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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "major urban areas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

The case for pension plan and university endowment equity investment in brownfields in the urban core of major metropolitan areas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this thesis is to present a case for institutional equity investment in brownfields in the urban core of major metropolitan areas. Pension plans and university endowments are the primary institutional investors ...

Larsen, Tamara C. (Tamara Candace), 1977-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Summertime Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Activity around Major Midwestern Urban Areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud-to-ground lightning flash data collected by the National Lightning Detection Network were analysed in and around 16 central U.S. cities for the period 1989?92. Lightning data are well suited to study storm activity in and around large urban ...

Nancy E. Westcott

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Mesh network model for urban area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Decreasing population, high crime rate, and limited economic opportunities are all symptoms of urban decline. These characteristics are, unfortunately, evident in major cities and small towns. Local municipalities in these ...

Chiang, Nhan Tu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

The major in Urban Studies is one of the options within the Committee Interdisciplinary Major (CIM) program. The  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The major in Urban Studies is one of the options within the Committee Interdisciplinary Major (CIM) program. The urban studies CIM is based in the College of Letters and Science and draws from classes

Saldin, Dilano

5

Inadvertent Weather Modification in Urban Areas: Lessons for Global Climate Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large metropolitan areas in North America, home to 65% of the nation's population, have created major changes in their climates over the past 150 years. The rate and amount of the urban climate change approximate those being predicted globally ...

Stanley A. Changnon

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Soiling by atmospheric aerosols in an urban industrial area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The gradual and progressive soiling of structures exposed to the atmosphere is commonplace. Material soiling results from the deposition of atmospheric aerosols. Both wet and dry deposition occurs. The particle size and the orientation, exposure and roughness of the surface determine the dominant deposition mechanisms. Wet deposition is not an important cause of surface soiling, but precipitation removes particles from a surface. Aged atmospheric particles are characterized by a bimodal size distribution of coarse and fine particles. Coarse particles tend to be inactive chemically and are removed by washout and runoff. A primary cause of building soiling in urban areas has been attributed to the fine-particle mode. When fine particles contain carbon they tend to be black, and adhere more tenaciously to surface than do course particles. Elemental carbon is usually 10-20 percent of the urban fine aerosol mass, and vehicular emissions, particularly diesel emissions, are the major source of urban black smoke. The soiling of buildings occurs over the years from fine particle deposition and is associated with low atmospheric concentrations. This paper describes the influences of particle size and rainfall on the deposition, and on the soiling of surfaces with different surface glosses, orientations and exposures.

Creighton, P.J. (Rutgers: The State Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (USA)); Lioy, P.J. (Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Inst., Piscataway, NJ (USA)); Haynie, F.H.; Lemmons, T.J.; Miller, J.L.; Gerhart, J. (Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (USA))

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Climatology of Chicago Area Urban-Rural Differences in Humidity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hourly measurements at an urban airport and at a rural laboratory have been used in a study of Chicago area urban-rural humidity differences. Although the relative humidity was usually lower in the city than in the country, largely a consequence ...

Bernice Ackerman

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Estimating material and energy intensities of urban areas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this thesis is to develop methods to estimate, analyze and visualize the resource intensity of urban areas. Understanding the resource consumption of the built environment is particularly relevant in cities ...

Quinn, David James, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Real-time modeling of complex atmospheric releases in urban areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

If a nuclear installation in or near an urban area has a venting, fire, or explosion, airborne radioactivity becomes the major concern. Dispersion models are the immediate tool for estimating the dose and contamination. Responses in urban areas depend on knowledge of the amount of the release, representative meteorological data, and the ability of the dispersion model to simulate the complex flows as modified by terrain or local wind conditions. A centralized dispersion modeling system can produce realistic assessments of radiological accidents anywhere in a country within several minutes if it is computer-automated. The system requires source-term, terrain, mapping and dose-factor databases, real-time meteorological data acquisition, three-dimensional atmospheric transport and dispersion models, and experienced staff. Experience with past responses in urban areas by the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory illustrate the challenges for three-dimensional dispersion models.

Baskett, R.L. [EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (United States); Ellis, J.S.; Sullivan, T.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Managing Imported Fire Ants in Urban Areas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The imported fire ant is found in much of Texas and across the southeastern U.S. This publication describes options for managing the pest in specific locations such as home lawns, gardens and buildings. Other topics include fire ant treatment methods, fire ant identification, medical problems, and organizing an area-wide suppression program. There is also a guide to fire ant insecticides.

Drees, Bastiaan M.

2006-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

11

Atmospheric deposition of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in an urban and a suburban area of Korea from 2002 to 2004  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric bulk samples (wet and dry) were collected monthly during 2002 to 2004 from an urban and a suburban area in Korea for assessment of depositional flux and seasonal variations in the concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). PAH depositional flux ranged from 64.1 to 610 {mu} g/m{sup 2}/y for the urban area and from 65 to 460 {mu} g/m{sup 2}/y for the suburban area. The fluxes of PAHs measured in this study were comparable with those reported for urban and suburban areas in other countries. The fluxes of particulates and PAHs were higher in winter than in summer, consistent with the greater per capita consumption of fossil fuel in winter than in summer. Ambient temperature played a major role in the seasonal variability in PAH fluxes. Photochemical degradation of PAHs appears to occur during the summer months. The relationship of PAH depositional fluxes with major air pollutants, such as ozone, sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, and presence of particulate matter up to 10 {mu} m in size (PM10), was also investigated. Dominant PAH compounds in both the urban and the suburban locations were benzo(g,h,i)perylene, pyrene, and indeno(1,2,3-c,d)pyrene. Based on the PAH diagnostic ratios and a factor analysis, the major sources of PAHs in the urban and the suburban regions were found to be similar. Diesel exhaust, coal combustion, and gasoline emissions contributed predominantly to atmospheric PAH contamination.

Moon, H.B.; Kannan, K.; Lee, S.J.; Ok, G. [National Fisheries Research & Development Institute, Pusan (Republic of Korea)

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

12

Application of district heating system to U. S. urban areas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the last few decades district-heating systems have been widely used in a number of European countries using waste heat from electric generation or refuse incineration, as well as energy from primary sources such as geothermal wells or fossil-fired boilers. The current world status of district-heat utilization is summarized. Cost and implementation projections for district-heating systems in the U. S. are discussed in comparison with existing modes of space conditioning and domestic water heating. A substantial fraction, i.e., up to approximately one-half of the U.S. population could employ district-heating systems using waste heat, with present population-distribution patterns. U.S. energy usage would be reduced by an equivalent of approximately 30 percent of current oil imports. Detailed analyses of a number of urban areas are used to formulate conceptual district energy-supply systems, potential implementation levels, and projected energy costs. Important national ancillary economic and social benefits are described, and potential difficulties relating to the implementation of district-heating systems in the U.S. are discussed. District-heating systems appear very attractive for meeting future U.S. energy needs. The technology is well established. The cost/benefit yield is favorable, and the conservation potential is significant. District heating can be applied in urban and densely populated suburban areas. The remaining demand, in rural and low-population-density communities, appears to be better suited to other forms of system substitution.

Karkheck, J.; Powell, J.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Visualizing Diurnal Population Change in Urban Areas for Emergency Management  

SciTech Connect

There is an increasing need for a quick, simple method to represent diurnal population change in metropolitan areas for effective emergency management and risk analysis. Many geographic studies rely on decennial U.S. Census data that assume that urban populations are static in space and time. This has obvious limitations in the context of dynamic geographic problems. The U.S. Department of Transportation publishes population data at the transportation analysis zone level in fifteen-minute increments. This level of spatial and temporal detail allows for improved dynamic population modeling. This article presents a methodology for visualizing and analyzing diurnal population change for metropolitan areas based on this readily available data. Areal interpolation within a geographic information system is used to create twenty-four (one per hour) population surfaces for the larger metropolitan area of Salt Lake County, Utah. The resulting surfaces represent diurnal population change for an average workday and are easily combined to produce an animation that illustrates population dynamics throughout the day. A case study of using the method to visualize population distributions in an emergency management context is provided using two scenarios: a chemical release and a dirty bomb in Salt Lake County. This methodology can be used to address a wide variety of problems in emergency management.

Kobayashi, Tetsuo [University of Utah; Medina, Richard M [ORNL; Cova, Thomas [University of Utah

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

WRF Simulations of the Urban Circulation in the Salt Lake City Area for CO2 Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A recent National Research Council report highlighted the potential utility of atmospheric observations and models for detecting trends in concentrated emissions from localized regions, such as urban areas. The Salt Lake City (SLC), Utah, area was ...

Thomas Nehrkorn; John Henderson; Mark Leidner; Marikate Mountain; Janusz Eluszkiewicz; Kathryn McKain; Steven Wofsy

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Parameterization of Net All-Wave Radiation for Urban Areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple scheme to estimate net all-wave radiation (Q*) is evaluated using annual datasets in three urban settings (Chicago, Illinois; Los Angeles, California; and ?ód?, Poland). Results are compared with a regression model based on incoming ...

B. Offerle; C. S. B. Grimmond; T. R. Oke

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

The Footprint of Urban Areas on Global Climate as Characterized by MODIS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One mechanism for climate change is the collected impact of changes in land cover or land use. Such changes are especially significant in urban areas where much of the world’s population lives. Satellite observations provide a basis for ...

Menglin Jin; Robert E. Dickinson; Da Zhang

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Low-Level Winds in Tornadoes and Potential Catastrophic Tornado Impacts in Urban Areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using an axisymmetric model of tornado structure tightly constrained by high-resolution wind field measurements collected by Doppler on Wheels (DOW) mobile radars, the potential impacts of intense tornadoes crossing densely populated urban areas ...

Joshua Wurman; Paul Robinson; Curtis Alexander; Yvette Richardson

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Trends in Extreme Temperatures in Relation to Urbanization in the Twin Cities Metropolitan Area, Minnesota  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The long-term trends in extreme summer season temperatures across the Twin Cities Metropolitan Area (TCMA) associated with urbanization are examined. To assess trends in extreme temperature data, maximum and minimum temperatures from 1975 to 2002 ...

Shouraseni Sen Roy; Fei Yuan

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Derivation of Effective Aerodynamic Surface Roughness in Urban Areas from Airborne Lidar Terrain Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An automated technique was developed that uses only airborne lidar terrain data to derive the necessary parameters for calculation of effective aerodynamic surface roughness in urban areas. The technique provides parameters for geometric models ...

Donald E. Holland; Judith A. Berglund; Joseph P. Spruce; Rodney D. McKellip

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Photometric Investigations of Precipitable Water and Optical Depth Wavelength Exponents in an Urban Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A six-channel Volz sunphotometer was used in the St. Louis urban area during Project METROMEX 1976 to monitor aerosol loading and atmospheric precipitable water. A weighted least-square fit of photometric observations to spatially and temporarily ...

Tom Yoksas

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "major urban areas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Modeling urban growth and land use/land cover change in the Houston Metropolitan Area from 2002 - 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Houston-Galveston-Brazoria Consolidated Metropolitan Statistical Area (Houston CMSA) has experienced rapid population growth during the past decades and is the only major US metropolitan area with no zoning regulations. We use SLEUTH, a spatially explicit cellular automata model, to simulate future (2002-2030) urban growth in the Houston metropolitan area, one of the fastest growing metropolises in the United States during the past decades. The model is calibrated with historical data for the period 1974-2002 that are extracted from a time series of satellite images. The dataset consists of four historical urban extents (1974, 1984, 1992, 2002), two land use layers (1992, 2002), five transportation layers (1974, 1984, 1990, 2002, 2025), slope layer, hillshade layer, and excluded layer. Future growth patterns are predicted based on growth coefficients derived during the calibration phase. After calibrating the model successfully, the spatial pattern of urban growth of the Houston CMSA for the period from 2002 to 2030 is predicted. Within SLEUTH, growth in the Houston CMSA is predominately "organic" with most growth occurring along the urban/rural fringe. Projected increases in urban area from 2002 to 2030 parallel projected increases in population growth within the Houston CMSA. We design three specific scenarios to simulate the spatial consequences of urban growth under different environmental conditions. The first scenario is to simulate the unmanaged growth with no restrictions. The second scenario is to project the moderate growth trend by taking into consideration environmental protection, specifically for agricultural areas, forests and wetlands. The last scenario is to simulate the managed growth with maximum environmental protection. Adjusting the level of protection for different land cover types was found to markedly affect the land use changes in the Houston CMSA. Without any protection on resource lands, Houston CMSA is estimated to lose 2,000 km2 of forest land by 2030, about 600 km2 of agricultural land, and approximately 400 km2 of wetland. Approximately half of all resource land could be saved by the third scenario, managed growth with maximum protection.

Oguz, Hakan

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Detection of Urban-Induced Rainfall Anomalies in a Major Coastal City  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is increasing evidence that large coastal cities, like Houston, Texas, can influence weather through complex urban land use–weather–climate feedbacks. Recent work in the literature establishes the existence of enhanced lightning activity ...

J. Marshall Shepherd; Steven J. Burian

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Literature survey of blast and fire effects of nuclear weapons on urban areas  

SciTech Connect

The American literature of the past 30 years on fire and blast effects of nuclear weapons on urban areas has been surveyed. The relevant work is briefly sketched and areas where information is apparently lacking are noted. This report is intended to provide the basis for suggesting research priorities in the fire and blast effects area for the Federal Emergency Management Agency. It is also intended to provide entry into the literature for researchers. over 850 references are given.

Reitter, T.A.; McCallen, D.B.; Kang, S.W.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Land-Cover Dynamics in an Urban Area of Ghana  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this study were to quantify land-cover changes. A short-term projection of land-cover distribution in a 2400-ha (1 ha = 10 000 m2 ) area of northern Ghana was generated. Landsat Thematic Mapper images acquired in 1984, 1992, and ...

Ademola K. Braimoh; Paul L. G. Vlek

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Increase in Number of Days with Heavy Precipitation in Tokyo Urban Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of daily precipitation in August from 1954 to 1976 shows a recent trend for urban areas of Tokyo to have heavier precipitation than the suburbs, although one would not expect such a situation when it is dry and the total monthly ...

Tsuneharu Yonetani

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Building detection in an urban area using lidar data and QuickBird imagery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article presents a hierarchical approach to detect buildings in an urban area through the combined usage of lidar data and QuickBird imagery. A normalized digital surface model nDSM was first generated on the basis of the difference between a digital ...

Lei Chen; Shuhe Zhao; Wenquan Han; Yun Li

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Urban Energy Fluxes in Built-Up Downtown Areas and Variations across the Urban Area, for Use in Dispersion Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface energy fluxes, at averaging times from 10 min to 1 h, are needed as inputs to most state-of-the-art dispersion models. The sensible heat flux is a major priority, because it is combined with the momentum flux to estimate the stability, the ...

Steven Hanna; Edson Marciotto; Rex Britter

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Urban Energy Fluxes in Built-Up Downtown Areas and Variations across the Urban Area, for Use in Dispersion Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Surface energy fluxes, at averaging times from 10 min to 1 h, are needed as inputs to most state-of-the-art dispersion models. The sensible heat flux is a major priority, because it is combined with the momentum flux to ...

Hanna, Steven

29

Turbulent Heat Fluxes in Urban Areas: Observations and a Local-Scale Urban Meteorological Parameterization Scheme (LUMPS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A linked set of simple equations specifically designed to calculate heat fluxes for the urban environment is presented. This local-scale urban meteorological parameterization scheme (LUMPS), which has similarities to the hybrid plume dispersion ...

C. S. B. Grimmond; T. R. Oke

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Fire initiation and spread in urban areas due to nuclear attack  

SciTech Connect

Calculation of fire development in urban areas is a critical step in estimating the global effects of nuclear warfare with regard to smoke production and transport. As part of the first phase of a program to improve our ability to calculate fire starts and spread in urban areas, we have performed a parameter sensitivity analysis using the three codes originally developed for civil defense planning by the IIT Research Institute. We have added graphics and made slight improvements to the codes and applied them to the representation of the San Jose urban area used in the Five-City Study of the late 1960s. For a chosen reference attack scenario, we have varied parameters and compared the results to those of a representative baseline case. The parameters varied included: atmospheric visibility, lowest of the various critical ignition energies of window coverings, shading of windows by trees and awnings, extent of blast extinguishment of fires, secondary ignitions, window glass transmittance, specific firebrand generation rate, firebrand distribution range, windspeed, building densities, specific fuel loadings, and window sizes. 13 references, 10 figures, 5 tables.

Reitter, T.A.; Takata, A.N.; Kang, S.W.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

A study on the security, the performance and the penetration of Wi-Fi networks in a Greek urban area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a study on the expansion of urbanWi-Fi networks and the degree of users' awareness about their characteristics. It involves an experiment contacted at the area of Serres, a Greek city of around 70,000 inhabitants. The findings revealed ... Keywords: Wi-Fi networks usage, urban networks, war driving, wireless security

Savvas Mousionis; Alex Vakaloudis; Constantinos Hilas

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Alternative energy facility siting policies for urban coastal areas: executive summary of findings and policy recommendations  

SciTech Connect

An analysis was made of siting issues in the coastal zone, one of the nation's most critical natural resource areas and one which is often the target for energy development proposals. The analysis addressed the changing perceptions of citizens toward energy development in the coastal zone, emphasizing urban communities where access to the waterfront and revitalization of waterfront property are of interest to the citizen. The findings of this analysis are based on an examination of energy development along New Jersey's urban waterfront and along the Texas-Louisiana Gulf Coast, and on redevelopment efforts in Seattle, San Francisco, Boston, and elsewhere. The case studies demonstrate the significance of local attitudes and regional cooperation in the siting process. In highly urbanized areas, air quality has become a predominant concern among citizen groups and an influential factor in development of alternative energy facility siting strategies, such as consideration of inland siting connected by pipeline to a smaller coastal facility. The study addresses the economic impact of the permitting process on the desirability of energy facility investments, and the possible effects of the location selected for the facility on the permitting process and investment economics. The economic analysis demonstrates the importance of viewing energy facility investments in a broad perspective that includes the positive or negative impacts of various alternative siting patterns on the permitting process. Conclusions drawn from the studies regarding Federal, state, local, and corporate politics; regulatory, permitting, licensing, environmental assessment, and site selection are summarized. (MCW)

Morell, D; Singer, G

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Comparison of the Impact of Global Climate Changes and Urbanization on Summertime Future Climate in the Tokyo Metropolitan Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, the impact of global climate change and anticipated urbanization over the next 70 years is estimated with regard to the summertime local climate in the Tokyo metropolitan area (TMA), whose population is already near its peak now. ...

Sachiho A. Adachi; Fujio Kimura; Hiroyuki Kusaka; Tomoshige Inoue; Hiroaki Ueda

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

A deterministic air quality forecasting system for Torino urban area, Italy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An urban air quality forecasting system for Torino city has been developed, within the EU funded project FUMAPEX, to support the prevention and management of urban air pollution episodes. The proposed forecasting system is designed to provide stakeholders ... Keywords: Air quality forecasting, Air quality management, Chemical transport models, Urban air pollution, Urban meteorology

S. Finardi; R. De Maria; A. D'Allura; C. Cascone; G. Calori; F. Lollobrigida

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Combined Heating and Power Using Microturbines in a Major Urban Hotel  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the results of a cooperative effort to install and operate a Cooling, Heating and Power (CHP) System at a major hotel in San Francisco, CA. The packaged CHP System integrated four microturbines, a double-effect absorption chiller, two fuel gas boosters, and the control hardware and software to ensure that the system operated predictably, reliably, and safely. The chiller was directly energized by the recycled hot exhaust from the microturbines, and could be configured to provide either chilled or hot water. As installed, the system was capable of providing up to 227 kW of net electrical power and 142 Refrigeration Tons (RT) of chilled water at a 59oF (15oC) ambient temperature. For the year, the CHP efficiency was 54 percent. Significant lessons learned from this test and verification project are discussed as well as measured performance and economic considerations.

Sweetser, Richard [Exergy Partners Corp.; Wagner, Timothy [United Technologies Research Center (UTRC); Leslie, Neil [Gas Technology Institute; Stovall, Therese K [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Survey on Cooling Costs and Related Factors for Apartments in an Urban Area of Osaka  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A questionnaire survey was carried out to assess cooling behaviors and cooling costs for 290 apartments in an urban area. 1) Cooling costs are strongly related to the number of air conditioners, the months of occupation, and the air conditioner usage frequency during sleep. Lifestyle and ecological interest do not decrease costs. 2) Target temperatures of air conditioning are strongly related to the air pollution outdoors, and to the frequency of window opening. Cooling temperatures are affected by the residents' constitution. 3) Both cooling temperature and air-conditioner use frequency are higher for residents worried more about dew, humidity, odors, and mold. 4) Air-conditioner use frequency is higher for residents who are annoyed by glances from outside and for those with a higher preference of outdoors. 5) South openings are related to the lower cooling costs and higher cooling temperatures, whereas west openings are related to higher cooling costs.

Umemiya, N.; Lin, X.; Inoue, G.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Urbanizing terrains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Urban "sprawl"in the East Attica area of Athens has dramatically changed the former rural economy in a manner consistent with the urbanizing terrain's underlying properties: agricultural subdivisions, existing centres, ...

Romanos, Christoforos

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Numerical Analysis on the Contribution of Urbanization to Wind Stilling: An Example over the Greater Beijing Metropolitan Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A decline of surface wind speed (wind stilling) has been observed in many regions of the world. The greater Beijing metropolitan area in China is taken as an example for analyzing the urbanization impact on wind stilling. This study set up five ...

Aizhong Hou; Guangheng Ni; Hanbo Yang; Zhidong Lei

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Prediction and visualization of GPS multipath signals in urban areas using LiDAR Digital Surface Models and building footprints  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explains a ray tracing method which is applied to prediction and visualization of diffracted and reflected GPS signals in dense urban areas. Reflected and diffracted signals can have a detrimental effect on GPS positioning accuracy especially ... Keywords: 3D visualization, GPS multipath, LiDAR

Jing Li; George Taylor; David Kidner; Mark Ware

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

CFD simulation for pedestrian wind comfort and wind safety in urban areas: General decision framework and case study for the Eindhoven University campus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind comfort and wind safety for pedestrians are important requirements in urban areas. Many city authorities request studies of pedestrian wind comfort and wind safety for new buildings and new urban areas. These studies involve combining statistical ... Keywords: Building aerodynamics, Built environment, Computational fluid dynamics (CFD), Discomfort and danger, Experimental validation, Guidelines, Wind flow

B. Blocken; W. D. Janssen; T. van Hooff

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "major urban areas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

A shallow water model for dense gas simulation in urban areas  

SciTech Connect

Large quantities of toxic chemicals are stored at industrial facilities and transported around the country via train and truck. In the event of an accidental release, many of these chemicals are released as heavier-than-air gases that stay low to the ground as they are transported by the wind . Breathing height concentrations can remain high due to reduced vertical mixing and hazard zone coverage area can be larger due to near-source gravitational slumping . A number of fast-response dense gas dispersion models have been developed and are routinely used to deal with heavier-than-air releases over unobstructed terrain. If a release were to occur in a built-up environment, however, the effects of buildings and other obstacles will significantly alter the initial spreading, the transport direction, and the amount of mixing of the dense gas cloud . We have developed a new fast-running dense gas dispersion model that is intended for handling releases in cities and at large industrial facilities. In this paper we describe the scheme employed and how the model has been integrated into the Quick Urban & Industrial Complex (QUIC) dispersion modeling system.

Brown, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Williams, Mike D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gowardhan, Akshay [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brambilla, Sara [POLITECNICO DI MILANO; Manca, Davide [POLITECNICO DI MILANO

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Fluxes, variability and sources of cadmium, lead, arsenic and mercury in dry atmospheric depositions in urban, suburban and rural areas  

SciTech Connect

In China's largest city, Shanghai, dry deposition fluxes of Cd, Pb, As and Hg were 137, 19 354, 2897 and 9.4 {mu}g m{sup -2} a{sup -1}, respectively in an urban area, intermediate in a suburban area, and 51.7, 5311, 1703 and 7.3 {mu}g m{sup -2} a{sup -1}, respectively in a rural area. Enrichment factors were Cd>Pb>As>Hg. Seasonal variations of metals differed: Pb and As were dominated by fossil fuel combustion, Cd was related to industrial pollution, and natural source controlled Hg levels.

Shi, G., E-mail: gt_shi@163.com [Polar Research Institute of China, Shanghai 200136 (China); Key Laboratory of Geographic Information Science of Ministry of Education, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China); Chen, Z. [Key Laboratory of Geographic Information Science of Ministry of Education, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Geographic Information Science of Ministry of Education, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China); Teng, J. [Shanghai Chongming Dongtan National Nature Reserve, Shanghai 202183 (China)] [Shanghai Chongming Dongtan National Nature Reserve, Shanghai 202183 (China); Bi, C.; Zhou, D.; Sun, C. [Key Laboratory of Geographic Information Science of Ministry of Education, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Geographic Information Science of Ministry of Education, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China); Li, Y. [Polar Research Institute of China, Shanghai 200136 (China)] [Polar Research Institute of China, Shanghai 200136 (China); Xu, S. [Key Laboratory of Geographic Information Science of Ministry of Education, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Geographic Information Science of Ministry of Education, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

43

Inhalation of motor vehicle emissions: effects of urban population and land area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M.A. , 1996. Total cost of motor-vehicle use. Access 8, 7-Urban density and inhalation of motor vehicle emissions JDof primary pollutants: motor vehicle emissions in the South

Marshall, J D; McKone, T E; Deakin, E; Nazaroff, William W

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Estimating the Urban Heat Island in Residential Areas in the Netherlands Using Observations by Weather Amateurs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A better quantification of the urban heat islands (UHIs) in the Netherlands is urgently needed given the heat stress–related problems in the recent past combined with the expected temperature rise for the coming decades. Professional temperature ...

Dirk Wolters; Theo Brandsma

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Recommendations for the analysis and design of naturally ventilated buildings in urban areas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The motivation behind this work was to obtain a better understanding of how a building's natural ventilation potential is affected by the complexities introduced by the urban environment. To this end, we have derived in ...

Truong, Phan Hue

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Observations and Modeling of Downward Radiative Fluxes (Solar and Infrared) in Urban/Rural Areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pollutants (gaseous and aerosol) contained in urban atmospheres alter radiative fluxes at the surface.Numerous radiative models have been developed, and while few experimental data are available, results areoften contradictory. We have taken ...

Claude Estournel; Raoul Vehil; Daniel Guedalia; Jacques Fontan; Aimé Druilhet

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Characterization of decontamination and decommissioning wastes expected from the major processing facilities in the 200 Areas  

SciTech Connect

This study was intended to characterize and estimate the amounts of equipment and other materials that are candidates for removal and subsequent processing in a solid waste facility when the major processing and handling facilities in the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site are decontaminated and decommissioned. The facilities in this study were selected based on processing history and on the magnitude of the estimated decommissioning cost cited in the Surplus Facilities Program Plan; Fiscal Year 1993 (Winship and Hughes 1992). The facilities chosen for this study include B Plant (221-B), T Plant (221-T), U Plant (221-U), the Uranium Trioxide (UO{sub 3}) Plant (224-U and 224-UA), the Reduction Oxidation (REDOX) or S Plant (202-S), the Plutonium Concentration Facility for B Plant (224-B), and the Concentration Facility for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) and REDOX (233-S). This information is required to support planning activities for current and future solid waste treatment, storage, and disposal operations and facilities.

Amato, L.C.; Franklin, J.D.; Hyre, R.A.; Lowy, R.M.; Millar, J.S.; Pottmeyer, J.A. [Los Alamos Technical Associates, Kennewick, WA (United States); Duncan, D.R. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Towards sustainable urban communities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Requirements for the assessment tools of buildings have increased, assessing of building components or separate buildings is not enough. Neighbourhoods, built environment, public transportations, and services, should be considered simultaneously. Number of population living in urban areas is high and increasing rapidly. Urbanisation is a major concern due to its detrimental effects on the environment. The aim of this study is to clarify the field of assessment tools for urban communities by analysing the current situation. The focus is on internationally well known assessment tools; BREEAM Communities, CASBEE for Urban Development and LEED for Neigborhood Development. The interest towards certification systems is increasing amongst the authorities, and especially amongst the global investors and property developers. Achieved certifications are expected to bring measureable publicity for the developers. The assessment of urban areas enables the comparison of municipalities and urban areas, and notably supports decision making processes. Authorities, city planners, and designers would benefit most from the use of the tools during the decision making process. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The urban assessment tools have strong linkage to the region. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The tools promote complementary building and retrofitting existing sites. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sharing knowledge and experiences is important in the development of the tools.

Haapio, Appu, E-mail: appu.haapio@vtt.fi

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

49

An emission time series generator for pollutant release modelling in urban areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dynamic priority pollutant (PP) fate models are being developed to assess appropriate strategies for limiting the release of PPs from urban sources and for treating PPs on a variety of spatial scales. Different possible sources of PP releases were mapped ... Keywords: Emission pattern, Generator, Priority pollutants, Release dynamics, Sewer catchment model, Time series

W. De Keyser; V. Gevaert; F. Verdonck; B. De Baets; L. Benedetti

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

The gated community: residents' crime experience and perception of safety behind gates and fences in the urban area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The primary purpose of the study is to explore the connections between residents' perception of safety and their crime experience, and the existence of gates and fences in multi-family housing communities in urban areas. For cultivating discussions regarding the connections between gated community territory, safety, and crime experience, this study classifies apartment communities according to the conditions of their gating and fencing: gated communities, perceived gated communities, and non-gated communities. It investigates residents' perceptions of safety and their opinions and managers' opinions on gated territory and safety. The major findings from the surveys are: Residents felt safer in gated communities than in non-gated communities. Residents' perceptions of safety in perceived gated communities were similar to those in gated communities. These results reflected the territoriality issue for improving residents' perceived safety in apartment communities. Residents' perceptions of safety in architectural spaces showed that residents' fear of crime in public and semi-public spaces must first be addressed in order to ease residents' fear of crime in an apartment territory. The reality of crime in apartment communities differed from residents' perceptions of safety. Gated community residents reported a higher crime rate than nongated community residents. In addition to gates and fences that define apartment territory, such elements as patrol services, bright lighting, direct emergency buttons, and visual access to the local police were indicated as the important factors for improving residents' perceived safety. Some architectural factors and demographic factors exhibited statistical correlations with residents' perceptions of safety. Those were types of communities, dwelling floor level, educational attainment, family size, and annual income. For predicting residents' perceptions of safety in their apartment territory, multiple regression models were obtained and residents' neighborhood attachment was also considered in the multiple regression models. The apartment community managers emphasized direct maintenance issues and residents' social contact with neighbors for improving residents' perceived safety. In conclusion, design and managerial suggestions for safer communities were proposed. For creating safer multi-family housing communities, territoriality and related architectural conditions and managerial considerations and residents' participations are emphasized. The concept of community programming for safer multi-family housing communities is suggested.

Kim, Suk Kyung

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Flexible urbanism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis seeks to find a new approach/method towards urbanization in existing low density neighborhoods in major metropolitan cities in the United States. The near South side of the city of Chicago (a city that carries ...

Anandam, Anahita

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Complete Urban Surface Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An observation program using ground and airborne thermal infrared radiometers is used to estimate the surface temperature of urban areas, taking into account the total active surface area. The authors call this the complete urban surface ...

J. A. Voogt; T. R. Oke

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Urban Wood Waste Resource Assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study collected and analyzed data on urban wood waste resources in 30 randomly selected metropolitan areas in the United States. Three major categories wood wastes disposed with, or recovered from, the municipal solid waste stream; industrial wood wastes such as wood scraps and sawdust from pallet recycling, woodworking shops, and lumberyards; and wood in construction/demolition and land clearing debris.

Wiltsee, G.

1998-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

54

Behind "successful" land acquisition : a case study of the Van Quan new urban area project in Hanoi, Vietnam  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The transition to a market economy has sparked Vietnam's unprecedented urbanization and industrialization. In order to accommodate the spiraling land demand triggered by urban and economic growth, the Vietnamese government ...

Bui, Phuong Anh, M. C. P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

The Effect of Clouds and Wind on the Difference in Nocturnal Cooling Rates between Urban and Rural Areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The urban warming effect is interesting in its own right and is important for understanding global warming. The aim of this study is to determine how the urban warming effect changes with cloud conditions and with wind speed. Studies of the urban ...

Stanley Q. Kidder; Oskar M. Essenwanger

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Modeling Surface Sensible Heat Flux Using Surface Radiative Temperatures in a Simple Urban Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sensible heat fluxes over a light industrial area in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, are analyzed from observed tower fluxes and modeled using a bulk heat transfer approach. The bulk transfer models are initialized using remotely sensed ...

J. A. Voogt; C. S. B. Grimmond

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Atmospheric Dispersion from Elevated Sources in an Urban Area: Comparison between Tracer Experiments and Model Calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric dispersion experiments were carried out in the Copenhagen area under neutral and unstable conditions. The tracer sulphurhexafluoride was released without buoyancy from a tower at a height of 115 m and then collected at ground-level ...

Sven-Erik Gryning; Erik Lyck

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Representative Air Temperature of Thermally Heterogeneous Urban Areas Using the Measured Pressure Gradient  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method to measure an area-averaged ground air temperature based on the hydrostatic equation is shown. The method was devised to overcome the problem of finding the most representative surface air temperature over a wide region, a problem that ...

Hirofumi Sugawara; Ken-ichi Narita; Takehiko Mikami

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Application of an SVM-based regression model to the air quality study at local scale in the Avilés urban area (Spain)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to build a regression model of air quality by using the support vector machine (SVM) technique in the Aviles urban area (Spain) at local scale. Hazardous air pollutants or toxic air contaminants refer to any substance that ... Keywords: Air quality, Machine learning, Pollutant substances, Support vector regression

A. SuáRez SáNchez; P. J. GarcíA Nieto; P. Riesgo FernáNdez; J. J. Del Coz DíAz; F. J. Iglesias-RodríGuez

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Effects of Synoptic-scale Wind under the Typical Summer Pressure Pattern on the Mesoscale High-Temperature Events in the Osaka and Kyoto Urban Areas in Japan by the WRF model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The actual conditions of the mesoscale summer high temperatures (HT) recorded in Osaka-Kyoto urban area in Japan were investigated by using our observation network. The daytime temperatures observed on ten HT events in this area were the highest ...

Yuya Takane; Yukitaka Ohashi; Hiroyuki Kusaka; Yoshinori Shigeta; Yukihiro Kikegawa

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "major urban areas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Turbulent Kinetic Energy in the Oklahoma City Urban Environment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A major field experiment, Joint URBAN 2003 (JU2003), was conducted in Oklahoma City in July 2003 to collect meteorological and tracer data sets for evaluating dispersion models in urban areas. The Department of Homeland Security and the Defense Threat Reduction Agency were the primary sponsors of JU2003. Investigators from five Department of Energy national laboratories, several other government agencies, universities, private companies, and international agencies conducted the experiment. Observations to characterize the meteorology in and around the urban area complemented the observation of the dispersion of SF6, an inert tracer gas. Over one hundred threedimensional sonic anemometers were deployed in and around the urban area to monitor wind speed, direction, and turbulence fluxes during releases of SF6. Sonic deployment locations included a profile of eight sonic anemometers mounted on a crane less than 1 km north of the central business district (CBD). Using data from these and other sonic anemometers deployed in the urban area, we can quantify the effect of the urban area on atmospheric turbulence and compare results seen in OKC to those in other urban areas to assess the parameters typically used in parameterizations of urban turbulence.

Lundquist, J; Leach, M; Gouveia, F

2004-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

62

Urban Canopy Modeling of the New York City Metropolitan Area: A Comparison and Validation of Single- and Multilayer Parameterizations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-resolution numerical simulations are conducted using the Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS) with two different urban canopy parameterizations for a 23-day period in August 2005 for the New York City (NYC) ...

Teddy Holt; Julie Pullen

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Sources of methane in China: A program to estimate emissions from rice paddy fields, bio-gas pits, and urban areas: Annual progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We are measuring methane from rice paddy fields and bio-gas pits. The project has produced new results that we are using to sharply focus the present study. We measured ambient concentrations at Minqin, Beijing, and Chendu. We obtained flux measurements from bio-gas pits, and flux measurements from rice paddy fields. Minqin is a background site with no large local sources of methane such as rice fields or urban areas. It serves as control for the experiment. Beijing is representative of a large industrialized Chinese city not affected by rice agriculture but heavily dependent on burning coal for cooking and heating. Chendu is in the heart of the rice producing areas of China where rice paddies cover millions of acres and methane from bio-gas pits is an important source of energy. Further progress was impeded by a lack of a formal agreement between the US and PRC, which was not signed until August 1987. 9 figs.

Rasmussen, R.A.; Khalil, M.A.K.

1987-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

64

Brazil-Promoting Low Emission Urban Development Strategies in Emerging  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brazil-Promoting Low Emission Urban Development Strategies in Emerging Brazil-Promoting Low Emission Urban Development Strategies in Emerging Economy Countries (URBAN-LEDS) Jump to: navigation, search Name Brazil-Promoting Low Emission Urban Development Strategies in Emerging Economy Countries (URBAN-LEDS) Agency/Company /Organization ICLEI - Local Governments for Sustainability, European Commission, UN Habitat Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Buildings, Buildings - Commercial, Buildings - Residential, People and Policy Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Baseline projection, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Market analysis, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.iclei.org/fileadmin Program Start 2012 Program End 2015 Country Brazil South America References UN-Habitat and European Commission sign major agreement on lower-emission city growth; ICLEI as main implementing partner[1]

65

India-Promoting Low Emission Urban Development Strategies in Emerging  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

India-Promoting Low Emission Urban Development Strategies in Emerging India-Promoting Low Emission Urban Development Strategies in Emerging Economy Countries (URBAN-LEDS) Jump to: navigation, search Name India-Promoting Low Emission Urban Development Strategies in Emerging Economy Countries (URBAN-LEDS) Agency/Company /Organization ICLEI - Local Governments for Sustainability, European Commission, UN Habitat Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Buildings, Buildings - Commercial, Buildings - Residential, People and Policy Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Baseline projection, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Market analysis, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.iclei.org/fileadmin Program Start 2012 Program End 2015 Country India Southern Asia References UN-Habitat and European Commission sign major agreement on lower-emission city growth; ICLEI as main implementing partner[1]

66

Indonesia-Promoting Low Emission Urban Development Strategies in Emerging  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Promoting Low Emission Urban Development Strategies in Emerging Promoting Low Emission Urban Development Strategies in Emerging Economy Countries (URBAN-LEDS) Jump to: navigation, search Name Indonesia-Promoting Low Emission Urban Development Strategies in Emerging Economy Countries (URBAN-LEDS) Agency/Company /Organization ICLEI - Local Governments for Sustainability, European Commission, UN Habitat Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Buildings, Buildings - Commercial, Buildings - Residential, People and Policy Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Baseline projection, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Market analysis, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.iclei.org/fileadmin Program Start 2012 Program End 2015 Country Indonesia South-Eastern Asia References UN-Habitat and European Commission sign major agreement on lower-emission city growth; ICLEI as main implementing partner[1]

67

A sustainable urban center refurbishment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the last century a vast new building construction activity was verified. The old urban centers were abandoned and new housing areas grew up without comply with sustainable principles. The great architectural and urban value of these centers led ... Keywords: indicators, refurbishment, sustainability, urban center

Ana Karina Lopes; Fernanda Rodrigues; Victor M. Ferreira; Romeu Vicente

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

A Square Prism Urban Canopy Scheme for the NHM and Its Evaluation on Summer Conditions in the Tokyo Metropolitan Area, Japan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A single-layered square prism urban canopy (SPUC) scheme for the Japan Meteorological Agency nonhydrostatic model (NHM) was developed. This scheme considers the urban canopy layer with square prism–shaped buildings. The basic concept of this ...

Toshinori Aoyagi; Naoko Seino

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Development and application of GIS-based analysis/synthesis modeling techniques for urban planning of Istanbul Metropolitan Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Istanbul is the largest city in Turkey with an area of around 5750km^2 and population of around 10.58M (2000). The population is increasing because of mass immigration. Planned and unplanned housing are increasing while green areas are decreasing in ... Keywords: Geographic information systems, Istanbul, Modeling, Spatial evaluation, Sustainability

Ibrahim Baz; Abdurrahman Geymen; Semih Nogay Er

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

The Effect of Urban Street Gang Densities on Small Area Homicide Incidence in a Large Metropolitan County, 1994–2002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

43 Two hundred eighty-nine zip code tabulation areas existedWe selected 255 of those zip codes to merge with homicideanalysis. We excluded zip codes with very low populations

Robinson, Paul L.; Boscardin, W. John; George, Sheba M.; Teklehaimanot, Senait; Heslin, Kevin C.; Bluthenthal, Ricky N.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Evaluation of MM5 High-Resolution Real-Time Forecasts over the Urban Area of Athens, Greece  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University–National Center for Atmospheric Research Mesoscale Model (MM5) forecast skill over an area of complex terrain is evaluated. Namely, the model is verified over a period of 1 yr (2002)...

V. Kotroni; K. Lagouvardos

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

AREA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AREA AREA FAQ # Question Response 316 vs DCAA FAQ 1 An inquiry from CH about an SBIR recipient asking if a DCAA audit is sufficient to comply with the regulation or if they need to add this to their audit they have performed yearly by a public accounting firm. 316 audits are essentially A-133 audits for for-profit entities. They DO NOT replace DCAA or other audits requested by DOE to look at indirect rates or incurred costs or closeouts. DCAA would never agree to perform A-133 or our 316 audits. They don't do A-133 audits for DOD awardees. The purpose of the audits are different, look at different things and in the few instances of overlap, from different perspectives. 316

73

Promoting Low Emission Urban Development Strategies in Emerging Economy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Countri (URBAN-LEDS) Countri (URBAN-LEDS) Jump to: navigation, search Name Promoting Low Emission Urban Development Strategies in Emerging Economy Countries (URBAN-LEDS) Agency/Company /Organization ICLEI - Local Governments for Sustainability, European Commission, UN Habitat Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Buildings, Buildings - Commercial, Buildings - Residential, People and Policy Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Baseline projection, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Market analysis, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.iclei.org/fileadmin Program Start 2012 Program End 2015 Country Brazil, India, Indonesia, South Africa South America, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Southern Africa References UN-Habitat and European Commission sign major agreement on lower-emission city growth; ICLEI as main implementing partner[1]

74

Overview of URBAN 2000: A Multiscale Field Study of Dispersion through an Urban Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major urban tracer and meteorological field campaign (URBAN 2000) was conducted in Salt Lake City, Utah, during October 2000. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Chemical and Biological National Security Program, the month-long ...

K. J. Allwine; J. H. Shinn; G. E. Streit; K. L. Clawson; M. Brown

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Information fusion of aerial images and LIDAR data in urban areas: vector-stacking, re-classification and post-processing approaches  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research investigates information fusion approaches of high-resolution aerial images and elevation data from Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) for urban-environment mapping. Three feature fusion methods are proposed and compared: (1) the vector-stacking ...

Xin Huang; Liangpei Zhang; Wei Gong

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Chinese Mothers and Adolescents' Views of Parent-Adolescent Conflict and the Quality of Their Relationship ---- A study of parent-adolescent relationship in urban and rural China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in contemporary urban and rural China. Child Development,between the urban and rural areas in China. Productivityadolescents in urban and rural China. Journal of Research on

Chen, Min

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Strategies for systemic urban constructed wetlands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As a result of ubiquitous impermeable surfaces, conventional water management and stormwater infrastructure, and the resultant degradation of natural hydrologic networks, most American urban areas have suffered severely ...

Balderas-Guzmán, Celina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Urban Reclamation in São Paulo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The urbanized terrain of São Paulo is characterized by wasteful landscapes on peripheral areas of the metropolitan agglomeration, and decaying landscapes of waste in the core of the city. If on the one hand, the increasingly ...

Eskinazi, Victor

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

District Level Analysis of Urbanization from Rural-to-Urban Migration in the Rajasthan State  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Migration has various dimensions; urbanization due to migration is one of them. In Rajasthan State, district level analysis of urbanization due to migrants shows trend invariably for all districts of the state, though the contribution in urbanization by migrants varies from district to district. In some districts the share of migrants moving to urban areas is very impressive, in others it is not that much high. The migrants' contribution is on the raising over the decades. In this paper, the district level migration in the Rajasthan State is examined in relation to total urbanization and urbanization due to migration.

Jayant Singh; Hansraj Yadav; Florentin Smarandache

2009-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

80

Building Technology and Urban Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office building exterior and infrared thermograph Office building exterior and infrared thermograph Building Technology and Urban Systems Building Technology and Urban Systems application/pdf icon btus-org-chart-03-2013.pdf In the areas of Building Technology and Urban Systems, EETD researchers conduct R&D and develop physical and information technologies to make buildings and urban areas more energy- and resource-efficient. These technologies create jobs and products for the marketplace in clean technology industries. They improve quality of life, and reduce the emissions of pollutants, including climate-altering greenhouse gases. BTUSD's goal is to provide the technologies needed to operate buildings at 50 to 70 percent less energy use than average today. BTUS develops, demonstrates and deploys: Information technologies for the real-time monitoring and control of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "major urban areas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Urban hopper.  

SciTech Connect

Hopping robots provide the possibility of breaking the link between the size of a ground vehicle and the largest obstacle that it can overcome. For more than a decade, DARPA and Sandia National Laboratories have been developing small-scale hopping robot technology, first as part of purely hopping platforms and, more recently, as part of platforms that are capable of both wheeled and hopping locomotion. In this paper we introduce the Urban Hopper robot and summarize its capabilities. The advantages of hopping for overcoming certain obstacles are discussed. Several configurations of the Urban Hopper are described, as are intelligent capabilities of the system. Key challenges are discussed.

Xavier, Patrick Gordon; Feddema, John Todd; Little, Charles Quentin; Spletzer, Barry Louis; Fischer, Gary John; Weagle, Christian A. (Boston Dynamics Waltham, MA); Salton, Jonathan Robert; Marron, Lisa Carol; Malchano, Matthew D. (Boston Dynamics Waltham, MA); Giarrantana, John (Boston Dynamics Waltham, MA); Murphy, Michael P. (Boston Dynamics Waltham, MA); Rizzi, Alfred A. (Boston Dynamics Waltham, MA); Buerger, Stephen P.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Urban Network Practices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the findings of an underground distribution practices immersion conducted by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) with Duke Energy Ohio. This immersion was conducted as part of a multiyear effort by EPRI to identify noteworthy practices in managing urban network systems. More specifically, this report profiles the practices (people, processes, and technology) in place at Duke Energy Ohio, a company serving the Cincinnati, Ohio, metropolitan area. In addition, this report hig...

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

83

Urban Network Systems Practices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the findings of an underground distribution practices immersion conducted by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) with CenterPoint Energy (CenterPoint). This immersion was conducted as part of a multiyear effort by EPRI to identify noteworthy practices in managing urban network systems. The report profiles the practices (that is, people, processes, and technology) in place at CenterPoint, a company serving the Houston, Texas, metropolitan area. This report is one of a serie...

2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

84

Urban Modification of Thunderstorms: An Observational Storm Climatology and Model Case Study for the Indianapolis Urban Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A radar-based climatology of 91 unique summertime (May 2000–August 2009) thunderstorm cases was examined over the Indianapolis, Indiana, urban area. The study hypothesis is that urban regions alter the intensity and composition/structure of ...

Dev Niyogi; Patrick Pyle; Ming Lei; S. Pal Arya; Chandra M. Kishtawal; Marshall Shepherd; Fei Chen; Brian Wolfe

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Analysis of large urban fires  

SciTech Connect

Fires in urban areas caused by a nuclear burst are analyzed as a first step towards determining their smoke-generation chacteristics, which may have grave implications for global-scale climatic consequences. A chain of events and their component processes which would follow a nuclear attack are described. A numerical code is currently being developed to calculate ultimately the smoke production rate for a given attack scenario. Available models for most of the processes are incorporated into the code. Sample calculations of urban fire-development history performed in the code for an idealized uniform city are presented. Preliminary results indicate the importance of the wind, thermal radiation transmission, fuel distributions, and ignition thresholds on the urban fire spread characteristics. Future plans are to improve the existing models and develop new ones to characterize smoke production from large urban fires. 21 references, 18 figures.

Kang, S.W.; Reitter, T.A.; Takata, A.N.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Urban Modification of Freezing-Rain Events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new national database for freezing-rain occurrences during the 1945–2000 period provided an opportunity for a study of the potential urban effects on freezing-rain events. Numerous past studies of snowfall events in urban areas have defined ...

Stanley A. Changnon

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Innovative Manufactured Housing Urban Design Demonstration Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One quarter of the new houses sold in the United States in 1999 were manufactured homes, and manufactured housing represents an important and growing market for power producers. One niche market opportunity for manufactured homes is in urban areas. EPRI facilitated the completion of two limited demonstrations of energy efficient manufactured homes designed specifically for urban neighborhoods.

2000-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

88

Source to tap urban water cycle modelling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The continuous expansion of urban areas is associated with increased water demand, both for domestic and non-domestic uses. To cover this additional demand, centralised infrastructure, such as water supply and distribution networks tend to become more ... Keywords: Metabolism models, Optimisation, Urban water cycle, Water demand management

Evangelos Rozos; Christos Makropoulos

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Analyses of Nocturnal Temperature Cooling-Rate Response to Historical Local-Scale Urban Land-Use/Land Cover Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Urbanization affects near-surface climates by increasing city temperatures relative to rural temperatures [i.e., the urban heat island (UHI) effect]. This effect is usually measured as the relative temperature difference between urban areas and a ...

Winston T. L. Chow; Bohumil M. Svoma

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Effects of urban land cover modifications in a mesoscale meteorological model on surface temperature and heat fluxes in the Phoenix metropolitan area.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and latent heat fluxes and therefore the ground temperature, Tg. Evaporation, E, for each grid cell temperature and heat fluxes in the Phoenix metropolitan area. S. Grossman-Clarke1, J.A. Zehnder2, and W) satellite images [2]. The data were upscaled to a 30-second grid and used to augment and correct

Hall, Sharon J.

91

Effects of Regional Warming due to Urbanization on Daytime Local Circulations in a Complex Basin of the Daegu Metropolitan Area, Korea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical and observational analyses were conducted using realistic and historical three-set land-use data over 40 yr from 1963 to 2002 to evaluate regional warming in the Daegu metropolitan area due to dramatic land-use alterations in the basin ...

Soon-Hwan Lee; Hae-Dong Kim

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Promoting Low Emission Urban Development Strategies in Emerging...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Project (URBAN LEDS) AgencyCompany Organization ICLEI - Local Governments for Sustainability Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Energy Efficiency Topics Low...

93

Promoting Low Emission Urban Development Strategies in Emerging...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Countries (URBAN-LEDS) AgencyCompany Organization ICLEI - Local Governments for Sustainability, European Commission, UN Habitat Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Renewable...

94

Discussions@TMS - What are the recycling trends between urban ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 4, 2007 ... Topic Title: What are the recycling trends between urban and rural areas and are there any specific infrastructure needs? Topic Summary: ...

95

Metromorphosis : evolution on the urban island  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cities are very much alive. Like islands, they provide a natural testing ground for evolution. With more than half of the world's population living in urban areas now, the influence cities have on the planet's life is ...

Vezina, Kenrick (Kenrick Freitas)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Urban Cloud Condensation Nuclei Spectral Flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectral flux and the condensation nuclei (CN) flux from an urban area are determined from in situ aircraft measurements at Denver, Colorado. The concentration differences between upwind and downwind cross ...

Paul R. Frisbie; James G. Hudson

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Development of a particle number and particle mass vehicle emissions inventory for an urban fleet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Motor vehicles are major emitters of gaseous and particulate matter pollution in urban areas, and exposure to particulate matter pollution can have serious health effects, ranging from respiratory and cardiovascular disease to mortality. Motor vehicle ... Keywords: Emission factors, Motor vehicle inventory, PM 1, PM 10, PM 2.5, Particle emissions, Particle mass, Particle number, South-East Queensland, Traffic modelling, Transport modelling, Ultrafine particles

Diane U. Keogh; Luis Ferreira; Lidia Morawska

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Roles of Urban Tree Canopy and Buildings in Urban Heat Island Effects: Parameterization and Preliminary Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Urban heat island (UHI) effects can strengthen heat waves and air pollution episodes. In this study, the dampening impact of urban trees on the UHI during an extreme heat wave in the Washington, D.C., and Baltimore, Maryland, metropolitan area is ...

Christopher P. Loughner; Dale J. Allen; Da-Lin Zhang; Kenneth E. Pickering; Russell R. Dickerson; Laura Landry

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Micro-scale simulation of the macro urban form: opportunities for exploring urban change and adaptation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Agent based models (ABM) and cellular automata (CA) micro-scale modeling have found abundant application in the area of urban land use and transport planning. These platforms enable a rich spatial representation of residential behavior. We present an ... Keywords: agent-based modeling, data driven simulation, social laboratory, urban growth,

Tim Baynes; Scott Heckbert

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Seasonal Variations of the Urban Heat Island at the Surface and the Near-Surface and Reductions due to Urban Vegetation in Mexico City  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The contrast of vegetation cover in urban and surrounding areas modulates the magnitude of the urban heat island (UHI). This paper examines the seasonal variations of the UHI using the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), surface ...

Yu Yan Cui; Benjamin de Foy

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "major urban areas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Community mobilization and ecological outcomes in peri-urban Mexico City, 1989-1992  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Beginning in the 1930s and continuing through the 1970s, Mexico City developed swiftly, thus engendering rapid urbanization and a demographic boom. The majority of population growth occurred on peri-urban agricultural and ...

DuBroff, Nicholas (Nicholas Jarad)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

South Africa-Promoting Low Emission Urban Development Strategies in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South Africa-Promoting Low Emission Urban Development Strategies in South Africa-Promoting Low Emission Urban Development Strategies in Emerging Economy Countries (URBAN-LEDS) Jump to: navigation, search Name South Africa-Promoting Low Emission Urban Development Strategies in Emerging Economy Countries (URBAN-LEDS) Agency/Company /Organization ICLEI - Local Governments for Sustainability, European Commission, UN Habitat Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Buildings, Buildings - Commercial, Buildings - Residential, People and Policy Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Baseline projection, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Market analysis, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.iclei.org/fileadmin Program Start 2012 Program End 2015 Country South Africa Southern Africa

103

Sustainable Urban Development Priorities - Development of a Rapid  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sustainable Urban Development Priorities - Development of a Rapid Sustainable Urban Development Priorities - Development of a Rapid Assessment Tool for Urban Mobility in Cities with Data Scarcity Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Sustainable Urban Development Priorities - Development of a Rapid Assessment Tool for Urban Mobility in Cities with Data Scarcity Agency/Company /Organization: Clean Air Asia, The Institute for Transportation and Development Policy (ITDP) Partner: UN Habitat Sector: Land Focus Area: Greenhouse Gas, People and Policy, Transportation Topics: Background analysis, Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Policies/deployment programs Website: cleanairinitiative.org/portal/node/7870

104

The Promise of Urban Science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Promise of Urban Science. Purpose: ... Speakers: Steven E. Koonin Director NYU Center for Urban Science and Progress. Details: ...

2013-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

105

Underground Distribution: Urban Network Practices Survey - 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has undertaken a multiyear research effort to identify and describe leading industry practices for managing urban network systems in the key functional areas of planning, design, construction, maintenance, operations, and safety. This report summarizes the results of the 2012 survey of urban network practices issued by EPRI and provides comparisons to a similar survey issued by EPRI in 2009.

2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

106

On Climate Impacts of a Potential Expansion of Urban Land in Europe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the last two decades, a disproportional increase of urban land area in comparison with the population growth has been observed in many countries of Europe, and this trend is predicted to continue. The conversion of vegetated land into urban ...

K. Trusilova; M. Jung; G. Churkina

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Overview and First Results of the Montreal Urban Snow Experiment 2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Within the framework of a large urban meteorology program recently launched in Canada, the Montreal Urban Snow Experiment (MUSE) campaign has been conducted in order to document the thermoradiative exchanges in a densely built-up area of Montreal ...

A. Lemonsu; S. Bélair; J. Mailhot; M. Benjamin; G. Morneau; B. Harvey; F. Chagnon; M. Jean; J. Voogt

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Characterization of Energy Flux Partitioning in Urban Environments: Links with Surface Seasonal Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A better understanding of links between the properties of the urban environment and the exchange to the atmosphere is central to a wide range of applications. The numerous measurements of surface energy balance data in urban areas enable ...

Thomas Loridan; C. S. B. Grimmond

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Promoting Low Emission Urban Development Strategies in Emerging Economy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Promoting Low Emission Urban Development Strategies in Emerging Economy Promoting Low Emission Urban Development Strategies in Emerging Economy Countries Project (URBAN LEDS) Jump to: navigation, search Name Promoting Low Emission Urban Development Strategies in Emerging Economy Countries Project (URBAN LEDS) Agency/Company /Organization ICLEI - Local Governments for Sustainability Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Energy Efficiency Topics Low emission development planning Resource Type Lessons learned/best practices, Training materials Website http://www.iclei.org/ References ICLEI - Local Governments for Sustainability[1] ICLEI acts as the implementing partner of UN-HABITAT in the "Promoting Low Emission Urban Development Strategies in Emerging Economy Countries Project (URBAN LEDS)", that is funded by the European Commission and launched on 9

110

Urban Transportation Emission Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Urban Transportation Emission Calculator Urban Transportation Emission Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Urban Transportation Emission Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: Transport Canada Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: wwwapps.tc.gc.ca/Prog/2/UTEC-CETU/Menu.aspx?lang=eng Cost: Free References: http://wwwapps.tc.gc.ca/Prog/2/UTEC-CETU/Menu.aspx?lang=eng The Urban Transportation Emissions Calculator (UTEC) is a user-friendly tool for estimating annual emissions from personal, commercial, and public transit vehicles. It estimates greenhouse gas (GHG) and criteria air contaminant (CAC) emissions from the operation of vehicles. It also estimates upstream GHG emissions from the production, refining and

111

Home | Buildings Technology & Urban Systems Department  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lab Buildings & Urban Systems Buildings Lab Buildings & Urban Systems Buildings Technology & Urban Systems Department Search Search Home About Us Groups Tools & Guides Facilities Publications News Links Contact Us Staff The Building Technology and Urban Systems Department (BTUS) works closely with industry to develop technologies for buildings that increase energy efficiency, and improve the comfort, health, and safety of building occupants. Berkeley Lab Hosts 5 Emerging Leaders During TechWomen 2013 As part of TechWomen 2013, emerging leaders from around the world toured a number of scientific facilities in the Bay Area, including the Advanced Light Source at Berkeley Lab. Pho Read More The Retrocommissioning Sensor Suitcase Brings Energy Efficiency to Small Commercial Buildings The data module communicates wirelessly with the smart pad, which launches

112

Improvement of modelling capabilities for assessing urban contamination : The EMRAS Urban Remediation Working Group.  

SciTech Connect

The Urban Remediation Working Group of the International Atomic Energy Agency's Environmental Modeling for Radiation Safety (EMRAS) programme was established to improve modeling and assessment capabilities for radioactively contaminated urban situations, including the effects of countermeasures. An example of the Working Group's activities is an exercise based on Chernobyl fallout data in Ukraine, which has provided an opportunity to compare predictions among several models and with available measurements, to discuss reasons for discrepancies, and to identify areas where additional information would be helpful.

Thiessen, K. M.; Batandjieva, B.; Andersson, K. G.; Arkhipov, A.; Charnock, T. W.; Gallay, F.; Gaschak, S.; Golikov, V.; Hwang, W. T.; Kaiser, J. C.; Kamboj, S.; Steiner, M.; Tomas, J.; Trifunovic, D.; Yu, C.; Ziemer, R. L.; Zlobenko, B.; Environmental Science Division; SENES Oak Ridge; IAEA; Riso National Lab.; Chernobyl Center for Nuclear Safety; Health Protection Agency; IRSN; Inst. of Radiation Hygene of the Ministry of Public Health, Russian Federation; KAERI, Republic of Korea; GSF, Germany; BfS, Germany; CPHR, Cuba; State Office for Radiation Protection, Croatia; AECL, Canada; National Academy of Science, Ukraine

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

ICLEI Sustainable Urban Energy Planning | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ICLEI Sustainable Urban Energy Planning ICLEI Sustainable Urban Energy Planning Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: ICLEI Sustainable Urban Energy Planning Agency/Company /Organization: ICLEI - Local Governments for Sustainability Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Energy Efficiency Topics: Background analysis, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Policies/deployment programs Website: www.iclei.org/ References: ICLEI Homepage [1] "ICLEI - Local Governments for Sustainability is an international association of local governments as well as national and regional local government organizations that have made a commitment to sustainable development."[1] Sustainable Urban Energy Planning: A handbook for cities and towns in developing countries

114

Urban food waste composting.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this thesis, a study was undertaken on the premise that the world population living in urban centers is expected to increase from 3.8 billion… (more)

Adhikari, Bijaya K.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Urban Heat Island Research in Phoenix, Arizona: Theoretical Contributions and Policy Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past 60 years, metropolitan Phoenix, Arizona, has been among the fastest-growing urban areas in the United States, and this rapid urbanization has resulted in an urban heat island (UHI) of substantial size and intensity. During this time, an ...

Winston T. L. Chow; Dean Brennan; Anthony J. Brazel

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Synergistic Interactions between Urban Heat Islands and Heat Waves: the Impact in Cities is Larger than the Sum of its Parts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cities are well known to be hotter than the rural areas that surround them; this phenomenon is called the “urban heat island”. Heat waves are excessively hot periods during which the air temperatures of both urban and rural areas increase ...

Dan Li; Elie Bou-Zeid

117

Synergistic Interactions between Urban Heat Islands and Heat Waves: The Impact in Cities Is Larger than the Sum of Its Parts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cities are well known to be hotter than the rural areas that surround them; this phenomenon is called the urban heat island. Heat waves are excessively hot periods during which the air temperatures of both urban and rural areas increase ...

Dan Li; Elie Bou-Zeid

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Spatial and Temporal Characteristics of Beijing Urban Heat Island Intensity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An hourly dataset of automatic weather stations over Beijing Municipality in China is developed and is employed to analyze the spatial and temporal characteristics of urban heat island intensity (UHII) over the built-up areas. A total of 56 ...

Ping Yang; Guoyu Ren; Weidong Liu

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Urban redevelopment in sunbelt cities : strategies and approaches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most Sunbelt cities reflect the suburbanization that characterized urban growth and development over the past forty years. Given this dispersion, these cities often contain large areas of strategically located land that ...

Moore, James A. (James Andrew), 1959-

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Meteorological and Air Pollution Modeling for an Urban Airport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Preliminary results are presented for numerical experiments modeling meteorology, multiple pollutant sources and nonlinear photochemical reactions for the case of an airport in a large urban area with complex terrain. The meteorological model ...

Paul R. Swan; In Young Lee

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "major urban areas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Sustainable urban forms for Chinese typical new towns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The phenomena of exploding world urban population and sharply decreasing global arable lands are illustrated in contemporary China in a dramatically amplified form. Construction of many new towns in rural areas has been ...

Son, Sunhwa, 1980-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Detecting urbanization changes using SPOT5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An automatic system to estimate the urbanization changes on the Belgian territory, using SPOT5 images and the National Geographic Institute vectorial database is proposed. The images and the vectorial data are first co-registered. Then, the vectorial ... Keywords: Built-up area detection, Cartography, Change detection, SPOT5

V. Lacroix; M. Idrissa; A. Hincq; H. Bruynseels; O. Swartenbroekx

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Majoring in Forest Resources & Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Majoring in Forest Resources & Conservation University of Florida/IFAS School of Forest Resources & Conservation www.sfrc.ufl.edu ~ 352-846-0847 ~ khaselier@ufl.edu Protected Areas Management is for students interested in managing lands for conservation and restoration purposes, usually on lands owned

Watson, Craig A.

124

Swarm Intelligence for Urban Dynamics Modelling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose swarm intelligence algorithms to deal with dynamical and spatial organization emergence. The goal is to model and simulate the developement of spatial centers using multi-criteria. We combine a decentralized approach based on emergent clustering mixed with spatial constraints or attractions. We propose an extension of the ant nest building algorithm with multi-center and adaptive process. Typically, this model is suitable to analyse and simulate urban dynamics like gentrification or the dynamics of the cultural equipment in urban area.

Ghnemat, Rawan; Bertelle, Cyrille [LITIS-University of Le Havre 25 rue Philippe Lebon-BP 540 76058 Le Havre cedex (France); Duchamp, Gerard H. E. [LIPN-University of Paris XIII 99 avenue Jean-Baptiste Clement 93430 Villetaneuse (France)

2009-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

125

Fuzzy model in urban planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents application of a fuzzy logic in urban planning. Urban environment quality evaluation is an important part of environmental planning and management. Traditional theory does not give as good evaluation as the fuzzy set theory, which ... Keywords: GIS, fuzzy logic, urban evaluation, urban planning

Jasna Pleho; Zikrija Avdagic

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

An augmented reality system for military operations in urban terrain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many future military operations are expected to occur in urban environments. These complex, 3D battlefields introduce many challenges to the dismounted warfighter. Better situational awareness is required for effective operation in urban environments. However, delivering this information to the dismounted warfighter is extremely difficult. For example, maps draw a user's attention away from the environment and cannot directly represent the three-dimensional nature of the terrain. To overcome these difficulties, we are developing the Battlefield Augmented Reality System (BARS). The system consists of a wearable computer, a wireless network system, and a tracked see-through head-mounted display (HMD). The computer generates graphics that, from the user's perspective, appear to be aligned with the actual environment. For example, a building could be augmented to show its name, a plan of its interior, icons to represent reported sniper locations, and the names of adjacent streets. This paper surveys the current state of development of BARS and describes ongoing research efforts. We describe four major research areas. The first is the development of an effective, efficient user interface for displaying data and processing user inputs. The second is the capability for collaboration between multiple BARS users and other systems. Third, we describe the current hardware for both a mobile and indoor prototype system. Finally, we

Mark A. Livingston; Mark A. Livingston; Lawrence J. Rosenblum; Simon J. Julier; Dennis Brown; Yohan Baillot; J. Edward; Swan Ii; Joseph L. Gabbard; Deborah Hix

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Event:World Urban Forum 6 (WUF6) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Urban Forum 6 (WUF6) Urban Forum 6 (WUF6) Jump to: navigation, search Calendar.png World Urban Forum 6 (WUF6): on 2012/09/01 "Organised jointly by UN-Habitat, the Government of Italy, the Campania Region and the City of Naples, the theme for this year's meeting is The Urban Future. Nearly 2,000 participants from 114 countries have already registered for the premier conference on cities and urban issues since registration opened just four weeks ago. The four focus areas for discussion are: Urban Planning: Institutions and Regulations, including the improvement of Quality of Life; Equity and Prosperity: Distribution of Wealth and Opportunities; Productive Cities: Competitive and Innovative Cities and Urban Mobility, Energy & Environment." Event Details Name World Urban Forum 6 (WUF6)

128

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Urban Electric Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Urban Electric Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Urban Electric Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Urban...

129

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Urban Electric Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Urban Electric Vehicles Toyota Urban Electric Vehicle Urban electric vehicles (UEVs) are regular passenger vehicles with top speeds of about 60 miles per hour (mph) and a...

130

Property:PotentialUrbanUtilityScalePVGeneration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PotentialUrbanUtilityScalePVGeneration PotentialUrbanUtilityScalePVGeneration Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PotentialUrbanUtilityScalePVGeneration Property Type Quantity Description The estimated potential energy generation from utility-scale PV in urban areas of a particular place. Use this type to express a quantity of energy. The default unit for energy on OpenEI is the Kilowatt hour (kWh), which is 3,600,000 Joules. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unit_of_energy It's possible types are Watt hours - 1000 Wh, Watt hour, Watthour Kilowatt hours - 1 kWh, Kilowatt hour, Kilowatthour Megawatt hours - 0.001 MWh, Megawatt hour, Megawatthour Gigawatt hours - 0.000001 GWh, Gigawatt hour, Gigawatthour Joules - 3600000 J, Joules, joules Pages using the property "PotentialUrbanUtilityScalePVGeneration"

131

It is well known that the West Texas banking community and the Area of Finance in the Rawls College of Business enjoy a long-standing and fruitful relationship. Undergraduate and graduate finance majors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is well known that the West Texas banking community and the Area of Finance in the Rawls College Texas Tech University are numerous among the thousands of community bankers throughout the region, is pleased to announce a new initiative called Banking on Texas Tech! This initiative is designed to provide

Westfall, Peter H.

132

Numerical Study of the Daytime Urban Effect and Its Interaction with the Sea Breeze  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under light gradient-wind conditions, the heat-island effect associated with large urban areas is characterized by a temperature rise after sunrise over the land (??L)and a temperature difference between the urban and rural areas (??) during the ...

Hiroshi Yoshik Ado

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Global Cooling: Effect of Urban Albedo on Global Temperature  

SciTech Connect

In many urban areas, pavements and roofs constitute over 60% of urban surfaces (roof 20-25%, pavements about 40%). The roof and the pavement albedo can be increased by about 0.25 and 0.10, respectively, resulting in a net albedo increase for urban areas of about 0.1. Many studies have demonstrated building cooling-energy savings in excess of 20% upon raising roof reflectivity from an existing 10-20% to about 60%. We estimate U.S. potential savings in excess of $1 billion (B) per year in net annual energy bills. Increasing albedo of urban surfaces can reduce the summertime urban temperature and improve the urban air quality. Increasing the urban albedo has the added benefit of reflecting more of the incoming global solar radiation and countering the effect of global warming. We estimate that increasing albedo of urban areas by 0.1 results in an increase of 3 x 10{sup -4} in Earth albedo. Using a simple global model, the change in air temperature in lowest 1.8 km of the atmosphere is estimated at 0.01K. Modelers predict a warming of about 3K in the next 60 years (0.05K/year). Change of 0.1 in urban albedo will result in 0.01K global cooling, a delay of {approx}0.2 years in global warming. This 0.2 years delay in global warming is equivalent to 10 Gt reduction in CO2 emissions.

Akbari, Hashem; Menon, Surabi; Rosenfeld, Arthur

2007-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

134

The Sourcebook on Sustainable Urban Transport | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sourcebook on Sustainable Urban Transport Sourcebook on Sustainable Urban Transport Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: The Sourcebook on Sustainable Urban Transport Agency/Company /Organization: GIZ Focus Area: Other Topics: Policy Impacts Resource Type: Reports, Journal Articles, & Tools Website: www.sutp.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=426&Itemid=189& The Sourcebook addresses the key areas of a sustainable transport policy framework for developing cities. It consists of more than twenty modules addressing the following themes: institutional and policy orientation; land use planning and demand management; transit, walking, and cycling; vehicles and fuels; environment and health; and social issues in transport. References Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=The_Sourcebook_on_Sustainable_Urban_Transport&oldid=515034"

135

Internships for Physics Majors  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Fermilab's IPM program offers ten-week summer internships to outstanding undergraduate physics majors. This program has been developed to familiarize students with opportunities at the frontiers of...

136

Urban Song Paths: place resounding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project Urban Song Paths took a traditional musical form, the Kaluli song path from Papua, New Guinea, and translated it for a contemporary urban situation. The Two Rivers Project explored a classic song path subject, the route of a ...

Viv Corringham

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Performance profiles of major energy producers 1995, January 1997  

SciTech Connect

This publication examines developments in the operations of the major U.S. energy-producing companies on a corporate level, by major line of business, by major function within each line of business, and by geographic area.

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Urban Network Systems - Technologies and Best Practices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the results of Phase II of a multiyear effort to identify noteworthy practices in managing urban network systems. The report profiles the practices (people, processes, and technology) in place at one host utility, The Illuminating Company (CEI), a FirstEnergy company serving the greater Cleveland area. In addition, this report highlights the similarities and differences in practices in place at The Illuminating Company and at two other utilities, Seattle City Light (SCL) and Con Edi...

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

139

Urban and Regional Air Quality  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

equipment equipment Urban and Regional Air Quality Research in this area is concerned with regional air quality issues such as: Controlling nitrogen oxides (NOx) and volatile organic compounds, to manage tropospheric ozone pollution. Hazardous air pollutants: using science to base standards on rigorously studied risks. Air quality and climate: how does climate influence air quality at a regional or local level? Current modeling practices often do not capture variations in pollutants such as ozone-they represent a limited sample of the diverse meteorology and human behavior that affect air pollution. Improved modeling of regional air quality will help understand variability, reveal patterns of behavior, and pollutant transport issues. Controlled experiments in lab and field can help validate improved models.

140

The urban coffee shop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis is an investigation of the role of the coffee shop in the urban environment throughout history. Coffee shops spread from the Arab world to Europe and then to the U.S. at the end of the seventeenth century. ...

Chadios, Konstantinos

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "major urban areas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Computationally unifying urban masterplanning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Architectural design, particularly in large scale masterplanning projects, has yet to fully undergo the computational revolution experienced by other design-led industries such as automotive and aerospace. These industries use computational frameworks ... Keywords: architectural analysis, architectural design, engineering analysis, unification, urban masterplanning

David Birch; Paul H. J. Kelly; Anthony J. Field; Alvise Simondetti

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development PROGRAMS OF HUD  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Housing and Urban Development Housing and Urban Development PROGRAMS OF HUD Major Mortgage, Grant, Assistance, and Regulatory Programs 2013 ii Table of Contents Table of Contents ................................................................................................................ ii Community Planning and Development ............................................................................ 1 Brownfields Economic Development Initiative (BEDI) ........................................................ 1 Capacity Building for Community Development and Affordable Housing .......................... 2 Community Development Block Grants (Disaster Recovery Assistance) ............................. 3 Community Development Block Grants (CDBG) (Entitlement) ........................................... 4

143

Emerging factors associated with the decline of a gray fox population and multi-scale land cover associations of mesopredators in the Chicago metropolitan area.  

SciTech Connect

Statewide surveys of furbearers in Illinois indicate gray (Urocyon cinereoargenteus) and red (Vulpes vulpes) foxes have experienced substantial declines in relative abundance, whereas other species such as raccoons (Procyon lotor) and coyotes (Canis latrans) have exhibited dramatic increases during the same time period. The cause of the declines of gray and red foxes has not been identified, and the current status of gray foxes remains uncertain. Therefore, I conducted a large-scale predator survey and tracked radiocollared gray foxes from 2004 to 2007 in order to determine the distribution, survival, cause-specific mortality sources and land cover associations of gray foxes in an urbanized region of northeastern Illinois, and examined the relationships between the occurrence of gray fox and the presence other species of mesopredators, specifically coyotes and raccoons. Although generalist mesopredators are common and can reach high densities in many urban areas their urban ecology is poorly understood due to their secretive nature and wariness of humans. Understanding how mesopredators utilize urbanized landscapes can be useful in the management and control of disease outbreaks, mitigation of nuisance wildlife issues, and gaining insight into how mesopredators shape wildlife communities in highly fragmented areas. I examined habitat associations of raccoons, opossums (Didelphis virginiana), domestic cats (Felis catus), coyotes, foxes (gray and red), and striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis) at multiple spatial scales in an urban environment. Gray fox occurrence was rare and widely dispersed, and survival estimates were similar to other studies. Gray fox occurrence was negatively associated with natural and semi-natural land cover types. Fox home range size increased with increasing urban development suggesting that foxes may be negatively influenced by urbanization. Gray fox occurrence was not associated with coyote or raccoon presence. However, spatial avoidance and mortality due to coyote predation was documented and disease was a major mortality source for foxes. The declining relative abundance of gray fox in Illinois is likely a result of a combination of factors. Assessment of habitat associations indicated that urban mesopredators, particularly coyotes and foxes, perceived the landscape as relatively homogeneous and that urban mesopredators interacted with the environment at scales larger than that accommodated by remnant habitat patches. Coyote and fox presence was found to be associated with a high degree of urban development at large and intermediate spatial scales. However, at a small spatial scale fox presence was associated with high density urban land cover whereas coyote presence was associated with urban development with increased forest cover. Urban habitats can offer a diversity of prey items and anthropogenic resources and natural land cover could offer coyotes daytime resting opportunities in urban areas where they may not be as tolerated as smaller foxes. Raccoons and opossums were found to utilize moderately developed landscapes with interspersed natural and semi-natural land covers at a large spatial scale, which may facilitate dispersal movements. At intermediate and small spatial scales, both species were found to utilize areas that were moderately developed and included forested land cover. These results indicated that raccoons and opossums used natural areas in proximity to anthropogenic resources. At a large spatial scale, skunk presence was associated with highly developed landscapes with interspersed natural and semi-natural land covers. This may indicate that skunks perceived the urban matrix as more homogeneous than raccoons or opossums. At an intermediate spatial scale skunks were associated with moderate levels of development and increased forest cover, which indicated that they might utilize natural land cover in proximity to human-dominated land cover. At the smallest spatial scale skunk presence was associated with forested land cover surrounded by a suburban matrix. Compared to raccoon

Willingham, Alison N.; /Ohio State U.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

The Network Analysis of Urban Streets: A Primal Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The network metaphor in the analysis of urban and territorial cases has a long tradition especially in transportation/land-use planning and economic geography. More recently, urban design has brought its contribution by means of the "space syntax" methodology. All these approaches, though under different terms like accessibility, proximity, integration,connectivity, cost or effort, focus on the idea that some places (or streets) are more important than others because they are more central. The study of centrality in complex systems,however, originated in other scientific areas, namely in structural sociology, well before its use in urban studies; moreover, as a structural property of the system, centrality has never been extensively investigated metrically in geographic networks as it has been topologically in a wide range of other relational networks like social, biological or technological. After two previous works on some structural properties of the dual and primal graph representations of urban street ne...

Porta, S; Latora, V; Porta, Sergio; Crucitti, Paolo; Latora, Vito

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Property:PotentialUrbanUtilityScalePVCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PotentialUrbanUtilityScalePVCapacity PotentialUrbanUtilityScalePVCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PotentialUrbanUtilityScalePVCapacity Property Type Quantity Description The nameplate capacity technical potential from utility-scale PV in urban areas of a particular place. Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS 0.001 GW,gigawatt,gigawatts,Gigawatt,Gigawatts,GigaWatt,GigaWatts,GIGAWATT,GIGAWATTS

146

Guidelines and Toolkits for Urban Transport Development in Medium Sized  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Guidelines and Toolkits for Urban Transport Development in Medium Sized Guidelines and Toolkits for Urban Transport Development in Medium Sized Cities in India Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Guidelines and Toolkits for Urban Transport Development in Medium Sized Cities in India Agency/Company /Organization: Asian Development Bank Focus Area: Governance - Planning - Decision-Making Structure Topics: Best Practices Complexity/Ease of Use: Not Available Website: sti-india-uttoolkit.adb.org/ Transport Toolkit Region(s): Asia Related Tools Promoting Clean Cars: Case Study of Stockholm and Sweden MOtor Vehicle Emission Simulator (MOVES) The World Bank - Transport ... further results Find Another Tool FIND TRANSPORTATION TOOLS This resource is designed to help decision makers and practitioners in states and municipal governments who are concerned with urban transport

147

Indonesia-GTZ Emissions Reductions in Urban Transport | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reductions in Urban Transport Reductions in Urban Transport Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Indonesia-GTZ Emissions Reductions in Urban Transport Name Indonesia-GTZ Emissions Reductions in Urban Transport Agency/Company /Organization GTZ Partner Ministry of Transportation Sector Energy Focus Area Transportation Topics Background analysis Website http://www.gtz.de/en/themen/um Program Start 2008 Program End 2012 Country Indonesia UN Region South-Eastern Asia References GTZ Transport & Climate Change Website[1] GTZ is working with Indonesia on this program with the following objective: "Indonesian cities increasingly plan and implement measures for a transport system that is energy efficient as well as environmentally and climate friendly." Background of the project is the absence of a national policy on

148

Evaluation of a Fast-Running Urban Dispersion Modeling System Using Joint Urban 2003 Field Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An urban dispersion modeling system was evaluated using the Joint Urban 2003 field data. The system consists of a fast-running urban airflow model (RUSTIC, for Realistic Urban Spread and Transport of Intrusive Contaminants) that is coupled with a ...

Eric A. Hendricks; Steve R. Diehl; Donald A. Burrows; Robert Keith

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Urban Network System Practices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the results of Phase I of a multi-year effort to identify noteworthy practices in managing urban network systems. The report profiles the practices (people, processes, and technology) in place at two host utilities: Seattle City Light (SCL), a small (375,000 customers) municipal utility, and Consolidated Edison (Con Edison), a large (3.2 million customers) investor-owned utility. The results illustrate the similarities and differences between the two utilities, describe the challeng...

2008-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

150

Urban Network Practices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the findings of an underground distribution practices immersion conducted by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) with National Grid. This immersion was conducted as part of a multiyear effort by EPRI to identify noteworthy practices in managing urban network systems. National Grid's U.S. operations, headquartered in Waltham, Massachusetts, serves customers through secondary network systems in multiple cities in New York and New England. This report profiles the practices (p...

2012-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

151

Informing public deliberation: value sensitive design of indicators for a large-scale urban simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate informing public deliberation regarding major land use and transportation decisions with the results from a sophisticated computer simulation of urban development. Our specific focus is on indicators that portray key results from the simulations. ...

Alan Borning; Batya Friedman; Janet Davis; Peyina Lin

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

DOUBLE MAJORS Imaging Science + ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DOUBLE MAJORS Imaging Science + ... Applied Mathematics Biomedical Sciences Computer Science Undergraduate Research Internships and Cooperative Education (Co-op) (optional) Study Abroad WHY IMAGING SCIENCE Science: BS, MS, PhD Color Science: MS, PhD BS + MS/PhD Combos HUMAN VISION BIO- MEDICAL ASTRO- PHYSICS

Zanibbi, Richard

153

A New Single-Layer Urban Canopy Model for Use in Mesoscale Atmospheric Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new single-layer urban canopy model for use in mesoscale atmospheric models is developed and validated. The urban canopy model represents a built-up area as a street canyon, two facing buildings, and a road. In this model, the two facing walls ...

Young-Hee Ryu; Jong-Jin Baik; Sang-Hyun Lee

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Analysis of the Urban Thermal Fingerprint of the City of Trento in the Alps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The temperature contrasts typically marking urban heat island (UHI) effects in the city of Trento, Italy, located in an Alpine valley and inhabited in its inner urban area by a population of about 56 000, are investigated. Time series of air ...

Lorenzo Giovannini; Dino Zardi; Massimiliano de Franceschi

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Gender and Asset Dimensions of Seasonal Water Insecurity in Urban Philippines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seasonal water insecurity is a social and climate-related problem of growing concern in many urban areas. From 2000 to 2050, the global urban population affected by seasonal water shortage is projected to increase from 312 million to 1.3 billion. ...

Lisa Reyes Mason

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

URBAN WATER SUPPLY IN INDIA: STATUS, REFORM OPTIONS AND POSSIBLE LESSONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of water produced that does not reach water board customers. Unaccounted for water results both from for water accounts for 25-40% of water produced by utilities in the main urban areas in India. WhileURBAN WATER SUPPLY IN INDIA: STATUS, REFORM OPTIONS AND POSSIBLE LESSONS David McKenzie Development

Kammen, Daniel M.

157

A Research on Strategies for Construction of MAS-Based Urban ITIS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In urban areas around the world, the number of trips made by vehicles has significantly increased in recent decades and resulted in frequent traffic congestions. ITIS offer optimal travel routes to road users with regard to the actual traffic state in ... Keywords: Multi-agent, ITIS, AHP, Urban traffic

Chaihou Zhao; Weiming Liu; Bei Wang

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Parameterization of the Urban Energy Budget with the Submesoscale Soil Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermal component of the Soil Model for Submesoscales, Urbanized Version (SM2-U), is described. SM2-U is an extension on a physical basis of the rural Interactions between Soil, Biosphere, and Atmosphere (ISBA) soil model to urban areas. It ...

Sylvain Dupont; Patrice G. Mestayer

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

A Study of the Urban Boundary Layer Using Different Urban Parameterizations and High-Resolution Urban Canopy Parameters with WRF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the last two decades, mesoscale models (MMs) with urban canopy parameterizations have been widely used to study urban boundary layer processes. Different studies show that such parameterizations are sensitive to the urban canopy parameters (...

Francisco Salamanca; Alberto Martilli; Mukul Tewari; Fei Chen

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

What can I do with this major? AREAS EMPLOYERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Prevention National Institutes of Health Military Legislative offices State government agencies Public health and Prevention National Center for Health Statistics State government agencies Public health departments and Human Services Office of the Surgeon General State government agencies Public health departments

Escher, Christine

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "major urban areas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Influences on farmland values in urban Texas counties and the State  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Farmland values have been a highly researched topic for the past several decades. Interest was spurred initially by increased variability between land values and farm income during the 1950's. Prior research sought to explain value changes through the defining the relationships between land values and an assortment of farm sector and nonfarm sector variables. The foci of the prior studies were mostly rural, homogeneous areas of major agricultural states. Although Texas is considered an important agricultural state with a diversity of related enterprises, its farmland values have generally escaped the scrutiny of review. In 1992, Texas farmland comprised nearly 10 percent of the U.S. aggregated farmland value. This study sought to further knowledge by evaluating previously identified significant land value influences for their importance in Texas. Based on a literature review, proxy variables were specified to represent the influences and were tested for their explanatory ability on Texas land value data. The scope of the study was selected to reflect years that were considered historically interesting for land values in the United States, 1969 through 1994. Urban counties were studied to ascertain if identified influences were important to designated agricultural-use land near metropolitan areas. The results indicate that land supply and demand factors were the most often important influences upon land values, General agricultural economic factors were next in prevalence, followed by farm and nonfarm income factors which were not usually significant to the urban farmland. The study also emphasized that land dedicated to agricultural use in the urban counties was chiefly valued for its abilities to serve investment and consumptive purposes, instead of productive participants need to ascertain local market conditions before making a decision to buy or sell land. Land owners must carefully consider land management choices, as resource issues will increasingly impact land value. Agricultural land owners should evaluate their land primarily in terms of its investment and consumptive potential, instead of its productive qualities.

Clampffer, Blake Robert

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Local Climate Zones for Urban Temperature Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of urban development on local thermal climate is widely documented in scientific literature. Observations of urban–rural air temperature differences—or urban heat islands (UHIs)—have been reported for cities and regions worldwide, often with ...

I. D. Stewart; T. R. Oke

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Adapting Urban Transport to Climate Change- Module 5f - Sustainable  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Adapting Urban Transport to Climate Change- Module 5f - Sustainable transport: a sourcebook for policy-makers in developing cities Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Adapting Urban Transport to Climate Change- Module 5f - Sustainable transport: a sourcebook for policy-makers in developing cities Agency/Company /Organization: gtz- Transport Policy Advisory Services, Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development Focus Area: Governance - Planning - Decision-Making Structure Topics: Analysis Tools Resource Type: Reports, Journal Articles, & Tools Website: www.giz.de/Themen/en/dokumente/gtz2010-en-adapting-urban-transport-to- This sourcebook addresses the key areas of a sustainable transport policy

164

3. Producing Areas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The OCS area provides surplus capacity to meet major seasonal swings in the lower 48 States gas requirements. The ... Jun-86 9,878 17,706 1,460 19,166 9,288 51.5

165

Sustainable Transport: from Bullock Carts to Bugatis: Reflections on Major  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sustainable Transport: from Bullock Carts to Bugatis: Reflections on Major Sustainable Transport: from Bullock Carts to Bugatis: Reflections on Major Transport Issues North and South Speaker(s): Lee Schipper Date: August 16, 2001 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Marcia Beck This talk reviews quantitative and qualitative trends in urban transportation and environment, focusing on developing countries. Reviewing recent efforts to look at transportation, the talk adopts a definition of "sustainable transportation" that includes economic and environmental sustainability as well as equity as key criteria. It is argued that governance sustainability is also important if policies and technologies are to reduce the main externalities from urban transport. An important identity is introduced to relate emissions to traffic, modal share, fuel

166

OPPORTUNITY COST OF LAND AND URBAN GROWTH.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study examines the impact of the opportunity cost of urban land on urban growth. Based on prices, costs and productivity data on agricultural commodities… (more)

Jiang, Bo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Waste Landscapes: [Re]valuing Urban Marginalia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Cities in North America are undergoing an organizational shift as urbanization increasingly expands outward, horizontally and diffusely. Left in the wake of decentralization and urban… (more)

Claus, Eric R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Tenements : dwellings for the urban poor. Comparative study illustrating 28 cases in developing countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tenements are significant systems that provide habitation to the poor in most of the urban areas of the developing countries. Yet, tenements are practically ignored if not prohibited by the public sector and consequently ...

Aliman, Isam Mohammad

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

The folding Roboscooter : structural analysis for an electric scooter used in urban conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Roboscooter is an electric, folding scooter designed for use in dense urban areas where congestion and pollution is a problem. Already heavily used in most European cities, scooters provide cheaper, faster transportation ...

Petron, Arthur J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Using geographic information systems to support student learning through urban ecology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes our urban street tree curriculum project in which we engage students in an ecological and economic evaluation of trees in highly populated areas through the use of Geographic Information Systems and modeling technologies. In particular, ...

Mike Barnett; Meredith Houle

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Form in the [middle]-ground : urban/suburban sprawl in Georgia & Tennessee  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the next quarter century the U.S. population will expand by 25 percent, an unprecedented steep and rapid increase that has already begun. The urban and suburban land area has been expanding to create a sprawling ...

Prevendar, Nathaniel J. (Nathaniel Joseph)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Contrasts between Urban and Rural Climate in CCSM4 CMIP5 Climate Change Scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new parameterization of urban areas in the Community Climate System Model version 4 (CCSM4) allows for simulation of temperature in cities where most of the global population lives. CCSM4 Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5) ...

Keith Oleson

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Rethinking walled residential compound in peripheral urban China : a guideline for boundary and size design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the last two decades, with the high speed urbanization, walled residential compound as the typical housing development is being constructed on a large scale in peripheral areas of Chinese cities. Its self-enclosing ...

Sun, Na

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Comparisons of Transport and Dispersion Model Predictions of the Joint Urban 2003 Field Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For a hazardous material release in a city or densely populated area, effective mitigation requires an understanding of the transport and dispersion of these hazards in the complex urban environment. Improved characterization and understanding of ...

Steve Warner; Nathan Platt; Jeffry T. Urban; James F. Heagy

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Urban-Effect Correction to Improve Accuracy of Spatially Interpolated Temperature Estimates in Korea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gridded temperature data are frequently used to run ecological models at regional scales and are routinely generated by spatially interpolating point observations at synoptic weather stations. If synoptic stations are located in urbanized areas, ...

Jaeyeon Choi; Uran Chung; Jin I. Yun

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Urban-scale impacts on the global-scale composition and climate effects of anthropogenic aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A reduced form meta model has been produced to simulate the effects of physical, chemical, and meteorological processing of highly reactive trace species in hypothetical urban areas, which is capable of efficiently simulating ...

Cohen, Jason Blake

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Diffusion from Low-Level Urban Sources: Reexamination Using Recently Available Experimental Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experimental meteorological tracer data recently collected or declassified concerning dispersion from low-level sources in urban areas are examined in terms of the findings of the St. Louis Dispersion Study. The latter still provides a standard ...

James L. McElroy

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Indications of the Urban Heat Island in Athens, Greece  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The analysis of air temperature data for a period of 22 years in the meteorological network stations in the greater Athens area shows clearly the effect of the urban heat island due to the city. This effect appears with different intensity ...

B. D. Katsoulis; G. A. Theoharatos

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Major Program Offices  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

101 101 Major Program Offices Doing Business with... Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of Environmental Management National Nuclear Security Administration Office of Science Gary G. Lyttek, Business Source Manager FY2010 DOE Procurement Base: $22.9B $1,556 $5,701 $9,523 $3,793 $2,304 $'s - Millions EE EM NNSA SC Other 2 Presentation for the DOE Small Business Conference EERE Funding Opportunity Announcements (FOA) May 2011 3 Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy 4 * The mission and vision of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) is to strengthen America's energy security, environmental quality and economic vitality in public-private partnerships that: * Enhance energy efficiency and productivity

180

OZONE PRODUCTION IN URBAN PLUMES.  

SciTech Connect

Ozone levels observed during a field campaign in Houston were significantly higher than that observed in Phoenix or Philadelphia. An examination of the slope of O{sub x} versus NO{sub z} in the urban plumes shows that NO{sub x} is used 2 to 3 times more efficiently in Houston as compared with Phoenix and Philadelphia. Representative values of OPEx are 7-12, 3, and 4, in Houston, Phoenix, and Philadelphia. Aircraft observations have been used to calculate P(O{sub 3})/P(NO{sub z}). Values in Houston are significantly higher than in Phoenix and Philadelphia. We show that P(O{sub 3})/P(NO{sub z}) is proportional to a VOC/NO{sub 2}-OH reactivity ratio. High values of P(O{sub 3})/P(NO{sub z}) in Houston are due to emissions of reactive olefins from the ship channel region. It is significant that high values of P(O{sub 3})/P(NO{sub z}) occur at NO{sub x} levels up to several 10's of ppb. Not only is the chemistry efficient but it will be long lasting. The occurrence of high NO{sub x} and high OPEx is fostered by the co-location of VOC and NO{sub x} sources in the Houston industrial areas.

KLEINMAN,L.

2001-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "major urban areas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Major Energy Producers  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

206(92) 206(92) Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1992 January 1994 Elk. I nergy Information dministration This publication and other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications may be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office. All telephone orders should be directed to: U.S. Government Printing Office Superintendent of Documents McPherson Square Bookstore U.S. Government Printing Office 1510 H Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20402 Washington, DC 20005 (202)783-3238 (202)653-2050 FAX (202)512-2233 FAX (202)376-5055 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., eastern time, M-F 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., eastern time, M-F All mail orders should be directed to: U.S. Government Printing Office P.O. Box 371954 Pittsburgh, PA 15250-7954 Complimentary subscriptions and single issues are available to certain groups of subscribers, such as

182

Property:PotentialUrbanUtilityScalePVArea | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PotentialUrbanUtilityScalePVArea PotentialUrbanUtilityScalePVArea Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PotentialUrbanUtilityScalePVArea Property Type Quantity Description The area of potential utility-scale PV in urban areas in a place. Use this type to express a quantity of two-dimensional space. The default unit is the square meter (m²). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Area Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: Square Meters - 1 m²,m2,m^2,square meter,square meters,Square Meter,Square Meters,Sq. Meters,SQUARE METERS Square Kilometers - 0.000001 km²,km2,km^2,square kilometer,square kilometers,square km,square Kilometers,SQUARE KILOMETERS Square Miles - 0.000000386 mi²,mi2,mi^2,mile²,square mile,square miles,square mi,Square Miles,SQUARE MILES Square Feet - 10.7639 ft²,ft2,ft^2,square feet,square

183

Environmental security planning : an application to the Longwood Medical Area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The thesis is a study of the security problems due to street crime in the Longwood Medical Area of Boston. The first part of the thesis defines the theories and practices of environmental security .planning, the urban ...

Garmaise, Miriam Gail

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Ethanol Usage in Urban Public Transportation - Presentation of Results |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ethanol Usage in Urban Public Transportation - Presentation of Results Ethanol Usage in Urban Public Transportation - Presentation of Results Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Ethanol Usage in Urban Public Transportation - Presentation of Results Agency/Company /Organization: BioEthanol for Sustainable Transport Focus Area: Fuels & Efficiency Topics: Best Practices Website: cenbio.iee.usp.br/download/publicacoes/SAE_BEST_2010.pdf This paper presents the BioEthanol for Sustainable Transport (BEST) project in Brazil, its partners, and the results from the demonstration tests performed in field, as well as the proposals of public policies that were elaborated and are being implemented. The BEST project was implemented in Sao Paulo as well as eight other cities located in Europe and Asia. How to Use This Tool

185

Characterization of urban solid waste in Chihuahua, Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The characterization of urban solid waste generation is fundamental for adequate decision making in the management strategy of urban solid waste in a city. The objective of this study is to characterize the waste generated in the households of Chihuahua city, and to compare the results obtained in areas of the city with three different socioeconomic levels. In order to identify the different socioeconomic trends in waste generation and characterization, 560 samples of solid waste were collected during 1 week from 80 households in Chihuahua and were hand sorted and classified into 15 weighted fractions. The average waste generation in Chihuahua calculated in this study was 0.676 kg per capita per day in April 2006. The main fractions were: organic (48%), paper (16%) and plastic (12%). Results show an increased waste generation associated with the socioeconomic level. The characterization in amount and composition of urban waste is the first step needed for the successful implementation of an integral waste management system.

Gomez, Guadalupe [Departament d'Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, 43007 Tarragona (Spain); Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Autonoma de Chihuahua, 31310 Chihuahua (Mexico); Meneses, Montserrat [Departament d'Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, 43007 Tarragona (Spain); Ballinas, Lourdes [Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Autonoma de Chihuahua, 31310 Chihuahua (Mexico); Castells, Francesc [Departament d'Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, 43007 Tarragona (Spain)], E-mail: francesc.castells@urv.cat

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

186

CANCELLED: From Energy Conscious Buildings to Climate-Sensitive Urban  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CANCELLED: From Energy Conscious Buildings to Climate-Sensitive Urban CANCELLED: From Energy Conscious Buildings to Climate-Sensitive Urban Design Speaker(s): Edna Shaviv Date: March 14, 2006 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 The consideration of solar rights in urban design is essential in order to allow passive heating of buildings in winter and to improve the comfort conditions of people in the street, sidewalks and open spaces. A new energy code for residential buildings in Israel defines a required level of solar insolation of the buildings according to different city areas, orientations and climatic zones. These requirements were used to define objective criteria for solar rights regulations. Following, we define a method and a simple design tool that allows achieving the required solar insolation. Three methods were suggested; two are based on performance approach while

187

Exploring the relationships between vegetation measurements and temperature in residential areas by integrating LIDAR and remotely sensed imagery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Population growth and urban sprawl have contributed to the formation of significant urban heat island phenomena in Houston, Texas, the fourth largest city in the United States. The population growth in Houston was 25.8% between 1990 and 2000 nearly double the national average. The demand for information concerning the effects of urban and suburban development is growing. Houston is currently the only major US city lacking any kind of comprehensive city zoning ordinances. The Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) has been used as a surrogate variable to estimate land surface temperatures at higher spatial resolutions, given the fact that a high-resolution remotely sensed NDVI can be created almost effortlessly and remotely sensed thermal data at higher resolutions is much more difficult to obtain. This has allowed researchers to study urban heat island dynamics at a micro-scale. However, this study suggests that a vegetation index alone might not be the best surrogate variable for providing information regarding the independent effects and level of contribution that tree canopy, grass, and low-lying plants have on surface temperatures in residential neighborhoods. This research combines LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) feature height data and high-resolution infrared aerial photos to measure the characteristics of the micro-structure of residential areas (residentialstructure), derives various descriptive vegetation measurement statistics, and correlates the spatial distribution of surface temperature to the type and amount of vegetation cover in residential areas. Regression analysis is used to quantify the independent influence that different residential-structures have on surface temperature. In regard to implementing changes at a neighborhood level, the descriptive statistics derived for residential-structure at a micro-scale may provide useful information to decision-makers and may reveal a guide for future developers concerned with mitigating the negative effects of urban heat island phenomena.

Clemonds, Matthew A

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Urban Bias in Area-averaged Surface Air Temperature Trends  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A data set derived from the United States Historical Climate Network has been compared to two global land-based temperature data sets that have been commonly cited in connection with the detection of the greenhouse effect and in other studies of ...

Thomas R. Karl; Philip D. Jones

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Applications of sustainable technology to retrofits in urban areas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Losses from old buildings comprise a significant percentage of the total residential energy consumption in the United States. Retrofitting buildings for conservation can greatly decrease the present energy demand ...

Taylor, Paki (Paki A.), 1974-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Comparisons of thermal effects of materials on urban area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1981: 1981 ASHRAE Handbook - Fundamentals. American Societyon the ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals (ASHRAE 1993), ?T h n

Kwon, Chunsong

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Deploying Lanes for High Occupancy Vehicles in Urban Areas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

inflow can be reduced by metering. We summarize the above ason-ramps are not queued (or metering is applied in the H-affects freeway mobility. Metering was used, as explained in

Cassidy, Michael J.; Daganzo, Carlos F.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

A new sanitation system for slums in urban dense areas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Around 2.6 billion people in the world do not have access to proper sanitation solutions, leading to many social, economical and health related problems. This… (more)

Melgarejo Fuentes, M.A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Dispersal and fallout simulations for urban consequences management (u)  

SciTech Connect

Hazardous chemical, biological, or radioactive releases from leaks, spills, fires, or blasts, may occur (intentionally or accidentally) in urban environments during warfare or as part of terrorist attacks on military bases or other facilities. The associated contaminant dispersion is complex and semi-chaotic. Urban predictive simulation capabilities can have direct impact in many threat-reduction areas of interest, including, urban sensor placement and threat analysis, contaminant transport (CT) effects on surrounding civilian population (dosages, evacuation, shelter-in-place), education and training of rescue teams and services. Detailed simulations for the various processes involved are in principle possible, but generally not fast. Predicting urban airflow accompanied by CT presents extremely challenging requirements. Crucial technical issues include, simulating turbulent fluid and particulate transport, initial and boundary condition modeling incorporating a consistent stratified urban boundary layer with realistic wind fluctuations, and post-processing of the simulation results for practical consequences management. Relevant fluid dynamic processes to be simulated include, detailed energetic and contaminant sources, complex building vortex shedding and flows in recirculation zones, and modeling of particle distributions, including particulate fallout, as well as deposition, re-suspension and evaporation. Other issues include, modeling building damage effects due to eventual blasts, addressing appropriate regional and atmospheric data reduction.

Grinstein, Fernando F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wachtor, Adam J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nelson, Matt [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brown, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bos, Randy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Patnik, Gopal [US NAVAL RESEARCH LAB.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Virtual urban traffic network simulator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this project, I designed and implemented a virtual urban traffic network simulator. The simulator serves as a testbed for human-subject experiments to determine driver behavior in road networks and also as a platform ...

Uh, Jason (Jason J.)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Claiming the urban industrial landscape  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents a propositIOn about a prevalent urban condition, that of marginal, left over, or disused space. It contends that these spaces, generally viewed as negative attributes by their communities have inherent ...

Linton, Cynthia Mayhew

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Urban household energy use in Thailand  

SciTech Connect

Changes in household fuel and electricity use that accompany urbanization in Third World countries bear large economic and environmental costs. The processes driving the fuel transition, and the policy mechanisms by which it can be influenced, need to be better understood for the sake of forecasting and planning, especially in the case of electricity demand. This study examines patterns of household fuel use and electrical appliance utilization in Bangkok, Chieng Mai and Ayutthaya, Thailand, based on the results of a household energy survey. Survey data are statistically analyzed using a variety of multiple regression techniques to evaluate the relative influence of various household and fuel characteristics on fuel and appliance choice. Results suggest that changes to the value of women's time in urban households, as women become increasingly active in the labor force, have a major influence on patterns of household energy use. The use of the home for small-scale commercial activities, particularly food preparation, also has a significant influence on fuel choice. In general, household income does not prove to be an important factor in fuel and appliance selection in these cities, although income is closely related to total electricity use. The electricity use of individual household appliances is also analyzed using statistical techniques as well as limited direct metering. The technology of appliance production in Thailand is evaluated through interviews with manufacturers and comparisons of product performance. These data are used to develop policy recommendations for improving the efficiency of electrical appliances in Thailand by relying principally on the dynamism of the consumer goods market, rather than direct regulation. The annual electricity savings from the recommended program for fostering rapid adoption of efficient technologies are estimated to reach 1800 GWh by the year 2005 for urban households alone.

Tyler, S.R.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Performance profiles of major energy producers 1996  

SciTech Connect

This publication examines developments in the operations of the major US e energy-producing companies on a corporate level, by major line of business, by major function within each line of business, and by geographic area. In 1996, 24 companies filed Form EIA-28. The analysis and data presented in this report represents the operations of the Financial Reporting System companies in the context of their worldwide operations and in the context of the major energy markets which they serve. Both energy and nonenergy developments of these companies are analyzed. Although the focus is on developments in 1996, important trends prior to that time are also featured. Sections address energy markets in 1996; key financial developments; oil and gas exploration, development, and production; downstream petroleum in 1996; coal and alternative energy; and foreign direct investment in US energy. 30 figs., 104 tabs.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Urban cycles and mobility patterns: Exploring and predicting trends in a bicycle-based public transport system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper provides an analysis of human mobility data in an urban area using the amount of available bikes in the stations of the community bicycle program Bicing in Barcelona. Based on data sampled from the operator's website, it is possible to detect ... Keywords: Community bicycle program, Mobility pattern, Urban behavior

Andreas Kaltenbrunner; Rodrigo Meza; Jens Grivolla; Joan Codina; Rafael Banchs

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Urban scale integrated assessment for London: Which emission reduction strategies are more effective in attaining prescribed PM10 air quality standards by 2005?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tightening of air quality standards for populated urban areas has led to increasing attention to assessment of air quality management areas (AQMAs) where exceedance occurs, and development of control strategies to eliminate such exceedance. Software ... Keywords: Air quality management, Dispersion modelling, Emission reduction strategies, Integrated assessment, Particulate matter, Urban air pollution

A. Mediavilla-Sahagún; H. M. ApSimon

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

An Acid Rain Study in the Washington, D.C. Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A field study in the Washington, D.C. area explored the impact of urban emissions and mesoscale meteorology on precipitation chemistry. The study was a follow-up to an earlier, considerably more industrialized, study in the Philadelphia area; ...

A. A. N. Patrinos; M. J. Leach; R. M. Brown; R. L. Tanner; F. S. Binkowski

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "major urban areas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Transportation of radionuclides in urban environs: draft environmental assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report assesses the environmental consequences of the transportation of radioactive materials in densely populated urban areas, including estimates of the radiological, nonradiological, and social impacts arising from this process. The chapters of the report and the appendices which follow detail the methodology and results for each of four causative event categories: incident free transport, vehicular accidents, human errors or deviations from accepted quality assurance practices, and sabotage or malevolent acts. The numerical results are expressed in terms of the expected radiological and economic impacts from each. Following these discussions, alternatives to the current transport practice are considered. Then, the detailed analysis is extended from a limited area of New York city to other urban areas. The appendices contain the data bases and specific models used to evaluate these impacts, as well as discussions of chemical toxicity and the social impacts of radioactive material transport in urban areas. The latter are evaluated for each causative event category in terms of psychological, sociological, political, legal, and organizational impacts. The report is followed by an extensive bibliography covering the many fields of study which were required in performing the analysis.

Finley, N.C.; Aldrich, D.C.; Daniel, S.L.; Ericson, D.M.; Henning-Sachs, C.; Kaestner, P.C.; Ortiz, N.R.; Sheldon, D.D.; Taylor, J.M.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Essays on rural-urban migration in hinterland China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Marriage Rates in Rural China . . . . . . . . . . .Urban Migration in Hinterland China . . . . . . . . . .and Rural-Urban Migration in Hinterland China . . . . . 1.

Meng, Lei

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Major Renovations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Major Renovations Major Renovations Major Renovations October 16, 2013 - 4:50pm Addthis Project Phases for Major Renovations The major renovation process still follows the phases of project design and construction, from planning to operations and maintenance. More information on how to integrate renewable energy into the phases of design is discussed in the main portion of this Guide. Major renovations are more constricted in design choices than new construction, but can still offer a wide range of opportunities for integrating renewable energy technologies into the renovation process. During a major Federal building renovation, more design factors may be pre-determined, such as building site and orientation, but a whole building design approach can still offer the most economic and efficient options.

204

Urban regeneration : enabled by mobility centric architecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The primary goal of this thesis is to develop a new urban architectural prototype to reinvigorate the British New Town. New models of adaptable, sustainable, architecture and urban design are explored with the ultimate ...

Higgins, Wayne Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

A transformation of Shanghai's urban fabric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Due to rapid development of the city, Shanghai has become characterized by drastic juxtapositions of building typologies and urban forms. Entire sections of the urban center are being replaced with large scale developments ...

Caine, Christine (Christine M.)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Case Studies in Urban Energy Planning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

present a few case studies on urban energy planning for Chinese cities, with the focus on district heating systems. Questions and challenges in urban energy research will be raised...

207

National Urban Database and Access Portal Tool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on the need for advanced treatments of high-resolution urban morphological features (e.g., buildings and trees) in meteorological, dispersion, air quality, and human-exposure modeling systems for future urban applications, a new project was ...

Jason Ching; Michael Brown; Timothy McPherson; Steven Burian; Fei Chen; Ron Cionco; Adel Hanna; Torrin Hultgren; David Sailor; Haider Taha; David Williams

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Director Position Center for Urban Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Director Position Center for Urban Transportation The Center for Urban Transportation Research for state policymakers, transportation agencies, transportation professionals and the public. CUTR conducts of Transportation's Federal Transit Administration and Federal Highway Administration, the Florida Department

Arslan, Hüseyin

209

in development and the urban environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

woodland The Queen's Inclosure, Havant, Hants Peri-urban Waterhayes, Newcastle-under-Lyme, Staffs Rural costs. 15 PERI-URBAN Waterhayes, Newcastle-under-Lyme RURALURBAN Environmental advantages Improved

210

BIDDING ON URBANITY WITH BUSINESS IMPROVEMENT DISTRICTS: .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??BIDDING ON URBANITY WITH BUSINESS IMPROVEMENT DISTRICTS: RE-MAKING URBAN PLACES IN WASHINGTON, DC Susanna Francesca Schaller, Ph.D. Cornell University 2007 ?The livable city,? one that… (more)

Schaller, Susanna

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

The urban heat island Mitigation Impact Screening Tool (MIST)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A web-based software tool has been developed to assist urban planners and air quality management officials in assessing the potential of urban heat island mitigation strategies to affect the urban climate, air quality, and energy consumption within their ... Keywords: Air quality, Albedo, Atmospheric modeling, Urban climate, Urban forestry, Urban heat islands

David J. Sailor; Nikolaas Dietsch

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Globalization and the Texas metropolises: competition and complementarity in the Texas Urban Triangle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation examines relationships between cities, and more specifically the largest Texas cities, and the global economy. Data on headquarters location and corporation sales over a 20-year period (1984-2004) supported the hypothesis that globalization is not homogeneous, regular or unidirectional, but actually showed contrasted phases. Texas cities have been raising in global rankings, due to corporate relocations and, to lesser extent, the growth of local activities. By year 2004, Dallas and Houston ranked among the top-20 headquarters cities measured by corporation sales The Texas Urban Triangle had one of the major global concentrations of oil- and computer-related corporation headquarters; conversely, key sectors like banking, insurance and automotive were not significant. Standardized employment data in major U.S. metropolitan areas was examined through principal components analyses. Overall, larger places showed higher degrees of diversity, and no trend toward economic convergence. The TUT also presented a degree of intra-regional diversity comparable to other urban regions. Findings confirmed the relevance of oil- and information-related activities, along with construction, and weakness of activities linked to finance and corporate management. Traffic and air linkages in Texas cities were contrasted to other American gateways. Dallas and Houston have been major nodes in global air transportation, with very important roles as transit hubs for domestic (the former) and short international (the latter) flights. For long-haul international traffic both cities were second-level American gateways, with Houston mobilizing better connected to Western Europe and Mesoamerica, and Dallas to South America and East Asia. Dallas central location strengthened its role in the domestic market, as the center of one of the five major subsystems in the country and a top gateway in enplanements, number of linkages and connectivity measures. The Texas air travel network hierarchical organization was relatively unbalanced, with two strong nodes at the top, three little-relevant middle nodes, and several very poorly interconnected gateways at the bottom. Finally, the high supply of regional flights between primary destinations, namely Dallas and Houston, resulted in significant effects of time-space convergence. Such effects were only found between highly-connected major gateways, and completely bypassed other places, independently of their size and relative location.

Gavinha, Jose Antonio dos Reis

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

An Observational and Modeling Study of Characteristics of Urban Heat Island and Boundary Layer Structures in Beijing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the characteristics of urban heat island (UHI) and boundary layer structures in the Beijing area, China, are analyzed using conventional and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) observations. The Weather Research ...

Shiguang Miao; Fei Chen; Margaret A. LeMone; Mukul Tewari; Qingchun Li; Yingchun Wang

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Hydroclimatic Response of Watersheds to Urban Intensity: An Observational and Modeling-Based Analysis for the White River Basin, Indiana  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Impervious surface area (ISA) has different surface characteristics from the natural land cover and has great influence on watershed hydrology. To assess the urbanization effects on streamflow regimes, the authors analyzed the U.S. Geological ...

Guoxiang Yang; Laura C. Bowling; Keith A. Cherkauer; Bryan C. Pijanowski; Dev Niyogi

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Urban emissions of CO2 from Davos, Switzerland: the first real-time monitoring system using an atmospheric inversion technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Anthropogenic emissions from urban areas represent 70% of the fossil fuel carbon emitted globally according to carbon emission inventories. We present here the first operational system able to monitor in near real-time daily emission estimates, ...

Thomas Lauvaux; Natasha L. Miles; Scott J. Richardson; Aijun Deng; Dave Stauffer; Kenneth J. Davis; Gloria Jacobson; Chris Rella; Gian-Paul Calonder; Philip L. DeCola

216

Using DER in Transmission-Constrained Urban Load Pockets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Urban load centers are characterized by their dense population, environmental constraints, as well as transmission-constrained electricity delivery. They also have potentially high infrastructure investment costs for distribution system investments to meet peak load growth. This report looks at seven areas in the United States that have been identified as transmission-constrained load pockets, focusing on opportunities for using distributed energy resources (DER).

2007-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

217

The development of Urban Crime Simulator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on routine activities theory, deviant places theory, and neighborhood life cycle concepts, this paper describes the development of an Urban Crime Simulator (UCS) that was developed to allow estimation for changes in property crime rates in urban ... Keywords: crime, deviant places theory, neighborhood life cycle, routine activities theory, simulation, urban growth

Jay Lee; Chaoqing Yu

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Variation of Solar Attenuation with Height in CAPLTER The atmosphere over rural and urbanized areas differs in many ways in relation to terrain influences and human-induced variations (e.g., heat, humidity, wind, and pollution). The sun's energy penetrate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on amounts of solar energy that are accumulated at any given time. These controls range from extraterrestrial of variability cascade into plant productivity, solar energy technology, and urban climate processes, in generalVariation of Solar Attenuation with Height in CAPLTER Abstract The atmosphere over rural

Hall, Sharon J.

219

Sources and Fates of Dissolved Organic Carbon in Rural and Urban Watersheds in Brazos County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Bryan/College Station (B/CS) region has been reported to have elevated concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in surface water. Increased DOC concentrations are worrisome as DOC has been shown to be an energy source for the recovery and regrowth of E. coli and many watersheds are impaired by high bacteria levels. To examine the sources and fates of DOC in rural and urban regions to better understand DOC movement though the environment, seven watersheds were studied. To investigate source, streams were analyzed using diffuse reflectance near infrared spectroscopy (DR-NIR) and carbon isotopes. Fate of DOC was determined through monthly streams samples, gathered between March 2011 and February 2012, which were incubated for biodegradable DOC (BDOC). Soil in the region was sampled based on land use categories. Soil was analyzed for DOC and BDOC as well as DOC adsorption, the other major fate of DOC. Above ground vegetation was sampled in conjunction with soil and analyzed for BDOC. Data indicated that fecal matter from cliff swallows provided considerable organic material to streams in the B/CS region as shown through DR-NIR. Carbon isotope values in streams ranged from -23.5 +/- 0.7% to -26.8 +/- 0.5%. Stream spectra may be able to predict carbon isotope values in streams (Adj. R2 = 0.88). Mean annual stream DOC concentrations ranged from 11 +/- 3 mg/L to 31 +/- 12 mg/L, which represents a significant decrease in DOC between 2007 and 2011. Concurrent increases in pH and conductivity were also recorded. The decrease in DOC and the increases in pH and conductivity may be due to impacts of high sodium irrigation tap water. Biodegradable DOC was low in streams, which is likely due to DOC being present in streams in refractory forms that are resistant to microbial breakdown. Soil chemistry, including soil adsorption, was greatly influenced by sodium. The elevated adsorption coefficients and release values seen in highly developed and urban open areas can be attributed to frequent exposure to high sodium irrigation water. The results indicate that sodium is a major driver of DOC in the system. Sound management decisions concerning irrigation water chemistry and urban development might eventually emerge to protect water quality as a result of this research.

Cioce, Danielle

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

SUSTAINABLE ENERGY AND URBAN FORM IN CHINA: THE RELEVANCE OF COMMUNITY ENERGY MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. However, coal gas and liquefied petroleum gases (LPGs) have made recent inroads in supplying energy for cooking uses in some urban areas, particularly in large cities and in those areas close to producers. Gas stoves have more than double the efficiency of coal #12;8 stoves. The degree of gas distribution systems

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "major urban areas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Water Conservation with Urban Landscape Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water shortages are a common problem in much of the southwest. Increasing urbanization and increasing population places greater demands on dwindling water supplies. Over half of the water used in urban areas of the southwest is used in the irrigation of landscapes. To help cope with increased urban water demands and low water supplies, research was conducted from March 1981 to July 1983 at The Texas Agricultural Experiment Station at Dallas to gain information relative to consumptive water use by native and non-native landscape plants. Twenty weighing lysimeters were constructed and installed and plants established in the lysimeters and adjacent areas. The lysimeters were made from 0.6 X 0.9 m undisturbed cores of Austin silty clay soil. Plants used in the lysimeter study were buffalograss, St. Augustine grass, cenizo, boxwood and Texas barberry. All plants are native to Texas except boxwood and St. Augustine grass. Four lysimeters were planted to each plant type. This allowed two moisture levels and two replications of each plant type. There was no difference in water use by St. Augustine grass and buffalo grass during the year of establishment. Daily water use ranged from 0.49 to 0.08 cm per day but was generally 50% class A pan evaporation. St. Augustine grass used 0.03 cm/day more water than buffalo grass during 1982. -Irrigation treatments used in 1982 did not influence water use by either grass type but buffalo grass retained higher quality under dry treatment (irrigated at 0.40 bar moisture tension) than St. Augustine grass. Water use from May to July 1983 was highest (of all treatments) by St. Augustine grass when irrigated at 0.25 bar soil moisture tension at 76 cm depth and lowest (of all treatments) by buffalograss when irrigated at 0.75 bar soil moisture tension at 76 cm depth. Application of 50% class A pan evaporation each week appears to be an acceptable guideline for irrigation of either turfgrass but research should be conducted over a longer time period to obtain more specific guidelines for each grass species. Water use by shrubs in lysimeters was variable and not influenced by plant type during the period of establishment (Fall 1981). During 1982 water use was influenced more by plant size than by specie or water level. Cenizo had much faster growth rate than the other shrubs in the study. Water use by container grown plants indicated that cenizo had higher water use efficiency than boxwood or Indian Hawthorn. Water use was determined for several native shrubs and of the ones compared, Texas barberry appeared to have the most promise for use in water conserving landscapes.

Hip, B. W.; Giordano, C.; Simpson, B.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Urban leakage of liquefied petroleum gas and its impact on Mexico City air quality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alkane hydrocarbons (propane, isobutane, and n-butane) from liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) are present in major quantities throughout Mexico City air because of leakage of the unburned gas from numerous urban sources. These hydrocarbons, together with olefinic minor LPG components, furnish substantial amounts of hydroxyl radical reactivity, a major precursor to formation of the ozone component of urban smog. The combined processes of unburned leakage and incomplete combustion of LPG play significant role in causing the excessive ozone characteristic of Mexico City. Reductions in ozone levels should be possible through changes in LPG composition and lowered rates of leakage. 23 refs., 3 tabs.

Blake, D.R.; Rowland, F.S. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

1995-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

223

Decontamination Technologies, Task 3, Urban Remediation and Response Project  

SciTech Connect

In the aftermath of a Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD, also known as a dirty bomb) it will be necessary to remediate the site including building exteriors and interiors, equipment, pavement, vehicles, personal items etc. Remediation will remove or reduce radioactive contamination from the area using a combination of removing and disposing of many assets (including possible demolition of buildings), decontaminating and returning to service other assets, and fixing in place or leaving in place contamination that is deemed 'acceptable'. The later will require setting acceptable dose standards, which will require negotiation with all involved parties and a balance of risk and cost to benefit. To accomplish the first two, disposal or decontamination, a combination of technologies will be deployed that can be loosely classified as: Decontamination; Equipment removal and size reduction; and Demolition. This report will deal only with the decontamination technologies that will be used to return assets to service or to reduce waste disposal. It will not discuss demolition, size reduction or removal technologies or equipment (e.g., backhoe mounted rams, rock splitter, paving breakers and chipping hammers, etc.). As defined by the DOE (1994), decontamination is removal of radiological contamination from the surfaces of facilities and equipment. Expertise in this field comes primarily from the operation and decommissioning of DOE and commercial nuclear facilities as well as a small amount of ongoing research and development closely related to RDD decontamination. Information related to decontamination of fields, buildings, and public spaces resulting from the Goiania and Chernobyl incidents were also reviewed and provide some meaningful insight into decontamination at major urban areas. In order to proceed with decontamination, the item being processed needs to have an intrinsic value that exceeds the cost of the cleaning and justifies the exposure of any workers during the decontamination process(es). In the case of an entire building, the value may be obvious; it's costly to replace the structure. For a smaller item such as a vehicle or painting, the cost versus benefit of decontamination needs to be evaluated. This will be determined on a case by case basis and again is beyond the scope of this report, although some thoughts on decontamination of unique, personal and high value items are given. But, this is clearly an area that starting discussions and negotiations early on will greatly benefit both the economics and timeliness of the clean up. In addition, high value assets might benefit from pre-event protection such as protective coatings or HEPA filtered rooms to prevent contaminated outside air from entering the room (e.g., an art museum).

Heiser,J.; Sullivan, T.

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

224

Energy in the urban environment: the role of energy use and energy efficiency in buildings  

SciTech Connect

A century ago, the world had many cities of which the greatest were magnificent centers of culture and commerce. However, even in the most industrialized countries at the time, only a tiny fraction of the people lived in these cities. Most people lived in rural areas, in small towns, in villages, and on farms. Visits to a great city were, for most of the population, uncommon events often of great fascination. The world has changed dramatically in the intervening years. Now most of the industrial world lives in urban areas in close proximity to large cities. Industry is often located in these vast urban areas. As the urbanized zones grow in extent, they begin to approach one another, as on the East Coast of the United States. The phenomenon of urbanization has moved to developing countries as well. There has been a flood of migrants who have left impoverished rural areas to seek economic opportunities in urban areas throughout the developing world. This movement from the countryside to cities has changed the entire landscape and economies of developing nations. Importantly, the growth of cities places very great demands on infrastructure. Transportation systems are needed to assure that a concentrated population can receive food from the countryside without fail. They are needed to assure personal and work-related travel. Water supplies must be created, water must be purified and maintained pure, and this water must be made available to a large population. Medical services--and a host of other vital services--must be provided to the population. Energy is a vital underpinning of all these activities, and must be supplied to the city in large quantities. Energy is, in many ways, the enabler of all the other services on which the maintenance of urban life depends. In this paper, we will discuss the evolution of energy use in residential and commercial buildings. This topic goes beyond urban energy use, as buildings exist in both urban and non-urban areas. The topic does not address all energy use in cities--urban transportation is clearly important. However, buildings are the largest energy consumer in cities by a wide margin. (A typical Western home will consume at least five times as much energy as the typical car that services it.) As we note later, buildings consume more than one-third of total commercial energy globally. In developing countries, a large portion of energy use in buildings is in urban areas even though there are still large populations in rural areas. This is because vast quantities of non-commercial energy--residue from plants, farm products, forests and dung from animals--are used to provide the services needed in households (primarily cooking and water heating) in many rural areas. Most of industrial energy use (which accounts for slightly more than 40 percent of global energy use) is outside of urban areas. Thus, any effort to address energy use in urban areas needs necessarily to deal with the energy use in buildings.

Levine, Mark D.; Meier, Alan K.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Adaptive Urban Dispersion Integrated Model  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numerical simulations represent a unique predictive tool for understanding the three-dimensional flow fields and associated concentration distributions from contaminant releases in complex urban settings (Britter and Hanna 2003). Utilization of the most accurate urban models, based on fully three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) that solve the Navier-Stokes equations with incorporated turbulence models, presents many challenges. We address two in this work; first, a fast but accurate way to incorporate the complex urban terrain, buildings, and other structures to enforce proper boundary conditions in the flow solution; second, ways to achieve a level of computational efficiency that allows the models to be run in an automated fashion such that they may be used for emergency response and event reconstruction applications. We have developed a new integrated urban dispersion modeling capability based on FEM3MP (Gresho and Chan 1998, Chan and Stevens 2000), a CFD model from Lawrence Livermore National Lab. The integrated capability incorporates fast embedded boundary mesh generation for geometrically complex problems and full three-dimensional Cartesian adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). Parallel AMR and embedded boundary gridding support are provided through the SAMRAI library (Wissink et al. 2001, Hornung and Kohn 2002). Embedded boundary mesh generation has been demonstrated to be an automatic, fast, and efficient approach for problem setup. It has been used for a variety of geometrically complex applications, including urban applications (Pullen et al. 2005). The key technology we introduce in this work is the application of AMR, which allows the application of high-resolution modeling to certain important features, such as individual buildings and high-resolution terrain (including important vegetative and land-use features). It also allows the urban scale model to be readily interfaced with coarser resolution meso or regional scale models. This talk will discuss details of the approach and present results for some example calculations performed in Manhattan in support of the DHS Urban Dispersion Program (UDP) using some of the tools developed as part of this new capability.

Wissink, A; Chand, K; Kosovic, B; Chan, S; Berger, M; Chow, F K

2005-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

226

Research Areas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Areas Areas Research Areas Print Scientists from a wide variety of fields come to the ALS to perform experiements. Listed below are some of the most common research areas covered by ALS beamlines. Below each heading are a few examples of the specific types of topics included in that category. Click on a heading to learn more about that research area at the ALS. Energy Science Photovoltaics, photosynthesis, biofuels, energy storage, combustion, catalysis, carbon capture/sequestration. Bioscience General biology, structural biology. Materials/Condensed Matter Correlated materials, nanomaterials, magnetism, polymers, semiconductors, water, advanced materials. Physics Atomic, molecular, and optical (AMO) physics; accelerator physics. Chemistry Surfaces/interfaces, catalysts, chemical dynamics (gas-phase chemistry), crystallography, physical chemistry.

227

Research Areas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Areas Print Research Areas Print Scientists from a wide variety of fields come to the ALS to perform experiements. Listed below are some of the most common research areas covered by ALS beamlines. Below each heading are a few examples of the specific types of topics included in that category. Click on a heading to learn more about that research area at the ALS. Energy Science Photovoltaics, photosynthesis, biofuels, energy storage, combustion, catalysis, carbon capture/sequestration. Bioscience General biology, structural biology. Materials/Condensed Matter Correlated materials, nanomaterials, magnetism, polymers, semiconductors, water, advanced materials. Physics Atomic, molecular, and optical (AMO) physics; accelerator physics. Chemistry Surfaces/interfaces, catalysts, chemical dynamics (gas-phase chemistry), crystallography, physical chemistry.

228

Major Demonstrations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Major Demonstrations Major Demonstrations Major Demonstrations A state-of-the-art integrated coal gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power plant, Tampa Electric's Polk Power Station produces enough electricity to serve 75,000 homes. A state-of-the-art integrated coal gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power plant, Tampa Electric's Polk Power Station produces enough electricity to serve 75,000 homes. The Office of Fossil Energy is co-funding large-scale demonstrations of clean coal technologies to hasten their adoption into the commercial marketplace. Through the year 2030, electricity consumption in the United States is expected to grow by about 1 percent per year. The ability of coal-fired generation to help meet this demand could be limited by concerns over greenhouse gas emissions. While the Major Demonstrations performed to date

229

Capacitated location of collection sites in an urban waste management system  

SciTech Connect

Urban waste management is becoming an increasingly complex task, absorbing a huge amount of resources, and having a major environmental impact. The design of a waste management system consists in various activities, and one of these is related to the location of waste collection sites. In this paper, we propose an integer programming model that helps decision makers in choosing the sites where to locate the unsorted waste collection bins in a residential town, as well as the capacities of the bins to be located at each collection site. This model helps in assessing tactical decisions through constraints that force each collection area to be capacitated enough to fit the expected waste to be directed to that area, while taking into account Quality of Service constraints from the citizens' point of view. Moreover, we propose an effective constructive heuristic approach whose aim is to provide a good solution quality in an extremely reduced computational time. Computational results on data related to the city of Nardo, in the south of Italy, show that both exact and heuristic approaches provide consistently better solutions than that currently implemented, resulting in a lower number of activated collection sites, and a lower number of bins to be used.

Ghiani, Gianpaolo, E-mail: gianpaolo.ghiani@unisalento.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell'Innovazione, Universita del Salento, via per Monteroni, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Itaca S.r.l., via P. Bucci 41C, 87036 Rende (Italy); Lagana, Demetrio, E-mail: dlagana@deis.unical.it [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informatica e Sistemistica, Universita della Calabria, via P. Bucci 41C, 87036 Rende (Italy); Manni, Emanuele, E-mail: emanuele.manni@unisalento.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell'Innovazione, Universita del Salento, via per Monteroni, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Itaca S.r.l., via P. Bucci 41C, 87036 Rende (Italy); Triki, Chefi, E-mail: chefi.triki@unisalento.it [Dipartimento di Matematica, Universita del Salento, via per Monteroni, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Sultan Qaboos University, Muscat (Oman)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

230

Global Cooling: Increasing World-Wide Urban Albedos to Offset CO2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modification of urban albedos reduces summertime urban temperatures, resulting in a better urban air quality and building air-conditioning savings. Furthermore, increasing urban albedos has the added benefit of reflecting some of the incoming global solar radiation and countering to some extent the effects of global warming. In many urban areas, pavements and roofs constitute over 60% of urban surfaces (roof 20-25%, pavements about 40%). Using reflective materials, both roof and the pavement albedos can be increased by about 0.25 and 0.10, respectively, resulting in a net albedo increase for urban areas of about 0.1. Many studies have demonstrated building cooling-energy savings in excess of 20% upon raising roof reflectivity from an existing 10-20% to about 60% (a U.S. potential savings in excess of $1 billion (B) per year in net annual energy bills). On a global basis, our preliminary estimate is that increasing the world-wide albedos of urban roofs and paved surfaces will induce a negative radiative forcing on the earth equivalent to removing {approx} 22-40 Gt of CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere. Since, 55% of the emitted CO{sub 2} remains in the atmosphere, removal of 22-40 Gt of CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere is equivalent to reducing global CO{sub 2} emissions by 40-73 Gt. At {approx} $25/tonne of CO{sub 2}, a 40-73 Gt CO{sub 2} emission reduction from changing the albedo of roofs and paved surfaces is worth about $1,000B to 1800B. These estimated savings are dependent on assumptions used in this study, but nevertheless demonstrate considerable benefits that may be obtained from cooler roofs and pavements.

Akbari, Hashem; Menon, Surabi; Rosenfeld, Arthur

2008-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

231

Interaction of Nocturnal Low-Level Jets with Urban Geometries as seen in Joint URBAN 2003 Data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The nocturnal low-level jet (LLJ) is a well-documented phenomenon world-wide, especially in the southern Great Plains of the United States (Bonner 1968, Whiteman et al. 1997, Banta et al., 2002) where it contributes to severe weather. In the canonical rural case, the nocturnal LLJ forms as the release of daytime convective turbulent stresses allow nighttime winds above a stable boundary layer to accelerate to supergeostrophic wind speeds. In situations with surface winds of less than 5 m/s, wind speeds at altitudes of 100m due to the nocturnal LLJ can be greater than 20 m/s. The turbulence generated by this wind shear can induce nocturnal mixing events and control surface-atmosphere exchange, thereby affecting atmospheric transport and dispersion. The Joint URBAN 2003 urban dispersion dataset, collected in Oklahoma City in July, 2003, includes several occurrences of strong LLJs, thereby providing a unique opportunity to document how the LLJ interacts with the complexity of urban geometries and to explore the significance of LLJs for transport and dispersion in urban environments. Based on this dataset, we will answer the following questions: (1) How often do LLJs occur during the experiment? (2) How does the increase in surface roughness represented by the city center, as compared to the rural environment, affect the altitude and speed of the jet, based on data from upwind and downwind wind profiles? (3) How often do LLJs contribute to nocturnal mixing events within the Oklahoma City urban area, as observed in profiles of turbulence quantities at an 80m pseudo-tower located 750m downwind of Oklahoma City center? (4) Can the effect of these LLJ-induced mixing events be identified in the dispersion datasets?

Lundquist, J K

2005-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

232

LES based urban dispersal predictions for consequence management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is unlikely that we will ever have a deterministic predictive framework for the study of flows in urban scale scenarios purely based on computational fluid dynamics. This is due to the inherent difficulty in modeling and validating all relevant physical sub-processes and acquiring all the necessary and relevant boundary condition information. On the other hand, this case is representative of very fundamental ones for which whole-domain scalable laboratory (or field) studies are impossible or very difficult, but for which it is also crucial to develop predictability. In this paper, we discuss a framework for detailed dispersal predictions in urban and regional settings based on effective linkage of strong motion codes - capable of simulating detailed energetic and contaminant sources, and large-eddy simulation - capable of emulating contaminant transport due to wind and turbulence fields in built-up areas. Challenging technical aspects of the simulation approach are outlined and recent progress is reviewed in th is context.

Grinstein, Fernando Franklin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bos, Randall [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dey, Tom [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Urban Network Practices: Ameren Missouri  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the findings of an underground distribution practices immersion conducted by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) with Ameren Missouri. This immersion was conducted as part of a multiyear effort by EPRI to identify noteworthy practices in managing urban network systems. More specifically, this report profiles the practices (people, processes, and technology) in place at Ameren Missouri, a St. Louis, Missouri, based utility serving customers through secondary network ...

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

234

An integrated monitoring/modeling framework for assessing human-nature interactions in urbanizing watersheds: Wappinger and Onondaga Creek watersheds, New York, USA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In much of the world, rapidly expanding areas of impervious surfaces due to urbanization threaten water resources. Although tools for modeling and projecting land use change and water quantity and quality exist independently, to date it is rare to find ... Keywords: Impervious surface, Remote sensing, Socio-economic factors, Uncertainty, Urbanization, Water resources

Bongghi Hong; Karin E. Limburg; Myrna H. Hall; Giorgos Mountrakis; Peter M. Groffman; Karla Hyde; Li Luo; Victoria R. Kelly; Seth J. Myers

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Impact of Upstream Urbanization on the Urban Heat Island Effects along the Washington–Baltimore Corridor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although there has been considerable research on urban heat island (UHI) effects, most of the previous studies have attributed UHI effects to localized, surface processes. In this study, the impact of upstream urbanization on enhanced UHI effects ...

Da-Lin Zhang; Yi-Xuan Shou; Russell R. Dickerson; Fei Chen

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Evaluation of an Urban Canopy Parameterization in a Mesoscale Model Using VTMX and URBAN 2000 Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A modified urban canopy parameterization (UCP) is developed and evaluated in a three-dimensional mesoscale model to assess the urban impact on surface and lower-atmospheric properties. This parameterization accounts for the effects of building ...

Hung-Neng S. Chin; Martin J. Leach; Gayle A. Sugiyama; John M. Leone Jr.; Hoyt Walker; J. S. Nasstrom; Michael J. Brown

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

An urban weather generator coupling a building simulation program with an urban canopy model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The increase in air temperature observed in urban environments compared to the undeveloped rural surroundings, known as the Urban Heat Island (UHI) effect, is being intensely studied, due to its adverse environmental and ...

Bueno Unzeta, Bruno

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Urban settlement issues : observations from 181 surveys of urban dwelling environments in developing countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Observations and summaries were made on 181 surveys of urban dwelling environments in developing countries, carried out by members of the Urban Settlement Design Program (U.S.D.P.), at MIT. The focus of this study is in ...

Wang, Chih-chien, M.S. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Consequences of Urban Stability Conditions for Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations of Urban Dispersion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The validity of omitting stability considerations when simulating transport and dispersion in the urban environment is explored using observations from the Joint Urban 2003 field experiment and computational fluid dynamics simulations of that ...

Julie K. Lundquist; Stevens T. Chan

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

NETL: Major Demonstrations Fact Sheets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Advanced Emissions Controls to Produce Next-Generation Circulating Fluid Bed Coal Generating Unit (Withdrawn) PDF-1.5MB ICCS: Area 1 Air Products and Chemicals, Inc.:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "major urban areas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Urban alternative homestead  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The three main areas of work were in redesigning and correcting the design flaws of the active heating system, the passive solar heating system, and the furnace controls, so that the building would heat and cool itself more efficiently and evenly than it had before. The active system was re-plumbed, fixing leaks, and adding joints and parts needed to work properly. Its tanks were insulated and new pumps installed. The passive system was reworked by adding a shadescreen to the outside of the greenhouse for summer cooling, and by adding ductwork to remove excess heat from the greenhouse and office, and redistribute it to the rest of the building, or to the outside. To help heat the north rooms, this recycled heat was very helpful. Also, insulating the floor under the north rooms was very helpful in providing more even heating. In order for the heating system to operate more efficiently, the electronic controls had to be reworked so the proper messages could be sent to the furnace about when to use each kind of heat. The lowered gas usage of the house told the story about how much better the active and passive systems were when the grant was completed. Moreover, the house was much more comfortable, not only from the overheating in the summer, but from a more even distribution of the heat to the north rooms. The fact that the electrical usage increased reflected the fact that the new pumps took more electricity to run them, and that the active system did not have all of the flaws worked out.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Major Natural Gas Transportation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Transportation Corridors Natural Gas Transportation Corridors About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Major Natural Gas Transportation Corridors Corridors from the Southwest | From Canada | From Rocky Mountain Area | Details about Transportation Corridors The national natural gas delivery network is intricate and expansive, but most of the major transportation routes can be broadly categorized into 11 distinct corridors or flow patterns. 5 major routes extend from the producing areas of the Southwest 4 routes enter the United States from Canada 2 originate in the Rocky Mountain area. A summary of the major corridors and links to details about each corridor are provided below. Corridors from the Southwest Region

243

A major lithospheric boundary in eastern California defined by isotope  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

major lithospheric boundary in eastern California defined by isotope major lithospheric boundary in eastern California defined by isotope ratios in Cenozoic basalts from the Coso Range and surrounding areas Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: A major lithospheric boundary in eastern California defined by isotope ratios in Cenozoic basalts from the Coso Range and surrounding areas Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Sr and Nd isotope ratios of Miocene-Recent basalts in eastern California, when screened for crustal contamination, vary dramatically and indicate the presence of a major lithospheric boundary that is not obvious from surface geology. Tectonic and geochemical interpretation of this boundary is difficult, however, because there are so many potential

244

A Study of the Effects of Different Urban Wind Models on Dispersion Patterns Using Joint Urban 2003 Data  

SciTech Connect

The Quick Urban & Industrial Complex (QUIC) Dispersion Modeling System has been developed to rapidly compute the transport and dispersion of toxic agent releases in the vicinity of buildings. It is composed of a wind solver, an 'urbanized' Lagrangian random-walk model, and a graphical user interface. QUIC has two different wind models: (a) The QUIC-URB wind solver, an empirically-based diagnostic wind model and (b) The QUIC-CFD (RANS) solver, based on the 3D Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations. In this paper, we discuss the effect of different wind models on dispersion patterns in dense built-up areas. The model-computed wind from the two urban wind models- QUIC-URB and QUIC-CFD are used to drive the dispersion model. The concentration fields are then compared to measurements from the Oklahoma City Joint Urban 2003 field experiment. QUIC produces high-resolution 3-D mean wind and concentration fields around buildings, in addition to deposition on the ground and building surfaces. It has options for different release types, including point, moving point, line, area, and volumetric sources, as well as dense gas, explosive buoyant rise, multi-particle size, bioslurry, and two-phase releases. Other features include indoor infiltration, a pressure solver, outer grid simulations, vegetative canopies, and population exposure calculations. It has been used for biological agent sensor siting in cities, vulnerability assessments for heavier-than-air chemical releases at industrial facilities, and clean-up assessments for radiological dispersal device (RDD) releases in cities (e.g., see Linger et al., 2005; Brown, 2006a, b). QUIC has also been used for dust transport studies (Bowker et al., 2007a) and for the impact of highway sound barriers on the transport and dispersion of vehicle emissions (Bowker et al., 2007b).

Gowardhan, A A; Brown, M J

2012-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

245

Disparity between rural and urban education.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??By asking two groups of students respectively from a rural school and an urban school in Yunnan Province in Southwest region of China, this research… (more)

Zhang, Li

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations in urban soils ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

yards, coking plants, power plants, chemical plants, urban parks, university ...... Barrie LA, Gregor DJ, Hargrave B, Lake R, Muir D, Shearer R, Tracy. B, Bidleman  ...

247

High-resolution urban thermal sharpener (HUTS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of zoning in urban ecosystems with remote sensing, Remote Sensing of Environment  Yaghoobian, N. , J.  of thermal imagery.  Remote Sensing of Environment 107 , 

Dominguez, Anthony; Kleissl, Jan; Luvall, Jeffrey C; Rickman, Douglas L

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

nissan hypermini urban electric vehicle testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department of Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program Nissan Hypermini Urban Electric Vehicle Testing TECHNICAL REPORT Roberta Brayer James Francfort January 2006...

249

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity - Urban Electric Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

are designed to carry two or four passengers. Click here for more information About Urban Electric Vehicles (PDF 128KB) Vehicle Testing Reports Ford THINK City Ford Thnk...

250

The Block: Enabler of Urban Architecture [Forum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Urban Architecture Vermont Village Plaza, a multifamilyin the midblock. Below: Vermont Avenue streetscape. Photos:Berkeley. Project: Vermont Village Plaza Architect: Solomon

Solomon, Daniel

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Chapter 1 Urban development patterns in China: The new, the renewed, and the ignored urban space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 1 Urban development patterns in China: The new, the renewed, and the ignored urban space Tingwei Zhang In Urbanization in China: Critical Issues in an Era of Rapid growth, 2007, Edited by Song, Y. Lincoln Institute of Land Use Policy, 3-27 The world witnesses impressive changes in China since

Illinois at Chicago, University of

252

Majoring in Forest Resources & Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Majoring in Forest Resources & Conservation University of Florida/IFAS School of Forest Resources & Conservation www.sfrc.ufl.edu ~ 352-846-0847 ~ khaselier@ufl.edu Business Management gives students a sound Management Summer B FOR3200C Foundations in Natural Resources and Conservation 3 credits FOR3434C Forest

Watson, Craig A.

253

Pathways for the Oxidation of Sarin in Urban Atmospheres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Terrorists have threatened and carried out chemicalhiological agent attacks on targets in major cities. The nerve agent sarin figured prominently in one well-publicized incident. Vapors disseminating from open containers in a Tokyo subway caused thousands of casualties. High-resolution tracer transport modeling of agent dispersion is at hand and will be enhanced by data on reactions with components of the urban atmosphere. As a sample of the level of complexity currently attainable, we elaborate the mechanisms by which sarin can decompose in polluted air. A release scenario is outlined involving the passage of a gas-phase agent through a city locale in the daytime. The atmospheric chemistry database on related organophosphorus pesticides is mined for rate and product information. The hydroxyl,radical and fine-mode particles are identified as major reactants. A review of urban air chernistry/rnicrophysics generates concentration tables for major oxidant and aerosol types in both clean and dirty environments. Organic structure-reactivity relationships yield an upper limit of 10-1' cm3 molecule-' S-* for hydrogen abstraction by hydroxyl. The associated midday loss time scale could be as little as one hour. Product distributions are difficult to define but may include nontoxic organic oxygenates, inorganic phosphorus acids, sarin-like aldehydes, and nitrates preserving cholinergic capabilities. Agent molecules will contact aerosol surfaces in on the order of minutes, with hydrolysis and side-chain oxidation as likely reaction channels.

Gerald E. Streit; James E. Bossert; Jeffrey S. Gaffney; Jon Reisner; Laurie A. McNair; Michael Brown; Scott Elliott

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Shaping urban form without zoning: a case study of houston  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Houston is the only major city in North America without zoning. The growth of Houston illustrates a traditional free market philosophy in which land use zoning is seen as a violation to private property and personal liberty. This dissertation explores how the lack of zoning has an impact on land use and urban form in Houston. It is based on a theoretical framework derived from economics and public policy theories for institutional analyses of land development controls. The dissertation uses cluster analysis integrating socioeconomic factors from census data to select three case study neighborhoods, and then applies GIS to analyze their urban form spatial characteristics with spatial data from Houston Planning Department. It also uses qualitative methods such as archives and documentations for the three neighborhoods. The study investigates the change of urban form in three case study neighborhoods over two decades. It also explores how local land use policies made by both the local government and non-governmental sectors shape urban form in Houston. The study results show that despite the city’s lack of zoning, local land use regulatory policies made by the municipality have significant influence on urban development. Additionally, civic and private organizations such as super neighborhoods and homeowner associations fill the gaps left by the lack of land use zoning. These two aspects contribute to land use planning and urban form of the city. Houston presents a contradiction of limited government intervention and public investments and subsidies. Land use controls by private contract and by government legislative intervention are not mutually exclusive or immutable. The study finds that it is difficult to achieve mixed race and income neighborhoods, even without zoning. Equity goals are not met in market approaches. Deed restrictions might be better at facilitating property sales and maintenance than at improving community welfare and governance. From the theoretical perspective, the study argues that a spectrum of market solutions and planning approaches at the ends are more relevant than the bipolarity view. Equity goals are not met in market approaches. For welfare and rights, public planning intervention is necessary. The market might provide physical land use diversity, but it fails to support socioeconomic diversity.

Qian, Zhu

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Urban Dispersion Modeling: Comparison with Single-Building Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two models have been developed to predict airflow and dispersion in urban environments. The first model, the Realistic Urban Spread and Transport of Intrusive Contaminants (RUSTIC) model, is a fast-running urban airflow code that rapidly ...

Steve R. Diehl; Donald A. Burrows; Eric A. Hendricks; Robert Keith

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Radiological Areas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Revision to Clearance Policy Associated with Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Revision to Clearance Policy Associated with Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Radiological Areas On July 13, 2000, the Secretary of Energy imposed an agency-wide suspension on the unrestricted release of scrap metal originating from radiological areas at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities for the purpose of recycling. The suspension was imposed in response to concerns from the general public and industry groups about the potential effects of radioactivity in or on material released in accordance with requirements established in DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment. The suspension was to remain in force until DOE developed and implemented improvements in, and better informed the public about, its release process. In addition, in 2001 the DOE announced its intention to prepare a

257

A method for evaluating transport energy consumption in suburban areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Urban sprawl is a major issue for sustainable development. It represents a significant contribution to energy consumption of a territory especially due to transportation requirements. However, transport energy consumption is rarely taken into account when the sustainability of suburban structures is studied. In this context, the paper presents a method to estimate transport energy consumption in residential suburban areas. The study aimed, on this basis, at highlighting the most efficient strategies needed to promote awareness and to give practical hints on how to reduce transport energy consumption linked to urban sprawl in existing and future suburban neighborhoods. The method uses data collected by using empirical surveys and GIS. An application of this method is presented concerning the comparison of four suburban districts located in Belgium to demonstrate the advantages of the approach. The influence of several parameters, such as distance to work places and services, use of public transport and performance of the vehicles, are then discussed to allow a range of different development situations to be explored. The results of the case studies highlight that traveled distances, and thus a good mix between activities at the living area scale, are of primordial importance for the energy performance, whereas means of transport used is only of little impact. Improving the performance of the vehicles and favoring home-work give also significant energy savings. The method can be used when planning new areas or retrofitting existing ones, as well as promoting more sustainable lifestyles regarding transport habits. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method allows to assess transport energy consumption in suburban areas and highlight the best strategies to reduce it. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Home-to-work travels represent the most important part of calculated transport energy consumption. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Energy savings can be achieved by reducing distances to travel through a good mix between activities at the local scale. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Means of transport used in only of little impact in the studied suburban neighborhoods. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Improving the performance of the vehicles and favoring home-work can significant energy savings.

Marique, Anne-Francoise, E-mail: afmarique@ulg.ac.be; Reiter, Sigrid, E-mail: Sigrid.Reiter@ulg.ac.be

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

258

Joint Urban 2003: Study Overview And Instrument Locations  

SciTech Connect

Quality-assured meteorological and tracer data sets are vital for establishing confidence that indoor and outdoor dispersion models used to simulate dispersal of potential toxic agents in urban atmospheres are giving trustworthy results. The U.S. Department of Defense-Defense Threat Reduction Agency and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security joined together to conduct the Joint Urban 2003 atmospheric dispersion study to provide this critically-needed high-resolution dispersion data. This major urban study was conducted from June 28 through July 31, 2003, in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, with the participation of over 150 scientists and engineers from over 20 U.S. and foreign institutions. The Joint Urban 2003 lead scientist was Jerry Allwine (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) who oversaw study design, logistical arrangements and field operations with the help of Joe Shinn (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory), Marty Leach (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory), Ray Hosker (Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Division), Leo Stockham (Northrop Grumman Information Technology) and Jim Bowers (Dugway Proving Grounds). This report gives a brief overview of the field campaign, describing the scientific objectives, the dates of the intensive observation periods, and the instruments deployed. The data from this field study is available to the scientific community through an on-line database that is managed by Dugway Proving Ground. This report will be included in the database to provide its users with some general information about the field study, and specific information about the instrument coordinates. Appendix A of this document provides the definitive record of the instrument locations during this field campaign, and Appendix B lists all the study principal investigators and participants.

Allwine, K Jerry; Flaherty, Julia E.

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

259

Daytime Local Circulations and Their Interactions in the Seoul Metropolitan Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Daytime local circulations and their interactions in the Seoul, South Korea, metropolitan area are investigated using a high-resolution mesoscale model. It is found that the urban-breeze circulation interacts strongly with other local circulations,...

Young-Hee Ryu; Jong-Jin Baik

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Interaction of Nocturnal Low-Level Jets with Urban Geometries as Seen in Joint Urban 2003 Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because accurate modeling of atmospheric flows in urban environments requires sophisticated representation of complex urban geometries, much work has been devoted to treatment of the urban surface. However, the importance of the larger-scale flow ...

Julie K. Lundquist; Jeffrey D. Mirocha

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "major urban areas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Essays on rural-urban migration in hinterland China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table 1.5: Rural to Urban Migration2. Land in the Rural-Urban MigrationMarriage Rates in Rural China . . . . . . . . . . .

Meng, Lei

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Gauging Improvements in Urban Building Energy Policy in India  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gauging Improvements in Urban Building Energy Policy in India Title Gauging Improvements in Urban Building Energy Policy in India Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of...

263

Joint Urban 2003: Indoor Measurements Final Data Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Joint Urban 2003: Indoor Measurements Final Data Report Title Joint Urban 2003: Indoor Measurements Final Data Report Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2004 Authors...

264

Indonesia-Promoting Low Emission Urban Development Strategies...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in Emerging Economy Countries (URBAN-LEDS) Jump to: navigation, search Name Indonesia-Promoting Low Emission Urban Development Strategies in Emerging Economy Countries...

265

Valuing the Environmental Benefits of Urban Water Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bene?ts of Urban Water Conservation LBNL-61011 1 Katiethe California Urban Water Conservation Council, LNBL Awardwww.irwd.com/Conservation/water conservation research.php#=

Coughlin, Katie M.; Bolduc, Chris A.; Chan, Peter T.; Dunham-Whitehead, C.; Van Buskirk, R.D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Sustainable Urban Development Priorities - Development of a Rapid...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development Priorities - Development of a Rapid Assessment Tool for Urban Mobility in Cities with Data Scarcity Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Sustainable Urban...

267

Guidelines and Toolkits for Urban Transport Development in Medium...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Guidelines and Toolkits for Urban Transport Development in Medium Sized Cities in India Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Guidelines and Toolkits for Urban Transport...

268

GIS spatial analysis for the design of urban open space.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Urban design in the landscape architectural tradition has a unique set of users and uses due to the nature of urban sites in densely developed… (more)

Howard, Michael Isaac

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Energy Department Announces the SUN Project, Empowering Urban...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Department Announces the SUN Project, Empowering Urban Native Youth in STEM Education Energy Department Announces the SUN Project, Empowering Urban Native Youth in STEM...

270

DOE News Release - DOE Conducts Urban Electric Vehicle Demonstration...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

program include: * Enhancing public awareness of Urban EVs * Defining the unique Urban EV market and niche applications * Enhancing EV infrastructure * Investigating the economic...

271

Community Renewable Energy Success Stories: Wind Energy in Urban...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stories: Wind Energy in Urban Environments Webinar (text version) Community Renewable Energy Success Stories: Wind Energy in Urban Environments Webinar (text version) Below is the...

272

The Transportation Energy and Carbon Footprints of the 100 Largest U.S. Metropolitan Areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present estimates of the automobile and truck travel based energy and carbon footprints of the largest 100 U.S. metropolitan areas. The footprints are based on the estimated vehicle miles traveled and the transportation fuels consumed. Results are presented on an annual basis and represent end use emissions only. Total carbon emissions, emissions per capita, and emissions per dollar of gross metropolitan product are reported. Two years of annual data were examined, 2000 and 2005, with most of the in-depth analysis focused on the 2005 results. In section 2 we provide background data on the national picture and derive some carbon and energy consumption figures for the nation as a whole. In section 3 of the paper we examine the metropolitan area-wide results based on the sums and averages across all 100 metro areas, and compare these with the national totals and averages. In section 4 we present metropolitan area specific footprints and examine the considerable variation that is found to exist across individual metro areas. In doing so we pay particular attention to the effects that urban form might have on these differences. Finally, section 5 provides a summary of major findings, and a list of caveats that need to be borne in mind when using the results due to known limitations in the data sources used.

Southworth, Frank [ORNL; Sonnenberg, Anthon [Georgia Institute of Technology; Brown, Marilyn A [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Simple laws of urban growth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By analysing the evolution of the street network of Greater London from the late 1700s to the present, we are able to shed light on the inner mechanisms that lie behind the growth of a city. First we define an object called a city as a spatial discontinuous phenomena, from clustering the density of street intersections. Second, we find that the city growth mechanisms can be described by two logistic laws, hence can be determined by a simple model of urban network growth in the presence of competition for limited space.

Masucci, Paolo; Batty, Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Major Communications Reports | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Major Communications Reports Major Communications Reports May 18, 2012 Green Button Data: More Power to You May 28, 2009 Major Communications Report May 28, 2009 May 7, 2009 Major...

275

Study of Pollutant Dispersion in Urban Environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-17 June, University of Osnabruck, Germany. 9. Simonite, T., 2005, Anti-terror study tracks gas dispersalStudy of Pollutant Dispersion in Urban Environments Razvan Corneliu Carbunescu Center head: Study of pollutant dispersion in urban environments #12;Abstract Computational simulations can

Allen, Gabrielle

276

Maximum Urban Heat Island Intensity in Seoul  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The maximum urban heat island (UHI) intensity in Seoul, Korea, is investigated using data measured at two meteorological observatories (an urban site and a rural site) during the period of 1973–96. The average maximum UHI is weakest in summer and ...

Yeon-Hee Kim; Jong-Jin Baik

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Tech Area II: A History  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report documents the history of the major buildings in Sandia National Laboratories' Technical Area II. It was prepared in support of the Department of Energy's compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act. Technical Area II was designed and constructed in 1948 specifically for the final assembly of the non-nuclear components of nuclear weapons, and was the primary site conducting such assembly until 1952. Both the architecture and location of the oldest buildings in the area reflect their original purpose. Assembly activities continued in Area II from 1952 to 1957, but the major responsibility for this work shifted to other sites in the Atomic Energy Commission's integrated contractor complex. Gradually, additional buildings were constructed and the original buildings were modified. After 1960, the Area's primary purpose was the research and testing of high-explosive components for nuclear weapons. In 1994, Sandia constructed new facilities for work on hi...

Rebecca Ullrich; Rebecca Ullrich

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Assessing the Feasibility of Creek Daylighting in San Francisco, Part I: A Synthesis of Lessons Learned from Existing Urban Daylighting Projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

systems, both have significant experience with urban stream daylighting, andDaylighting Projects Current City City Area Popu- Sewer Systemsystems could help San Francisco develop its own stream daylighting

Smith, Brooke Ray

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Influence of Air-Conditioning Waste Heat on Air Temperature in Tokyo during Summer: Numerical Experiments Using an Urban Canopy Model Coupled with a Building Energy Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coupled model consisting of a multilayer urban canopy model and a building energy analysis model has been developed to investigate the diurnal variations of outdoor air temperature in the office areas of Tokyo, Japan. Observations and numerical ...

Yukitaka Ohashi; Yutaka Genchi; Hiroaki Kondo; Yukihiro Kikegawa; Hiroshi Yoshikado; Yujiro Hirano

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

On the Derivation of Material Thermal Properties Representative of Heterogeneous Urban Neighborhoods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An important question arises when modeling a heterogeneous landscape (e.g., an urbanized area) with a mesoscale atmospheric model. The surface within a grid cell of the model (which has a typical dimension of one or more kilometers) can be ...

F. Salamanca; E. S. Krayenhoff; A. Martilli

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "major urban areas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Spatial and Temporal Structure of the Urban Heat Island in Seoul  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spatial and temporal structure of the urban heat island in Seoul, Korea, is investigated using near-surface temperature data measured at 31 automatic weather stations (AWSs) in the Seoul metropolitan area for the 1-yr period from March 2001 ...

Yeon-Hee Kim; Jong-Jin Baik

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Correlation of Ozone and Meteorology with Hydrogen Peroxide in Urban and Rural Regions of North Carolina  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas-phase hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and ozone (O3) along With other trace gases and meteorology were monitored in two distinct regimes of high- and low-NOx (urban and rural) areas in North Carolina during the summer of 1991 as part of the Southern ...

Viney P. Aneja; Mita Das

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Citywide mobile internet access using dense urban WiFi coverage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate if it is feasible to use the WiFi coverage in urban areas for mobile Internet access and which type of applications can benefit from the Internet access provided by the already deployed WiFi Access Points (APs). Nowadays, most smartphones ... Keywords: mobile clients, mobile internet access, wifi, wireless networks

Maria Eugenia Berezin; Franck Rousseau; Andrzej Duda

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Temporal and Spatial Aspects of Velocity Variance in the Urban Surface Roughness Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data from six urban areas in a nationwide network of sites within the surface roughness layer are examined. It is found that the average velocity variances in time, derived by averaging the conventional variances from a network of n stations, are ...

Bruce B. Hicks; Elena Novakovskaia; Ronald J. Dobosy; William R. Pendergrass III; William J. Callahan

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

An Urban Parameterization for a Global Climate Model. Part I: Formulation and Evaluation for Two Cities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Urbanization, the expansion of built-up areas, is an important yet less-studied aspect of land use/land cover change in climate science. To date, most global climate models used to evaluate effects of land use/land cover change on climate do not ...

K. W. Oleson; G. B. Bonan; J. Feddema; M. Vertenstein; C. S. B. Grimmond

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

A Validation of FEM3MP with Joint Urban 2003 Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy and U.S. Department of Homeland Security, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model for simulating airflow and dispersion of chemical/biological agents released in urban areas has recently ...

Stevens T. Chan; Martin J. Leach

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

MAJOR OIL PLAYS IN UTAH AND VICINITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utah oil fields have produced over 1.2 billion barrels (191 million m{sup 3}). However, the 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m{sup 3}) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes this trend can be reversed by providing play portfolios for the major oil producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios will include: descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary techniques for each play; locations of major oil pipelines; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and identification and discussion of land use constraints. All play maps, reports, databases, and so forth, produced for the project will be published in interactive, menu-driven digital (web-based and compact disc) and hard-copy formats. This report covers research activities for the third quarter of the first project year (January 1 through March 31, 2003). This work included gathering field data and analyzing best practices in the eastern Uinta Basin, Utah, and the Colorado portion of the Paradox Basin. Best practices used in oil fields of the eastern Uinta Basin consist of conversion of all geophysical well logs into digital form, running small fracture treatments, fingerprinting oil samples from each producing zone, running spinner surveys biannually, mapping each producing zone, and drilling on 80-acre (32 ha) spacing. These practices ensure that induced fractures do not extend vertically out of the intended zone, determine the percentage each zone contributes to the overall production of the well, identify areas that may be by-passed by a waterflood, and prevent rapid water breakthrough. In the eastern Paradox Basin, Colorado, optimal drilling, development, and production practices consist of increasing the mud weight during drilling operations before penetrating the overpressured Desert Creek zone; centralizing treatment facilities; and mixing produced water from pumping oil wells with non-reservoir water and injecting the mixture into the reservoir downdip to reduce salt precipitation, dispose of produced water, and maintain reservoir pressure to create a low-cost waterflood. During this quarter, technology transfer activities consisted of technical presentations to members of the Technical Advisory Board in Colorado and the Colorado Geological Survey. The project home page was updated on the Utah Geological Survey Internet web site.

Thomas C. Chidsey Jr; Craig D. Morgan; Roger L. Bon

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Access to jobs : transportation barriers faced by low-skilled autoless workers in U.S. metropolitan areas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the major concerns in today's urban labor market is spatial mismatch, the geographic separation between jobs and workers. Although numerous studies examine spatial mismatch, most of them focus on inner-city minorities, ...

Kawabata, Mizuki, 1972-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Major Oil Plays in Utah and Vicinity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utah oil fields have produced over 1.2 billion barrels (191 million m{sup 3}). However, the 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m{sup 3}) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes this trend can be reversed by providing play portfolios for the major oil-producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios will include: descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; locations of major oil pipelines; identification and discussion of land-use constraints; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary techniques for each play. This report covers research activities for the sixth quarter of the project (October 1 through December 31, 2003). This work included describing outcrop analogs for the Jurassic Twin Creek Limestone and Mississippian Leadville Limestone, major oil producers in the thrust belt and Paradox Basin, respectively, and analyzing best practices used in the southern Green River Formation play of the Uinta Basin. Production-scale outcrop analogs provide an excellent view of reservoir petrophysics, facies characteristics, and boundaries contributing to the overall heterogeneity of reservoir rocks. They can be used as a ''template'' for evaluation of data from conventional core, geophysical and petrophysical logs, and seismic surveys. In the Utah/Wyoming thrust belt province, the Jurassic Twin Creek Limestone produces from subsidiary closures along major ramp anticlines where the low-porosity limestone beds are extensively fractured and sealed by overlying argillaceous and non-fractured units. The best outcrop analogs for Twin Creek reservoirs are found at Devils Slide and near the town of Peoa, Utah, where fractures in dense, homogeneous non-porous limestone beds are in contact with the basal siltstone units (containing sealed fractures) of the overlying units. The shallow marine, Mississippian Leadville Limestone is a major oil and gas reservoir in the Paradox Basin of Utah and Colorado. Hydrocarbons are produced from basement-involved, northwest-trending structural traps with closure on both anticlines and faults. Excellent outcrops of Leadville-equivalent rocks are found along the south flank of the Uinta Mountains, Utah. For example, like the Leadville, the Mississippian Madison Limestone contains zones of solution breccia, fractures, and facies variations. When combined with subsurface geological and production data, these outcrop analogs can improve (1) development drilling and production strategies such as horizontal drilling, (2) reservoir-simulation models, (3) reserve calculations, and (4) design and implementation of secondary/tertiary oil recovery programs and other best practices used in the oil fields of Utah and vicinity. In the southern Green River Formation play of the Uinta Basin, optimal drilling, development, and production practices consist of: (1) owning drilling rigs and frac holding tanks; (2) perforating sandstone beds with more than 8 percent neutron porosity and stimulate with separate fracture treatments; (3) placing completed wells on primary production using artificial lift; (4) converting wells relatively soon to secondary waterflooding maintaining reservoir pressure above the bubble point to maximize oil recovery; (5) developing waterflood units using an alternating injector--producer pattern on 40-acre (16-ha) spacing; and (6) recompleting producing wells by perforating all beds that are productive in the waterflood unit. As part of technology transfer activities during this quarter, an abstract describing outcrop reservoir analogs was accepted by the American Assoc

Thomas C. Chidsey; Craig D. Morgan; Kevin McClure; Douglas A. Sprinkel; Roger L. Bon; Hellmut H. Doelling

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

290

Geothermal resource area 9: Nye County. Area development plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal Resource area 9 encompasses all of Nye County, Nevada. Within this area there are many different known geothermal sites ranging in temperature from 70/sup 0/ to over 265/sup 0/ F. Fifteen of the more major sites have been selected for evaluation in this Area Development Plan. Various potential uses of the energy found at each of the resource sites discussed in this Area Development Plan were determined after evaluating the area's physical characteristics, land ownership and land use patterns, existing population and projected growth rates, and transportation facilities, and comparing those with the site specific resource characteristics. The uses considered were divided into five main categories: electrical generation, space heating, recreation, industrial process heat, and agriculture. Within two of these categories certain subdivisions were considered separately. The findings about each of the 15 geothermal sites considered in this Area Development Plan are summarized.

Pugsley, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Dynamical Detection on Urban Sprawl Based on EO Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the development of society and economy, the rapid urban sprawl in land use is being witnessed of late in urban districts. As a result, many problems in society and environment have appeared in urban districts, such as population expansion, air pollution, ... Keywords: EO data, GIS, Integration, RS, urban spraw

Pan Hongyi; Peng Wenfu; He Wei; Jiang Guiguo; Zhou Jieming; Zhou Wancun

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Prediction and visualization for urban heat island simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The simulation and forecast of urban heat island effect was studied. Since the reason for the formation of urban heat island is complex, the current model cannot take all the influence factors into consideration. When a new influence factor is introduced, ... Keywords: genetic algorithm, information visual, neural network, urban air temperature simulation, urban heat island

Bin Shao; Mingmin Zhang; Qingfeng Mi; Nan Xiang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Major Changes in Natural Gas Pipeline Transportation Capacity, 1998-2008  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This presentation graphically illustrates the areas of major growth on the national natural gas pipeline transmission network between 1998 and the end of 2008.

Information Center

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

294

Evaluation study of building-resolved urban dispersion models  

SciTech Connect

For effective emergency response and recovery planning, it is critically important that building-resolved urban dispersion models be evaluated using field data. Several full-physics computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models and semi-empirical building-resolved (SEB) models are being advanced and applied to simulating flow and dispersion in urban areas. To obtain an estimate of the current state-of-readiness of these classes of models, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) funded a study to compare five CFD models and one SEB model with tracer data from the extensive Midtown Manhattan field study (MID05) conducted during August 2005 as part of the DHS Urban Dispersion Program (UDP; Allwine and Flaherty 2007). Six days of tracer and meteorological experiments were conducted over an approximately 2-km-by-2-km area in Midtown Manhattan just south of Central Park in New York City. A subset of these data was used for model evaluations. The study was conducted such that an evaluation team, independent of the six modeling teams, provided all the input data (e.g., building data, meteorological data and tracer release rates) and run conditions for each of four experimental periods simulated. Tracer concentration data for two of the four experimental periods were provided to the modeling teams for their own evaluation of their respective models to ensure proper setup and operation. Tracer data were not provided for the second two experimental periods to provide for an independent evaluation of the models. The tracer concentrations resulting from the model simulations were provided to the evaluation team in a standard format for consistency in inter-comparing model results. An overview of the model evaluation approach will be given followed by a discussion on the qualitative comparison of the respective models with the field data. Future model developments efforts needed to address modeling gaps identified from this study will also be discussed.

Flaherty, Julia E.; Allwine, K Jerry; Brown, Mike J.; Coirier, WIlliam J.; Ericson, Shawn C.; Hansen, Olav R.; Huber, Alan H.; Kim, Sura; Leach, Martin J.; Mirocha, Jeff D.; Newsom, Rob K.; Patnaik, Gopal; Senocak, Inanc

2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

295

An environmental pressure index proposal for urban development planning based on the analytic network process  

SciTech Connect

This paper introduces a new approach to prioritize urban planning projects according to their environmental pressure in an efficient and reliable way. It is based on the combination of three procedures: (i) the use of environmental pressure indicators, (ii) the aggregation of the indicators in an Environmental Pressure Index by means of the Analytic Network Process method (ANP) and (iii) the interpretation of the information obtained from the experts during the decision-making process. The method has been applied to a proposal for urban development of La Carlota airport in Caracas (Venezuela). There are three options which are currently under evaluation. They include a Health Club, a Residential Area and a Theme Park. After a selection process the experts chose the following environmental pressure indicators as ANP criteria for the project life cycle: used land area, population density, energy consumption, water consumption and waste generation. By using goal-oriented questionnaires designed by the authors, the experts determined the importance of the criteria, the relationships among criteria, and the relationships between the criteria and the urban development alternatives. The resulting data showed that water consumption is the most important environmental pressure factor, and the Theme Park project is by far the urban development alternative which exerts the least environmental pressure on the area. The participating experts coincided in appreciating the technique proposed in this paper is useful and, for ranking ordering these alternatives, an improvement from traditional techniques such as environmental impact studies, life-cycle analysis, etc.

Gomez-Navarro, Tomas, E-mail: tgomez@dpi.upv.e [Departamento de Proyectos de Ingenieria, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n. 46022, Valencia (Spain); Garcia-Melon, Monica, E-mail: mgarciam@dpi.upv.e [Departamento de Proyectos de Ingenieria, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n. 46022, Valencia (Spain); Acuna-Dutra, Silvia, E-mail: sacuna@unimet.edu.v [Departamento de Estudios Ambientales, Universidad Metropolitana, Autopista Guarenas, Sector La Urbina, Distribuidor Metropolitano, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Diaz-Martin, Diego, E-mail: ddiaz@unimet.edu.v [Departamento de Estudios Ambientales, Universidad Metropolitana, Autopista Guarenas, Sector La Urbina, Distribuidor Metropolitano, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

296

Mapping Population onto Priority Conservation Areas Draft report for WWF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

zones. The same trend is observed in the Mekong (p Karoo (p is significant only in Coastal East Africa / Namib Karoo and the Mesoamerican Reef. Rural areas in the Congo / Namib Karoo and the Mesoamerican Reef ecoregions show significant urban-rural differences in unmet need

Lopez-Carr, David

297

Urban land use, air toxics and public health: Assessing hazardous exposures at the neighborhood scale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land use data are increasingly understood as important indicators of potential environmental health risk in urban areas where micro-scale or neighborhood level hazard exposure data are not routinely collected. This paper aims to offer a method for estimating the distribution of air toxics in urban neighborhoods using land use information because actual air monitoring data rarely exist at this scale. Using Geographic Information System spatial modeling tools, we estimate air toxics concentrations across neighborhoods in New York City and statistically compare our model with the US Environmental Protection Agency's National Air Toxic Assessment and air monitoring data across three NYC neighborhoods. We conclude that land use data can act as a good proxy for estimating neighborhood scale air toxics, particularly in the absence of monitoring data. In addition, the paper suggests that land use data can expand the reach of environmental impact assessments that routinely exclude analyses of potential exposures to urban air toxics at the neighborhood scale.

Corburn, Jason [Columbia University, Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation and School of International and Public Affairs, 400 Avery Hall, 1172 Amsterdam Ave. New York, NY 10027 (United States)]. E-mail: jtc2105@columbia.edu

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

298

Analysis of sheltering and evacuation strategies for an urban nuclear detonation scenario.  

SciTech Connect

Development of an effective strategy for shelter and evacuation is among the most important planning tasks in preparation for response to a low yield, nuclear detonation in an urban area. This study examines shelter-evacuate policies and effectiveness focusing on a 10 kt scenario in Los Angeles. The goal is to provide technical insights that can support development of urban response plans. Results indicate that extended shelter-in-place can offer the most robust protection when high quality shelter exists. Where less effective shelter is available and the fallout radiation intensity level is high, informed evacuation at the appropriate time can substantially reduce the overall dose to personnel. However, uncertainties in the characteristics of the fallout region and in the exit route can make evacuation a risky strategy. Analyses indicate that only a relatively small fraction of the total urban population may experience significant dose reduction benefits from even a well-informed evacuation plan.

Yoshimura, Ann S.; Brandt, Larry D.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Major Risk Factors Integrated Facility Disposition Project -...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- Oak Ridge Summary - Major Risk Factors Integrated Facility Disposition Project (IFDP) Oak Ridge, TN More Documents & Publications Major Risk Factors to the Integrated...

300

The urban garden : Port Alliance, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis focuses on of three urban parks; Central Park i n New York , the Fens to Franklin Park in Boston, and Rock Creek Park in washington, designed by Frederick Law Olmsted and the growth of the cities around them. ...

Manning, Isaac Hall, 1958-

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "major urban areas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Webinar: Tapping Into Wind in Urban Environments  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This live webinar presented by DOE on "Community Renewable Energy Success Stories: Tapping into Wind in Urban Environments" will take place on Tuesday, September 18, 2012, from 3:00 – 4:15 p.m....

302

Urban Behavioral Simulation and 3D Visualization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

UrbanSim is a micro-simulation model system that represents the location choices of households and firms within the region, and the choices of real estate developers to construct...

303

Urban Heat Island Assessment: Metadata Are Important  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Urban heat island (UHI) analyses for the conterminous United States were performed using three different forms of metadata: nightlights-derived metadata, map-based metadata, and gridded U.S. Census Bureau population metadata. The results ...

Thomas C. Peterson; Timothy W. Owen

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Ecotransology : integrated design for urban mobility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis demonstrates a rethinking of urban mobility through ecological design. Human mobility and ecological accountability are inextricably linked in city design; our current world ecological crisis underscores this ...

Joachim, Mitchell Whitney

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Flow and Turbulence in an Urban Canyon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A better understanding of the interaction between the built environment and the atmosphere is required to more effectively manage urban airsheds. This paper reports an analysis of data from an atmospheric measurement campaign in Oklahoma City, ...

D. Zajic; H. J. S. Fernando; R. Calhoun; M. Princevac; M. J. Brown; E. R. Pardyjak

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Sustainable and equitable urban environments in Asia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study identifies some of the factors and conditions that can encourage the development of sustainable and equitable urban environments. It argues that cities will continue to grow and that it is not productive to view ...

Badshah, Akhtar

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

New urban housing in Seoul, Korea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For the last three decades, the capital city of Korea, Seoul, has experienced an explosive increase in population and rapid urbanization. This increase has led to a severe housing shortage in Seoul. The government responded ...

Lee, Kwanghyun, 1971-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Beyond opposites : an urban initiative in Seoul  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The thesis began with the understanding of urban, cultural, and social conditions of Seoul. The choice of the existing bridge as the point of departure has meaning in two layers. layer one: the need for more space in the ...

Moon, Hoon

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Urban solarium : thermal performance in Boston  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis addresses the issue of energy efficiency through the lens of thermal performance in the context of urban housing in the city of Boston. Located in the historic brick row house neighborhood of the South End, the ...

Hsu, Juliet Chia-Wen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Urban Aerosol Impacts on Downwind Convective Storms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impacts of urban-enhanced aerosol concentrations on convective storm development and precipitation over and downwind of St. Louis, Missouri, are investigated. This is achieved through the use of a cloud-resolving mesoscale model, in which ...

Susan C. van den Heever; William R. Cotton

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Urban Integrated Industrial Cogeneration Systems Analysis. Phase II final report  

SciTech Connect

Through the Urban Integrated Industrial Cogeneration Systems Analysis (UIICSA), the City of Chicago embarked upon an ambitious effort to identify the measure the overall industrial cogeneration market in the city and to evaluate in detail the most promising market opportunities. This report discusses the background of the work completed during Phase II of the UIICSA and presents the results of economic feasibility studies conducted for three potential cogeneration sites in Chicago. Phase II focused on the feasibility of cogeneration at the three most promising sites: the Stockyards and Calumet industrial areas, and the Ford City commercial/industrial complex. Each feasibility case study considered the energy load requirements of the existing facilities at the site and the potential for attracting and serving new growth in the area. Alternative fuels and technologies, and ownership and financing options were also incorporated into the case studies. Finally, site specific considerations such as development incentives, zoning and building code restrictions and environmental requirements were investigated.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Assessing urban and rural neighborhood characteristics using audit and GIS data: derivation and reliability of constructs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bureau: Census 2000 urban and rural classifications. 2009 [Assessing urban and rural neighborhood characteristics usingreliability in both urban and rural segments (r = 0.96).

Evenson, Kelly R; Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela; Herring, Amy H; Messer, Lynne; Laraia, Barbara A; Rodríguez, Daniel A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Modeling the Dynamics of Desakota Regions: Global - Local Nexus in the Taipei Metropolitan Area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the 1970s, Asia has experienced rapid urbanization processes, which are distinct from U.S. society, and the direction of Asian urbanization is more strongly affected by economic globalization. The desakota model, proposed by McGee and Ginsburg in 1991, focuses on how internal domestic and local forces drive the specific rural-urban transformation in Asia. However, the McGee-Ginsburg model does not emphasize the importance of globalization on Asian urbanization. To fill the gap, this study develops a GIS-based CA framework based on the desakota model to not only simulate the unique urbanization processes in Asia but also integrate the influence of globalization into Asian urban dynamics. Three approaches are developed in the CA simulation: 1) physical constraints and land-use classification from remotely sensed images in 1993, 2000, and 2008, are incorporated into micro-scale transformation; 2) population dynamics, shifts of economic activities, and foreign direct investment (FDIs), a representative of the impact of globalization, are applied for multi-scale interconnection; 3) the Monte Carlo mechanism is finally introduced to combine the above two approaches and implement the simulation process. The Taipei metropolitan area, a rapid urbanizing region that highly interacts with the global economy in Asia, is chosen to examine this model. The CA simulation model establishes a strong interaction between FDIs, an indicator representing impacts of globalization, and the dazzling Asian urban model. The combination of multi-scale economic factors and micro-scale land-use transformation also reveals how urban growth of the Taipei metropolis in recent years fits the characterization of the desakota model, and how desakota regions, the growth generators, interact with city cores. As a result, the research not only successfully links the influence of globalization with the desakota model and simulates urban dynamics of Asian cities but also provides scenarios of different FDI inputs for governments to better handle urban growth with global impacts under the deep economic recession since 2007.

Wu, Bing-Sheng

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Perception of principals in the southern, urban U.S. and eastern, urban China regarding the selection, preparation, and professional development of elementary principals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An effective principal is the catalyst for an effective school. For this reason, it is imperative that education stakeholders all over the world become responsible for addressing the selection, preparation and development of principals. The purpose of this study is to explore the similarities and differences in the selection process, preparation programs and the professional development practices as perceived by elementary school principals in urban public schools in the southern U.S and urban public schools in eastern China. The naturalistic paradigm of inquiry was used to frame the study and acquire and analyze data. The sample consisted of fourteen elementary school principals in a southern, urban area in the U.S. and an eastern, urban area in China selected via a purposive sample. The researcher visited their campuses between September, 2004 and January, 2005. Intensive interviews and observations were used to gather information from principals in American and Chinese urban elementary schools. Data from interviews were unitized into categories. Some of the conclusions included: ?? The American respondents indicated that current admission criteria for entrance into educational leadership programs were not sufficient for identifying a candidate??s aptitude for being a successful principal. ?? The Chinese principals believed that most selected Chinese principals are successful school leaders. ?? The American principals were satisfied with the effectiveness of the university preparation programs. ?? The Chinese principals were not satisfied with the effectiveness of classroom instruction of preparation programs. ?? The American principals felt that their professional development programs were helpful for improving their practice and their schools. ?? The Chinese principals were not satisfied with the effectiveness of the professional development programs. ?? Similarities and differences exist between the American and Chinese respondents?? perceptions of selection, preparation, and professional development.

Lin, Jie

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

MAJOR OIL PLAYS IN UTAH AND VICINITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utah oil fields have produced over 1.2 billion barrels (191 million m{sup 3}). However, the 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m{sup 3}) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes this trend can be reversed by providing play portfolios for the major oil-producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios will include: descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary techniques for each play; locations of major oil pipelines; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and identification and discussion of land use constraints. All play maps, reports, databases, and so forth, produced for the project will be published in interactive, menu-driven digital (web-based and compact disc) and hard-copy formats. This report covers research activities for the fourth quarter of the first project year (April 1 through June 30, 2003). This work included describing outcrop analogs to the Jurassic Nugget Sandstone and Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation, the major oil producers in the thrust belt and Paradox Basin, respectively. Production-scale outcrop analogs provide an excellent view, often in three dimensions, of reservoir-facies characteristics and boundaries contributing to the overall heterogeneity of reservoir rocks. They can be used as a ''template'' for evaluation of data from conventional core, geophysical and petrophysical logs, and seismic surveys. The Nugget Sandstone was deposited in an extensive dune field that extended from Wyoming to Arizona. Outcrop analogs are found in the stratigraphically equivalent Navajo Sandstone of southern Utah which displays large-scale dunal cross-strata with excellent reservoir properties and interdunal features such as oases, wadi, and playa lithofacies with poor reservoir properties. Hydrocarbons in the Paradox Formation are stratigraphically trapped in carbonate buildups (or phylloid-algal mounds). Similar carbonate buildups are exposed in the Paradox along the San Juan River of southeastern Utah. Reservoir-quality porosity may develop in the types of facies associated with buildups such as troughs, detrital wedges, and fans, identified from these outcrops. When combined with subsurface geological and production data, these outcrop analogs can improve (1) development drilling and production strategies such as horizontal drilling, (2) reservoir-simulation models, (3) reserve calculations, and (4) design and implementation of secondary/tertiary oil recovery programs and other best practices used in the oil fields of Utah and vicinity. During this quarter, technology transfer activities consisted of exhibiting the project plans, objectives, and products at a booth at the 2003 annual convention of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists. The project home page was updated on the Utah Geological Survey Internet web site.

Thomas C. Chidsey; Craig D. Morgan; Kevin McClure; Grant C. Willis

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

An Analysis of Simultaneous Online GC Measurements of BTEX Aromatics at Three Selected Sites in the Greater Munich Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During two field campaigns in 1993 and 1994, measurements of aromatic compounds [benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, m-/p-/o-xylenes (BTEX)] were carried out at urban and rural sites in the greater Munich area. These field campaigns represent a ...

B. Rappenglück; P. Fabian

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

In situ measurements of speciated atmospheric mercury and the identification of source regions in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to expand the currently limited understanding of atmospheric mercury source-receptor relationships in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area, real time measurements of atmospheric mercury were made at a downtown urban ...

Rutter, A. P.

318

Smart Beijing: Correlation of Urban Electrical Energy Consumption with Urban Environmental Sensing for Optimizing Distribution Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Smart Beijing: Correlation of Urban Electrical Energy Consumption with Urban Environmental Sensing and investigates the environmental impact of the electrical energy consumer (transportation, buildings, street will be trained to recognize important city events and dynamics which will affect electrical power consumption

Beigl, Michael

319

Salazar, Chu Announce Major Offshore Wind Initiatives | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Major Offshore Wind Initiatives Major Offshore Wind Initiatives Salazar, Chu Announce Major Offshore Wind Initiatives February 7, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis NORFOLK, VA - Unveiling a coordinated strategic plan to accelerate the development of offshore wind energy, Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar and Secretary of Energy Steven Chu today announced major steps forward in support of offshore wind energy in the United States, including new funding opportunities for up to $50.5 million for projects that support offshore wind energy deployment and several high priority Wind Energy Areas in the mid-Atlantic that will spur rapid, responsible development of this abundant renewable resource. Deployment of clean, renewable offshore wind energy will help meet the President's goal of generating 80 percent of the Nation's electricity from

320

Dating of major normal fault systems using thermochronology- An example  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dating of major normal fault systems using thermochronology- An example Dating of major normal fault systems using thermochronology- An example from the Raft River detachment, Basin and Range, western United States Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Dating of major normal fault systems using thermochronology- An example from the Raft River detachment, Basin and Range, western United States Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Application of thermochronological techniques to major normal fault systems can resolve the timing of initiation and duration of extension, rates of motion on detachment faults, timing of ductile mylonite formation and passage of rocks through the crystal-plastic to brittle transition, and multiple events of extensional unroofing. Here we determine

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "major urban areas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Shoe leather epidemiology: active travel and transport infrastructure in the urban landscape  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/database right 2005. An Ordnance Survey/EDINA supplied service. Table 2: Neighbourhoods represented in the interview study Neighbourhood Characteristics Participant numbers Laurieston and Eglinton A busy, noisy urban environment containing two major arterial... bus services) was generally regarded as good, services being described as nearby, frequent and offering a choice of routes (P1, P3, P4, P5, P7). However, two participants with limited mobility had found it impossible to use local public trans- port...

Ogilvie, David; Mitchell, Richard; Mutrie, Nanette; Petticrew, Mark; Platt, Stephen

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

322

MAJOR PLAYS IN UTAH AND VICINITY  

SciTech Connect

Utah oil fields have produced over 1.2 billion barrels (191 million m{sup 3}). However, the 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m{sup 3}) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes this trend can be reversed by providing play portfolios for the major oil-producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios will include: descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary techniques for each play; locations of major oil pipelines; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and identification and discussion of land-use constraints. All play maps, reports, databases, and so forth, produced for the project will be published in interactive, menu-driven digital (web-based and compact disc) and hard-copy formats. This report covers research activities for the first quarter of the second project year (July 1 through September 30, 2003). This work included (1) describing the Conventional Southern Uinta Basin Play, subplays, and outcrop reservoir analogs of the Uinta Green River Conventional Oil and Gas Assessment Unit (Eocene Green River Formation), and (2) technology transfer activities. The Conventional Oil and Gas Assessment Unit can be divided into plays having a dominantly southern sediment source (Conventional Southern Uinta Basin Play) and plays having a dominantly northern sediment source (Conventional Northern Uinta Basin Play). The Conventional Southern Uinta Basin Play is divided into six subplays: (1) conventional Uteland Butte interval, (2) conventional Castle Peak interval, (3) conventional Travis interval, (4) conventional Monument Butte interval, (5) conventional Beluga interval, and (6) conventional Duchesne interval fractured shale/marlstone. We are currently conducting basin-wide correlations to define the limits of the six subplays. Production-scale outcrop analogs provide an excellent view, often in three dimensions, of reservoir-facies characteristics and boundaries contributing to the overall heterogeneity of reservoir rocks. They can be used as a ''template'' for evaluation of data from conventional core, geophysical and petrophysical logs, and seismic surveys. Outcrop analogs for each subplay except the Travis interval are found in Indian and Nine Mile Canyons. During this quarter, the project team members submitted an abstract to the American Association of Petroleum Geologists for presentation at the 2004 annual national convention in Dallas, Texas. The project home page was updated on the Utah Geological Survey Internet web site.

Craig D. Morgan; Thomas C. Chidsey

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Western Area Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

April 1, 2013 April 1, 2013 CX-010106: Categorical Exclusion Determination Flaming Gorge Microwave Site Communications Building Access Road Repairs CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 04/01/2013 Location(s): Utah Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region March 26, 2013 CX-010105: Categorical Exclusion Determination Urban Transmission Line Danger Tree Management CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 03/26/2013 Location(s): Colorado, Colorado, Colorado, Colorado, Wyoming Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region January 23, 2013 CX-009804: Categorical Exclusion Determination Kersey West Switching Station Interconnection Kiowa Creek - Welc 115 Kilovolt Transmission Line CX(s) Applied: B4.1, B4.11 Date: 01/23/2013 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

324

A comparative study of O{sub 3} formation in the Houston urban and industrial plumes during the TEXAQS 2000 Study.  

SciTech Connect

Ozone formation in the Houston area during a period of high ozone concentrations that occurred on 29 August 2000 during the TexAQS 2000 study is examined to understand differences in the sources of O{sub 3} precursors and the rate and efficiency of ozone formation over the city of Houston and the industrialized Ship Channel region to the east of Houston. From late morning through late afternoon on 29 August, a period of stagnation occurred, allowing accumulation of O{sub 3} and product species separately over downtown Houston and the Houston Ship Channel. Three aircraft flights were made in the region, starting from about 0900 CST and extending to about 1700 CST. A localized plume of high O{sub 3} ranging between 120 and 200 ppb was observed over the Ship Channel on all of these aircraft flights. Over the same time period, O{sub 3} concentrations over the city were much lower ranging between 40 and 90 ppb. NO{sub x} concentrations measured in the two regions in the late morning were roughly the same, but hydrocarbon reactivities over the industrial area were much higher, by as much as a factor of 10. Photochemical box model calculations constrained by observations of NO{sub x}, hydrocarbons, O{sub 3}, and other stable species indicated that the instantaneous ozone formation rate was much lower (3-18 ppb/h) over downtown Houston than it was over the Ship Channel (3-80 ppb/h). The much faster O{sub 3} formation rates and higher concentrations observed over the Ship Channel are attributed to the much higher hydrocarbon reactivity, the majority of which was contributed by low molecular weight alkenes. These high hydrocarbon reactivities also caused O{sub 3} over the Ship Channel to be produced with much higher efficiency than over urban Houston. Comparison of photochemical product distributions suggests that O{sub 3} formation in the urban area is much more hydrocarbon limited than in the Ship Channel, consistent with the geographic distribution of major hydrocarbon sources in the area.

Daum, P. H.; Kleinman, L. I.; Springston, S. R.; Nunnermacker, L. J.; Lee, Y. N.; Weinstein-Lloyd, J.; Zheng, J.; Berkowitz, C.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Planning for mitigating climate change risk to metropolitan areas (USA)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the last couple of decades, there has been increasing evidence of changes in global climate. With urban areas identified as the primary contributors to the climate change, there is an impetus for initiatives to persuade major contributors of greenhouse gases to undertake policy measures for climate change mitigation. The support for such initiatives at the international level has been mixed with many nations, including the United States, not accepting the Kyoto protocol. In view of the evident disagreement at the international level, initiatives promoting local communities to adopt self regulating policies for climate change mitigation have gained importance. One such initiative is the Cities for Climate Protection (CCP) supported by the International Council for Local Environmental Initiatives. This research explores the differences in the socio-economic and civic characteristics of metropolitan areas in the contiguous United States that have committed to CCP (as a policy measure for climate change mitigation) to those that have not. The data in this study has been primarily collected from the census documents and government publications. The indicators are grouped into risk, stress and civic variables. The differences amongst the metropolitan areas with CCP committed jurisdictions and those with non-committed jurisdictions have been analyzed through statistical t-tests and use of geographical information system (GIS). The research reveals that metropolitan areas with a higher degree of risk are more likely to commit to climate change mitigation policies whereas those with higher stress index are less likely to commit. The metropolitan areas with higher civic index were also found more likely to commit to policy measures for climate change mitigation. The results of the study are significant as they reveal that communities that are at risk are not necessarily adding to the climate stress and those contributing the most to the climatic stress are not committed to climate change mitigation. The results of the study support the need to discontinue the closed box approach and instead adopt an approach with vertical integration. Cooperation and coordination amongst the hierarchical aggregate levels of communities, from a place to a region, are imperative for effective implementation of climate mitigation initiatives.

Grover, Himanshu

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Major Communications Report May 28, 2009  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This file includes the Department of Energy's major announcements regarding the Recovery Act such as press releases, videos, press events or other major communications for the week of May 28, 2009.

327

Major Communications Report April 28, 2009  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This file includes the Department of Energy's major announcements regarding the Recovery Act such as press releases, videos, press events or other major communications for the week of April 28, 2009.

328

Major Communications Report March 24, 2009  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This file includes the Department of Energy's major announcements regarding the Recovery Act such as press releases, videos, press events or other major communications for the week of March 24, 2009.

329

Major Communications Report April 17, 2009  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This file includes the Department of Energy's major announcements regarding the Recovery Act such as press releases, videos, press events or other major communications for the week of April 17, 2009.

330

Mozambique becomes a major coking coal exporter?  

SciTech Connect

In addition to its potential role as a major international supplier of coking coal, Mozambique will also become a major source of power generation for southern Africa. 3 figs.

Ruffini, A.

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

331

Genome Majority Vote (GMV), Version 0.x  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Genome Majority Vote (GMV), Version 0.x Genome Majority Vote (GMV), Version 0.x The pipeline runs PRODIGAL gene predictions on all genomes, runs pan-reciprocal BLAST, and...

332

Genealogy Of Major U.S. Refiners  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

A summary presentation iof mergers and acquisitions by U.S. major oil companies (including the U.S. affiliates of foreign major oil companies). The presentation focuses on petroleum refining over the last several years through late 2009.

Neal Davis

2009-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

333

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers - Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Financial market analysis and financial data for major energy companies. Environment. ... Country energy information, detailed and overviews. Highlights

334

Enhanced Classifications of Engineered Paved Surfaces for Urban Systems Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a greater need than ever for the ability to accurately model urban system impacts resulting around the planet. Rapid urbanization is transforming landscapes from vegetation to an engineered infrastructure and thus altering land cover and ...

Jay Golden; W. C. Chuang; W. L. Stefanov

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

A CFD Model for Simulating Urban Flow and Dispersion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model is developed to simulate urban flow and dispersion, to understand fluid dynamical processes therein, and to provide practical solutions to some emerging problems of urban air pollution. ...

Jong-Jin Baik; Jae-Jin Kim; Harindra J. S. Fernando

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Transportation planning for mega events : a model of urban change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

My study is about opportunities for revolutionary developments in urban transport. Often, we think of transport and urban development as an evolutionary process, yet there exist a few opportunities for cities to revolutionize ...

Kassens, Eva

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Estimating Urban Temperature Bias Using Polar-Orbiting Satellite Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Urban temperature bias, defined to be the difference between a shelter temperature reading of unknown but suspected urban influence and some appropriate rural reference temperature, is estimated through the use of polar-orbiting satellite data. ...

Gregory L. Johnson; Jerry M. Davis; Thomas R. Karl; Alan L. McNab; Kevin P. Gallo; J. Dan Tarpley; Peter R. Bloomfield

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Improving Building Performance at Urban Scale with a Framework...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improving Building Performance at Urban Scale with a Framework for Real-time Data Sharing Title Improving Building Performance at Urban Scale with a Framework for Real-time Data...

339

Modernity of Chinese urban neighborhoods : toward new spatial forms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is always a general dilemma about how to balance technology and humanity in urban neighborhood development. Modem technology creates many new spatial forms for Chinese urban neighborhoods, but it also destroys many ...

Yi, Qian, 1973-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Stadium development and urban renewal : a look at Washington, DC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis investigates the factors, related to urban stadium development, that act as a catalyst for subsequent local urban renewal. Over the recent decades there has been substantial debate related to stadium or arena ...

Rizzo, James W. (James Watson)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "major urban areas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Architecture of the rail : exploring the potential of urban infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis is the pursuit of a sensitivity for the relationship between urban infrastructure and architectural form, an attempt to restore a quality of "publicness" in the urban landscape through the implementation of a ...

Iboshi, Gregory Kenji

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Approximate translation : media, narrative, and experience in urban design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Approximate translation is developed as a design process through which the place-embedded history of an urban environment can be understood, allowing for better design and intervention in that urban environment. Generally, ...

Crisman, Jonathan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Exploding the edge : inversions into the urban landscape  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis explores the relationship between building and green space in a dense urban environment in order to create a humane contemplative experience of individual and collective memory. The urban environment has the ...

Chia, Katherine Kai-sun

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Studies of Urban Climates and Air Pollution in Switzerland  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In addition to an assessment of the factors that are responsible for urban climate change, this paper describes climatological studies and peculiarities of some Swiss cities. Although these cities are small, urban air pollution presents a real ...

Heinz Wanner; Jacques-André Hertig

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Camera for the invisible : toward a toolkit for urban exploration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We are disconnected from our environment. We can't reconnect because we can't even see the Nature within our urban surroundings. Inspired by urban explorers and Nature Awareness traditions, I will develop methodologies and ...

Silver, Jay (Jay S.)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Major Oil Plays In Utah And Vicinity  

SciTech Connect

Utah oil fields have produced over 1.33 billion barrels (211 million m{sup 3}) of oil and hold 256 million barrels (40.7 million m{sup 3}) of proved reserves. The 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m3) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. However, in late 2005 oil production increased, due, in part, to the discovery of Covenant field in the central Utah Navajo Sandstone thrust belt ('Hingeline') play, and to increased development drilling in the central Uinta Basin, reversing the decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes providing play portfolios for the major oil-producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming can continue this new upward production trend. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios include descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; locations of major oil pipelines; identification and discussion of land-use constraints; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary recovery techniques for each play. The most prolific oil reservoir in the Utah/Wyoming thrust belt province is the eolian, Jurassic Nugget Sandstone, having produced over 288 million barrels (46 million m{sup 3}) of oil and 5.1 trillion cubic feet (145 billion m{sup 3}) of gas. Traps form on discrete subsidiary closures along major ramp anticlines where the depositionally heterogeneous Nugget is also extensively fractured. Hydrocarbons in Nugget reservoirs were generated from subthrust Cretaceous source rocks. The seals for the producing horizons are overlying argillaceous and gypsiferous beds in the Jurassic Twin Creek Limestone, or a low-permeability zone at the top of the Nugget. The Nugget Sandstone thrust belt play is divided into three subplays: (1) Absaroka thrust - Mesozoic-cored shallow structures, (2) Absaroka thrust - Mesozoic-cored deep structures, and (3) Absaroka thrust - Paleozoic-cored shallow structures. Both of the Mesozoic-cored structures subplays represent a linear, hanging wall, ramp anticline parallel to the leading edge of the Absaroka thrust. Fields in the shallow Mesozoic subplay produce crude oil and associated gas; fields in the deep subplay produce retrograde condensate. The Paleozoic-cored structures subplay is located immediately west of the Mesozoic-cored structures subplays. It represents a very continuous and linear, hanging wall, ramp anticline where the Nugget is truncated against a thrust splay. Fields in this subplay produce nonassociated gas and condensate. Traps in these subplays consist of long, narrow, doubly plunging anticlines. Prospective drilling targets are delineated using high-quality, two-dimensional and three-dimensional seismic data, forward modeling/visualization tools, and other state-of-the-art techniques. Future Nugget Sandstone exploration could focus on more structurally complex and subtle, thrust-related traps. Nugget structures may be present beneath the leading edge of the Hogsback thrust and North Flank fault of the Uinta uplift. The Jurassic Twin Creek Limestone play in the Utah/Wyoming thrust belt province has produced over 15 million barrels (2.4 million m{sup 3}) of oil and 93 billion cubic feet (2.6 billion m{sup 3}) of gas. Traps form on discrete subsidiary closures along major ramp anticlines where the low-porosity Twin Creek is extensively fractured. Hydrocarbons in Twin Creek reservoirs were generated from subthrust Cretaceous source rocks. The seals for the producing horizons are overlying argillaceous and clastic beds, and non-fractured units within the Twin Creek. The Twin Creek Limestone thrust belt play is divided into two subplays: (1) Absaroka thrust-Mesozoic-cored structures and (2) A

Thomas Chidsey

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

347

The broadband digital divide and the economic benefits of mobile broadband for rural areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Broadband is becoming increasingly important to national economies and the personal lives of users. However, broadband availability and adoption are not diffusing in rural and urban areas at the same rates. This article updates the rural broadband digital ... Keywords: Digital divide, Economic development, Fixed broadband, Interval censored Poisson estimation, Mobile broadband, Rural areas

James E. Prieger

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region MW K Coso Geothermal Area Coso Geothermal Area Walker Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Pull Apart in Strike Slip Fault Zone Mesozoic Granitic MW K Dixie Valley Geothermal Area Dixie Valley Geothermal Area Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Stepover or Relay Ramp in Normal Fault Zones major range front fault Jurassic Basalt MW K Geysers Geothermal Area Geysers Geothermal Area Holocene Magmatic Geothermal Region Pull Apart in Strike Slip Fault Zone intrusion margin and associated fractures MW K Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Walker Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Displacement Transfer Zone Caldera Margin Quaternary Rhyolite MW K

349

Urban Search and Rescue Robots Information at NIST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Unmanned Vehicle Systems Tech Transfer Forum (10 ... of Homeland Security Urban Search and Rescue ... Science and Technology Directorate (DHS ...

2010-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

350

Major Contract Solicitations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Major Major Contract Solicitations Major Contract Solicitations Welcome to the DOE Headquarters major solicitation page. The following is a listing of major active solicitations. Contained within each solicitation link can be found draft and final solicitations, questions and answers, attachments and all other associated documentation necessary for potential offerors to participate along with contact information. Issuance of Special Notice - Operations and Maintenance Support Services for the iManage Program Aviation Management Green Leases Executive Secretariat Energy Reduction at HQ Real Estate Approvals Documents and Publications Facilities and Infrastructure Federal Advisory Committee Management Freedom of Information Act Financial Assistance Information Systems

351

Suburbs offset Low Carbon Footprint of major U.S. Cities | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Suburbs offset Low Carbon Footprint of major U.S. Cities Suburbs offset Low Carbon Footprint of major U.S. Cities Home > Blogs > Graham7781's blog Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(2002) Super contributor 9 January, 2014 - 13:12 carbon cities CO2 emissions OpenEI suburbs US New research from the University of California-Berkeley shows that those who live in cities in the United States have significantly smaller per-capita carbon footprints than their suburban counterparts. The difference is such that suburban dwellers essentially offset the low carbon footprints of urban dwellers. Vehicle emissions accounted for the biggest contributor to carbon dioxide, accounted by longer commutes to work, school, and shopping. The data, balancing 37 factors such as weather, income, home size, shows that those dwelling in major cities have a carbon footprint about 50 percent below the

352

Numerical Study of Urban Impact on Boundary Layer Structure: Sensitivity to Wind Speed, Urban Morphology, and Rural Soil Moisture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mesoscale model with a detailed urban surface exchange parameterization is used to study urban influences on boundary layer structure. The parameterization takes into account thermal and mechanical factors, and it is able to reproduce the most ...

Alberto Martilli

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Estimation of Climate-Change Impacts on the Urban Heat Load Using an Urban Climate Model and Regional Climate Projections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A pragmatic approach to estimate the impact of climate change on the urban environment, here called the cuboid method, is presented. This method allows one to simulate the urban heat load and the frequency of air temperature threshold exceedances ...

Barbara Früh; Paul Becker; Thomas Deutschländer; Johann-Dirk Hessel; Meinolf Kossmann; Ingrid Mieskes; Joachim Namyslo; Marita Roos; Uwe Sievers; Thomas Steigerwald; Heidelore Turau; Uwe Wienert

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Sustainable Urbanism : an examination of environmentally responsible neighborhood developments in Europe and lessons for sustainable urban planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The emergence of the sustainable development concept at the end of the 1980s triggered the intensification of the environmental sustainability discourse in urban design and planning. The vision of sustainable urbanism ...

Kasioumi, Eirini

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Urban Consortium Energy Task Force - Year 21 Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Urban Consortium Energy Task Force (UCETF), comprised of representatives of large cities and counties in the United States, is a subgroup of the Urban Consortium, an organization of the nation's largest cities and counties joined together to identify, develop and deploy innovative approaches and technological solutions to pressing urban issues.

NONE

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

A flexible IT infrastructure for integrated urban planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an IT infrastructure based on an event driven architecture with the objective to decrease the turnaround time for urban planning. Most urban planning takes a long time, not only to get all stakeholders involved, but also to assess ... Keywords: Urban planning, event driven architecture, flexibility, infrastructure, interoperability

Wout Hofman; Walter Lohman; Ab Schelling

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Lifecycle Assessment of Beijing-Area Building Energy Use and Emissions: Summary Findings and Policy Applications  

SciTech Connect

Buildings are at the locus of three trends driving China's increased energy use and emissions: urbanization, growing personal consumption, and surging heavy industrial production. Migration to cities and urban growth create demand for new building construction. Higher levels of per-capita income and consumption drive building operational energy use with demand for higher intensity lighting, thermal comfort, and plug-load power. Demand for new buildings, infrastructure, and electricity requires heavy industrial production. In order to quantify the implications of China's ongoing urbanization, rising personal consumption, and booming heavy industrial sector, this study presents a lifecycle assessment (LCA) of the energy use and carbon emissions related to residential and commercial buildings. The purpose of the LCA model is to quantify the impact of a given building and identify policy linkages to mitigate energy demand and emissions growth related to China's new building construction. As efficiency has become a higher priority with growing energy demand, policy and academic attention to buildings has focused primarily on operational energy use. Existing studies estimate that building operational energy consumption accounts for approximately 25% of total primary energy use in China. However, buildings also require energy for mining, extracting, processing, manufacturing, and transporting materials, as well as energy for construction, maintenance, and decommissioning. Building and supporting infrastructure construction is a major driver of industry consumption--in 2008 industry accounted for 72% of total Chinese energy use. The magnitude of new building construction is large in China--in 2007, for example, total built floor area reached 58 billion square meters. During the construction boom in 2007 and 2008, more than two billion m{sup 2} of building space were added annually; China's recent construction is estimated to account for half of global construction. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) developed an integrated LCA model to capture the energy and emissions implications of all aspects of new buildings from material mining through construction, operations, and decommissioning. Over the following four sections, this report describes related existing research, the LBNL building LCA model structure and results, policy linkages of this lifecycle assessment, and conclusions and recommendations for follow-on work. The LBNL model is a first-order approach to gathering local data and applying lifecycle assessment to buildings in the Beijing area--it represents one effort among a range of established, predominantly American and European, LCA models. This report identifies the benefits, limitations, and policy applications of lifecycle assessment modeling for quantifying the energy and emissions impacts of specific residential and commercial buildings.

Aden, Nathaniel; Qin, Yining; Fridley, David

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

358

Lifecycle Assessment of Beijing-Area Building Energy Use and Emissions: Summary Findings and Policy Applications  

SciTech Connect

Buildings are at the locus of three trends driving China's increased energy use and emissions: urbanization, growing personal consumption, and surging heavy industrial production. Migration to cities and urban growth create demand for new building construction. Higher levels of per-capita income and consumption drive building operational energy use with demand for higher intensity lighting, thermal comfort, and plug-load power. Demand for new buildings, infrastructure, and electricity requires heavy industrial production. In order to quantify the implications of China's ongoing urbanization, rising personal consumption, and booming heavy industrial sector, this study presents a lifecycle assessment (LCA) of the energy use and carbon emissions related to residential and commercial buildings. The purpose of the LCA model is to quantify the impact of a given building and identify policy linkages to mitigate energy demand and emissions growth related to China's new building construction. As efficiency has become a higher priority with growing energy demand, policy and academic attention to buildings has focused primarily on operational energy use. Existing studies estimate that building operational energy consumption accounts for approximately 25% of total primary energy use in China. However, buildings also require energy for mining, extracting, processing, manufacturing, and transporting materials, as well as energy for construction, maintenance, and decommissioning. Building and supporting infrastructure construction is a major driver of industry consumption--in 2008 industry accounted for 72% of total Chinese energy use. The magnitude of new building construction is large in China--in 2007, for example, total built floor area reached 58 billion square meters. During the construction boom in 2007 and 2008, more than two billion m{sup 2} of building space were added annually; China's recent construction is estimated to account for half of global construction. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) developed an integrated LCA model to capture the energy and emissions implications of all aspects of new buildings from material mining through construction, operations, and decommissioning. Over the following four sections, this report describes related existing research, the LBNL building LCA model structure and results, policy linkages of this lifecycle assessment, and conclusions and recommendations for follow-on work. The LBNL model is a first-order approach to gathering local data and applying lifecycle assessment to buildings in the Beijing area--it represents one effort among a range of established, predominantly American and European, LCA models. This report identifies the benefits, limitations, and policy applications of lifecycle assessment modeling for quantifying the energy and emissions impacts of specific residential and commercial buildings.

Aden, Nathaniel; Qin, Yining; Fridley, David

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

359

Enhanced oil recovery: major equipment and its projected demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After years of research and pilot tests, the enhanced oil recovery (EOR) industry is taking major leaps forward in 1981. With the launching of several hundred new EOR pilot tests, the announcement of major CO/sub 2/ pipelines into W. Texas, and a $3.6-billion purchase of South Belridge heavy oil by Shell, oil companies are showing their confidence in this technologically-emerging area. While much research remains to be done to make these processes more efficient and economic, the important commercial stage of the EOR industry's growth has clearly been reached. Along with the growth of the EOR industry will come a major demand for equipment and facilities. This demand will include traditional requirements for steam generators and compressors, although on a scale many times larger than at present, as well as new requirements for gas separation, chemical storage, and special tubulars.

Kuuskraa, V.A.; Hammershaimb, E.C.; Wicks, D.E.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Scaling the Daytime Urban Heat Island and Urban-Breeze Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The urban-breeze circulation is a mesoscale response of the atmospheric flow that is related to horizontal variations in temperature associated, for dry conditions, with gradients in sensible heat flux densities. This local circulation is ...

Julia Hidalgo; Valéry Masson; Luis Gimeno

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "major urban areas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Food urbanism : urban agriculture as a strategy to facilitate social mobility in informal settlements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Can community-based urban agriculture generate stronger communities? How is this possible? This thesis explores the possibility of community development through application of community gardens in an informal settlement ...

Amirtahmasebi, Rana

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Incorporating Urban Systems in Global Climate Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Resolutions IPCC AR4 The Future? Preliminary Data #12;CLM Urban Canyon Model Building Building Solar Radiation properties Building Properties Thermal Conductivity (W/mK) Heat Capacity (MJ/m^3 K) Albedo Density (kg/m^3T ,1shdwlT min , maxi buildT T T

Peterson, Blake R.

363

S. Sabina Wolfson Urban Transportation Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

official support for (or recognition of) BRT. New York City's "vision" for the future of transportationS. Sabina Wolfson Urban Transportation Planning Term paper Bus Rapid Transit on the East Side of Manhattan The East Side of Manhattan needs more (and better) public transportation1. Eventually a Second

Wolfson, Sabina

364

Robust video communication over an urban VANET  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Video communication within a Vehicular Ad Hoc Network (VANET) has the potential to be of considerable benefit in an urban emergency, as it allows emergency vehicles approaching the scene to better understand the nature of the emergency. However, the ... Keywords: Error resilience, IEEE 802.11p, VANET, multiple path delivery, redundant frames, video communication

N. Qadri; M. Altaf; M. Fleury; M. Ghanbari

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Major Normal Fault | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Major Normal Fault Major Normal Fault Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Major Normal Fault Dictionary.png Major Normal Fault: Normal faults are structures in which the hanging wall is down dropped along the fault plane relative to the foot wall. They are the predominant type of structure in extensional tectonic environments, but are commonly encountered in a number of geologic settings. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Controlling Structures List of controlling structures typically associated with geothermal systems: Major Normal Fault Termination of a Major Normal Fault Stepover or Relay Ramp in Normal Fault Zones Apex or Salient of Normal Fault Fault Intersection Accommodation Zone Displacement Transfer Zone Pull-Apart in Strike-Slip Fault Zone

366

Inhalation of primary motor vehicle emissions: Effects of urbanpopulation and land area  

SciTech Connect

Urban population density can influence transportation demand, as expressed through average daily vehicle-kilometers traveled per capita (VKT). In turn, changes in transportation demand influence total passenger vehicle emissions. Population density can also influence the fraction of total emissions that are inhaled by the exposed urban population. Equations are presented that describe these relationships for an idealized representation of an urban area. Using analytic solutions to these equations, we investigate the effect of three changes in urban population and urban land area (infill, sprawl, and constant-density growth) on per capita inhalation intake of primary pollutants from passenger vehicles. The magnitude of these effects depends on density-emissions elasticity ({var_epsilon}{sub e}), a normalized derivative relating change in population density to change in vehicle emissions. For example, if urban population increases, per capita intake is less with infill development than with constant-density growth if {var_epsilon}{sub e} is less than -0.5, while for {var_epsilon}{sub e} greater than -0.5 the reverse is true.

Marshall, Julian D.; McKone, Thomas E.; Nazaroff, William W.

2004-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

367

Energy Crossroads: Major Conservation Programs & Initiatives...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Major Conservation Programs & Initiatives < Previous Topic Energy Crossroads Index Next Topic > Suggest a Listing California Energy Commission's Public Programs Office The...

368

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers - Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Financial market analysis and financial data for major energy companies. Environment. Greenhouse gas data, voluntary report- ing, electric power plant emissions.

369

Appendix B Major Disturbances and Unusual Occurrences  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

144 U.S. Energy Information Administration/Electric Power Monthly June 2012 Table B.2 Major Disturbances and Unusual Occurrences, Year-to-Date through ...

370

Combatting urban air pollution through Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) analysis, testing, and demonstration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Deteriorating urban air quality ranks as a top concern worldwide, since air pollution adversely affects both public health and the environment. The outlook for improving air quality in the world`s megacities need not be bleak, however, The use of natural gas as a transportation fuel can measurably reduce urban pollution levels, mitigating chronic threats to health and the environment. Besides being clean burning, natural gas vehicles (NGVs) are economical to operate and maintain. The current cost of natural gas is lower than that of gasoline. Natural gas also reduces the vehicle`s engine wear and noise level, extends engine life, and decreases engine maintenance. Today, about 700,000 NGVs operate worldwide, the majority of them converted from gasoline or diesel fuel. This article discusses the economic, regulatory and technological issues of concern to the NGV industry.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Majors' Shift to Natural Gas, The  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Majors' Shift to Natural Gas investigates the factors that have guided the United States' major energy producers' growth in U.S. natural gas production relative to oil production. The analysis draws heavily on financial and operating data from the Energy Information Administration's Financial Reporting System (FRS)

Bruce Bawks

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Solar Spectral Irradiance under Clear Skies around a Major Metropolitan Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates the influence of gaseous pollutants and aerosol on the spectral composition of various segments of the solar spectrum in cloudless conditions. This investigation is done by using data of the spectral energy distribution of ...

C. P. Jacovides; Michael D. Steven; D. N. Asimakopoulos

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

The Impact of Urban Form and Housing Characteristics on Residential Energy Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cities and their characteristics of energy use play an important role in climate change. While there is abundant research about the impact of energy use on transportation the impact of urban form and housing characteristics on residential energy use has not been considered widely. There is certainly a need to take a closer look about the residential energy use and housing relationships to identify planning implications. This study examines the relationship between various urban form, housing characteristics and the energy use that result from residential electricity and fuel use. Ordinary least squares regression methods are used to measure the correlations between energy consumption and variables describing housing and urban form characteristics in the metropolitan statistical areas in the United States. After controlling for differences in energy price and income, a positive relationship between residential energy consumption and a history of greater rates of land conversion was found. This study also finds significantly higher energy use associated with a greater incidence of detached single-family housing when compared against high-rise buildings. A correlation between increased rate of row housing and lower energy use was found as well. This study can contribute to a literature that can help planners to create more environmentally- friendly cities by contributing to the understanding of the impacts that certain energy- related housing characteristics have on the sustainability of a city. The literature regarding smart growth and new urbanism should explore potential impacts on household energy consumption in its discussion of urban planning along with considering impacts on transportation related energy use.

Kim, Jong Yon

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations More Documents & Publications Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations Slide 1 Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations...

375

PIA - WEB Physical Security Major Application | Department of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Physical Security Major Application PIA - WEB Physical Security Major Application PIA - WEB Physical Security Major Application PIA - WEB Physical Security Major Application More...

376

Vermont Air Pollution Control Regulations, Major Stationary Sources...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Major Stationary Sources and Major Modifications (Vermont) Vermont Air Pollution Control Regulations, Major Stationary Sources and Major Modifications (Vermont) Eligibility Utility...

377

Effectiveness And Welfare Impacts Of Alternative Policies To Address Atmospheric Pollution In URBAN ROAD TRANSPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we compare the effectiveness and welfare effects of alternative fuel efficiency, environmental and transport policies for a given urban area. The urban transport activities are represented as a set of interrelated markets, one for each mode of transport and type of vehicle. For each market, four different marginal external costs are computed in the present equilibrium: air pollution, accidents, noise and congestion. The gap between marginal social costs and prices shows that congestion and unpaid parking are the dominant sources of inefficiencies. Air pollution costs are significant as well. The effects of a typical air quality policy (regulation of car emission technology) and two typical fuel based policies (minimum fuel efficiency policy and fuel taxes) are compared with the effects of three alternative transport policies (full external cost pricing, cordon pricing, parking charges). Regulation of emission technology and of fuel efficiency do not necessarily lead to welfare gains, whereas transport pricing policies yield substantial gains for the urban area under study.

Stef Proost; Kurt Van Dender

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Urban modeling based on segmentation and regularization of airborne lidar point clouds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents an approach to process raw lidar 3-D point clouds over urban area and extract terrain, buildings and other urban features. In the initial step, “non-ground points ” are separated from ground points using a one dimensional filtering process based on the slope between two consecutive points in the point cloud and the terrain elevation in the vicinity of the points. In the next step, the non-ground point dataset is processed to segment individual buildings. This is accomplished by using a 3-D regional growing approach. At the end of this step, each lidar point is attributed to a building. The first step towards building reconstruction is to obtain an approximate footprint of the building, which is accomplished by extracting the points on the building boundary by a modified convex hull algorithm. Once the footprint boundary points are found, their edges are regularized by using a least squares model to form the final building shape. Mathematic formulation of 3D region growing and boundary regularization is presented. Tests results of reconstructed buildings over complex urban areas are reported. 1.

Aparajithan Sampath; Jie Shan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Abundance and Distribution of Africanized Honey Bees in an Urban Environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Africanized honey bees (AHB) are a hybrid between African and European honey bees (EHB). Compared to the EHB, AHB exhibit more intense, defensive behaviors but nevertheless provide the same important ecosystem service--pollination. AHB have been found in Tucson, AZ. since 1993. It is important to understand the population ecology of AHB for several reasons. Most directly, the behavioral traits retained from African bees present public safety and health risk. AHB are easily agitated; even slight disturbances (e.g., human movements) can provoke attacks. Several hybridized bee traits (e.g., higher colony growth rates, reproduction at a smaller colony size, nesting in a wider range of cavity materials, etc.) also make them more adapted to urban landscapes. The overlap of habitats and resource-using of AHB with human significantly raise the risk of stinging incidents, especially in the areas of bee aggregation. Although the presence of AHB in urban environments may present a public safety and health risk, they do contribute to urban ecosystems substantially through pollination. The fact that AHB is a part of the urban ecosystem suggests a need for a better understanding of the relationship among climate factors, urban landscape characteristics, and AHB population dynamics. The goal of my dissertation was to understand population dynamics of AHB in urban environments using removal records of AHB colonies in water meter boxes. I have demonstrated useful methods and repeatable procedures to process, extract, and synthesize water meter box data which were not collected or sampled specifically for any ecological research. I also examined the spatio-temporal distributions of AHB colony removals in water meter boxes, and evaluated the effects of variations of temperature and precipitation on observed patterns. Then, I investigated the linkage between spatial patterns of AHB colonies and urban landscape characteristics by evaluating densities of water meter boxes, AHB colony abundance, and colony occupancy among different land cover/land use types. Lastly, a conceptual model and quantitative models were developed to illustrate AHB population dynamics, particularly and the interactions among water meter boxes, alternative cavities, and honey bee colonies. Overall, the probabilities of AHB colonies selecting nesting sites can be influenced by: (1) the ratio of water meter boxes and alternative cavities; (2) the difference of vegetative attributes among locations associated with the preference of AHB in selecting new nesting sites. Seasonal variations of precipitation and temperature can affect the development and productivity of AHB population.

Chen, Szu-Hung

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Strategic Focus Areas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Focus Areas Lockheed Martin on behalf of Sandia National Laboratories will consider grant requests that best support the Corporation's strategic focus areas and reflect effective...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "major urban areas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Geothermal resource area 3: Elko County. Area development plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal Resource Area 3 includes all of the land in Elko County, Nevada. There are in excess of 50 known thermal anomalies in this area. Several of the more major resources have been selected for detailed description and evaluation in this Area Development Plan. The other resources are considered too small, too low in temperature, or too remote to be considered for development in the near future. Various potential uses of the energy found at each of the studied resource sites in Elko County were determined after evaluating the area's physical characteristics; the land ownership and land use patterns; existing population and projected growth rates; transportation facilities and energy requirements. These factors were then compared with resource site specific data to determine the most likely uses of the resource. The uses considered in this evaluation were divided into five main categories: electrical generation, space heating, recreation, industrial process heat, and agriculture. Within two of these categories several subdivisions were considered separately. It was determined that several of the geothermal resources evaluated in the Area Development Plan could be commercially developed. The potential for development for the seven sites considered in this study is summarized.

Pugsley, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1993  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3) 3) Distribution Category UC-950 Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1993 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Energy Information Administration/ Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1993 ii This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration/ Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1993 iii The Financial Reporting System, 1977-1993 diskette is available from the Energy Information Administration.

383

Major Contract Solicitation | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Solicitation | National Nuclear Security Administration Solicitation | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Major Contract Solicitation Home > About Us > Our Operations > Acquisition and Project Management > Major Contract Solicitation Major Contract Solicitation Pantex Plant Wind Farm Acquisition Y-12 National Security Complex, Pantex Plant, with Option for

384

Performance profiles of major energy producers 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1994 is the eighteenth annual report of the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) Financial Reporting System (FRS). The report examines financial and operating developments in energy markets, with particular reference to the 24 major U.S. energy companies required to report annually on Form EIA-28. Financial information is reported by major lines of business, including oil and gas production, petroleum refining and marketing, other energy operations, and nonenergy businesses. Financial and operating results are presented in the context of energy market developments with a view toward identifying changing corporate strategies and measuring the performance of ongoing operations both in the United States and abroad.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Retrofit Legislation at the Urban Level  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Retrofit Legislation at the Urban Level Retrofit Legislation at the Urban Level In March, the city of Berkeley, California, passed new legislation that should serve as a model for local policies intended to keep energy dollars within the community while protecting the environment. The Commercial Energy Conservation Ordinance (CECO) is based on a similar ordinance that has been law since 1989 in San Francisco, Berkeley's neighbor across the Bay. San Francisco is currently the only other city in the world to have this type of legislation. As part of the Berkeley Municipal Code, CECO requires commercial buildings to undergo energy conservation retrofits when they are sold or substantially renovated. CECO was designed with the participation of LBL's Kristin Heinemeier, who also works with the Berkeley

386

NICKEL SPECIATION OF URBAN PARTICULATE MATTER  

SciTech Connect

A four-step sequential Ni extraction method, summarized in Table AB-1, was evaluated for identifying and quantifying the Ni species occurring in urban total suspended particulate (TSP) matter and fine particulate matter (<10 {micro}m [PM{sub 10}] and <2.5 {micro}m [PM{sub 2.5}] in aerodynamic diameter). The extraction method was originally developed for quantifying soluble, sulfidic, elemental, and oxidic forms of Ni that may occur in industrial atmospheres. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy were used to evaluate the Ni species selectivity of the extraction method. Uncertainties in the chemical speciation of Ni in urban PM{sub 10} and PM{sub 2.5} greatly affect inhalation health risk estimates, primarily because of the large variability in acute, chronic, and cancer-causing effects for different Ni compounds.

Kevin C. Galbreath; Charlene R. Crocker; Carolyn M. Nyberg; Frank E. Huggins; Gerald P. Huffman

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Energy Saving Potentials and Air Quality Benefits of Urban HeatIslandMitigation  

SciTech Connect

Urban areas tend to have higher air temperatures than their rural surroundings as a result of gradual surface modifications that include replacing the natural vegetation with buildings and roads. The term ''Urban Heat Island'' describes this phenomenon. The surfaces of buildings and pavements absorb solar radiation and become extremely hot, which in turn warm the surrounding air. Cities that have been ''paved over'' do not receive the benefit of the natural cooling effect of vegetation. As the air temperature rises, so does the demand for air-conditioning (a/c). This leads to higher emissions from power plants, as well as increased smog formation as a result of warmer temperatures. In the United States, we have found that this increase in air temperature is responsible for 5-10% of urban peak electric demand for a/c use, and as much as 20% of population-weighted smog concentrations in urban areas. Simple ways to cool the cities are the use of reflective surfaces (rooftops and pavements) and planting of urban vegetation. On a large scale, the evapotranspiration from vegetation and increased reflection of incoming solar radiation by reflective surfaces will cool a community a few degrees in the summer. As an example, computer simulations for Los Angeles, CA show that resurfacing about two-third of the pavements and rooftops with reflective surfaces and planting three trees per house can cool down LA by an average of 2-3K. This reduction in air temperature will reduce urban smog exposure in the LA basin by roughly the same amount as removing the basin entire onroad vehicle exhaust. Heat island mitigation is an effective air pollution control strategy, more than paying for itself in cooling energy cost savings. We estimate that the cooling energy savings in U.S. from cool surfaces and shade trees, when fully implemented, is about $5 billion per year (about $100 per air-conditioned house).

Akbari, Hashem

2005-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

388

Definition: Reduced Major Outages | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Outages Outages Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Major Outages A major outage is defined using the beta method, per IEEE Std 1366-2003 (IEEE Power Engineering Society 2004). The monetary benefit of reducing major outages is based on the VOS of each customer class. The VOS parameter represents the total cost of a power outage per MWh. This cost includes the value of unserved energy, lost productivity, collateral damage, the value of penalties and performance-based rates. Functions that lead to this benefit can mitigate major outages by allowing the system to be reconfigured on the fly to help restore service to as many customers as possible, enable a quicker response in the restoration effort, or mitigate the impact of an outage through islanding or alternative power supply.[1]

389

Performance profiles of major energy producers 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1993 is the seventeenth annual report of the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) Financial Reporting System (FRS). The report examines financial and operating developments in energy markets, with particular reference to the 25 major US energy companies required to report annually on Form EIA-28. Financial information is reported by major liens of business, including oil and gas production, petroleum refining and marketing, other energy operations, and nonenergy businesses. Financial and operating results are presented in the context of energy market developments with a view toward identifying changing corporate strategies and measuring the performance of ongoing operations both in the US and abroad. This year`s report analyzes financial and operating developments for 1993 (Part 1: Developments in 1993) and also reviews key developments during the 20 years following the Arab Oil Embargo of 1973--1974 (Part 2: Major Energy Company Strategies Since the Arab Oil Embargo). 49 figs., 104 tabs.

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

An overview on the Urban Boundary-layer Atmosphere Network in Helsinki  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Helsinki UrBAN (Urban Boundary-layer Atmosphere Network, http://urban.fmi.fi) is a dedicated research-grade observational network where we study the physical processes in the atmosphere above the city. Helsinki UrBAN is the most poleward intensive urban ...

Wood CR; Järvi L; Kouznetsov RD; Nordbo A; Joffre S; Drebs A; Vihma T; Hirsikko A; Suomi I; Fortelius C; O'Connor E; Moiseev D; Haapanala S; Moilanen J; Kangas M; Karppinen A; Vesala T; Kukkonen J

391

Conversion of agricultural land to urban use  

SciTech Connect

The large amount of land lost each year to urbanization has led nearly all states to adopt legislation that grants tax preferences to agricultural land use. Several studies have analyzed the effects of such policies on the rate of land development and on the total amount of land eventually developed. However, these studies have only analyzed permanent tax-rate changes despite the fact that most such changes are temporary. A distinction is made in this study between temporary, permanent, anticipated, and unanticipated tax-rate increases. Using a hedonic approach, the elasticity of supply of urban fringe land in McHenry County, Illinois is estimated to be approximately 0.30, which indicates that the amount of land converted to urban use is unlikely to be affected much by these polices. The hedonic approach as usually implemented is shown to lead to inconsistent parameter estimates. A consistent estimation procedure is proposed that produces testable cross-equation restrictions. A restriction is implied in the empirical section of this study by the use of the Box-Cox transformation to generalize functional form; it is tested and is not rejected. However, little is known about the small-sample properties of this transformation. To rectify this, a Monte Carlo study is conducted of the performance of Lagrange Multiplier tests for incorrect functional form and heteroskedasticity in a model that uses this transformation.

McMillen, D.P.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Large-Scale Urban Decontamination; Developments, Historical Examples and Lessons Learned  

SciTech Connect

Recent terrorist threats and actual events have lead to a renewed interest in the technical field of large scale, urban environment decontamination. One of the driving forces for this interest is the real potential for the cleanup and removal of radioactive dispersal device (RDD or “dirty bomb”) residues. In response the U. S. Government has spent many millions of dollars investigating RDD contamination and novel decontamination methodologies. Interest in chemical and biological (CB) cleanup has also peaked with the threat of terrorist action like the anthrax attack at the Hart Senate Office Building and with catastrophic natural events such as Hurricane Katrina. The efficiency of cleanup response will be improved with these new developments and a better understanding of the “old reliable” methodologies. Perhaps the most interesting area of investigation for large area decontamination is that of the RDD. While primarily an economic and psychological weapon, the need to cleanup and return valuable or culturally significant resources to the public is nonetheless valid. Several private companies, universities and National Laboratories are currently developing novel RDD cleanup technologies. Because of its longstanding association with radioactive facilities, the U. S. Department of Energy National Laboratories are at the forefront in developing and testing new RDD decontamination methods. However, such cleanup technologies are likely to be fairly task specific; while many different contamination mechanisms, substrate and environmental conditions will make actual application more complicated. Some major efforts have also been made to model potential contamination, to evaluate both old and new decontamination techniques and to assess their readiness for use. Non-radioactive, CB threats each have unique decontamination challenges and recent events have provided some examples. The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), as lead agency for these emergency cleanup responses, has a sound approach for decontamination decision-making that has been applied several times. The anthrax contamination at the U. S. Hart Senate Office Building and numerous U. S. Post Office facilities are examples of employing novel technical responses. Decontamination of the Hart Office building required development of a new approach for high level decontamination of biological contamination as well as techniques for evaluating the technology effectiveness. The World Trade Center destruction also demonstrated the need for, and successful implementation of, appropriate cleanup methodologies. There are a number of significant lessons that can be gained from a look at previous large scale cleanup projects. Too often we are quick to apply a costly “package and dispose” method when sound technological cleaning approaches are available. Understanding historical perspectives, advanced planning and constant technology improvement are essential to successful decontamination.

Rick Demmer

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Opportunities for Saving Energy and Improving Air Quality in Urban Heat Islands  

SciTech Connect

World energy use is the main contributor to atmospheric CO2. In 2002, about 7.0 giga metric tons of carbon (GtC) were emitted internationally by combustion of gas, liquid, and solid fuels (CDIAC, 2006), 2 to 5 times the amount contributed by deforestation (Brown et al., 1988). The share of atmospheric carbon emissions for the United States from fossil fuel combustion was 1.6 GtC. Increasing use of fossil fuel and deforestation together have raised atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration some 25% over the last 150 years. According to global climate models and preliminary measurements, these changes in the composition of the atmosphere have already begun raising the Earth's average temperature. If current energy trends continue, these changes could drastically alter the Earth's temperature, with unknown but potentially catastrophic physical and political consequences. During the last three decades, increased energy awareness has led to conservation efforts and leveling of energy consumption in the industrialized countries. An important byproduct of this reduced energy use is the lowering of CO{sub 2} emissions. Of all electricity generated in the United States, about one-sixth is used to air-condition buildings. The air-conditioning use is about 400 tera-watt-hours (TWh), equivalent to about 80 million metric tons of carbon (MtC) emissions, and translating to about $40 billion (B) per year. Of this $40 B/year, about half is used in cities that have pronounced 'heat islands'. The contribution of the urban heat island to the air-conditioning demand has increased over the last 40 years and it is currently at about 10%. Metropolitan areas in the United States (e.g., Los Angeles, Phoenix, Houston, Atlanta, and New York City) have typically pronounced heat islands that warrant special attention by anyone concerned with broad-scale energy efficiency (HIG, 2006). The ambient air is primarily heated through three processes: direct absorption of solar radiation, convection of heat from hot surfaces, and man-made heat (exhaust from cars, buildings, etc.). Air is fairly transparent to light--the direct absorption of solar radiation in atmospheric air only raises the air temperature by a small amount. Typically about 90% of solar radiation reaches the Earth's surface and then is either absorbed or reflected. The absorbed radiation on the surface increases the surface temperature. And in turn the hot surfaces heat the air. This convective heating is responsible for the majority of the diurnal temperature range. The contribution of man-made heat (e.g., air conditioning, cars) is very small, compared to the heating of air by hot surfaces, except for the downtown high-rise areas.

Akbari, Hashem

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

URBAN ATMOSPHERIC OBSERVATORY (UAO) FIRST PLANNING WORKSHOP, JANUARY 27-28-2003. WORKSHOP SUMMARY.  

SciTech Connect

The Urban Atmospheric Observatory (UAO) First Planning Workshop was held on 27-28 January 2003 at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) in downtown Manhattan, New York City. The meeting was well attended by local, state, and national administrators, as well as scientists and engineers from the national laboratories and academia. The real-time intensive UAO is a necessary step toward the development and validation of new technologies in support of the New York City emergency management and anti-terrorism effort. The real-time intensive UAO will be a dense array of meteorological instrumentation, remote sensing and satellite products and model output, as well as radiation detection, gamma spectrometer and aerosol measurements focused onto a small area in the heart of Manhattan. Such a test-bed, developed in a somewhat homogeneous urban area, and with a well-developed communication and data collection backbone, will be of immense utility for understanding how models of all scales can be improved and how they can best be integrated into the city's emergency program. The goal of the First Planning Workshop was to bring together a small group of experts in the fields of urban meteorology, modeling from mesoscale to fine-mesh computational fluid dynamics, instrumentation, communications and visualization, in order to (1) establish the importance of the observational program, (2) define the most efficient and cost-effective design for the program, (3) define needed intensive observational efforts and establish a schedule, and (4) define the importance of the UAO in emergency operations. The workshop achieved its goals with the enthusiastic participation of over forty persons. There was a synthesis of ideas towards a world-class facility that would benefit both immediate emergency management activities and, over an extended time, the entire field of urban meteorology and contaminant dispersion modeling.

REYNOLDS,R.M.; LEE,H.N.

2003-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

395

URBAN ATMOSPHERIC OBSERVATORY (UAO) FIRST PLANNING WORKSHOP, JANUARY 27-28-2003. WORKSHOP SUMMARY.  

SciTech Connect

The Urban Atmospheric Observatory (UAO) First Planning Workshop was held on 27-28 January 2003 at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) in downtown Manhattan, New York City. The meeting was well attended by local, state, and national administrators, as well as scientists and engineers from the national laboratories and academia. The real-time intensive UAO is a necessary step toward the development and validation of new technologies in support of the New York City emergency management and anti-terrorism effort. The real-time intensive UAO will be a dense array of meteorological instrumentation, remote sensing and satellite products and model output, as well as radiation detection, gamma spectrometer and aerosol measurements focused onto a small area in the heart of Manhattan. Such a test-bed, developed in a somewhat homogeneous urban area, and with a well-developed communication and data collection backbone, will be of immense utility for understanding how models of all scales can be improved and how they can best be integrated into the city's emergency program. The goal of the First Planning Workshop was to bring together a small group of experts in the fields of urban meteorology, modeling from mesoscale to fine-mesh computational fluid dynamics, instrumentation, communications and visualization, in order to (1) establish the importance of the observational program, (2) define the most efficient and cost-effective design for the program, (3) define needed intensive observational efforts and establish a schedule, and (4) define the importance of the UAO in emergency operations. The workshop achieved its goals with the enthusiastic participation of over forty persons. There was a synthesis of ideas towards a world-class facility that would benefit both immediate emergency management activities and, over an extended time, the entire field of urban meteorology and contaminant dispersion modeling.

REYNOLDS,R.M.; LEE,H.N.

2003-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

396

Vermont Air Pollution Control Regulations, Major Stationary Sources and Major Modifications (Vermont)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section of the air quality standards applies to all major sources and major modifications and outlines the required control technology to achieve the most stringent emission rate. Emission...

397

Major Economies Forum on Energy and Climate | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Economies Forum on Energy and Climate Economies Forum on Energy and Climate Jump to: navigation, search Name Major Economies Forum on Energy and Climate Agency/Company /Organization Major Economies Forum Sector Energy, Land Focus Area Conventional Energy, Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Biomass, Solar, Wind, Buildings, Industry, Transportation, Forestry, Agriculture Topics Policies/deployment programs, Pathways analysis, Technology characterizations Resource Type Lessons learned/best practices Website http://www.majoreconomiesforum References MEF[1] Contents 1 Background 2 Technology Action Plans 2.1 Advanced Vehicles 2.2 Bioenergy 2.3 Carbon Capture, Use and Storage 2.4 Energy Efficiency-Buildings Sector 2.5 Energy Efficiency-Industrial Sector 2.6 High-Efficiency, Low-Emissions (HELE) Coal Technologies

398

The major in American Indian Studies is one of the options within the Committee Interdisciplinary Major  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Major (CIM) program. CIM majors "build" their own major by working with a committee of faculty members their personal educational and career objectives. The American Indian Studies CIM is an interdisciplinary program experience with American Indian people and their culture. UWMilwLetSci The American Indian Studies CIM

Saldin, Dilano

399

More Than “Not Urban”: Seeking a Quantifiable Definition of Rural  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2010. “2010 Census Urban and Rural Classification and Urbanwillamson_2003.cfm. California Rural Legal Assistance, Inc.and Opportunities in Four Rural Americas. Durham: University

Miller, Ruth

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Urban Bias, Rural Sexual Minorities, and the Courts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sexual-Minority Adolescents in Rural Communities in British1967)). Id. Urban Bias, Rural Sexual Minorities entationsitive to the fact that many rural sexual minorities engage

Luke, Boso

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "major urban areas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Decentralizing urbanization : harnessing the potential of small cities in India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Perceived as symbols of national development or degeneration, megacities continue to dominate discourse and action related to urbanization, particularly in developing countries like India. Simultaneously, a large portion ...

Suri, Sagarika

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Urban Electric Vehicle Specificatio...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Test Procedures to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Urban Electric Vehicle Specifications and Test Procedures on Facebook Tweet about Advanced Vehicle...

403

Urban Eyes: Ultra-wideband (UWB) Detecting and Tracking  

California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, under Contract No. W-7405-Eng-48. UCRL-PRES-217242 • Urban Eyes is a man-portable micro-power

404

Adapting Urban Transport to Climate Change- Module 5f - Sustainable...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Urban Transport to Climate Change- Module 5f - Sustainable transport: a sourcebook for policy-makers in developing cities Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Adapting...

405

Urban Search and Rescue Robots Nationwide Deploy for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... aquatic emergency response robots from across the country will face realistic urban search and rescue challenges April 4-6 at Disaster City near ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

406

Global cooling: increasing world-wide urban albedos to offset...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In addition, increasing urban albedo can result in less absorption of incoming solar radiation by the surface-troposphere system, countering to some extent the global scale...

407

Cosmopolis Now: Urban Narratives in the Age of Global Migration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rishora. “The Passionate Cosmopolitan in Salman Rushdie’sCraig Young, eds. Cosmopolitan Urbanism. London: Routledge,Keith, After the Cosmopolitan? : Multicultural Cities and

Jirn, Jin Suh

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Urban Electric Vehicle Special...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Special Projects to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Urban Electric Vehicle Special Projects on Facebook Tweet about Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity:...

409

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Urban Electric Vehicle Testing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing Reports to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Urban Electric Vehicle Testing Reports on Facebook Tweet about Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity:...

410

Urban aerosols harbor diverse and dynamic bacterial populations  

Urban aerosols harbor diverse and dynamic bacterial populations Eoin L. Brodie, Todd Z. DeSantis, Jordan P. Moberg Parker, Ingrid X. Zubietta, Yvette M. Piceno, and ...

411

Urban-rural differences in distal forearm fractures: Cohort Norway  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

with increasing degree of urbanization for both genders in ... The capital city of Oslo still had a higher incidence ... energy wrist fracture have osteoporosis (T-

412

Quality and Price Perceptions of Urban Chinese Consumers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Abstract Quality and price are two product attributes that urban Chinese consumers always take into consideration in the evaluation of alternative brands. Understanding how they… (more)

Zhang , Chun

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Texas Avenue mixed-use urban street redevelopment, Lubbock, Texas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis focused primarily on establishing design principles for mixed-use urban street redevelopment. This study began with a literature review exploring the history of modern… (more)

[No author

414

Studies of urban atmospheric aerosols using lidar and sky radiometer.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

???This thesis discusses the remote sensing of atmospheric aerosols, the corresponding instrumental technology and inversion algorithm. The urban aerosol optical properties in Hong Kong have… (more)

Yang, Xun (??)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

BNL | TCP News | NYU's Center for Urban Science and Progress ...  

... and emergency preparedness to some of the real problems facing New York and other urban communities is exciting to our engineers and scientists," ...

416

taking charge : optimizing urban charging infrastructure for shared electric vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis analyses the opportunities and constraints of deploying charging infrastructure for shared electric vehicles in urban environments. Existing electric vehicle charging infrastructure for privately owned vehicles ...

Subramani, Praveen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Tanks focus area. Annual report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management is tasked with a major remediation project to treat and dispose of radioactive waste in hundreds of underground storage tanks. These tanks contain about 90,000,000 gallons of high-level and transuranic wastes. We have 68 known or assumed leaking tanks, that have allowed waste to migrate into the soil surrounding the tank. In some cases, the tank contents have reacted to form flammable gases, introducing additional safety risks. These tanks must be maintained in the safest possible condition until their eventual remediation to reduce the risk of waste migration and exposure to workers, the public, and the environment. Science and technology development for safer, more efficient, and cost-effective waste treatment methods will speed up progress toward the final remediation of these tanks. The DOE Office of Environmental Management established the Tanks Focus Area to serve as the DOE-EM`s technology development program for radioactive waste tank remediation in partnership with the Offices of Waste Management and Environmental Restoration. The Tanks Focus Area is responsible for leading, coordinating, and facilitating science and technology development to support remediation at DOE`s four major tank sites: the Hanford Site in Washington State, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory in Idaho, Oak Ridge Reservation in Tennessee, and the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. The technical scope covers the major functions that comprise a complete tank remediation system: waste retrieval, waste pretreatment, waste immobilization, tank closure, and characterization of both the waste and tank. Safety is integrated across all the functions and is a key component of the Tanks Focus Area program.

Frey, J.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

418

Intern experience at the Center for Urban Programs: an internship report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report discusses the author's internship at Texas A&M University Center for Urban Programs from May, 1978 through February, 1979. The objectives of the internship were to: 1. Increase the intern's technical competence in problems facing local governments; 2. Improve the administration of the Center for Urban Programs so that the Center can more effectively serve Texas local governments; and 3. Gain insight into the decision making process of local governments by active participation. The intern's responsibilities included work on Center staff-directed research projects, Center-coordinated research projects, and Center administration. The intern's major project responsibilities included directing the Community Energy Conservation project of the Texas Energy Extension Service, developing a street maintenance priority ranking system for the City of Denton, serving as University Coordinator for the Garland Urban Observatory and devising a Budget Forecasting System for the Center. To accomplish the third objective, the author served on the College Station Parks and Recreation Board during the internship. In evaluating the internship, the intern found that it fulfilled all the objectives set forth by the intern, his internship supervisor, and his academic committee chairman. The intern increased his technical competence in solving problems facing local governments. He effectively handled administrative responsibilities at the Center and he participated in the decision making process of a local government. The intern also developed personal contacts with local, state, and federal government officials.

Kerbel, Richard (Richard Ira), 1950-

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Infrastructure Ecology for Sustainable and Resilient Urban Infrastructure Design  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The population growth coupled with increasing urbanization is predicted to exert a huge demand on the growth and retrofit of urban infrastructure, particularly in water and energy systems. The U.S. population is estimated to grow by 23% (UN, 2009) between 2005 and 2030. The corresponding increases in energy and water demand were predicted as 14% (EIA, 2009) and 20% (Elcock, 2008), respectively. The water-energy nexus needs to be better understood to satisfy the increased demand in a sustainable manner without conflicting with environmental and economic constraints. Overall, 4% of U.S. power generation is used for water distribution (80%) and treatment (20%). 3% of U.S. water consumption (100 billion gallons per day, or 100 BGD) and 40% of U.S. water withdrawal (340 BGD) are for thermoelectric power generation (Goldstein and Smith, 2002). The water demand for energy production is predicted to increase most significantly among the water consumption sectors by 2030. On the other hand, due to the dearth of conventional water sources, energy intensive technologies are increasingly in use to treat seawater and brackish groundwater for water supply. Thus comprehending the interrelation and interdependency between water and energy system is imperative to evaluate sustainable water and energy supply alternatives for cities. In addition to the water-energy nexus, decentralized or distributed concept is also beneficial for designing sustainable water and energy infrastructure as these alternatives require lesser distribution lines and space in a compact urban area. Especially, the distributed energy infrastructure is more suited to interconnect various large and small scale renewable energy producers which can be expected to mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In the case of decentralized water infrastructure, on-site wastewater treatment facility can provide multiple benefits. Firstly, it reduces the potable water demand by reusing the treated water for non-potable uses and secondly, it also reduces the wastewater load to central facility. In addition, lesser dependency on the distribution network contributes to increased reliability and resiliency of the infrastructure. The goal of this research is to develop a framework which seeks an optimal combination of decentralized water and energy alternatives and centralized infrastructures based on physical and socio-economic environments of a region. Centralized and decentralized options related to water, wastewater and stormwater and distributed energy alternatives including photovoltaic (PV) generators, fuel cells and microturbines are investigated. In the context of the water-energy nexus, water recovery from energy alternatives and energy recovery from water alternatives are reflected. Alternatives recapturing nutrients from wastewater are also considered to conserve depleting resources. The alternatives are evaluated in terms of their life-cycle environmental impact and economic performance using a hybrid life cycle assessment (LCA) tool and cost benefit analysis, respectively. Meeting the increasing demand of a test bed, an optimal combination of the alternatives is designed to minimize environmental and economic impacts including CO2 emissions, human health risk, natural resource use, and construction and operation cost. The framework determines the optimal combination depending on urban density, transmission or conveyance distance or network, geology, climate, etc. Therefore, it will be also able to evaluate infrastructure resiliency against physical and socio-economic challenges such as population growth, severe weather, energy and water shortage, economic crisis, and so on.

Jeong, Hyunju [Georgia Institute of Technology; Pandit, Arka [Georgia Institute of Technology; Crittenden, John [Georgia Institute of Technology; Xu, Ming [University of Michigan; Perrings, Charles [Arizona State University; Wang, Dali [ORNL; Li, Ke [University of Georgia; French, Steve [Georgia Institute of Technology

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Characterizing Variability of the Urban Physical Environment for a Suite of Cities in Rondônia, Brazil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Urban environments are characterized by high spectral and spatial heterogeneity and, as a consequence, most urban pixels in moderate-resolution imagery contain multiple land-cover materials. Despite these complexities, virtually all urban land ...

Rebecca L. Powell; Dar A. Roberts

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "major urban areas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Financial News for Major Energy Companies  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Third Quarter 2005 Third Quarter 2005 The "Financial News for Major Energy Companies" is issued quarterly to report recent trends in the financial performance of the major energy companies. These include the respondents to Form EIA-28 (Financial Reporting System (FRS)), with the exception of the FRS companies that do not issue quarterly earnings releases or fail to provide separate information for the company's U.S. operations. Twenty-one 1 major energy companies reported overall net income (excluding unusual items) of $26.0 billion on revenues of $295.1 billion during the third quarter of 2005 (Q305). The level of net income for Q305 was 69 percent higher than in the third quarter of 2004 (Q304) (Table 1). Net income for Q305 increased primarily as a result of higher crude oil and

422

Financial News for Major Energy Companies  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

First Quarter 2006 First Quarter 2006 The "Financial News for Major Energy Companies" is issued quarterly to report recent trends in the financial performance of the major energy companies. These include the respondents to Form EIA-28 (Financial Reporting System (FRS)), with the exception of the FRS companies that do not issue quarterly earnings releases or fail to provide separate information for the company's U.S. operations. Twenty-one major energy companies 1 reported overall net income (excluding unusual items) of $24.1 billion on revenues of $276.6 billion during the first quarter of 2006 (Q106). The level of net income for Q106 was 23 percent higher than in the first quarter of 2005 (Q105) (Table 1). Net income for Q106 increased primarily as a result of higher crude oil and

423

Financial News for Major Energy Companies  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Second Quarter 2005 Second Quarter 2005 The "Financial News for Major Energy Companies" is issued quarterly to report recent trends in the financial performance of the major energy companies. These include the respondents to Form EIA-28 (Financial Reporting System (FRS)), with the exception of the FRS companies that do not issue quarterly earnings releases or fail to provide separate information for the company's U.S. operations. Twenty-five major energy companies reported overall net income (excluding unusual items) of $23.0 billion on revenues of $276.1 billion during the second quarter of 2005 (Q205). The level of net income for Q205 was 38 percent higher than in the second quarter of 2004 (Q204) (Table 1). Net income for Q205 increased primarily as a result of higher crude oil

424

Relay Performance During Major System Disturbances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract—Power systems in the United States and abroad experienced several wide-area disturbances in the last 15 years including the largest blackout on August 14, 2003, in the Midwest

Demetrios Tziouvaras; Schweitzer Engineering Laboratories

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Southern Nevada residents` views about the Yucca Mountain high-level nuclear waste repository and related issues: A comparative analysis of urban and rural survey data  

SciTech Connect

two separate surveys were undertaken in 1988 to ascertain southern Nevadans` views about the Yucca Mountain repository and related issues. The first of these studies focused on the attitudes and perceptions of residents in the Las Vegas metropolitan area. The second study addressed similar issues, but focused on the views of residents in six rural communities in three counties adjacent to the Yucca Mountain site. However, parallel findings from the two data sets have not been jointly analyzed in order to identify ways in which the views and orientations of residents in the rural and urban study areas may be similar or different. The purpose of this report is to develop and present a comparative assessment of selected issues addressed in the rural and urban surveys. Because both urban and rural populations would potentially be impacted by the Yucca Mountain repository, such an analysis will provide important insights into possible repository impacts on the well-being of residents throughout southern Nevada.

Krannich, R.S.; Little, R.L. [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States); Mushkatel, A.; Pijawka, K.D.; Jones, P. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

DC's Marble ceiling : urban height and its regulation in Washington, DC; Urban height and its regulation in Washington, DC.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Washington, DC has a unique urban form that is the result of a century-old law. Through the narrow lens of DC's height limit, I survey… (more)

Trueblood, Andrew Tyson

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

taking charge : optimizing urban charging infrastructure for shared electric vehicles; Optimizing urban charging infrastructure for shared electric vehicles.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis analyses the opportunities and constraints of deploying charging infrastructure for shared electric vehicles in urban environments. Existing electric vehicle charging infrastructure for privately… (more)

Subramani, Praveen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Exploring the feasibility of developing partnerships between Hispanic-serving organizations and the 4-H clubs in the state of Texas, in both urban and rural communities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The primary purpose of this study was to explore the phics. feasibility of developing partnerships between Hispanic-serving organizations and the 4-H club in both rural and urban areas in the state of Texas. The study also identified existing and non-existing Hispanic-serving organizations in the state of Texas, current relationships between Hispanic-service organizations and the 4-H program in the state of Texas, and benefits that can arise between these partnerships. The study was conducted during late spring and early summer, 1998. The target sample for this study was three hundred forty Hispanic-serving organizations in the state of Texas. There were eight Hispanic-serving organization directories that were used as the sampling frame for the study. The instrument used consisted of fifteen questions to determine familiarity of 4-H clubs, programs that focus on youth, youth and volunteer training, and current and potential collaboration between the 4-H program and Hispanic-serving organizations. The questionnaire also included two open-ended questions regarding benefits and alternative practices. l . The majority of the surveys came from urban areas where there were more Hispanic serving organizations to cater to the needs of the Hispanic population. The areas were Austin, Brownsville, Dallas, El Paso, Fort Worth, Houston, and San Antonio. 2. 75 percent of all organizations that responded to the survey were involved in service to youth in some form or fashion. The Hispanic-serving organizations that responded to the survey did not dedicate sufficient time (determined by the researcher) to the four main components of the 4-H program (leadership, youth training programs, public speaking, and community service). 4. Hispanic-serving organizations showed some familiarity with the 4-H program. However, 4-H is still seen as a club for the youth that live on a farm or rich. 5. Less than eve percent of Hispanic-serving organizations were currently working with the local 4-H program in their communities. Organizations are unsure as to what 4-H can provide to their community. 6. More than 50 percent of the Hispanic-serving organizations that responded to the survey were interested in developing a partnership with the 4-H club.

Rodriguez, Reyes Isaac

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Division/ Interest Area Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Learn more about Divisions and Interest areas. Division/ Interest Area Information Membership Information achievement application award Awards distinguished division Divisions fats job Join lipid lipids Member member get a member Membership memori

430

Mascoma Announces Major Cellulosic Biofuel Technology Breakthrough  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mascoma Announces Major Cellulosic Biofuel Technology Breakthrough Lebanon, NH - May 7, 2009 bioprocessing, or CBP, a low-cost processing strategy for production of biofuels from cellulosic biomass. CBP much, much closer to billions of gallons of low cost cellulosic biofuels," said Michigan State

431

Conservation justice in metropolitan Cape Town: A study at the Macassar Dunes Conservation Area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conservation justice in metropolitan Cape Town: A study at the Macassar Dunes Conservation Area J xxxx Keywords: Conservation justice Community-based conservation South Africa Urban conservation Stakeholder analysis a b s t r a c t Conservation justice, a concept analogous to environmental justice

Silander Jr., John A.

432

Urban Water Conservation along the Rio Grande  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Not long ago, conversations on urban water demand were not only rare but dull. Today, especially in the West and Southwest, these conversations can turn into heated debates. The question of who has enough water for the future has pitted urban interests against agriculture and financial resources against cultural values. Water supply is finite, even if it is part of a cycle. Water may be plentiful in some places and scarce in others. Until we are ready to make water conservation a pattern of behavior to use less water, our demand will continue to grow as our population grows. Although water conservation is not an answer to all growth, it does offer an alternative to acquiring some new water supplies. Water conservation is almost always the least expensive water supply alternative. Water conservation can have two definitions. First and most often, conservation is considered a reduction in the amount of water used. Each person uses less. An alternative definition implies more efficient use of water. We waste less. Less waste can be attributed to best management practices, more efficient hardware or literally less water running into the streets from irrigation systems. Urban water conservation incorporates watersaving measures and incentives for the home, on the landscape and throughout the city water distribution system. It is easy to differentiate between water-saving measures and incentives. A water-saving measure such as a water-efficient toilet reduces the amount used each and every time it is flushed. Or, a rain sensor turns off a sprinkler system during rain showers. In contrast, incentives encourage the wise use of water through education, ordinances or scheduling. Educational programs suggest water reductions in the landscape, ordinances mandate how much turf is planted, and schedules tell homeowners when to irrigate. Combined, measures and incentives provide a water conservation program.

Silvey, Valeen; Kaiser, Ronald; Lesikar, Bruce; Runyan, Craig

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Modeling Suburban and Rural-Residential Development Beyond the Urban Fringe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impacts on Agriculture and Rural Land. ” Agricultural2003. “Biodiversity across a Rural Land-Use Gradient. ”Managing Urban Growth at the Rural-Urban Fringe: A Parcel-

Newburn, David A.; Berck, Peter

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Urban Policies and Earthquake Risk Mitigation  

SciTech Connect

The paper aims at proposing some considerations about some recent experiences of research carried out on the theme of earthquake risk mitigation and combining policies and actions of mitigation with urban development strategies. The objective was to go beyond the classical methodological approach aiming at defining a 'technical' evaluation of the earthquake risk through a procedure which can correlate the three 'components' of danger, exposure and vulnerability. These researches experiment, in terms of methodology and application, with a new category of interpretation and strategy: the so-called Struttura Urbana Minima (Minimum urban structure).Actually, the introduction of the Struttura Urbana Minima establishes a different approach towards the theme of safety in the field of earthquake risk, since it leads to a wider viewpoint, combining the building aspect of the issue with the purely urban one, involving not only town planning, but also social and managerial implications.In this sense the constituent logic of these researches is strengthened by two fundamental issues:- The social awareness of earthquake;- The inclusion of mitigation policies in the ordinary strategies for town and territory management. Three main aspects of the first point, that is of the 'social awareness of earthquake', characterize this issue and demand to be considered within a prevention policy:- The central role of the risk as a social production,- The central role of the local community consent,- The central role of the local community capability to planTherefore, consent, considered not only as acceptance, but above all as participation in the elaboration and implementation of choices, plays a crucial role in the wider issue of prevention policies.As far as the second point is concerned, the inclusion of preventive mitigation policies in ordinary strategies for the town and territory management demands the identification of criteria of choice and priorities of intervention and, as a consequence, the opportunity to promote an approach to the theme of mitigation policies realized through strategic principles and systemic logics able to shift the problem from the building to the town. The critical aspects of this theme are tied to three main issues:- The sharing of the way of interpreting town planning,- The integration of multiple objectives in one intervention tool,- The measures which can be adopted for an effective prevention policy.The above-mentioned elements have inspired these researches experimented on Calabrian towns.In particular, in this paper the experience carried out on Reggio Calabria is proposed. Its cultural roots derive from the principles and criteria experimented in small Calabrian towns, but it modifies them according to the complexity of the urban settlement, introducing also some experimental concepts and methodological approaches.

Sarlo, Antonella [Department of Architecture and Analysis of Mediterranean City Mediterranea University, via Melissari-Feo di Vito, 89124 Reggio Calabria (Italy)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

435

Ultralight Stainless Steel Urban Bus Concept  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

While stainless steel buses are certainly not new, this study reveals opportunities for substantial improvements in structural performance.The objective of this project was to investigate the mass saving potential of ultra-high strength stainless steel as applied to the structure of a full size urban transit bus.The resulting design for a low floor,hybrid bus has an empty weight less than half that of a conventional transit bus.The reduced curb weight allows for a greater payload,without exceeding legal axle limits. A combination of finite element modeling and dynamic testing of scale models was used to predict structural performance.

J. Bruce Emmons; Leonard J. Blessing

2001-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

436

DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National Interest Electric Transmission Corridors October 2, 2007 DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National...

437

DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National Interest Electric Transmission Corridors DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National Interest Electric...

438

Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal br Resource br Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region MW K Coso Geothermal Area Coso Geothermal Area Walker Lane...

439

A Strategic Project Appraisal framework for ecologically sustainable urban infrastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Actors in the built environment are progressively considering environmental and social issues alongside functional and economic aspects of development projects. Infrastructure projects represent major investment and construction initiatives with attendant environmental, economic and societal impacts across multiple scales. To date, while sustainability strategies and frameworks have focused on wider national aspirations and strategic objectives, they are noticeably weak in addressing micro-level integrated decision making in the built environment, particularly for infrastructure projects. The proposed approach of this paper is based on the principal that early intervention is the most cost-effective and efficient means of mitigating the environmental effects of development projects, particularly macro infrastructure developments. A strategic overview of the various project alternatives, taking account for stakeholder and expert input, could effectively reduce project impacts/risks at low cost to the project developers but provide significant benefit to wider communities, including communities of future stakeholders. This paper is the first exploratory step in developing a more systematic framework for evaluating strategic alternatives for major metropolitan infrastructure projects, based on key sustainability principles. The developed Strategic Project Appraisal (SPA) framework, grounded in the theory of Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA), provides a means of practically appraising project impacts and alternatives in terms of quantified ecological limits; addresses the neglected topic of metropolitan infrastructure as a means of delivering sustainability outcomes in the urban context and more broadly, seeks to open a debate on the potential for SEA methodology to be more extensively applied to address sustainability challenges in the built environment. Practically applied and timed appropriately, the SPA framework can enable better decision-making and more efficient resource allocation ensuring low impact infrastructure development.

Morrissey, John, E-mail: john.morrissey@rmit.edu.au [Centre for Design, RMIT University, GPO Box 2476, Melbourne VIC 3001 (Australia); Iyer-Raniga, Usha, E-mail: usha.iyer-raniga@rmit.edu.au [School of Property, Construction and Project Management, RMIT University, GPO Box 2476, Melbourne VIC 3001 (Australia); McLaughlin, Patricia; Mills, Anthony [School of Property, Construction and Project Management, RMIT University, GPO Box 2476, Melbourne VIC 3001 (Australia)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

440

Interactive design of urban spaces using geometrical and behavioral modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main contribution of our work is in closing the loop between behavioral and geometrical modeling of cities. Editing of urban design variables is performed intuitively and visually using a graphical user interface. Any design variable can be constrained ... Keywords: 3D models, editing, interactive, urban spaces

Carlos A. Vanegas; Daniel G. Aliaga; Bed?ich Beneš; Paul A. Waddell

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "major urban areas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Modelling the upgrade of an urban waste disposal system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The waste intermodal station of Clyde, in the city of Sydney, Australia, is in the heart of a complex network of terminals connected by road and rail to transport urban waste from its first collection to its final disposal. The amount of waste the network ... Keywords: Discrete-event simulation, Intermodal transfer, Satellite stations, Urban solid waste, Waste collection

G. Guariso; F. Michetti; F. Porta; S. Moore

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Modeling heavy metal mass releases from urban battery litter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Consumer batteries littered on urban pavements release metals of environmental significance (Ag, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Li, Mn, Ni, Pd, Ti, Zn) to stormwater runoff. Predicting the mass loading of any one metal is difficult because of the random composition ... Keywords: Heavy metals, filtered Poisson process, Mass loading, zinc, Stormwater contamination, Urban battery litter

Caleb Krouse; Aaron A. Jennings; Dario Gasparini

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

The Shear Layer above and in Urban Canopies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nature and role of the shear layer, which occurs at the level of the average building height in urban canopies, are poorly understood. Velocity data are analyzed to determine the characteristics of the shear layer of the urban canopy, defined ...

Pablo Huq; Louis A. White; Alejandro Carrillo; Jose Redondo; Seshu Dharmavaram; Steven R. Hanna

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

The city at hand: media installations as urban information systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes an approach to design a novel system for presenting data related to a city in an intuitive and metaphorical way. By using interactive surfaces and the coupling of information with graspable physical objects, urban data, maps and ... Keywords: HCI, collaboration, interaction design, maps, multimedia, paper-pen metaphor, presentation system, tangible interface, tangible interfaces, urban information system

Roland Haring; Hideaki Ogawa; Christopher Lindinger; Horst Hörtner; Shervin Afshar; David Stolarsky

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Program Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations in the United States Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations More Documents & Publications Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations...

446

Application of a Sequential Reaction Model to PANS and Aldehyde Measurements in Two Urban Areas  

SciTech Connect

Measurements of peroxycarboxylic nitric anhydrides (= PAN, PPN, MPAN) and aldehydes (acetaldehyde, propanal, and methacrolein) were made at Nashville, Tennessee, in 1999 and Houston, Texas, in 2000. The data were interpreted with a sequential reaction model that included reaction of aldehydes with hydroxl radical and formation or loss of PANs mediated by peroxyacyl radicals. The comparison of the measured ratios with those predicted by the model showed disagreement for PAN/acetaldehyde and PPN/propanal in Nashville but agreement in Houston. These features are consistent with the relative importance of isoprene to PAN formation at each site.

Roberts, James M.; Stroud, C.; Jobson, B Tom T.; Trainer, Michael; Hereid, D.; Williams, E. J.; Fehsenfeld, Fred C.; Brune, W. H.; Martinez, M.; Harder, H.

2001-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

447

The amphibians and reptiles in three urban protected areas... A STUDY ON THE AMPHIBIANS (AMPHIBIA) AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

phylogenetic information (de- rived from the Fisher information matrix; Edwards 1972; Atkinson and Donev 1992" for experimental design; Atkinson and Donev 1992). We compared changes in information to identify branches where

Mollov, Ivelin Aldinov

448

Inhalation of motor vehicle emissions: effects of urban population and land area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M.A. , 1996. Total cost of motor-vehicle use. Access 8,of ammonia and other motor vehicle exhaust emissions.and engine load on motor vehicle emissions. Environmental

Marshall, Julian D.; McKone, Thomas E.; Deakin, Elizabeth; Nazaroff, William W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Optimizing the use of public transit system during no-notice evacuation of urban areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a methodology that can be used to design plans for evacuating transit-dependent citizens during no-notice disasters. A mixed-integer linear program is proposed to model the problem of finding optimal evacuation routes. The objective ... Keywords: Emergency evacuation, Mixed-integer linear programming, No-notice disasters, Public transit system

Fatemeh Sayyady; Sandra D. Eksioglu

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Insulators for cold urban areas: The problem of Road Salt Ravi Gorur and Sreeram Venkataraman  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that is being funded through an industry-utility-university consortium PSERC, Power Sytems Engineering Research are more concerned with the effect that the road salts have on insulators, both ceramic and composite

451

Factors Influencing the Diffusion of Battery Electric Vehicles in Urban Areas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Purchasing a battery electric vehicle is a type of pro-environmental behavior but the impact of such behavior on the environment becomes significant and beneficial only… (more)

Mashayekhi, Morteza

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Challenges and strategies for increasing adoption of small wind turbines in urban areas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A student group at MIT in cooperation with the MIT Department of Facilities is currently working to install a Skystream 3.7 wind turbine on MIT's campus. This has raised several questions about how to best develop small ...

Ferrigno, Kevin J. (Kevin James)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Regional Recovery Framework for a Biological Attack in the Seattle Urban Area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

imaging techniques · Unconventional oil and gas recovery · Gas hydrates · Nano-sensors Cross recovery Unconventional resources Renewable fuels Carbon dioxide Public policy Environmental/health #12;The and commercializing OxProp a "controlled buoyancy proppant" that is expected to materially enhance oil and gas

454

Simulations of the Urban Planetary Boundary Layer in an Arid Metropolitan Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A modified version of the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University–National Center for Atmospheric Research Mesoscale Model (MM5) was applied to the arid Phoenix, Arizona, metropolitan region. The ability of the model to simulate ...

Susanne Grossman-Clarke; Yubao Liu; Joseph A. Zehnder; Jerome D. Fast

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Figliozzi, Kingdon, and Wilkitzki 1 Analysis of Freight Tours in a Congested Urban Area Using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

analysis proved challenging due to the large number of customers visited and links traveled during length distribution reflects variations in the daily number of customer demand and locations decreases as the number of customers visited per tour increases: for 4 customers the percentage of empty

Bertini, Robert L.

456

Aerodynamic Properties of Urban Areas Derived from Analysis of Surface Form  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several methods to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of a site through analysis of its surface form (morphometry) are considered in relation to cities. The measures discussed include zero-plane displacement length (zd), roughness length (...

C. S. B. Grimmond; T. R. Oke

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Heat Storage in Urban Areas: Local-Scale Observations and Evaluation of a Simple Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The flux density of sensible heat to or from storage in the physical mass of the city is determined for seven cities (Chicago, Illinois; Los Angeles, California; Mexico City, Distrito Federal; Miami, Florida; Sacramento, California; Tucson, ...

C. S. B. Grimmond; T. R. Oke

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Doppler Lidar Measurements of Turbulent Structure Function over an Urban Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of radial wind velocity data from the Salford pulsed Doppler infrared lidar is used to calculate turbulent spectral statistics over the city of Salford in the United Kingdom. The results presented here, first, outline the error ...

F. Davies; C. G. Collier; G. N. Pearson; K. E. Bozier

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Integration of supply and demand for water in central Illinois urban areas. Research report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water demand functions were estimated using two sets of data for Central Illinois -- community-wide data and household data. The community-wide data consist of total residential consumption for each of four pre-selected medium-sized cities in Central Illinois. The household data consist of residents from five cities who responded to a mail survey. The study investigates comparability of parameter estimates from the two approaches. If the parameter estimates are comparable, it would suggest water demand estimates need not require costly and time-consuming household surveys. Estimates of price elasticity are negative and less than unitary based on the two data sets used. The estimated price elasticity based on community-wide data is -.037, while using household data estimated price elasticities are in the range from -.14 to -.16. The reasons for these differences are not immediately apparent and warrant further investigation.

Miranda, C.S.; Braden, J.B.; Martin, W.E.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Distribution of physical activity facilities in Scotland by small area measures of deprivation and urbanicity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

References 1. Zaninotto P, Wardle H, Stamatakis E, Mindell J: Forecasting obesity to 2010 London: Department of Health 2006. 2. Department of Health Public Health Research Consortium, Law C, Power C, Graham H, Merrick D: Obesity and health inequalities... , Sundquist K, Ahlen H, Johansson SE, Winkleby MA, Sundquist J: Neighborhood deprivation and cardiovascular disease risk factors: Protective and harmful effects. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health 2006, 34:228-237. 12. Ellaway A, Macintyre S: Does where you...

Lamb, Karen E; Ferguson, Neil S; Wang, Yang; Ogilvie, David; Ellaway, Anne

2010-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "major urban areas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

AN EVALUATION OF THE VARIABILITY OF AIR MASS CHARACTER BETWEEN URBAN AND RURAL AREAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of occurrence of air masses at Washington DC National Airport (DCA), along with the temperature differences air mass characteristics is performed for four two-week "windows" throughout the year; programs then select days which meet all of these criteria for each air mass during each window. Routines

Sheridan, Scott

462

Operational Nowcasting of the Sun Protection Factor for the Urban Area of Vienna  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method was developed to produce hourly updated nowcasts of recommended sun protection factors (SPF) for different photobiological skin types. Actual UV (250–400 nm) measurements and a forecast of the UV index provide the basis of the method. ...

Alois W. Schmalwieser; Günther Schauberger

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Earthquake Risk Management of Underground Lifelines in the Urban Area of Catania  

SciTech Connect

Lifelines typically include the following five utility networks: potable water, sewage natural gas, electric power, telecommunication and transportation system. The response of lifeline systems, like gas and water networks, during a strong earthquake, can be conveniently evaluated with the estimated average number of ruptures per km of pipe. These ruptures may be caused either by fault ruptures crossing, or by permanent deformations of the soil mass (landslides, liquefaction), or by transient soil deformations caused by seismic wave propagation. The possible consequences of damaging earthquakes on transportation systems may be the reduction or the interruption of traffic flow, as well as the impact on the emergency response and on the recovery assistance. A critical element in the emergency management is the closure of roads due to fallen obstacles and debris of collapsed buildings.The earthquake-induced damage to buried pipes is expressed in terms of repair rate (RR), defined as the number of repairs divided by the pipe length (km) exposed to a particular level of seismic demand; this number is a function of the pipe material (and joint type), of the pipe diameter and of the ground shaking level, measured in terms of peak horizontal ground velocity (PGV) or permanent ground displacement (PGD). The development of damage algorithms for buried pipelines is primarily based on empirical evidence, tempered with engineering judgment and sometimes by analytical formulations.For the city of Catania, in the present work use has been made of the correlation between RR and peak horizontal ground velocity by American Lifelines Alliance (ALA, 2001), for the verifications of main buried pipelines. The performance of the main buried distribution networks has been evaluated for the Level I earthquake scenario (January 11, 1693 event I = XI, M 7.3) and for the Level II earthquake scenario (February 20, 1818 event I = IX, M 6.2).Seismic damage scenario of main gas pipelines and water has been obtained, with PGV values calculated for level I and level II earthquake scenarios.

Grasso, S.; Maugeri, M. [University of Catania, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Viale A. Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

464

Feasibility Study of Small Scale Standalone Wind Turbine for Urban Area.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The recent worldwide economic crisis, climate change and global warming have emphasized that the need for low carbon emissions while also ensuring the economic… (more)

Gebrelibanos, Kalekirstos Gebremariam

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

A robust motion planning approach for autonomous driving in urban areas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents an improved sampling-based motion planning algorithm, Robust RRT, that is designed specifically for large robotic vehicles and uncertain, dynamic environments. Five main extensions have been made to ...

Fiore, Gaston A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Improving Building Performance at Urban Scale with a Framework for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Performance at Urban Scale with a Framework for Building Performance at Urban Scale with a Framework for Real-time Data Sharing Title Improving Building Performance at Urban Scale with a Framework for Real-time Data Sharing Publication Type Conference Proceedings LBNL Report Number LBNL-6303E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Pang, Xiufeng, Tianzhen Hong, and Mary Ann Piette Date Published 05/2013 Keywords building performance, energy efficiency, energy modeling, optimal operation, urban scale. Abstract This paper describes work in progress toward an urban-scale system aiming to reduce energy use in neighboring buildings by providing three components: a database for accessing past and present weather data from high quality weather stations; a network for communicating energy-saving strategies between building owners; and a set of modeling tools for real-time building energy simulation.

467

Energy Department Announces the SUN Project, Empowering Urban Native Youth  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Department Announces the SUN Project, Empowering Urban Energy Department Announces the SUN Project, Empowering Urban Native Youth in STEM Education Energy Department Announces the SUN Project, Empowering Urban Native Youth in STEM Education November 13, 2013 - 4:50pm Addthis Energy Department Announces the SUN Project, Empowering Urban Native Youth in STEM Education Andre H. Sayles, Ph.D. Andre H. Sayles, Ph.D. Principal Deputy Director of the Office of Economic Impact and Diversity and Acting Deputy Director of the Office of Minority Business and Economic Development Recently, I had the honor of announcing the launch of the SUN Project, a collaboration between the U.S. Department of Energy and the American Indian Science and Engineering Society to engage urban Native American youth in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields.

468

September 18, 2012, Webinar: Wind Energy in Urban Environments | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 18, 2012, Webinar: Wind Energy in Urban Environments September 18, 2012, Webinar: Wind Energy in Urban Environments September 18, 2012, Webinar: Wind Energy in Urban Environments This webinar was held September 18, 2012, and provided information on wind energy installations in Boston Harbor in Hull, Massachusetts, and near downtown Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Download the presentations below, watch the webinar (WMV 128 MB), or read the text version. Find more CommRE webinars. Lessons Learned: Milwaukee's Wind Turbine Project This presentation provided information on the A-to-Z basics for constructing a wind turbine in an urban environment as well as the lessons learned. The City of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, found that information and transparency were two key items that helped win over local officials and the public when planning their 100-kilowatt urban wind project. Learn more

469

Energy Department Announces the SUN Project, Empowering Urban Native Youth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Department Announces the SUN Project, Empowering Urban Energy Department Announces the SUN Project, Empowering Urban Native Youth in STEM Education Energy Department Announces the SUN Project, Empowering Urban Native Youth in STEM Education November 13, 2013 - 4:50pm Addthis Energy Department Announces the SUN Project, Empowering Urban Native Youth in STEM Education Andre H. Sayles, Ph.D. Andre H. Sayles, Ph.D. Principal Deputy Director of the Office of Economic Impact and Diversity and Acting Deputy Director of the Office of Minority Business and Economic Development Recently, I had the honor of announcing the launch of the SUN Project, a collaboration between the U.S. Department of Energy and the American Indian Science and Engineering Society to engage urban Native American youth in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields.

470

Urban Enterprise Zone Program (New Jersey) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Urban Enterprise Zone Program (New Jersey) Urban Enterprise Zone Program (New Jersey) Urban Enterprise Zone Program (New Jersey) < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State New Jersey Program Type Enterprise Zone New Jersey's Urban Enterprise (UEZ) Program operates under the Department of Community Affairs. The UEZ Program exists to foster an economic climate that revitalizes designated urban communities and stimulates their growth by encouraging businesses to develop and create private sector jobs through public and private investment. Applicant businesses must be registered, located in one of the designated zones, be in tax compliance with the state, and certified by the Program.

471

Environmental Effects Abroad of Major Federal Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

44-NO. 62 44-NO. 62 3-29-79 PAGES 18633-18921 E THURSDAY, MARCH 29, 1979 € 18722 NOTICES [ 31 25-01-MI COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY 'ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS ABROAD OF MAJOR FEDERAL ACTIONS Executive Order 12144; Implementing and Explanotory Documents MARCH 21, 1979. AGENCY: Council on Environmental Quality, Executive Office of t h e F'resi- dent. ACTION: Information Only: Publica- tion of Implementing Documents Con- cerning Executive Order 12114. SUMMARY: O n January 4, 1979, t h e President signed Executive Order 12114, Environmental Effects Abroad of Major Federal Actions (44 FR 1957 (Jan. 9, 1979)). The Council has re- ceived numerous requests for t h e im- plementing and explanatory docu- ments. I n order efficiently to respond to such public requests. t

472

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1995  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5) 5) Distribution Category UC-950 Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1995 January 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration/ Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1995 ii To download the Financial Reporting System 1977-1995 data files, access the Energy Information Center's FTP site, at ftp: //ftp.eia.doe.gov or access the Energy Information Administration's Home Page at http://www.eia.doe.gov.

473

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1996  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6) 6) Distribution Category UC-950 Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1996 January 1998 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration/ Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1996 ii The Financial Reporting System 1977-1996 data files can be downloaded from the Energy Information

474

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1997  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7) 7) Distribution Category UC-950 Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1997 January 1999 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration/ Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1997 ii The Financial Reporting System 1977-1997 data files can be downloaded from the Energy Information Administration's

475

Major Energy Electric Services | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric Services Electric Services Jump to: navigation, search Name Major Energy Electric Services Place New York Utility Id 56504 Utility Location Yes Ownership R NERC Location NPCC ISO NY Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates Residential: $0.0967/kWh Commercial: $0.1070/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Major_Energy_Electric_Services&oldid=411033" Categories: EIA Utility Companies and Aliases

476

Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 - Major Characteristics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Major Characteristics of All Commercial Buildings in 2003 Major Characteristics of All Commercial Buildings in 2003 CBECS data are used to answer basic questions about the commercial buildings sector, such as: What types are there? How large are they? How old are they? and Where are they? Results from the 2003 CBECS show that: The commercial buildings sector is not dominated by a single building type. Office buildings, the most common type of commercial building, account for 17 percent of buildings, floorspace, and energy consumed. Commercial buildings range widely in size and smaller buildings are much more numerous than larger buildings. The smallest buildings (1,001 to 5,000 square feet) account for 53 percent of buildings, but consume only 11 percent of total energy. The largest buildings (those larger than 500,000 square feet)

477

Behavioral ecology of striped skunk: factors influencing urban rabies management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis) are a rabies vector in Texas and efforts are underway to develop an oral rabies vaccination program for skunks. To better understand some of the components necessary, I studied the habitat preferences and home range of skunks, an alternative skunk capture method, and surveyed the knowledge base of medical providers practicing across the state. I radiocollared 99 skunks from the Houston, Texas metropolitan area and monitored skunk movements from March 2004–June 2006. To accelerate progress of this study, I captured 93 of 99 skunks using a dip net. Dip netting allowed for an effective collection alternative to cage trapping. Movement data indicated a strong preference for short grass areas (82%), however, habitat use changed to remote, brushy areas when temperatures were ?7C. Habitat use during the year was different (P = 0.001), with December 2004, January 2005, and February 2005 significantly (P = 0.001) different from one another. Additionally, habitat use during December 2005, February 2006, and March 2006 were significantly different (P = 0.045, P =0.098, and P =0.003, respectively). Data from 20 skunks, covering multiple seasons, were analyzed for home range use. I found male home range use averaged 255 ha (217–345), while females averaged 126 ha (60–218). Male range use was significantly larger than females (P = 0.005). No significant seasonal movements were observed. Lastly, I conducted a survey of 297 Texas primary care medical providers to assess their knowledge of rabies vaccine procedures and their experience with rabies vaccines. Small town providers within the oral rabies vaccination baiting zone were more aware of rabies prophylaxis (P 95% of 297) rarely saw patients for rabies prophylaxis. Survey data indicated providers have minimal, if any, experience with acquiring and administering rabies prophylaxis. My data suggests that an effective oral rabies vaccination program could be established within urban areas by using short grass area baiting strategies during the fall season, using dip net capturing for faster surveillance collection, and by initiating a rabies education program targeted at Texas’ primary care physicians and their staff.

Ruffino, Denise Marie

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Genealogy of major U.S. refiners  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of major U.S. refiners of major U.S. refiners 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Amoco SOHIO BP ARCO Mapco Williams Clark Refining 1/89 12/98 4/00 3/98 Orion Diamond Shamrock Ultramar k 12/96 7/03 Ultramar Diamond Shamrock (UDS) Total North America UDS 9/97 Valero Salomon (Basis) Valero Williams BP BP b BP-Husky Refining LLC (jv) Husky Huntway 5/97 6/01 9/05 Valero Premcor g Valero Valero Valero 12/01 7/94 e 12/98 f Carlyle Group y Coastal 3/03 d 12/88 a 6/01 o Sun Company Sunoco v 7/07 i 4/08 c 5/04 h Pacific Refining (jv) 12/88 r El Paso 1/04 w 10/98 m 6/00 n 9/89 t 8/94 u See notes, footnotes, and source notes below. PBF Energy 6/10 p 12/10 q 3/11 x 10/11 j 9/00 l 1/01 s Genealogy of major U.S. refiners (continued) 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

479

Performance profiles of major energy producers, 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The energy industry generally and petroleum and natural gas operations in particular are frequently reacting to a variety of unsettling forces. Falling oil prices, economic upswings, currency devaluations, increasingly rigorous environmental quality standards, deregulation of electricity markets, and continued advances in exploration and production technology were among the challenges and opportunities to the industry in 1997. To analyze the extent to which these and other developments have affected energy industry financial and operating performance, strategies, and industry structure, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) maintains the Financial Reporting Systems (FRS). Through Form EIA-28, major US energy companies annually report to the FRS. Financial and operating information is reported by major lines of business, including oil and gas production (upstream), petroleum refining and marketing (downstream), other energy operations, and nonenergy business. Performance Profiles of Major Producers 1997 examines the interplays of energy markets, companies` strategies, and government policies (in 1997 and in historical context) that gave rise to the results given here. The report also analyzes other key aspects of energy company financial performance as seen through the multifaceted lens provided by the FRS data and complementary data for industry overall. 41 figs., 77 tabs.

NONE

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Effectiveness of Urban Shelter-in-Place. III: Commercial Districts  

SciTech Connect

In the event of a toxic chemical release to the atmosphere, shelter-in-place (SIP) is an emergency response option available to protect public health. This paper is the last in a three-part series that examines the effectiveness of SIP at reducing adverse health effects in communities. We model a hypothetical chemical release in an urban area, and consider SIP effectiveness in protecting occupants of commercial buildings. Building air infiltration rates are predicted from empirical data using an existing model. We consider the distribution of building air infiltration rates both with mechanical ventilation systems turned off and with the systems operating. We also consider the effects of chemical sorption to indoor surfaces and nonlinear chemical dose-response relationships. We find that commercial buildings provide effective shelter when ventilation systems are off, but that any delay in turning off ventilation systems can greatly reduce SIP effectiveness. Using a two-zone model, we find that there can be substantial benefit by taking shelter in the inner parts of a building that do not experience direct air exchange with the outdoors. Air infiltration rates vary substantially among buildings and this variation is important in quantifying effectiveness for emergency response. Community-wide health metrics, introduced in the previous papers in this series, can be applied in pre-event planning and to guide real-time emergency response.

Chan, Wanyu R.; Chan, Wanyu R.; Nazaroff, William W.; Price, Phillip N.; Gadgil, Ashok J.

2007-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "major urban areas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Dudley Square : a public building as a catalyst for urban revitalization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dudley Square in Roxbury, Massachusetts serves as the economic and commercial center for Boston's minority community. Between 1650 and 1950 the Dudley Square area grew in importance to become a major economic center outside ...

Raymond, Harold Ray

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Thermal regimes of major volcanic centers: Magnetotelluric constraints  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The interpretation of geophysical/electromagnetic field data has been used to study dynamical processes in the crust beneath three of the major tectono-volcanic features in North America: the Long Valley/Mono Craters Volcanic Complex in eastern California, the Cascades Volcanic Belt in Oregon, and the Rio Grande Rift in the area of Socorro, New Mexico. Primary accomplishments have been in the area of creating and implementing a variety of 2-D generalized inverse computer codes, and the application of these codes to fields studies on the basin structures and he deep thermal regimes of the above areas. In order to more fully explore the space of allowable models (i.e. those inverse solutions that fit the data equally well), several distinctly different approaches to the 2-D inverse problem have been developed: (1) an overdetermined block inversion; (2) an overdetermined spline inverstion; (3) a generalized underdetermined total inverse which allows one to tradeoff certain attributes of their model, such as minimum structure (flat models), roughness (smooth models), or length (small models). Moreover, we are exploring various approaches for evaluating the resolution model parameters for the above algorithms. 33 refs.

Hermance, J.F.

1989-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

483

Material Disposal Areas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Material Disposal Areas Material Disposal Areas Material Disposal Areas Material Disposal Areas, also known as MDAs, are sites where material was disposed of below the ground surface in excavated pits, trenches, or shafts. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Material Disposal Areas at LANL The following are descriptions and status updates of each MDA at LANL. To view a current fact sheet on the MDAs, click on LA-UR-13-25837 (pdf). MDA A MDA A is a Hazard Category 2 nuclear facility comprised of a 1.25-acre, fenced, and radiologically controlled area situated on the eastern end of Delta Prime Mesa. Delta Prime Mesa is bounded by Delta Prime Canyon to the north and Los Alamos Canyon to the south.

484

Innovation investment area: Technology summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mission of Environmental Management`s (EM) Office of Technology Development (OTD) Innovation Investment Area is to identify and provide development support for two types of technologies that are developed to characterize, treat and dispose of DOE waste, and to remediate contaminated sites. They are: technologies that show promise to address specific EM needs, but require proof-of-principle experimentation; and (2) already proven technologies in other fields that require critical path experimentation to demonstrate feasibility for adaptation to specific EM needs. The underlying strategy is to ensure that private industry, other Federal Agencies, universities, and DOE National Laboratories are major participants in developing and deploying new and emerging technologies. To this end, about 125 different new and emerging technologies are being developed through Innovation Investment Area`s (IIA) two program elements: RDDT&E New Initiatives (RD01) and Interagency Agreements (RD02). Both of these activities are intended to foster research and development partnerships so as to introduce innovative technologies into other OTD program elements for expedited evaluation.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Naval applications study areas  

SciTech Connect

This memorandum discusses study areas and items that will require attention for the naval studies of the utilization of nuclear propulsion in a submarine-based missile system.

Hadley, J. W.

1962-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

486

Boulder Area Transportation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NIST does not endorse or guarantee the quality or services provided by these businesses. All Denver/Boulder area transportation companies. ...

2011-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

487

NIST Aperture area measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... particularly critical, for example, in climate and weather applications on ... of aperture areas used in exo-atmospheric solar irradiance measurements; ...

2011-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

488

The Regeneration of Urban Empty Space / Detroit.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The depopulation of once-major central cities is no longer an uncommon occurrence. Between the years 1950 and 2010, over 350 large cities worldwide lost a… (more)

Hall, Philip A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1) 1) Distribution Category UC-950 Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 2001 January 2003 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts This report was prepared in the Office of Energy Markets and End Use of the Energy Information Administration

490

Urban Form Energy Use and Emissions in China: Preliminary Findings and Model Proof of Concept  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

urban form level the World Bank's Energy Sector Managementbees/. World Bank (ESMAP). 2009. " Energy Efficient Cities

Aden, Nathaniel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

An Overview of the Urban Boundary Layer Atmosphere Network in Helsinki  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Helsinki Urban Boundary-Layer Atmosphere Network (UrBAN: http://urban.fmi.fi) is a dedicated research-grade observational network where the physical processes in the atmosphere above the city are studied. Helsinki UrBAN is the most poleward intensive ...

C. R. Wood; L. Järvi; R. D. Kouznetsov; A. Nordbo; S. Joffre; A. Drebs; T. Vihma; A. Hirsikko; I. Suomi; C. Fortelius; E. O'Connor; D. Moiseev; S. Haapanala; J. Moilanen; M. Kangas; A. Karppinen; T. Vesala; J. Kukkonen

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Future Urban Transport, Berkeley, 19-21 May 2008 International Comparative Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Future Urban Transport, Berkeley, 19-21 May 2008 International Comparative Study of Mega Transport Director of OMEGA Centre University College London Conference on Future Urban Transport Berkeley Center for Future Urban Transport May 19-21, 2008 #12;Future Urban Transport, Berkeley, 19-21 May 2008 Overall

California at Berkeley, University of

493

Urban Ecosystems, 7: 175178, 2004 c 2004 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Manufactured in The Netherlands.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and ecosystem function in the urban fringe. Nassauer, Allan, Johengan, Kosek, and Infante examine how

Wu, Jianguo "Jingle"

494

Selecting major Appalachian basin gas plays  

SciTech Connect

Under a cooperative agreement with the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) the Appalachian Oil and Natural Gas Research Consortium (AONGRC) is preparing a geologic atlas of the major gas plays in the Appalachian basin, and compiling a database for all fields in each geologic play. the first obligation under this agreement was to prepare a topical report that identifies the major gas plays, briefly describes each play, and explains how the plays were selected. Four main objectives have been defined for this initial task: assign each gas reservoir to a geologic play, based on age, trap type, degree of structural control, and depositional environment; organize all plays into geologically-similar groups based on the main criteria that defines each play; prepare a topical report for METC; and transfer this technology to industry through posters and talks at regional geological and engineering meetings including the Appalachian Petroleum Geology Symposium, Northeastern Section meeting of the Geological Society of America, the METC Gas Contractors Review meeting, the Kentucky Oil and Gas Association, and the Appalachian Energy Group.

Patchen, D.G.; Nuttall, B.C.; Baranoski, M.T.; Harper, J.A.; Schwietering, J.F.; Van Tyne, A.; Aminian, K.; Smosna, R.A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Selecting major Appalachian basin gas plays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under a cooperative agreement with the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) the Appalachian Oil and Natural Gas Research Consortium (AONGRC) is preparing a geologic atlas of the major gas plays in the Appalachian basin, and compiling a database for all fields in each geologic play. the first obligation under this agreement was to prepare a topical report that identifies the major gas plays, briefly describes each play, and explains how the plays were selected. Four main objectives have been defined for this initial task: assign each gas reservoir to a geologic play, based on age, trap type, degree of structural control, and depositional environment; organize all plays into geologically-similar groups based on the main criteria that defines each play; prepare a topical report for METC; and transfer this technology to industry through posters and talks at regional geological and engineering meetings including the Appalachian Petroleum G