is no larger than beam divergence from a conventional Ni coated guide. A model is developed that permits rapid calculation of beam profiles and absolute event rates from such a beam. We propose a procedure that permits inter-comparability of the main features of beams emitted from ballistic or conventional neutron guides.

H. Abele; D. Dubbers; H. Haese; M. Klein; A. Knoepfler; M. Kreuz; T. Lauer; B. Maerkisch; D. Mund; V. Nesvizhevsky; A. Petoukhov; C. Schmidt; M. Schumann; T. Soldner

2005-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

320

Gamow-Teller transitions from {sup 56}Ni  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new technique to measure (p,n) charge-exchange reactions in inverse kinematics at intermediate energies on unstable isotopes was successfully developed and used to study the {sup 56}Ni(p,n) reaction at 110 MeV/u. Gamow-Teller transition strengths from {sup 56}Ni to {sup 56}Cu were obtained and compared with shell-model predictions in the pf-shell using the KB3G and GXPF1A interactions. The calculations with the GXPF1A interaction reproduce the experimental GT strength distribution much better than the calculations that employed the KB3G interaction, indicating deficiencies in the spin-orbit and proton-neutron residual potentials for the latter. The results are important for improving the description of electron-capture rates on nuclei in the iron region, which are important for modeling the late evolution of core-collapse and thermonuclear supernovae.

Sasano, M. [RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, 351-0198 (Japan); Perdikakis, G. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States) and Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Zegers, R.G.T. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); and others

2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "malta pf paracel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

{sup 34}P({sup 7}Li,{sup 7}Be+{gamma}) Reaction at 100A MeV in Inverse Kinematics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on the first successful extraction of a {beta}{sup +} Gamow-Teller strength distribution from a radioactive isotope in an intermediate-energy charge-exchange experiment in inverse kinematics. The ({sup 7}Li,{sup 7}Be+{gamma}(429 keV)) reaction at 100A MeV was used to measure Gamow-Teller transition strengths from {sup 34}P to states in {sup 34}Si. The results show that little mixing occurs between sd and pf shell configurations for the low-lying 0{sup +} and 2{sup +} states even though {sup 34}Si neighbors the island of inversion and low-lying 2({h_bar}/2{pi}){omega} intruder states exist. Shell-model calculations in the sdpf model space are consistent with these findings.

Zegers, R. G. T.; Meharchand, R.; Brown, B. A.; Guess, C. J.; Hitt, G. W. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824-1321 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Shimbara, Y.; Bazin, D.; Diget, C. A.; Hausmann, M.; Vaman, C.; Weisshaar, D.; Yurkon, J. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824-1321 (United States); Austin, Sam M.; Tur, C. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824-1321 (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Gade, A.; King, M.; Miller, D.; Signoracci, A.; Starosta, K.; Voss, P. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824-1321 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

2010-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

322

Characterization of the passivation layer on disordered carbons in lithium-ion cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Intercalation anodes of graphite or disordered carbon in rechargeable Li-ion batteries (based on aprotic organic solvents) develop a passivating film during the first intercalation of Li{sup +}. The formation of this film reduces the cycling efficiency and results in excessive consumption of Li{sup +}. The exact nature of this film is not well defined, although there are many similarities in properties to the films that form on Li anodes under similar cycling conditions. In this study we report on characterization studies of films formed during galvanostatic cycling of disordered carbons derived from polymethylacryolintrile (PMAN) in a 1M LiPF{sub 6} solution in ethylene carbonateldimethyl carbonate solution (1:1 by vol.). Complementary tests were also conducted with glass carbon, where intercalation cannot occur. Complex-impedance spectroscopy was the primary measurement technique, supplemented by cyclic voltammetry.

Guidotti, R.; Johnson, B.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Intrinsic Surface Stability in LiMn2-xNixO4-d (x=0.45, 0.5) High Volt-age Spinel Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries  

SciTech Connect

This work reports the surface stability of the high voltage Li ion cathode LiMn2-xNixO4- (x= 0.5, 0.45) by comparing thin film and powder composite electrodes after cycling using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The thin film electrodes offer the ability to probe the surface of the material without the need of a conductive agent and polymer binder typically used in composite electrodes. The results suggest that neither oxidation of PF6 to POF5 nor the decomposition of ethylene carbonate or dimethylene carbonate occurs on the surface of the spinel material. These results confirm the enhanced cycling stability and rate capability associated with the high voltage spinel material and suggests that the SEI layer forms due to the reaction of electrochemically inactive components in composite electrodes with the electrolyte.

Carroll, Kyler J [University of California, San Diego; Yang, Ming-Che [University of Florida, Gainesville; Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL; Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL; Meng, Ying Shirley [University of California, San Diego

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

EA-1942-FERC-NOI-FR-2012.pdf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 Federal Register 1 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 189 / Friday, September 28, 2012 / Notices 1 The appendices referenced in this notice are not being printed in the Federal Register. Copies of appendices were sent to all those receiving this notice in the mail and are available at www.ferc.gov using the link called ''eLibrary'' or from the Commission's Public Reference Room, 888 First Street NE., Washington, DC 20426, or call (202) 502-8371. For instructions on connecting to eLibrary, refer to the last page of this notice. Dated: September 21, 2012. Nathaniel J. Davis, Sr., Deputy Secretary. [FR Doc. 2012-23943 Filed 9-27-12; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6717-01-P DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. PF12-16-000] Dominion Cove Point LNG, LP; Notice

325

Advanced Photovoltaic Inverter Functionality using 500 kW Power Hardware-in-Loop Complete System Laboratory Testing: Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the increasing penetration of distribution connected photovoltaic (PV) systems, more and more PV developers and utilities are interested in easing future PV interconnection concerns by mitigating some of the impacts of PV integration using advanced PV inverter controls and functions. This paper describes the testing of a 500 kW PV inverter using Power Hardware-in-Loop (PHIL) testing techniques. The test setup is described and the results from testing the inverter in advanced functionality modes, not commonly used in currently interconnected PV systems, are presented. PV inverter operation under PHIL evaluation that emulated both the DC PV array connection and the AC distribution level grid connection are shown for constant power factor (PF) and constant reactive power (VAr) control modes. The evaluation of these modes was completed under varying degrees of modeled PV variability.

Mather, B. A.; Kromer, M. A.; Casey, L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Microsoft Word - NOI to prepare EA - Elba GA _04-22-2013_  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION Elba Liquefaction Company, L.L.C. Docket No. PF13-3-000 Southern LNG Company, L.L.C. Elba Express Company, L.L.C. NOTICE OF INTENT TO PREPARE AN ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE PLANNED ELBA LIQUEFACTION PROJECT, REQUEST FOR COMMENTS ON ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES, AND NOTICE OF PUBLIC SCOPING MEETINGS (April 22, 2013) The staff of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC or Commission) will prepare an environmental assessment (EA) that will discuss the environmental impacts of the Elba Liquefaction Project and EEC Modification Project (collectively referred to as the Elba Liquefaction Project) involving construction and operation of facilities in Georgia by Elba Liquefaction Company, LLC (ELC); Southern LNG

327

Current parallel I/O limitations to scalable data analysis.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the limitations to parallel scalability which we have encountered when applying our otherwise optimally scalable parallel statistical analysis tool kit to large data sets distributed across the parallel file system of the current premier DOE computational facility. This report describes our study to evaluate the effect of parallel I/O on the overall scalability of a parallel data analysis pipeline using our scalable parallel statistics tool kit [PTBM11]. In this goal, we tested it using the Jaguar-pf DOE/ORNL peta-scale platform on a large combustion simulation data under a variety of process counts and domain decompositions scenarios. In this report we have recalled the foundations of the parallel statistical analysis tool kit which we have designed and implemented, with the specific double intent of reproducing typical data analysis workflows, and achieving optimal design for scalable parallel implementations. We have briefly reviewed those earlier results and publications which allow us to conclude that we have achieved both goals. However, in this report we have further established that, when used in conjuction with a state-of-the-art parallel I/O system, as can be found on the premier DOE peta-scale platform, the scaling properties of the overall analysis pipeline comprising parallel data access routines degrade rapidly. This finding is problematic and must be addressed if peta-scale data analysis is to be made scalable, or even possible. In order to attempt to address these parallel I/O limitations, we will investigate the use the Adaptable IO System (ADIOS) [LZL+10] to improve I/O performance, while maintaining flexibility for a variety of IO options, such MPI IO, POSIX IO. This system is developed at ORNL and other collaborating institutions, and is being tested extensively on Jaguar-pf. Simulation code being developed on these systems will also use ADIOS to output the data thereby making it easier for other systems, such as ours, to process that data.

Mascarenhas, Ajith Arthur; Pebay, Philippe Pierre

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

MAR flow mapping of Analytical Chemistry Operations (Preliminary Report)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The recently released Supplemental Directive, NA-1 SD 1027, updates the radionuclide threshold values in DOE-STD-1027-92 CN1 to reflect the use of modern parameters for dose conversion factors and breathing rates. The directive also corrects several arithmetic errors within the original standard. The result is a roughly four-fold increase in the amount of weapons-grade nuclear material allowed within a designated radiological facility. Radiological laboratory space within the recently constructed Radiological Laboratory Office and Utility Building (RLUOB) is slated to house selected analytical chemistry support activities in addition to small-scale actinide R&D activities. RLUOB is within the same facility operations envelope as TA-55. Consolidation of analytical chemistry activities to RLUOB and PF-4 offers operational efficiency improvements relative to the current pre-CMRR plans of dividing these activities between RLUOB, PF-4, and CMR. RLUOB is considered a Radiological Facility under STD-1027 - 'Facilities that do not meet or exceed Category 3 threshold criteria but still possess some amount of radioactive material may be considered Radiological Facilities.' The supplemental directive essentially increases the allowable material-at-risk (MAR) within radiological facilities from 8.4 g to 38.6 g for {sup 239}Pu. This increase in allowable MAR provides a unique opportunity to establish additional analytical chemistry support functions in RLUOB without negatively impacting either R&D activities or facility operations. Individual radiological facilities are tasked to determine MAR limits (up to the Category 3 thresholds) appropriate to their operational conditions. This study presents parameters that impact establishing MAR limits for RLUOB and an assessment of how various analytical chemistry support functions could operate within the established MAR limits.

Barr, Mary E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farish, Thomas J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

329

Validation of protection provided by one brand of filtering facepiece respirator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A previous laboratory study of a widely used disposable dust / mist (D/M) respirator (3M{trademark}8710) utilized a challenge agent that had high penetration values for D/M filter media. Therefore, measured protection factors (PFs) reflected both filter and faceseal penetration, and would be lower than that expected for faceseal penetration only. The purpose of this study was to determine a PF for this brand of disposable D/M respirator using a challenge agent that has low filter penetration for this type of filter. Methodology involved qualitatively (QLFT) and quantitatively (QNFT) fit testing 15 males and 15 females while wearing the respirator. One QLFT was done per subject using the saccharin method. Three QNFTs were performed on each subject utilizing a 2.5 {mu}m mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) monodisperse challenge aerosol. Measured PF`s were corrected for lung deposition of this size aerosol. The average fit for each subject was the arithmetic mean of the three PFs. The PFs were found to be approximately log-normally distributed, so logs of PFs were used in the statistical analysis. The exponent of the 95% lower tolerance level (LTL) of the fifth percentile of the log PFs was 50. This compares to an exponent of the 95% LTL of the fifth percentile of the log PFs of two determined in a previous study and to the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Assigned Protection Factor (APF) of ten. No significant difference of average fit between males and females was found. The sensitivity of the saccharin QLFT was 42.9%, and specificity could not be evaluated.

Peacock, J.R. [Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham, AL (United States). Dept. of Environmental Health Sciences

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

A SUB-GRID VOLUME-OF-FLUIDS (VOF) MODEL FOR MIXING IN RESOLVED SCALE AND IN UNRESOLVED SCALE COMPUTATIONS  

SciTech Connect

A sub-grid mix model based on a volume-of-fluids (VOF) representation is described for computational simulations of the transient mixing between reactive fluids, in which the atomically mixed components enter into the reactivity. The multi-fluid model allows each fluid species to have independent values for density, energy, pressure and temperature, as well as independent velocities and volume fractions. Fluid volume fractions are further divided into mix components to represent their 'mixedness' for more accurate prediction of reactivity. Time dependent conversion from unmixed volume fractions (denoted cf) to atomically mixed (af) fluids by diffusive processes is represented in resolved scale simulations with the volume fractions (cf, af mix). In unresolved scale simulations, the transition to atomically mixed materials begins with a conversion from unmixed material to a sub-grid volume fraction (pf). This fraction represents the unresolved small scales in the fluids, heterogeneously mixed by turbulent or multi-phase mixing processes, and this fraction then proceeds in a second step to the atomically mixed fraction by diffusion (cf, pf, af mix). Species velocities are evaluated with a species drift flux, {rho}{sub i}u{sub di} = {rho}{sub i}(u{sub i}-u), used to describe the fluid mixing sources in several closure options. A simple example of mixing fluids during 'interfacial deceleration mixing with a small amount of diffusion illustrates the generation of atomically mixed fluids in two cases, for resolved scale simulations and for unresolved scale simulations. Application to reactive mixing, including Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF), is planned for future work.

VOLD, ERIK L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; SCANNAPIECO, TONY J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2007-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

331

Analysis of cis-elements that facilitate extrachromosomal persistence of human papillomavirus genomes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are maintained latently in dividing epithelial cells as nuclear plasmids. Two virally encoded proteins, E1, a helicase, and E2, a transcription factor, are important players in replication and stable plasmid maintenance in host cells. Recent experiments in yeast have demonstrated that viral genomes retain replication and maintenance function independently of E1 and E2 [Angeletti, P.C., Kim, K., Fernandes, F.J., and Lambert, P.F. (2002). Stable replication of papillomavirus genomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. J. Virol. 76(7), 3350-8; Kim, K., Angeletti, P.C., Hassebroek, E.C., and Lambert, P.F. (2005). Identification of cis-acting elements that mediate the replication and maintenance of human papillomavirus type 16 genomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. J. Virol. 79(10), 5933-42]. Flow cytometry studies of EGFP-reporter vectors containing subgenomic HPV fragments with or without a human ARS (hARS), revealed that six fragments located in E6-E7, E1-E2, L1, and L2 regions showed a capacity for plasmid stabilization in the absence of E1 and E2 proteins. Interestingly, four fragments within E7, the 3' end of L2, and the 5' end of L1 exhibited stability in plasmids that lacked an hARS, indicating that they possess both replication and maintenance functions. Two fragments lying in E1-E2 and the 3' region of L1 were stable only in the presence of hARS, that they contained only maintenance function. Mutational analyses of HPV16-GFP reporter constructs provided evidence that genomes lacking E1 and E2 could replicate to an extent similar to wild type HPV16. Together these results support the concept that cellular factors influence HPV replication and maintenance, independently, and perhaps in conjunction with E1 and E2, suggesting a role in the persistent phase of the viral lifecycle.

Pittayakhajonwut, Daraporn [Nebraska Center for Virology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE, 68588-0666 (United States); Angeletti, Peter C. [Nebraska Center for Virology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE, 68588-0666 (United States)], E-mail: Pangeletti2@unl.edu

2008-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

332

Facile Thermal W-W Bond Homolysis in the N-Heterocyclic Carbene-Containing Tungsten Dimer [CpW(CO)2(IMe)]2  

SciTech Connect

The thermal W-W bond homolysis in [CpW(CO)2(IMe)]2 (IMe = 1,3-dimethylimidazol-2-ylidene) was investigated and was found to occur to a large extent compared to other tungsten dimers such as [CpW(CO)3]2. CpW(CO)2(IMe)H was prepared by heating a solution of [IMeH]+[CpW(CO)2(PMe3)]?, and exists in solution as a mixture of interconverting cis and trans isomers. The carbene rotation in CpW(CO)2(IMe)H was explored by DFT calculations, and low enthalpic barriers (< 3.5 kcal mol?1) are predicted. CpW(CO)2(IMe)H has pKaMeCN = 31.5(3) and deprotonation with KH gives K+[CpW(CO)2(IMe)]? ( MeCN). Hydride abstraction from CpW(CO)2(IMe)H with Ph3C+PF6? in the presence of a coordinating ligand L (MeCN or THF) gives [CpW(CO)2(IMe)(L)]+PF6?. Electrochemical measurements on the anion [CpW(CO)2(IMe)]? in MeCN, together with digital simulations, give an E1/2 of ?1.54(2) V vs Cp2Fe+/0 for the [CpW(CO)2(IMe)]/? couple. A thermochemical cycle provides the solution bond dissociation free energy of the W-H bond of CpW(CO)2(IMe)H as 61.3(6) kcal mol?1. In the electrochemical oxidation of [CpW(CO)2(IMe)]?, reversible dimerization of the electrogenerated radical CpW(CO)2(IMe) occurs, and digital simulation provides kinetic and thermodynamic parameters for the monomer-dimer equilibrium: kdimerization ~ 2.5 ? 104 M?1 s?1, khomolysis ~ 0.5 s?1 (i.e., Kdim ~ 5 ? 104 M?1). Reduction of [CpW(CO)2(IMe)(MeCN)]+PF6? with cobaltocene gives the dimer [CpW(CO)2(IMe)]2, which in solution exists as a mixture of anti and gauche rotomers. As expected from the electrochemical experiments, the dimer is in equilibrium with detectable amounts of CpW(CO)2(IMe). This species was observed by IR spectroscopy, and its presence in solution is also in accordance with the observed reactivity toward 2,6-di-tert-butyl-1,4-benzoquinone, chloroform and dihydrogen. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Biosciences and Geosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle. The EPR studies were performed at EMSL, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energys Office of Biological and Environmental Research located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

van der Eide, Edwin F.; Liu, Tianbiao L.; Camaioni, Donald M.; Walter, Eric D.; Bullock, R. Morris

2012-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

333

Phase-field Model for Interstitial Loop Growth Kinetics and Thermodynamic and Kinetic Models of Irradiated Fe-Cr Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microstructure evolution kinetics in irradiated materials has strongly spatial correlation. For example, void and second phases prefer to nucleate and grow at pre-existing defects such as dislocations, grain boundaries, and cracks. Inhomogeneous microstructure evolution results in inhomogeneity of microstructure and thermo-mechanical properties. Therefore, the simulation capability for predicting three dimensional (3-D) microstructure evolution kinetics and its subsequent impact on material properties and performance is crucial for scientific design of advanced nuclear materials and optimal operation conditions in order to reduce uncertainty in operational and safety margins. Very recently the meso-scale phase-field (PF) method has been used to predict gas bubble evolution, void swelling, void lattice formation and void migration in irradiated materials,. Although most results of phase-field simulations are qualitative due to the lake of accurate thermodynamic and kinetic properties of defects, possible missing of important kinetic properties and processes, and the capability of current codes and computers for large time and length scale modeling, the simulations demonstrate that PF method is a promising simulation tool for predicting 3-D heterogeneous microstructure and property evolution, and providing microstructure evolution kinetics for higher scale level simulations of microstructure and property evolution such as mean field methods. This report consists of two parts. In part I, we will present a new phase-field model for predicting interstitial loop growth kinetics in irradiated materials. The effect of defect (vacancy/interstitial) generation, diffusion and recombination, sink strength, long-range elastic interaction, inhomogeneous and anisotropic mobility on microstructure evolution kinetics is taken into account in the model. The model is used to study the effect of elastic interaction on interstitial loop growth kinetics, the interstitial flux, and sink strength of interstitial loop for interstitials. In part II, we present a generic phase field model and discuss the thermodynamic and kinetic properties in phase-field models including the reaction kinetics of radiation defects and local free energy of irradiated materials. In particular, a two-sublattice thermodynamic model is suggested to describe the local free energy of alloys with irradiated defects. Fe-Cr alloy is taken as an example to explain the required thermodynamic and kinetic properties for quantitative phase-field modeling. Finally the great challenges in phase-field modeling will be discussed.

Li, Yulan; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

334

Crystal structures of MW1337R and lin2004: Representatives of a novel protein family that adopt a four-helical bundle fold  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To extend the structural coverage of proteins with unknown functions, we targeted a novel protein family (Pfam accession number PF08807, DUF1798) for which we proposed and determined the structures of two representative members. The MW1337R gene of Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus Rosenbach (Wood 46) encodes a protein with a molecular weight of 13.8 kDa (residues 1-116) and a calculated isoelectric point of 5.15. The lin2004 gene of the nonspore-forming bacterium Listeria innocua Clip11262 encodes a protein with a molecular weight of 14.6 kDa (residues 1-121) and a calculated isoelectric point of 5.45. MW1337R and lin2004, as well as their homologs, which, so far, have been found only in Bacillus, Staphylococcus, Listeria, and related genera (Geobacillus, Exiguobacterium, and Oceanobacillus), have unknown functions and are annotated as hypothetical proteins. The genomic contexts of MW1337R and lin2004 are similar and conserved in related species. In prokaryotic genomes, most often, functionally interacting proteins are coded by genes, which are colocated in conserved operons. Proteins from the same operon as MW1337R and lin2004 either have unknown functions (i.e., belong to DUF1273, Pfam accession number PF06908) or are similar to ypsB from Bacillus subtilis. The function of ypsB is unclear, although it has a strong similarity to the N-terminal region of DivIVA, which was characterized as a bifunctional protein with distinct roles during vegetative growth and sporulation. In addition, members of the DUF1273 family display distant sequence similarity with the DprA/Smf protein, which acts downstream of the DNA uptake machinery, possibly in conjunction with RecA. The RecA activities in Bacillus subtilis are modulated by RecU Holliday-junction resolvase. In all analyzed cases, the gene coding for RecU is in the vicinity of MW1337R, lin2004, or their orthologs, but on a different operon located in the complementary DNA strand. Here, we report the crystal structures of MW1337R and lin2004, which were determined using the semiautomated, high-throughput pipeline of the Joint Center for Structural Genomics (JCSG), part of the National Institute of General Medical Sciences Protein Structure Initiative.

Kozbial, Piotr; Xu, Qingping; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; McMullan, Daniel; Krishna, S. Sri; Miller, Mitchell D.; Abdubek, Polat; Acosta, Claire; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Carlton, Dennis; Clayton, Thomas; Deller, Marc; Duan, Lian; Elias, Ylva; Elsliger, Marc-Andr; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grzechnik, Slawomir K.; Hale, Joanna; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Koesema, Eric; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; Morse, Andrew T.; Murphy, Kevin D.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Oommachen, Silvya; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; Spraggon, Glen; Trout, Christina V.; ban den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; White, Aprilfawn; Wolf, Guenter; Zubieta, Chloe; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A. (Scripps); (SSRL); (JCSG); (UCSD); (Burnham)

2009-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

335

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Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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336

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Office of Legacy Management (LM)

I I . (-J&l ,J z-i2 Ff?,c Y / . June 24, 1953 +a-. "0 !I 2 F 4s 21' + p; 3: h $7 . . a- d :Q 4. 4 'i @j $w J 9. 10. 11. p - ",..-- AU~ORIZA'PION. Project Number bth0a8 ana SC~ eontempmed uf D &to be fabricated on a sub- bv ~CrELftnc.~~o~~, Ohio. These will 1 . be JY?kilrnefl kn TWV Estf~tea Ma~pswer Required gHezn Months) A. Technical A- B. Non-Technical starting Da&e4 Tllne 1 1 QPf -_ _ u_____e (2) Overhead a B. ' 13 ana OpePatfag Suppli~. (G) earmlsge (D) Addf%fmaB Equipmnt Required ___1~_1 m,f&ea S&ogs %Q be Effee%ed Posf~iblY $0 .20 per slug

337

CERTS.pptx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Efficient Efficient A C O p-mal P ower F low & G lobal O p-mizer S olu-ons HyungSeon O h State U niversity o f N ew Y ork a t B uffalo August 6 , 2 013 CERTS R &M R eview M ee-ng Contents * Objec-ve * Our Q CQP m odel * Global s olu-on * Efficient a lgorithm 1 Objec-ve Development o f a n a lgorithm * Efficient t o s olve A C O PF f or a l arge---scale system * Seeking f or t he g lobal o p-mizer 2 AC O p-mal P ower F low * Find a n o p-mal s olu-on t o m eet a ll t he economic, o pera-onal, a nd e ngineering constraints i n p ower s ystem o pera-on * Computa-onally c omplex d ue t o i ts n on--- convexity, n onlinearity, a nd l arge---scale * Needs t o b e s olved i n a - mely m anner - Weekly i n 8 hrs, D aily i n 2 hrs, H ourly i n 1 5mins - Each 5 mins i n 1 min, S elf---healing p ost---con-ngency 0.5 mins 3 Challenges t

338

Interfacial studies of a thin-film Li2Mn4O9 electrode  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interfacial studies of a thin-film Li2Mn4O9 electrode Interfacial studies of a thin-film Li2Mn4O9 electrode Title Interfacial studies of a thin-film Li2Mn4O9 electrode Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 1999 Authors Kostecki, Robert, Fanping Kong, Yoshiaki Matsuo, and Frank R. McLarnon Journal Electrochimica Acta Volume 45 Pagination 225-233 Keywords interfacial films, manganese oxide electrode Abstract A thin-film spinel Li2Mn4O9 electrode was prepared by spin coating onto a Pt substrate. Spectroscopic ellipsometry, X-ray diffraction and current-sensing atomic force microscopy (CSAFM) were used to characterize interfacial processes and film formation at this electrode in the presence of 1.0 M LiPF6, EC:DMC (1:1 by volume) electrolyte. Prolonged exposure of the film to the electrolyte at ambient temperature resulted in spontaneous decomposition of the spinel to λ-MnO2 without disruption of the original structure. The surface of the resulting λ-MnO2 film exhibited no significant change in morphology, however a thin passive electrode surface layer was detected by the CSAFM probe. This electrode surface layer exhibited insulating properties and most likely contained Li2O, a by-product of Li2Mn4O9 decomposition.

339

Headquarters_Security_Overview_Handbook_March_2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

H H H E E A A D D Q Q U U A A R R T T E E R R S S S S E E C C U U R R I I T T Y Y O O V V E E R R V V I I E E W W H H A A N N D D B B O O O O K K November 2012 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Health, Safety and Security Office of Security Operations Office of Headquarters Security Operations Phone: 301-903-9990 Fax: 301-903-4601 E-mail: HS-92Operations@hq.doe.gov 1 Table of Contents Making a Difference 2 Introduction 2 Responsibilities 2 Headquarters Protective Force (PF) 2 Headquarters Security Officers (HSOs) 2 Headquarters Security Procedures 3-5 Classified Matter Protection and Control 5-8 A Final Word 8 Emergency Telephone Numbers 9 Reminders 9 2 MAKING A DIFFERENCE

340

RR UECX I DEUEetdJ16 T LEMON7 ILL =@I9 V  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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341

Microsoft PowerPoint - Proceedings Cover Sheets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capture - Capture - Membranes (1) Nanocomposite and Ionic Materials For CO2 Capture May 8-11, 2006 * Hilton Alexandria Mark Center * Alexandria, Virginia George Hu, Hailin Cong, Jianbin Tang, Youqing Shen Maciej Radosz (Speaker) Institute of Energy, Enhanced Oil Recovery Institute Soft Materials Laboratory, Department of Chemical & Petroleum Engineering University of Wyoming, USA Polyionic and Nanocomposite Materials for CO 2 Recovery from Flue Gas and Natural Gas Amine absorption: $40/ton, energy intensive, corrosion, solvent loss Ionic Liquids N N R 1 R 2 N R N R 1 R 2 R 4 R 3 P R 1 R 2 R 4 R 3 Anions: Cations: PF 6 - , BF 4 - , CF 3 SO 3 - F 3 C S N S CF 3 O O O O F 3 C C N S CF 3 O O O imidazolium ammonium C H 3 3 C C 3 2 3 3 3 C H N N + n c : BF 4 P[VBBI][BF 4 ] d : Tf 2 N P[VBBI][Tf 2 N] n C H H 3 N + CH 3 C H 3 CH 3 BF 4 n O O H C H C H C H N + CH 3 C H 3 CH 3 BF 4 O O C H N N

342

Data:F4c17fff-f1f6-4acd-ae27-e0e2fa091ee4 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

fff-f1f6-4acd-ae27-e0e2fa091ee4 fff-f1f6-4acd-ae27-e0e2fa091ee4 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Bonneville Power Admin Effective date: 2011/10/01 End date if known: 2013/09/30 Rate name: PF - 12 Public - Average Tier 1 rate Sector: Residential Description: Source or reference: http://www.bpa.gov/Power/PSP/rates/current.shtml Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous

343

PDF Document (18322k)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fig. Fig. 58 )... ~ ~ ~ ~ G ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~ .,,;:0) ~ ~ " ~ --J)... ~~ ~~ ~ ~ I() ~ l4:: I 4 fi } ~ ~ ,- c "' Pf/()TO-ANALYSIS OF VESSEL INTERIOR. i8ERRJNrE:QFROM tJSNPIC REPORT N-PZII P.6) 59. 4 MINIATURE CAMERA PHOTOGRAPH THROUGH PORT No.8 Fig. 61 ~ .0 - I - - " .I~ , . ~ ~ / Q fr) WATER PROBE ENTRY REFERENCE DIMENSIONS Fig.63 CORE SHP.OUD ~ ~ (() .~ t( ." O}'PICJAL USE ON1.f .50RVEYE./) - J/IN. /0. /96'/ RAOIATION SURVEYOF SL -I MILITARY TRAINING BUILOING Fig.69 5VA v£YED -c.lAIV /1/,.96! 5I./P?ORT FAC/L/TY IOOM/f RADIATION SURVEY OF FIRST FLOOR- SL-I ADMINISTRATION BUILDING F 19.70 SI/.eV~yFO v.4N I~ /961 RAOIATION SURVEY OF SECONO FLOOR- SL-I AOMINISTRATION BUILOING Fig. 71 ~ ~ ~ '\.7) \9 0) ~"' s ~ ~ 5 ~~ ~ ~ 0- 0... \4,. SI) \4,.~ ~~ )0.;::! ~~ ~~ ::5~

344

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Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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345

Hypersensitivity of human and rodent Fanconianemia (FA) cells to bystander effect-induced DNA damage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hypersensitivity Hypersensitivity o f h uman a nd r odent F anconi a nemia ( FA) c ells t o b ystander effect---induced D NA d amage P.F. Wilson 1,2 , H. Nagasawa 3 , A .C. K ohlgruber 2 , S .S. U rbin 2 , F .A. Bourguet 2 , J .R. Brogan 3 , J .S. Bedford 3 , M .A. Coleman 2 , J.M. Hinz 4 , and J.B. Little 5 1 B iology D epartment/NASA S pace R adiation L aboratory, B rookhaven N ational L aboratory, U pton, N Y 1 1733 2 Biosciences a nd B iotechnology D ivision, L awrence L ivermore N ational L aboratory, L ivermore, C A 9 4551 3 Department o f E nvironmental a nd R adiological H ealth S ciences, C olorado S tate U niversity, F ort C ollins, C O 8 0523 4 School o f M olecular B iosciences, W ashington S tate U niversity, P ullman, W A 9 9164 5 D epartment o f G enetics a nd C omplex D iseases, H arvard S chool o f P ublic H ealth, B oston, M A 0 2115 Fanconi

346

Data:5df79e82-7d10-48b9-b5ab-e69db05a4c49 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

df79e82-7d10-48b9-b5ab-e69db05a4c49 df79e82-7d10-48b9-b5ab-e69db05a4c49 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Bonneville Power Admin Effective date: 2011/10/01 End date if known: 2013/09/30 Rate name: PF - 12 Public - Average Tier 1 + Tier 2 rate Sector: Residential Description: Source or reference: http://www.bpa.gov/Power/PSP/rates/current.shtml Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring:

347

TRAC calculations of overcooling transients in PWRs for pressurized thermal-shock analysis  

SciTech Connect

This paper briefly describes the overall pressurized thermal shock (PTS) program at Los Alamos with emphasis on TRAC-PF1 calculations of severe overcooling transients in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Overcooling transients for both the Oconee-1 and Calvert Cliffs-1 nuclear plants have been performed. A summary of results for several calculations are presented for the Oconee-1 PWR along with detailed discussions of two of the most severe overcooling transients predicted (main steam-line break and turbine-bypass valve (TBV) failures). The calculations performed were plant specific in that details of both the primary and secondary sides were modeled in addition to a detailed model of the plant integrated control system (ICS). For the Oconee-1 main steam-line break transient, a minimum downcomer fluid temperature of approx. 405/sup 0/K was predicted. For the transient involving the failure of one bank of TBVs to close after initially opening following reactor and turbine trips, and extrapolated downcomer fluid temperature of approx. 365/sup 0/K was estimated. The latter temperature is at the nil-ductility temperature (NDT) limit (approx. 365/sup 0/K) for Oconee-1.

Ireland, J.R.; Boyack, B.E.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

The Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment. The OGLE-III Catalog of Variable Stars. XI. RR Lyrae Stars in the Galactic Bulge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The eleventh part of the OGLE-III Catalog of Variable Stars (OIII-CVS) contains 16836 RR Lyr stars detected in the OGLE fields toward the Galactic bulge. The total sample is composed of 11756 RR Lyr stars pulsating in the fundamental mode (RRab), 4989 overtone pulsators (RRc), and 91 double-mode (RRd) stars. About 400 RR Lyr stars are members of the Sagittarius Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy. The catalog includes the time-series photometry collected in the course of the OGLE survey, basic parameters of the stars, finding charts, and cross-identifications with other catalogs of RR Lyr stars toward the Milky Way center. We notice that some RRd stars in the Galactic bulge show unusually short periods and small ratio of periods, down to P_F=0.35 days and P_1O/P_F=0.726. In the Petersen diagram double-mode RR Lyr stars form a parabola-like structure, which connects shorter- and longer-period RRd stars. We show that the unique properties of the bulge RRd stars may be explained by allowing for the wide range of the metal a...

Soszynski, I; Udalski, A; Poleski, R; Szymanski, M K; Kubiak, M; Pietrzynski, G; Wyrzykowski, L; Ulaczyk, K; Kozlowski, S; Pietrukowicz, P

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Signature of a Pairing Transition in the Heat Capacity of Finite Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The heat capacity of iron isotopes is calculated within the interacting shell model using the complete (pf + 0g9/2)-shell. We identify a signature of the pairing transition in the heat capacity that is correlated with the suppression of the number of spin-zero neutron pairs as the temperature increases. Our results are obtained by a novel method that significantly reduces the statistical errors in the heat capacity calculated by the shell model Monte Carlo approach. The Monte Carlo results are compared with finite-temperature Fermi gas and BCS calculations. Typeset using REVTEX 1 Pairing effects in finite nuclei are well known; examples include the energy gap in the spectra of even-even nuclei and an odd-even effect observed in nuclear masses. However, less is known about the thermal signatures of the pairing interaction in nuclei. In a macroscopic conductor, pairing leads to a phase transition from a normal metal to a superconductor below a certain critical temperature, and in the BCS theory [1] the heat capacity is characterized

S. Liu; Y. Alhassid

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Distribution of contact forces in a homogeneous granular material of identical spheres under triaxial compression  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The distribution P(F) of contact forces F in a homogeneous isotropic disordered granular sample subject to uniform triaxial stress field is studied using a model where forces propagate and collide. Collisions occur at grain and obey given rules which allow satisfying local static equilibrium. Analogy with Boltzmann's equation of density evolution is drawn and used to derive the parameters that control the distribution Ps(F) of contact forces F in the stationary state in case of a packing of mono-disperse spheres. Using symmetry argument and mean field approximation, it is found that stationarity is achieved when the density Ps(F) of force can be written as the product of exponentials of quantities whose sums are preserved during collisions. This introduces 3 parameters in 2d and 6 in 3d which are the mean force components {Fxo, Fyo, Fzo}, and the mean torques of the force on a grain {Mxo, Myo, Mzo} >. Astonishingly, it seems that the theory cannot include distribution of contact orientation implicitly. Extension of the model is possible with some care to case of anisotropic packing. Pacs # : 5.40 ; 45.70 ; 62.20 ; 83.70.Fn

P. Evesque

2005-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

351

Work function control of hole-selective polymer/ITO anode contacts: an electrochemical doping study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a novel method for electrodeposition of ultra-thin films of poly-3-hexylthiophene (e-P3HT) on chemically modified indium-tin oxide (ITO) electrodes, to produce a hole-selective contact with an easily tuned work function (?), as demonstrated by a combination of spectroelectrochemistry and ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS). Selective contacts for optimized charge injection have become essential components for both thin film organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) and organic photovoltaics (OPVs). Electrochemically doped e-P3HT thin films, using counter ions such as PF{sub 6}{sup ?} do not suffer from stability issues associated with more acidic polymer layers (e.g. PEDOT:PSS). By controlling the oxidation state of the e-P3HT film via electrochemical doping we control the charge density within the film, resulting in an increase in work function with an increase in degree of oxidation. The method of electrochemical formation and doping of the e-P3HT film, using either constant potential step (CA) versus pulsed-potential step (PPS) protocols, has a significant secondary impact on the work function, as a result of the interface dipole effects from entrapment of these counter ions in the near-surface region of the polymer film. These results have significance for the performance of both OLEDs and OPVs built on these doped e-P3HT layers.

Ratcliff, Erin L.; Lee, Paul A.; Armstrong, Neal R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Plasma shape control calculations for BPX divertor design  

SciTech Connect

The Burning Plasma Experiment (BPX) divertor is to be capable of withstanding heat loads corresponding to ignited operation and 500 MW of fusion power for a current rise time and flattop lasting several seconds. The poloidal field (PF), diagnostic, and feedback equilibrium control systems must provide precise X-point position control in order to sweep the separatrices across the divertor target surface and optimally distribute the heat loads. A control matrix MHD equilibrium code, BEQ, and the Tokamak Simulation Code (TSC) are used to compute preprogrammed double-null (DN) divertor sweep trajectories that maximize sweep distance while simultaneously satisfying a set of strict constraints: minimum lengths of the field lines between the X-point and strike points, minimum spacing between the inboard plasma edge and the limiter, maximum spacing between the outboard plasma edge and the ICRF antennas, minimum safety factor, and linked poloidal flux. A sequence of DN diverted equilibria and a consistent TSC fiducial discharge simulation are used in evaluating the performance of the BPX divertor shape and possible modifications. 5 refs., 10 figs.

Strickler, D.J.; Neilson, G.H. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Jardin, S.C.; Pomphrey, N. (Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

In-situ raman microscopy of individual LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 particles in the Li-ion battery composite cathode  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Kinetic characteristics of Li{sup +} intercalation/deintercalation into/from individual LiNi{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.15}Al{sub 0.05}O{sub 2} particles in a composite cathode were studied in-situ using Raman microscopy during electrochemical charge-discharge in 1.2 M LiPF{sub 6}, ethylene carbonate (EC): ethyl-methyl carbonate (EMC), 3:7 by volume. Spectroscopic analysis of a cathode that was removed from a tested high-power Li-ion cell, which suffered substantial power and capacity loss, showed that the state of charge (SOC) of oxide particles on the cathode surface was highly non-uniform despite deep discharge of the Li-ion cell at the end of the test. In-situ monitoring of the SOC of selected oxide particles in the composite cathode in a sealed spectro-electrochemical cell revealed that the rate at which particles charge and discharge varied with time and location. The inconsistent kinetic behavior of individual oxide particles was attributed to degradation of the electronically conducting matrix in the composite cathode upon testing. These local micro-phenomena are responsible for the overall impedance rise of the cathode and contribute to the mechanism of lithium-ion cell failure.

Lei, Jinglei; McLarnon, Frank; Kostecki, Robert

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

A study of surface film formation on LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 cathodes u sing attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The surface films formed on commercial LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 cathodes (ATD Gen2) charged from 3.75V to 4.2V vs. Li/Li+ in EC:DEC - 1M LiPF6 were analyzed using ex-situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) with the attenuated total reflection (ATR) technique. A surface layer of Li2CO3 is present on the virgin cathode, probably from reaction of the active material with air during the cathode preparation procedure. The Li2CO3 layer disappeared even after soaking in the electrolyte, indicating that the layer dissolved into the electrolyte possibly even before potential cycling of the electrode. IR features only from the binder (PVdF) and a trace of polyamide from the Al current collector were observed on the surfaces of cathodes charged to below 4.2 V, i.e., no surface species from electrolyte oxidation. Some new IR features were, however, found on the cathode charged to 4.2 V and higher. An electrolyte oxidation product was observed that appeared to contain dicarbonyl anhydride and (poly)ester functionalities. The reaction appears to be an indirect electrochemical oxidation with overcharging (removal of > 0.6 Li ions) destabilizing oxygen in the oxide lattice resulting in oxygen transfer to the solvent molecules.

Song, S.-W.; Zhuang, G.V.; Ross Jr., P.N.

2004-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

355

Shell Structure from 100Sn to 78Ni: Implications for Nuclear Astrophysics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The single-particle structure and shell gap of {sup 100}Sn is inferred from prompt in-beam and delayed {gamma}-ray spectroscopy of seniority and spin-gap isomers. Recent results in {sup 94, 95}Ag and {sup 98}Cd stress the importance of large-scale shell model calculations employing realistic interactions for the isomerism, np-nh excitations and E2 polarization of the {sup 100}Sn core. The strong monopole interaction of the {Delta}l = 0 spin-flip partners {pi}g{sub 9/2-} {nu}g{sub 7/2} in N = 51 isotones below {sup 100}Sn is echoed in the {Delta}l = 1 pf5/2- ?g9/2 pair of nucleons, which is decisive for the persistence of the N = 50 shell gap in {sup 78}Ni. This is corroborated by recent experimental data on {sup 70, 76}Ni, {sup 78}Zn. The importance of monopole driven shell evolution for the appearance of new shell closures in neutron-rich nuclei and implications for r-process abundances near the N = 82 shell is discussed.

Grawe, Hubert H [ORNL; Blazhev, A. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Gorska, M. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Mukha, I. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Plettner, C. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Roeckl, E. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Nowacki, F. [IReS, Strasbourg, Cedex, France; Grzywacz, Robert Kazimierz [ORNL; Sawicka, M. [University of Warsaw

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

UCN production by multiphonon processes in superfluid Helium under pressure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cold neutrons are converted to ultra-cold neutrons (UCN) by the excitation of a single phonon or multiphonons in superfluid helium. The dynamic scattering function S(q, omega) of the superfluid helium strongly depends on pressure, leading to a pressure- dependent differential UCN production rate. A phenomenological expression for the multiphonon part of the scattering function s(lambda) describing UCN production has been derived from inelastic neutron scattering data. When combined with the production rate from single phonon processes this allows us to calculate the UCN production for any incident neutron flux. For calculations of the UCN production from single phonon processes we propose to use the values for S*(SVP) = 0.118(8) and S*(20 bar) = 0.066(6). As an example we will calculate the expected UCN production rate at the cold neutron beam for fundamental physics PF1b at the Institut Laue Langevin. We conclude that UCN production in superfluid helium under pressure is not attractive.

P. Schmidt-Wellenburg; K. H. Andersen; O. Zimmer

2008-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

357

PROGRESS WITH NSLS-II INJECTION STRAIGHT SECTION DESIGN  

SciTech Connect

The NSLS-II injection straight section (SR) consists of pulsed and DC bumps, septa system, beam trajectory correction and diagnostics systems. In this paper we discuss overall injection straight layout, preliminary element designs, specifications for the pulsed and DC magnets and their power supplies, vacuum devices and chambers and diagnostics devices. Prior to selecting the current 'conventional' design of the injection straight section we analyzed an option of injection via pulsed multipole pioneered at PF-AR. We found that this promising approach was not suited to the NSLS-II storage ring optics, since it would require a impractically compact arrangement of the injection straight section components and a complex modification of the transport line optics due to the strong focusing of the injected beam passing off the pulsed multipole axis. In addition, the requirement for a small injection transient of the stored beam orbit severely constrains the vertical alignment tolerance of the pulsed multipole. The design of the NSLS-II injection straight section is now completed with exception of transition chamber details, which will be adjusted to accommodate the actual layouts of the pulsed magnets.

Shaftan, T.; Blednykh, A.; Casey, B.; Dalesio, B.; Faussete, R.; Ferreira, M.; Fliller, R.; Ganetis, G.; Heese, R.; Hseuh, H.-C.; Job, P.K.; Johnson, E.; Kosciuk, B.; Kowalski, S.; Padrazo, D.; Parker, B.; Pinayev, I.; Sharma, S.; Singh, O.; Spataro, C.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

358

Nonaqueous electrolyte for electrical storage devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Improved nonaqueous electrolytes for application in electrical storage devices such as electrochemical capacitors or batteries are disclosed. The electrolytes of the invention contain salts consisting of alkyl substituted, cyclic delocalized aromatic cations, and their perfluoro derivatives, and certain polyatomic anions having a van der Waals volume less than or equal to 100 .ANG..sup.3, preferably inorganic perfluoride anions and most preferably PF.sub.6.sup.-, the salts being dissolved in organic liquids, and preferably alkyl carbonate solvents, or liquid sulfur dioxide or combinations thereof, at a concentration of greater than 0.5M and preferably greater than 1.0M. Exemplary electrolytes comprise 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate dissolved in a cyclic or acylic alkyl carbonate, or methyl formate, or a combination therof. These improved electrolytes have useful characteristics such as higher conductivity, higher concentration, higher energy storage capabilities, and higher power characteristics compared to prior art electrolytes. Stacked capacitor cells using electrolytes of the invention permit high energy, high voltage storage.

McEwen, Alan B. (Melrose, MA); Yair, Ein-Eli (Waltham, MA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

In situ synchrotron x-ray studies of LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} cathodes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

LiCoO{sub 2} cathodes are now used in most commercial lithium ion batteries. LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} is an attractive low cost alternative. However, it is difficult to make reproducibly. At Brookhaven National Laboratory two in situ synchrotron x-ray techniques, that are available at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), have been used to investigate LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}. The techniques are x-ray absorption and high resolution x-ray diffraction. With x-ray absorption it is possible to follow the changes in the Mn oxidation state and the changes in the Mn-O and Mn-Mn bond lengths on cycling. Also it is possible to detect amorphous phases. The high energy x-rays at the diffraction Beam Lines at the NSLS (up to 24 KeV) permit in situ x-ray diffraction, in the transmission mode, in thin lithium and lithium ion cells. The evolution of the structural chances that occur on cycling can be followed. These in situ measurements were done on Li/LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} cells with a liquid electrolyte (1 M LiPF{sub 6} in a 1:1:3 PC:EC:DMC solvent).

McBreen, J.; Mukerjee, S.; Yang, X.Q. [and others

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

The phase diagram of ice: a quasi-harmonic study based on a flexible water model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The phase diagram of ice is studied by a quasi-harmonic approximation. The free energy of all experimentally known ice phases has been calculated with the flexible q-TIP4P/F model of water. The only exception is the high pressure ice X, in which the presence of symmetric O-H-O bonds prevents its modeling with this empirical interatomic potential. The simplicity of our approach allows us to study ice phases at state points of the T-P plane that have been omitted in previous simulations using free energy methods based on thermodynamic integration. The effect in the phase diagram of averaging the proton disorder that appears in several ice phases has been studied. It is found particularly relevant for ice III, at least for cell sizes typically used in phase coexistence simulations. New insight into the capability of the employed water model to describe the coexistence of ice phases is presented. We find that the H-ordered ices IX and XIV, as well as the H-disordered ice XII, are particularly stable for this wate...

Ramirez, R; Herrero, C P

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "malta pf paracel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

The phase diagram of ice Ih, II, and III: a quasi-harmonic study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The phase diagram of ice Ih, II, and III is studied by a quasi-harmonic approximation. The results of this approach are compared to phase diagrams previously derived by thermodynamic integration using path integral and classical simulations, as well as to experimental data. The studied models are based on both flexible (q-TIP4P/F) and rigid (TIP4P/2005, TIP4PQ/2005) descriptions of the water molecule. Many aspects of the simulated phase diagrams are reasonably reproduced by the quasi-harmonic approximation. Advantages of this simple approach are that it is free from the statistical errors inherent to computer simulations, both classical and quantum limits are easily accessible, and the error of the approximation is expected to decrease in the zero temperature limit. We find that the calculated phase diagram of ice Ih, II, and III depends strongly on the hydrogen disorder of ice III, at least for cell sizes typically used in phase coexistence simulations. Either ice II (in the classical limit) or ice III (in t...

Ramirez, R; Herrero, C P; 10.1063/1.4757064

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Fused ring and linking groups effect on overcharge protection for lithium-ion batteries.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The derivatives of 1,3-benzodioxan (DBBD1) and 1,4-benzodioxan (DBBD2) bearing two tert-butyl groups have been synthesized as new redox shuttle additives for overcharge protection of lithium-ion batteries. Both compounds exhibit a reversible redox wave over 4 V vs Li/Li{sup +} with better solubility in a commercial electrolyte (1.2 M LiPF{sub 6}) dissolved in ethylene carbonate/ethyl methyl carbonate (EC/EMC 3/7) than the di-tert-butyl-substituted 1,4-dimethoxybenzene (DDB). The electrochemical stability of DBBD1 and DBBD2 was tested under charge/discharge cycles with 100% overcharge at each cycle in MCMB/LiFePO{sub 4} and Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}/LiFePO{sub 4} cells. DBBD2 shows significantly better performance than DBBD1 for both cell chemistries. The structural difference and reaction energies for decomposition have been studied by density functional calculations.

Weng, W.; Zhang, Z.; Redfern, P. C.; Curtiss, L. A.; Amine, K.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

The effect of location on the predicted performance of a heat pump water heater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory testing and field testing have shown that a heat pump water heater (HPWH) uses about half the electrical energy input that an electric resistance water heater does. However, since the HPWH extracts energy from the air in its environment, the question arises as to how this energy extraction would affect the house heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system if the HPWH were located in a conditioned space of a household. A second question concerns the savings obtained by locating the HPWH in an unconditioned space such as a garage or basement. The effect of locating the HPWH in the conditioned spaces of houses with a high-performance heat pump as well as resistance- gas- and oil-heated houses with a high performance electric air conditioner was studied. All calculations were made on a desktop computer. Weather bin data and inlet water temperatures for each city were used to calcuate the energy consumption for the house first with a resistance water heater, and then with a HPWH. The difference between these values was used to calculate the performance factor (PF) of the HPWH. The HPWH will add to the house heating load in winter and lessen the house cooling load in summer.

Levins, W.P.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Plasma focus ion beam fluence and flux-Scaling with stored energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements on plasma focus ion beams include various advanced techniques producing a variety of data which has yet to produce benchmark numbers [A Bernard et al., J. Mosc. Phys. Soc. 8, 93-170 (1998)]. This present paper uses the Lee Model code [S Lee, http://www.plasmafocus.net (2012)], integrated with experimental measurements to provide the basis for reference numbers and the scaling of deuteron beams versus stored energy E{sub 0}. The ion number fluence (ions m{sup -2}) and energy fluence (J m{sup -2}) computed as 2.4-7.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} and 2.2-33 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6}, respectively, are found to be independent of E{sub 0} from 0.4 to 486 kJ. Typical inductance machines (33-55 nH) produce 1.2-2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} ions per kJ carrying 1.3%-4% E{sub 0} at mean ion energy 50-205 keV, dropping to 0.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} ions per kJ carrying 0.7% E{sub 0} for the high inductance INTI PF.

Lee, S. [INTI International University, 71800 Nilai (Malaysia); Institute for Plasma Focus Studies, 32 Oakpark Drive, Chadstone 3148 (Australia); Physics Department, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Saw, S. H. [INTI International University, 71800 Nilai (Malaysia); Institute for Plasma Focus Studies, 32 Oakpark Drive, Chadstone 3148 (Australia)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

365

Crystallization and doping of amorphous silicon on low temperature plastic  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method or process of crystallizing and doping amorphous silicon (a-Si) on a low-temperature plastic substrate using a short pulsed high energy source in a selected environment, without heat propagation and build-up in the substrate is disclosed. The pulsed energy processing of the a-Si in a selected environment, such as BF3 and PF5, will form a doped micro-crystalline or poly-crystalline silicon (pc-Si) region or junction point with improved mobilities, lifetimes and drift and diffusion lengths and with reduced resistivity. The advantage of this method or process is that it provides for high energy materials processing on low cost, low temperature, transparent plastic substrates. Using pulsed laser processing a high (>900 C), localized processing temperature can be achieved in thin films, with little accompanying temperature rise in the substrate, since substrate temperatures do not exceed 180 C for more than a few microseconds. This method enables use of plastics incapable of withstanding sustained processing temperatures (higher than 180 C) but which are much lower cost, have high tolerance to ultraviolet light, have high strength and good transparency, compared to higher temperature plastics such as polyimide. 5 figs.

Kaschmitter, J.L.; Truher, J.B.; Weiner, K.H.; Sigmon, T.W.

1994-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

366

Crystallization and doping of amorphous silicon on low temperature plastic  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method or process of crystallizing and doping amorphous silicon (a-Si) on a low-temperature plastic substrate using a short pulsed high energy source in a selected environment, without heat propagation and build-up in the substrate. The pulsed energy processing of the a-Si in a selected environment, such as BF3 and PF5, will form a doped micro-crystalline or poly-crystalline silicon (pc-Si) region or junction point with improved mobilities, lifetimes and drift and diffusion lengths and with reduced resistivity. The advantage of this method or process is that it provides for high energy materials processing on low cost, low temperature, transparent plastic substrates. Using pulsed laser processing a high (>900.degree. C.), localized processing temperature can be achieved in thin films, with little accompanying temperature rise in the substrate, since substrate temperatures do not exceed 180.degree. C. for more than a few microseconds. This method enables use of plastics incapable of withstanding sustained processing temperatures (higher than 180.degree. C.) but which are much lower cost, have high tolerance to ultraviolet light, have high strength and good transparency, compared to higher temperature plastics such as polyimide.

Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA); Truher, Joel B. (Palo Alto, CA); Weiner, Kurt H. (Campbell, CA); Sigmon, Thomas W. (Beaverton, OR)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Studies of ionic liquids in lithium-ion battery test systems  

SciTech Connect

In this work, thermal and electrochemical properties of neat and mixed ionic liquid - lithium salt systems have been studied. The presence of a lithium salt causes both thermal and phase-behavior changes. Differential scanning calorimeter DSC and thermal gravimetric analysis TGA were used for thermal analysis for several imidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, trifluoromethansulfonate, BF{sub 4}, and PF{sub 6} systems. Conductivities and diffusion coefficient have been measured for some selected systems. Chemical reactions in electrode - ionic liquid electrolyte interfaces were studied by interfacial impedance measurements. Lithium-lithium and lithium-carbon cells were studied at open circuit and a charged system. The ionic liquids studied include various imidazolium systems that are already known to be electrochemically unstable in the presence of lithium metal. In this work the development of interfacial resistance is shown in a Li|BMIMBF{sub 4} + LiBF{sub 4}|Li cell as well as results from some cycling experiments. As the ionic liquid reacts with the lithium electrode the interfacial resistance increases. The results show the magnitude of reactivity due to reduction of the ionic liquid electrolyte that eventually has a detrimental effect on battery performance.

Salminen, Justin; Prausnitz, John M.; Newman, John

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

VERIFICATION OF THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY'S (DWPF) PROCESS DIGESTION METHOD FOR THE SLUDGE BATCH 7A QUALIFICATION SAMPLE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For each sludge batch that is processed in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performs confirmation of the applicability of the digestion method to be used by the DWPF lab for elemental analysis of Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) receipt samples and SRAT product process control samples. DWPF SRAT samples are typically dissolved using a room temperature HF-HNO{sub 3} acid dissolution (i.e., DWPF Cold Chem Method, see DWPF Procedure SW4-15.201) and then analyzed by inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). This report contains the results and comparison of data generated from performing the Aqua Regia (AR), Sodium peroxide/Hydroxide Fusion (PF) and DWPF Cold Chem (CC) method digestions of Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) SRAT Receipt and SB7a SRAT Product samples. The SB7a SRAT Receipt and SB7a SRAT Product samples were prepared in the SRNL Shielded Cells, and the SRAT Receipt material is representative of the sludge that constituates the SB7a Batch or qualification composition. This is the sludge in Tank 51 that is to be transferred into Tank 40, which will contain the heel of Sludge Batch 6 (SB6), to form the Sb7a Blend composition.

Click, D.; Edwards, T.; Jones, M.; Wiedenman, B.

2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

369

Review of Wind Energy Forecasting Methods for Modeling Ramping Events  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Tall onshore wind turbines, with hub heights between 80 m and 100 m, can extract large amounts of energy from the atmosphere since they generally encounter higher wind speeds, but they face challenges given the complexity of boundary layer flows. This complexity of the lowest layers of the atmosphere, where wind turbines reside, has made conventional modeling efforts less than ideal. To meet the nation's goal of increasing wind power into the U.S. electrical grid, the accuracy of wind power forecasts must be improved. In this report, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, in collaboration with the University of Colorado at Boulder, University of California at Berkeley, and Colorado School of Mines, evaluates innovative approaches to forecasting sudden changes in wind speed or 'ramping events' at an onshore, multimegawatt wind farm. The forecast simulations are compared to observations of wind speed and direction from tall meteorological towers and a remote-sensing Sound Detection and Ranging (SODAR) instrument. Ramping events, i.e., sudden increases or decreases in wind speed and hence, power generated by a turbine, are especially problematic for wind farm operators. Sudden changes in wind speed or direction can lead to large power generation differences across a wind farm and are very difficult to predict with current forecasting tools. Here, we quantify the ability of three models, mesoscale WRF, WRF-LES, and PF.WRF, which vary in sophistication and required user expertise, to predict three ramping events at a North American wind farm.

Wharton, S; Lundquist, J K; Marjanovic, N; Williams, J L; Rhodes, M; Chow, T K; Maxwell, R

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

370

Beta decay of Neutron-Rich 53-56Ca  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Beta-decay properties of neutron-rich Ca isotopes have been obtained. Half-life values were determined for the first time for 54Ca [86(7) ms], 55Ca [22(2) ms], and 56Ca [11(2) ms]. The half-life of 230(6) ms deduced for 53Ca is significantly longer than reported previously, where the decay chain 53K -> 53Ca -> 53Sc was considered. A delayed gamma ray with energy 247 keV as identified following beta decay of 54Ca, and is proposed to depopulate the first 1+ level in 54Sc. The beta-decay properties compare favorably with the results of shell model calculations completed in the full pf-space with the GXPF1 interaction. The half-lives of the neutron-rich Ca isotopes are also compared with gross beta-decay theory. The systematic trend of the neutron-rich Ca half-lives is consistent with the presence of a subshell gap at N=32.

P. F. Mantica; R. Broda; H. L. Crawford; A. Damaske; B. Fornal; A. A. Hecht; C. Hoffman; M. Horoi; N. Hoteling; R. V. F. Janssens; J. Pereira; J. S. Pinter; J. B. Stoker; S. L. Tabor; T. Sumikama; W. B. Walters; X. Wang; S. Zhu

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

371

Beta decay of Neutron-Rich 53-56Ca  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Beta-decay properties of neutron-rich Ca isotopes have been obtained. Half-life values were determined for the first time for 54Ca [86(7) ms], 55Ca [22(2) ms], and 56Ca [11(2) ms]. The half-life of 230(6) ms deduced for 53Ca is significantly longer than reported previously, where the decay chain 53K -> 53Ca -> 53Sc was considered. A delayed gamma ray with energy 247 keV as identified following beta decay of 54Ca, and is proposed to depopulate the first 1+ level in 54Sc. The beta-decay properties compare favorably with the results of shell model calculations completed in the full pf-space with the GXPF1 interaction. The half-lives of the neutron-rich Ca isotopes are also compared with gross beta-decay theory. The systematic trend of the neutron-rich Ca half-lives is consistent with the presence of a subshell gap at N=32.

Mantica, P F; Crawford, H L; Damaske, A; Fornal, B; Hecht, A A; Hoffman, C; Horoi, M; Hoteling, N; Janssens, R V F; Pereira, J; Pinter, J S; Stoker, J B; Tabor, S L; Sumikama, T; Walters, W B; Wang, X; Zhu, S

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Development and characterization of acrylated palm oil nanoparticles using ionizing radiation  

SciTech Connect

In this study, the utilization of radiation crosslinking methods which are known as intermolecular and intramolecular crosslinking for the formation of nanoparticles of Acrylated Palm Oil (APO) in the microemulsion system that also consists of Pluronic F-127 (PF-127) surfactant was demonstrated. This microemulsion system was subjected to the ionizing radiation i.e. gamma irradiation at different doses to form the crosslinked APO nanoparticles. The effects of radiation doses on the size of APO nanoparticles were investigated using the Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) method and their images were viewed using the Transmission Electron Microcrospy (TEM). The Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to characterize the chemical structure and the crosslinking conversion of carbon-carbon double bond (-C = C-) of the APO nanoparticles after irradiation. As a result, the size of the APO nanoparticle decreased when the irradiation dose increased. Reduce in size might be due to the effect of intramolecular crosslinking reaction of the APO nanoparticles during irradiation process. Meanwhile, the intramolecular -C C- crosslinking conversion percentage was increased at doses below 1kGy before decreasing at the higher dose that might due to the intermolecular crosslinking of the macromolecules. This study showed that radiation crosslinking methods of polymerization and crosslinking in the microemulsion were found to be promising for the synthesis of nanoparticles.

Tajau, Rida; Yunus, Wan Md Zin Wan; Dahlan, Khairul Zaman Mohd; Mahmood, Mohd Hilmi; Hashim, Kamaruddin [Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia), Radiation Processing Technology Division (BTS), Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, University Putra Malaysia (UPM), 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia), Radiation Processing Technology Division (BTS), Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia)

2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

373

The Effect of Laser Surface Reconstruction of Disordered Carbons on Performance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The reconstruction of the surface of disordered carbons was examined by heating carbons derived from polymethacrylonitrile (PMAN) and divinylbenzene (DVB) with a pulsed infrared laser in an argon or helium atmosphere, both fluidized and under static conditions. By graphitizing the outer surface of the carbons, it was hoped to reduce the high first-cycle losses associated with such disordered materials in Li-ion cells. The power to the sample was varied to observed the effects on surface morphology and electrochemical performance in 1M LiPF{sub 6} ethylene carbonate-dimethyl carbonate. The use various reactive atmosphere such as ethylene, 2-vinylpyridine, pyrrole, and furfuryl alcohol were also evaluated as an alternative means of hopefully forming a thin graphitic layer on the carbon particles to reduce first-cycle irreversibility. While some improvement was realized, these losses were still unacceptably high. The laser heating did improve the rate capabilities of the carbons, however. More work in this area is necessary to fully understand surface and bulk effects.

EVEN JR., WILLIAM R.; GUIDOTTI, RONALD A.

1999-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

374

Electrostatic energy harvester and Li-Ion charger circuit for microscale applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AbstractModern portable micro-systems like biomedical implants and ad-hoc wireless transceiver micro-sensors continue to integrate more functions into smaller devices, which result in low energy levels and short operational lives. Researchers and industry alike are consequently considering harvesting energy from the surrounding environment as a means of offsetting this energy deficit. Even with power efficient designs, low duty-cycle operation, smart power-aware network architectures, and batteries with improved energy density, the stored energy in micro-scale systems is simply not sufficient to sustain extended lifetimes. Fortunately, the surrounding environment is a rich source of energy, from solar and thermal to kinetic, but harnessing it without dissipating much power in the process is challenging. In this paper, an electrostatic vibrational energy harvester circuit is proposed and evaluated. It harnesses energy from inherent vibrations in the system (e.g., engine-powered applications) by modulating the parallelplate distance of a variable capacitor and channeling the resulting change in charge into a secondary Li-Ion micro-battery. The varactor, in essence, behaves like a vibration-dependent current source. Simulations show that a 100-to-1 pF variable plate capacitor subjected to vibrations with a period of 15 s produces an average harvesting current of 40.8 A, an energy gain of 569 pJ per cycle, and a net average power gain of 38 W.

Erick O. Torres; Student Member; Gabriel A. Rincn-mora; Senior Member

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Highly Quantitative Electrochemical Characterization of Non-Aqueous Electrolytes & Solid Electrolyte Interphases  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The methods to measure solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) electrochemical properties and SEI formation capability of non-aqueous electrolyte solutions are not adequately addressed in the literature. And yet, there is a strong demand in new electrolyte generations that promote stabilized SEIs and have an influence to resolve safety, calendar life and other limitations of Li-ion batteries. To fill this gap, in situ electrochemical approach with new descriptive criteria for highly quantitative characterization of SEI and electrolytes is proposed. These criteria are: SEI formation capacity, SEI corrosion rate, SEI maintenance rate, and SEI kinetic stability. These criteria are associated with battery parameters like irreversible capacity, self-discharge, shelf-life, power, etc. Therefore, they are especially useful for electrolyte development and standard fast screening, allowing a skillful approach to narrow down the search for the best electrolyte. The characterization protocol also allows retrieving information on interfacial resistance for SEI layers and the electrochemical window of electrolytes, the other important metrics of characterization. The method validation was done on electrolyte blends containing phosphazenes, developed at Idaho National Laboratory, as 1.2M LiPF6 [80 % EC-MEC (2:8) (v/v) + 20% Phosphazene variety] (v/v), which were targeted for safer electrolyte variations.

Sergiy V. Sazhin; Kevin L. Gering; Mason K. Harrup; Harry W. Rollins

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Rhodium mediated bond activation: from synthesis to catalysis  

SciTech Connect

Recently, our lab has developed monoanionic tridentate ligand, To{sup R}, showing the corresponding coordination chemistry and catalyst reactivity of magnesium, zirconium, zinc and iridium complexes. This thesis details synthetic chemistry, structural study and catalytic reactivity of the To{sup R}-supported rhodium compounds. Tl[To{sup R}] has been proved to be a superior ligand transfer agent for synthesizing rhodium complexes. The salt metathesis route of Tl[To{sup M}] with [Rh({mu}-Cl)(CO)]{sub 2} and [Rh({mu}- Cl)(COE)]{sub 2} gives To{sup M}Rh(CO){sub 2} (2.2) and To{sup M}RhH({eta}{sup 3}-C{sub 8}H{sub 13}) (3.1) respectively while Tl[To{sup P}] with [Rh({mu}-Cl)(CO)]{sub 2} affords To{sup P}Rh(CO){sub 2} (2.3). 2.2 reacts with both strong and weak electrophiles, resulting in the oxazoline N-attacked and the metal center-attacked compounds correspondingly. Using one of the metal center-attacked electrophiles, 2.3 was demonstrated to give high diastereoselectivity. Parallel to COE allylic C-H activation complex 3.1, the propene and allylbenzene allylic C-H activation products have also been synthesized. The subsequent functionalization attempts have been examined by treating with Brnsted acids, Lewis acids, electrophiles, nucleophiles, 1,3-dipolar reagents and reagents containing multiple bonds able to be inserted. Various related complexes have been obtained under these conditions, in which one of the azide insertion compounds reductively eliminates to give an allylic functionalization product stoichiometrically. 3.1 reacts with various primary alcohols to give the decarbonylation dihydride complex To{sup M}Rh(H){sub 2}CO (4.1). 4.1 shows catalytic reactivity for primary alcohol decarbonylation under a photolytic condition. Meanwhile, 2.2 has been found to be more reactive than 4.1 for catalytic alcohol decarbonylation under the same condition. Various complexes and primary alcohols have been investigated as well. The proposed mechanism is based on the stochiometric reactions of the possible metal and organic intermediates. Primary amines, hypothesized to undergo a similar reaction pathway, have been verified to give dehydrogenative coupling product, imines. In the end, the well-developed neutral tridentate Tpm coordinates to the rhodium bis(ethylene) dimer in the presence of TlPF{sub 6} to give the cationic complex, [TpmRh(C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2}][PF{sub 6}] (5.1). 5.1 serves as the first example of explicit determination of the solid state hapticity, evidenced by X-ray structure, among all the cationic Tpm{sup R}M(C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2}{sup +} (Tpm{sup R} = Tpm, Tpm*, M = Rh, Ir) derivatives. The substitution chemistry of this compound has been studied by treating with soft and hard donors. The trimethylphosphine-sbustituted complex activates molecular hydrogen to give the dihydride compound.

Ho, Hung-An

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

377

A Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion Batteries Print A Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion Batteries Print Lithium-ion batteries are in smart phones, laptops, most other consumer electronics, and the newest electric cars. Good as these batteries are, the need for energy storage in batteries is surpassing current technologies. In a lithium-ion battery, charge moves from the cathode to the anode, a critical component for storing energy. A team of Berkeley Lab scientists has designed a new kind of anode that absorbs eight times the lithium of current designs, and has maintained its greatly increased energy capacity after more than a year of testing and many hundreds of charge-discharge cycles. Cyclical Science Succeeds The anode achievement described in this highlight provides a rare scientific showcase, combining advanced tools of synthesis, characterization, and simulation in a novel approach to materials development. Gao Liu's original research team, part of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division (EETD), got the ball rolling by designing the original series of polyfluorene-based conducting polymers. Then, Wanli Yang of the ALS suggested soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy to determine their key electronic properties. To better understand these results, and their relevance to the conductivity of the polymer, the growing team sought a theoretical explanation from Lin-Wang Wang of Berkeley Lab's Materials Sciences Division (MSD). By conducting calculations on the promising polymers at Berkeley Lab's National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC), the team gained insight into what was really happening in the PF with the carbonyl functional group, singling it out for further development.

378

A Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion Batteries Print A Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion Batteries Print Lithium-ion batteries are in smart phones, laptops, most other consumer electronics, and the newest electric cars. Good as these batteries are, the need for energy storage in batteries is surpassing current technologies. In a lithium-ion battery, charge moves from the cathode to the anode, a critical component for storing energy. A team of Berkeley Lab scientists has designed a new kind of anode that absorbs eight times the lithium of current designs, and has maintained its greatly increased energy capacity after more than a year of testing and many hundreds of charge-discharge cycles. Cyclical Science Succeeds The anode achievement described in this highlight provides a rare scientific showcase, combining advanced tools of synthesis, characterization, and simulation in a novel approach to materials development. Gao Liu's original research team, part of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division (EETD), got the ball rolling by designing the original series of polyfluorene-based conducting polymers. Then, Wanli Yang of the ALS suggested soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy to determine their key electronic properties. To better understand these results, and their relevance to the conductivity of the polymer, the growing team sought a theoretical explanation from Lin-Wang Wang of Berkeley Lab's Materials Sciences Division (MSD). By conducting calculations on the promising polymers at Berkeley Lab's National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC), the team gained insight into what was really happening in the PF with the carbonyl functional group, singling it out for further development.

379

A Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion Batteries Print Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion Batteries Print Lithium-ion batteries are in smart phones, laptops, most other consumer electronics, and the newest electric cars. Good as these batteries are, the need for energy storage in batteries is surpassing current technologies. In a lithium-ion battery, charge moves from the cathode to the anode, a critical component for storing energy. A team of Berkeley Lab scientists has designed a new kind of anode that absorbs eight times the lithium of current designs, and has maintained its greatly increased energy capacity after more than a year of testing and many hundreds of charge-discharge cycles. Cyclical Science Succeeds The anode achievement described in this highlight provides a rare scientific showcase, combining advanced tools of synthesis, characterization, and simulation in a novel approach to materials development. Gao Liu's original research team, part of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division (EETD), got the ball rolling by designing the original series of polyfluorene-based conducting polymers. Then, Wanli Yang of the ALS suggested soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy to determine their key electronic properties. To better understand these results, and their relevance to the conductivity of the polymer, the growing team sought a theoretical explanation from Lin-Wang Wang of Berkeley Lab's Materials Sciences Division (MSD). By conducting calculations on the promising polymers at Berkeley Lab's National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC), the team gained insight into what was really happening in the PF with the carbonyl functional group, singling it out for further development.

380

SULFUR REDUCTION IN GASOLINE AND DIESEL FUELS BY EXTRACTION/ADSORPTION OF REFRACTORY DIBENZOTHIOPHENES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Refractory 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene, which is difficult to remove from petroleum feedstocks, binds to the Ru in Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 5}(H{sub 2}O){sup 2+} by displacing the H{sub 2}O ligand. Thiophene, benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene (DBT) also react with Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 5}(H{sub 2}O){sup 2+} similarly. This binding ability of Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 5}(H{sub 2}O){sup 2+} has been used to remove over 50% of the DBT in simulated petroleum feedstocks by a biphasic extraction process. The extraction phase is readily regenerated by air-oxidation thereby completing a cyclic process that removes DBT from petroleum feedstocks. Solid phase extractants consisting of Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 5}(H{sub 2}O){sup 2+}, CpRu(CO){sub 2}(BF{sub 4}), CpFe(CO){sub 2}(C{sub 4}H{sub 8}){sup +} and AgX (where X = BF{sub 4}{sup -}, PF{sub 6}{sup -} or NO{sub 3}{sup -}) adsorbed on silica have also been used to remove DBT and 4,6-Me{sub 2}DBT from simulated petroleum feedstocks. The AgX/silica adsorbents remove 90% of the DBT and 4,6-Me{sub 2}DBT and can be regenerated and re-used for multiple extractions, which makes these adsorbents of potential industrial use for the removal of refractory dibenzothiophenes from petroleum feedstocks.

Robert J. Angelici

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

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381

A capacitor-less low drop-out voltage regulator with fast transient response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power management has had an ever increasing role in the present electronic industry. Battery powered and handheld applications require power management techniques to extend the life of the battery and consequently the operation life of the device. Most systems incorporate several voltage regulators which supply various subsystems and provide isolation among such subsystems. Low dropout (LDO) voltage regulators are generally used to supply low voltage, low noise analog circuitry. Each LDO regulator demands a large external capacitor, in the range of a few microfarads, to perform. These external capacitors occupy valuable board space, increase the IC pin count, and prohibit system-on-chip (SoC) solutions. The presented research provides a solution to the present bulky external capacitor LDO voltage regulators with a capacitor-less LDO architecture. The large external capacitor was completely removed and replaced with a reasonable 100pF internal output capacitor, allowing for greater power system integration for SoC applications. A new compensation scheme is presented that provides both a fast transient response and full range ac stability from a 0mA to 50mA load current. A 50mA, 2.8V, capacitor-less LDO voltage regulator was fabricated in a TSMC 0.35um CMOS technology, consuming only 65uA of ground current with a dropout voltage of 200mV. Experimental results show that the proposed capacitor-less LDO voltage regulator exceeds the current published works in both transient response and ac stability. The architecture is also less sensitive to process variation and loading conditions. Thus, the presented capacitor-less LDO voltage regulator is suitable for SoC solutions.

Milliken, Robert Jon

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Sulfone-based electrolytes for high voltage li-ion batteries.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sulfone-based electrolytes have been investigated as electrolytes for lithium-ion cells using high-voltage positive electrodes, such as LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} and LiNi{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 1.5}O{sub 4} spinels, and Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12} spinel as negative electrode. In the presence of imide salt (LiTFSI) and ethyl methyl sulfone or tetramethyl sulfone (TMS) electrolytes, the Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}/LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} cell exhibited a specific capacity of 80 mAh g{sup -1} with an excellent capacity retention after 100 cycles. In a cell with high-voltage LiNi{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 1.5}O{sub 4} positive electrode and 1 M LiPF{sub 6} in TMS as electrolyte, the capacity reached 110 mAh g{sup -1} at the C/12 rate. When TMS was blended with ethyl methyl carbonate, the Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}/LiNi{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 1.5}O{sub 4} cell delivered an initial capacity of 80 mAh g{sup -1} and cycled fairly well for 1000 cycles under 2C rate. The exceptional electrochemical stability of the sulfone electrolytes and their compatibility with the Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12} safer and stable anode were the main reason behind the outstanding electrochemical performance observed with high-potential spinel cathode materials. These electrolytes could be promising alternative electrolytes for high-energy density battery applications such as plug-in hybrid and electric vehicles that require a long cycle life.

Abouimrane, A.; Belharouak, I.; Amine, K. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division)

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Air Conditioner Compressor Performance Model  

SciTech Connect

During the past three years, the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) Load Modeling Task Force (LMTF) has led the effort to develop the new modeling approach. As part of this effort, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Southern California Edison (SCE), and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Solutions tested 27 residential air-conditioning units to assess their response to delayed voltage recovery transients. After completing these tests, different modeling approaches were proposed, among them a performance modeling approach that proved to be one of the three favored for its simplicity and ability to recreate different SVR events satisfactorily. Funded by the California Energy Commission (CEC) under its load modeling project, researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) led the follow-on task to analyze the motor testing data to derive the parameters needed to develop a performance models for the single-phase air-conditioning (SPAC) unit. To derive the performance model, PNNL researchers first used the motor voltage and frequency ramping test data to obtain the real (P) and reactive (Q) power versus voltage (V) and frequency (f) curves. Then, curve fitting was used to develop the P-V, Q-V, P-f, and Q-f relationships for motor running and stalling states. The resulting performance model ignores the dynamic response of the air-conditioning motor. Because the inertia of the air-conditioning motor is very small (H<0.05), the motor reaches from one steady state to another in a few cycles. So, the performance model is a fair representation of the motor behaviors in both running and stalling states.

Lu, Ning; Xie, YuLong; Huang, Zhenyu

2008-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

384

A phenomenological model of the thermal-hydraulics of convective boiling during the quenching of hot rod bundles: Part 2, Assessment of the model with steady-state and transient post-CHF data  

SciTech Connect

After completing the thermal-hydraulic model developed in a companion paper, we performed assessment calculations of the model using steady-state and transient post-critical heat flux (CHF) data. This paper discusses the results of those calculations. The hot-patch model, in conjunction with the other thermal-hydraulic models, was capable of modeling the Winfrith post-CHF hot-patch experiments. The hot-patch model kept the wall temperatures at the specified levels in the hot-patch regions and did not allow any quench-front propagation from either the bottom or the top of the test section. Among the four Winfrith runs selected to assess the hot-patch model, the average deviation in hot-patch power predictions was 15.4%, indicating reasonable predictions of the amount of energy transferred to the fluid by the hot patch. The interfacial heat-transfer model tended to slightly under-predict the vapor temperatures. The maximum difference between calculated and measured vapor superheats was 20%, with a 10% difference for the remainder of the runs considered. The wall-to-fluid heat transfer was predicted reasonably well, and the predicted wall superheats were in reasonable agreement with measured data with a maximum relative error of less than 13%. The effects of pressure, test section power, and flow rate on the axial variation of tube wall temperature are predicted reasonably well for a large range of operating parameters. A comparison of the predicted and measured local wall. The thermal-hydraulic model in TRAC/PF1-MOD2 was used to predict the axial variation of void fraction as measured in Winfrith post-CHF tests. The predictions for reflood calculations were reasonable. The model correctly predicted the trends in void fraction as a result of the effect of pressure and power, with the effect of pressure being more apparent than that of power. 13 refs.

Unal, C.; Nelson, R.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

A phenomenological model of the thermal-hydraulics of convective boiling during the quenching of hot rod bundles: Part 2, Assessment of the model with steady-state and transient post-CHF data  

SciTech Connect

After completing the thermal-hydraulic model developed in a companion paper, we performed assessment calculations of the model using steady-state and transient post-critical heat flux (CHF) data. This paper discusses the results of those calculations. The hot-patch model, in conjunction with the other thermal-hydraulic models, was capable of modeling the Winfrith post-CHF hot-patch experiments. The hot-patch model kept the wall temperatures at the specified levels in the hot-patch regions and did not allow any quench-front propagation from either the bottom or the top of the test section. Among the four Winfrith runs selected to assess the hot-patch model, the average deviation in hot-patch power predictions was 15.4%, indicating reasonable predictions of the amount of energy transferred to the fluid by the hot patch. The interfacial heat-transfer model tended to slightly under-predict the vapor temperatures. The maximum difference between calculated and measured vapor superheats was 20%, with a 10% difference for the remainder of the runs considered. The wall-to-fluid heat transfer was predicted reasonably well, and the predicted wall superheats were in reasonable agreement with measured data with a maximum relative error of less than 13%. The effects of pressure, test section power, and flow rate on the axial variation of tube wall temperature are predicted reasonably well for a large range of operating parameters. A comparison of the predicted and measured local wall. The thermal-hydraulic model in TRAC/PF1-MOD2 was used to predict the axial variation of void fraction as measured in Winfrith post-CHF tests. The predictions for reflood calculations were reasonable. The model correctly predicted the trends in void fraction as a result of the effect of pressure and power, with the effect of pressure being more apparent than that of power. 13 refs.

Unal, C.; Nelson, R.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

386

IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY IN MISSISSIPPIAN CARBONATE RESERVOIRS OF KANSAS - NEAR TERM - CLASS 2  

SciTech Connect

This annual report describes progress during the final year of the project entitled ''Improved Oil Recovery in Mississippian Carbonate Reservoirs in Kansas''. This project funded under the Department of Energy's Class 2 program targets improving the reservoir performance of mature oil fields located in shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs. The focus of the project was development and demonstration of cost-effective reservoir description and management technologies to extend the economic life of mature reservoirs in Kansas and the mid-continent. As part of the project, tools and techniques for reservoir description and management were developed, modified and demonstrated, including PfEFFER spreadsheet log analysis software. The world-wide-web was used to provide rapid and flexible dissemination of the project results through the Internet. A summary of demonstration phase at the Schaben and Ness City North sites demonstrates the effectiveness of the proposed reservoir management strategies and technologies. At the Schaben Field, a total of 22 additional locations were evaluated based on the reservoir characterization and simulation studies and resulted in a significant incremental production increase. At Ness City North Field, a horizontal infill well (Mull Ummel No.4H) was planned and drilled based on the results of reservoir characterization and simulation studies to optimize the location and length. The well produced excellent and predicted oil rates for the first two months. Unexpected presence of vertical shale intervals in the lateral resulted in loss of the hole. While the horizontal well was not economically successful, the technology was demonstrated to have potential to recover significant additional reserves in Kansas and the Midcontinent. Several low-cost approaches were developed to evaluate candidate reservoirs for potential horizontal well applications at the field scale, lease level, and well level, and enable the small independent producer to identify efficiently candidate reservoirs and also to predict the performance of horizontal well applications.

Timothy R. Carr; Don W. Green; G. Paul Willhite

2000-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

387

TOWARD IDENTIFYING THE UNASSOCIATED GAMMA-RAY SOURCE 1FGL J1311.7-3429 WITH X-RAY AND OPTICAL OBSERVATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present deep optical and X-ray follow-up observations of the bright unassociated Fermi-LAT gamma-ray source 1FGL J1311.7-3429. The source was already known as an unidentified EGRET source (3EG J1314-3431, EGR J1314-3417), hence its nature has remained uncertain for the past two decades. For the putative counterpart, we detected a quasi-sinusoidal optical modulation of {Delta}m {approx} 2 mag with a period of {approx_equal}1.5 hr in the Rc, r', and g' bands. Moreover, we found that the amplitude of the modulation and peak intensity changed by {approx}>1 mag and {approx}0.5 mag, respectively, over our total six nights of observations from 2012 March to May. Combined with Swift UVOT data, the optical-UV spectrum is consistent with a blackbody temperature, kT {approx_equal} 1 eV and the emission volume radius R{sub bb} {approx_equal} 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} d{sub kpc} km (d{sub kpc} is the distance to the source in units of 1 kpc). In contrast, deep Suzaku observations conducted in 2009 and 2011 revealed strong X-ray flares with a light curve characterized with a power spectrum density of P(f) {proportional_to} f {sup -2.0{+-}0.4}, but the folded X-ray light curves suggest an orbital modulation also in X-rays. Together with the non-detection of a radio counterpart, and significant curved spectrum and non-detection of variability in gamma-rays, the source may be the second 'radio-quiet' gamma-ray emitting millisecond pulsar candidate after 1FGL J2339.7-0531, although the origin of flaring X-ray and optical variability remains an open question.

Kataoka, J.; Takahashi, Y.; Maeda, K. [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1, Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Yatsu, Y.; Kawai, N. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1, Ohokayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Urata, Y.; Tsai, A. [Institute of Astronomy, National Central University, Chung-Li 32054, Taiwan (China); Cheung, C. C. [National Research Council Research Associate, National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC 20001 (United States); Totani, T.; Makiya, R. [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Hanayama, H.; Miyaji, T., E-mail: kataoka.jun@waseda.jp [Ishigakijima Astronomical Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 1024-1 Arakawa, Ishigaki, Okinawa, 907-0024 (Japan)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

A phenomenological model of the thermal hydraulics of convective boiling during the quenching of hot rod bundles  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, a phenomenological model of the thermal hydraulics of convective boiling in the post-critical-heat-flux (post-CHF) regime is developed and discussed. The model was implemented in the TRAC-PF1/MOD2 computer code (an advanced best-estimate computer program written for the analysis of pressurized water reactor systems). The model was built around the determination of flow regimes downstream of the quench front. The regimes were determined from the flow-regime map suggested by Ishii and his coworkers. Heat transfer in the transition boiling region was formulated as a position-dependent model. The propagation of the CHF point was strongly dependent on the length of the transition boiling region. Wall-to-fluid film boiling heat transfer was considered to consist of two components: first, a wall-to-vapor convective heat-transfer portion and, second, a wall-to-liquid heat transfer representing near-wall effects. Each contribution was considered separately in each of the inverted annular flow (IAF) regimes. The interfacial heat transfer was also formulated as flow-regime dependent. The interfacial drag coefficient model upstream of the CHF point was considered to be similar to flow through a roughened pipe. A free-stream contribution was calculated using Ishii's bubbly flow model for either fully developed subcooled or saturated nucleate boiling. For the drag in the smooth IAF region, a simple smooth-tube correlation for the interfacial friction factor was used. The drag coefficient for the rough-wavy IAF was formulated in the same way as for the smooth IAF model except that the roughness parameter was assumed to be proportional to liquid droplet diameter entrained from the wavy interface. The drag coefficient in the highly dispersed flow regime considered the combined effects of the liquid droplets within the channel and a liquid film on wet unheated walls. 431 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

Nelson, R.A.; Unal, C.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Pool boiling on nano-finned surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect of nano-structured surfaces on pool boiling heat transfer is explored in this study. Experiments are conducted in a cubical test chamber containing fluoroinert coolant (PF5060, Manufacturer: 3M Co.) as the working fluid. Pool boiling experiments are conducted for saturation and subcooled conditions. Three different types of ordered nano-structured surfaces are fabricated using Step and flash imprint lithography on silicon substrates followed by Reactive Ion Etching (RIE) or Deep Reactive Ion Etching (DRIE). These nano-structures consist of a square array of cylindrical nanofins with a longitudinal pitch of 1 mm, transverse pitch of 0.9 mm and fixed (uniform) heights ranging from 15 nm - 650 nm for each substrate. The contact angle of de-ionized water on the substrates is measured before and after the boiling experiments. The contact-angle is observed to increase with the height of the nano-fins. Contact angle variation is also observed before and after the pool boiling experiments. The pool boiling curves for the nano-structured silicon surfaces are compared with that of atomically smooth single-crystal silicon (bare) surfaces. Data processing is performed to estimate the heat flux through the projected area (plan area) for the nano-patterned zone as well as the heat flux through the total nano-patterned area, which includes the surface area of the fins. Maximum heat flux (MHF) is enhanced by ~120 % for the nanofin surfaces compared to bare (smooth) surfaces, under saturation condition. The pool boiling heat flux data for the three nano-structured surfaces progressively overlap with each other in the vicinity of the MHF condition. Based on the experimental data several micro/nano-scale transport mechanisms responsible for heat flux enhancements are identified, which include: "microlayer" disruption or enhancement, enhancement of active nucleation site density, enlargement of cold spots and enhancement of contact angle which affects the vapor bubble departure frequency.

Sriraman, Sharan Ram

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Pool boiling on nano-finned surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect of nano-structured surfaces on pool boiling heat transfer is explored in this study. Experiments are conducted in a cubical test chamber containing fluoroinert coolant (PF5060, Manufacturer: 3M Co.) as the working fluid. Pool boiling experiments are conducted for saturation and subcooled conditions. Three different types of ordered nano-structured surfaces are fabricated using Step and flash imprint lithography on silicon substrates followed by Reactive Ion Etching (RIE) or Deep Reactive Ion Etching (DRIE). These nano-structures consist of a square array of cylindrical nanofins with a longitudinal pitch of 1 mm, transverse pitch of 0.9 mm and fixed (uniform) heights ranging from 15 nm 650 nm for each substrate. The contact angle of de-ionized water on the substrates is measured before and after the boiling experiments. The contact-angle is observed to increase with the height of the nano-fins. Contact angle variation is also observed before and after the pool boiling experiments. The pool boiling curves for the nano-structured silicon surfaces are compared with that of atomically smooth single-crystal silicon (bare) surfaces. Data processing is performed to estimate the heat flux through the projected area (plan area) for the nano-patterned zone as well as the heat flux through the total nano-patterned area, which includes the surface area of the fins. Maximum heat flux (MHF) is enhanced by ~120 % for the nanofin surfaces compared to bare (smooth) surfaces, under saturation condition. The pool boiling heat flux data for the three nano-structured surfaces progressively overlap with each other in the vicinity of the MHF condition. Based on the experimental data several micro/nano-scale transport mechanisms responsible for heat flux enhancements are identified, which include: microlayer disruption or enhancement, enhancement of active nucleation site density, enlargement of cold spots and enhancement of contact angle which affects the vapor bubble departure frequency.

Sriraman, Sharan Ram

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Layered Nickel Oxide-Based Cathodes for Lithium Cells: Analysis ofPerformance Loss Mechanisms  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Spectroscopic and electrochemical diagnostic measurements are reported for the cell components of a Generation 2 (Gen 2) Li-Ion cell from the US Department of Energy's Advanced Technology Development (ATD) project. The cells are composed of LiNi{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.15}Al{sub 0.05}O{sub 2} positive electrodes (cathode), carbon graphite anodes and electrolyte consisting of 1.2 M LiPF{sub 6} in EC:EMC 3:7. Fluorophosphates were observed by {sup 19}F and {sup 31}P NMR in the electrolyte obtained from a Gen 2 cell aged 72 weeks at 45 C and presenting 50% power fade. These electrolyte decomposition products were also observed by {sup 31}P solid-state NMR on the surface of the cathode of the same cell. Samples were cut from the aged cathode from the original cell, subjected to different treatments (ultrasonic washing in anhydrous DMC, pressing, ultrasonic washing and pressing), and subsequently reassembled into small lab cells for electrochemical characterization. These treatments recovered the capacity of the electrodes to within a few percent of the original value, with the most improvement being obtained with the washed and pressed cathode. The impedance of the cathodes was also lowered after the ultrasonic washing and pressing treatments. Electron microscopy revealed that the ultrasonic washing of the aged Gen 2 cathode material resulted in the removal of small particles covering the surface of the active cathode. These findings are interpreted in terms of a model whereby capacity loss, and thus power capability, is restored by removing the fluorophosphate deposit and restoring electronic contact to the active cathode material.

Kerlau, Marie; Reimer, Jeffrey A.; Cairns, Elton J.

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Effects of electrolyte salts on the performance of Li-O2 batteries  

SciTech Connect

It is well known that the stability of nonaqueous electrolyte is critical for the rechargeable Li-O2 batteries. Although stability of many solvents used in the electrolytes has been investigated, considerably less attention has been paid to the stability of electrolyte salt which is the second major component. Herein, we report the systematic investigation of the stability of seven common lithium salts in tetraglyme used as electrolytes for Li-O2 batteries. The discharge products of Li-O2 reaction were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The performance of Li-O2 batteries was strongly affected by the salt used in the electrolyte. Lithium tetrafluoroborate (LiBF4) and lithium bis(oxalato)borate (LiBOB) decompose and form LiF and lithium borates, respectively during the discharge of Li-O2 batteries. Several other salts, including lithium bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonamide (LiTFSI), lithium trifluoromethanesulfonate (LiTf), lithium hexafluorophosphate (LiPF6), lithium perchlorate (LiClO4) , and lithium bromide (LiBr) led to the discharge products which mainly consisted of Li2O2 and only minor signs of decomposition of LiTFSI, LiTf, LPF6 and LiClO4 were detected. LiBr showed the best stability during the discharge process. As for the cycling performance, LiTf and LiTFSI were the best among the studied salts. In addition to the instability of lithium salts, decomposition of tetraglyme solvent was a more significant factor contributing to the limited cycling stability. Thus a more stable nonaqueous electrolyte including organic solvent and lithium salt still need to be further developed to reach a fully reversible Li-O2 battery.

Nasybulin, Eduard N.; Xu, Wu; Engelhard, Mark H.; Nie, Zimin; Burton, Sarah D.; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Gross, Mark E.; Zhang, Jiguang

2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

393

Evaluating the combustion reactivity of drop tube furnace and thermogravimetric analysis coal chars with a selection of metal additives  

SciTech Connect

Opportunities exist for effective coal combustion additives that can reduce the carbon content of pulverized fuel ash (PFA) to below 6%, thereby making it saleable for filler/building material applications without the need for postcombustion treatment. However, with only limited combustion data currently available for the multitude of potential additives, catalytic performance under pulverized fuel (PF) boiler conditions has received relatively little attention. This paper therefore compares the reactivity of catalyzed bituminous coal chars from thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) with those generated by devolatilization in a drop tube furnace (DTF). The principal aim was to explore the fundamental chemistry behind the chosen additives' relative reactivities. Accordingly, all eight of the investigated additives increased the TGA burnout rate of the TGA and DTF chars, with most of the catalysts demonstrating consistent reactivity levels across chars from both devolatilization methods. Copper(I) chloride, silver chloride, and copper nitrate were thus identified as the most successful additives tested, but it proved difficult to establish a definitive reactivity ranking. This was largely due to the use of physical mixtures for catalyst dispersion, the relatively narrow selection of additives examined, and the inherent variability of the DTF chars. Nevertheless, one crucial exception to normal additive behavior was discovered, with copper(I) chloride perceptibly deactivating during devolatilization in the DTF, even though it remained the most effective catalyst tested. As a prolonged burnout at over 1000{sup o}C was required to replicate this deactivation effect on the TGA, the phenomenon could not be detected by typical testing procedures. Subsequently, a comprehensive TGA study showed no obvious relationship between the catalyst-induced reductions in the reaction's apparent activation energy and the samples recorded burnout rates.

Katherine Le Manquais; Colin E. Snape; Ian McRobbie; Jim Barker [University of Nottingham (United Kingdom). Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering

2011-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

394

Screening of low cost sorbents for arsenic and mercury capture in gasification systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel laboratory-scale fixed-bed reactor has been developed to investigate trace metal capture on selected sorbents for cleaning the hot raw gas in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants. The new reactor design is presented, together with initial results for mercury and arsenic capture on five sorbents. It was expected that the capture efficiency of sorbents would decrease with increasing temperature. However, a commercial activated carbon, Norit Darco 'Hg', and a pyrolysis char prepared from scrap tire rubber exhibit similar efficiencies for arsenic at 200 and at 400{sup o}C (70% and 50%, respectively). Meta-kaolinite and fly ash both exhibit an efficiency of around 50% at 200{sup o}C, which then dropped as the test temperature was increased to 400{sup o}C. Activated scrap tire char performed better at 200{sup o}C than the pyrolysis char showing an arsenic capture capacity similar to that of commercial Norit Darco 'Hg'; however, efficiency dropped to below 40% at 400{sup o}C. These results suggest that the capture mechanism of arsenic (As4) is more complex than purely physical adsorption onto the sorbents. Certain elements within the sorbents may have significant importance for chemical adsorption, in addition to the effect of surface area, as determined by the BET method. This was indeed the case for the mercury capture efficiency for all four sorbents tested. Three of the sorbents tested retained 90% of the mercury when operated at 100{sup o}C. As the temperature increased, the efficiency of activated carbon and pyrolysis char reduced significantly. Curiously, despite having the smallest Brunauer-Emmet-Teller (BET) surface area, a pf-combustion ash was the most effective in capturing mercury over the temperature range studied. These observations suggest that the observed mercury capture was not purely physical adsorption but a combination of physical and chemical processes. 27 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

Cedric Charpenteau; Revata Seneviratne; Anthe George; Marcos Millan; Denis R. Dugwell; Rafael Kandiyoti [Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom). Department of Chemical Engineering

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

395

On the control of filamentation of intense laser beams propagating in underdense plasma  

SciTech Connect

In indirect drive ICF ignition designs, the laser energy is delivered into the hohlraum through the laser entrance holes (LEH), which are sized as small as practicable to minimize X-ray radiation losses. On the other hand, deleterious laser plasma processes, such as filamentation and stimulated back-scatter, typically increase with laser intensity. Ideally, therefore, the laser spot shape should be a close fit to the LEH, with uniform (envelope) intensity in the spot and minimal energy at larger radii spilling onto the LEH material. This keeps the laser intensity as low as possible consistent with the area of the LEH aperture and the power requirements of the design. This can be achieved (at least for apertures significantly larger than the laser's aberrated focal spot) by the use of custom-designed phase plates. However, outfitting the 192 beam (National Ignition facility) NIF laser with multiple sets of phase plates optimized for a variety of different LEH aperture sizes is an expensive proposition. It is thus important to assess the impact on laser-plasma interaction processes of using phase plates with a smaller than optimum focal spot (or even no phase plates at all!) and then de-focusing the beam to expand it to fill the LEH and lower its intensity. We find significant effects from the lack of uniformity of the laser envelope out of the focal plane, from changes in the characteristic sizes of the laser speckle, and on the efficacy of additional polarization and/or SSD beam smoothing. We quantify these effects with analytic estimates and simulations using our laser plasma interaction code pF3D.

Williams, E A

2005-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

396

Chlorine in solid fuels fired in pulverized fuel boilers sources, forms, reactions, and consequences: a literature review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chlorine is a significant source of corrosion and deposition, both from coal and from biomass, and in PF boilers. This investigation was designed to highlight the potential for corrosion risks associated with once-through units and advanced cycles. The research took the form of a detailed literature investigation to evaluate chlorine in solid fuels: coals of various ranks and origins, biomass fuels of a variety of types, petroleum cokes, and blends of the above. The investigation focused upon an extensive literature review of documents dating back to 1991. The focus is strictly corrosion and deposition. To address the deposition and corrosion issues, this review evaluates the following considerations: concentrations of chlorine in available solid fuels including various coals and biomass fuels, forms of chlorine in those fuels, and reactions - including reactivities - of chlorine in such fuels. The assessment includes consideration of alkali metals and alkali earth elements as they react with, and to, the chlorine and other elements (e.g., sulfur) in the fuel and in the gaseous products of combustion. The assessment also includes other factors of combustion: for example, combustion conditions including excess O{sub 2} and combustion temperatures. It also considers analyses conducted at all levels: theoretical calculations, bench scale laboratory data and experiments, pilot plant experiments, and full scale plant experience. Case studies and plant surveys form a significant consideration in this review. The result of this investigation focuses upon the concentrations of chlorine acceptable in coals burned exclusively, in coals burned with biomass, and in biomass cofired with coal. Values are posited based upon type of fuel and combustion technology. Values are also posited based upon both first principles and field experience. 86 refs., 8 figs., 7 tabs.

David A. Tillman; Dao Duong; Bruce Miller [Foster Wheeler North America Corp. (United States)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

397

Effects of Carbon Nanotube Coating on Bubble Departure Diameter and Frequency in Pool Boiling on a Flat, Horizontal Heater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effects of a carbon nanotube (CNT) coating on bubble departure diameter and frequency in pool boiling experiments was investigated and compared to those on a bare silicon wafer. The pool boiling experiments were performed at liquid subcooling of 10 degrees Celsius and 20 degrees Celsius using PF-5060 as the test fluid and at atmospheric pressure. High-speed digital image acquisition techniques were used to perform hydrodynamic measurements. Boiling curves obtained from the experiments showed that the CNT coating enhanced critical heat flux (CHF) by 63% at 10 degrees Celsius subcooling. The CHF condition was not measured for the CNT sample at 20 degrees Celsius subcooling. Boiling incipience superheat for the CNT-coated surface is shown to be much lower than predicted by Hsu's hypothesis. It is proposed that bubble nucleation occurs within irregularities at the surface of the CNT coating. The irregularities could provide larger cavities than are available between individual nanotubes of the CNT coating. Measurements from high-speed imaging showed that the average bubble departing from the CNT coating in the nucleate boiling regime (excluding the much larger bubbles observed near CHF) was about 75% smaller (0.26 mm versus 1.01 mm)and had a departure frequency that was about 70% higher (50.46 Hz versus 30.10 Hz). The reduction in departure diameter is explained as a change in the configuration of the contact line, although further study is required. The increase in frequency is a consequence of the smaller bubbles, which require less time to grow. It is suggested that nucleation site density for the CNT coating must drastically increase to compensate for the smaller departure diameters if the rate of vapor creation is similar to or greater than that of a bare silicon surface.

Glenn, Stephen T.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Effects of Village Power Quality on Fuel Consumption and Operating Expenses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Alaska's rural village electric utilities are isolated from the Alaska railbelt electrical grid intertie and from each other. Different strategies have been developed for providing power to meet demand in each of these rural communities. Many of these communities rely on diesel electric generators (DEGs) for power. Some villages have also installed renewable power sources and automated generation systems for controlling the DEGs and other sources of power. For example, Lime Village has installed a diesel battery photovoltaic hybrid system, Kotzebue and Wales have wind-diesel hybrid systems, and McGrath has installed a highly automated system for controlling diesel generators. Poor power quality and diesel engine efficiency in village power systems increases the cost of meeting the load. Power quality problems may consist of poor power factor (PF) or waveform disturbances, while diesel engine efficiency depends primarily on loading, the fuel type, the engine temperature, and the use of waste heat for nearby buildings. These costs take the form of increased fuel use, increased generator maintenance, and decreased reliability. With the cost of bulk fuel in some villages approaching $1.32/liter ($5.00/gallon) a modest 5% decrease in fuel use can result in substantial savings with short payback periods depending on the village's load profile and the cost of corrective measures. This project over its five year history has investigated approaches to improving power quality and implementing fuel savings measures through the use of performance assessment software tools developed in MATLAB{reg_sign} Simulink{reg_sign} and the implementation of remote monitoring, automated generation control, and the addition of renewable energy sources in select villages. The results have shown how many of these communities would benefit from the use of automated generation control by implementing a simple economic dispatch scheme and the integration of renewable energy sources such as wind generation.

Richard Wies; Ron Johnson

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

399

Continuous time very low frequency analog signal processors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work, basic analog integrated circuits such as integrators, multipliers, comparators, summers and impedance scaling networks which serve as the basic building blocks for designing complicated continuous time analog signal processing systems are analyzed and designed. These circuits are designed to operate at low supply voltages and consume low power. Special emphasis is laid on very low frequencies of operation (of the order of a few Hertz). For an Operational Transconductance Amplifier- Capacitor (OTA-C) integrated circuit implementation, this directly translates to a very small transconductance (of the order of a few nA/V) and a very large on-chip capacitance (of the order of several hundred pF). Both the above mentioned aspects of low frequency IC design are addressed in this thesis. Specifically, a family of OTA'S with very small transconductances has been designed using several design schemes such as current division, use of floating gate Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MOSFET'S) and bulk driven transistors. A detailed comparison has been made among these schemes in terms of performance characteristics such as power consumption, active silicon area and signal to noise ratio. A multiplier based OTA with very small transconductance has also been designed with a view to obtain a wide transconductance tuning range. Moreover, an impedance scaling circuit has also been designed in order to realize very large capacitors on-chip. As sample applications for these circuits, a low pass filter, relaxation oscillator, band pass filter and a band pass based oscillator have also been designed. A11 circuit design has been done through a novel approach by the use of an all-region MOSFET model. A11 the above mentioned circuits have been designed, simulated and eventually fabricated in a 1.2[] NWELL CMOS process available through MOSIS. The fabricated circuits have all been tested for functionality and performance in the lab and measurement results are tabulated.

Veeravalli Raghupathy, Anand

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Overview of KSTAR initial operation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the successful first plasma generation in the middle of 2008, three experimental campaigns were successfully made for the KSTAR device, accompanied with a necessary upgrade in the power supply, heating, wall-conditioning and diagnostic systems. KSTAR was operated with the toroidal magnetic field up to 3.6 T and the circular and shaped plasmas with current up to 700 kA and pulse length of 7 s, have been achieved with limited capacity of PF magnet power supplies. The mission of the KSTAR experimental program is to achieve steady-state operations with high performance plasmas relevant to ITER and future reactors. The first phase (2008 2012) of operation of KSTAR is dedicated to the development of operational capabilities for a super-conducting device with relatively short pulse. Development of start-up scenario for a super-conducting tokamak and the understanding of magnetic field errors on start-up are one of the important issues to be resolved. Some specific operation techniques for a super-conducting device are also developed and tested. The second harmonic pre-ionization with 84 and 110 GHz gyrotrons is an example. Various parameters have been scanned to optimize the pre-ionization. Another example is the ICRF wall conditioning (ICWC), which was routinely applied during the shot to shot interval. The plasma operation window has been extended in terms of plasma beta and stability boundary. The achievement of high confinement mode was made in the last campaign with the first neutral beam injector and good wall conditioning. Plasma control has been applied in shape and position control and now a preliminary kinetic control scheme is being applied including plasma current and density. Advanced control schemes will be developed and tested in future operations including active profiles, heating and current drives and control coil-driven magnetic perturbation.

Kwon, M. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejon, South Korea; Oh, Y. K. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejon, South Korea; Yang, H. L. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejon, South Korea; Na, H. K. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejon, South Korea; Kim, Y. S. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejon, South Korea; Kwak, J. G. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejon, South Korea; Kim, W. C. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejon, South Korea; Kim, J. Y. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejon, South Korea; Ahn, Joonwook [ORNL; Ahn, J.W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Bae, Y. S. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejon, South Korea; Baek, S. H. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejon, South Korea; Bak, J. G. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejon, South Korea; Bang, E. N. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejon, South Korea; Chang, C. S. [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology; Chang, D. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute; Chavdarovski, I. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejon, South Korea; Chen, Z. Y. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejon, South Korea; Cho, K. W. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejon, South Korea; Cho, M. H. [Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang, Republic of Korea; Choe, W. [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology; Choi, J. H. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejon, South Korea; Chu, Y. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejon, South Korea; Chung, K. S. [Hanyang University, Korea; Diamond, P. H. [University of California, San Diego; Do, H. J. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejon, South Korea; Eidietis, N. W. [General Atomics, San Diego; England, A. C. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejon, South Korea; Grisham, L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Hahm, T. S. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Hahn, S. H. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejon, South Korea; Han, W. S. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejon, South Korea; Hatae, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA); Hillis, D. L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Hong, J. S. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejon, South Korea; Hong, S. H. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejon, South Korea

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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401

Large Bore Powder Gun Qualification (U)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Large Bore Powder Gun (LBPG) is being designed to enable experimentalists to characterize material behavior outside the capabilities of the NNSS JASPER and LANL TA-55 PF-4 guns. The combination of these three guns will create a capability to conduct impact experiments over a wide range of pressures and shock profiles. The Large Bore Powder Gun will be fielded at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) U1a Complex. The Complex is nearly 1000 ft below ground with dedicated drifts for testing, instrumentation, and post-shot entombment. To ensure the reliability, safety, and performance of the LBPG, a qualification plan has been established and documented here. Requirements for the LBPG have been established and documented in WE-14-TR-0065 U A, Large Bore Powder Gun Customer Requirements. The document includes the requirements for the physics experiments, the gun and confinement systems, and operations at NNSS. A detailed description of the requirements is established in that document and is referred to and quoted throughout this document. Two Gun and Confinement Systems will be fielded. The Prototype Gun will be used primarily to characterize the gun and confinement performance and be the primary platform for qualification actions. This gun will also be used to investigate and qualify target and diagnostic modifications through the life of the program (U1a.104 Drift). An identical gun, the Physics Gun, will be fielded for confirmatory and Pu experiments (U1a.102D Drift). Both guns will be qualified for operation. The Gun and Confinement System design will be qualified through analysis, inspection, and testing using the Prototype Gun for the majority of process. The Physics Gun will be qualified through inspection and a limited number of qualification tests to ensure performance and behavior equivalent to the Prototype gun. Figure 1.1 shows the partial configuration of U1a and the locations of the Prototype and Physics Gun/Confinement Systems.

Rabern, Donald A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Valdiviez, Robert [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

402

Three XMM-Newton observations of the Anomalous X-ray Pulsar 1E 1048.1-5937: long term variations in spectrum and pulsed fraction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the results of a recent (July 2004) XMM-Newton Target of Opportunity observation of the Anomalous X-ray pulsar 1E 1048.1-5937, together with a detailed re-analysis of previous observations carried out in 2000 and 2003. In July 2004 the source had a 2-10 keV flux of 6.2$\\times10^{-12}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ and a pulsed fraction P$_F$=0.68. The comparison of the three data sets shows the presence of an anti-correlation between flux and pulsed fraction, implying that previous estimates of the source energetics based on the assumption of a large and constant pulsed fraction might be significantly underestimated. The source spectrum is well described by a power law plus blackbody model (kT~0.63 keV, photon index $\\Gamma$~2.7-3.5) or, alternatively, by the sum of two blackbodies of which the hotter is Comptonized by relativistic electrons. In this case the temperatures are kT${_1}$~0.2-0.3 keV and kT${_2}$~0.4-0.5 keV and the emitting area of the cooler component is consistent with the whole neutron star surface. The long term luminosity variation of a factor >~2 is accompanied by relatively small variations in the spectral shape. Phase resolved spectroscopy indicates a harder spectrum in correspondence of the pulse maximum. No spectral features have been detected with 4$\\sigma$ limits on the equivalent width in the range ~10-220 eV, depending on line energy and width.

A. Tiengo; S. Mereghetti; R. Turolla; S. Zane; N. Rea; L. Stella; G. L. Israel

2005-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

403

Reinvestigation on the state-of-the-art nonaqueous carbonate electrolytes for 5 V Li-ion battery applications  

SciTech Connect

The charging voltage limits of mixed carbonate solvents for Li-ion batteries have been systematically investigated from 4.9 to 5.3 V in half cells using Cr-doped spinel cathode material LiNi0.45Cr0.05Mn1.5O4. We found that the stability of conventional carbonate electrolytes is strongly related to the stability and properties of the cathode materials at both lithiated and de-lithiated states. It is the first time to report that the conventional electrolytes based on mixtures of ethylene carbonate (EC) and linear carbonate (dimethyl carbonate - DMC, ethyl methyl carbonate - EMC, and diethyl carbonate - DEC) have shown very similar long-term cycling performance when cycled up to 5.2 V on LiNi0.45Cr0.05Mn1.5O4. The discharge capacity increases with the charge cutoff voltage and reaches the highest discharge capacity at 5.2 V. The capacity retention is about 87% after 500 cycles at 1C rate for all three carbonate mixtures when cycled between 3.0 V and 5.2V. The first-cycle efficiency has a maximum value at 5.1 V, with an average from 83% to 85% at C/10 rate. When cycled to 5.3 V, EC-DMC still shows good cycling performance but EC-EMC and EC-DEC show faster capacity fading. EC-DMC and EC-EMC have much better rate capability than EC-DEC. In addition, the first-cycle irreversible capacity loss increases with the cutoff voltage and the 'inactive' conductive carbon has also been found to be partly associated with the low first-cycle Coulombic efficiency at high voltages due to electrolyte decomposition and probably the PF6- anion irreversible intercalation.

Xu, Wu; Chen, Xilin; Ding, Fei; Xiao, Jie; Wang, Deyu; Pan, Anqiang; Zheng, Jianming; Li, Xiaohong S.; Padmaperuma, Asanga B.; Zhang, Jiguang

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

PHOTOCHEMICAL CO2 REDUCTION BY RHENUIM AND RUTHENIUM COMPLEXES.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Photochemical conversion of CO{sub 2} to fuels or useful chemicals using renewable solar energy is an attractive solution to both the world's need for fuels and the reduction of greenhouse gases. Rhenium(I) and ruthenium(II) diimine complexes have been shown to act as photocatalysts and/or electrocatalysts for CO{sub 2} reduction to CO. We have studied these photochemical systems focusing on the identification of intermediates and the bond formation/cleavage reactions between the metal center and CO{sub 2}. For example, we have produced the one-electron-reduced monomer (i.e. Re(dmb)(CO){sub 3}S where dmb = 4,4'-dimethy-2,2'-bipyridine and S = solvent) either by reductive quenching of the excited states of fac-[Re(dmb)(CO){sub 3}(CH{sub 3}CN)]PF{sub 6} or by photo-induced homolysis of [Re(dmb)(CO){sub 3}]{sub 2}. We previously found that: (1) the remarkably slow dimerization of Re(dmb)(CO){sub 3}S is due to the absence of a vacant coordination site for Re-Re bond formation, and the extra electron is located on the dmb ligand; (2) the reaction of Re(dmb)(CO){sub 3}S with CO{sub 2} forms a CO{sub 2}-bridged binuclear species (CO){sub 3}(dmb)Re-CO(O)-Re(dmb)(CO){sub 3} as an intermediate in CO formation; and (3) the kinetics and mechanism of reactions are consistent with the interaction of the CO{sub 2}-bridged binuclear species with CO{sub 2} to form CO and CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}.

FUJITA,E.; MUCKERMAN, J.T.; TANAKA, K.

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

405

New ambient pressure organic superconductors:. alpha. -(BEDT-TTF) sub 2 (NH sub 4 )Hg(SCN) sub 4 ,. beta. m-(BEDO-TTF) sub 3 Cu sub 2 (NCS) sub 3 , and. kappa. -(BEDT-TTF) sub 2 Cu(N(CN) sub 2 )Br  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More than one hundred and twenty conducting salts based on the organic donor-molecule BEDT-TTF are known, where BEDT-TTF is bis(ethylenedithio)tetrathiafulvalene (abbreviated herein as ET). Several of the early salts possessed tetrahedral and octahedral anions, such as (ET){sub 2}ClO{sub 4}(TCE), (ET){sub 2}PF{sub 6}, (ET){sub 2}ReO{sub 4}, and (ET){sub 2}BrO{sub 4}. The perchlorate salt is metallic to 1.4 K,{sup 1} and the perrenate derivative was the first ET based organic superconductor ({Tc} 2 K, 4.5 kbar). Since the discovery of ambient pressure superconductivity in {beta}-(ET){sub 2}I{sub 3} ({Tc} 1.4 K),{sup 5} other isostructural {beta}-(ET){sub 2}X salts have been prepared with higher {Tc}'s. A structure-property correlation for the {beta}-type salts has been reviewed in this volume; it predicts that {Tc}'s higher than 8K are possible if {beta}-salts with linear anions longer than I{sub 3}{sup {minus}} can be synthesized. During the search for new linear anions, a variety of compounds with discovered with polymeric anions. The report of superconductivity in {kappa}-(ET){sub 4}Hg{sub 3}X{sub 8} (X = Cl, {Tc} 5.4 K 29 kbar and X = Br, {Tc} 4.3 K ambient pressure and 6.7 K 3.5 kbar) and {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu(NCS){sub 2} ({Tc} 10.4 K) further stimulated the search for novel polymeric anions. A general synthetic strategy for preparing new salts containing polymeric anions is to couple a coordinatively unsaturated neutral transition metal halide/pseudohalide with a simple halide or pseudohalide during an electrocrystallization synthesis. In this article, the authors discuss three new ambient pressure organic superconductors with novel polymeric anions, {alpha}-(ET){sub 2}(NH{sub 4})Hg(SCN){sub 4}, {beta}m-(BO){sub 3}Cu{sub 2}(NCS){sub 3} and {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu(N(CN){sub 2})Br. 48 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

Wang, H.H.; Beno, M.A.; Carlson, K.D.; Geiser, U.; Kini, A.M.; Montgomery, L.K.; Thompson, J.E.; Williams, J.M.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Games on Graphs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce and study Maker-Breaker positional games on random graphs. Our goal is to determine the threshold probability pF for the existence of Maker's strategy to claim a member of F in the unbiased (one-on-one) game played on the edges of the random graph G(n; p), for various target families F of winning sets. More generally, for each probability above this threshold we study the smallest bias b such that Maker wins the (1: b) biased game. We investigate these functions for a number of basic games, like the connectivity game, the perfect matching game, the clique game, the Hamiltonian cycle game and the tree game. Particular attention is devoted to unbiased games, when b = 1. Next, we consider the planarity game and the k-coloring game on the complete graph on n vertices. In the planarity game the winning sets are all non-planar subgraphs, and in the k-coloring game the winning sets are all non-k-colorable subgraphs. For both of the games we look at a (1: b) biased game. We are interested in determining the largest bias b such that Maker wins the Maker-Breaker version of the game. On the other hand, we want to find the largest bias b such that Forcer wins the Avoider-Forcer version of the game. Finally, we deal with balanced online games on the random graph process. The game is played by a player called Painter. Edges in the random graph process are introduced two at a time. For each pair of edges Painter immediately and irrevocably chooses one of the two possibilities to color one of them red and the other one blue. His goal is to avoid creating a monochromatic copy of a prescribed fixed graph H, for as long as possible. We study the threshold mH for the number of edges to be played to know that Painter almost surely will create a monochromatic copy of H, for H being a cycle, a path and a star.

Milos Stojakovic

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

The influence of anion-pi interactions between multi-atomic anions and pi-acidic ring systems on the self-assembly of coordination compounds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Anion-? interactions, weak attractions between anions and ?-acidic ring systems, have become an important topic in supramolecular chemistry within the past five years. Although a variety of computational studies have been undertaken by several groups to investigate the nature of these interactions, no comprehensive experimental investigations had been performed until the completion of the work described herein. The results presented in this dissertation indicate that anion-? interactions involving large complex anions are controlling elements in self-assembly reactions with cations that involve ?-acidic ring systems. Syntheses performed with the ligand 3-6-bis(2-pyridyl)-1,2,4,5-tetrazine, or bptz, with M(II) first row transition metal salts (M = Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, and Zn), produced self-assembled complexes that varied in shape and M:ligand ratio based on the presence of particular anions. Through a series of solution and structural studies, it was determined that the cationic polygons are templated by the size and shape of the specific anions during self-assembly. A close inspection of the bptz complexes in the solid state indicated that the anions were participating in anion-? interactions with the ?-acidic central tetrazine ring of the ligand. To show that these anion-? interactions were indeed important, reactions of bptz ligand as well with 3,6-bis(2-pyridyl)-1,2-pyridazine (bppn) with Ag(I) salts were performed to compare the effect that specific anions had on self-assembly interactions between similar ligands with different ?-acidities. The results indicate that the Ag(I) complexes that included the ?-acidic tetrazine ring are strongly influenced by the anion presence, while those complexes that were synthesized with the similarly shaped, but electroneutral bppn ligand only relied on the anions for charge-balance. To better understand the anion-? interactions in the obtained bptz complexes, a computational study was performed on systems with the polyatomic anions [BF4]- and [PF6]- interacting with simple heteroaromatic rings of varying degrees of ?-acidity. Based on the final optimized complex geometries and Atoms in Molecules (AIM) critical point analyses, it was determined that anion-? interactions involving multiatomic anions interact with ?-systems in different orientations based on the symmetry of the ring system in the complex.

Schottel, Brandi Lee

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Cyanide clusters of ReII with 3d metal ions and their magnetic properties: incorporating anisotropic ions into metal-cyanide clusters with high spin magnetic ground states  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Clusters of metal ions that possess large numbers of magnetically coupled unpaired electrons have attracted much interest in recent years due to their fascinating magnetic behavior. With an appreciable component of magnetic anisotropy, these large-spin paramagnetic molecules can exhibit an energy barrier to inversion of their magnetic dipole, leading to spontaneous magnetization and magnetic hysteresis below a critical temperature. Since this behavior is a property of an individual clusters rather than a collection of molecules, this phenomenon has been dubbed ??Single Molecule Magnetism??. Our approach to the study of new high-spin systems has been to exert a measure of synthetic control in the preparation of clusters. Specifically we are employing highly anisotropic metal ions with the anticipation that these ions would engender large overall magnetic anisotropy in the resulting clusters. The first step in this process was the development of the chemistry of two new d5 ReII (S = ??) complexes, namely [ReII(triphos)(CH3CN)3][PF6]2 and [Et4N][ReII(triphos)(CN)3]. The magnetic, optical and electrochemical properties were studied and theoretical models were developed to describe the origin of the large temperature independent paramagnetism that was observed. Next, we successfully employed transition metal cyanide chemistry using the ReII building blocks to prepare a family of isostructural, cubic clusters of the general formula {[MCl]4[Re(triphos)(CN)3]4} M = Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn whose 3d ions adopt local tetrahedral geometries. Within the clusters, magnetic exchange is observed between the paramagnetic ions, which has been modeled using an Ising exchange model to account for the dominating anisotropy of the ReII ion. Despite the high pseudo-symmetry of the clusters (Td), this work has yielded a rare example of a metal-cyanide single molecule magnet, {[MCl]4[Re(triphos)(CN)3]4} with an S = 8 ground state, D = -0.39 cm-1 and an effective energy barrier for magnetization reversal of Ueff = 8.8 cm-1. The elucidation of this family of isostructural clusters has also allowed us to pursue fundamental work on the structure/property relationships of the exotic, paramagnetic ReII ion. As the clusters are soluble, stable compounds, the future of this chemistry lies in the development of a true building-block approach to ??super-clusters?? that exhibit very high ground state spin values.

Schelter, Eric John

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Design Techniques for High Speed Low Voltage and Low Power Non-Calibrated Pipeline Analog to Digital Converters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The profound digitization of modern microelectronic modules made Analog-to- Digital converters (ADC) key components in many systems. With resolutions up to 14bits and sampling rates in the 100s of MHz, the pipeline ADC is a prime candidate for a wide range of applications such as instrumentation, communications and consumer electronics. However, while past work focused on enhancing the performance of the pipeline ADC from an architectural standpoint, little has been done to individually address its fundamental building blocks. This work aims to achieve the latter by proposing design techniques to improve the performance of these blocks with minimal power consumption in low voltage environments, such that collectively high performance is achieved in the pipeline ADC. Towards this goal, a Recycling Folded Cascode (RFC) amplifier is proposed as an enhancement to the general performance of the conventional folded cascode. Tested in Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC) 0.18?m Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) technology, the RFC provides twice the bandwidth, 8-10dB additional gain, more than twice the slew rate and improved noise performance over the conventional folded cascode-all at no additional power or silicon area. The direct auto-zeroing offset cancellation scheme is optimized for low voltage environments using a dual level common mode feedback (CMFB) circuit, and amplifier differential offsets up to 50mV are effectively cancelled. Together with the RFC, the dual level CMFB was used to implement a sample and hold amplifier driving a singleended load of 1.4pF and using only 2.6mA; at 200MS/s better than 9bit linearity is achieved. Finally a power conscious technique is proposed to reduce the kickback noise of dynamic comparators without resorting to the use of pre-amplifiers. When all techniques are collectively used to implement a 1Vpp 10bit 160MS/s pipeline ADC in Semiconductor Manufacturing International Corporation (SMIC) 0.18[mu]m CMOS, 9.2 effective number of bits (ENOB) is achieved with a near Nyquist-rate full scale signal. The ADC uses an area of 1.1mm2 and consumes 42mW in its analog core. Compared to recent state-of-the-art implementations in the 100-200MS/s range, the presented pipeline ADC uses the least power per conversion rated at 0.45pJ/conversion-step.

Assaad, Rida Shawky

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Experimental and Theoretical Investigations of Anion-pi Interactions Metallacyclic Architectures of First-Row Transition Metals and N-Heteroaromatic Ligands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research into anion-pi interactions has shifted from attempts to establish the legitimacy of the interaction to the incorporation of anion-pi interactions into supramolecular architectures. The research discussed in this dissertation explores the subtle effects of ligand, anion, and metal ion on supramolecular architectures of tetrazine-based ligands in the context of anion-pi interactions and their importance in the design and synthesis of supramolecular architectures. Computational studies highlight the importance of the arene quadrupole moment, molecular polarizability, and substituent effects on the strength of anion-pi interactions. More importantly, however, this work establishes that there is a distinct directionality inherent to the anion-pi interaction between polyatomic anions and N-heterocycles, which can be used to direct ligands in supramolecular architectures as demonstrated through the work of the Dunbar group in recent years, particularly that of the square and pentagonal metallacycles. The extension of metallacycles of bptz to CoII and FeII demonstrates the ability to tune the size of the metallacyclic cavity by simply changing the metal ion and results in the surprising encapsulation of two [SbF6]- anions in [Fe5(bptz)5(NCCH3)10][SbF6]10. 1H NMR spectroscopy and electrochemical studies reveal slight but significant differences characteristic of the square and pentagonal metallacycles and support the presence of anion-pi interactions in solution and highlight the importance of the encapsulated anion in the templation and stability of the metallacycles. A study of the interconversion between the square and pentagonal metallacycles via 1H NMR is presented for the first time. Increasing the pi-acidity of the chelating ligand from bptz to bmtz results in the encapsulation of only one [SbF6]- anion in [Fe5(bmtz)5(NCCH3)10][SbF6]10, maximizing anion-pi interactions with the ligand despite the tighter fit. A significant hurdle in the incorporation of different anions into the metallacyclic structures was overcome with the development of a new synthetic protocol for [Fe(NCCH3)6]2+ salts of a wide range of anions from sodium salts and Fe4Cl8(THF)6. Also, the nuclearity of the less stable [Fe5(bptz)5(NCCH3)10][PF6]10 metallacycle was established via a combination of MS, electrochemistry and 1H NMR experiments through comparisons with known FeII metallacycle solution behavior.

Giles, Ian

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

The effects of added wheat proteins on processing and quality of wheat flour tortillas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Specific proteins improve quality of flour for breadmaking but protein composition in tortilla flour has not been investigated. Selected wheat protein fractions can separately modify dough resistance and extensibility. This may yield tortillas with increased diameter, opacity and stability. Tortillas were prepared using laboratory-scale, commercial equipment with fixed processing parameters. Dough and tortilla properties were evaluated using a texture analyzer and subjective methods. Tortillas were stored in plastic bags at 22?C for 28 days. The effects of ten wheat proteins (donated by Midwest Grain Products, Inc; at 3.0 baker's percent) on processing and quality of flour tortillas were determined. Mixograph parameters varied but were not significantly affected by added wheat proteins. Dough absorption, mixing time, and cysteine level were adjusted slightly to attain uniform dough for tortillas. Wheat protein fractions added to pastry, tortilla and bread flours did not significantly affect tortilla weight, moisture, pH, opacity or specific volume, except for glutenin and vital wheat gluten, which decreased opacity in pastry flour tortillas. Protein fractions yielding improved tortilla properties and stability were FP600, FP6000, FP5000 and Gliadin in pastry and tortilla flour. Addition levels of selected wheat proteins were evaluated in weak protein tortilla formulas. Addition of 1% FP5000 or PF6000 improved tortilla stability. Calcium peroxide was added to the formula to better incorporate added protein fractions in a reduced-oxidized dough system. A combination of 7.5 ppm calcium peroxide with 1% Gliadin resulted in tortillas with improved shelf stability. Bread-making quality of wheat flour is correlated with the insoluble polymeric protein fraction. The insoluble polymeric proteins in flour correlated with smaller diameter and improved rollability score at 12 days of storage for tortillas made from different wheat flours. The insoluble proteins correlated only with tortilla stability for tortillas prepared with added wheat protein fractions to flours with different protein strengths. Several wheat protein fractions improve storage stability of tortillas, while retaining good tortilla properties. This was not related to the insoluble protein amount; however the more insoluble proteins in flour caused smaller diameter tortillas.

Pascut, Simina

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Design and implementation of low power multistage amplifiers and high frequency distributed amplifiers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The advancement in integrated circuit (IC) technology has resulted in scaling down of device sizes and supply voltages without proportionally scaling down the threshold voltage of the MOS transistor. This, coupled with the increasing demand for low power, portable, battery-operated electronic devices, like mobile phones, and laptops provides the impetus for further research towards achieving higher integration on chip and low power consumption. High gain, wide bandwidth amplifiers driving large capacitive loads serve as error amplifiers in low-voltage low drop out regulators in portable devices. This demands low power, low area, and frequency-compensated multistage amplifiers capable of driving large capacitive loads. The first part of the research proposes two power and area efficient frequency compensation schemes: Single Miller Capacitor Compensation (SMC) and Single Miller Capacitor Feedforward Compensation (SMFFC), for multistage amplifiers driving large capacitive loads. The designs have been implemented in a 0.5??m CMOS process. Experimental results show that the SMC and SMFFC amplifiers achieve gain-bandwidth products of 4.6MHz and 9MHz, respectively, when driving a load of 25K?/120pF. Each amplifier operates from a ??1V supply, dissipates less than 0.42mW of power and occupies less than 0.02mm2 of silicon area. The inception of the latest IEEE standard like IEEE 802.16 wireless metropolitan area network (WMAN) for 10 -66 GHz range demands wide band amplifiers operating at high frequencies to serve as front-end circuits (e.g. low noise amplifier) in such receiver architectures. Devices used in cascade (multistage amplifiers) can be used to increase the gain but it is achieved at an expense of bandwidth. Distributing the capacitance associated with the input and the output of the device over a ladder structure (which is periodic), rather than considering it to be lumped can achieve an extension of bandwidth without sacrificing gain. This concept which is also known as distributed amplification has been explored in the second part of the research. This work proposes certain guidelines for the design of distributed low noise amplifiers operating at very high frequencies. Noise analysis of the distributed amplifier with real transmission lines is introduced. The analysis for gain and noise figure is verified with simulation results from a 5-stage distributed amplifier implemented in a 0.18??m CMOS process.

Mishra, Chinmaya

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Foraging ecology of wintering wading birds along the Gulf of Mexico coast  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I studied flock composition, distribution and foraging ecology of wintering wading birds along the Gulf of Mexico coast. I focused on geographic variability in wintering wading bird assemblages, the processes that structured these assemblages and habitat use by wading birds. I found considerable variation among three sites, Aransas National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), Texas; Marsh Island Wildlife Refuge (MIWR), Louisiana; and Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge (CNWR), Florida. Species comprising wintering wading bird assemblages varied regionally. ANWR had the most species-rich assemblage, with eight species. MIWR had only six wading bird species. And CNWR had only three different species. Processes that structured wintering wading bird assemblages also varied regionally. In ANWR, Texas, the Random Fraction niche apportionment model (RF model) best explained the empirical abundance data for ANWR. For abundance data from MIWR a good fit was obtained with the MacArthur Fraction (MF) model and the Power Fraction (PF) models. None of the models fully explained the CNWR abundance data. I also examined patterns of habitat partitioning among wintering wading birds at three different scales at two sites, Matagorda Island National Wildlife Refuge (MINWR) and Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge (LANWR). At the macrohabitat level, wintering wading birds showed interspecific differences in macrohabitat use of both open water habitats and vegetated flats. At the mesohabitat level all species at MINWR used the category nearest the edge most often, alternatively, at LANWR wading birds were most often in the mesohabitat category of 8.1- 12 m. from the edge. In both locations wading birds partitioned habitat based on water depth. Finally, I found that Great Egrets and Snowy Egrets participated more often in flock foraging and derived more benefits from feeding in flocks than other species. Great Egrets feeding in flocks had a higher mean strike rate than those foraging alone, whereas Snowy Egrets had a higher success rate foraging in flocks than those foraging alone. In the case of the darkercolored species (e.g., Great Blue Herons, etc.) they either showed no difference in behaviors between birds foraging in flocks versus those foraging alone or they actually did worse when they foraged in flocks.

Sherry, Dawn Ann

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

You are now leaving Energy.gov | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

generating-your-own-power/incentive-program/!ut/p/b1/rZRNc5swEIb_invwUcMiBEhHSF0MuKb-aBJz8QgQlEwsiE3str--suuZDE5j7HE5MOzMuw-rd1erxdqjFku-LQvelJXkz_s4tpY69ZyhPwM_cn0LfPfOuYuiAICAEiyUAD54HDjkMw8GwyAC35tPDPCNCYxnjmMAWNqDFmtxKpu6-aEtNqlYppVshGyWQvbh-N2H5HVTSrHZ9KEQUqxVdbLo_ape171qJ3t1tRPrPpQyVeJyK1C9roo1X-3RNS9EJjZlIQ9RWmbaAps5sznPUcZ4gogtMKJE50hPqMB2pgthsOPBzlTeMsab2hj84H4wilwdA8HH_DOCVj51GVXGhqOBPsKe58Fp_ntBR2MOxna0pqs5cdchx8NqJbSFKtX-UBbq2uzNe5pTwjKDImqSXHmf5YhRXaCEYSvnNDExSbqA5FZgZHqg3Bp44Vd3Dsy-Hhhc0P7y6eUldtR076f4Z6M9do73aZ0nTactJ3X1G5IaKbJymiGC1SuxbBPtq-SM6UJnVgfQs28Ftp30Q3w1MLjgIlzv5JlF8e4I7avTHteLVsV5ILFvBdLp5LMCGtbAcr_AN2peDQwuWOP_1eR_beN69X1Fn_IwHFnT4Q4Ms97-nuerB8QT-jca5ePxMXouPv0BOUBh4A!!/dl4/d5/L2dBISEvZ0FBIS9nQSEh generating-your-own-power/incentive-program/!ut/p/b1/rZRNc5swEIb_invwUcMiBEhHSF0MuKb-aBJz8QgQlEwsiE3str--suuZDE5j7HE5MOzMuw-rd1erxdqjFku-LQvelJXkz_s4tpY69ZyhPwM_cn0LfPfOuYuiAICAEiyUAD54HDjkMw8GwyAC35tPDPCNCYxnjmMAWNqDFmtxKpu6-aEtNqlYppVshGyWQvbh-N2H5HVTSrHZ9KEQUqxVdbLo_ape171qJ3t1tRPrPpQyVeJyK1C9roo1X-3RNS9EJjZlIQ9RWmbaAps5sznPUcZ4gogtMKJE50hPqMB2pgthsOPBzlTeMsab2hj84H4wilwdA8HH_DOCVj51GVXGhqOBPsKe58Fp_ntBR2MOxna0pqs5cdchx8NqJbSFKtX-UBbq2uzNe5pTwjKDImqSXHmf5YhRXaCEYSvnNDExSbqA5FZgZHqg3Bp44Vd3Dsy-Hhhc0P7y6eUldtR076f4Z6M9do73aZ0nTactJ3X1G5IaKbJymiGC1SuxbBPtq-SM6UJnVgfQs28Ftp30Q3w1MLjgIlzv5JlF8e4I7avTHteLVsV5ILFvBdLp5LMCGtbAcr_AN2peDQwuWOP_1eR_beN69X1Fn_IwHFnT4Q4Ms97-nuerB8QT-jca5ePxMXouPv0BOUBh4A!!/dl4/d5/L2dBISEvZ0FBIS9nQSEh

415

High Temperature Integrated Thermoelectric Ststem and Materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The final goal of this project is to produce, by the end of Phase II, an all ceramic high temperature thermoelectric module. Such a module design integrates oxide ceramic n-type, oxide ceramic p-type materials as thermoelectric legs and oxide ceramic conductive material as metalizing connection between n-type and p-type legs. The benefits of this all ceramic module are that it can function at higher temperatures (> 700 C), it is mechanically and functionally more reliable and it can be scaled up to production at lower cost. With this all ceramic module, millions of dollars in savings or in new opportunities recovering waste heat from high temperature processes could be made available. A very attractive application will be to convert exhaust heat from a vehicle to reusable electric energy by a thermoelectric generator (TEG). Phase I activities were focused on evaluating potential n-type and p-type oxide compositions as the thermoelectric legs. More than 40 oxide ceramic powder compositions were made and studied in the laboratory. The compositions were divided into 6 groups representing different material systems. Basic ceramic properties and thermoelectric properties of discs sintered from these powders were measured. Powders with different particles sizes were made to evaluate the effects of particle size reduction on thermoelectric properties. Several powders were submitted to a leading thermoelectric company for complete thermoelectric evaluation. Initial evaluation showed that when samples were sintered by conventional method, they had reasonable values of Seebeck coefficient but very low values of electrical conductivity. Therefore, their power factors (PF) and figure of merits (ZT) were too low to be useful for high temperature thermoelectric applications. An unconventional sintering method, Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) was determined to produce better thermoelectric properties. Particle size reduction of powders also was found to have some positive benefits. Two composition systems, specifically 1.0 SrO - 0.8 x 1.03 TiO2 - 0.2 x 1.03 NbO2.5 and 0.97 TiO2 - 0.03 NbO2.5, have been identified as good base line compositions for n-type thermoelectric compositions in future module design. Tests of these materials at an outside company were promising using that company's processing and material expertise. There was no unique p-type thermoelectric compositions identified in phase I work other than several current cobaltite materials. Ca3Co4O9 will be the primary p-type material for the future module design until alternative materials are developed. BaTiO3 and rare earth titanate based dielectric compositions show both p-type and n-type behavior even though their electrical conductivities were very low. Further research and development of these materials for thermoelectric applications is planned in the future. A preliminary modeling and optimization of a thermoelectric generator (TEG) that uses the n-type 1.0 SrO - 1.03 x 0.8 TiO2 - 1.03 x 0.2 NbO2.5 was performed. Future work will combine development of ceramic powders and manufacturing expertise at TAM, development of SPS at TAM or a partner organization, and thermoelectric material/module testing, modeling, optimization, production at several partner organizations.

Mike S. H. Chu

2011-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

416

Enhancing Magnetic Properties of Molecular Magnetic Materials: The Role of Single-Ion Anisotropy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Considerable efforts are being devoted to designing enhanced molecular magnetic materials, in particular single molecule magnets (SMMs) that can meet the requirements for future technologies such as quantum computing and spintronics. A current trend in the field is enhancing the global anisotropy in metal complexes using single-ion anisotropy. The work in this dissertation is devoted to the synthesis and characterization of new building blocks of the highly anisotropic early transition metal ion V(III) with the aim of incorporating them into heterometallic molecular materials. The results underscore the importance of tuning the local coordination environments of metal ions in order to ensure enhanced single ion anisotropy. A family of mononuclear axially distorted vanadium (III) compounds, A[L_(3)VX_(3)] (3-9) (X = F, Cl or Br, A^(+) = Et_(4)N^(+), nBu_(4)N^(+) or PPN^(+) , L_(3) = Tp or Tp* (Tp = tris(-1-pyrazolyl)borohydride), Tp* = tris(3,5-dimethyl-1-pyrazolyl)borohydride)), and [Tp*V(DMF)_(3)](PF_(6))_(2) were studied. Replacement of the Tp ligand in 3 with the stronger ?-donor Tp* results in a near doubling of the magnitude of the axial zero-field splitting parameter D_(z) (D_(z) = -16.0 cm^(-1) in 3, and -30.0 cm^(-1) in 4) as determined by magnetic measurements. Such findings support the idea that controlling the axial crystal field distortion is an excellent way to enhance single-ion anisotropy. High Field-High Frequency EPR measurements on 4 revealed an even higher D value, -40.0 cm^(-1). Interestingly, compound 4 exhibits evidence for an out-of-phase ac signal under dc field. In another effort, a new series of vanadium cyanide building blocks, PPN[V(acac)_(2)(CN)_(2)]?PPNCl (13) (acac = acetylacetonate), A[V(L)(CN)_(2)] (A^(+) = Et_(4)N^(+), L = N,N'-Ethylenebis(salicylimine) (14), A = PPN^(+), L = N,N'-Ethylenebis(salicylimine) (15), L = N,N'-Phenylenebis(salicylimine) (16), and L = N,N'-Ethylenebis(2-methoxysalicylimine) (17)) were synthesized. Magnetic studies revealed moderate Dz values (-10.0, 5.89, 3.7, 4.05 and 4.36 cm^(-1) for 13-17 respectively). The first family of cyanide-bridged lanthanide containing molecules with a trigonal bipyramidal (TBP) geometry, (Et_(4)N)_(2)[(Re(triphos)(CN)_(3))_(2)(Ln(NO_(3))_(3))_(3)]-?4CH_(3)CN (19-27 with Ln = La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd, Tb, Dy and Ho) were prepared using the [(triphos)Re(CN)_(3)]^(-) building block, results that add valuable information to our database of compounds with a TBP geometry. Magnetic studies revealed diverse magnetic responses including slow relaxation of the magnetization at zero field for 25 and 26 , an indication of SMM behavior.

Saber, Mohamed Rashad Mohamed

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

2012 SARA Students Technical Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Service Academy Research Associates (SARA) program provides an opportunity for Midshipmen and Cadets from US Service Academies to participate in research at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Sandia National Laboratory for several weeks during the summer as part of their summer training assignments. During the summer of 2012, three Midshipmen were assigned to work with the XCP Division at LANL for approximately 5-6 weeks. As one of the nation's top national security science laboratories, LANL stretches across 36 square miles, has over 2,100 facilities, and employs over 9,000 individuals including a significant number of students and postdocs. LANL's mission is to 'apply science and technology to: ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the US nuclear deterrent, reduce global threats, and solve other emerging national security challenges.' While LANL officially operates under the US Department of Energy (DoE), fulfilling this mission requires mutual cooperation with the US Department of Defense (DoD) as well. LANL's high concentration of knowledge and experience provides interns a chance to perform research in many disciplines, and its connection with the DoD in both operation and personnel gives SARA students insight to career possibilities both during and after military service. SARA students have plenty of opportunity to enjoy hiking, camping, the Los Alamos YMCA, and many other outdoor activities in New Mexico while staying at the Buffalo Thunder Resort, located 20 miles east of the lab. XCP Division is the Computational Physics division of LANL's Weapons Department. Working with XCP Division requires individuals to be Q cleared by the DoE. This means it is significantly more convenient for SARA students to be assigned to XCP Division than their civilian counterparts as the DoD CNWDI clearance held by SARA students is easily transferred to the lab prior to the students arriving at the start of the summer. SARA students working with XCP Division were given a comprehensive introduction into nuclear engineering and physics, nuclear weapons, and radiation transport and detection via texts and lectures at various classification levels. Students also attended tours of several prominent facilities at LANL including TA-41 Ice House, TA-55 PF-4 plutonium facility, the Nicholas C. Metropolis Center for Modeling and Simulation, also known as the Secure Computing Center (SCC), and the Dual-Axis Radiological Hydro Test (DARHT) facility; in addition, SARA students accompanied by LANL staff traveled to Minot AFB in North Dakota for tours of the 5th Bomb Wing and 91st Missile Wing facilities. Students participated in a week long class on the Monte Carlo N Particle (MCNP) code to supplement their understanding of radiation transport simulations. SARA students were then tasked with using this knowledge to model radiation detectors and use MCNP to compare their models to experimental data and previously accepted models.

Briccetti, Angelo [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lorei, Nathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yonkings, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lorio, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Goorley, John T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sood, Avneet [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

418

Effects of dry bulk density and particle size fraction on gas transport parameters in variably saturated landfill cover soil  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: > The effects of soil physical properties on gas transport parameters were investigated. > Higher values of D{sub p} and k{sub a} exhibited in the '+gravel' than the '-gravel' fraction at same soil-air content ({epsilon}). > Recent power law models for D{sub p} (WLR) and k{sub a} (RPL) were modified. > Model parameters were linearly related to easily measurable dry bulk density ({rho}{sub b}). - Abstract: Landfill sites are emerging in climate change scenarios as a significant source of greenhouse gases. The compacted final soil cover at landfill sites plays a vital role for the emission, fate and transport of landfill gases. This study investigated the effects of dry bulk density, {rho}{sub b}, and particle size fraction on the main soil-gas transport parameters - soil-gas diffusivity (D{sub p}/D{sub o}, ratio of gas diffusion coefficients in soil and free air) and air permeability (k{sub a}) - under variably-saturated moisture conditions. Soil samples were prepared by three different compaction methods (Standard and Modified Proctor compaction, and hand compaction) with resulting {rho}{sub b} values ranging from 1.40 to 2.10 g cm{sup -3}. Results showed that D{sub p} and k{sub a} values for the '+gravel' fraction (<35 mm) became larger than for the '-gravel' fraction (<2 mm) under variably-saturated conditions for a given soil-air content ({epsilon}), likely due to enhanced gas diffusion and advection through less tortuous, large-pore networks. The effect of dry bulk density on D{sub p} and k{sub a} was most pronounced for the '+gravel' fraction. Normalized ratios were introduced for all soil-gas parameters: (i) for gas diffusivity D{sub p}/D{sub f}, the ratio of measured D{sub p} to D{sub p} in total porosity (f), (ii) for air permeability k{sub a}/k{sub a,pF4.1}, the ratio of measured k{sub a} to k{sub a} at 1235 kPa matric potential (=pF 4.1), and (iii) for soil-air content, the ratio of soil-air content ({epsilon}) to total porosity (f) (air saturation). Based on the normalized parameters, predictive power-law models for D{sub p}({epsilon}/f) and k{sub a}({epsilon}/f) models were developed based on a single parameter (water blockage factor M for D{sub p} and P for k{sub a}). The water blockage factors, M and P, were found to be linearly correlated to {rho}{sub b} values, and the effects of dry bulk density on D{sub p} and k{sub a} for both '+gravel' and '-gravel' fractions were well accounted for by the new models.

Wickramarachchi, Praneeth, E-mail: praneeth1977@yahoo.co.uk [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Kawamoto, Ken; Hamamoto, Shoichiro [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Institute for Environmental Science and Technology, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Nagamori, Masanao [Center for Environmental Science in Saitama, 914 Kamitanadare, Kazo, Saitama 347-0115 (Japan); Moldrup, Per [Environmental Engineering Section, Dept. of Biotechnology, Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Aalborg University, Sohngaardsholmsvej 57, DK-9000 Aalborg (Denmark); Komatsu, Toshiko [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Institute for Environmental Science and Technology, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

419

Experimental & Numerical Investigation of Pool Boiling on Engineered Surfaces with Integrated Thin-flim Temperature Sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this investigation is to measure and analyze surface temperature fluctuations in pool boiling. The surface temperature fluctuations were recorded on silicon surfaces with and without multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT). Novel Thin Film Thermocouples (TFT) are micro-fabricated on test substrates to measure surface temperatures. A dielectric liquid refrigerant (PF-5060) is used as test fluid. Both nucleate and lm boiling regimes are investigated for the silicon test substrates. Dynamics of nucleate boiling is investigated on the CNT coated substrates. High frequency temperature fluctuation data is analyzed for the presence of determinism using non-linear time series analysis techniques in TISEAN(copyright) software. The impact of subcooling and micro/nano-scale surface texturing using MWCNT coatings on the dynamics of pool boiling is assessed. Dynamic invariants such as correlation dimensions and Lyapunov spectrum are evaluated for the reconstructed attractor. A non-linear noise reduction scheme is employed to reduce the level of noise in the data. Previous investigations in pool boiling chaos, reported in literature were based on temperature measurements underneath the test surface consisting of single or few active nucleation sites. Previous studies have indicated the presence of low-dimensional behavior in nucleate boiling and high-dimensional behavior in CHF and film boiling. Currently, there is no study detailing the effects of multiple nucleation sites, subcooling and surface texturing on pool boiling dynamics. The investigation comprises of four parts: i) in situ micro-machining of Chromelalumel (K-type) TFT, ii) calibration of these sensors, iii) utilizing these sensors in pool boiling experiments iv) analysis of these fluctuations using techniques of nonlinear time series analysis. Ten TFT are fabricated on a rectangular silicon surface within an area of ~ 3.00 cm x 3.00 cm. The sensing junctions of the TFT measure 50 mm in width and 250 nm in depth. Surface temperature fluctuations of the order of i) 0.65-0.93 degrees C are observed near ONB ii) 2.3-6.5 degrees C in FDNB iii) 2.60-5.00 degrees C at CHF and iv) 2.3-3.5 degrees C in film boiling. Investigations show the possible presence of chaotic dynamics near CHF and in film-boiling in saturated and subcooled pool boiling. Fully-developed nucleate boiling (FDNB) is chaotic. No clear assessment of the dynamics could be made in the onset of nucleate boiling (ONB) and partial nucleate boiling (PNB) regimes due to the effects of noise. However, the frequency spectra in these regimes appear to have two independent frequencies and their integral combinations indicating a possible quasiperiodic bifurcation route to chaos. The dimensionality in FDNB, at CHF and in film-boiling is lower in saturated pool boiling as compared to values in corresponding regimes in subcooled pool boiling. Surface temperature fluctuations can damage electronic components and need to be carefully controlled. Understanding the nature of these fluctuations will aid in deciding the modeling approach for surface temperature transients on an electronic chip. Subsequently, the TFT signals can be employed in a suitable feedback control loop to prevent the occurrence of hotspots.

Sathyamurthi, Vijaykumar

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

TRITIUM AGING EFFECTS ON THE FRACTURE TOUGHNESS PROPERTIES OF STAINLESS STEEL BASE METAL AND WELDS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Tritium reservoirs are constructed from welded stainless steel forgings. While these steels are highly resistant to the embrittling effects of hydrogen isotopes and helium from tritium decay; they are not immune. Tritium embrittlement is an enhanced form of hydrogen embrittlement because of the presence of helium-3 from tritium decay which nucleates as nanometer-sized bubbles on dislocations, grain boundaries, and other microstructural defects. Steels with decay helium bubble microstructures are hardened and less able to deform plastically and become more susceptible to embrittlement by hydrogen and its isotopes. Ductility, elongation-to-failure, and fracture toughness are reduced by exposures to tritium and the reductions increase with time as helium-3 builds into the material from tritium permeation and radioactive decay. Material and forging specifications have been developed for optimal material compatibility with tritium. These specifications cover composition, mechanical properties, and select microstructural characteristics like grain size, flow-line orientation, inclusion content, and ferrite distribution. For many years, the forming process of choice for reservoir manufacturing was high-energy-rate forging (HERF), principally because the DOE forging facility owned only HERF hammers. Today, some reservoir forgings are being made that use a conventional, more common process known as press forging (PF or CF). One of the chief differences between the two forging processes is strain rate: Conventional hydraulic or mechanical forging presses deform the metal at 4-8 ft/s, about ten-fold slower than the HERF process. The material specifications continue to provide successful stockpile performance by ensuring that the two forging processes produce similar reservoir microstructures. While long-term life storage tests have demonstrated the general tritium compatibility of tritium reservoirs, fracture-toughness properties of both conventionally forged and high-energy-rate forged are needed for designing and establishing longer tritium-reservoir lifetimes, ranking materials, and, potentially, for qualifying new forging vendors or processes. Measurements on the effects of tritium and decay helium on the fracture toughness properties of CF stainless steels having similar composition, grain size, and mechanical properties to previously studied HERF steels are needed and have not been conducted until now. The compatibility of stainless steel welds with tritium represents another concern for long-term reservoir performance. Weldments have not been well-characterized with respect to tritium embrittlement, although a recent study was completed on the effect of tritium and decay helium on the fracture toughness properties of Type 304L weldments. This study expands the characterization of weldments through measurements of tritium and decay helium effects on the fracture toughness properties of Type 21-6-9 stainless steel. The purpose of this study was to measure and compare the fracture toughness properties of Type 21-6-9 stainless steel for conventional forgings and weldments in the non-charged, hydrogen-charged and tritium-charged-and-aged conditions.

Morgan, M.

2009-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

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Battery-level material cost model facilitates high-power li-ion battery cost reductions.  

SciTech Connect

Under the FreedomCAR Partnership, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is working to identify and develop advanced anode, cathode, and electrolyte components that can significantly reduce the cost of the cell chemistry, while simultaneously enhancing the calendar life and inherent safety of high-power Li-Ion batteries. Material cost savings are quantified and tracked via the use of a cell and battery design model that establishes the quantity of each material needed in batteries designed to meet the requirements of hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). In order to quantify the material costs, relative to the FreedomCAR battery cost goals, ANL uses (1) laboratory cell performance data, (2) its battery design model and (3) battery manufacturing process yields to create battery-level material cost models. Using these models and industry-supplied material cost information, ANL assigns battery-level material costs for different cell chemistries. These costs can then be compared to the battery cost goals to determine the probability of meeting the goals with these cell chemistries. The most recent freedomCAR cost goals for 25-kW and 40-kW power-assist HEV batteries are $500 and $800, respectively, which is $20/kW in both cases. In 2001, ANL developed a high-power cell chemistry that was incorporated into high-power 18650 cells for use in extensive accelerated aging and thermal abuse characterization studies. This cell chemistry serves as a baseline for this material cost study. It incorporates a LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 cathode, a synthetic graphite anode, and a LiPF6 in EC:EMC electrolyte. Based on volume production cost estimates for these materials-as well as those for binders/solvents, cathode conductive additives, separator, and current collectors--the total cell winding material cost for a 25-kW power-assist HEV battery is estimated to be $399 (based on a 48- cell battery design, each cell having a capacity of 15.4 Ah). This corresponds to {approx}$16/kW. Our goal is to reduce the cell winding material cost to <$10/kW, in order to allow >$10/kW for the cell and battery manufacturing costs, as well as profit for the industrial manufacturer. The material cost information is obtained directly from the industrial material suppliers, based on supplying the material quantities necessary to support an introductory market of 100,000 HEV batteries/year. Using its battery design model, ANL provides the material suppliers with estimates of the material quantities needed to meet this market, for both 25-kW and 40-kW power-assist HEV batteries. Also, ANL has funded a few volume-production material cost analyses, with industrial material suppliers, to obtain needed cost information. In a related project, ANL evaluates and develops low-cost advanced materials for use in high-power Li-Ion HEV batteries. [This work is the subject of one or more separate papers at this conference.] Cell chemistries are developed from the most promising low-cost materials. The performance characteristics of test cells that employ these cell chemistries are used as input to the cost model. Batteries, employing these cell chemistries, are designed to meet the FreedomCAR power, energy, weight, and volume requirements. The cost model then provides a battery-level material cost and material cost breakdown for each battery design. Two of these advanced cell chemistries show promise for significantly reducing the battery-level material costs (see Table 1), as well as enhancing calendar life and inherent safety. It is projected that these two advanced cell chemistries (A and B) could reduce the battery-level material costs by an estimated 24% and 43%, respectively. An additional cost advantage is realized with advanced chemistry B, due to the high rate capability of the 3-dimensional LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel cathode. This means that a greater percentage of the total Ah capacity of the cell is usable and cells with reduced Ah capacity can be used. This allows for a reduction in the quantity of the anode, electrolyte, separator, and current collector materials needed f

Henriksen, G.; Chemical Engineering

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z