Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "major risk factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Major Risk Factors Integrated Facility Disposition Project -...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- Oak Ridge Summary - Major Risk Factors Integrated Facility Disposition Project (IFDP) Oak Ridge, TN More Documents & Publications Major Risk Factors to the Integrated...

2

Major Risk Factors to the Integrated Facility Disposition Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge Reservation Tennessee Major Risk Factors to the Integrated Facility Disposition Project (IFDP) Challenge The scope of the Integrated Facility Disposition Project (IFDP) needs to comprehensively address a wide range of environmental management risks at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORO). These include: environmental remediation, regulatory compliance, deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) activities, and disposition of legacy materials and waste, along with the ongoing modernization, reindustrialization, and reconfiguration initiatives at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and at the Y-12 National Security Complex. The balancing of the broad nature of these activities and issues at ORO are a key challenge for the IFDP especially since their interrelationship is not always obvious.

3

Major Risk Factors Integrated Facility Disposition Project - Oak Ridge  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

O O O f f f f i i c c e e o o f f E E n n v v i i r r o o n n m m e e n n t t a a l l M M a a n n a a g g e e m m e e n n t t ( ( E E M M ) ) E E n n g g i i n n e e e e r r i i n n g g a a n n d d T T e e c c h h n n o o l l o o g g y y External Technical Review (ETR) Report Major Risk Factors Integrated Facility Disposition Project (IFDP) Oak Ridge, TN AUGUST 1, 2008 Acknowledgement The External Technical Review of the Integrated Facility Disposition Project was conducted simultaneous to other assessments and visits. The ETR Team wishes to note the outstanding support received from all parties involved in the review, including the DOE Oak Ridge Office, the National Nuclear Security Administration Y-12 Site Office, UT-Battelle, B&W Y-12, and the Professional Project Services, Inc. (Pro2Serve). The ETR Team feels compelled to note, and

4

Major Risk Factors to the Integrated Facility Disposition Project...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facility Disposition Project The scope of the Integrated Facility Disposition Project (IFDP) needs to comprehensively address a wide range of environmental management risks at the...

5

Summary - Major Risk Factors Integrated Facility Disposition...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

& ORNL, Oak Ridge, TN EM Project: Integrated Facility Disposition Project (IFDP) ETR Report Date: August 2008 ETR-15 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental...

6

Major Risk Factors Integrated Facility Disposition Project -...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(Treatment Alternatives For Process Wastewater at ORNL, ORNLCF-0603-R1, November 2007; HFIR and REDC Process Waste Drains and Waste Treatment Plant, ORNL Facilities Development...

7

Capacity Factor Risk At Nuclear Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a model of the dynamic structure of capacity factor risk. It incorporates the risk that the capacity factor may vary widely from year-to-year, and also the risk that the reactor may be permanently shutdown prior ...

Du, Yangbo

8

What are the major factors affecting natural gas prices? - FAQ ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

What are the major factors affecting natural gas prices? Natural gas prices are mainly a function of market supply and demand. Because there are ...

9

Feedstock Loss from Drought is a Major Economic Risk for Biofuel...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feedstock Loss from Drought is a Major Economic Risk for Biofuel Producers Title Feedstock Loss from Drought is a Major Economic Risk for Biofuel Producers Publication Type Report...

10

Indoor Residential Chemical Emissions as Risk Factors for Children...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The identified risk factors include specific organic compounds such as formaldehyde, benzene, and phthalates, as well as indoor materials or finishes such as vinyl flooring,...

11

Common Risk Factors in Currency Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We identify a “slope” factor in exchange rates. High interest rate currencies load more on this slope factor than low interest rate currencies. This factor accounts for most of the cross-sectional variation in average ...

Roussano, Nikolai

12

Major Management Challenges and Program Risks : Department of Energy GAO/OCG-99-6  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GAO GAO Performance and Accountability Series January 1999 Major Management Challenges and Program Risks Department of Energy GAO/OCG-99-6 GAO United States General Accounting Office Washington, D.C. 20548 Comptroller General of the United States January 1999 The President of the Senate The Speaker of the House of Representatives This report addresses the major performance and management challenges that have limited the effectiveness of the Department of Energy (DOE) in carrying out its mission. For many years, we have reported significant management challenges at DOE. These challenges include difficulties in completing large projects, making the transition to external regulation, modifying the Department's organizational structure to correct challenges, reforming its contracting practices,

13

Indoor Residential Chemical Emissions as Risk Factors for Children's  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor Residential Chemical Emissions as Risk Factors for Children's Indoor Residential Chemical Emissions as Risk Factors for Children's Respiratory Health Speaker(s): Mark Mendell Date: February 23, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Most research into the effects of residential indoor air exposures on asthma and allergies has focused on exposures to biologic allergens, moisture and mold, endotoxin, or combustion byproducts. A growing body of research suggests that chemical emissions from common indoor materials and finishes have adverse effects, including increased risk of asthma, allergies, and pulmonary infections. The identified risk factors include specific organic compounds such as formaldehyde, benzene, and phthalates, as well as indoor materials or finishes such as vinyl flooring, carpet, paint, and plastics. This presentation presents a brief review of studies

14

November 2010CAPACITY FACTOR RISK AT NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a model of the dynamic structure of capacity factor risk. It incorporates the risk that the capacity factor may vary widely from year-to-year, and also the risk that the reactor may be permanently shutdown prior to the end of its anticipated useful life. We then fit the parameters of the model to the IAEA’s PRIS dataset of historical capacity factors on reactors across the globe. The estimated capacity factor risk is greatest in the first year of operation. It then quickly declines over the next couple of years, after which it is approximately constant. Whether risk is constant or increasing in later years depends significantly on the probability of a premature permanent shutdown of the reactor. Because these should be very rare events, the probability is difficult to estimate reliably from the small historical sample of observations. Our base case is parameterized with a conservatively low probability of a premature permanent shutdown which yields the approximately constant variance. Our model, combined with the global historical dataset, also yields relatively low estimates for the expected level of the capacity factor through the life of the plant. Our base case estimate is approximately 74%. Focusing on alternative subsets of the data raises the estimated mean capacity factor marginally, but not significantly, unless the sample chosen is restricted to selected countries over select years. This emphasizes the need for judgment in exploiting the historical data to project future probabilities.

Yangbo Du; John E. Parsons; Yangbo Du; John E. Parsons

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Northeast Regional Cancer Institute's Cancer Surveillance and Risk Factor Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

OBJECTIVES The Northeast Regional Cancer Institute is conducting a program of ongoing epidemiologic research to address cancer disparities in northeast Pennsylvania. Of particular concern are disparities in the incidence of, stage at diagnosis, and mortality from colorectal cancer. In northeast Pennsylvania, age-adjusted incidence and mortality rates for colorectal cancer are higher, and a significantly smaller proportion of new colorectal cancer cases are diagnosed with local stage disease than is observed in comparable national data. Further, estimates of the prevalence of colorectal cancer screening in northeast Pennsylvania are lower than the US average. The Northeast Regional Cancer Institute’s research program supports surveillance of common cancers, investigations of cancer risk factors and screening behaviors, and the development of resources to further cancer research in this community. This project has the following specific objectives: I. To conduct cancer surveillance in northeast Pennsylvania. a. To monitor incidence and mortality for all common cancers, and colorectal cancer, in particular, and b. To document changes in the stage at diagnosis of colorectal cancer in this high-risk, underserved community. II. To conduct a population-based study of cancer risk factors and screening behavior in a six county region of northeast Pennsylvania. a. To monitor and document changes in colorectal cancer screening rates, and b. To document the prevalence of cancer risk factors (especially factors that increase the risk of colorectal cancer) and to identify those risk factors that are unusually common in this community. APPROACH Cancer surveillance was conducted using data from the Northeast Regional Cancer Institute’s population-based Regional Cancer Registry, the Pennsylvania Cancer Registry, and NCI’s SEER program. For common cancers, incidence and mortality were examined by county within the region and compared to data for similar populations in the US. For colorectal cancer, the stage at diagnosis of cases diagnosed in northeast Pennsylvania was compared to data from prior years. A population-based interview study of healthy adults was conducted to document the status of cancer screening and to estimate the prevalence of established cancer risk factors in this community. This study is similar in design to that used by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). EXPERIMENTAL METHODS AND PROCEDURES: This program includes two distinct but related projects. The first project uses existing data to conduct cancer surveillance in northeast Pennsylvania, and the second is a population-based study of cancer risk factors and cancer screening behaviors in this same population. HUMAN SUBJECTS CONSIDERATIONS This program includes two projects: cancer surveillance and a population-based study of cancer risk factors and screening behavior. The cancer surveillance project involves only the use of existing aggregate data or de-identified data. As such, the surveillance project is exempt from human subjects considerations. The study of cancer risk factors and screening behaviors includes data from a random sample of adult residents of northeast Pennsylvania who are 18 or more years of age. All races, ethnicities and both sexes are included in proportion to their representation in the population. Subjects are interviewed anonymously by telephone; those who are unable to complete an interview in English are ineligible. This project has been reviewed and approved by the Scranton-Temple Residency Program IRB (IRB00001355), which is the IRB for the Northeast Regional Cancer Institute.

Lesko, Samuel M.

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

16

Major Facilities on the Path to Demo: Missions, Requirements, and Risks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

handling & fueling systems · W-divertor · Remote handling · Test blanket modules RISK: Schedule 1st plasma generation. Complete T fuel cycle. Material &component Validation Power and particle handling. Necessary date

17

Breast Cancer and Personal Environmental Risk Factors in Marin County --  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Breast Cancer and Personal Environmental Risk Factors in Marin County -- Breast Cancer and Personal Environmental Risk Factors in Marin County -- Pilot Study Title Breast Cancer and Personal Environmental Risk Factors in Marin County -- Pilot Study Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2003 Authors Erdmann, Christine A., Georgianna Farren, Kimberly Baltzell, Terri Chew, Cynthia Clarkson, Ruth Fleshman, Colin Leary, Mary Mizroch, Fern Orenstein, Marion L. Russell, Virginia Souders-Mason, and Margaret Wrensch Abstract The purpose of the Personal Environmental Risk Factor Study (PERFS) pilot project was to develop methodologies and a questionnaire for a future population-based case-control study to investigate the role of selected environmental exposures in breast cancer development. Identification of etiologically relevant exposures during a period of potential vulnerability proximate to disease onset offers the possibility of clinical disease prevention even when disease initiation may have already occurred many years earlier. Certain personal environmental agents or combinations of agents may influence disease promotion. Therefore, this pilot study focused on exposures that occurred during the ten-year period prior to diagnosis for cases and the last ten years for controls, rather than more historic exposures. For this pilot study, we used a community-based research approach. In our collaborative efforts, community members participated with academic researchers in all phases of the research, including research question identification, study design, development of research tools, development of the human subjects protocol, and report writing. Community member inclusion was based upon the concept that community participation could improve the relevance of scientific studies and ultimate success of the research by encouraging an ongoing dialogue between community members and academic representatives. Early activities of this project focused on the collection of input from the community regarding the possible role of environmental factors in the incidence of breast cancer in Marin County. The intent was to inform the scientists of community concerns, enhance the research team's understanding of the community being studied, and provide interested community members with a better understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of traditional research methods through active participation in the research process. This pilot study identified specific testable hypotheses through review of the literature and consultation with relevant experts and the affected community. Initially, the study was to focus on modifiable personal environmental exposures that are associated with breast tumor promotion and higher socioeconomic status (SES). However, little information was available in the scientific literature regarding the putative mechanism by which some of the suspected environmental factors may act (i.e., initiator vs. promoter). Likewise, little is known about the distribution of personal environmental risk factors by socioeconomic status. Therefore, tumor promotion involvement and association with SES were not very useful as selection criteria, and selection of topics was based primarily on published scientific findings of human studies and community input. This study was approved by the Institutional Review Boards at the University of California at San Francisco (Committee on Human Research) and at the University of California at Berkeley (Committee for the Protection of Human Subjects)

18

Computer science and computer information technology majors together: analyzing factors impacting students' success in introductory programming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2004 Northern Kentucky University began offering a Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Information Technology. As these new majors began to enroll alongside Computer Science majors in the required and standard Computer Science 1 (CS 1) course, ... Keywords: computer information technology education, computer science education, retention

Maureen Doyle; Dhanuja Kasturiratna; Bartley D. Richardson; Suzanne W. Soled

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Predicting injury among nursing personnel using personal risk factors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this thesis was to develop a means of predicting future injury among nursing personnel working in a hospital system. Nursing has one of the highest incidence rates of musculoskeletal injuries among U.S. occupations. Endemic to the job are tasks such as rolling, sitting, standing, and transferring large, and often times, uncooperative patients. These tasks often place large biomechanical stresses on the musculoskeletal system and, in some cases, contribute to or cause a musculoskeletal injury. Given the current nursing shortage, it is imperative to keep nurses injury-free and productive so they can provide patient care services. Even though a large number of nursing personnel are injured every year and most are exposed to these high levels of biomechanical stress, the majority of nurses are injury-free. The question then arises "Why do some nurses have injuries while others do not?" The purpose of this thesis was to determine whether individual attributes in a population of nurses were associated with risk of future injury. The subject population was comprised of 140 nursing personnel at a local hospital system hired between April 1995 and February 1999. Data on individual attributes, such as patient demographics, previous injuries, posture, joint range of motion, flexibility, and muscular strength, was ascertained during a post-offer screening on these personnel. Twenty six (19%) nurses experienced an injury associated with the axial skeleton. Chi square test for homogeneity for the categorical predictor variables, and the Student's T-test for continuous predictor variables were used to determine if any individual attributes were associated with future injuries. None of the variables were associated with a risk of future axial skeletal injury. Practical application of these results for St. Joseph Regional Health Center, and possibly other acute care facilities, directs us to stop costly pre-employment/post-offer testing for the purpose of identifying injury prone nurse applicants. Secondly, it allows the focus of limited resources to be on making the job safer through administrative and engineering controls.

Gjolberg, Ivar Henry

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

A new approach to risk analysis with a focus on organizational risk factors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Preventing accidents in complex socio-technical systems requires an approach to risk management that continuously monitors risk and identifies potential areas of concern before they lead to hazards, and constrains hazards ...

Marais, Karen, 1973-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "major risk factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Is Adjuvant Chemoradiotherapy Overtreatment in Cervical Cancer Patients With Intermediate Risk Factors?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine whether adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) improves the outcome of cervical cancer patients with intermediate risk factors. Methods and Materials: Between January 2000 and June 2006, the medical records of 735 patients who had undergone radical surgery for Stage IB-IIA cervical cancer were reviewed retrospectively. Of the 735 patients, 172 with two or more intermediate risk factors (i.e., lymphovascular space involvement, deep stromal invasion, and tumor size {>=}2 cm) were grouped as follows according to the adjuvant treatment received: 34 patients, no further treatment; 49 patients, RT; and 89 patients, CRT. The significance of the clinical parameters and recurrence-free survival of each group were analyzed. Results: Of the 172 patients with any of the intermediate risk factors, 137 (79.6%) had two or more intermediate risk factors. Of the 172 patients, 12 developed recurrences (6.4%)->(7.0%), with 6 in the pelvis and 6 in distant sites. All 12 recurrences occurred in those who had two or more intermediate risk factors (sensitivity, 100%); however, only six recurrences were detected in patients who met the Gynecologic Oncology Group criteria for the intermediate-risk group (sensitivity, 50%; Z test, p .05). Conclusion: Postoperative adjuvant CRT can improve the outcome of cervical cancer patients with intermediate risk factors, with low increase in toxicity.

Ryu, Sang-Young, E-mail: ryu@kcch.re.k [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sang-Il [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Byung-Ho [Center for Clinical Trials, National Cancer Center, Kyongi (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Chul-Koo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kidong; Kim, Beob-Jong; Kim, Moon-Hong; Choi, Seok-Cheol; Lee, Eui-Don; Lee, Kyoung-Hee [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Radium concentration factors and their use in health and environmental risk assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radium is known to be taken up by aquatic animals, and tends to accumulate in bone, shell and exoskeleton. The most common approach to estimating the uptake of a radionuclide by aquatic animals for use in health and environmental risk assessments is the concentration factor method. The concentration factor method relates the concentration of a contaminant in an organism to the concentration in the surrounding water. Site specific data are not usually available, and generic, default values are often used in risk assessment studies. This paper describes the concentration factor method, summarizes some of the variables which may influence the concentration factor for radium, reviews reported concentration factors measured in marine environments and presents concentration factors derived from data collected in a study in coastal Louisiana. The use of generic default values for the concentration factor is also discussed.

Meinhold, A.F.; Hamilton, L.D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Radium concentration factors and their use in health and environmental risk assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radium is known to be taken up by aquatic animals, and tends to accumulate in bone, shell and exoskeleton. The most common approach to estimating the uptake of a radionuclide by aquatic animals for use in health and environmental risk assessments is the concentration factor method. The concentration factor method relates the concentration of a contaminant in an organism to the concentration in the surrounding water. Site specific data are not usually available, and generic, default values are often used in risk assessment studies. This paper describes the concentration factor method, summarizes some of the variables which may influence the concentration factor for radium, reviews reported concentration factors measured in marine environments and presents concentration factors derived from data collected in a study in coastal Louisiana. The use of generic default values for the concentration factor is also discussed.

Meinhold, A.F.; Hamilton, L.D.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

24

Consumption Moment Risk Factors and Cross-Section of Long-Run Stock Returns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce the multifactor asset pricing model that includes as risk factors the …ve Chen et al. (1986) macroeconomic variables along with the rates of change in the …rst four cross-sectional consumption moments. The empirical evidence on the pricing of the economic state variables is sensitive to the experimental design, whereas we …nd strong evidence that with the limited participation of households in the capital markets the aggregate consumption risk (measured by the rate of change in average consumption) and the background risk in consumption (measured jointly by the rates of change in the higher-order consumption moments) are both signi…cantly priced. JEL classi…cation: G12

Andrei Semenov

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Fractures of the Sacrum After Chemoradiation for Rectal Carcinoma: Incidence, Risk Factors, and Radiographic Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Sacral insufficiency fractures after adjuvant radiation for rectal carcinoma can present similarly to recurrent disease. As a complication associated with pelvic radiation, it is important to be aware of the incidence and risk factors associated with sacral fractures in the clinical assessment of these patients. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2007, a total of 582 patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma received adjuvant chemoradiation and surgical excision. Of these, 492 patients had imaging studies available for review. Hospital records and imaging studies from all 492 patients were retrospectively evaluated to identify risk factors associated with developing a sacral insufficiency fracture. Results: With a median follow-up time of 3.5 years, the incidence of sacral fractures was 7.1% (35/492). The 4-year sacral fracture free rate was 0.91. Univariate analysis showed that increasing age ({>=}60 vs. =}60 vs. <60 years, hazard ratio [HR] = 2.50, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.22-5.13, P=.01), female sex (HR = 2.64, CI = 1.29-5.38, P=.008), and history of osteoporosis (HR = 3.23, CI = 1.23-8.50, P=.02) were independent risk factors associated with sacral fracture. Conclusions: Sacral insufficiency fractures after pelvic radiation for rectal carcinoma occur more commonly than previously described. Independent risk factors associated with fracture were osteoporosis, female sex, and age greater than 60 years.

Kim, Han Jo [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)] [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Boland, Patrick J. [Department of Surgery, Orthopaedic Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Surgery, Orthopaedic Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Meredith, Dennis S. [Hospital for Special Surgery, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, New York, New York (United States)] [Hospital for Special Surgery, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, New York, New York (United States); Lis, Eric [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Zhang Zhigang; Shi Weiji [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Yamada, Yoshiya J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Goodman, Karyn A., E-mail: goodmank@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Estimation of dynamics of risk factors by the dynamic regression method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A problem is considered for the estimation of dynamics of risk factors and other indicators of health by the data of a number of population studies performed in various years on the same age category of the population. In the case of the nonlinear time ... Keywords: 87.15.Aa

V. A. Moltchanov; A. I. Mikhal'Skii

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Heart. Author manuscript Cardiorespiratory risk factors as predictors of 40-year mortality in women  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heart. Author manuscript Page /1 13 Cardiorespiratory risk factors as predictors of 40-year.7) mortality, while associations between 2-hour­ ­ glucose and all-cause 1.15 (1.1 1.2), coronary heart disease ; Cause of Death ; Cohort Studies ; Female ; Heart Diseases ; mortality ; physiopathology ; Humans ; Male

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

28

Intimate partner violence in three former Soviet Union countries (Azerbaijan, Moldova, and Ukraine)| Prevalence, risk factors, and women's reproductive health.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? A scarce body of scientific knowledge is available on IPV in the transitional countries of the former Soviet Union/fSU and the magnitude, risk factors,… (more)

Ismayilova, Leyla

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Severe Pulmonary Toxicity After Myeloablative Conditioning Using Total Body Irradiation: An Assessment of Risk Factors  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To assess factors associated with severe pulmonary toxicity after myeloablative conditioning using total body irradiation (TBI) followed by allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Methods and Materials: A total of 101 adult patients who underwent TBI-based myeloablative conditioning for hematologic malignancies at Duke University between 1998 and 2008 were reviewed. TBI was combined with high-dose cyclophosphamide, melphalan, fludarabine, or etoposide, depending on the underlying disease. Acute pulmonary toxicity, occurring within 90 days of transplantation, was scored using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Actuarial overall survival and the cumulative incidence of acute pulmonary toxicity were calculated via the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using a log-rank test. A binary logistic regression analysis was performed to assess factors independently associated with acute severe pulmonary toxicity. Results: The 90-day actuarial risk of developing severe (Grade 3-5) pulmonary toxicity was 33%. Actuarial survival at 90 days was 49% in patients with severe pulmonary toxicity vs. 94% in patients without (p < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, the number of prior chemotherapy regimens was the only factor independently associated with development of severe pulmonary toxicity (odds ratio, 2.7 per regimen). Conclusions: Severe acute pulmonary toxicity is prevalent after TBI-based myeloablative conditioning regimens, occurring in approximately 33% of patients. The number of prior chemotherapy regimens appears to be an important risk factor.

Kelsey, Chris R., E-mail: kelse003@mc.duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Horwitz, Mitchell E. [Department of Medicine, Division of Cellular Therapy, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Chino, Junzo P.; Craciunescu, Oana; Steffey, Beverly [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Folz, Rodney J. [Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Disorders Medicine, University of Louisville Health Sciences Center, Louisville, KY (United States); Chao, Nelson J.; Rizzieri, David A. [Department of Medicine, Division of Cellular Therapy, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Marks, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

How Sovereign Is Sovereign Credit Risk?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the nature of sovereign credit risk using an extensive set of sovereign CDS data. We find that the majority of sovereign credit risk can be linked to global factors. A single principal component accounts for 64 ...

Longstaff, Francis A.

31

The Number of High-Risk Factors and the Risk of Prostate Cancer-Specific Mortality After Brachytherapy: Implications for Treatment Selection  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine whether an increasing number of high-risk factors is associated with higher prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM) among men treated with brachytherapy (BT)-based treatment, and whether supplemental therapy has an impact on this risk. Methods and Materials: We analyzed the cases of 2234 men with localized prostate cancer treated between 1991 and 2007 with low-dose rate BT monotherapy (n = 457) or BT with supplemental external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT, n = 229), androgen suppression therapy (AST, n = 424), or both (n = 1124). All men had at least one high-risk factor (prostate-specific antigen >20 ng/mL, biopsy Gleason score 8-10, or clinical stage {>=}T2c). Competing-risks multivariable regressions were performed to determine whether the presence of at least two high-risk factors was associated with an increased risk of PCSM, with adjustment for age, comorbidity, and the type of supplemental treatment. Results: The median follow-up time was 4.3 years. The number of men with at least two high-risk factors was highest in the group treated with BT, EBRT, and AST (21%), followed by BT plus EBRT or AST (13%), and BT alone (8%) (p{sub trend} < 0.001). The adjusted hazard ratio (AHR) for PCSM for those with at least two high-risk factors (as compared with one) was 4.8 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.8-8.0; p < 0.001). The use of both supplemental EBRT and AST was associated with a decreased risk of PCSM (AHR 0.5; 95% CI, 0.2-0.9; p = 0.03) compared with BT alone. When the high-risk factors were analyzed separately, Gleason score 8-10 was most significantly associated with increased PCSM (AHR 6.2; 95% CI, 3.5-11.2; p < 0.001). Conclusions: Men with high-risk prostate adenocarcinoma treated with BT have decreased PCSM if they receive trimodailty therapy that includes EBRT and AST. This benefit is likely most important in men with multiple determinants of high risk.

Wattson, Daniel A., E-mail: dwattson@partners.org [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, MA (United States); Chen Minghui [Department of Statistics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States); Moul, Judd W. [Division of Urology, Department of Surgery and Duke Prostate Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Moran, Brian J. [Prostate Cancer Foundation of Chicago, Westmont, IL (United States); Dosoretz, Daniel E. [21st Century Oncology, Fort Myers, FL (United States); Robertson, Cary N.; Polascik, Thomas J. [Division of Urology, Department of Surgery and Duke Prostate Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Braccioforte, Michelle H. [Prostate Cancer Foundation of Chicago, Westmont, IL (United States); Salenius, Sharon A. [21st Century Oncology, Fort Myers, FL (United States); D'Amico, Anthony V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

A security risk analysis model for information systems: Causal relationships of risk factors and vulnerability propagation analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the increasing organizational dependence on information systems, information systems security has become a very critical issue in enterprise risk management. In information systems, security risks are caused by various interrelated internal and ... Keywords: Ant colony optimization, Bayesian networks, Information systems, Security risk, Vulnerability propagation

Nan Feng, Harry Jiannan Wang, Minqiang Li

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Spinal Recurrence From Intracranial Germinoma: Risk Factors and Treatment Outcome for Spinal Recurrence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To analyze retrospectively the risk factors of spinal recurrence in patients with intracranial germinoma and clinical outcomes of patients who developed spinal recurrence. Methods and Materials: Between 1980 and 2007, 165 patients with no evidence of spinal metastases at diagnosis were treated with cranial radiotherapy without spinal irradiation. The median follow-up in all 165 patients was 61.2 months (range, 1.2-260.1 months). Results: After the initial treatment, 15 patients (9.1%) developed spinal recurrences. Multivariate analysis revealed that large intracranial disease ({>=}4 cm) and multifocal intracranial disease were independent risk factors for spinal recurrence. Radiation field, total radiation dose, and the use of chemotherapy did not affect the occurrence of spinal recurrences. Of the 15 patients who experienced spinal recurrence, the 3-year actuarial overall survival and disease-free survival (DFS) rates from the beginning of salvage treatments were 65% and 57%, respectively. In the analysis, presence of intracranial recurrence and salvage treatment modality (radiotherapy with chemotherapy vs. radiotherapy alone) had a statistically significant impact on DFS. The 3-year DFS rate in patients with no intracranial recurrence and treated with both spinal radiotherapy and chemotherapy was 100%, whereas only 17% in patients with intracranial recurrence or treated with radiotherapy alone (p = 0.001). Conclusion: Large intracranial disease and multifocal intracranial disease were risk factors for spinal recurrence in patients with intracranial germinoma with no evidence of spinal metastases at diagnosis. For patients who developed spinal recurrence alone, salvage treatment combined with spinal radiotherapy and chemotherapy was effective in controlling the recurrent disease.

Ogawa, Kazuhiko [Department of Radiology, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan)], E-mail: kogawa@med.u-ryukyu.ac.jp; Yoshii, Yoshihiko [Department of Neurosurgery, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Shikama, Naoto [Department of Radiology, Shinshu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Nakamura, Katsumasa [Department of Radiology, Kyushu University, Nagano (Japan); Uno, Takashi [Department of Radiology, Chiba University, Chiba (Japan); Onishi, Hiroshi [Department of Radiology, Yamanashi University, Yamanashi (Japan); Itami, Jun [Department of Radiology, International Medical Center of Japan, Tokyo (Japan); Shioyama, Yoshiyuki [Department of Radiology, Shinshu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Iraha, Shiro [Department of Radiology, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Hyodo, Akio [Department of Neurosurgery, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Toita, Takafumi; Kakinohana, Yasumasa; Tamaki, Wakana [Department of Radiology, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Ito, Hisao [Department of Radiology, Chiba University, Chiba (Japan); Murayama, Sadayuki [Department of Radiology, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan)

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Risk factors for work-related symptoms in northern California office workers  

SciTech Connect

In most episodes of health complaints reported in office buildings in the last-twenty years, causal factors have not been identified. In order to assess risk factors for work-related symptoms in office workers, a reanalysis was performed of previous studies, and an epidemiologic study was conducted. The reanalysis of data, showed remarkable agreement among studies. Air-conditioned buildings were consistently associated with higher prevalence of headache, lethargy, and eye, nose, or throat problems. Humidification was not a necessary factor for this higher prevalence. Mechanical ventilation without air-conditioning was not associated with higher symptom prevalence. A study was conducted among 880 office workers, within 12 office buildings selected without regard to worker complaints, in northern California. A number of factors were found associated with prevalence of work-related symptoms, after adjustment in a logistic regression model for personal, psychosocial, job, workspace, and building factors. Two different ventilation types were associated with increases Ln symptom prevalence, relative to workers in naturally ventilated buildings: mechanical supply and exhaust ventilation, without air conditioning and with operable windows; and air-conditioning with sealed windows. No study buildings were humidified. In both these ventilation types, the highest odds ratios (ORs) found were for skin symptoms (ORs-5.0, 5.6) and for tight chest or difficulty breathing (ORs-3.6, 4.3). Use of carbonless copies or photocopiers, sharing a workspace, carpets, new carpets, new walls, and distance from a window were associated with symptom increases. Cloth partitions and new paint were associated with symptom decreases.

Mendell, M.J.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Derivation of Accident-Specific Material-at-Risk Equivalency Factors  

SciTech Connect

A novel method for calculating material at risk (MAR) dose equivalency developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) now allows for increased utilization of dose equivalency for facility MAR control. This method involves near-real time accounting for the use of accident and material specific release and transport. It utilizes all information from the committed effective dose equation and the five factor source term equation to derive dose equivalency factors which can be used to establish an overall facility or process MAR limit. The equivalency factors allow different nuclide spectrums to be compared for their respective dose consequences by relating them to a specific quantity of an identified reference nuclide. The ability to compare spectrums to a reference limit ensures that MAR limits are in fact bounding instead of attempting to establish a representative or bounding spectrum which may lead to unintended or unanalyzed configurations. This methodology is then coupled with a near real time material tracking system which allows for accurate and timely material composition information and corresponding MAR equivalency values. The development of this approach was driven by the complex nature of processing operations in some INL facilities. This type of approach is ideally suited for facilities and processes where the composition of the MAR and possible release mechanisms change frequently but in well defined fashions and in a batch-type nature.

Jason P. Andrus; Dr. Chad L. Pope

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Casual factors of increased project risk : a review of four in-flight anomalies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Risk management is an essential component any project. Traditional tools of risk management, however, tend to focus solely on the three traditional project elements-cost, schedule, and technical-ignoring the broader ...

Dal Santo, Rita M. (Rita Marie)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Gastroduodenal Complications After Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy in Patients With Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Endoscopic Findings and Risk Factors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) is useful in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but little is known about radiation-induced gastroduodenal complications following therapy. To determine risk factors, we investigated the prevalence and patterns of gastroduodenal complications following CCRT using endoscopy. Methods and Materials: Enrolled in the study were 123 patients treated with CCRT for unresectable HCC between January 1998 and December 2005. Radiation-induced gastroduodenal complications were defined as radiation gastritis/duodenitis, radiation gastric/duodenal ulcer, or other gastroduodenal toxicity associated with radiation, based on Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE 3.0). Serious gastroduodenal complications were defined as events occurring within 12 months from completion of CCRT, those requiring prompt therapeutic intervention, or symptoms equivalent to Grade 3 or 4 radiation-related gastroduodenal toxicity, including nausea or vomiting, based on CTCAE 3.0. Results: A month after completion of CCRT, 65 (52.8%) patients displayed endoscopic evidence of radiation-induced gastroduodenal complications. Radiation gastric and duodenal ulcers were found in 32 (26.0%) and 20 (16.3%) patients, respectively; radiation gastritis and duodenitis were found in 50 (40.7%) and 42 (34.1%) patients, respectively. Radiation-related bleeding was observed in 13 patients (10.6%). Serious gastroduodenal complications occurred in 18 patients (14.6%) and were significantly more frequent in patients with liver cirrhosis than in those without cirrhosis (p = 0.043). There were no radiation-related deaths. Conclusions: Endoscopically detectable radiation-induced gastroduodenal complications were common in HCC following CCRT. Although serious complications were uncommon, the frequency was higher in patients with liver cirrhosis; thus, these patients should be closely monitored when receiving CCRT.

Chon, Young Eun [Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seong, Jinsil [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Beom Kyung [Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Jihye [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seung Up; Park, Jun Yong; Ahn, Sang Hoon; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Chon, Chae Yoon [Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Gastroenterology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Liver Cirrhosis Clinical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Sung Kwan, E-mail: kaarma@yuhs.ac [Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Gastroenterology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Do Young, E-mail: dyk1025@yuhs.ac [Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Gastroenterology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Liver Cirrhosis Clinical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Risk Factors Associated With Secondary Sarcomas in Childhood Cancer Survivors: A Report From the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Childhood cancer survivors have an increased risk of secondary sarcomas. To better identify those at risk, the relationship between therapeutic dose of chemotherapy and radiation and secondary sarcoma should be quantified. Methods and Materials: We conducted a nested case-control study of secondary sarcomas (105 cases, 422 matched controls) in a cohort of 14,372 childhood cancer survivors. Radiation dose at the second malignant neoplasm (SMN) site and use of chemotherapy were estimated from detailed review of medical records. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by conditional logistic regression. Excess odds ratio (EOR) was modeled as a function of radiation dose, chemotherapy, and host factors. Results: Sarcomas occurred a median of 11.8 years (range, 5.3-31.3 years) from original diagnosis. Any exposure to radiation was associated with increased risk of secondary sarcoma (OR = 4.1, 95% CI = 1.8-9.5). A dose-response relation was observed, with elevated risks at doses between 10 and 29.9 Gy (OR = 15.6, 95% CI = 4.5-53.9), 30-49.9 Gy (OR = 16.0, 95% CI 3.8-67.8) and >50 Gy (OR = 114.1, 95% CI 13.5-964.8). Anthracycline exposure was associated with sarcoma risk (OR = 3.5, 95% CI = 1.6-7.7) adjusting for radiation dose, other chemotherapy, and primary cancer. Adjusting for treatment, survivors with a first diagnosis of Hodgkin lymphoma (OR = 10.7, 95% CI = 3.1-37.4) or primary sarcoma (OR = 8.4, 95% CI = 3.2-22.3) were more likely to develop a sarcoma. Conclusions: Of the risk factors evaluated, radiation exposure was the most important for secondary sarcoma development in childhood cancer survivors; anthracycline chemotherapy exposure was also associated with increased risk.

Henderson, Tara O., E-mail: thenderson@peds.bsd.uchicago.edu [University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Rajaraman, Preetha [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)] [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States); Stovall, Marilyn [M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, Houston, TX (United States)] [M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, Houston, TX (United States); Constine, Louis S. [University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States)] [University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Olive, Aliza [Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Smith, Susan A. [M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, Houston, TX (United States)] [M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, Houston, TX (United States); Mertens, Ann [Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States)] [Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Meadows, Anna [Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Neglia, Joseph P. [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)] [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Hammond, Sue [Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH (United States)] [Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH (United States); Whitton, John [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (United States)] [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Inskip, Peter D. [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)] [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States); Robison, Leslie L. [St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)] [St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Diller, Lisa [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Children's Hospital Cancer Center, Boston, MA (United States)] [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Children's Hospital Cancer Center, Boston, MA (United States)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

1.0 MAJOR STUDIES SUPPORTING THIS SCOPING RISK The most important period of past U.S. uranium production spanned from approximately 1948  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of abandoned uranium mines. The major studies supporting this scoping analysis include EPA's 1983 Report plants (U.S. DOE/EIA 2003a, 2003b, 2006). Uranium exploration, mining, and ore processing left a legacy to Congress on the Potential Health and Environmental Hazards of Uranium Mine Wastes (U.S. EPA 1983a, b, c

40

Radiation-Induced Rib Fractures After Hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy: Risk Factors and Dose-Volume Relationship  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to clarify the incidence, the clinical risk factors, and the dose-volume relationship of radiation-induced rib fracture (RIRF) after hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: One hundred sixteen patients treated with SBRT for primary or metastatic lung cancer at our institution, with at least 6 months of follow-up and no previous overlapping radiation exposure, were included in this study. To determine the clinical risk factors associated with RIRF, correlations between the incidence of RIRF and the variables, including age, sex, diagnosis, gross tumor volume diameter, rib-tumor distance, and use of steroid administration, were analyzed. Dose-volume histogram analysis was also conducted. Regarding the maximum dose, V10, V20, V30, and V40 of the rib, and the incidences of RIRF were compared between the two groups divided by the cutoff value determined by the receiver operating characteristic curves. Results: One hundred sixteen patients and 374 ribs met the inclusion criteria. Among the 116 patients, 28 patients (46 ribs) experienced RIRF. The estimated incidence of rib fracture was 37.7% at 3 years. Limited distance from the rib to the tumor (<2.0 cm) was the only significant risk factor for RIRF (p = 0.0001). Among the dosimetric parameters used for receiver operating characteristic analysis, the maximum dose showed the highest area under the curve. The 3-year estimated risk of RIRF and the determined cutoff value were 45.8% vs. 1.4% (maximum dose, {>=}42.4 Gy or less), 51.6% vs. 2.0% (V40, {>=}0.29 cm{sup 3} or less), 45.8% vs. 2.2% (V30, {>=}1.35 cm{sup 3} or less), 42.0% vs. 8.5% (V20, {>=}3.62 cm{sup 3} or less), or 25.9% vs. 10.5% (V10, {>=}5.03 cm{sup 3} or less). Conclusions: The incidence of RIRF after hypofractionated SBRT is relatively high. The maximum dose and high-dose volume are strongly correlated with RIRF.

Asai, Kaori [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)] [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Shioyama, Yoshiyuki, E-mail: shioyama@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Heavy Particle Therapy and Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)] [Department of Heavy Particle Therapy and Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Nakamura, Katsumasa; Sasaki, Tomonari; Ohga, Saiji; Nonoshita, Takeshi [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)] [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Yoshitake, Tadamasa [Department of Heavy Particle Therapy and Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)] [Department of Heavy Particle Therapy and Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Ohnishi, Kayoko [Department of Radiology, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)] [Department of Radiology, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Terashima, Kotaro; Matsumoto, Keiji [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)] [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Hirata, Hideki [Department of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)] [Department of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Honda, Hiroshi [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)] [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "major risk factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Herd-level Risk Factors Associated with Antimicrobial Susceptibility Patterns and Distributions in Fecal Bacteria of Porcine Origin.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this dissertation is threefold: to determine the differences in apparent prevalence and the antimicrobial susceptibility of Campylobacter spp. between antimicrobial-free and conventional swine farms; secondly, to introduce an appropriate statistical model to compare the minimum inhibitory concentration distributions of Escherichia coli and Campylobacter spp. isolated from both farm types; and thirdly, to examine the potential herd level risk factors that may be associated with antimicrobial resistance of Campylobacter spp. and E. coli isolates from finishers on antimicrobial-free and conventional farming systems. In addition, a critical review of studies that have compared the levels and patterns of antimicrobial resistance among animals from antimicrobial-free and conventional farming practices was performed. Fecal samples from 15 pigs were collected from each of 35 antimicrobial-free and 60 conventional farms in the Midwestern U.S. Campylobacter spp. was isolated from 464 of 1,422 fecal samples, and each isolate was tested for susceptibility to 6 antimicrobials. The apparent prevalence of Campylobacter spp. isolates was approximately 33 percent on both conventional and antimicrobial-free farms. The proportion of antimicrobial resistance among Campylobacter was higher for three antimicrobials within conventional compared to antimicrobial-free farms. The susceptibilities of populations of bacteria to antimicrobial drugs were summarized as minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) frequency distributions. The use of MIC values removed the subjectivity associated with the choice of breakpoints which define an isolate as susceptible or resistant. A discrete-time survival analysis model was introduced as the recommended statistical model when MICs are the outcome. A questionnaire was completed by each farm manager on biosecurity, preventive medication, vaccines, disease history, and production management. Multivariable population-averaged statistical models were used to determine the relationships among antimicrobial susceptibility patterns and potential herd-level risk factors. Controlling for herd type (antimicrobial-free versus conventional), each antimicrobial-bacterial species combination yielded unique combinations of risk factors; however, housing type, history of rhinitis, farm ventilation, and history of swine flu were significant in more than one model. A variety of herd-level practices were associated with the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance on swine farms. Further studies are encouraged when considering interventions for antimicrobial resistance on both antimicrobial-free and conventional farms.

Rollo, Susan Noble

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Uncertainties in risk assessment at USDOE facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (USDOE) has embarked on an ambitious program to remediate environmental contamination at its facilities. Decisions concerning cleanup goals, choices among cleanup technologies, and funding prioritization should be largely risk-based. Risk assessments will be used more extensively by the USDOE in the future. USDOE needs to develop and refine risk assessment methods and fund research to reduce major sources of uncertainty in risk assessments at USDOE facilities. The terms{open_quote} risk assessment{close_quote} and{open_quote} risk management{close_quote} are frequently confused. The National Research Council (1983) and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA, 1991a) described risk assessment as a scientific process that contributes to risk management. Risk assessment is the process of collecting, analyzing and integrating data and information to identify hazards, assess exposures and dose responses, and characterize risks. Risk characterization must include a clear presentation of {open_quotes}... the most significant data and uncertainties...{close_quotes} in an assessment. Significant data and uncertainties are {open_quotes}...those that define and explain the main risk conclusions{close_quotes}. Risk management integrates risk assessment information with other considerations, such as risk perceptions, socioeconomic and political factors, and statutes, to make and justify decisions. Risk assessments, as scientific processes, should be made independently of the other aspects of risk management (USEPA, 1991a), but current methods for assessing health risks are based on conservative regulatory principles, causing unnecessary public concern and misallocation of funds for remediation.

Hamilton, L.D.; Holtzman, S.; Meinhold, A.F.; Morris, S.C.; Rowe, M.D.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Major Renovations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Major Renovations Major Renovations Major Renovations October 16, 2013 - 4:50pm Addthis Project Phases for Major Renovations The major renovation process still follows the phases of project design and construction, from planning to operations and maintenance. More information on how to integrate renewable energy into the phases of design is discussed in the main portion of this Guide. Major renovations are more constricted in design choices than new construction, but can still offer a wide range of opportunities for integrating renewable energy technologies into the renovation process. During a major Federal building renovation, more design factors may be pre-determined, such as building site and orientation, but a whole building design approach can still offer the most economic and efficient options.

44

Contaminants in Buildings and Occupied Spaces as Risk Factors forOccupant Symptoms in U.S. Office Buildings: Findings from the U.S. EPABASE Study  

SciTech Connect

Nonspecific building-related symptoms among occupants of modern office buildings worldwide are common and may be associated with important reductions in work performance, but their etiology remains uncertain. Most reported research into environmental risk factors for these symptoms has focused on ventilation system-related factors, dampness, and particle removal through filtration and cleaning, with relatively few studies of other potential sources of indoor contaminants. We analyzed data collected by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) from a representative sample of 100 large U.S. office buildings--the Building Assessment and Survey Evaluation (BASE) study--using multivariate-adjusted logistic regression models with generalized estimating equations. We estimated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for associations between seven building-related symptom outcomes and a diverse set of potential indoor and outdoor sources for indoor pollutants. Although most of the investigated risk factors showed no apparent association with building-related symptoms, some interesting associations resulted. Increased prevalence of symptoms was associated with carpets older than one year (lower respiratory symptoms), non-carpeted floors (upper and lower respiratory symptoms), older furniture (eye and skin symptoms), infrequent vacuuming (upper respiratory, eye, and skin symptoms and headache), and masonry exterior walls (cough, eye symptoms, and fatigue/concentration difficulty). For the many potential risk factors assessed, almost none had been investigated previously, and many associations found here may have been by chance. Additional confirmatory research focused on risk factors initially identified here is needed, using more objective measures of health outcomes and risk factors or exposures.

Mendell, M.J.; Mirer, A.; Lei-Gomez, Q.

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

A cross-sectional study of the prevalence and risk factors for hypertension in rural Nepali women  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

factors for hypertension in rural Nepali women. BMC Publicof hypertension in a rural community in Nepal. Indian Hearton difference between rural and urban community. Bangladesh

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Internships for Physics Majors  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Fermilab's IPM program offers ten-week summer internships to outstanding undergraduate physics majors. This program has been developed to familiarize students with opportunities at the frontiers of...

47

Risk management for IT and software projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Risk management can be defined as a systematic process for identifying, analyzing and controlling risks in projects or organizations. Definitions and illustrations of risks are given; in particular, a list of ten risk factors which occur most frequently ... Keywords: Riskit, analysis of risks, control of risks, identification of risks, monitoring of risks, project risks, quality management, risk definition, risk management, risk management process, risk scenario

E. Wallmüller

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Majors' Shift to Natural Gas, The  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Majors' Shift to Natural Gas investigates the factors that have guided the United States' major energy producers' growth in U.S. natural gas production relative to oil production. The analysis draws heavily on financial and operating data from the Energy Information Administration's Financial Reporting System (FRS)

Bruce Bawks

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Risk and risk management in software projects: A reassessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Controlling risk in software projects is considered to be a major contributor to project success. This paper reconsiders the status of risk and risk management in the literature and practice. The analysis is supported by a study of risk practices in ... Keywords: Project management, Risk management, Software projects, Threat management

Paul L. Bannerman

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

DOUBLE MAJORS Imaging Science + ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DOUBLE MAJORS Imaging Science + ... Applied Mathematics Biomedical Sciences Computer Science Undergraduate Research Internships and Cooperative Education (Co-op) (optional) Study Abroad WHY IMAGING SCIENCE Science: BS, MS, PhD Color Science: MS, PhD BS + MS/PhD Combos HUMAN VISION BIO- MEDICAL ASTRO- PHYSICS

Zanibbi, Richard

51

Dosimetric parameters as predictive factors for biochemical control in patients with higher risk prostate cancer treated with Pd-103 and supplemental beam radiation  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To analyze the role of dosimetric quality parameters in maximizing cancer eradication in higher risk prostate cancer patients treated with palladium (Pd)-103 and supplemental beam radiation. Methods: One-hundred-seventy-nine patients treated with Pd-103 and supplemental beam radiation, with minimum 2 years follow-up prostate-specific antigen (PSA) values and posttreatment computed tomography scans were analyzed. Dosimetric parameters included the V100 (percent of the postimplant volume covered by the prescription dose), the D90 (the minimum dose that covered 90% of the post implant volume), and the treatment margins (the radial distance between the prostatic edge and the prescription isodose). Treatment margins (TMs) were calculated using premarket software. Results: Freedom from biochemical failure was 79% at 3 years, with 92 of the 179 patients (51%) followed beyond 3 years. In comparing patients who did or did not achieve biochemical control, the most striking differences were in biologic factors of pretreatment PSA and Gleason score. The V100, D90, and average TM all showed nonsignificant trends to higher values in patients with biochemical control. In multivariate analysis of each of the three dosimetric parameters against PSA and Gleason score, TM showed the strongest correlation with biochemical control (p = 0.19). Conclusions: For patients with intermediate and high-risk prostate cancer treated with Pd-103 brachytherapy and external beam radiation, biologic factors (PSA and Gleason score) were the most important determinants of cancer eradication. However, there is a trend to better outcomes among patients with higher quality implant parameters, suggesting that attention to implant quality will maximize the likelihood of cure.

Orio, Peter [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Radiation Oncology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA (United States); Wallner, Kent [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States) and Radiation Oncology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA (United States) and Group Health Cooperative, Seattle, WA (United States)]. E-mail: kent.Wallner@med.va.gov; Merrick, Gregory [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling, WV (United States); Herstein, Andrew [Radiation Oncology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA (United States); Mitsuyama, Paul [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Radiation Oncology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA (United States); Thornton, Ken [Varian Medical Systems, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Butler, Wayne [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling, WV (United States); Sutlief, Steven [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Radiation Oncology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA (United States)

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Do changes in traditional coronary heart disease risk factors over time explain the association between socio-economic status and coronary heart disease?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

case-control study. Heart 2009, Franks P, Tancredi DJ,status in coronary heart disease risk estimation. Ann Famstatus and coronary heart disease risk prediction. JAMA

Franks, Peter; Winters, Paul C; Tancredi, Daniel J; Fiscella, Kevin A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Producer perception of fed cattle price risk.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Risk is an inevitable part of agricultural production and all producers face various forms of risk. Output price has been shown to be the major… (more)

Riley, John Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Major Program Offices  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

101 101 Major Program Offices Doing Business with... Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of Environmental Management National Nuclear Security Administration Office of Science Gary G. Lyttek, Business Source Manager FY2010 DOE Procurement Base: $22.9B $1,556 $5,701 $9,523 $3,793 $2,304 $'s - Millions EE EM NNSA SC Other 2 Presentation for the DOE Small Business Conference EERE Funding Opportunity Announcements (FOA) May 2011 3 Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy 4 * The mission and vision of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) is to strengthen America's energy security, environmental quality and economic vitality in public-private partnerships that: * Enhance energy efficiency and productivity

55

Major Energy Producers  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

206(92) 206(92) Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1992 January 1994 Elk. I nergy Information dministration This publication and other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications may be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office. All telephone orders should be directed to: U.S. Government Printing Office Superintendent of Documents McPherson Square Bookstore U.S. Government Printing Office 1510 H Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20402 Washington, DC 20005 (202)783-3238 (202)653-2050 FAX (202)512-2233 FAX (202)376-5055 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., eastern time, M-F 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., eastern time, M-F All mail orders should be directed to: U.S. Government Printing Office P.O. Box 371954 Pittsburgh, PA 15250-7954 Complimentary subscriptions and single issues are available to certain groups of subscribers, such as

56

Risk Assess - updated  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Software Development Risk Assessment Software Development Risk Assessment Note: The purpose of this prompt list is to provide project managers with a tool for identifying and planning for potential project risks. It is process-based and supports the framework established by the DOE Software Engineering Methodology. It will be used within the stage exit process as an additional tool to ensure that the project manager has identified and is managing known risk factors. Additional detailed information describes the various risk factors and how to score them. Performing a risk assessment is an important step in being prepared for potential problems that can occur within any software project. During the risk assessment, if a potential risk is identified, a solution or plan of action should be developed. (A problem analyzed and planned

57

Multi-Pathway Human Health and Ecological Risk Assessment for a Model Coal-Fired Power Plant Using a Revised Arsenic Bioconcentratio n Factor for Edible Fish  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a multimedia human health and ecosystem risk study of a model coal-fired power plant in a model setting, using data from an actual power plant that have been transposed to a lakeside setting in the same state. Values of arsenic concentrations in similar ecosystem settings were applied to calculate its contributions to risk.BackgroundThere is increased scientific and regulatory interest in the suite of risks to human health and ecosystems ...

2013-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

58

A new CS0 course for at-risk majors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Bureau of Labor Statistics forecasts that approximately 175,100 software engineering jobs will be created between 2008 and 2018. In order to fill these positions, new computer scientists, who enjoy and are competent in the art of programming and ...

Mona Rizvi; Thorna Humphries; Debra Major; Heather Lauzun; Meghan Jones

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Evaluation of severe accident risks: Quantification of major input parameters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report records part of the vast amount of information received during the expert judgment elicitation process that took place in support of the NUREG-1150 effort sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The results of the Containment Loads and Molten Core/Containment Interaction Expert Panel Elicitation are presented in this part of Volume 2 of NUREG/CR-4551. The Containment Loads Expert Panel considered seven issues: (1) hydrogen phenomena at Grand Gulf; (2) hydrogen burn at vessel breach at Sequoyah; (3) BWR reactor building failure due to hydrogen; (4) Grand Gulf containment loads at vessel breach; (5) pressure increment in the Sequoyah containment at vessel breach; (6) loads at vessel breach: Surry; and (7) pressure increment in the Zion containment at vessel breach. The report begins with a brief discussion of the methods used to elicit the information from the experts. The information for each issue is then presented in five sections: (1) a brief definition of the issue, (2) a brief summary of the technical rationale supporting the distributions developed by each of the experts, (3) a brief description of the operations that the project staff performed on the raw elicitation results in order to aggregate the distributions, (4) the aggregated distributions, and (5) the individual expert elicitation summaries. The Molten Core/Containment Interaction Panel considered three issues. The results of the following two of these issues are presented in this document: (1) Peach Bottom drywell shell meltthrough; and (2) Grand Gulf pedestal erosion. 89 figs., 154 tabs.

Harper, F.T.; Payne, A.C.; Breeding, R.J.; Gorham, E.D.; Brown, T.D.; Rightley, G.S.; Gregory, J.J. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Murfin, W. (Technadyne Engineering Consultants, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Amos, C.N. (Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Cancer and work in Canada with particular reference to occupational risk factors in breast cancer patients in one community and related selected research methods used to investigate those factors.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Cancer represents a major cause of human morbidity and mortality. There is no scientific consensus regarding cancer causality or prevention. Occupational exposure potentially remains a… (more)

Brophy, James Thomas

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "major risk factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Risk Framework for the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plant Construction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Uncertainty can be either an opportunity or a risk. Every construction project begins with the expectation of project performance. To meet the expectation, construction projects need to be managed through sound risk assessment and management beginning with the front-end of the project life cycle to check the feasibility of a project. The Construction Industry Institute’s (CII) International Project Risk Assessment (IPRA) tool has been developed, successfully used for a variety of heavy industry sector projects, and recently elevated to Best Practice status. However, its current format is inadequate to address the unique challenges of constructing the next generation of nuclear power plants (NPP). To understand and determine the risks associated with NPP projects, the goal of this thesis is to develop tailored risk framework for NPP projects that leverages and modifies the existing IPRA process. The IPRA has 82 elements to assess the risks associated with international construction projects. The modified IPRA adds five major issues (elements) to consider the unique risk factors of typical NPP projects based upon a review of the literature and an evaluation of the performance of previous nuclear-related facilities. The modified IPRA considers the sequence of NPP design that ultimately impacts the risks associated with plant safety and operations. Historically, financial risks have been a major chronic problem with the construction of NPPs. This research suggests that unstable regulations and the lack of design controls and oversight are significant risk issues. This thesis includes a consistency test to initially validate whether the asserted risks exist in actual conditions. Also, an overall risk assessment is performed based on the proposed risk framework for NPP and the list of assessed risk is proposed through a possible scenario. After the assessment, possible mitigation strategies are also provided against the major risks as a part of this thesis. This study reports on the preliminary findings for developing a new risk framework for constructing nuclear power plants. Future research is needed for advanced verification of the proposed elements. Follow-on efforts should include verification and validation of the proposed framework by industry experts and methods to quantify and evaluate the performance and risks associated with the multitude of previous NPP projects.

Yeon, Jaeheum 1981-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Risk identification and assessment in a risk based audit environment: the effects of budget constraints and decision aid use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Risk based audit (RBA) approaches represent a major trend in current audit methodology. The approach is based on risk analysis used to identify business strategy risk. The RBA has created a new set of research issues that need investigation. In particular, this approach has important implications for risk identification and risk assessment. The success of the RBA approach is contingent on understanding what factors improve or interfere with the accuracy of these risk judgments. I examine how budget constraints and decision aid use affect risk identification and risk assessment. Unlike previous budget pressure studies, I cast budget constraints as a positive influence on auditors. I expect more stringent budget constraints to be motivating to the auditor as they provide a goal for the auditor to achieve. I also expect budget constraints to induce feelings of pressure leading to the use of time-pressure adaptation strategies. When auditors have use of a decision aid, they take advantage of these motivational goals and/or use beneficial adaptive strategies. Overall, I find that auditor participants tend to be more accurate when identifying financial statement risks compared to business risks. Budget constraints have no effect on risk identification for financial or business risks; they also have no effect on financial risk assessments. On the other hand, business risk assessments are improved by implementing more stringent budget constraints, but only when a decision aid is also provided. Budget constraints can affect performance through a goal theory route or a time-pressure adaptation route. I investigate the paths through which budget constraints improve business risk assessments under decision aid use. I find that budget constraints directly affect performance, supporting a goal theory route. However, I do not find that budget constraints are mediated by perceived budget pressure as expected. Auditors appear to use a positive adaptive strategy to respond to perceived budget pressure, however perceived budget pressure is not induced by providing a more stringent budget.

Diaz, Michelle Chandler

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Screening Risk Evaluation methodology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Screening Risk Evaluation (SRE) Guidance document is a set of guidelines provided for the uniform implementation of SREs performed on D&D facilities. These guidelines are designed specifically for the completion of the second (semi-quantitative screening) phase of the D&D Risk-Based Process. The SRE Guidance produces screening risk scores reflecting levels of risk through the use of risk ranking indices. Five types of possible risk are calculated from the SRE: current releases, worker exposures, future releases, physical hazards, and criticality. The Current Release Index (CRI) calculates the risk to human health and the environment from ongoing or probable releases within a one year time period. The Worker Exposure Index (WEI) calculates the risk to workers, occupants, and visitors in D&D facilities of contaminant exposure. The Future Release Index (FRI) calculates the risk of future releases of contaminants, after one year, to human health and the environment. The Physical Hazards Index (PHI) calculates the risk-to human health due to factors other than that of contaminants. The index of Criticality is approached as a modifying factor to the entire SRE, due to the fact that criticality issues are strictly regulated under DOE. Screening risk results will be tabulated in matrix form and Total Risk will be calculated (weighted equation) to produce a score on which to base early action recommendations. Other recommendations from the screening risk scores will be made based either on individual index scores or from reweighted Total Risk calculations. All recommendations based on the SRE will be made based on a combination of screening risk scores, decision drivers, and other considerations, determined on a project by project basis. The SRE is the first and most important step in the overall D&D project level decision making process.

Hopper, K.M. [Midwest Technical, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. EPA, Washington, D.C. 1992. Risk Assessment Forum. Wildlife Exposure Factors Handbook. Vol. I. United Staes Environmental Protection Agency. Office of Research and...

65

Executing major projects through Contractors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project based organizational structures are utilized in many industries. The firms engaged in these significant endeavors, project sponsor and contractor alike, risk both capital and reputation in the market-place with ...

McKenna, Nicholas A. (Nicholas Alan)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Major Demonstrations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Major Demonstrations Major Demonstrations Major Demonstrations A state-of-the-art integrated coal gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power plant, Tampa Electric's Polk Power Station produces enough electricity to serve 75,000 homes. A state-of-the-art integrated coal gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power plant, Tampa Electric's Polk Power Station produces enough electricity to serve 75,000 homes. The Office of Fossil Energy is co-funding large-scale demonstrations of clean coal technologies to hasten their adoption into the commercial marketplace. Through the year 2030, electricity consumption in the United States is expected to grow by about 1 percent per year. The ability of coal-fired generation to help meet this demand could be limited by concerns over greenhouse gas emissions. While the Major Demonstrations performed to date

67

Risk Prioritization  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Quality Managers Quality Managers Software Quality Assurance Subcommittee Reference Document SQAS21.01.00 - 1999 Software Risk Management A Practical Guide February, 2000 Abstract This document is a practical guide for integrating software risk management into a software project. The purpose of Risk Management is to identify, assess and control project risks. Identified risks are analyzed to determine their potential impact and likelihood of occurrence. Risk Management Plans are developed to document the project's approach to risk management, risks, and decisions made about what should be done with each risk. Risks and risk actions are then tracked to closure. Software Risk Management: A Practical Guide SQAS21.01.00 Acknowledgments This document was prepared for the Department of Energy (DOE) by a Working Group of the DOE

68

Impact of Screening and Risk Factors for Local Recurrence and Survival After Conservative Surgery and Radiotherapy for Early Breast Cancer: Results From a Large Series With Long-Term Follow-Up  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To investigate conventional prognostic factors for ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR), distant metastasis (DM), and survival after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) in screen-detected and symptomatic cases on surveillance up to 25 years. Patients and Methods: A total of 1812 consecutive patients in three cohorts (1981-1989, 1990-1992, and 1993-1998) with T12N01M0 invasive breast cancer were treated with BCT (median follow-up, 14 years). Tumor type and grade were reviewed by a single pathologist. Hormone receptor status was measured by immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to assess independent prognostic variables for relapse and survival. Results: A total of 205 IBTR occurred, with 5-, 10-, 15-, and 20-year actuarial relapse rates of 4.5% (95% confidence interval [CI] 3.35-5.5%), 8.4% (95% CI 7.1-9.8%), 14.1% (95% CI 12.0-16%), and 17.4% (95% CI 14.5-20.2%). Number of nodes, young age, pathologic tumor size, and multifocality were significant factors for IBTR. Three hundred seventy-eight patients developed DM. The actuarial metastatic rate was 12% at 5 years and 17.9% at 10 years. Young age, number of positive nodes, pathologic tumor size, and tumor grade were significant factors for DM relapse. When conventional prognostic indices were taken into account screen-detected cancers showed no improvement in overall relapse or survival rate compared with symptomatic cases but did show a reduced risk of DM after IBTR. After 10 years IBTR relapse continued at a constant rate of 0.87% per annum. Conclusions: The Edinburgh BCT series has shown that screen-detected invasive breast cancers do not have significantly different clinical outcomes compared with symptomatic cases when pathologic risk factors are taken into account. This suggests that these patients be managed in a similar way.

Kunkler, Ian H., E-mail: I.Kunkler@ed.ac.uk [Edinburgh Cancer Centre, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Kerr, Gillian R. [Edinburgh Cancer Centre, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Thomas, Jeremy S. [Department of Pathology, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Jack, Wilma J.L. [Edinburgh Breast Unit, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Bartlett, John M.S. [Edinburgh Cancer Research Centre, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Pedersen, Hans C. [DAKO (Denmark); Cameron, David A. [Edinburgh Cancer Centre, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Dixon, J. Michael; Chetty, Udi [Edinburgh Breast Unit, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Majoring in Forest Resources & Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Majoring in Forest Resources & Conservation University of Florida/IFAS School of Forest Resources & Conservation www.sfrc.ufl.edu ~ 352-846-0847 ~ khaselier@ufl.edu Business Management gives students a sound Management Summer B FOR3200C Foundations in Natural Resources and Conservation 3 credits FOR3434C Forest

Watson, Craig A.

70

Majoring in Forest Resources & Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Majoring in Forest Resources & Conservation University of Florida/IFAS School of Forest Resources & Conservation www.sfrc.ufl.edu ~ 352-846-0847 ~ khaselier@ufl.edu Protected Areas Management is for students interested in managing lands for conservation and restoration purposes, usually on lands owned

Watson, Craig A.

71

Risk of Strong Hurricane Winds to Florida Cities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A statistical procedure for estimating the risk of strong winds from hurricanes is demonstrated and applied to several major cities in Florida. The procedure, called the hurricane risk calculator, provides an estimate of wind risk over different ...

Jill C. Malmstadt; James B. Elsner; Thomas H. Jagger

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Ionizing radiation risks to satellite power systems (SPS) workers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The radiation risks to the health of workers who will construct and maintain solar power satellites in the space environment were examined. For ionizing radiation, the major concern will be late or delayed health effects, particularly the increased risk of radiation-induced cancer. The estimated lifetime risk for cancer is 0.8 to 5.0 excess deaths per 10,000 workers per rad of exposure. Thus, for example, in 10,000 workers who completed ten missions with an exposure of 40 rem per mission, 320 to 2000 additional deaths in excess of the 1640 deaths from normally occurring cancer, would be expected. These estimates would indicate a 20 to 120% increase in cancer deaths in the worker-population. The wide range in these estimates stems from the choice of the risk-projection model and the dose-response relationsip. The choice between a linear and a linear-quadratic dose-response model may alter the risk estimate by a factor of about two. The method of analysis (e.g., relative vs absolute risk model) can alter the risk estimate by an additional factor of three. Choosing different age and sex distributions can further change the estimate by another factor of up to three. The potential genetic consequences could be of significance, but at the present time, sufficient information on the age and sex distribution of the worker population is lacking for precise estimation of risk. The potential teratogenic consequences resulting from radiation are considered significant. Radiation exposure of a pregnant worker could result in developmental abnormalities.

Lyman, J.T.; Ainsworth, E.J.; Alpen, E.L.; Bond, V.; Curtis, S.B.; Fry, R.J.M.; Jackson, K.L.; Nachtwey, S.; Sondhaus, C.; Tobias, C.A.; Fabrikant, J.I.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Major Communications Reports | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Major Communications Reports Major Communications Reports May 18, 2012 Green Button Data: More Power to You May 28, 2009 Major Communications Report May 28, 2009 May 7, 2009 Major...

74

Risk identification in Green IT practice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A variety of risk factors may affect Green IT's practice and eventually displease the goal of environmental sustainability. This paper adopts the value model approach to analyze potential risk effect in Green IT. The Green IT value model has been used ... Keywords: Environmental sustainability, Green IT, Risk factors, Value model

David C. Chou

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Toward A Human-Centered Uml For Risk Analysis -- Application to . . .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Safety is now a major concern in many complex systems such as medical robots. A way to control the complexity of such systems is to manage risk. The first and important step of this activity is risk analysis. During risk analysis, two main studies concerning human factors must be integrated: task analysis and human error analysis. This multidisciplinary analysis often leads to a work sharing between several stakeholders who use their own languages and techniques. This often produces consistency errors and understanding difficulties between them. Hence, this paper proposes to treat the risk analysis on the common expression language UML (Unified Modeling Language) and to handle human factors concepts for task analysis and human error analysis based on the features of this language. The approach is applied to the development of a medical robot for teleechography.

Jérémie Guiochet; Gilles Motet; Claude Baron; Guy Boy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

NETL: Health Effects - Risk Assessment of Reduced Mercury Emissions From  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Risk Assessment of Reduced Mercury Emissions From Coal-Fired Power Plants Risk Assessment of Reduced Mercury Emissions From Coal-Fired Power Plants Given that mercury emissions from coal power plants will almost certainly be limited by some form of national regulation or legislation, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is performing an assessment of the reduction in human health risk that may be achieved through reduction in coal plant emissions of mercury. The primary pathway for mercury exposure is through consumption of fish. The most susceptible population to mercury exposure is the fetus. Therefore, the risk assessment focuses on consumption of fish by women of child-bearing age. Preliminary Risk Assessment A preliminary risk assessment was conducted using a simplified approach based on three major topics: Hg emissions and deposition (emphasizing coal plants), Hg consumption through fish, and dose-response functions for Hg. Using information available from recent literature, dose response factors (DRFs) were generated from studies on loss of cognitive abilities (language skills, motor skills, etc.) by young children whose mothers consumed large amounts of fish with high Hg levels. Population risks were estimated for the general population in three regions of the country, (the Midwest, Northeast, and Southeast) that were identified by EPA as being heavily impacted by coal emissions.

77

Carbon Sequestration Risks and Risk Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Sequestration Risks and Risk Management Title Carbon Sequestration Risks and Risk Management Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2008 Authors Price, Phillip N.,...

78

Major Oil Plays in Utah and Vicinity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utah oil fields have produced over 1.2 billion barrels (191 million m{sup 3}). However, the 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m{sup 3}) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes this trend can be reversed by providing play portfolios for the major oil-producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios will include: descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; locations of major oil pipelines; identification and discussion of land-use constraints; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary techniques for each play. This report covers research activities for the sixth quarter of the project (October 1 through December 31, 2003). This work included describing outcrop analogs for the Jurassic Twin Creek Limestone and Mississippian Leadville Limestone, major oil producers in the thrust belt and Paradox Basin, respectively, and analyzing best practices used in the southern Green River Formation play of the Uinta Basin. Production-scale outcrop analogs provide an excellent view of reservoir petrophysics, facies characteristics, and boundaries contributing to the overall heterogeneity of reservoir rocks. They can be used as a ''template'' for evaluation of data from conventional core, geophysical and petrophysical logs, and seismic surveys. In the Utah/Wyoming thrust belt province, the Jurassic Twin Creek Limestone produces from subsidiary closures along major ramp anticlines where the low-porosity limestone beds are extensively fractured and sealed by overlying argillaceous and non-fractured units. The best outcrop analogs for Twin Creek reservoirs are found at Devils Slide and near the town of Peoa, Utah, where fractures in dense, homogeneous non-porous limestone beds are in contact with the basal siltstone units (containing sealed fractures) of the overlying units. The shallow marine, Mississippian Leadville Limestone is a major oil and gas reservoir in the Paradox Basin of Utah and Colorado. Hydrocarbons are produced from basement-involved, northwest-trending structural traps with closure on both anticlines and faults. Excellent outcrops of Leadville-equivalent rocks are found along the south flank of the Uinta Mountains, Utah. For example, like the Leadville, the Mississippian Madison Limestone contains zones of solution breccia, fractures, and facies variations. When combined with subsurface geological and production data, these outcrop analogs can improve (1) development drilling and production strategies such as horizontal drilling, (2) reservoir-simulation models, (3) reserve calculations, and (4) design and implementation of secondary/tertiary oil recovery programs and other best practices used in the oil fields of Utah and vicinity. In the southern Green River Formation play of the Uinta Basin, optimal drilling, development, and production practices consist of: (1) owning drilling rigs and frac holding tanks; (2) perforating sandstone beds with more than 8 percent neutron porosity and stimulate with separate fracture treatments; (3) placing completed wells on primary production using artificial lift; (4) converting wells relatively soon to secondary waterflooding maintaining reservoir pressure above the bubble point to maximize oil recovery; (5) developing waterflood units using an alternating injector--producer pattern on 40-acre (16-ha) spacing; and (6) recompleting producing wells by perforating all beds that are productive in the waterflood unit. As part of technology transfer activities during this quarter, an abstract describing outcrop reservoir analogs was accepted by the American Assoc

Thomas C. Chidsey; Craig D. Morgan; Kevin McClure; Douglas A. Sprinkel; Roger L. Bon; Hellmut H. Doelling

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

79

Risk management study for the retired Hanford Site facilities: Qualitative risk evaluation for the retired Hanford Site facilities. Volume 3  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a risk evaluation of the 100 and 200 Area retired, surplus facilities on the Hanford Site. Also included are the related data that were compiled by the risk evaluation team during investigations performed on the facilities. Results are the product of a major effort performed in fiscal year 1993 to produce qualitative information that characterizes certain risks associated with these facilities. The retired facilities investigated for this evaluation are located in the 100 and 200 Areas of the 1,450-km{sup 2} (570-mi{sup 2}) Hanford Site. The Hanford Site is a semiarid tract of land in southeastern Washington State. The nearest population center is Richland, Washington, (population 32,000) 30-km (20 mi) southeast of the 200 Area. During walkdown investigations of these facilities, data on real and potential hazards that threatened human health or safety or created potential environmental release issues were identified by the risk evaluation team. Using these findings, the team categorized the identified hazards by facility and evaluated the risk associated with each hazard. The factors contributing to each risk, and the consequence and likelihood of harm associated with each hazard also are included in this evaluation.

Coles, G.A.; Shultz, M.V.; Taylor, W.E.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

An approach to assessing stochastic radiogenic risk in medical imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: This letter suggests a formalism, the medical effective dose (MED), that is suitable for assessing stochastic radiogenic risks in diagnostic medical procedures. Methods: The MED is derived from radiobiological and probabilistic first principals, including: (1) The independence of radiation-induced biological effects in neighboring voxels at low doses; (2) the linear no-threshold assumption for stochastic radiation injury (although other dose-response relationships could be incorporated, instead); (3) the best human radiation dose-response data currently available; and (4) the built-in possibility that the carcinogenic risk to an irradiated organ may depend on its volume. The MED involves a dose-risk summation over irradiated voxels at high spatial resolution; it reduces to the traditional effective dose when every organ is irradiated uniformly and when the dependence of risk on organ volumes is ignored. Standard relative-risk tissue weighting factors can be used with the MED approach until more refined data become available. Results: The MED is intended for clinical and phantom dosimetry, and it provides an estimate of overall relative radiogenic stochastic risk for any given dose distribution. A result of the MED derivation is that the stochastic risk may increase with the volume of tissue (i.e., the number of cells) irradiated, a feature that can be activated when forthcoming radiobiological research warrants it. In this regard, the MED resembles neither the standard effective dose (E) nor the CT dose index (CTDI), but it is somewhat like the CT dose-length product (DLP). Conclusions: The MED is a novel, probabilistically and biologically based means of estimating stochastic-risk-weighted doses associated with medical imaging. Built in, ab initio, is the ability to link radiogenic risk to organ volume and other clinical factors. It is straightforward to implement when medical dose distributions are available, provided that one is content, for the time being, to accept the relative tissue weighting factors published by the International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP). It requires no new radiobiological data and avoids major problems encountered by the E, CTDI, and CT-E formalisms. It makes possible relative inter-patient dosimetry, and also realistic intercomparisons of stochastic risks from different protocols that yield images of comparable quality.

Wolbarst, Anthony B.; Hendee, William R. [Department of Radiology, College of Medicine and Division of Radiation Sciences, College of Health Sciences, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40536 (United States); Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55901 (United States)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "major risk factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

MAJOR OIL PLAYS IN UTAH AND VICINITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utah oil fields have produced over 1.2 billion barrels (191 million m{sup 3}). However, the 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m{sup 3}) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes this trend can be reversed by providing play portfolios for the major oil producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios will include: descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary techniques for each play; locations of major oil pipelines; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and identification and discussion of land use constraints. All play maps, reports, databases, and so forth, produced for the project will be published in interactive, menu-driven digital (web-based and compact disc) and hard-copy formats. This report covers research activities for the third quarter of the first project year (January 1 through March 31, 2003). This work included gathering field data and analyzing best practices in the eastern Uinta Basin, Utah, and the Colorado portion of the Paradox Basin. Best practices used in oil fields of the eastern Uinta Basin consist of conversion of all geophysical well logs into digital form, running small fracture treatments, fingerprinting oil samples from each producing zone, running spinner surveys biannually, mapping each producing zone, and drilling on 80-acre (32 ha) spacing. These practices ensure that induced fractures do not extend vertically out of the intended zone, determine the percentage each zone contributes to the overall production of the well, identify areas that may be by-passed by a waterflood, and prevent rapid water breakthrough. In the eastern Paradox Basin, Colorado, optimal drilling, development, and production practices consist of increasing the mud weight during drilling operations before penetrating the overpressured Desert Creek zone; centralizing treatment facilities; and mixing produced water from pumping oil wells with non-reservoir water and injecting the mixture into the reservoir downdip to reduce salt precipitation, dispose of produced water, and maintain reservoir pressure to create a low-cost waterflood. During this quarter, technology transfer activities consisted of technical presentations to members of the Technical Advisory Board in Colorado and the Colorado Geological Survey. The project home page was updated on the Utah Geological Survey Internet web site.

Thomas C. Chidsey Jr; Craig D. Morgan; Roger L. Bon

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Strategy Guideline: Mitigation of Retrofit Risk Factors  

SciTech Connect

The Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI) is currently developing strategies designed to promote and achieve increased energy savings and promote upgrades in the residential retrofit sector. These strategies are targeted to retrofit program managers, retrofit contractors, policy makers, academic researchers, and non-governmental organizations. This report focuses on four key areas to promote home energy upgrades: fostering accurate energy savings projections; understanding consumer perceptions for energy savings; measuring energy savings, and ensuring quality control for retrofit installations.

Berman, M.; Smith, P.; Porse, E.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Environmental Risk Factors for Autistic Disorder  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

77. Please enter the dishwasher detergent you used mostPlease enter the automatic dishwasher rinse agent you used75. Please enter the dishwasher detergent you used most

Schultz, Stephen T.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

ORIGINAL CONTRIBUTION Contribution of Vascular Risk Factors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/Inwood Columbia Aging Project, a multiethnic, community- based, prospective study of aging in north- ern Manhattan/Inwood Columbia Aging Project, New York, New York. Patients: One hundred fifty-six patients with incident AD (mean Aging Project are from 2 population-based cohorts of Medicare enroll- ees. Recruitment for the first

85

Initial Risk Analysis and Decision Making Framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Commercialization of new carbon capture simulation initiative (CCSI) technology will include two key elements of risk management, namely, technical risk (will process and plant performance be effective, safe, and reliable) and enterprise risk (can project losses and costs be controlled within the constraints of market demand to maintain profitability and investor confidence). Both of these elements of risk are incorporated into the risk analysis subtask of Task 7. Thus far, this subtask has developed a prototype demonstration tool that quantifies risk based on the expected profitability of expenditures when retrofitting carbon capture technology on a stylized 650 MW pulverized coal electric power generator. The prototype is based on the selection of specific technical and financial factors believed to be important determinants of the expected profitability of carbon capture, subject to uncertainty. The uncertainty surrounding the technical performance and financial variables selected thus far is propagated in a model that calculates the expected profitability of investments in carbon capture and measures risk in terms of variability in expected net returns from these investments. Given the preliminary nature of the results of this prototype, additional work is required to expand the scope of the model to include additional risk factors, additional information on extant and proposed risk factors, the results of a qualitative risk factor elicitation process, and feedback from utilities and other interested parties involved in the carbon capture project. Additional information on proposed distributions of these risk factors will be integrated into a commercial implementation framework for the purpose of a comparative technology investment analysis.

Engel, David W.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Major Communications Report May 28, 2009  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This file includes the Department of Energy's major announcements regarding the Recovery Act such as press releases, videos, press events or other major communications for the week of May 28, 2009.

87

Major Communications Report April 28, 2009  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This file includes the Department of Energy's major announcements regarding the Recovery Act such as press releases, videos, press events or other major communications for the week of April 28, 2009.

88

Major Communications Report March 24, 2009  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This file includes the Department of Energy's major announcements regarding the Recovery Act such as press releases, videos, press events or other major communications for the week of March 24, 2009.

89

Major Communications Report April 17, 2009  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This file includes the Department of Energy's major announcements regarding the Recovery Act such as press releases, videos, press events or other major communications for the week of April 17, 2009.

90

Mozambique becomes a major coking coal exporter?  

SciTech Connect

In addition to its potential role as a major international supplier of coking coal, Mozambique will also become a major source of power generation for southern Africa. 3 figs.

Ruffini, A.

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

91

Genome Majority Vote (GMV), Version 0.x  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Genome Majority Vote (GMV), Version 0.x Genome Majority Vote (GMV), Version 0.x The pipeline runs PRODIGAL gene predictions on all genomes, runs pan-reciprocal BLAST, and...

92

Genealogy Of Major U.S. Refiners  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

A summary presentation iof mergers and acquisitions by U.S. major oil companies (including the U.S. affiliates of foreign major oil companies). The presentation focuses on petroleum refining over the last several years through late 2009.

Neal Davis

2009-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

93

MAJOR OIL PLAYS IN UTAH AND VICINITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utah oil fields have produced over 1.2 billion barrels (191 million m{sup 3}). However, the 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m{sup 3}) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes this trend can be reversed by providing play portfolios for the major oil-producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios will include: descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary techniques for each play; locations of major oil pipelines; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and identification and discussion of land use constraints. All play maps, reports, databases, and so forth, produced for the project will be published in interactive, menu-driven digital (web-based and compact disc) and hard-copy formats. This report covers research activities for the fourth quarter of the first project year (April 1 through June 30, 2003). This work included describing outcrop analogs to the Jurassic Nugget Sandstone and Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation, the major oil producers in the thrust belt and Paradox Basin, respectively. Production-scale outcrop analogs provide an excellent view, often in three dimensions, of reservoir-facies characteristics and boundaries contributing to the overall heterogeneity of reservoir rocks. They can be used as a ''template'' for evaluation of data from conventional core, geophysical and petrophysical logs, and seismic surveys. The Nugget Sandstone was deposited in an extensive dune field that extended from Wyoming to Arizona. Outcrop analogs are found in the stratigraphically equivalent Navajo Sandstone of southern Utah which displays large-scale dunal cross-strata with excellent reservoir properties and interdunal features such as oases, wadi, and playa lithofacies with poor reservoir properties. Hydrocarbons in the Paradox Formation are stratigraphically trapped in carbonate buildups (or phylloid-algal mounds). Similar carbonate buildups are exposed in the Paradox along the San Juan River of southeastern Utah. Reservoir-quality porosity may develop in the types of facies associated with buildups such as troughs, detrital wedges, and fans, identified from these outcrops. When combined with subsurface geological and production data, these outcrop analogs can improve (1) development drilling and production strategies such as horizontal drilling, (2) reservoir-simulation models, (3) reserve calculations, and (4) design and implementation of secondary/tertiary oil recovery programs and other best practices used in the oil fields of Utah and vicinity. During this quarter, technology transfer activities consisted of exhibiting the project plans, objectives, and products at a booth at the 2003 annual convention of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists. The project home page was updated on the Utah Geological Survey Internet web site.

Thomas C. Chidsey; Craig D. Morgan; Kevin McClure; Grant C. Willis

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers - Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Financial market analysis and financial data for major energy companies. Environment. ... Country energy information, detailed and overviews. Highlights

95

Total Risk Approach in Applying PRA to Criticality Safety  

SciTech Connect

As nuclear industry continues marching from an expert-base support to more procedure-base support, it is important to revisit the total risk concept to criticality safety. A key objective of criticality safety is to minimize total criticality accident risk. The purpose of this paper is to assess key constituents of total risk concept pertaining to criticality safety from an operations support perspective and to suggest a risk-informed means of utilizing criticality safety resources for minimizing total risk. A PRA methodology was used to assist this assessment. The criticality accident history was assessed to provide a framework for our evaluation. In supporting operations, the work of criticality safety engineers ranges from knowing the scope and configurations of a proposed operation, performing criticality hazards assessment to derive effective controls, assisting in training operators, response to floor questions, surveillance to ensure implementation of criticality controls, and response to criticality mishaps. In a compliance environment, the resource of criticality safety engineers is increasingly being directed towards tedious documentation effort to meet some regulatory requirements to the effect of weakening the floor support for criticality safety. By applying a fault tree model to identify the major contributors of criticality accidents, a total risk picture is obtained to address relative merits of various actions. Overall, human failure is the key culprit in causing criticality accidents. Factors such as failure to follow procedures, lacks of training, lack of expert support at the floor level etc. are main contributors. Other causes may include lack of effective criticality controls such as inadequate criticality safety evaluation. Not all of the causes are equally important in contributing to criticality mishaps. Applying the limited resources to strengthen the weak links would reduce risk more than continuing emphasis on the strong links of criticality safety support. For example, some compliance failures such as lack of detailed documentation may not be as relevant as the lack of floor support in answering operator's questions during operations. Misuse of resources in reducing lesser causes rather than on major causes of criticality accidents is not risk free without severe consequences. A regulatory mandate without due consideration of total risk may have its opposite effect of increasing the total risk of an accident. A lesson is to be learned here. For regulatory standard/guide development, use of ANS/ANSI standard process, which provides the pedigree of consensus participation, is recommended.

Huang, S T

2005-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

96

N Reactor external events probabilistic risk assessment using NUREG-1150 methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the first full-scope Level-III PRA completed for the DOE Category A reactor using the updated NUREG-1150 methods. The comparisons to the quantitative NRC safety objectives and DOE nuclear safety guidelines also set analytical precedent for DOE production reactors. Generally speaking, the risks of operating N Reactor are low because of a combination of factors such as low power density, large confinement volume, effective redundant scram systems and core cooling systems, remote location, etc. This work has been a major effort to evaluate the N Reactor risk using state-of-the-art PRA technology. It is believed that this PRA has resulted in realistic, or slightly conservative, results (as opposed to unduly conservative or nonconservative results). The study concluded that the risk to the public and to nearby DOE workers from the operation of N Reactor is very low. This analysis also found that N Reactor meets all the quantitative NRC safety objectives and DOE nuclear safety guidelines, and is generally as safe as, or safer than most commercial reactors in terms of societal and individual risks. The calculated risk to Hanford onsite workers is comparable to public risk from commercial reactors in the NUREG-1150 study. As a result of these low-risk estimates, only a small effort has been devoted to identifying significant risk reduction alternatives. 22 refs., 2 figs., 10 tabs.

Wang, O.S.; Baxter, J.T.; Coles, G.A.; Zentner, M.D.; Powers, T.B.; Collard, L.B.; Rainey, T.E.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Major Contract Solicitations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Major Major Contract Solicitations Major Contract Solicitations Welcome to the DOE Headquarters major solicitation page. The following is a listing of major active solicitations. Contained within each solicitation link can be found draft and final solicitations, questions and answers, attachments and all other associated documentation necessary for potential offerors to participate along with contact information. Issuance of Special Notice - Operations and Maintenance Support Services for the iManage Program Aviation Management Green Leases Executive Secretariat Energy Reduction at HQ Real Estate Approvals Documents and Publications Facilities and Infrastructure Federal Advisory Committee Management Freedom of Information Act Financial Assistance Information Systems

98

Derivation of a chemical-specific adjustment factor (CSAF) for use in the assessment of risk from chronic exposure to ethylene glycol: Application of international programme for chemical safety guidelines  

SciTech Connect

The International Programme for Chemical Safety (IPCS) has developed a set of guidelines ('the Guidance') for the establishment of Chemical-Specific Adjustment Factors (CSAFs) for in the assessment of toxicity risk to the human population as a result of chemical exposure. The development of case studies is encouraged in the Guidance document and comments on them have been encouraged by the IPCS. One provision in the Guidance is for the determination of CSAFs based on human data. We present a case study of the use of the Guidance for the determination of the CSAF for ethylene glycol (EG) primarily utilizing clinically obtained data. The most relevant endpoint for this analysis was deemed to be acute renal injury. These data were applied based on an assessment of the known pharmaco/toxico-kinetic properties of EG. Because of the lack of both bioaccumulation of EG and reports of chronic or progressive renal injury from EG, it was concluded that the most appropriate model of chronic exposure is one of repeated acute episodes. The most relevant exposure metric was determined to be plasma glycolate concentration. Based on a prospective human study of EG-poisoned patients, the NOAEL for glycolate was found to be 10.1 mM. This value is similar to that obtained from animal data. The application of the Guidelines to this data resulted in a CSAF of 10.24, corresponding to a daily EG dose of 43.7 mg/kg/day. In 2000, Health Canada (HC) produced an animal data-based analysis of the maximum tolerated dose of EG. The results of our analysis are compared with those of HC, and the strengths and weaknesses of these two data types related to EG are discussed.

Palmer, Robert B. [University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, CO 80262 (United States)]. E-mail: RPalmer@Toxicologyassoc.com; Brent, Jeffrey [University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, CO 80262 (United States)

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Estimate of the Geothermal Energy Resource in the Major Sedimentary Basins in the United States (Presentation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because most sedimentary basins have been explored for oil and gas, well logs, temperatures at depth, and reservoir properties such as depth to basement and formation thickness are well known. The availability of this data reduces exploration risk and allows development of geologic exploration models for each basin. This study estimates the magnitude of recoverable geothermal energy from 15 major known U.S. sedimentary basins and ranks these basins relative to their potential. The total available thermal resource for each basin was estimated using the volumetric heat-in-place method originally proposed by (Muffler, 1979). A qualitative recovery factor was determined for each basin based on data on flow volume, hydrothermal recharge, and vertical and horizontal permeability. Total sedimentary thickness maps, stratigraphic columns, cross sections, and temperature gradient information was gathered for each basin from published articles, USGS reports, and state geological survey reports. When published data were insufficient, thermal gradients and reservoir properties were derived from oil and gas well logs obtained on oil and gas commission databases. Basin stratigraphy, structural history, and groundwater circulation patterns were studied in order to develop a model that estimates resource size, temperature distribution, and a probable quantitative recovery factor.

Esposito, A.; Porro, C.; Augustine, C.; Roberts, B.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

MAJOR PLAYS IN UTAH AND VICINITY  

SciTech Connect

Utah oil fields have produced over 1.2 billion barrels (191 million m{sup 3}). However, the 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m{sup 3}) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes this trend can be reversed by providing play portfolios for the major oil-producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios will include: descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary techniques for each play; locations of major oil pipelines; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and identification and discussion of land-use constraints. All play maps, reports, databases, and so forth, produced for the project will be published in interactive, menu-driven digital (web-based and compact disc) and hard-copy formats. This report covers research activities for the first quarter of the second project year (July 1 through September 30, 2003). This work included (1) describing the Conventional Southern Uinta Basin Play, subplays, and outcrop reservoir analogs of the Uinta Green River Conventional Oil and Gas Assessment Unit (Eocene Green River Formation), and (2) technology transfer activities. The Conventional Oil and Gas Assessment Unit can be divided into plays having a dominantly southern sediment source (Conventional Southern Uinta Basin Play) and plays having a dominantly northern sediment source (Conventional Northern Uinta Basin Play). The Conventional Southern Uinta Basin Play is divided into six subplays: (1) conventional Uteland Butte interval, (2) conventional Castle Peak interval, (3) conventional Travis interval, (4) conventional Monument Butte interval, (5) conventional Beluga interval, and (6) conventional Duchesne interval fractured shale/marlstone. We are currently conducting basin-wide correlations to define the limits of the six subplays. Production-scale outcrop analogs provide an excellent view, often in three dimensions, of reservoir-facies characteristics and boundaries contributing to the overall heterogeneity of reservoir rocks. They can be used as a ''template'' for evaluation of data from conventional core, geophysical and petrophysical logs, and seismic surveys. Outcrop analogs for each subplay except the Travis interval are found in Indian and Nine Mile Canyons. During this quarter, the project team members submitted an abstract to the American Association of Petroleum Geologists for presentation at the 2004 annual national convention in Dallas, Texas. The project home page was updated on the Utah Geological Survey Internet web site.

Craig D. Morgan; Thomas C. Chidsey

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "major risk factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Application of Chemically Accelerated Biotreatment to Reduce Risk in Oil-Impacted Soils  

SciTech Connect

Research was conducted in six major focus areas: (1) Evaluation of the process using 6 test soils with full chemical and physical characteristics to determine controlling factors for biodegradation and chemical oxidation; (2) Determination of the sequestration time on chemical treatment suspectability; (3) Risk factors, i.e. toxicity after chemical and biological treatment; (4) Impact of chemical treatment (Fenton's Reagent) on the agents of biodegradation; (5) Description of a new genus and its type species that degrades hydrocarbons; and (6) Intermediates generate from Fenton's reagent treatment of various polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons.

Paterek, J.R.; Bogan, W.W.; Sirivedhin; Tanita

2003-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

102

LET is a Critical Factor in Accelerating Development of Lymphoma in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is a Critical Factor in Accelerating Development of Lymphoma in is a Critical Factor in Accelerating Development of Lymphoma in Irradiated Bax Transgenic C57/B6 Mice James Jacobus University of Iowa Abstract A major risk during exposure to both low and high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation is the development of lymphoma. Both occupationally and therapeutically exposed individuals are at risk for lymphoma development induced by low LET radiation, while deeply penetrating high LET radiation is a significant concern for those planning and undertaking long duration missions in space where a high degree of uncertainty on actual risk exists due to the lack of epidemiologically-based datasets. The C57/B6 transgenic mice used in this study have been genetically engineered to possess either one (Bax 1) or two (Bax 38/1) extra copies of

103

Major Oil Plays In Utah And Vicinity  

SciTech Connect

Utah oil fields have produced over 1.33 billion barrels (211 million m{sup 3}) of oil and hold 256 million barrels (40.7 million m{sup 3}) of proved reserves. The 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m3) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. However, in late 2005 oil production increased, due, in part, to the discovery of Covenant field in the central Utah Navajo Sandstone thrust belt ('Hingeline') play, and to increased development drilling in the central Uinta Basin, reversing the decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes providing play portfolios for the major oil-producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming can continue this new upward production trend. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios include descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; locations of major oil pipelines; identification and discussion of land-use constraints; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary recovery techniques for each play. The most prolific oil reservoir in the Utah/Wyoming thrust belt province is the eolian, Jurassic Nugget Sandstone, having produced over 288 million barrels (46 million m{sup 3}) of oil and 5.1 trillion cubic feet (145 billion m{sup 3}) of gas. Traps form on discrete subsidiary closures along major ramp anticlines where the depositionally heterogeneous Nugget is also extensively fractured. Hydrocarbons in Nugget reservoirs were generated from subthrust Cretaceous source rocks. The seals for the producing horizons are overlying argillaceous and gypsiferous beds in the Jurassic Twin Creek Limestone, or a low-permeability zone at the top of the Nugget. The Nugget Sandstone thrust belt play is divided into three subplays: (1) Absaroka thrust - Mesozoic-cored shallow structures, (2) Absaroka thrust - Mesozoic-cored deep structures, and (3) Absaroka thrust - Paleozoic-cored shallow structures. Both of the Mesozoic-cored structures subplays represent a linear, hanging wall, ramp anticline parallel to the leading edge of the Absaroka thrust. Fields in the shallow Mesozoic subplay produce crude oil and associated gas; fields in the deep subplay produce retrograde condensate. The Paleozoic-cored structures subplay is located immediately west of the Mesozoic-cored structures subplays. It represents a very continuous and linear, hanging wall, ramp anticline where the Nugget is truncated against a thrust splay. Fields in this subplay produce nonassociated gas and condensate. Traps in these subplays consist of long, narrow, doubly plunging anticlines. Prospective drilling targets are delineated using high-quality, two-dimensional and three-dimensional seismic data, forward modeling/visualization tools, and other state-of-the-art techniques. Future Nugget Sandstone exploration could focus on more structurally complex and subtle, thrust-related traps. Nugget structures may be present beneath the leading edge of the Hogsback thrust and North Flank fault of the Uinta uplift. The Jurassic Twin Creek Limestone play in the Utah/Wyoming thrust belt province has produced over 15 million barrels (2.4 million m{sup 3}) of oil and 93 billion cubic feet (2.6 billion m{sup 3}) of gas. Traps form on discrete subsidiary closures along major ramp anticlines where the low-porosity Twin Creek is extensively fractured. Hydrocarbons in Twin Creek reservoirs were generated from subthrust Cretaceous source rocks. The seals for the producing horizons are overlying argillaceous and clastic beds, and non-fractured units within the Twin Creek. The Twin Creek Limestone thrust belt play is divided into two subplays: (1) Absaroka thrust-Mesozoic-cored structures and (2) A

Thomas Chidsey

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

104

Major Normal Fault | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Major Normal Fault Major Normal Fault Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Major Normal Fault Dictionary.png Major Normal Fault: Normal faults are structures in which the hanging wall is down dropped along the fault plane relative to the foot wall. They are the predominant type of structure in extensional tectonic environments, but are commonly encountered in a number of geologic settings. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Controlling Structures List of controlling structures typically associated with geothermal systems: Major Normal Fault Termination of a Major Normal Fault Stepover or Relay Ramp in Normal Fault Zones Apex or Salient of Normal Fault Fault Intersection Accommodation Zone Displacement Transfer Zone Pull-Apart in Strike-Slip Fault Zone

105

Energy Crossroads: Major Conservation Programs & Initiatives...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Major Conservation Programs & Initiatives < Previous Topic Energy Crossroads Index Next Topic > Suggest a Listing California Energy Commission's Public Programs Office The...

106

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers - Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Financial market analysis and financial data for major energy companies. Environment. Greenhouse gas data, voluntary report- ing, electric power plant emissions.

107

Appendix B Major Disturbances and Unusual Occurrences  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

144 U.S. Energy Information Administration/Electric Power Monthly June 2012 Table B.2 Major Disturbances and Unusual Occurrences, Year-to-Date through ...

108

Comparison of risk-dominant scenario assumptions for several TRU waste facilities in the DOE complex  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to gain a risk management perspective, the DOE Rocky Flats Field Office (RFFO) initiated a survey of other DOE sites regarding risks from potential accidents associated with transuranic (TRU) storage and/or processing facilities. Recently-approved authorization basis documents at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) have been based on the DOE Standard 3011 risk assessment methodology with three qualitative estimates of frequency of occurrence and quantitative estimates of radiological consequences to the collocated worker and the public binned into three severity levels. Risk Class 1 and 2 events after application of controls to prevent or mitigate the accident are designated as risk-dominant scenarios. Accident Evaluation Guidelines for selection of Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs) are based on the frequency and consequence bin assignments to identify controls that can be credited to reduce risk to Risk Class 3 or 4, or that are credited for Risk Class 1 and 2 scenarios that cannot be further reduced. This methodology resulted in several risk-dominant scenarios for either the collocated worker or the public that warranted consideration on whether additional controls should be implemented. RFFO requested the survey because of these high estimates of risks that are primarily due to design characteristics of RFETS TRU waste facilities (i.e., Butler-type buildings without a ventilation and filtration system, and a relatively short distance to the Site boundary). Accident analysis methodologies and key assumptions are being compared for the DOE sites responding to the survey. This includes type of accidents that are risk dominant (e.g., drum explosion, material handling breach, fires, natural phenomena, external events, etc.), source term evaluation (e.g., radionuclide material-at-risk, chemical and physical form, damage ratio, airborne release fraction, respirable fraction, leakpath factors), dispersion analysis (e.g., meteorological assumptions, distance to receptors, plume meander, deposition, and other factors affecting the calculated {chi}/Q), dose assessments (specific activities, inhalation dose conversion factors, breathing rates), designated frequency of occurrence, and risk assignment per the DOE Standard 3011 methodology. Information from the sites is being recorded on a spreadsheet to facilitate comparisons. The first response from Westinghouse Safety Management Solutions for the Savannah River Site (SRS) also provided a detailed analysis of the major differences in methods and assumptions between RFETS and SRS, which forms much of the basis for this paper. Other sites responding to the survey include the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Hanford, and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

Foppe, T.L. [Foppe and Associates, Inc., Golden, CO (United States); Marx, D.R. [Westinghouse Safety Management Solutions, Inc., Aiken, SC (United States)

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Take Steps to Reduce Heart Risks  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Take Steps to Reduce Heart Risks Take Steps to Reduce Heart Risks February is American Heart Month -- a time to reflect on the sobering fact that heart disease remains the number one killer of both women and men in the United States. The good news is you have the power to protect and improve your heart health. NIH and other government agencies have been working to advance our understanding of heart disease so that people can live longer, healthier lives. Research has found that you can lower your risk for heart disease simply by adopting sensible health habits. To protect your heart, the first step is to learn your own personal risk factors for heart disease. Risk factors are conditions or habits that make you more likely to develop a disease. Risk factors can also increase the chances that an existing disease will get worse.

110

Risk in agriculture : a study of crop yield distributions and crop insurance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agriculture is a business fraught with risk. Crop production depends on climatic, geographical, biological, political, and economic factors, which introduce risks that are quantifiable given the appropriate mathematical ...

Gayam, Narsi Reddy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations More Documents & Publications Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations Slide 1 Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations...

112

PIA - WEB Physical Security Major Application | Department of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Physical Security Major Application PIA - WEB Physical Security Major Application PIA - WEB Physical Security Major Application PIA - WEB Physical Security Major Application More...

113

Vermont Air Pollution Control Regulations, Major Stationary Sources...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Major Stationary Sources and Major Modifications (Vermont) Vermont Air Pollution Control Regulations, Major Stationary Sources and Major Modifications (Vermont) Eligibility Utility...

114

Health risks of energy technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume examines occupational, public health, and environmental risks of the coal fuel cycle, the nuclear fuel cycle, and unconventional energy technologies. The 6 chapters explore in detail the relationship between energy economics and risk analysis, assess the problems of applying traditional cost-benefit analysis to long-term environmental problems (such as global carbon dioxide levels), and consider questions about the public's perception and acceptance of risk. Also included is an examination of the global risks associated with current and proposed levels of energy production and comsumption from all major sources. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 6 chapters; all are included in Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA) and four in Energy Research Abstracts (ERA).

Travis, C.C.; Etnier, E.L. (eds.)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1993  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3) 3) Distribution Category UC-950 Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1993 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Energy Information Administration/ Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1993 ii This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration/ Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1993 iii The Financial Reporting System, 1977-1993 diskette is available from the Energy Information Administration.

116

Major Contract Solicitation | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Solicitation | National Nuclear Security Administration Solicitation | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Major Contract Solicitation Home > About Us > Our Operations > Acquisition and Project Management > Major Contract Solicitation Major Contract Solicitation Pantex Plant Wind Farm Acquisition Y-12 National Security Complex, Pantex Plant, with Option for

117

Performance profiles of major energy producers 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1994 is the eighteenth annual report of the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) Financial Reporting System (FRS). The report examines financial and operating developments in energy markets, with particular reference to the 24 major U.S. energy companies required to report annually on Form EIA-28. Financial information is reported by major lines of business, including oil and gas production, petroleum refining and marketing, other energy operations, and nonenergy businesses. Financial and operating results are presented in the context of energy market developments with a view toward identifying changing corporate strategies and measuring the performance of ongoing operations both in the United States and abroad.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Definition: Reduced Major Outages | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Outages Outages Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Major Outages A major outage is defined using the beta method, per IEEE Std 1366-2003 (IEEE Power Engineering Society 2004). The monetary benefit of reducing major outages is based on the VOS of each customer class. The VOS parameter represents the total cost of a power outage per MWh. This cost includes the value of unserved energy, lost productivity, collateral damage, the value of penalties and performance-based rates. Functions that lead to this benefit can mitigate major outages by allowing the system to be reconfigured on the fly to help restore service to as many customers as possible, enable a quicker response in the restoration effort, or mitigate the impact of an outage through islanding or alternative power supply.[1]

119

Performance profiles of major energy producers 1996  

SciTech Connect

This publication examines developments in the operations of the major US e energy-producing companies on a corporate level, by major line of business, by major function within each line of business, and by geographic area. In 1996, 24 companies filed Form EIA-28. The analysis and data presented in this report represents the operations of the Financial Reporting System companies in the context of their worldwide operations and in the context of the major energy markets which they serve. Both energy and nonenergy developments of these companies are analyzed. Although the focus is on developments in 1996, important trends prior to that time are also featured. Sections address energy markets in 1996; key financial developments; oil and gas exploration, development, and production; downstream petroleum in 1996; coal and alternative energy; and foreign direct investment in US energy. 30 figs., 104 tabs.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Performance profiles of major energy producers 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1993 is the seventeenth annual report of the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) Financial Reporting System (FRS). The report examines financial and operating developments in energy markets, with particular reference to the 25 major US energy companies required to report annually on Form EIA-28. Financial information is reported by major liens of business, including oil and gas production, petroleum refining and marketing, other energy operations, and nonenergy businesses. Financial and operating results are presented in the context of energy market developments with a view toward identifying changing corporate strategies and measuring the performance of ongoing operations both in the US and abroad. This year`s report analyzes financial and operating developments for 1993 (Part 1: Developments in 1993) and also reviews key developments during the 20 years following the Arab Oil Embargo of 1973--1974 (Part 2: Major Energy Company Strategies Since the Arab Oil Embargo). 49 figs., 104 tabs.

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "major risk factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Vermont Air Pollution Control Regulations, Major Stationary Sources and Major Modifications (Vermont)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section of the air quality standards applies to all major sources and major modifications and outlines the required control technology to achieve the most stringent emission rate. Emission...

122

Risks of LNG and LPG. [Review  

SciTech Connect

Since the use of liquefied natural gas (LNG) and liquefied petroleum gases (LPG) as fuels is likely to increase and will certainly persist for some time to come, assessment of the safety of LNG/LPG systems will continue to draw attention and is quite likely to force continuing review of operating and design standards for LNG/LPG facilities. Scientific investigations to date appear to have identified the major hazards. Except for the dispersive behavior of vapor clouds - a not-insignificant factor in risk evaluation - the consequences of spills are well circumscribed by current analyses. The physically significant effects accompanying nonexplosive combustion of spilled material are fairly well documented; yet, potentially substantial uncertainties remain. Catastrophic spills of 10/sup 4/-10/sup 5/ m/sup 3/ on land or water are possible, given the current size of storage vessels. Almost all experimental spills have used less than 10 m/sup 3/ of liquid. There is thus some uncertainty regarding the accuracy and validity of extrapolation of current empirical information and physical models to spills of catastrophic size. The less-likely but still-possible explosive or fireball combustion modes are not well understood in respect to their inception. The troubling experience with such violent combustion of similar combustible vapors suggests that this possibility will need further definition. Extant LNG and LPG risk analyses illustrate the difficulties of substantiating the numerous event probabilities and the determination of all event sequences that can lead to hazardous consequences. Their disparate results show that significant improvements are needed. Most importantly, a detailed critique of past efforts and a determination of an exhaustive set of criteria for evaluating the adequacy of a risk analysis should precede any further attempts to improve on existing studies. 44 references, 1 table.

Fay, J.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

The major in American Indian Studies is one of the options within the Committee Interdisciplinary Major  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Major (CIM) program. CIM majors "build" their own major by working with a committee of faculty members their personal educational and career objectives. The American Indian Studies CIM is an interdisciplinary program experience with American Indian people and their culture. UWMilwLetSci The American Indian Studies CIM

Saldin, Dilano

124

Prediction markets for cost and risk assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Several temporal and political factors can sometimes limit the effectiveness of traditional methods of project tracking and cost estimation. A large organization is susceptible to internal and external risks that are ...

Aggarwal, Taroon

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Risk Management Tool Attributes:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- Tools & SMEs - Tools & SMEs Outline for Breakout Session TOOLS 1. Types of Tools a. Risk Management - Database & Reports, risk register, risk forms, risk tracking & monitoring, basis of estimate, action item tracking, historical record of risks & changes, configuration control, enterprise-wide, metrics, risk performance index, risk checklist, graphical display, management reporting (various levels), risk communications b. Risk Analysis i. Cost, ii. budgets, funding, cash-flow analysis, iii. Schedule iv. tailoring categories v. Integrated Cost & Schedule vi. Project phase analysis; organization ownership & joint planning c. Risk Knowledge and Lessons Learned Database i. Enterprise-wide ii. Job/owner-specific iii. Workshops - project specific, risk management,

126

Financial News for Major Energy Companies  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Third Quarter 2005 Third Quarter 2005 The "Financial News for Major Energy Companies" is issued quarterly to report recent trends in the financial performance of the major energy companies. These include the respondents to Form EIA-28 (Financial Reporting System (FRS)), with the exception of the FRS companies that do not issue quarterly earnings releases or fail to provide separate information for the company's U.S. operations. Twenty-one 1 major energy companies reported overall net income (excluding unusual items) of $26.0 billion on revenues of $295.1 billion during the third quarter of 2005 (Q305). The level of net income for Q305 was 69 percent higher than in the third quarter of 2004 (Q304) (Table 1). Net income for Q305 increased primarily as a result of higher crude oil and

127

Financial News for Major Energy Companies  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

First Quarter 2006 First Quarter 2006 The "Financial News for Major Energy Companies" is issued quarterly to report recent trends in the financial performance of the major energy companies. These include the respondents to Form EIA-28 (Financial Reporting System (FRS)), with the exception of the FRS companies that do not issue quarterly earnings releases or fail to provide separate information for the company's U.S. operations. Twenty-one major energy companies 1 reported overall net income (excluding unusual items) of $24.1 billion on revenues of $276.6 billion during the first quarter of 2006 (Q106). The level of net income for Q106 was 23 percent higher than in the first quarter of 2005 (Q105) (Table 1). Net income for Q106 increased primarily as a result of higher crude oil and

128

Financial News for Major Energy Companies  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Second Quarter 2005 Second Quarter 2005 The "Financial News for Major Energy Companies" is issued quarterly to report recent trends in the financial performance of the major energy companies. These include the respondents to Form EIA-28 (Financial Reporting System (FRS)), with the exception of the FRS companies that do not issue quarterly earnings releases or fail to provide separate information for the company's U.S. operations. Twenty-five major energy companies reported overall net income (excluding unusual items) of $23.0 billion on revenues of $276.1 billion during the second quarter of 2005 (Q205). The level of net income for Q205 was 38 percent higher than in the second quarter of 2004 (Q204) (Table 1). Net income for Q205 increased primarily as a result of higher crude oil

129

Mascoma Announces Major Cellulosic Biofuel Technology Breakthrough  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mascoma Announces Major Cellulosic Biofuel Technology Breakthrough Lebanon, NH - May 7, 2009 bioprocessing, or CBP, a low-cost processing strategy for production of biofuels from cellulosic biomass. CBP much, much closer to billions of gallons of low cost cellulosic biofuels," said Michigan State

130

D & D screening risk evaluation guidance  

SciTech Connect

The Screening Risk Evaluation (SRE) guidance document is a set of guidelines provided for the uniform implementation of SREs performed on decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) facilities. Although this method has been developed for D&D facilities, it can be used for transition (EM-60) facilities as well. The SRE guidance produces screening risk scores reflecting levels of risk through the use of risk ranking indices. Five types of possible risk are calculated from the SRE: current releases, worker exposures, future releases, physical hazards, and criticality. The Current Release Index (CRI) calculates the current risk to human health and the environment, exterior to the building, from ongoing or probable releases within a one-year time period. The Worker Exposure Index (WEI) calculates the current risk to workers, occupants and visitors inside contaminated D&D facilities due to contaminant exposure. The Future Release Index (FRI) calculates the hypothetical risk of future releases of contaminants, after one year, to human health and the environment. The Physical Hazards Index (PHI) calculates the risks to human health due to factors other than that of contaminants. Criticality is approached as a modifying factor to the entire SRE, due to the fact that criticality issues are strictly regulated under DOE. Screening risk results will be tabulated in matrix form, and Total Risk will be calculated (weighted equation) to produce a score on which to base early action recommendations. Other recommendations from the screening risk scores will be made based either on individual index scores or from reweighted Total Risk calculations. All recommendations based on the SRE will be made based on a combination of screening risk scores, decision drivers, and other considerations, as determined on a project-by-project basis.

Robers, S.K.; Golden, K.M.; Wollert, D.A.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Geological and Anthropogenic Factors Influencing Mercury Speciation in Mine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geological and Anthropogenic Factors Influencing Mercury Speciation Geological and Anthropogenic Factors Influencing Mercury Speciation in Mine Wastes Christopher S. Kim,1 James J. Rytuba,2 Gordon E. Brown, Jr.3 1Department of Physical Sciences, Chapman University, Orange, CA 92866 2U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA 94025 3Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 Introduction Figure 1. Dr. Christopher Kim collects a mine waste sample from the Oat Hill mercury mine in Northern California. The majority of mercury mine wastes at these sites are present as loose, unconsolidated piles, facilitating the transport of mercury-bearing material downstream into local watersheds. Mercury (Hg) is a naturally occurring element that poses considerable health risks to humans, primarily through the consumption of fish which

132

Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Program Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations in the United States Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations More Documents & Publications Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations...

133

A UML-based method for risk analysis of human-robot interactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Safety is a major concern for robots that interact physically with humans. We propose a risk analysis method based on deviation analysis of system usage scenarios that allows the identification of major risks. Scenarios are described with the common ... Keywords: HAZOP, UML, risk analysis, safety, scenario

Damien Martin-Guillerez; Jérémie Guiochet; David Powell; Christophe Zanon

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Environmental Effects Abroad of Major Federal Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

44-NO. 62 44-NO. 62 3-29-79 PAGES 18633-18921 E THURSDAY, MARCH 29, 1979 € 18722 NOTICES [ 31 25-01-MI COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY 'ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS ABROAD OF MAJOR FEDERAL ACTIONS Executive Order 12144; Implementing and Explanotory Documents MARCH 21, 1979. AGENCY: Council on Environmental Quality, Executive Office of t h e F'resi- dent. ACTION: Information Only: Publica- tion of Implementing Documents Con- cerning Executive Order 12114. SUMMARY: O n January 4, 1979, t h e President signed Executive Order 12114, Environmental Effects Abroad of Major Federal Actions (44 FR 1957 (Jan. 9, 1979)). The Council has re- ceived numerous requests for t h e im- plementing and explanatory docu- ments. I n order efficiently to respond to such public requests. t

135

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1995  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5) 5) Distribution Category UC-950 Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1995 January 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration/ Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1995 ii To download the Financial Reporting System 1977-1995 data files, access the Energy Information Center's FTP site, at ftp: //ftp.eia.doe.gov or access the Energy Information Administration's Home Page at http://www.eia.doe.gov.

136

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1996  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6) 6) Distribution Category UC-950 Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1996 January 1998 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration/ Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1996 ii The Financial Reporting System 1977-1996 data files can be downloaded from the Energy Information

137

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1997  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7) 7) Distribution Category UC-950 Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1997 January 1999 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration/ Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1997 ii The Financial Reporting System 1977-1997 data files can be downloaded from the Energy Information Administration's

138

Major Energy Electric Services | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric Services Electric Services Jump to: navigation, search Name Major Energy Electric Services Place New York Utility Id 56504 Utility Location Yes Ownership R NERC Location NPCC ISO NY Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates Residential: $0.0967/kWh Commercial: $0.1070/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Major_Energy_Electric_Services&oldid=411033" Categories: EIA Utility Companies and Aliases

139

Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 - Major Characteristics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Major Characteristics of All Commercial Buildings in 2003 Major Characteristics of All Commercial Buildings in 2003 CBECS data are used to answer basic questions about the commercial buildings sector, such as: What types are there? How large are they? How old are they? and Where are they? Results from the 2003 CBECS show that: The commercial buildings sector is not dominated by a single building type. Office buildings, the most common type of commercial building, account for 17 percent of buildings, floorspace, and energy consumed. Commercial buildings range widely in size and smaller buildings are much more numerous than larger buildings. The smallest buildings (1,001 to 5,000 square feet) account for 53 percent of buildings, but consume only 11 percent of total energy. The largest buildings (those larger than 500,000 square feet)

140

A Stochastic Processes Toolkit for Risk Management ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In risk management it is desirable to grasp the essential statistical features of a time series representing a risk factor. This tutorial aims to introduce a number of different stochastic processes that can help in grasping the essential features of risk factors describing different asset classes or behaviors. This paper does not aim at being exhaustive, but gives examples and a feeling for practically implementable models allowing for stylised features in the data. The reader may also use these models as building blocks to build more complex models, although for a number of risk management applications the models developed here suffice for the first step in the quantitative analysis. The broad qualitative features addressed here are fat tails and mean reversion. We give some orientation on the initial choice of a suitable stochastic process and then explain how the process parameters can be estimated based on historical data. Once the process has been calibrated, typically through maximum likelihood estimation, one may simulate the risk factor and build future scenarios for the risky portfolio. On the terminal simulated distribution of the portfolio one may then single out several risk measures, although here we focus on the stochastic processes estimation preceding the simulation of the risk factors Finally, this first survey report focuses on single time series. Correlation

Damiano Brigo; Antonio Daless; Matthias Neugebauer; Fares Triki

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "major risk factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Genealogy of major U.S. refiners  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of major U.S. refiners of major U.S. refiners 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Amoco SOHIO BP ARCO Mapco Williams Clark Refining 1/89 12/98 4/00 3/98 Orion Diamond Shamrock Ultramar k 12/96 7/03 Ultramar Diamond Shamrock (UDS) Total North America UDS 9/97 Valero Salomon (Basis) Valero Williams BP BP b BP-Husky Refining LLC (jv) Husky Huntway 5/97 6/01 9/05 Valero Premcor g Valero Valero Valero 12/01 7/94 e 12/98 f Carlyle Group y Coastal 3/03 d 12/88 a 6/01 o Sun Company Sunoco v 7/07 i 4/08 c 5/04 h Pacific Refining (jv) 12/88 r El Paso 1/04 w 10/98 m 6/00 n 9/89 t 8/94 u See notes, footnotes, and source notes below. PBF Energy 6/10 p 12/10 q 3/11 x 10/11 j 9/00 l 1/01 s Genealogy of major U.S. refiners (continued) 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

142

Performance profiles of major energy producers, 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The energy industry generally and petroleum and natural gas operations in particular are frequently reacting to a variety of unsettling forces. Falling oil prices, economic upswings, currency devaluations, increasingly rigorous environmental quality standards, deregulation of electricity markets, and continued advances in exploration and production technology were among the challenges and opportunities to the industry in 1997. To analyze the extent to which these and other developments have affected energy industry financial and operating performance, strategies, and industry structure, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) maintains the Financial Reporting Systems (FRS). Through Form EIA-28, major US energy companies annually report to the FRS. Financial and operating information is reported by major lines of business, including oil and gas production (upstream), petroleum refining and marketing (downstream), other energy operations, and nonenergy business. Performance Profiles of Major Producers 1997 examines the interplays of energy markets, companies` strategies, and government policies (in 1997 and in historical context) that gave rise to the results given here. The report also analyzes other key aspects of energy company financial performance as seen through the multifaceted lens provided by the FRS data and complementary data for industry overall. 41 figs., 77 tabs.

NONE

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1) 1) Distribution Category UC-950 Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 2001 January 2003 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts This report was prepared in the Office of Energy Markets and End Use of the Energy Information Administration

144

Risk Management RM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This tool is the process of continuous and iterative identification and control of project risks and opportunities. Risks can be technical, financial, or programmatic. The goal for the risk...

145

Risk and robust optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis develops and explores the connections between risk theory and robust optimization. Specifically, we show that there is a one-to-one correspondence between a class of risk measures known as coherent risk measures ...

Brown, David Benjamin, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Cooled silicon nitride stationary turbine vane risk reduction. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this program was to reduce the technical risk factors for demonstration of air cooled silicon nitride turbine vanes. The effort involved vane prototype fabrication efforts at two U.S. based gas turbine grade silicon nitride component manufacturers. The efficacy of the cooling system was analyzed via a thermal time/temperature flow test technique previously at UTRC. By having multiple vendors work on parts fabrication, the chance of program success increased for producing these challenging components. The majority of the effort under this contract focused on developing methods for, and producing, the complex thin walled silicon nitride vanes. Components developed under this program will undergo engine environment testing within N00014-96-2-0014.

Holowczak, John

1999-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

147

Conversion Factor  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Conversion Factor (Btu per cubic foot) Production Marketed... 1,110 1,106 1,105 1,106 1,109 Extraction Loss ......

148

Selecting major Appalachian basin gas plays  

SciTech Connect

Under a cooperative agreement with the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) the Appalachian Oil and Natural Gas Research Consortium (AONGRC) is preparing a geologic atlas of the major gas plays in the Appalachian basin, and compiling a database for all fields in each geologic play. the first obligation under this agreement was to prepare a topical report that identifies the major gas plays, briefly describes each play, and explains how the plays were selected. Four main objectives have been defined for this initial task: assign each gas reservoir to a geologic play, based on age, trap type, degree of structural control, and depositional environment; organize all plays into geologically-similar groups based on the main criteria that defines each play; prepare a topical report for METC; and transfer this technology to industry through posters and talks at regional geological and engineering meetings including the Appalachian Petroleum Geology Symposium, Northeastern Section meeting of the Geological Society of America, the METC Gas Contractors Review meeting, the Kentucky Oil and Gas Association, and the Appalachian Energy Group.

Patchen, D.G.; Nuttall, B.C.; Baranoski, M.T.; Harper, J.A.; Schwietering, J.F.; Van Tyne, A.; Aminian, K.; Smosna, R.A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Selecting major Appalachian basin gas plays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under a cooperative agreement with the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) the Appalachian Oil and Natural Gas Research Consortium (AONGRC) is preparing a geologic atlas of the major gas plays in the Appalachian basin, and compiling a database for all fields in each geologic play. the first obligation under this agreement was to prepare a topical report that identifies the major gas plays, briefly describes each play, and explains how the plays were selected. Four main objectives have been defined for this initial task: assign each gas reservoir to a geologic play, based on age, trap type, degree of structural control, and depositional environment; organize all plays into geologically-similar groups based on the main criteria that defines each play; prepare a topical report for METC; and transfer this technology to industry through posters and talks at regional geological and engineering meetings including the Appalachian Petroleum Geology Symposium, Northeastern Section meeting of the Geological Society of America, the METC Gas Contractors Review meeting, the Kentucky Oil and Gas Association, and the Appalachian Energy Group.

Patchen, D.G.; Nuttall, B.C.; Baranoski, M.T.; Harper, J.A.; Schwietering, J.F.; Van Tyne, A.; Aminian, K.; Smosna, R.A.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

PRIME VALUE METHOD TO PRIORITIZE RISK HANDLING STRATEGIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Funding for implementing risk handling strategies typically is allocated according to either the risk-averse approach (the worst risk first) or the cost-effective approach (the greatest risk reduction per implementation dollar first). This paper introduces a prime value approach in which risk handling strategies are prioritized according to how nearly they meet the goals of the organization that disburses funds for risk handling. The prime value approach factors in the importance of the project in which the risk has been identified, elements of both risk-averse and cost-effective approaches, and the time period in which the risk could happen. This paper also presents a prioritizer spreadsheet, which employs weighted criteria to calculate a relative rank for the handling strategy of each risk evaluated.

Noller, D

2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

151

Use of limited data to construct Bayesian networks for probabilistic risk assessment.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) is a fundamental part of safety/quality assurance for nuclear power and nuclear weapons. Traditional PRA very effectively models complex hardware system risks using binary probabilistic models. However, traditional PRA models are not flexible enough to accommodate non-binary soft-causal factors, such as digital instrumentation&control, passive components, aging, common cause failure, and human errors. Bayesian Networks offer the opportunity to incorporate these risks into the PRA framework. This report describes the results of an early career LDRD project titled %E2%80%9CUse of Limited Data to Construct Bayesian Networks for Probabilistic Risk Assessment%E2%80%9D. The goal of the work was to establish the capability to develop Bayesian Networks from sparse data, and to demonstrate this capability by producing a data-informed Bayesian Network for use in Human Reliability Analysis (HRA) as part of nuclear power plant Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA). This report summarizes the research goal and major products of the research.

Groth, Katrina M.; Swiler, Laura Painton

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Major Unit Sponsored Funding by Academic Credit over the past three Fiscal Years Major Unit Name  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Major Unit Sponsored Funding by Academic Credit over the past three Fiscal Years Major Unit Name SCIENCES $ 0$ 0$ 0 Academic and Administrative Units VP FOR RESEARCH UNITS $ 21,255,194$ 21,236,451$ 26 AND PROVOST $ 46,734$ 47,608$ 270,234 SR VP FOR ACADEMIC AFFAIRS UNITS $ 5,174,939$ 6,228,485$ 5,456,032 SR VP

Arnold, Jonathan

153

EC Transmission Line Risk Identification and Analysis  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to assist in evaluating and planning for the cost, schedule, and technical project risks associated with the delivery and operation of the EC (Electron cyclotron) transmission line system. In general, the major risks that are anticipated to be encountered during the project delivery phase associated with the implementation of the Procurement Arrangement for the EC transmission line system are associated with: (1) Undefined or changing requirements (e.g., functional or regulatory requirements) (2) Underperformance of prototype, first unit, or production components during testing (3) Unavailability of qualified vendors for critical components Technical risks associated with the design and operation of the system are also identified.

Bigelow, Tim S [ORNL

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Douglas Factors  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Merit Systems Protection Board in its landmark decision, Douglas vs. Veterans Administration, 5 MSPR 280, established criteria that supervisors must consider in determining an appropriate penalty to impose for an act of employee misconduct. These twelve factors are commonly referred to as “Douglas Factors” and have been incorporated into the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Personnel Management System and various FAA Labor Agreements.

155

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1994  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4) 4) Distribution Category UC-950 Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1994 January 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts This report was prepared in the Office of Energy Markets and End Use of the Energy Information Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, under the general direction of W. Calvin Kilgore. The project was directed by Mark E. Rodekohr, Director of the Energy Markets and Contingency Information Division (202) 586-1441, and Mary E. Northup, Chief of

156

Environment and safety: major goals for MARS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS) is a conceptual design study for a commercial fusion power reactor. One of the major goals of MARS is to develop design guidance so that fusion reactors can meet reasonable expectations for environmental health and safety. One of the first steps in the assessment of health and safety requirements was to examine what the guidelines might be for health and safety in disposal of radioactive wastes from fusion reactors. Then, using these quidelines as criteria, the impact of materials selection upon generation of radioactive wastes through neutron activation of structural materials was investigated. A conclusion of this work is that fusion power systems may need substantial engineering effort in new materials development and selection to meet the probable publicly acceptable levels of radioactivity for waste disposal in the future.

Maninger, R.C.

1983-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

157

Console Networks for Major Computer Systems  

SciTech Connect

A concept for interactive time-sharing of a major computer system is developed in which satellite computers mediate between the central computing complex and the various individual user terminals. These techniques allow the development of a satellite system substantially independent of the details of the central computer and its operating system. Although the user terminals' roles may be rich and varied, the demands on the central facility are merely those of a tape drive or similar batched information transfer device. The particular system under development provides service for eleven visual display and communication consoles, sixteen general purpose, low rate data sources, and up to thirty-one typewriters. Each visual display provides a flicker-free image of up to 4000 alphanumeric characters or tens of thousands of points by employing a swept raster picture generating technique directly compatible with that of commercial television. Users communicate either by typewriter or a manually positioned light pointer.

Ophir, D; Shepherd, B; Spinrad, R J; Stonehill, D

1966-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

158

European Committee on Radiation Risk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radioactivity form the Fukushima Catastrophe is now reaching centres of population like Tokyo and will appear in the USA. Authorities are downplaying the risk on the basis of absorbed dose levels using the dose coefficients of the International Commission on Radiological Protection the ICRP. These dose coefficients and the ICRP radiation risk model is unsafe for this purpose. This is clear from hundreds of research studies of the Chernobyl accident outcomes. It has also been conceded by the editor of the ICRP risk model, Dr Jack Valentin, in a discussion with Chris Busby in Stockholm, Sweden in April 2009. Valentin specifically stated in a videoed interview (available on www.llrc.org and vimeo.com) that the ICRP model could not be used to advise politicians of the health consequences of a nuclear release like the one from Fukushima. Valentin agreed that for certain internal exposures the risk model was insecure by 2 orders of magnitude. The CERRIE committee stated that the range of insecurity was between 10 and members of the committee put the error at nearer to 1000, a factor which would be necessary to explain the nuclear site child leukemia clusters. The ECRR risk model was developed for situations like Fukushima

Chris Busby

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Major Cold War Cleanup Milestone Reached at the Savannah River Site |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Major Cold War Cleanup Milestone Reached at the Savannah River Site Major Cold War Cleanup Milestone Reached at the Savannah River Site Major Cold War Cleanup Milestone Reached at the Savannah River Site March 29, 2012 - 10:37am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Today, the Energy Department announced it has reached a major milestone in the Department's efforts to clean up the Cold War legacy at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina, laying the groundwork for closing two underground storage tanks that previously held radioactive liquid waste from nuclear weapons production at SRS. The determination signed by Energy Secretary Steven Chu paves the way for SRS to begin closing the massive tanks that make up the F Tank Farm. The site will start this year by closing two tanks that pose the greatest risk to the environment - Tanks 18 and 19. These tank closures will be the first

160

Major Cold War Cleanup Milestone Reached at the Savannah River Site |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Major Cold War Cleanup Milestone Reached at the Savannah River Site Major Cold War Cleanup Milestone Reached at the Savannah River Site Major Cold War Cleanup Milestone Reached at the Savannah River Site March 29, 2012 - 10:37am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Today, the Energy Department announced it has reached a major milestone in the Department's efforts to clean up the Cold War legacy at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina, laying the groundwork for closing two underground storage tanks that previously held radioactive liquid waste from nuclear weapons production at SRS. The determination signed by Energy Secretary Steven Chu paves the way for SRS to begin closing the massive tanks that make up the F Tank Farm. The site will start this year by closing two tanks that pose the greatest risk to the environment - Tanks 18 and 19. These tank closures will be the first

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "major risk factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Job Satisfaction, Disgruntlement and Insider Risk  

SciTech Connect

The prediction of future events and trends was the purview of fortune tellers and science writers; however futuristic studies are now an acceptable form of sociological research including workplace dynamics. The nuclear industry is also affected by workplace trends which currently indicate that there will be fewer jobs and individuals who are employed will be required to have greater technical skills. This reshaping of the workforce is partially due to an aging workforce and diversity within the work environment. The reshaping brings with it the need for greater productivity and employee expectations for increased pay and/or benefits. If employee satisfaction is not realized there is a real possibility of disgruntled employees who then become a potential insider risk to the organization. Typically this is an individual who has been employed for several years, becomes dissatisfied with the job, or some other aspect of their life. If the dissatisfaction is directly related to work the individual may retaliate in a destructive manner. Perceived inequities are a major factor and directly related to situational pressures, opportunity, and personal integrity. It is known that the greatest losses within an organization are attributed to employees working alone or in a conspiracy with fellow employees who engage in theft and other fraudulent activities. In the nuclear industry this threat is intensified by the nature of the work, the materials employees come in contact with and the potential of an occurrence that could adversely affect a large geographic region and/or the security of a country. The paper will address motivating factors, recommendations, and include a profile discussion of a possible disgruntled employee.

Eisele, Gerhard R [ORNL; Coates, Cameron W [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Motor dysfunction in apparently normal high-risk children.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Infants born extremely prematurely (ie. <29 weeks gestation) or with extremely low birth weight (ie. <1000 grams) are at high-risk of major and minor motor… (more)

Goyen, Traci-Anne

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

GAO-03-119, High-Risk Series: An Update  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 2003 High-Risk Series An Update GAO-03-119 This Series This report entitled High-Risk Series: An Update is part of a special GAO series, first issued in 1993 and periodically updated. In this 2003 report, GAO identifies areas at high risk due to either their greater vulnerabilities to waste, fraud, abuse, and mismanagement or major challenges associated with their economy, efficiency, or effectiveness. This series also includes reports on three crosscutting high-risk areas: strategic human capital management, protecting information systems supporting the federal government and the nation's critical infrastructures, and federal real property. A companion series, Performance and Accountability Series: Major Management Challenges and Program Risks, contains separate reports covering each cabinet department, most major independent agencies, and the U.S.

164

Performance profiles of major energy producers 1995, January 1997  

SciTech Connect

This publication examines developments in the operations of the major U.S. energy-producing companies on a corporate level, by major line of business, by major function within each line of business, and by geographic area.

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Identification and Selection of Major Carbon Dioxide Stream Compositions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A critical component in the assessment of long-term risk from geologic sequestration of CO2 is the ability to predict mineralogical and geochemical changes within storage reservoirs due to rock-brine-CO2 reactions. Impurities and/or other constituents selected for co-sequestration can affect both the chemical and physical (e.g. density, viscosity, interfacial tension) behavior of CO2 in the deep subsurface. These impurities and concentrations are a function of both the industrial source(s) of the CO2, as well as the carbon capture technology used to extract the CO2 and produce a concentrated stream for geologic sequestration. This report summarizes the relative concentrations of CO2 and other constituents in exhaust gases from major non-energy related industrial sources of CO2. Assuming that carbon-capture technology would remove most of the incondensable gases N2, O2, and Ar, leaving SO2 and NOx as the main impurities, we selected four test fluid compositions for use in geochemical experiments. These included: 1) a pure CO2 stream representative of food grade CO2 used in most enhanced oil recovery projects: 2) a test fluid composition containing low concentrations (0.5 mole %) SO2 and NOx (representative of that generated from cement production), 3) a test fluid composition with higher concentrations (2.5 mole %) of SO2, and 4) and test fluid composition containing 3 mole % H2S.

Last, George V.; Schmick, Mary T.

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

166

Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction: Major  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Major Renovations to someone by E-mail Major Renovations to someone by E-mail Share Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction: Major Renovations on Facebook Tweet about Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction: Major Renovations on Twitter Bookmark Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction: Major Renovations on Google Bookmark Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction: Major Renovations on Delicious Rank Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction: Major Renovations on Digg Find More places to share Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction: Major Renovations on AddThis.com... Home Introduction Assessing Renewable Energy Options Planning, Programming, & Budgeting Project Funding

167

Obama Administration Announces Major Steps Forward to Advance...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Major Steps Forward to Advance Energy Efficiency Efforts, Improve Access to Low-Cost Financing for States and Local Communities Obama Administration Announces Major Steps Forward...

168

The Department of Energy's Other Major Laboratories and Facilities  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY'S Other Major Laboratories and Facilities All Major Laboratories and Facilities Achievements History Ames Laboratory (ANL) Achievements History The New...

169

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Risk Assessment Documents Risk Assessment Documents ORNL RA Graphic Results ORNL Baseline Risk Assessment Results ORNL Screening Risk Assessment Results ORNL Other Risk Assessment Results ORNL RA Graphic Results WAG 2 Residential Landuse Sediment - Total Risk Sediment - Cesium 137 Risk Sediment - Cobalt 60 Risk Surface Water - Total Hazard Surface Water - Total Risk Surface Water - Strontium 90 Risk Surface Water - Tritium Risk Recreational Landuse Sediment - Total Risk Sediment - Cesium 137 Risk Sediment - Cobalt 60 Risk Surface Water - Total Hazard Surface Water - Total Risk Surface Water - Strontium 90 Risk Surface Water - Tritium Risk Recreational Landuse (No Fish) Surface Water - Total Hazard Surface Water - Total Risk Surface Water - Strontium 90 Risk Surface Water - Tritium Risk Industrial Landuse

170

LPP Risk Management Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

History and Process History and Process Slide 2 M E Environmental Management Environmental Management History â—¦ Current Baseline Process Overview â—¦ Identification â—¦ Simulation â—¦ Management Successes & Challenges Slide 3 M E Environmental Management Environmental Management Current Baseline Risks â—¦ 1 Week Risk Summit held week of August 4 th , 2008 Broad representation from all levels of Isotek, DOE, PTC, and outside consultants Focused on risk and opportunity identification Included risk description, assumptions, and triggers No quantification or analysis No restrictions, constraints, or filtering HQ provided facilitator Prescribed format and capture methodology Slide 4 M E Environmental Management Environmental Management Current Baseline Risks â—¦ Risk Summit Results

171

Estimating the risk associated with computerized tomography doses  

SciTech Connect

The largest annual whole- body dose to the US population from man-made radiation is from medical sources. According to the BEIR report, the use of diagnostic x-rays by the medical profession has increased in recent years at an annual rate of 1 to 4%. Risk factors developed by the BEIR committee can be used to estimate the risk to the population due to the exposure incurred through medical radiography. In this paper, these risk factors are employed to obtain an estimate of risk due to radiation exposure from computerized tomography (CT).

Yalcintas, M.G.; Leggett, R.W.; Dunning, D.E.; Nalcioglu, O.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Novel Threat-risk Index Using Probabilistic Risk Assessment and Human Reliability Analysis - Final Report  

SciTech Connect

In support of a national need to improve the current state-of-the-art in alerting decision makers to the risk of terrorist attack, a quantitative approach employing scientific and engineering concepts to develop a threat-risk index was undertaken at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). As a result of this effort, a set of models has been successfully integrated into a single comprehensive model known as Quantitative Threat-Risk Index Model (QTRIM), with the capability of computing a quantitative threat-risk index on a system level, as well as for the major components of the system. Such a threat-risk index could provide a quantitative variant or basis for either prioritizing security upgrades or updating the current qualitative national color-coded terrorist threat alert.

George A. Beitel

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Transportation risk assessment for ethanol transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research is aimed at assessing the quantitative risks involved with an ethanol pipeline. Pipelines that run from the Midwest, where the vast majority of ethanol is produced, to the target areas where reformulated gasoline is required (California, Texas Gulf Coast, New England Atlantic Coast) will be of particular interest. The goal is to conduct a quantitative risk assessment on the pipeline, truck, and rail transportation modes to these areas. As a result of the quantitative risk assessment, we are able to compare the risk associated with the different modes of transportation for ethanol. In order to perform and compare the quantitative risk assessment, the following challenges are addressed: 1) Identify target areas requiring reformulated gasoline 2) Map detailed route for each transportation mode to all three target areas 3) Perform a quantitative risk assessment for each transportation mode 4) Compare quantitative risk assessment results for each route and transportation mode The focus is on California, Texas Gulf Coast, and New England Atlantic Coast because of the large volume. It is beneficial to look at these areas as opposed to the smaller areas because pipeline transportation requires very large volumes. In order to find a meaningful comparison between all three transportation modes, only the areas with the three large volumes were evaluated. Since the risk assessment is completed using historical data, each route is segmented in a way that is consistent with the data that is available. All of the curves support the hypothesis that pipeline transportation poses the least societal risk when transporting ethanol from the Midwest to target areas. Rail transportation poses the largest amount of societal risk. While overall rail incidents are not as frequent as road incidents, the frequency of a fatality is much higher when an incident does occur.

Shelton Davis, Anecia Delaine

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Transportation risk assessment for ethanol transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research is aimed at assessing the quantitative risks involved with an ethanol pipeline. Pipelines that run from the Midwest, where the vast majority of ethanol is produced, to the target areas where reformulated gasoline is required (California, Texas Gulf Coast, New England Atlantic Coast) will be of particular interest. The goal is to conduct a quantitative risk assessment on the pipeline, truck, and rail transportation modes to these areas. As a result of the quantitative risk assessment, we are able to compare the risk associated with the different modes of transportation for ethanol. In order to perform and compare the quantitative risk assessment, the following challenges are addressed: • Identify target areas requiring reformulated gasoline • Map detailed route for each transportation mode to all three target areas • Perform a quantitative risk assessment for each transportation mode • Compare quantitative risk assessment results for each route and transportation mode The focus is on California, Texas Gulf Coast, and New England Atlantic Coast because of the large volume. It is beneficial to look at these areas as opposed to the smaller areas because pipeline transportation requires very large volumes. In order to find a meaningful comparison between all three transportation modes, only the areas with the three large volumes were evaluated. Since the risk assessment is completed using historical data, each route is segmented in a way that is consistent with the data that is available. All of the curves support the hypothesis that pipeline transportation poses the least societal risk when transporting ethanol from the Midwest to target areas. Rail transportation poses the largest amount of societal risk. While overall rail incidents are not as frequent as road incidents, the frequency of a fatality is much higher when an incident does occur.

Shelton Davis, Anecia Delaine

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Financial Market Risk and U.S. Money Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper empirically examines U.S. broad money demand, emphasizing the role of financial market risk. Broad money demand displays long-run stability after controlling for financial market factors. We show that money demand rises with the liquidity risk of stock markets or the credit risk of corporate bond markets. The financial risk model for money demand surpasses the traditional model in explaining the persistent fluctuations observed in broad money demand in the last 15 years. Also, the models estimated in an error-correction specification suggest that financial market risk affects substantially the short-term fluctuations of broad money demand since the early 1990s.

Woon Gyu Choi; David Cook

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technical Memorandum , Part II. Screening Level Risk Assessment 92-225-161-49 K-33 Cooling Towers screening risk assessments (2) K-770 sites screening risk assessment (9...

177

Expected productivity-based risk analysis in conceptual design : with application to the Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer mission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the design process, risk is mentioned often, but, due to the lack of a quantitative parameter that engineers can understand and trade, infrequently impacts major design decisions. The definition of risk includes two ...

Wertz, Julie (Julie Ann), 1978-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance for Major  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Major Equipment Types to someone by E-mail for Major Equipment Types to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance for Major Equipment Types on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance for Major Equipment Types on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance for Major Equipment Types on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance for Major Equipment Types on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance for Major Equipment Types on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance for Major Equipment Types on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance

179

Environmental Effects Abroad of Major Federal Actions | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Effects Abroad of Major Federal Actions Effects Abroad of Major Federal Actions Environmental Effects Abroad of Major Federal Actions On January 4, 1979, President Carter signed Executive Order 12114, entitled Environmental Effects of Major Federal Actions. The purpose of this Council on Environmental Quality memorandum is to initiate the consultation process required by this Executive Order. 44 Fed Reg 18633: Council on Environmental Quality: Environmental Effects Abroad of Major Federal Actions More Documents & Publications Implementation of Executive Order 12114 Environmental Effects Abroad of Major Federal Actions: Final Guideline EO 12114: Environmental Effects Abroad of Major Federal Actions Unified Procedures Applicable to Major Federal Actions Relating to Nuclear Activities Subject to Executive Order 12114 (State Department, 44 Fed Reg

180

Innovative Texas Clean Coal Project Takes Major Step Forward...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Innovative Texas Clean Coal Project Takes Major Step Forward as DOE Issues Record of Decision Innovative Texas Clean Coal Project Takes Major Step Forward as DOE Issues Record of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "major risk factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Oil and natural gas import reliance of major economies ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration - EIA ... Financial market analysis and financial data for major energy companies. Environment. Greenhouse gas data, ...

182

Risk management of student-run small satellite programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper proposes an approach for failure mode identification in university-affiliated, small satellite programs. These small programs have a unique set of risks due to many factors, including a typically inexperienced ...

Deems, Elizabeth (Elizabeth Carolina)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Identifying the Risk-Return Spectrum of the FSU Oil Economies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper quantifies the risk-return spectrum of the FSU' oil economies, which are of high potential as China's major crude oil-importing sources, and explores the influence of introducing the relative risk weights on the changes of the risk-return ...

Xiaolei Sun; Wan He; Gang Li; Jianping Li

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Mitigation of Energy and Natural Gas Market Risks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report examines the landscape of market risk management for owners of gas-fired capacity. Gas generation is experiencing a second boom, though not as great as the boom that began a decade ago. Whereas overbuilding of capacity was foreseeable then, the underpinnings of gas' new prominence appear more durable, though not without risk. This report reviews factors driving new gas-fired plants and describes the many facets of energy risk management. The report addresses the regulatory setting affecting u...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

185

ICT Supply Chain Risk Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... ICT Supply Chain Risk Management Manager's Forum ... ICT Supply Chain Risk Management National Institute of Standards and Technology Page 6. ...

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

186

Apples with apples: accounting for fuel price risk in comparisons of gas-fired and renewable generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the market, allowing natural gas price volatility to flowClearly, the variability of gas prices poses a major risk toincreasingly volatile natural gas prices, renewable energy

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

The major in Urban Studies is one of the options within the Committee Interdisciplinary Major (CIM) program. The  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The major in Urban Studies is one of the options within the Committee Interdisciplinary Major (CIM) program. The urban studies CIM is based in the College of Letters and Science and draws from classes

Saldin, Dilano

188

Sociocultural definitions of risk  

SciTech Connect

Public constituencies frequently are criticized by technical experts as being irrational in response to low-probability risks. This presentation argued that most people are concerned with a variety of risk attributes other than probability and that is rather irrational to exclude these from the definition and analysis of technological risk. Risk communication, which is at the heart of the right-to-know concept, is described as the creation of shared meaning rather than the mere transmission of information. A case study of utilities, public utility commissions, and public interest groups illustrates how the diversity of institutional cultures in modern society leads to problems for the creation of shared meanings in establishing trust, distributing liability, and obtaining consent to risk. This holistic approach to risk analysis is most appropriate under conditions of high uncertainty and/or decision stakes. 1 fig., 5 tabs.

Rayner, S.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

DUF6 Environmental Risks  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Risks A discussion of the potential environmental impacts associated with depleted uranium handling or processing facilities. Impacts Considered in the PEIS Depleted uranium...

190

Risk Management Tool Attributes:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of cost - input cost distribution; expert input on distribution selection g. time-phase input h. scenarios 2. Outputs a. Distributions b. Graphics c. Key risks (tornado) d....

191

*Corresponding Author. The Contributions of Economic Fundamentals and Risk Premium to Movements in Exchange Rates: A State-Space Decomposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has been a puzzle in the literature that fundamental variables do not help forecast the future exchange rate change better than the random walk benchmark. Recently Engel and West (2005, 2006) show that such a result can be explained by the present value model of the exchange rate if the discount factor for the expectation of future fundamental variables is close to one and the fundamental variables are I(1). In this work we propose a novel approach to offer an empirical evaluation of these exchange rate models. We develop a state-space framework in which the expectations of the fundamentals growth and the risk premium are modeled as latent factors and then are integrated into a stylized present value model of the exchange rate. This approach allows us not only to directly estimate the discount factor but also to study the expectation dynamics that are important in evaluating these exchange rate models. We estimate these models using a century of data for the US and UK. One of our major findings is that the discount factor is indeed very close to unity, lending support to Engel and West (2005, 2006). Furthermore, the estimated expectation dynamics suggest that the expected future fundamentals may explain a large portion of the exchange rate movement. We postulate two major reasons for why fundamentals have

Nathan S. Balke; Jun Ma; Mark E. Wohar

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

The cohort of the atomic bomb survivors major basis of radiation safety regulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since 1950 about 87 000 A-bomb survivors from Hiroshima and Nagasaki have been monitored within the framework of the Life Span Study, to quantify radiation-induced late effects. In terms of incidence and mortality, a statistically significant excess was found for leukemia and solid tumors. In another major international effort, neutron and gamma radiation doses were estimated, for those survivors (Dosimetry System DS02). Both studies combined allow the deduction of risk coefficients that serve as a basis for international safety regulations. As an example, current results on all solid tumors combined suggest an excess relative risk of 0.47 per Sievert for an attained age of 70 years, for those who were exposed at an age of 30 years. After exposure to an effective dose of one Sievert the solid tumor mortality would thus be about 50% larger than that expected for a similar cohort not exposed to any ionizing radiation from the bombs.

Rühm, W; Nekolla, E A

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Domestic Violence and Risk Factors among Korean Immigrant ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 23, 2007 ... ing laundry (Wife), driving the car (Husband), shopping for groceries (Wife), paying bills (Both), taking care of the chil- dren (Wife), disciplining ...

194

Light, Nearwork, and Visual Environment Risk Factors in Myopia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hours and integrated solar radiation during each study15 minutes and included precipitation and solar radiation.The solar radiation data, in W/m 2 , were converted to lux

Alvarez, Amanda Aleksandra

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

GAO-05-207, HIGH-RISK SERIES: An Update  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Accountability Office Accountability Office GAO January 2005 HIGH-RISK SERIES An Update a GAO-05-207 January 2005 HIGH-RISK SERIES An Update Why Area Is High Risk Highlights Accountability Integrity Reliability www.gao.gov/cgi-bin/getrpt?GAO-05-207. To view the full product, including the scope and methodology, click on the link above. For more information, contact George H. Stalcup at (202) 512-9490 or stalcupg@gao.gov. Highlights of GAO-05-207, a report to Congress on GAO's High-Risk Series GAO's audits and evaluations identify federal programs and operations that, in some cases, are high risk due to their greater vulnerabilities to fraud, waste, abuse, and mismanagement. Increasingly, GAO also is identifying high-risk areas to focus on the need for broad-based transformations to address major

196

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Graphic Results Graphic Results Baseline Risk Assessment Results Screening Risk Assessment Results Other Risk Assessment Results Graphic Results K-25 Groundwater Residential Landuse Bedrock Wells - Total Hazard (range: 1-30) Bedrock Wells - Total Hazard (range: 0.1 - 1) Bedrock Wells - Total Risk Bedrock Wells - Arsenic Risk Bedrock Wells - Dichloroethene, 1,1- Risk Bedrock Wells - Trichloroethene Risk Unconsolidated Wells - Total Hazard (range: 1-150) Unconsolidated Wells - Total Hazard (range: 0.1 - 1) Unconsolidated Wells - Total Risk (range:10-4 - 1) Unconsolidated Wells - Total Risk (range:10-6 - 10-4) Unconsolidated Wells - Arsenic Risk Unconsolidated Wells - Trichloroethene Risk ORNL WAG 2 Residential Landuse Sediment - Total Risk Sediment - Cesium 137 Risk Sediment - Cobalt 60 Risk

197

Proceedings of the Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting: Volume 1, Plenary session; Advanced reactor research; advanced control system technology; advanced instrumentation and control hardware; human factors research; probabilistic risk assessment topics; thermal hydraulics; thermal hydraulic research for advanced passive LWRs  

SciTech Connect

This three-volume report contains 90 papers out of the 102 that were presented at the Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 25--27, 1993. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from France, Germany, Japan, Russia, Switzerland, Taiwan, and United Kingdom. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting. Individual papers have been cataloged separately. This document, Volume 1 covers the following topics: Advanced Reactor Research; Advanced Instrumentation and Control Hardware; Advanced Control System Technology; Human Factors Research; Probabilistic Risk Assessment Topics; Thermal Hydraulics; and Thermal Hydraulic Research for Advanced Passive Light Water Reactors.

Monteleone, S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [comp.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Suburbs offset Low Carbon Footprint of major U.S. Cities | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Suburbs offset Low Carbon Footprint of major U.S. Cities Suburbs offset Low Carbon Footprint of major U.S. Cities Home > Blogs > Graham7781's blog Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(2002) Super contributor 9 January, 2014 - 13:12 carbon cities CO2 emissions OpenEI suburbs US New research from the University of California-Berkeley shows that those who live in cities in the United States have significantly smaller per-capita carbon footprints than their suburban counterparts. The difference is such that suburban dwellers essentially offset the low carbon footprints of urban dwellers. Vehicle emissions accounted for the biggest contributor to carbon dioxide, accounted by longer commutes to work, school, and shopping. The data, balancing 37 factors such as weather, income, home size, shows that those dwelling in major cities have a carbon footprint about 50 percent below the

199

List of Major Information Systems,National Nuclear Security Administration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

List of Major Information Systems,National Nuclear Security List of Major Information Systems,National Nuclear Security Administration ADaPT Networked: List of Major Information Systems,National Nuclear Security Administration ADaPT Networked: List of Major Information Systems, Defense Line of Business National Nuclear Security Administration ADaPT Networked: Develops and deploys emerging information networking technology to production processes in support of the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile. National Nuclear Security Administration ADaPT Network Infrastructure: Develops and deploys emerging information networking technology to production processes in support of the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile. .major_information_systems.pdf List of Major Information Systems,National Nuclear Security Administration ADaPT Networked:

200

Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility, Major Design Changes...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility, Major Design Changes Late...Lessons Learned Report, NNSA,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "major risk factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Major Source Permits (District of Columbia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Major Source Permits (District of Columbia) Major Source Permits (District of Columbia) Major Source Permits (District of Columbia) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Industrial Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider District Department of the Environment The District reviews designs for new pollution sources and design modifications for existing sources. Permits are issued to allow sources to emit limited and specified amounts of pollution as allowed by air quality laws and regulations. Major sources include power plants, heating plants, and large printing facilities. Three types of permits are issued: pre-construction review permits; new source review permits; and operating permits. These permits include conditions intended to minimize emissions of

202

Major Milestone: PPPL completes first quadrant of the heart of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Major Milestone: PPPL completes first quadrant of the heart of the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade By John Greenwald March 18, 2013 Tweet Widget Facebook Like Google...

203

EM Major Procurements as of 05/09/2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Following is a listing of major procurement actions currently being competed by the Office of Environmental Management.  Information contained in the report is based on publicly available...

204

Undergraduate Degrees Upon declaring a major or minor in econom-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

including government and markets, class, race, gender, poverty and inequality. Not available for major, energy resources and environmental issues, welfare and income distribution. Prerequisite: ECON 500

Zhang, Jianfeng

205

Obama Administration Announces Major Steps Forward to Advance...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Obama Administration Announces Major Steps Forward to Advance Energy Efficiency Efforts, Improve Access to Low-Cost Financing for States and Local Communities Obama Administration...

206

Chapter 34 - Major Systems Acquisition | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

quisitionofMajorSystems0.pdf More Documents & Publications OPAM Policy Acquisition Guides Policy Flash 2013-40 Acquisition Guide Chapter 43.3 - Maintaining Alignment of Project...

207

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Risk Assessment Documents Risk Assessment Documents Y-12 RA Graphic Results Y-12 Baseline Risk Assessment Results Y-12 Screening Risk Assessment Results Bullet Graphic Risk Results Arrow Bear Creek Valley Maps Residential Landuse Groundwater - Total Hazard (range: 1 - 900) Groundwater - Total Hazard (range: 0.1 - 1) Groundwater - Total Risk (range: 10-4 - 1) Groundwater - Total Risk (range: 10-5 - 10-4) Groundwater - Total Risk (range: 10-6 - 10-5) Groundwater - Dichloroethane, 1,1- Hazard Groundwater - Dichloroethene, 1,1- Hazard Groundwater - Dichloroethene, 1,1- Risk Groundwater - Dichloroethane, 1,2- Risk Groundwater - Dichloroethene, 1,2- Hazard Groundwater - Nitrate Hazard Groundwater - Radium Risk Groundwater - Technetium-99 Risk Groundwater - Tetrachloroethene Hazard Groundwater - Tetrachloroethene Risk

208

NETL: Carbon Storage - Simulation and Risk Assessment Focus Area  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Simulation and Risk Assessment Simulation and Risk Assessment Carbon Storage Simulation and Risk Assessment Focus Area The Simulation and Risk Assessment Focus Area is an integrated effort to develop advanced simulation models of the subsurface and integrate the results into a risk assessment that includes both technical and programmatic risks. As the simulation models are refined with new data, the uncertainty surrounding the identified risks decreases, which in turn provides a more accurate risk assessment and mitigation plan for each project site. Both qualitative and quantitative protocols will be developed to ensure the safe and permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO2). Results from the simulation models will be incorporated into risk assessments on a project-by-project basis and on a larger basin-scale. As carbon capture and storage (CCS) becomes deployed in major basins, macro model results will be needed to manage reservoirs for pressure management, plume migration, and potential risks of multiple CO2 injection projects across the basin.

209

Continuing Developments in PV Risk Management: Strategies, Solutions, and Implications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the PV industry matures, successful risk management practices will become more imperative to ensure investor confidence, control costs, and facilitate further growth. This report discusses several key aspects of risk management during the commercial- and utility-scale project life cycle, from identification of risks, to the process of mitigating and allocating those risks among project parties, to transferring those risks through insurance. The report also explores novel techniques in PV risk management, options to offload risks onto the capital markets, and innovative insurance policies (namely warranty policies) that address risks unique to the PV sector. One of the major justifications for robust risk management in the PV industry is the cost-reduction opportunities it affords. If the PV industry can demonstrate the capability to successfully manage its risks, thereby inspiring confidence in financiers, it may be able to obtain a lower cost of capital in future transactions. A lower cost of capital translates to a lower cost of energy, which will in turn enhance PV?s competitiveness at a time when it will have to rely less on subsidies to support its market penetration.

Lowder, T.; Mendelsohn, M.; Speer, B.; Hill, R.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Uncertainties in Cancer Risk Coefficients for Environmental Exposure to Radionuclides. An Uncertainty Analysis for Risk Coefficients Reported in Federal Guidance Report No. 13  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Federal Guidance Report No. 13 (FGR 13) provides risk coefficients for estimation of the risk of cancer due to low-level exposure to each of more than 800 radionuclides. Uncertainties in risk coefficients were quantified in FGR 13 for 33 cases (exposure to each of 11 radionuclides by each of three exposure pathways) on the basis of sensitivity analyses in which various combinations of plausible biokinetic, dosimetric, and radiation risk models were used to generate alternative risk coefficients. The present report updates the uncertainty analysis in FGR 13 for the cases of inhalation and ingestion of radionuclides and expands the analysis to all radionuclides addressed in that report. The analysis indicates that most risk coefficients for inhalation or ingestion of radionuclides are determined within a factor of 5 or less by current information. That is, application of alternate plausible biokinetic and dosimetric models and radiation risk models (based on the linear, no-threshold hypothesis with an adjustment for the dose and dose rate effectiveness factor) is unlikely to change these coefficients by more than a factor of 5. In this analysis the assessed uncertainty in the radiation risk model was found to be the main determinant of the uncertainty category for most risk coefficients, but conclusions concerning the relative contributions of risk and dose models to the total uncertainty in a risk coefficient may depend strongly on the method of assessing uncertainties in the risk model.

Pawel, David [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Leggett, Richard Wayne [ORNL; Eckerman, Keith F [ORNL; Nelson, Christopher [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Risk spreading and US energy development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Who should bear the risks and financial burdens of future energy development. Is government regulation an appropriate mechanism to spread and allocate financial, regulatory, and engineering risks of future large-scale and high-risk energy projects. These two critical questions are examined within the context of the court battles over the Federal Energy Regulatory Administration's precedent-setting attempt to force gas consumers of five major pipelines to finance the Great Plains Coal Gasification Project. Private financing is the most-efficient method of funding investment when the assumptions of perfect competition are reasonably approximated. In the absence of market failures, consumer financing via construction-project surcharges on energy bills has equal efficiency properties, although consumer financing may reduce the project-builders incentives to minimize cost. However, government financing is clearly preferred in the presence of market failures that characterize large-scale, high-risk energy projects. In the case of Great Plains, its high risk and large scale coupled with the security benefits of a successful synfuels demonstration project suggested that government financing was both the most efficient and equitable means of financing Great Plains. That ideal solution ran afoul of the reality of selfinterested corporate behavior, Congressional politics, and bureaucratic expediency. 18 references.

Navarro, P.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Attachment 2 Â… List of Major Information Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 - List of Major Information Systems 1 - List of Major Information Systems Defense Line of Business National Nuclear Security Administration ADaPT Networked: Develops and deploys emerging information networking technology to production processes in support of the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile. National Nuclear Security Administration ADaPT Network Infrastructure: Develops and deploys emerging information networking technology to production processes in

213

History by The Department of Energy's Other Major Laboratories and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BY THE BY THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY'S Other Major Laboratories and Facilities Ames Laboratory Ames Laboratory-Shaping Science for 60 Years A History of Innovation Ames Achievements Listing of Major Labs and Facilities Top The New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) History New Brunswick Lab Marks Its 50th Anniversary NBL Achievements Listing of Major Labs and Facilities Top Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) About ORISE: Message from the Director Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education ORISE Achievements Listing of Major Labs and Facilities Top Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) History of the PPPL History of the Harold P. Furth Plasma Physics Library PPPL Achievements Listing of Major Labs and Facilities Top Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL)

214

Achievements by The Department of Energy's Other Major Laboratories and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Other Major Laboratories and Facilities Other Major Laboratories and Facilities Ames Laboratory Medical Applications of Non-Medical Research Metamaterials Found to Work for Visible Light, with Science Article: Physics: Negative Refractive Index at Optical Wavelengths Points of Pride AMES History Listing of Major Labs and Facilities Top The New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) Inside NBL Measurement Development NBL Information NBL History Listing of Major Labs and Facilities Top Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) ORISE at a Glance (Fact Sheet) ORISE Reestablished Cytogenetic Biodosimetry Laboratory ORISE Science Education Programs ORISE History Listing of Major Labs and Facilities Top Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) ITER and the Promise of Fusion Energy: What is ITER?

215

Unified Procedures Applicable to Major Federal Actions Relating to Nuclear  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Unified Procedures Applicable to Major Federal Actions Relating to Unified Procedures Applicable to Major Federal Actions Relating to Nuclear Activities Subject to Executive Order 12114 (State Department, 44 Fed Reg 65560) Unified Procedures Applicable to Major Federal Actions Relating to Nuclear Activities Subject to Executive Order 12114 (State Department, 44 Fed Reg 65560) The following unified procedures issued by the State Department are established to satisfy the requirement of the Executive Order for implementing procedures concerning nuclear export activities of Federal agencies. 44 Fed Reg 65560: Department of State: Unified Procedures Applicable to Major Federal Actions Relating to Nuclear Activities Subject to Executive Order 12114 More Documents & Publications Environmental Effects Abroad of Major Federal Actions

216

Operations and Maintenance for Major Equipment Types | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for Major Equipment Types for Major Equipment Types Operations and Maintenance for Major Equipment Types October 7, 2013 - 9:53am Addthis Equipment lies at the heart of all operations and maintenance (O&M) activities. This equipment varies greatly across the Federal sector in age, size, type, model, condition, etc. No single resource covers all equipment in use by Federal agencies, and listing major equipment types is beyond the scope of this website. Instead, the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) outlines major equipment types within chapter 9 of the Federal Energy Management Programs's (FEMP) O&M Best Practices Guide. The FEMP O&M Best Practices Guide focuses on: Boilers Steam traps Chillers Cooling towers Energy management and building automation systems Air handling systems

217

Risk And Risk Management In Geothermal Exploration And Development...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Risk And Risk Management In Geothermal Exploration And Development Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL...

218

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Debra Stewart at (865)482-2657 or dthomas3@utk.edu. Risk assessments conducted for the DOE-ORO should implement Guidance for Conducting Risk Assessments and Related Risk...

219

Risk in the Weapons Stockpile  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When it comes to the nuclear weapons stockpile, risk must be as low as possible. Design and care to keep the stockpile healthy involves all aspects of risk management. Design diversity is a method that helps to mitigate risk.

Noone, Bailey C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

220

High Risk Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Risk Plan Risk Plan John Bashista Melissa Rider Jeff Davis Timeline to date * OMB memo on Improving Government Acquisition issued July 29, 2009 - Review existing contracts and acquisition practices to save 7% of baseline contract spending (3.5% in FY 2010 and 3.5% in FY 2011) - Reduce high risk contracts by 10% the share of dollars obligated in FY2010 - Final plan was due and submitted on November 2, 2009 - OMB reviewed and requested revision Dec 23, 2009 - Revision submitted April 21, 2010 M&Os are an Issue * With respect to reductions in high risk contracting strategies, the M&O contracts was also a challenge since the opportunity to further influence competition and contract type was highly constrained. The Department had already competed approximately 85 percent of its M&O

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "major risk factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Risk Management RM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Risk Management Review Module Risk Management Review Module March 2010 CD-0 O 0 OFFICE OF C CD-1 F ENVIRO Standard R Risk M Rev Critical Decis CD-2 M ONMENTAL Review Plan Managem view Module sion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 L MANAGE (SRP) ment e pplicability D-3 EMENT CD-4 Post Ope eration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM project review process encompasses key milestones established by DOE O 413.3A, Change 1, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, DOE-STD-1189-2008, Integration of Safety into the Design Process, and EM's internal

222

Risks to the public  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Edited by Peter G. Neumann (Risks Forum Moderator and Chairman of the ACM Committee on Computers and Public Policy), plus personal contributions by others, as indicated. Opinions expressed are individual rather than organizational, and all of the usual ...

Peter G. Neumann

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Risks to the public  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Edited by Peter G. Neumann (Risks Forum Moderator and Chairman of the ACM Committee on Computers and Public Policy), plus personal contributions by others, as indicated. Opinions expressed are individual rather than organizational, and all of the usual ...

Peter G. Neumann

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Risks to the public  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Edited by Peter G. Neumann (Risks Forum Moderator and Chairman of the ACM Committee on Computers and Public Policy), plus personal contributions by others, as indicated. Opinions expressed are individual rather than organizational, and all of the usual ...

Peter G. Neumann

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Risks to the public  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Edited by Peter G. Neumann (Risks Forum Moderator and Chairman of the ACM Committee on Computers and Public Policy), plus personal contributions by others, as indicated. Opinions expressed are individual rather than organizational, and all of the usual ...

Peter G. Neumann

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Risks to the public  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Edited by Peter G. Neumann (Risks Forum Moderator and Chairman of the ACM Committee on Computers and Public Policy), plus personal contributions by others, as indicated. Opinions expressed are individual rather than organizational, and all of the usual ...

Peter G. Neumann

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Risks to the public  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Edited by Peter G. Neumann (Risks Forum Moderator and Chairman of the ACM Committee on Computers and Public Policy), plus personal contributions by others, as indicated. Opinions expressed are individual rather than organizational, and all of the usual ...

Peter G. Neumann

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Risks to the public  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Edited by Peter G. Neumann (Risks Forum Moderator and Chairman of the ACM Committee on Computers and Public Policy), plus personal contributions by others, as indicated. Opinions expressed are individual rather than organizational, and all of the usual ...

Peter G. Neumann

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Risk Mitigation Strategies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical update builds upon the development of attack/failure and cyber-physical attack scenarios focused on combined cyber-physical attacks. These scenarios include threats and vulnerabilities that may be exploited by well-financed and motivated entities. It also leverages risk assessment processes developed to address combined cyber-physical attack scenarios. The framework in this update supports the further development of risk mitigation strategies focused on combined cyber-physical ...

2012-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

230

Transmission Price Risk Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is concerned with the financial risks that arise from the uncertain price of transmission service in restructured or competitive electricity markets. These risks are most severe in markets with locational pricing (LMP), but they also exist in more traditionally organized electricity markets. This report has two main purposes. The first is to review the existing mathematical models of electricity price formation in spot and forward markets that may be helpful as the foundations for developing ...

2006-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

231

Computer Science Contact List for Inquiring Students First Name Last Name Major(s) Minor(s) Email  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computer Science Contact List for Inquiring Students First Name Last Name Major(s) Minor(s) Email Summer 2011 - Mobile Applications and Game Development Taha Bakhtiyar Economics, Computer Science tahaalib@brandeis.edu Jared Dunn Undeclared jwdunn1@brandeis.edu Todd Kirkland Computer Science tkirk

Snider, Barry B.

232

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guidance for Conducting Risk Assessments and Related Risk Activities for the DOE-ORO Environmental Management Program. BJCOR-271 Guidance for Treatment of Variability and...

233

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

risk assessment information used to evaluate and remediate legacy contamination from the Manhattan Project. The RAIS was designed to provide all risk assessment processes in a...

234

Original article: The dynamics of BRICS's country risk ratings and domestic stock markets, U.S. stock market and oil price  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa) are viewed currently as pillars of relative political, economic and financial stability, with the prospect of a major shift in future world power. The paper aims at investigating the relationships ... Keywords: ARDL, Country risk ratings, D81, Economic risk, F23, Financial risk, G22, G31, Political risk

Shawkat Hammoudeh, Ramazan Sari, Mehmet Uzunkaya, Tengdong Liu

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Cultural resource management: The risk of compliance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The statutory mandate for federal agencies to involve American Indians in the management of cultural resources may create a cultural risk for the people those statutes are intended to protect. A conceptual framework is given to help understand this dilemma. Factors that can exacerbate the severity of the adverse cultural impacts for tribal people are also examined. Policy recommendations are offered for reducing tensions among an the participants in the statutory process.

Curtis, S.A.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Idiosyncratic Consumption Risk and the Cross Section of Asset Returns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper investigates the importance of idiosyncratic consumption risk for the cross-sectional variation in average returns on stocks and bonds. If idiosyncratic consumption risk is not priced, the only pricing factor in a multiperiod economy is the rate of aggregate consumption growth. We o®er evidence that the cross-sectional variance of consumption growth is also a priced factor. This demonstrates that consumers are not fully insured against idiosyncratic consumption risk, and that asset returns re°ect their attempts to reduce their exposure to this risk. We ¯nd that over the sample period the resulting two-factor pricing model has lower Hansen-Jagannathan distances than the CAPM and the Fama-French three-factor model. Moreover, in the presence of the market factor and the size and book-to-market factors, the two consumption based factors retain explanatory power. Together with the results of Lettau and Ludvigson (2000), these ¯ndings indicate that consumption-based asset pricing is relevant for explaining the cross-section of asset returns.

Kris Jacobs; Kevin Q. Wang

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Statement on Department of Energy's Major System Capital Asset Projects  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Department of Energy's Major System Capital Asset Projects Department of Energy's Major System Capital Asset Projects before the House Committee on Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy & Water Development | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Congressional Testimony > Statement on Department of Energy's Major System ...

238

Breast cancer risk and environmental exposures. Environ Health Perspect 105:891–896  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although environmental contaminants have potential to affect breast cancer risk, explicit environmental links to this disease are limited. The most well-defined environmental risk factors are radiation exposure and alcohol ingestion. Diet is clearly related to the increased incidence of breast cancer in developed countries, but its precise role is not yet established. Recent studies have implicated exposure to organochlorines including DDT as a risk factor for breast cancer in

Mary S. Wolff; Ainsley Weston

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Safety Analysis, Hazard and Risk Evaluations [Nuclear Waste Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety Analysis, Hazard Safety Analysis, Hazard and Risk Evaluations Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management Technologies Overview Modeling and analysis Unit Process Modeling Mass Tracking System Software Waste Form Performance Modeling Safety Analysis, Hazard and Risk Evaluations Development, Design, Operation Overview Systems and Components Development Expertise System Engineering Design Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr Nuclear Waste Management using Electrometallurgical Technology Safety Analysis, Hazard and Risk Evaluations Bookmark and Share NE Division personnel had a key role in the creation of the FCF Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR), FCF Technical Safety Requirements (TSR)

240

Risk Management Process Overview | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cybersecurity Risk Management Process Risk Management Process Overview Risk Management Process Overview figure depicting three tier risk management process The cybersecurity...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "major risk factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Major Natural Gas Transportation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Transportation Corridors Natural Gas Transportation Corridors About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Major Natural Gas Transportation Corridors Corridors from the Southwest | From Canada | From Rocky Mountain Area | Details about Transportation Corridors The national natural gas delivery network is intricate and expansive, but most of the major transportation routes can be broadly categorized into 11 distinct corridors or flow patterns. 5 major routes extend from the producing areas of the Southwest 4 routes enter the United States from Canada 2 originate in the Rocky Mountain area. A summary of the major corridors and links to details about each corridor are provided below. Corridors from the Southwest Region

242

Energy Department Awards First Major Task Order Under Streamlined  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

First Major Task Order Under Streamlined First Major Task Order Under Streamlined Contracting System Energy Department Awards First Major Task Order Under Streamlined Contracting System October 17, 2005 - 11:59am Addthis New Mexico Firm Contracted for Ashtabula Clean-up WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy (DOE) has awarded a Task Order for an estimated $19.4 million to LATA-SHARP Remediation Services, LLC for the completion of clean-up activities at the Ashtabula Closure Project (ACP) in Ashtabula, Ohio. This is the first major Task Order that has been issued under the Office of Environmental Management's Nationwide Indefinite Delivery, Indefinite Quantity (ID/IQ) Multiple Award Contract, which pre-qualifies companies to do work for DOE's EM program. Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management James Rispoli said. "We

243

Energy Department Announces Major Milestones for Decatur, Ill. Clean Coal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Announces Major Milestones for Decatur, Ill. Announces Major Milestones for Decatur, Ill. Clean Coal Project Energy Department Announces Major Milestones for Decatur, Ill. Clean Coal Project September 19, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Today, the U.S. Energy Department marked two important milestones in the Illinois Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage (ICCS) project in Decatur, Illinois, a major clean coal project and the Department's first large-scale industrial carbon capture and storage demonstration project. The Archer Daniels Midland Company (ADM) marked the progress made on construction on the project's storage facility, as well as the public opening of the National Sequestration Education Center. The Center was funded in partnership with the Richland Community College and will contain classrooms, training, and laboratory facilities, offering

244

By Lab, Major Site, or Technology Center | Scientific and Technical  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

By Lab, Major Site, or Technology Center By Lab, Major Site, or Technology Center Print page Print page Email page Email page OSTI databases allow you to find research results and science information from the Manhattan Project to the present. Follow the 'Find STI..." links below to see technical reports from or related to DOE national laboratories, major sites, and technology centers. DOE National Laboratories Major Sites and Technology Centers DOE National Laboratories Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Find STI from or about ANL Visit ANL Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Find STI from or about BNL Visit BNL Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FERMI) Find STI from or about FERMI Visit FERMI Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Find STI from or about to INL Visit INL Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Find STI from or about LBNL Visit LBNL

245

Salazar, Chu Announce Major Offshore Wind Initiatives | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Major Offshore Wind Initiatives Major Offshore Wind Initiatives Salazar, Chu Announce Major Offshore Wind Initiatives February 7, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis NORFOLK, VA - Unveiling a coordinated strategic plan to accelerate the development of offshore wind energy, Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar and Secretary of Energy Steven Chu today announced major steps forward in support of offshore wind energy in the United States, including new funding opportunities for up to $50.5 million for projects that support offshore wind energy deployment and several high priority Wind Energy Areas in the mid-Atlantic that will spur rapid, responsible development of this abundant renewable resource. Deployment of clean, renewable offshore wind energy will help meet the President's goal of generating 80 percent of the Nation's electricity from

246

A Climatology of Intense (or Major) Atlantic Hurricanes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The variability of intense (or major) hurricanes in the Atlantic basin is investigated on both intraseasonal and interannual time scales. Differences are highlighted in characteristics between intense hurricanes and the weaker minor hurricanes ...

Christopher W. Landsea

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Water Usage Law, Major Water Users (Missouri) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Usage Law, Major Water Users (Missouri) Water Usage Law, Major Water Users (Missouri) Water Usage Law, Major Water Users (Missouri) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Missouri Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Missouri Department of Natural Resources Any water user with the capability to withdraw or divert 100,000 gallons or more per day from any stream, river, lake, well, spring or other water source must register and file for a permit for water withdrawal and diversion from the Department of Natural Resources. Additionally, no major

248

Thirteen Major Companies Join Energy Department's Workplace Charging  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Major Companies Join Energy Department's Workplace Major Companies Join Energy Department's Workplace Charging Challenge Thirteen Major Companies Join Energy Department's Workplace Charging Challenge January 31, 2013 - 11:38am Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON -- Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced 13 major U.S. employers and eight stakeholder groups have joined the new Workplace Charging Challenge to help expand access to workplace charging stations for American workers across the country. In a speech at the Washington Auto Show, Secretary Chu outlined the new initiative, which aims to expand the availability of workplace charging, increasing the convenience of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) and providing drivers with more options. "The market for electric vehicles is expanding dramatically, giving

249

SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup American Recovery and Reinvestment Act can now claim that 85 percent of the Savannah River Site (SRS) has been cleaned up with the recent completion of the Lower Three Runs (stream) Project. Twenty miles long, Lower Three Runs leaves the main body of the 310-square mile site and runs through parts of Barnwell and Allendale Counties until it flows into the Savannah River. Government property on both sides of the stream acts as a buffer as it runs through privately-owned property. Completing this project reduces the site's footprint by another 10 percent. SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup More Documents & Publications

250

Chu, Salazar to Announce Major Offshore Wind Energy Initiatives |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Salazar to Announce Major Offshore Wind Energy Initiatives Salazar to Announce Major Offshore Wind Energy Initiatives Chu, Salazar to Announce Major Offshore Wind Energy Initiatives February 4, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis NORFOLK,VA - On Monday, February 7, 2011 Energy Secretary Steven Chu and Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar will announce major new initiatives to accelerate the responsible siting and development of offshore wind energy projects. WHAT: Offshore Wind Energy News Conference WHEN: Monday, February 7, 11:00 AM EST WHO: Steven Chu, Secretary of Energy Ken Salazar, Secretary of the Interior WHERE: Half Moone Center 11 Waterside Dr Norfolk, VA 23510 DIAL-IN: News media, state and local stakeholders, industry representatives and other interested parties can join a listen-only teleconference of the announcement by dialing 800-369-3311 and entering code: OFFSHORE.

251

SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup American Recovery and Reinvestment Act can now claim that 85 percent of the Savannah River Site (SRS) has been cleaned up with the recent completion of the Lower Three Runs (stream) Project. Twenty miles long, Lower Three Runs leaves the main body of the 310-square mile site and runs through parts of Barnwell and Allendale Counties until it flows into the Savannah River. Government property on both sides of the stream acts as a buffer as it runs through privately-owned property. Completing this project reduces the site's footprint by another 10 percent. SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup More Documents & Publications

252

Financial News for Major Energy Companies, October - December 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Financial News for Major Energy Companies Financial News for Major Energy Companies Twenty-two major energy companies reported overall net income (excluding unusual items) of $4.6 billion during the fourth quarter of 2001 (Q401). The level of net income represented a 65-percent decline relative to the fourth quarter of 2000 (Q400) (Table 1). The majors' foreign upstream oil and natural gas production operations made the largest contribution to overall net income in Q401 at $2.0 billion (Table 1), with domestic upstream oil and natural gas production operations second at $1.8 billion, and worldwide downstream natural gas (i.e., those natural gas operations that occur between the wellhead and the consumer) and power operations third at $1.5 billion. The mergers of Chevron and Texaco, El Paso and

253

Dating of major normal fault systems using thermochronology- An example  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dating of major normal fault systems using thermochronology- An example Dating of major normal fault systems using thermochronology- An example from the Raft River detachment, Basin and Range, western United States Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Dating of major normal fault systems using thermochronology- An example from the Raft River detachment, Basin and Range, western United States Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Application of thermochronological techniques to major normal fault systems can resolve the timing of initiation and duration of extension, rates of motion on detachment faults, timing of ductile mylonite formation and passage of rocks through the crystal-plastic to brittle transition, and multiple events of extensional unroofing. Here we determine

254

Obama Administration Announces Major Step Forward for the American  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Major Step Forward for the American Major Step Forward for the American Centrifuge Plant Obama Administration Announces Major Step Forward for the American Centrifuge Plant June 13, 2012 - 9:36am Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced today that the Obama Administration reached a major milestone in its efforts to secure an advanced domestic uranium enrichment capability for national security purposes. The Energy Department, USEC Inc. and American Centrifuge Demonstration, LLC, have signed a set of agreements that will enable the research, development and demonstration (RD&D) project at the American Centrifuge Plant (ACP) in Piketon, Ohio, to move forward while providing significant taxpayer protections. The RD&D at ACP will be managed under a

255

Financial News for Major Energy Companies, October - December 2004  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The "Financial News for Major Energy Companies" is issued quarterly to report recent trends in The "Financial News for Major Energy Companies" is issued quarterly to report recent trends in the financial performance of the major energy companies. These include the respondents to Form EIA-28 (Financial Reporting System (FRS)), with the exception of the FRS companies that do not issue quarterly earnings releases or fail to provide separate information for the company's U.S. operations. Twenty-three major energy companies reported overall net income (excluding unusual items) of $20.2 billion on revenues of $241.9 billion during the fourth quarter of 2004 (Q404). The level of net income for Q404 was 101 percent higher than in the fourth quarter of 2003 (Q403) (Table 1). Similarly, net income for 2004 was 53 percent higher than for 2003 on

256

TOMORROW: Secretaries Chu and Salazar to Make Major Renewable Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TOMORROW: Secretaries Chu and Salazar to Make Major Renewable TOMORROW: Secretaries Chu and Salazar to Make Major Renewable Energy Announcement TOMORROW: Secretaries Chu and Salazar to Make Major Renewable Energy Announcement December 15, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC --- Secretary of Energy Steven Chu and Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar will hold a news media teleconference tomorrow, Thursday, December 16, 2010 to make a major announcement regarding renewable energy development on public lands in the West. Credentialed media may participate in the 1:00 p.m. Eastern conference call by dialing 1-800-857-9733 and entering the access code ENERGY. WHO: Steven Chu, Secretary of Energy Ken Salazar, Secretary of the Interior Robert Abbey, Director of the Bureau of Land Management WHAT: Renewable Energy News Conference Call

257

Montana Major Facility Siting Act (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Montana Major Facility Siting Act (Montana) Montana Major Facility Siting Act (Montana) Montana Major Facility Siting Act (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Wind Solar Program Info State Montana Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Montana Department of Environmental Quality The Montana Major Facility Siting Act aims to protect the environment from

258

Obama Administration Announces Major Step Forward for the American  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Major Step Forward for the American Major Step Forward for the American Centrifuge Plant Obama Administration Announces Major Step Forward for the American Centrifuge Plant June 13, 2012 - 9:36am Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced today that the Obama Administration reached a major milestone in its efforts to secure an advanced domestic uranium enrichment capability for national security purposes. The Energy Department, USEC Inc. and American Centrifuge Demonstration, LLC, have signed a set of agreements that will enable the research, development and demonstration (RD&D) project at the American Centrifuge Plant (ACP) in Piketon, Ohio, to move forward while providing significant taxpayer protections. The RD&D at ACP will be managed under a

259

A major lithospheric boundary in eastern California defined by isotope  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

major lithospheric boundary in eastern California defined by isotope major lithospheric boundary in eastern California defined by isotope ratios in Cenozoic basalts from the Coso Range and surrounding areas Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: A major lithospheric boundary in eastern California defined by isotope ratios in Cenozoic basalts from the Coso Range and surrounding areas Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Sr and Nd isotope ratios of Miocene-Recent basalts in eastern California, when screened for crustal contamination, vary dramatically and indicate the presence of a major lithospheric boundary that is not obvious from surface geology. Tectonic and geochemical interpretation of this boundary is difficult, however, because there are so many potential

260

Obama Administration Takes Major Step toward Advanced Vehicles with New  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Takes Major Step toward Advanced Vehicles with Takes Major Step toward Advanced Vehicles with New Fleet Management Practices and Launch of First Federal Electric Vehicle Pilot Obama Administration Takes Major Step toward Advanced Vehicles with New Fleet Management Practices and Launch of First Federal Electric Vehicle Pilot May 24, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Today, Secretary of Energy Steven Chu, General Services Administrator Martha Johnson, and White House Council on Environmental Quality Chair Nancy Sutley announced a major step in moving the Federal fleet further towards advanced vehicles and decreased petroleum consumption, while also cutting costs associated with fuel consumption. Furthering the Administration's goals to cut oil imports by one-third by 2025 and to put one million advanced vehicles on the road by 2015,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "major risk factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

EO 12114: Environmental Effects Abroad of Major Federal Actions |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EO 12114: Environmental Effects Abroad of Major Federal Actions EO 12114: Environmental Effects Abroad of Major Federal Actions EO 12114: Environmental Effects Abroad of Major Federal Actions The purpose of this Executive Order is to enable responsible officials of Federal Agencies having ultimate responsibility for authorizing and approving actions encompassed by this Order to be informed of pertinent environmental considerations and to take such considerations into account, with other pertinent considerations of national policy, in making decisions regarding such actions EO 12114: Environmental Effects Abroad of Major Federal Actions More Documents & Publications EIS-0386: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement, Amend Relevant Agency Land Use Plans, and Conduct Public Scoping

262

Green networking for major components of information communication technology systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Green Networking can be the way to help reduce carbon emissions by the Information and Communications Technology (ICT) Industry. This paper presents some of the major components of Green Networking and discusses how the carbon footprint of these components ...

Naveen Chilamkurti; Sherali Zeadally; Frank Mentiplay

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Major Volcanic Eruptions and Climate: A Critical Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines whether major volcanic eruptions of the past century have had a significant impact on surface land and ocean temperatures surface pressure and precipitation. Both multieruption composites and individual eruption time series ...

Clifford F. Mass; David A. Portman

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

TOMORROW: Secretaries Chu and Salazar to Make Major Renewable...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Make Major Renewable Energy Announcement December 15, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC --- Secretary of Energy Steven Chu and Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar will hold...

265

Major issues associated with DOE commercial recycling initiatives  

SciTech Connect

Major initiatives are underway within DOE to recycle large volumes of scrap material generated during cleanup of the DOE Weapons Complex. These recycling initiatives are driven not only by the desire to conserve natural resources, but also by the recognition that shallow level burial is not a politically acceptable option. The Fernald facility is in the vanguard of a number of major DOE recycling efforts. These early efforts have brought issues to light that can have a major impact on the ability of Fernald and other major DOE sites to expand recycling efforts in the future. Some of these issues are; secondary waste deposition, title to material and radioactive contaminants, mixed waste generated during recycling, special nuclear material possession limits, cost benefit, transportation of waste to processing facilities, release criteria, and uses for beneficially reused products.

Motl, G.P.; Burns, D.D. [Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States); Rast, D.M. [USDOE Fernald Field Office, OH (United States)

1994-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

266

Financial News for Major Energy Companies, Third Quarter 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

those U.S. majors reporting crude oil andor natural gas production (Table 1) further enhanced domestic upstream earnings. The results were mixed as slightly more than half of the...

267

Summary of Major Energy Bill Provisions Affecting Federal Energy Managers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Major Energy Bill Provisions Affecting Federal Energy Managers of Major Energy Bill Provisions Affecting Federal Energy Managers Section Lead Agency Provisions 102. Energy management goals DOE * Annual energy reduction goal of 2% from FY 2006 - FY 2015 * Reporting baseline changed from 1985 to 2003 * In 180 days, DOE issues guidelines * Retention of energy and water savings by agencies * DOE reports annually on progress to the President and Congress

268

Summary of Major Energy Bill Provisions Affecting Federal Energy Managers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Major Energy Bill Provisions Affecting Federal Energy Managers of Major Energy Bill Provisions Affecting Federal Energy Managers Section Lead Agency Provisions 102. Energy management goals DOE * Annual energy reduction goal of 2% from FY 2006 - FY 2015 * Reporting baseline changed from 1985 to 2003 * In 180 days, DOE issues guidelines * Retention of energy and water savings by agencies * DOE reports annually on progress to the President and Congress

269

Assessing the Changes In Safety Risk Arising From the Use of Natural Gas Infrastructure For Mixtures of Hydrogen and Natural Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6/02/2005 6/02/2005 Assessing the changes in safety risk arising from the use of natural gas infrastructures for mixtures of hydrogen and natural gas NATURALHY G. Hankinson Loughborough University, UK 2 16/02/2005 Naturalhy project safety work package NATURALHY 3 16/02/2005 Outline NATURALHY To identify and quantify the major factors influencing safety in the transportation, distribution, and delivery of hydrogen/natural gas mixtures by means of existing natural gas infrastructures. 4 16/02/2005 Purpose NATURALHY To provide information to allow risk assessments to be performed to assist decisions concerning: * The amount of hydrogen that can be introduced into natural gas systems * The conditions under which such systems should be operated, and * The identification of vulnerable locations where

270

Manhole Event Risk Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical update report is an account of continuing research conducted in 2007 on managing and mitigating underground distribution manhole events. Major events that result in collateral damage are rare; but the energy involved in a major event is equivalent to that released by several sticks of dynamite; and it may present significant hazard to the public and result in costly litigation. Research effort in 2007 concentrated mainly on developing a software model of gas-related explosions that can be ...

2007-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

271

Topography as a modifier of breeding habitats and concurrent vulnerability to malaria risk in the western Kenya highlands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2001, 80(1):1-8. 24. Carter R, Mendis KN, Roberts D: SpatialPK, Attanayake N, Carter R, Mendis KN: Malaria risk factors

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Mercury Risk Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ASSESSING THE MERCURY HEALTH RISKS ASSOCIATED ASSESSING THE MERCURY HEALTH RISKS ASSOCIATED WITH COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS: IMPACTS OF LOCAL DEPOSITIONS *T.M. Sullivan 1 , F.D. Lipfert 2 , S.M. Morris 2 , and S. Renninger 3 1 Building 830, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 2 Private Consultants 3 Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV ABSTRACT The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has announced plans to regulate emissions of mercury to the atmosphere from coal-fired power plants. However, there is still debate over whether the limits should be placed on a nationwide or a plant-specific basis. Before a nationwide limit is selected, it must be demonstrated that local deposition of mercury from coal-fired power plants does not impose an excessive local health risk. The principal health

273

Conversion factors for energy equivalents: All factors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Conversion factors for energy equivalents Return to online conversions. Next page of energy equivalents. Definition of uncertainty ...

274

Faster Quantum Number Factoring via Circuit Synthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A major obstacle to implementing Shor's quantum number-factoring algorithm is the large size of modular-exponentiation circuits. We reduce this bottleneck by customizing reversible circuits for modular multiplication to individual runs of Shor's algorithm. Our circuit-synthesis procedure exploits spectral properties of multiplication operators and constructs optimized circuits from the traces of the execution of an appropriate GCD algorithm. Empirically, gate counts are reduced by 4-5 times, and circuit latency is reduced by larger factors.

Igor L. Markov; Mehdi Saeedi

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

275

Equipment Risk and Performance Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Risk assessment and management are key elements in a well developed asset management implementation. Consequently an increasing number of utility managers are devoting resources to the task of improving their capabilities for risk-based decision making. Equipment risk models are essential elements in a risk assessment process. However, most proposed power delivery equipment risk models require for their successful application some probabilistic representation describing the chances of equipment ...

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

276

Equipment Risk and Performance Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Risk assessment and management are key elements in a well-developed asset management implementation. Consequently, an increasing number of utility managers are devoting resources to the task of improving their capabilities for risk-based decision making. Equipment risk models are essential elements in the risk assessment process. However, for their application, most proposed power delivery equipment risk models require some probabilistic representation describing the chances of equipment failure. This re...

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

277

Predictive Factors for Radiation Pneumonitis in Hodgkin Lymphoma Patients Receiving Combined-Modality Therapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: This study sought to quantify the risk of radiation pneumonitis (RP) in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) patients receiving mediastinal radiation therapy (RT) and to identify predictive factors for RP. Methods and Materials: We identified 75 patients with newly diagnosed HL treated with mediastinal RT and 17 patients with relapsed/refractory HL treated with mediastinal RT before or after transplant. Lung dose-volumetric parameters including mean lung dose and percentage of lungs receiving 20 Gy were calculated. Factors associated with RP were explored by use of the Fisher exact test. Results: RP developed in 7 patients (10%) who received mediastinal RT as part of initial therapy (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 1 in 6 cases). A mean lung dose of 13.5 Gy or greater (p = 0.04) and percentage of lungs receiving 20 Gy of 33.5% or greater (p = 0.009) significantly predicted for RP. RP developed in 6 patients (35%) with relapsed/refractory HL treated with peri-transplant mediastinal RT (Grade 3 in 4 cases). Pre-transplant mediastinal RT, compared with post-transplant mediastinal RT, significantly predicted for Grade 3 RP (57% vs. 0%, p = 0.015). Conclusions: We identified threshold lung metrics predicting for RP in HL patients receiving mediastinal RT as part of initial therapy, with the majority of cases being of mild severity. The risk of RP is significantly higher with peri-transplant mediastinal RT, especially among those who receive pre-transplant RT.

Fox, Amy M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); 21st Century Oncology, Fort Myers, FL (United States); Dosoretz, Arie P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Mauch, Peter M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Chen, Yu-Hui [Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Fisher, David C.; LaCasce, Ann S.; Freedman, Arnold S. [Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Silver, Barbara [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Ng, Andrea K., E-mail: ang@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Program on Technology Innovation: Cumulative Risk Assessment of Urban Air Toxics: Pilot Modeling Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cumulative risk modeling for estimating the burden of exposure to urban air toxics requires consideration of a range of factors influencing population health. These factors include multiple toxic compounds, a variety of pollutant sources, background levels of air pollutants, and non-chemical stressors not historically considered in regulatory risk assessments. To date, quantitative methods to account for all these factors remain sporadic and relatively untested. However, the United States ...

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

279

NGNP Risk Management Database: A Model for Managing Risk  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Risk Management System (RMS) is a database used to maintain the project risk register. The RMS also maps risk reduction activities to specific identified risks. Further functionality of the RMS includes mapping reactor suppliers Design Data Needs (DDNs) to risk reduction tasks and mapping Phenomena Identification Ranking Table (PIRTs) to associated risks. This document outlines the basic instructions on how to use the RMS. This document constitutes Revision 1 of the NGNP Risk Management Database: A Model for Managing Risk. It incorporates the latest enhancements to the RMS. The enhancements include six new custom views of risk data - Impact/Consequence, Tasks by Project Phase, Tasks by Status, Tasks by Project Phase/Status, Tasks by Impact/WBS, and Tasks by Phase/Impact/WBS.

John Collins; John M. Beck

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Health risks in perspective: Judging health risks of energy technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Almost daily, Americans receive reports from the mass news media about some new and frightening risk to health and welfare. Most such reports emphasize the newsworthiness of the risks -- the possibility of a crisis, disagreements among experts, how things happened, who is responsible for fixing them, how much will it cost, conflict among parties involved, etc. As a rule, the magnitudes of the risks, or the difficulty of estimating those magnitudes, have limited newsworthiness, and so they are not mentioned. Because of this emphasis in the news media, most people outside the risk assessment community must judge the relative significance of the various risks to which we all are exposed with only that information deemed newsworthy by reporters. This information is biased and shows risks in isolation. There is no basis for understanding and comparing the relative importance of risks among themselves, or for comparing one risk, perhaps a new or newly-discovered one, in the field of all risks. The purpose of this report is to provide perspective on the various risks to which we are routinely exposed. It serves as a basis for understanding the meaning of quantitative risk estimates and for comparing new or newly-discovered risks with other, better-understood risks. Specific emphasis is placed on health risks of energy technologies.

Rowe, M.D.

1992-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "major risk factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Initial Stage Affects Survival Even After Complete Pathologic Remission is Achieved in Locally Advanced Esophageal Cancer: Analysis of 70 Patients With Pathologic Major Response After Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To analyze outcomes and factors predictive for recurrence and survival in patients with operable esophageal carcinoma who achieved pathologic complete response (PCR) or microscopic residual disease (MRD) after preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Materials and Methods: Outcomes were assessed in 70 patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer who achieved pathologic major response (53 with PCR and 17 with MRD) after preoperative CRT. Results: At a median follow-up of 38.6 months for surviving patients, 17 of 70 patients (24.3%) experienced disease recurrence and 31 (44.3%) died. Clinical stage (II vs III; p = 0.013) and pathologic response (PCR vs. MRD; p = 0.014) were independent predictors of disease recurrence. Median overall survival (OS) was 99.6 months (95% CI, 44.1-155.1 months) and the 5-year OS rate was 57%. Median recurrence-free survival (RFS) was 71.5 months (95% CI, 39.5-103.6 months) and the 5-year RFS rate was 51.3%. Median OS of patients with Stage II and Stage III disease was 108.8 months and 39.9 months, respectively, and the 5-year OS rates were 68.2% and 27.0%, respectively (p = 0.0003). In a subgroup of patients with PCR, median OS and RFS were also significantly different according to clinical stage. Multivariate analysis showed that clinical stage was an independent predictor of RFS (p = 0.01) and OS (p = 0.008). Conclusions: Even though patients achieved major response after preoperative CRT, pretreatment clinical stage is an important prognostic marker for recurrence and survival. Patients with MRD have an increased recurrence risk but similar survival compared with patients achieved PCR.

Kim, Min Kyoung [Division of Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Internal Medicine, Yeungnam University, College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Kyung-Ja [Department of Pathology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seung-Il; Kim, Yong Hee [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Hoon [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, Ho-Young; Shin, Ji Hoon [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Hwoon Yong; Lee, Gin Hyug; Choi, Kee Don; Song, Ho June [Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Jin-Sook [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung-Bae [Division of Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: sbkim3@amc.seoul.kr

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Anthrax Lethal Factor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thiang Yian Wong, Robert Schwarzenbacher and Robert C. Liddington Thiang Yian Wong, Robert Schwarzenbacher and Robert C. Liddington The Burnham Institute, 10901 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037. Anthrax Toxin is a major virulence factor in the infectious disease, Anthrax1. This toxin is produced by Bacillus anthracis, which is an encapsulated, spore-forming, rod-shaped bacterium. Inhalation anthrax, the most deadly form, is contracted through breathing spores. Once spores germinate within cells of the immune system called macrophages2, bacterial cells are released into the bloodstream. There they proliferate rapidly and secrete Anthrax Toxin, ultimately leading to septic shock and death. Although antibiotics may be used to kill the bacteria, the level of toxin has often become so high in the bloodstream that removing the bacteria alone is not sufficient to prevent death. Therefore, the design of anti-toxins offers the prospect of treatment in the advanced stages of infection. Together with collaborators from the NIH and Harvard Medical School, we are involved in the atomic resolution study of the Anthrax Toxin components and their complexes, including small molecules with therapeutic potential. Data collection at SSRL and other synchrotron radiation sources has been key to the advances made in this research so far and is expected to play a continuing role in the future.

283

Modelling environmental risk  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As environmental issues have become increasingly important in economic research and policy for sustainable development, firms in the private sector have introduced environmental and social issues in conducting their business activities. Such behaviour ... Keywords: Asymmetry, Conditional volatility, Dow Jones Sustainability Indexes, Environmental risk, Environmental sustainability index, GARCH, GJR, Log-moment condition, Moment condition, Persistence, Shocks

Suhejla Hoti; Michael McAleer; Laurent L. Pauwels

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Five More States Reach Major Recovery Act Weatherization Milestone |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Five More States Reach Major Recovery Act Weatherization Milestone Five More States Reach Major Recovery Act Weatherization Milestone Five More States Reach Major Recovery Act Weatherization Milestone June 18, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - The U.S. Department of Energy announced today that five more states have reached a significant milestone under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - completing weatherization work for more than 30 percent of the homes they have planned. Now that New Hampshire, New Mexico, Montana, Minnesota, and Utah have each met this target, along with completing a series of monitoring and reporting milestones, the states will have access to the remaining 50 percent of their Recovery Act funding for the program. The Weatherization Assistance Program under the Recovery Act has weatherized more than 108,000 homes nationally, saving American

285

Obama Administration Announces Major Steps Forward to Advance Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Obama Administration Announces Major Steps Forward to Advance Obama Administration Announces Major Steps Forward to Advance Energy Efficiency Efforts, Improve Access to Low-Cost Financing for States and Local Communities Obama Administration Announces Major Steps Forward to Advance Energy Efficiency Efforts, Improve Access to Low-Cost Financing for States and Local Communities June 26, 2012 - 2:15pm Addthis News Media Contacts DOE: (202) 586-4940 Treasury: (202) 622-2812 WASHINGTON - The Obama Administration today announced 36 new states, local governments, and school districts have joined President Obama's Better Buildings Challenge. These new commitments total nearly 300 million square feet in job-creating building energy upgrades, equivalent to more than 130 Empire State Buildings. In addition, new public tax guidance issued today by the Department of the

286

Innovative Nanocoatings Unlock the Potential for Major Energy and Cost  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nanocoatings Unlock the Potential for Major Energy and Nanocoatings Unlock the Potential for Major Energy and Cost Savings for Airline Industry Innovative Nanocoatings Unlock the Potential for Major Energy and Cost Savings for Airline Industry July 17, 2012 - 3:33pm Addthis Erosion-resistant nanocoatings are making gas turbine engines more efficient, reducing cost and saving fuel. Erosion-resistant nanocoatings are making gas turbine engines more efficient, reducing cost and saving fuel. Bob Gemmer Technology Manager, Research and Development for the Advanced Manufacturing Office What does this mean for me? WIth help from DOE, one company has developed a nanocoating that has the potential to improve the energy efficiency of aircrafts and save the airline industry hundreds of millions of dollars in fuel costs annually.

287

Financial News for Major Energy Companies, Second Quarter 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Second Quarter 2006 Overview The "Financial News for Major Energy Companies" is issued quarterly to report recent trends in the financial performance of the major energy companies. These include the respondents to Form EIA-28 (Financial Reporting System (FRS)), with the exception of the FRS companies that do not issue quarterly earnings releases or do not provide separate information for the company's U.S. operations. Twenty-one major energy companies 1 reported overall net income (excluding unusual items) of $30.1 billion on revenues of $297.1 billion during the second quarter of 2006 (Q206). The level of net income for Q206 was 36 percent higher than in the second quarter of 2005 (Q205) (Table 1). Net income for Q206 increased primarily as a result of higher crude oil

288

Department of Energy Launches Major Initiative to Increase Energy Savings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Major Initiative to Increase Energy Major Initiative to Increase Energy Savings Across the Nationwide DOE Complex by 30 Percent Department of Energy Launches Major Initiative to Increase Energy Savings Across the Nationwide DOE Complex by 30 Percent August 8, 2007 - 3:16pm Addthis NEW ORLEANS, LA - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Samuel W. Bodman today launched the Transformational Energy Action Management (TEAM) Initiative, a Department-wide effort aimed at reducing energy intensity across the nationwide DOE complex by 30 percent. The TEAM Initiative aims to meet or exceed the aggressive goals for increasing energy efficiency throughout the federal government already laid out by President Bush. Reducing energy intensity by 30 percent across the DOE complex will save approximately $90 million in taxpayer dollars per year, after projects are

289

A Major Milestone for ARPA-E | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Major Milestone for ARPA-E A Major Milestone for ARPA-E A Major Milestone for ARPA-E August 31, 2011 - 8:47am Addthis Dr. Anthony Atti, CEO of Phononic Devices, demonstrates the standard semiconductor bonding equipment used to fabricate Phononic's high performance thermoelectric devices. Phononic Devices is one of the five innovative ARPA-E Awardees that have attracted over $100 million in outside capital investments. | Photo Courtesy of Phononic Devices. Dr. Anthony Atti, CEO of Phononic Devices, demonstrates the standard semiconductor bonding equipment used to fabricate Phononic's high performance thermoelectric devices. Phononic Devices is one of the five innovative ARPA-E Awardees that have attracted over $100 million in outside capital investments. | Photo Courtesy of Phononic Devices.

290

Financial News for Major Energy Producers, Third Quarter 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Producers, Third Quarter 2010 Producers, Third Quarter 2010 Release Date: January 5, 2011 Next Release Date: To Be Determined Report Sections: Corporate and Petroleum Net Income Worldwide Oil and Gas Production Operations Worldwide Refining/Marketing Operations Worldwide Petroleum Capital Expenditures Worldwide Downstream Natural Gas and Power, and Chemicals Operations Supplemental Figures Supplemental Tables Download this Report: Full Report in PDF-Format Past Issues in PDF-Format Additional Information FRS Home Financial Terms Glossary Contacts Notes: The "Financial News for Major Energy Producers" is issued quarterly to report recent trends in the financial performance of the major energy producers. "Major energy producers" are respondents to Form EIA-28 (Financial Reporting System). All U.S.-based respondent companies that

291

President Obama Announces Major Initiative to Spur Biofuels Industry and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Major Initiative to Spur Biofuels Major Initiative to Spur Biofuels Industry and Enhance America's Energy Security President Obama Announces Major Initiative to Spur Biofuels Industry and Enhance America's Energy Security August 16, 2011 - 11:45am Addthis USDA, Department of Energy and Navy Partner to Advance Biofuels to Fuel Military and Commercial Transportation, Displace Need for Foreign Oil, and Strengthen Rural America WASHINGTON, Aug. 16, 2011 - President Obama today announced that the U.S. Departments of Agriculture, Energy and Navy will invest up to $510 million during the next three years in partnership with the private sector to produce advanced drop-in aviation and marine biofuels to power military and commercial transportation. The initiative responds to a directive from President Obama issued in March as part of his Blueprint for A Secure

292

Genealogy of major U.S. refiners - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

See full Genealogy of Major U.S. Refiners Previous Release Genealogy of Major U.S. Refiners Genealogy of Major U.S. Refiners Release date: September 18, 2013 figre 1. World energy consumption, 1990-2040. The structure of the U.S. petroleum refining industry has changed substantially over the past several years. In the diagram the companies shown on the right side are presently active in U.S. refining. The transactions over the past 25 years that created these companies also are shown. The transactions included here may be as little as a single refinery, or as much as all the refining assets of the parties to the transaction. Transactions that include less than all refining assets are indicated by vertical dotted lines while vertical solid lines indicate that all refining assets are included. Additionally,

293

Major Corporate Fleets Align to Reduce Oil Consumption | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Major Corporate Fleets Align to Reduce Oil Consumption Major Corporate Fleets Align to Reduce Oil Consumption Major Corporate Fleets Align to Reduce Oil Consumption April 1, 2011 - 1:07pm Addthis President Obama announces the National Clean Fleets Partnership to help companies reduce fuel usage by incorporating electric vehicles, alternative fuels, and conservation techniques. Dennis A. Smith Director, National Clean Cities What does this project do? Cuts oil imports and consumption Helps businesses save money Increases the efficiency of large-scale fleets Reduces emissions Surrounded by cutting-edge vehicles, from all-electric trucks to hydraulic hybrids, President Obama today announced the National Clean Fleets Partnership, an initiative of the Department's Clean Cities program, at a UPS fleet facility in Landover, Maryland. This public-private partnership

294

Major Corporate Fleets Align to Reduce Oil Consumption | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Major Corporate Fleets Align to Reduce Oil Consumption Major Corporate Fleets Align to Reduce Oil Consumption Major Corporate Fleets Align to Reduce Oil Consumption April 1, 2011 - 1:07pm Addthis President Obama announces the National Clean Fleets Partnership to help companies reduce fuel usage by incorporating electric vehicles, alternative fuels, and conservation techniques. Dennis A. Smith Director, National Clean Cities What does this project do? Cuts oil imports and consumption Helps businesses save money Increases the efficiency of large-scale fleets Reduces emissions Surrounded by cutting-edge vehicles, from all-electric trucks to hydraulic hybrids, President Obama today announced the National Clean Fleets Partnership, an initiative of the Department's Clean Cities program, at a UPS fleet facility in Landover, Maryland. This public-private partnership

295

Five More States Reach Major Recovery Act Weatherization Milestone |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Five More States Reach Major Recovery Act Weatherization Milestone Five More States Reach Major Recovery Act Weatherization Milestone Five More States Reach Major Recovery Act Weatherization Milestone June 18, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - The U.S. Department of Energy announced today that five more states have reached a significant milestone under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - completing weatherization work for more than 30 percent of the homes they have planned. Now that New Hampshire, New Mexico, Montana, Minnesota, and Utah have each met this target, along with completing a series of monitoring and reporting milestones, the states will have access to the remaining 50 percent of their Recovery Act funding for the program. The Weatherization Assistance Program under the Recovery Act has weatherized more than 108,000 homes nationally, saving American

296

Financial News for Major Energy Companies, Fourth Quarter 2005  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fourth Quarter 2005 Fourth Quarter 2005 Overview The "Financial News for Major Energy Companies" is issued quarterly to report recent trends in the financial performance of the major energy companies. These include the respondents to Form EIA-28 (Financial Reporting System (FRS)), with the exception of the FRS companies that do not issue quarterly earnings releases or fail to provide separate information for the company's U.S. operations. Twenty-one major energy companies 1 reported overall net income (excluding unusual items) of $28.7 billion on revenues of $298.4 billion (i.e., 9.6 cents of net income per dollar of revenue) during the fourth quarter of 2005 (Q405). The level of net income for Q405 was 43 percent higher than in the fourth quarter of 2004 (Q404) (Table 1). Net income for Q405

297

Procedures Applicable to Major Federal Actions ... Subject to EO 12114  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 13, 1979 Part 111 Department of State - Office of the Secretary ~ Unified Procedures Applicable to Major Federal Actions Relating to Nuclear Activities Subject to Executive Order 121 14 65560 Federal Register I Vol. 44, No, 220 / T u e s d a y , N o v e m b e r 13, 1979 / Notices DEPARTMENTOFSTATE [Public Notice 6901 Unified Procedures Applicable to Major Federal Actions Relating to Nuclear Activities Subject to Executive Order 12114 . Executive Order 12114. "En\ ironmental Effects Abroad of Major Federal Actions." was signed by the President on Jan-ary 4, 19i9. The Order represents the excl;sive and complete determination by the L'nited States Governmen! of the procedural and other actions to be taken by Federal agencies to further the purposes of the National

298

Energy Department Report Finds Major Potential to Increase Clean  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report Finds Major Potential to Increase Clean Report Finds Major Potential to Increase Clean Hydroelectric Power Energy Department Report Finds Major Potential to Increase Clean Hydroelectric Power April 17, 2012 - 12:39pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- As part of President Obama's all-out, all-of-the-above energy strategy, the Energy Department today released a renewable energy resource assessment detailing the potential to develop electric power generation at existing dams across the United States that aren't currently equipped to produce power. The report estimates that without building a single new dam, these available hydropower resources, if fully developed, could provide an electrical generating capacity of more than 12 gigawatts (GW), equivalent to roughly 15 percent of current U.S. hydropower capacity. These findings demonstrate one of the ways the nation

299

Obama Administration Officials to Announce Major Steps toward Federal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Officials to Announce Major Steps toward Officials to Announce Major Steps toward Federal Advanced Vehicle Fleet Obama Administration Officials to Announce Major Steps toward Federal Advanced Vehicle Fleet May 23, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - On May 24, 2011, U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu, U.S. General Services Administrator Martha Johnson and White House Council on Environmental Quality Chair Nancy Sutley, will announce next steps in moving the Federal fleet further towards advanced vehicles and decreased petroleum consumption. Tuesday's announcement will continue to advance the President's goals of reducing Federal agency petroleum fuel use by 30 percent by 2020 and cutting our nation's oil imports by one-third by 2025. In October 2009, President Obama signed Executive Order 13514 on Federal Leadership in

300

DOE Highlights Clean Energy Jobs, Announces Major New Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Highlights Clean Energy Jobs, Announces Major New Energy Highlights Clean Energy Jobs, Announces Major New Energy Efficiency Milestone DOE Highlights Clean Energy Jobs, Announces Major New Energy Efficiency Milestone September 21, 2011 - 10:23am Addthis Washington, D.C. - One day before Deputy Secretary of Energy Daniel Poneman highlights the clean energy jobs created with support from the Obama Administration, the Energy Department announced that the weatherization program under the Recovery Act has now made more than 500,000 low-income homes nationwide more energy-efficient. The weatherization program is helping families save hundreds of dollars a year on their energy bills, while employing more than 14,000 workers across the country and countless others throughout the supply chain. The Department of Energy also today released a new video showing the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "major risk factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Enhanced oil recovery: major equipment and its projected demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After years of research and pilot tests, the enhanced oil recovery (EOR) industry is taking major leaps forward in 1981. With the launching of several hundred new EOR pilot tests, the announcement of major CO/sub 2/ pipelines into W. Texas, and a $3.6-billion purchase of South Belridge heavy oil by Shell, oil companies are showing their confidence in this technologically-emerging area. While much research remains to be done to make these processes more efficient and economic, the important commercial stage of the EOR industry's growth has clearly been reached. Along with the growth of the EOR industry will come a major demand for equipment and facilities. This demand will include traditional requirements for steam generators and compressors, although on a scale many times larger than at present, as well as new requirements for gas separation, chemical storage, and special tubulars.

Kuuskraa, V.A.; Hammershaimb, E.C.; Wicks, D.E.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Financial statistics of major US publicly owned electric utilities 1993  

SciTech Connect

The 1993 edition of the Financial Statistics of Major U.S. Publicly Owned Electric Utilities publication presents five years (1989 to 1993) of summary financial data and current year detailed financial data on the major publicly owned electric utilities. The objective of the publication is to provide Federal and State governments, industry, and the general public with current and historical data that can be used for policymaking and decision making purposes related to publicly owned electric utility issues. Generator and nongenerator summaries are presented in this publication. The primary source of publicly owned financial data is the Form EIA-412, the Annual Report of Public Electric Utilities, filed on a fiscal basis.

Not Available

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

CCSI Risk Estimation: An Application of Expert Elicitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) is a multi-laboratory simulation-driven effort to develop carbon capture technologies with the goal of accelerating commercialization and adoption in the near future. One of the key CCSI technical challenges is representing and quantifying the inherent uncertainty and risks associated with developing, testing, and deploying the technology in simulated and real operational settings. To address this challenge, the CCSI Element 7 team developed a holistic risk analysis and decision-making framework. The purpose of this report is to document the CCSI Element 7 structured systematic expert elicitation to identify additional risk factors. We review the significance of and established approaches to expert elicitation, describe the CCSI risk elicitation plan and implementation strategies, and conclude by discussing the next steps and highlighting the contribution of risk elicitation toward the achievement of the overarching CCSI objectives.

Engel, David W.; Dalton, Angela C.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Minor Chemie und Molekulare Wissenschaften und Major Biologie und Erdwissenschaften  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Minor Chemie und Molekulare Wissenschaften und Major Biologie und Erdwissenschaften Stundenplan 1 Chemie I Prof. J. Hulliger UG 113 5 ECTS 10.15-11.00 Allgemeine Chemie I Prof. J. Hulliger UG 113 Allgemeine Chemie I Prof. J. Hulliger UG 113 11.15-12.00 12.15-13.00 Allgemeine Chemie I Prof. J. Hulliger UG

Mühlemann, Oliver

305

Financial News for Major Energy Producers, Third Quarter 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

for Major for Major Energy Producers > Company List Financial News for Major Energy Producers, Third Quarter 2010 What is FRS? | Contacts | FRS Home Corporate and Petroleum Net Income Worldwide Oil and Gas Production Operations Worldwide Refining/Marketing Operations Worldwide Petroleum Capital Expenditures Worldwide Downstream Natural Gas and Power Operations, Supplemental Figures Supplemental Tables Download this Report: pdf icon Full Report in PDF-format pdf icon Past issues in PDF-format Additional Information FRS Home Financial Terms Glossary Contacts Company List for the Financial News for Major Energy Producers Links to the press releases of 21 companies are provided below, which is the number of companies that are included in this report. Only 20 of the companies are included in compilation of corporate revenue and corporate net income because the U.S. operations of BP are included in the results of the U.S. lines of business, but not in the foreign or corporate results because it is foreign based and does not report the overall revenues and net income of its U.S. affiliate.

306

Review of Major Integrated Energy Policy Report Recommendations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;1 Review of Major Integrated Energy Policy Report Recommendations In general, I find that the 2004 Integrated Energy Policy Report Update (or Energy Report), inclusive of the 2003 Energy Report, is consistent with my views on energy policy, except as noted otherwise

307

Toward a Parametric Model for Major Household Systems Performance1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to include the EnerGuide Appliance Directory [OEE, 2007] directly into the technology tables with actual users in the community. Also, the potential of including the EnerGuide Appliance Directory [OEE, 2006), and Japan (Shimoda et al, 2003). These databases of building stock can help to identify major

Salustri, Filippo A.

308

The Impact of Temperature on Major League Baseball  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Major League Baseball is played from the beginning of April through the end of October each year, encompassing three of the four meteorological seasons: spring, summer, and fall. The 30 teams play in cities across the United States and Canada in ...

Brandon Lee D. Koch; Anna K. Panorska

309

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE With a Major in COMPUTER SCIENCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE With a Major in COMPUTER SCIENCE The Bachelor of Science (BS) degree is intended for students who wish to pursue a professional degree program in Computer Science. Students planning to do graduate work in computer science are strongly advised to pursue this degree program

Delene, David J.

310

Financial statistics of major publicly owned electric utilities, 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Financial Statistics of Major Publicly Owned Electric Utilities publication presents summary and detailed financial accounting data on the publicly owned electric utilities. The objective of the publication is to provide Federal and State governments, industry, and the general public with data that can be used for policymaking and decisionmaking purposes relating to publicly owned electric utility issues.

Not Available

1993-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

311

A majorization approach to downlink multiuser VBR video streaming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we investigate the problem of optimal power control for multiuser variable bit rate (VBR) video streaming in a cellular network with orthogonal channels. We adopt a deterministic model for VBR video traffic that incorporates video frame ... Keywords: Majorization, Power control, Stochastic programming, Variable bit rate, Video streaming

Yingsong Huang; Shiwen Mao; Yihan Li

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Estimating Major and Minor Natural Fracture Patterns in Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimating Major and Minor Natural Fracture Patterns in Gas Shales Using Production Data Razi Identification of infill drilling locations has been challenging with mixed results in gas shales. Natural fractures are the main source of permeability in gas shales. Natural fracture patterns in shale has a random

Mohaghegh, Shahab

313

Factors for the Simulation of Convectively Coupled Kelvin Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the major factors for the realistic simulation of convectively coupled Kelvin waves (CCKWs) using the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Climate Forecast System (CFS) models. CFS simulations employing ...

Kyong-Hwan Seo; Jin-Ho Choi; Sang-Dae Han

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Factors Influencing Skill Improvements in the ECMWF Forecasting System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the past 30 years the skill in ECMWF numerical forecasts has steadily improved. There are three major contributing factors: 1) improvements in the forecast model, 2) improvements in the data assimilation, and 3) the increased number of ...

Linus Magnusson; Erland Källén

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Conversion factors for energy equivalents: All factors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Previous page of energy equivalents. Definition of uncertainty notation eg, 123(45) | Basis of conversion factors for energy equivalents. Top. ...

316

Draft Risk Assessment Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A cyber security risk assessment process includes the characterization of assets. A thorough asset characterization process can lead to a more robust threat characterization. One means of enhancing the thoroughness of the asset-and-threat characterization processes is to improve the characterization mechanisms. This technical update supports this approach by providing the results of initial research and developing a framework to support further analysis.This project builds upon the work ...

2012-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

317

Estimate of Geothermal Energy Resource in Major U.S. Sedimentary Basins (Presentation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study estimates the magnitude of geothermal energy from fifteen major known US sedimentary basins and ranks these basins relative to their potential. Because most sedimentary basins have been explored for oil and gas, well logs, temperatures at depth, and reservoir properties are known. This reduces exploration risk and allows development of geologic exploration models for each basin as well as a relative assessment of geologic risk elements for each play. The total available thermal resource for each basin was estimated using the volumetric heat-in-place method originally proposed by Muffler (USGS). Total sedimentary thickness maps, stratigraphic columns, cross sections, and temperature gradient Information were gathered for each basin from published articles, USGS reports, and state geological survey reports. When published data was insufficient, thermal gradients and reservoir properties were derived from oil and gas well logs obtained on oil and gas commission websites. Basin stratigraphy, structural history, and groundwater circulation patterns were studied in order to develop a model that estimates resource size and temperature distribution, and to qualitatively assess reservoir productivity.

Porro, C.; Augustine, C.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Analyzing and Forecasting Volatility Spillovers, Asymmetries and Hedging in Major Oil Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Crude oil price volatility has been analyzed extensively for organized spot, forward and futures markets for well over a decade, and is crucial for forecasting volatility and Value-at-Risk (VaR). There are four major benchmarks in the international oil market, namely West Texas Intermediate (USA), Brent (North Sea), Dubai/Oman (Middle East), and Tapis (Asia-Pacific), which are likely to be highly correlated. This paper analyses the volatility spillover and asymmetric effects across and within the four markets, using three multivariate GARCH models, namely the constant conditional correlation (CCC), vector ARMA-GARCH (VARMA-GARCH) and vector ARMA-asymmetric GARCH (VARMA-AGARCH) models. A rolling window approach is used to forecast the 1-day ahead conditional correlations. The paper presents evidence of volatility spillovers and asymmetric effects on the conditional variances for most pairs of series. In addition, the forecast conditional correlations between pairs of crude oil returns have both positive and negative trends. Moreover, the optimal hedge ratios and optimal portfolio weights of crude oil across different assets and market portfolios are evaluated in order to provide important policy implications for risk management in crude oil markets.

Chia-lin Chang; Michael Mcaleer; Roengchai Tansuchat; Chia-lin Chang; Michael Mcaleer; Roengchai Tansuchat

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Risk assessment handbook  

SciTech Connect

The Probabilistic Risk Assessment Unit at EG G Idaho has developed this handbook to provide guidance to a facility manager exploring the potential benefit to be gained by performance of a risk assessment properly scoped to meet local needs. This document is designed to help the manager control the resources expended commensurate with the risks being managed and to assure that the products can be used programmatically to support future needs in order to derive maximum beneflt from the resources expended. We present a logical and functional mapping scheme between several discrete phases of project definition to ensure that a potential customer, working with an analyst, is able to define the areas of interest and that appropriate methods are employed in the analysis. In addition the handbook is written to provide a high-level perspective for the analyst. Previously, the needed information was either scattered or existed only in the minds of experienced analysts. By compiling this information and exploring the breadth of knowledge which exists within the members of the PRA Unit, the functional relationships between the customers' needs and the product have been established.

Farmer, F.G.; Jones, J.L.; Hunt, R.N.; Roush, M.L.; Wierman, T.E.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Risk assessment handbook  

SciTech Connect

The Probabilistic Risk Assessment Unit at EG&G Idaho has developed this handbook to provide guidance to a facility manager exploring the potential benefit to be gained by performance of a risk assessment properly scoped to meet local needs. This document is designed to help the manager control the resources expended commensurate with the risks being managed and to assure that the products can be used programmatically to support future needs in order to derive maximum beneflt from the resources expended. We present a logical and functional mapping scheme between several discrete phases of project definition to ensure that a potential customer, working with an analyst, is able to define the areas of interest and that appropriate methods are employed in the analysis. In addition the handbook is written to provide a high-level perspective for the analyst. Previously, the needed information was either scattered or existed only in the minds of experienced analysts. By compiling this information and exploring the breadth of knowledge which exists within the members of the PRA Unit, the functional relationships between the customers` needs and the product have been established.

Farmer, F.G.; Jones, J.L.; Hunt, R.N.; Roush, M.L.; Wierman, T.E.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "major risk factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RAIS Risk Exposure Models for Radionuclides User's Guide RAIS Risk Exposure Models for Radionuclides User's Guide Note The RAIS presents this updated Risk calculator in response to the following: incorporating chemical-specific parameters from the lastest EPI release, addition of air as a media, and conversion to a new database structure. The previous RAIS Risk calculator presented Risks for radionuclides and chemcials together. Recent development of chemical and radionuclide exposure equations has necessitated that the RAIS separate the chemicals and the radionuclides. To calculate risks for chemicals, use the RAIS Risk Exposure Models for Chemicals calculator. Currently the agricultural equations for the RAIS chemical and radionuclide risk calculators are identical. The EPA's Preliminary Remediation Goals for

322

Probabilistic Risk Assessment - A Bibliography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Probabilistic risk analysis is an integration of failure modes and effects analysis (FEMA), fault tree analysis and other techniques to assess the potential for failure and to find ways to reduce risk. This bibliography references 160 documents in the ...

Program NASA Scientific and Technical Information

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Appendix F Human Health Risk Assessment Document Number Q0029500 Appendix F  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Human Health Risk Assessment Human Health Risk Assessment Document Number Q0029500 Appendix F This appendix presents the detailed calculations used to estimate risks to human health. It includes the exposure factors, equations, abbreviations, assumptions, and references. Separate spreadsheets for ground water ingestion for the near-term and 20-year assumptio~ls have also been provided. The following spreadsheets are included in this appendix: Overview (Exposure Factors, Equations, Abbreviations, and COPCs) .......................... F-3 * Contaminant Concentrations-Near-Tern1 Ground Water Concentrations .................... F-6 Toxicity Factors ...................................... .. ............................................................ F-8 * Lower Montezuma'creek Exposure Scenario-Reasonable Maximurn Exposure ...... F-10

324

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RAIS Chemical Risk Calculator RAIS Chemical Soil to Ground Water Calculator Radionuclide Calculators Preliminary Remediation Goals (PRGs) Radionuclide Calculator RAIS...

325

EO 12114: Environmental Effects Abroad of Major Federal Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

114-Environmental Effects Abroad of Major Federal Actions 114-Environmental Effects Abroad of Major Federal Actions SOURCE: The provisions of Executive Order 12114 of January 4, 1979, appear at 44 FR 1957, 3 CFR, 1979, Comp., p. 356, unless otherwise noted. By virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, and as President of the United States, in order to further environmental objectives consistent with the foreign policy and national security policy of the United States, it is ordered as follows: Section 1. 1-1. Purpose and Scope. The purpose of this Executive Order is to enable responsible officials of Federal Agencies having ultimate responsibility for authorizing and approving actions encompassed by this Order to be informed of pertinent environmental considerations and to take

326

Major Economies Forum on Energy and Climate | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Economies Forum on Energy and Climate Economies Forum on Energy and Climate Jump to: navigation, search Name Major Economies Forum on Energy and Climate Agency/Company /Organization Major Economies Forum Sector Energy, Land Focus Area Conventional Energy, Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Biomass, Solar, Wind, Buildings, Industry, Transportation, Forestry, Agriculture Topics Policies/deployment programs, Pathways analysis, Technology characterizations Resource Type Lessons learned/best practices Website http://www.majoreconomiesforum References MEF[1] Contents 1 Background 2 Technology Action Plans 2.1 Advanced Vehicles 2.2 Bioenergy 2.3 Carbon Capture, Use and Storage 2.4 Energy Efficiency-Buildings Sector 2.5 Energy Efficiency-Industrial Sector 2.6 High-Efficiency, Low-Emissions (HELE) Coal Technologies

327

Energy Department, ArcelorMittal Partnership Boosts Efficiency of Major  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department, ArcelorMittal Partnership Boosts Efficiency of Department, ArcelorMittal Partnership Boosts Efficiency of Major Steel Manufacturing Plant Energy Department, ArcelorMittal Partnership Boosts Efficiency of Major Steel Manufacturing Plant December 17, 2012 - 2:14pm Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - Today, Senior Advisor in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Gil Sperling, joined local officials and company representatives for the ribbon cutting ceremony and tour of the ArcelorMittal steel manufacturing plant in East Chicago, Indiana. ArcelorMittal unveiled a new, energy recovery and reuse boiler that recycles waste gas generated through its ironmaking process and uses it to generate electricity to help power the plant. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) awarded ArcelorMittal $31.6 million for

328

Major Business Expansion Bond Program (Maine) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Expansion Bond Program (Maine) Expansion Bond Program (Maine) Major Business Expansion Bond Program (Maine) < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Maine Program Type Bond Program Provider Finance Authority of Maine The Major Business Expansion Bond Program provides long-term, credit-enhanced financing up to $25,000,000 at taxable bond rates for businesses creating or retaining at least 50 jobs; up to $10,000,000 is available for businesses which expand their manufacturing services. The bond proceeds may be used to acquire real estate, machinery, equipment, or rehabilitate or expand an existing facility. The interest rate is determined by market forces at the time of the bond sale

329

Sustainable Transport: from Bullock Carts to Bugatis: Reflections on Major  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sustainable Transport: from Bullock Carts to Bugatis: Reflections on Major Sustainable Transport: from Bullock Carts to Bugatis: Reflections on Major Transport Issues North and South Speaker(s): Lee Schipper Date: August 16, 2001 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Marcia Beck This talk reviews quantitative and qualitative trends in urban transportation and environment, focusing on developing countries. Reviewing recent efforts to look at transportation, the talk adopts a definition of "sustainable transportation" that includes economic and environmental sustainability as well as equity as key criteria. It is argued that governance sustainability is also important if policies and technologies are to reduce the main externalities from urban transport. An important identity is introduced to relate emissions to traffic, modal share, fuel

330

Major County, Oklahoma: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Major County, Oklahoma: Energy Resources Major County, Oklahoma: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 36.3479671°, -98.5281613° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.3479671,"lon":-98.5281613,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

331

Major Business Facility Job Tax Credit (Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facility Job Tax Credit (Virginia) Facility Job Tax Credit (Virginia) Major Business Facility Job Tax Credit (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Virginia Program Type Corporate Tax Incentive Provider Virginia Department of Taxation The Major Business Facility Job Tax Credit is a program administered by the Virginia Department of Taxation. The credit provides $1,000 per job over a 25 or 50-job threshold, which varies by locality. The job threshold must be

332

A Curious New Milky Way Satellite in Ursa Major  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this Letter, we study a localized stellar overdensity in the constellation of Ursa Major, first identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data and subsequently followed up with Subaru imaging. Its color-magnitude diagram shows a well-defined sub-giant branch, main sequence and turn-off, from which we estimate a distance of about 30 kpc and a projected size of about 250 pc. Based on its extent and its stellar population, we argue that this is a previously unknown satellite galaxy of the Milky Way, hereby named after its constellation as Ursa Major II (UMa II). Using SDSS data, we find an absolute magnitude of M_V = -3.8, which would make it the faintest known satellite galaxy. UMa II's isophotes are irregular and distorted with evidence for multiple concentrations; this suggests that the satellite may be in the process of disruption.

Zucker, D B; Evans, N W; Irwin, M J; Kleyna, J T; Wilkinson, M I; Fellhauer, M; Bramich, D M; Gilmore, G; Newberg, H J; Yanny, B; Smith, J A; Hewett, P C; Bell, E F; Rix, H W; Gnedin, O Y; Vidrih, S; Wyse, R F G; Willman, B; Grebel, E K; Schneider, D P; Beers, T C; Kniazev, A Yu; Barentine, J C; Brewington, H; Brinkmann, J; Harvanek, M; Kleinman, S J; Krzesínski, J; Long, D; Nitta, A; Snedden, S A

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

A Curious New Milky Way Satellite in Ursa Major  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this Letter, we study a localized stellar overdensity in the constellation of Ursa Major, first identified in Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data and subsequently followed up with Subaru imaging. Its color-magnitude diagram (CMD) shows a well-defined sub-giant branch, main sequence and turn-off, from which we estimate a distance of ~30 kpc and a projected size of ~250 x 125 pc. The CMD suggests a composite population with some range in metallicity and/or age. Based on its extent and stellar population, we argue that this is a previously unknown satellite galaxy of the Milky Way, hereby named Ursa Major II (UMa II) after its constellation. Using SDSS data, we find an absolute magnitude of M_V \\~ -3.8, which would make it the faintest known satellite galaxy. UMa II's isophotes are irregular and distorted with evidence for multiple concentrations; this suggests that the satellite is in the process of disruption.

D. B. Zucker; V. Belokurov; N. W. Evans; J. T. Kleyna; M. J. Irwin; M. I. Wilkinson; M. Fellhauer; D. M. Bramich; G. Gilmore; H. J. Newberg; B. Yanny; J. A. Smith; P. C. Hewett; E. F. Bell; H. -W. Rix; O. Y. Gnedin; S. Vidrih; R. F. G. Wyse; B. Willman; E. K. Grebel; D. P. Schneider; T. C. Beers; A. Y. Kniazev; J. C. Barentine; H. Brewington; J. Brinkmann; M. Harvanek; S. J. Kleinman; J. Krzesinski; D. Long; A. Nitta; S. A. Snedden

2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

334

Recent market activities of major interstate pipeline companies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In addition to analyzing trends in wellhead purchases over the past year, this study also presents information and analysis of natural gas purchases from other pipeline companies, and sales to several types of customers. Activities of 20 major interstate pipeline companies were analysed in response to market developments over the past 4 years and over the past year in particular. This study includes an analysis of trends in natural gas sales and of the effects of increasing prices since 1979. It includes separate analyses of direct industrial sales, sales to major pipeline companies, and other sales for resale, as well as analyses of the volumes transported for sale to others. It also reports on purchase patterns in general since 1979 and on purchase projection patterns for particular types of gas since 1981. The differing behavior of pipeline companies in purchasing high-cost gas in the current market is also analyzed. (PSB)

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Enterprise level IT risk management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing IT budget and over-dependence of business on IT infra-structure makes risk management a critical component of enterprise management. The creation and sustenance of an IT risk management framework is one of the crucial and challenging tasks ... Keywords: enterprise level, information technology, risk management

Nadhirah Azizi; Khairuddin Hashim

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, RISK MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

performance within the CSU System. #12;2004 ­ 2005 Risk Management Annual Report Page 3 · Chaired the CSU-04 2004-05 Fullerton System-Wide #12;2004 ­ 2005 Risk Management Annual Report Page 10 University · International travel · Facilities use · Deferred maintenance Working with the University's Risk Management

de Lijser, Peter

337

Belief-based risk analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a method for risk analysis based on the approach used in CRAMM, but instead of using discrete measures for threats and vulnerabilities and look-up tables to derive levels of risk, it uses subjective beliefs about threats and vulnerabilities ... Keywords: belief calculus, risk analysis, security

Audun Jøsang; Daniel Bradley; Svein J. Knapskog

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radionuclide Decay Chain Radionuclide Decay Chain Using the Radionuclide Decay Chain Tool Click on the steps below for detailed instructions about each page of the Radionuclide Chain Tool. 1. Select Isotope 2. Decay Chain Table 3. Decay Chain Animation 1. Select Isotope Select the isotope of interest and click the "Submit" button. 2. Decay Chain Table A table of the ICRP 107 decay chain appears that displays the parent and all daughters in the decay chain through the stable isotope(s). The half-life, decay modes, and the branching fractions are given. Decay chains that are repeated as a result of multiple branching fractions are only presented once in the table. Text below the decay chain table contains decay mode definitions and further information on the daughters included in the +D slope factors for risk assessment purposes. A back button is provided to return to the main page. To watch an animated representation of the decay process, click the link "Click for visual diagram."

339

Reliability Engineering and System Safety 92 (2007) 609618 The nuclear industry's transition to risk-informed regulation and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

standards and the use of the newly instituted risk-informed reactor oversight process. Key factors affecting developed a probabilistic risk assessment policy in the early 1980s and nuclear reactor regulation (NRR in the development of risk- informed technologies and its use in the regulatory arena formed a small owner's group

340

Financial statistics of major US publicly owned electric utilities 1994  

SciTech Connect

This publication presents 5 years (1990--94) of summary financial data and current year detailed financial data on the major publicly owned electric utilities. Generator and nongenerator summaries are presented. Composite tables present: Aggregates of income statement and balance sheet data, financial indicators, electric operation and maintenance expenses, electric utility plant, number of consumers, sales of electricity, and operating revenue, and electric energy account data.

NONE

1995-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "major risk factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Computers for The recommended computer for your major  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computers for The recommended computer for your major 2011-2012 Semesters 5-11-2010 Computer for U RAW.indd 1 3/31/11 10:32 AM #12;2 Computers for U TableofContents About the Program 3 About U Tech 4-37 Computer Purchase Plan 38-39 5-11-2010 Computer for U RAW.indd 2 3/31/11 10:32 AM #12;Computers for U 3

Provancher, William

342

A New Milky Way dwarf galaxy in Ursa Major  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this Letter, we report the discovery of a new dwarf satellite to the Milky Way, located at ({alpha}{sub 2000}, {delta}{sub 2000}) = (158.72,51.92) in the constellation of Ursa Major. This object was detected as an overdensity of red, resolved stars in Sloan Digital Sky Survey data. The color-magnitude diagram of the Ursa Major dwarf looks remarkably similar to that of Sextans, the lowest surface brightness Milky Way companion known, but with approximately an order of magnitude fewer stars. Deeper follow-up imaging confirms this object has an old and metal-poor stellar population and is {approx} 100 kpc away. We roughly estimate M{sub V} = -6.75 and r{sub 1/2} = 250 pc for this dwarf. Its luminosity is several times fainter than the faintest known Milky Way dwarfs. However, its physical size is typical for dSphs. Even though its absolute magnitude and size are presently quite uncertain, Ursa Major is likely the lowest luminosity and lowest surface brightness galaxy yet known.

Willman, Beth; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Martinez-Delgado, David; West, Andrew A.; Blanton, Michael R.; Hogg, David W.; Barentine, J.C.; Brewington, Howard J.; Harvanek, Michael; Kleinman, S.J.; Krzesinski, Jurek; Long, Dan; Neilsen, Eric H., Jr.; Nitta, Atsuko; Snedden, Stephanie A.; /CCPP, New York /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /IAA, Granada /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. Astron. /Apache Point Observ. /Mt. Suhora Observ., Cracow /Fermilab

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

A New Milky Way Dwarf Galaxy in Ursa Major  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this Letter, we report the discovery of a new dwarf satellite to the Milky Way, located at (ra, dec) = (158.72,51.92) in the constellation of Ursa Major. This object was detected as an overdensity of red, resolved stars in Sloan Digital Sky Survey data. The color-magnitude diagram of the Ursa Major dwarf looks remarkably similar to that of Sextans, the lowest surface brightness Milky Way companion known, but with approximately an order of magnitude fewer stars. Deeper follow-up imaging confirms this object has an old and metal-poor stellar population and is 100 kpc away. We roughly estimate M_V = -6.75 and r_1/2 = 250 pc for this dwarf. Its luminosity is several times fainter than the faintest known Milky Way dwarfs. However, its physical size is typical for dSphs. Even though its absolute magnitude and size are presently quite uncertain, Ursa Major is likely the lowest luminosity and lowest surface brightness galaxy yet known.

Willman, B; Martínez-Delgado, D; West, A A; Blanton, M R; Hogg, D W; Barentine, J C; Brewington, H J; Harvanek, M; Kleinman, S J; Krzesínski, J; Long, D; Neilsen, E H; Nitta, A; Snedden, S A; Willman, Beth; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Martinez-Delgado, David; West, Andrew A.; Blanton, Michael R.; Hogg, David W.; Brewington, Howard J.; Harvanek, Michael; Krzesinski, Jurek; Long, Dan; Neilsen, Eric H.; Nitta, Atsuko; Snedden, Stephanie A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

A New Milky Way Dwarf Galaxy in Ursa Major  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this Letter, we report the discovery of a new dwarf satellite to the Milky Way, located at ($\\alpha_{2000}, \\delta_{2000}$) $=$ (158.72,51.92) in the constellation of Ursa Major. This object was detected as an overdensity of red, resolved stars in Sloan Digital Sky Survey data. The color-magnitude diagram of the Ursa Major dwarf looks remarkably similar to that of Sextans, the lowest surface brightness Milky Way companion known, but with approximately an order of magnitude fewer stars. Deeper follow-up imaging confirms this object has an old and metal-poor stellar population and is $\\sim$ 100 kpc away. We roughly estimate M$_V =$ -6.75 and $r_{1/2} =$ 250 pc for this dwarf. Its luminosity is several times fainter than the faintest known Milky Way dwarf. However, its physical size is typical for dSphs. Even though its absolute magnitude and size are presently quite uncertain, Ursa Major is likely the lowest luminosity and lowest surface brightness galaxy yet known.

Beth Willman; Julianne J. Dalcanton; David Martinez-Delgado; Andrew A. West; Michael R. Blanton; David W. Hogg; J. C. Barentine; Howard J. Brewington; Michael Harvanek; S. J. Kleinman; Jurek Krzesinski; Dan Long; Eric H. Neilsen, Jr.; Atsuko Nitta; Stephanie A. Snedden

2005-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

345

NGNP Risk Management Database: A Model for Managing Risk  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To facilitate the implementation of the Risk Management Plan, the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project has developed and employed an analytical software tool called the NGNP Risk Management System (RMS). A relational database developed in Microsoft® Access, the RMS provides conventional database utility including data maintenance, archiving, configuration control, and query ability. Additionally, the tool’s design provides a number of unique capabilities specifically designed to facilitate the development and execution of activities outlined in the Risk Management Plan. Specifically, the RMS provides the capability to establish the risk baseline, document and analyze the risk reduction plan, track the current risk reduction status, organize risks by reference configuration system, subsystem, and component (SSC) and Area, and increase the level of NGNP decision making.

John Collins

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

A forecasting model of tourist arrivals from major markets to Thailand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International tourism is a rapidly growing phenomenon hics. worldwide. However, the East Asia and Pacific Region is expected to be the focus of the worldwide tourism industry in the new millennium because tourist arrivals and receipts registered a growth about twice the rates of industrialized countries in the last decade. The tourism industry has become a powerful engine for economic development and a major foreign exchange generator. With such growth and increased competition, it is vitally important to forecast tourism demand in the region and understand the factors affecting demand. Considering the national importance of tourism, Thailand was chosen as the destination country with nine major markets as the countries of origin. A model was developed for each country to forecast tourism demand from that market. Multiple regression analysis was applied over time series data. The empirical results suggest that independent variables, such as income level in the country of origin, prices of tourism goods in the destination country, currency exchange rate between the origin and destination country, and rooms supply in destination, do affect tourism demand. Qualitative factors, represented by dummy variables, namely special promotional program and political unrest, show slight impact on demand. The study reveals that there are differences in the relative impacts of variables among the tourist generating countries. Thus, country-specific forecasting models and strategies must be formulated to reflect the uniqueness of each country of origin. Furthermore, forecasting techniques should include more qualitative factors to better asses their impacts on tourism demand. For future research, it is suggested that the models developed be updated regularly to reflect changes in the selected independent variables. Surveys and studies dealing with consumer motivation should be carried out to understand more about the tourists themselves and how they select particular destinations and types of tourism. Finally, in order to take advantage of modern technologies, the Internet is suggested as a tool to promote tourism.

Hao, Ching

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

LPP Risk Management Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plan More Documents & Publications Software Development Risk Assessment High Risk Plan SC Introduction to Risk Management Energy.gov Careers & Internships For Staff &...

348

EMAB Risk Subcommittee Interim Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FIRST INTERIM REPORT TO THE ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT ADVISORY BOARD Incorporating Risk and Sustainability into Decision Making Submitted by the EMAB Risk Subcommittee December 3, 2012 Background: In December 2011, then Acting Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management David Huizenga, asked the Environmental Management Advisory Board (EMAB or Board) to establish a Risk Subcommittee. In February 2012, the Subcommittee's Work Plan was approved. Under the Work Plan, the purpose of the Subcommittee is to evaluate "risk-informed decision making," specifically whether the prioritization tool developed by the Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP) for use at the Oak Ridge Reservation (Oak Ridge) is one that

349

Photovoltaic Degradation Risk: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

The ability to accurately predict power delivery over the course of time is of vital importance to the growth of the photovoltaic (PV) industry. Important cost drivers include the efficiency with which sunlight is converted into power, how this relationship changes over time, and the uncertainty in this prediction. An accurate quantification of power decline over time, also known as degradation rate, is essential to all stakeholders - utility companies, integrators, investors, and researchers alike. In this paper we use a statistical approach based on historical data to quantify degradation rates, discern trends and quantify risks related to measurement uncertainties, number of measurements and methodologies.

Jordan, D. C.; Kurtz, S. R.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Risk Exposure Models for Chemicals User's Guide Risk Exposure Models for Chemicals User's Guide 1. Introduction The purpose of this calculator is to assist Remedial Project Managers (RPMs), On Scene Coordinators (OSC's), risk assessors and others involved in decision-making at hazardous waste sites and to determine whether levels of contamination found at the site may warrant further investigation or site cleanup, or whether no further investigation or action may be required. The risk values presented on this site are chemical-specific values for individual contaminants in air, water, soil and biota that may warrant further investigation or site cleanup. It should be noted that the risks in this calculator are based upon human health risk and do not address potential ecological risk. Some sites in sensitive ecological settings may also need to be evaluated for potential

351

Using hardware vulnerability factors to enhance AVF analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fault tolerance is now a primary design constraint for all major microprocessors. One step in determining a processor's compliance to its failure rate target is measuring the Architectural Vulnerability Factor (AVF) of each on-chip structure. The AVF ... Keywords: architectural vulnerability factor, fault tolerance, reliability

Vilas Sridharan; David R. Kaeli

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

A Review of Expertise and Judgment Processes for Risk Estimation  

SciTech Connect

A major challenge of risk and reliability analysis for human errors or hardware failures is the need to enlist expert opinion in areas for which adequate operational data are not available. Experts enlisted in this capacity provide probabilistic estimates of reliability, typically comprised of a measure of central tendency and uncertainty bounds. While formal guidelines for expert elicitation are readily available, they largely fail to provide a theoretical basis for expertise and judgment. This paper reviews expertise and judgment in the context of risk analysis; overviews judgment biases, the role of training, and multivariate judgments; and provides guidance on the appropriate use of atomistic and holistic judgment processes.

R. L. Boring

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Review of the Diablo Canyon probabilistic risk assessment  

SciTech Connect

This report details the review of the Diablo Canyon Probabilistic Risk Assessment (DCPRA). The study was performed under contract from the Probabilistic Risk Analysis Branch, Office of Nuclear Reactor Research, USNRC by Brookhaven National Laboratory. The DCPRA is a full scope Level I effort and although the review touched on all aspects of the PRA, the internal events and seismic events received the vast majority of the review effort. The report includes a number of independent systems analyses sensitivity studies, importance analyses as well as conclusions on the adequacy of the DCPRA for use in the Diablo Canyon Long Term Seismic Program.

Bozoki, G.E.; Fitzpatrick, R.G.; Bohn, M.P. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sabek, M.G. [Atomic Energy Authority, Nuclear Regulatory and Safety Center, Cairo (Egypt); Ravindra, M.K.; Johnson, J.J. [EQE Engineering, San Francisco, CA (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Microsoft PowerPoint - AVTALeaftestinganalysis_Major summary092112.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AVTA Nissan Leaf testing and analysis October 12 th 2012 Henning Lohse-Busch, PhD Mike Duoba, Eric Rask, Mark Meyer, APRF & Co., Argonne National Laboratory Sponsored by Lee Slezak Note: This presentation summarizes the major finding which have been presented at several different occasions in the past. Overview  Vehicle information  Instrumentation and test plan  General test results - SAE J1634 Short cut test method - Energy Consumption and range - Two Leafs, two different results - Battery performance, depletion and charging - Accessory load summary  Thermal testing - 72F results - 20F results - 95F with solar load results  Conclusions 2 Advanced Powertrain Research Facility Nissan Leaf -

355

3D Object Digitization: Majority Interpolation and Marching Cubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a previous paper we showed that a 3D object can be digitized without changing the topology if the object is r-regular and if the reconstruction method fulfills certain requirements. In this paper we give two important examples for such reconstruction methods. First, we introduce Majority Interpolation, an algorithm to interpolate sampling points at doubled resolution such that topological ambiguities are resolved. Second, we show how the well-known Marching Cubes algorithm has to be modified such that it is topology preserving. This is the first approach of digitizing 3D objects which guarantees topology preservation for voxel-based or polygonal surface-based reconstructions. 1

Peer Stelldinger

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Proposed framework for the Western Area Power Administration Environmental Risk Management Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Western Area Power Administration (Western) views environmental protection and compliance as a top priority as it manages the construction, operation, and maintenance of its vast network of transmission lines, substations, and other facilities. A recent Department of Energy audit of Western`s environmental management activities recommends that Western adopt a formal environmental risk program. To accomplish this goal, Western, in conjunction with Pacific Northwest Laboratory, is in the process of developing a centrally coordinated environmental risk program. This report presents the results of this design effort, and indicates the direction in which Western`s environmental risk program is heading. Western`s environmental risk program will consist of three main components: risk communication, risk assessment, and risk management/decision making. Risk communication is defined as an exchange of information on the potential for threats to human health, public safety, or the environment. This information exchange provides a mechanism for public involvement, and also for the participation in the risk assessment and management process by diverse groups or offices within Western. The objective of risk assessment is to evaluate and rank the relative magnitude of risks associated with specific environmental issues that are facing Western. The evaluation and ranking is based on the best available scientific information and judgment and serves as input to the risk management process. Risk management takes risk information and combines it with relevant non-risk factors (e.g., legal mandates, public opinion, costs) to generate risk management options. A risk management tool, such as decision analysis, can be used to help make risk management choices.

Glantz, C.S.; DiMassa, F.V.; Pelto, P.J.; Brothers, A.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Roybal, A.L. [Western Area Power Administration, Golden, CO (United States)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

factor.mws - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

... 0 "" {TEXT -1 61 "Be default \\+ factor factors over the field of rational numbers. ... {PARA 0 "> " 0 "" {MPLTEXT 1 0 36 "alias(beta=RootOf(x^5+x^3+x^2+x+1));" } ...

358

Prediction of response to therapy with ezatiostat in lower risk myelodysplastic syndrome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: Approximately 70% of all patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) present with lower-risk disease. Some of these patients will initially respond to treatment with growth factors to improve anemia but will ...

Galili, Naomi

359

Financial statistics major US publicly owned electric utilities 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1996 edition of The Financial Statistics of Major US Publicly Owned Electric Utilities publication presents 5 years (1992 through 1996) of summary financial data and current year detailed financial data on the major publicly owned electric utilities. The objective of the publication is to provide Federal and State governments, industry, and the general public with current and historical data that can be used for policymaking and decision making purposes related to publicly owned electric utility issues. Generator and nongenerator summaries are presented in this publication. Five years of summary financial data are provided. Summaries of generators for fiscal years ending June 30 and December 31, nongenerators for fiscal years ending June 30 and December 31, and summaries of all respondents are provided. The composite tables present aggregates of income statement and balance sheet data, as well as financial indicators. Composite tables also display electric operation and maintenance expenses, electric utility plant, number of consumers, sales of electricity, and operating revenue, and electric energy account data. 2 figs., 32 tabs.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Collateral Risk Analytics for Energy Trading and Portfolio Risk Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the need for a strong collateral risk management function as an integral part of an energy company’s risk management program. It reviews the basics of margining and collateral both in over-the-counter markets and on exchanges. In addition, it details the technology available to measure collateral risk properly. Then it reviews the recent efforts to regulate OTC derivatives, the potential impact that it could have on energy companies’ management of cash collateral, and strategies tha...

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "major risk factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

An Introduction to Risk with a Focus on Design Diversity in the Stockpile  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The maintenance and security of nuclear weapons in the stockpile involves decisions based on risk analysis and quantitative measures of risk. Risk is a factor in all decisions, a particularly important factor in decisions of a large scale. One example of high-risk decisions we will discuss is the risk involved in design diversity within the stockpile of nuclear weapons arsenal. Risk is defined as 'possibility of loss or injury' and the 'degree of probability of such loss' (Kaplan and Garrick 12). To introduce the risk involved with maintaining the weapons stockpile we will draw a parallel to the design and maintenance of Southwest Airlines fleet of Boeing 737 planes. The clear benefits for cost savings in maintenance of having a uniform fleet are what historically drove Southwest to have only Boeing 737s in their fleet. Less money and resources are need for maintenance, training, and materials. Naturally, risk accompanies those benefits. A defect in a part of the plane indicates a potential defect in that same part in all the planes of the fleet. As a result, safety, business, and credibility are at risk. How much variety or diversity does the fleet need to mitigate that risk? With that question in mind, a balance is needed to accommodate the different risks and benefits of the situation. In a similar way, risk is analyzed for the design and maintenance of nuclear weapons in the stockpile. In conclusion, risk must be as low as possible when it comes to the nuclear weapons stockpile. Design and care to keep the stockpile healthy involves all aspects of risk management. Design diversity is a method that helps to mitigate risk, and to help balance options in stockpile stewardship.

Noone, Bailey C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

362

SU?E?I?47: Comparison of Risks for Two Medical Imaging Procedures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose:Radiologists may need to decide which type of image procedure is most appropriate for a particular patient. One factor relevant in making this decision is the relative risk of secondary cancers due to each relevant procedure. Differences in the risk posed by each method are not just due to the total radiationdose imparted by each procedure

K Roy Choudhury; R Tian; X Li; E Samei

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Development of Risk Assessment System for Coal-Bed Methane Underbalanced Drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As there are a lot of factors with complexity and uncertainty, the process of coal-bed methane under balanced drilling has great risk. In order to overcome the one-sidedness and limitation caused by single evaluation method, the combined evaluation model ... Keywords: coal-bed methane, underbalanced drilling, combined evaluation model, risk assessment system

Xiujuan Yang; Qingyang Wen; Xiangzhen Yan; Yan Xia

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Evaluation of Heat Stress Risk for Workers in the Electric Power Industry: Project Update 2013  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat stress remains an important risk factor affecting worker health and safety, due not only to the high and sustained workloads but also to heat contributions from the environment, machinery, and nature of protective clothing (such as arc- and fire-resistant clothing). In combination with individual factors, including age, common comorbidities (such as diabetes), fitness, and hydration levels, workers are at heat-related risk beyond overt clinical symptoms of heat stress. Regardless of the source, ...

2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

365

Assessment of ISLOCA risk-methodology and application to a combustion engineering plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Inter-system loss-of-coolant accidents (ISLOCAs) have been identified as important contributors to offsite risk for some nuclear power plants. A methodology has been developed for identifying and evaluating plant-specific hardware designs, human factors issues, and accident consequence factors relevant to the estimation of ISOLOCA core damage frequency and risk. This report presents a detailed of description of the application of this analysis methodology to a Combustion Engineering plant.

Kelly, D.L.; Auflick, J.L.; Haney, L.N. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Risk Assessment Documents - ORR Risk Assessment Documents - ORR Bullet Baseline Risk Assessments Bullet Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Environmental Assessment Report South Campus Facility, Oak Ridge Tenn [DOE/OR/02-1274&D] Bullet Baseline Risk Assessment for Lower East Fork Poplar Creek [DOE/OR/1119 & D2 & V2] Bullet Remedial Investigation/ Feasibility Study Report for Lower Watts Bar Reservoir Operable Unit [DOE/OR/01 1282 & D1] [ORNL/ER-2] Bullet The Utility of Existing Data Conducting a CERCLA Baseline Risk Assessment for Lower Watts Bar Reservoir (draft) [ORNL/ER-?] Bullet East Fork Poplar Creek Sewer Line Beltway Remedial Investigation Report [DOE/OR/02-1119&D2] Bullet Screening Risk Assessments Bullet Preliminary Assessment of Radiation Doses to the Public from Cesium

367

Analysis of automated highway system risks and uncertainties. Volume 5  

SciTech Connect

This volume describes a risk analysis performed to help identify important Automated Highway System (AHS) deployment uncertainties and quantify their effect on costs and benefits for a range of AHS deployment scenarios. The analysis identified a suite of key factors affecting vehicle and roadway costs, capacities and market penetrations for alternative AHS deployment scenarios. A systematic protocol was utilized for obtaining expert judgments of key factor uncertainties in the form of subjective probability percentile assessments. Based on these assessments, probability distributions on vehicle and roadway costs, capacity and market penetration were developed for the different scenarios. The cost/benefit risk methodology and analysis provide insights by showing how uncertainties in key factors translate into uncertainties in summary cost/benefit indices.

Sicherman, A.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Other Major Litigation of Direct Interest to DOE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2008 2008 Other Major Litigation of Direct Interest to DOE Entergy Corporation v. EPA; PSEG Fossil LLC v. Riverkeeper, Inc.; Utility Water Group v. Riverkeeper, Inc., S. Ct. Nos. 07-588, 07-589, and 07-597. The question presented in this litigation is whether Section 316(b) of the Clean Water Act, 33 U.S.C. 1326(b), authorizes EPA to compare costs and benefits in determining the "best technology available for minimizing adverse environmental impact" at cooling water intake structures. The Second Circuit held that EPA may not engage in cost-benefit analysis in determining the "best technology available," and that consideration of cost is limited to choosing "a less expensive technology that achieves essentially the same results" as the best technology that industry can reasonably bear. EPA did

369

Major Facilities for Materials Research and Related Disciplines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities Facilities for Materials Research and Related Disciplines Major Materials Facilities Committee Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Resources National Research Council NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS Washington, DC 1984 NOTICE: The project that is the subject of this report was approved by the Governing Board of the National Research Council, whose members are drawn from the councils of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the Institute of Medicine. The members of the committee responsible for the report were chosen for their special competences and with regard for appropriate balance. This report has been reviewed by a group other than the authors according to procedures approved by a Report Review Committee con- sisting of members of the National Academy of Sciences, the National

370

Financial News for Major Energy Companies, January - March 2004  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Companies Twenty-four major energy companies reported overall net income (excluding unusual items) of $13.9 billion on revenues of $198.3 billion during the first quarter of 2004 (Q104). The level of net income for Q104 was significantly higher than in the first quarter of 2003 (Q103), rising 18 percent (Table 1). The overall increase in net income was due primarily to slightly higher crude oil prices, higher foreign production of crude oil, and higher refinery throughput. Overall, the petroleum line of business (which includes both oil and natural gas production and petroleum refining/marketing) registered an 8-percent increase in net income between Q103 and Q104, as the 3-percent increase in oil and gas production net income was augmented by a 30-percent increase in refining/marketing net income.

371

NETL: News Release - DOE, Jacksonville Utility Complete Major Clean Coal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

August 2, 2005 August 2, 2005 DOE, Jacksonville Utility Complete Major Clean Coal Technology Project Eight Year Demonstration Project Results in One of World's Cleanest Coal-Based Power Plants WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy and JEA, the public utility of Florida, have achieved a significant milestone in the DOE's Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program by completing a project in which JEA's Northside Generating Station was converted into one of the cleanest burning coal-fired power plants in the world. MORE INFO Read the final project report [PDF-438KB] As part of the 8-year, $320 million cost-shared project, JEA installed state-of-the-art technology known as circulating fluidized bed combustion in a 300?megawatt combustor-triple the size of any previous

372

Review of tribological sinks in six major industries  

SciTech Connect

Friction and material wear occur throughout all industries and are involved in many processes within each industry. These conditions make assessing tribological activity overall in industry very complex and expensive. Therefore, a research strategy to obtain preliminary information on only the most significant industrial tribological sinks was defined. The industries examined were selected according to both the magnitude of overall energy consumption (particularly machine drive) and the known presence of significant tribological sinks. The six industries chosen are as follows: mining, agriculture, primary metals, chemicals/refining, food, and pulp and paper. They were reviewed to identify and characterize the major tribology sinks. It was concluded that wear losses are greater than friction losses, and that reducing wear rates would improve industrial productivity.

Imhoff, C.H.; Brown, D.R.; Hane, G.J.; Hutchinson, R.A.; Erickson, R.; Merriman, T.; Gruber, T.; Barber, S.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Thermal regimes of major volcanic centers: magnetotelluric constraints  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The focus of activity at this laboratory is on applying natural electromagnetic methods along with other geophysical techniques to studying the dynamical processes and thermal regimes associated with centers of major volcanic activity. We are presently emphasizing studies of the Long Valley/Mono Craters Volcanic Complex, the Cascades Volcanic Belt, and the Valles Caldera. This work addresses questions regarding geothermal energy, chemical transport of minerals in the crust, emplacement of economic ore deposits, and optimal siting of drill-holes for scientific purposes. In addition, since much of our work is performed in the intermontane sedimentary basins of the western US (along with testing our field-system in some of the graben structures in the Northeast), there is an application of these studies to developing exploration and interpretational strategies for detecting and delineating structures associated with hydrocarbon reserves.

Hermance, J.F.

1987-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

374

Financial statistics of major US publicly owned electric utilities 1992  

SciTech Connect

The 1992 edition of the Financial Statistics of Major US Publicly Owned Electric Utilities publication presents 4 years (1989 through 1992) of summary financial data and current year detailed financial data on the major publicly owned electric utilities. The objective of the publication is to provide Federal and State governments, industry, and the general public with current and historical data that can be used for policymaking and decisionmaking purposes related to publicly owned electric utility issues. Generator and nongenerator summaries are presented in this publication. Four years of summary financial data are provided. Summaries of generators for fiscal years ending June 30 and December 31, nongenerators for fiscal years ending June 30 and December 31, and summaries of all respondents are provided. The composite tables present aggregates of income statement and balance sheet data, as well as financial indicators. Composite tables also display electric operation and maintenance expenses, electric utility plant, number of consumers, sales of electricity, and operating revenue, and electric energy account data. The primary source of publicly owned financial data is the Form EIA-412, {open_quotes}Annual Report of Public Electric Utilities.{close_quotes} Public electric utilities file this survey on a fiscal year, rather than a calendar year basis, in conformance with their recordkeeping practices. In previous editions of this publication, data were aggregated by the two most commonly reported fiscal years, June 30 and December 31. This omitted approximately 20 percent of the respondents who operate on fiscal years ending in other months. Accordingly, the EIA undertook a review of the Form EIA-412 submissions to determine if alternative classifications of publicly owned electric utilities would permit the inclusion of all respondents.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Relative risks of energy sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper compares the risks associated with various energy sources in an attempt to demonstrate the relative safety of nuclear energy. (JEF)

Haire, M.J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Pollutant Exposure and Health Risk  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TEMcKone@lbl.gov (510) 486-6163 Links Exposure and Risk Assessment Group Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Electricity Grid Energy Analysis Energy...

377

ORISE: Crisis and Risk Communication  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Risk Communication Because a natural disaster, act of terrorism or other public emergency can happen without notice, having a planned, coordinated communication effort is...

378

Dynamic Operational Risk Assessment with Bayesian Network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil/gas and petrochemical plants are complicated and dynamic in nature. Dynamic characteristics include ageing of equipment/components, season changes, stochastic processes, operator response times, inspection and testing time intervals, sequential dependencies of equipment/components and timing of safety system operations, all of which are time dependent criteria that can influence dynamic processes. The conventional risk assessment methodologies can quantify dynamic changes in processes with limited capacity. Therefore, it is important to develop method that can address time-dependent effects. The primary objective of this study is to propose a risk assessment methodology for dynamic systems. In this study, a new technique for dynamic operational risk assessment is developed based on the Bayesian networks, a structure optimal suitable to organize cause-effect relations. The Bayesian network graphically describes the dependencies of variables and the dynamic Bayesian network capture change of variables over time. This study proposes to develop dynamic fault tree for a chemical process system/sub-system and then to map it in Bayesian network so that the developed method can capture dynamic operational changes in process due to sequential dependency of one equipment/component on others. The developed Bayesian network is then extended to the dynamic Bayesian network to demonstrate dynamic operational risk assessment. A case study on a holdup tank problem is provided to illustrate the application of the method. A dryout scenario in the tank is quantified. It has been observed that the developed method is able to provide updated probability different equipment/component failure with time incorporating the sequential dependencies of event occurrence. Another objective of this study is to show parallelism of Bayesian network with other available risk assessment methods such as event tree, HAZOP, FMEA. In this research, an event tree mapping procedure in Bayesian network is described. A case study on a chemical reactor system is provided to illustrate the mapping procedure and to identify factors that have significant influence on an event occurrence. Therefore, this study provides a method for dynamic operational risk assessment capable of providing updated probability of event occurrences considering sequential dependencies with time and a model for mapping event tree in Bayesian network.

Barua, Shubharthi

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Defining resilience within a risk-informed assessment framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The concept of resilience is the subject of considerable discussion in academic, business, and governmental circles. The United States Department of Homeland Security for one has emphasised the need to consider resilience in safeguarding critical infrastructure and key resources. The concept of resilience is complex, multidimensional, and defined differently by different stakeholders. The authors contend that there is a benefit in moving from discussing resilience as an abstraction to defining resilience as a measurable characteristic of a system. This paper proposes defining resilience measures using elements of a traditional risk assessment framework to help clarify the concept of resilience and as a way to provide non-traditional risk information. The authors show various, diverse dimensions of resilience can be quantitatively defined in a common risk assessment framework based on the concept of loss of service. This allows the comparison of options for improving the resilience of infrastructure and presents a means to perform cost-benefit analysis. This paper discusses definitions and key aspects of resilience, presents equations for the risk of loss of infrastructure function that incorporate four key aspects of resilience that could prevent or mitigate that loss, describes proposed resilience factor definitions based on those risk impacts, and provides an example that illustrates how resilience factors would be calculated using a hypothetical scenario.

Coles, Garill A.; Unwin, Stephen D.; Holter, Gregory M.; Bass, Robert B.; Dagle, Jeffery E.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

A design approach to a risk review for fuel cell-based distributed cogeneration systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A risk review of a fuel cell-based distributed co-generation (FC-Based DCG) system was conducted to identify and quantify the major technological system risks in a worst-case scenario. A risk review entails both a risk assessment and a risk analysis of a designed system, and it is part of risk engineering. Thorough literature reviews and expert interviews were conducted in the field of fuel cells. A thorough literature review of the risk engineering field was also conducted. A procedure for a risk review of the FC-Based DCG System was developed. The representative system design was identified by the current DCG design technology. The risk assessment was carried out, identifying the system components and potential failure modes and consequences. Then, using probabilities of failure for the various system components, the risk associated with a particular system design was determined. A Monte Carlo simulation on the total system reliability was used to evaluate the potential for system failure at a time of 1 hour, 5 hours, 10 hours, 50 hours, 100 hours and 500 hours of continuous operation. The original system was found to be acceptable at the initial times, but after 100 hours was predicted to fail. The components which consistently contribute significantly to the overall system risk are the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) and the nickel-metal foam flow fields. A revised system was analyzed with the reliability of the MEA and the Ni-foam set to 100%. After the revision, the components which contributed significantly to the system risk were the pumps. Simulations were run for several alternative systems to provide feedback on risk management suggestions. The risk engineering process developed with the design approach for this research is applicable to any system and it accommodates the use of many different risk engineering tools.

Luthringer, Kristin Lyn

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "major risk factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Software products for risk assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For assessing risks in all environments it is often necessary to use a systematic approach of modeling and simulation with the aim to simplify this process in the framework of designing new technological lines, machines, equipment and processes. Also ... Keywords: crisis management, risk assessment, software products

Jozef Ristvej; Tomas Lovecek

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Equipment Risk and Performance Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report introduces the basis for understanding, developing, and applying a new set of practical, condition-based risk models for substation equipment. Because of the great variety of risks encountered in the power delivery industry and the diversity in utility equipment and business practices, the focus at this stage of the project is at the conceptual level.

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

383

Decision support framework for risk management on sea ports and terminals using fuzzy set theory and evidential reasoning approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As sea ports and terminals are valuable assets, in today's uncertain and complex environment further refinements are needed to assess risks and prioritise protective measures for these critical pieces of logistics infrastructure. The major problem that ... Keywords: Decision support framework, Evidential reasoning (ER), Fuzzy set theory (FST), Ports and terminals operations and management (PTOM), Risk management (RM)

Kambiz Mokhtari; Jun Ren; Charles Roberts; Jin Wang

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Chemical characteristics of the major thermal springs of Montana  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Twenty-one thermal springs in western Montana were sampled for chemical, isotope, and gas compositions. Most of the springs issue dilute to slightly saline sodium-bicarbonate waters of neutral to slightly alkaline pH. A few of the springs issue sodium-mixed anion waters of near neutral pH. Fluoride concentrations are high in most of the thermal waters, up to 18 miligrams per litre, while F/Cl ratios range from 3/1 in the dilute waters to 1/10 in the slightly saline waters. Most of the springs are theoretically in thermodynamic equilibrium with respect to calcite and fluorite. Nitrogen is the major gas escaping from most of the hot springs; however, Hunters Hot Springs issue principally methane. The deuterium content of the hot spring waters is typical of meteoric water in western Montana. Geothermal calculations based on silica concentrations and Na-K-Ca ratios indicate that most of the springs are associated with low temperature aquifers (less than 100/sup 0/C). Chalcedony may be controlling the silica concentrations in these low temperature aquifers even in ''granitic'' terranes.

Mariner, R.H.; Presser, T.S.; Evans, W.C.

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Thermal regimes of major volcanic centers: Magnetotelluric constraints  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The interpretation of geophysical/electromagnetic field data has been used to study dynamical processes in the crust beneath three of the major tectono-volcanic features in North America: the Long Valley/Mono Craters Volcanic Complex in eastern California, the Cascades Volcanic Belt in Oregon, and the Rio Grande Rift in the area of Socorro, New Mexico. Primary accomplishments have been in the area of creating and implementing a variety of 2-D generalized inverse computer codes, and the application of these codes to fields studies on the basin structures and he deep thermal regimes of the above areas. In order to more fully explore the space of allowable models (i.e. those inverse solutions that fit the data equally well), several distinctly different approaches to the 2-D inverse problem have been developed: (1) an overdetermined block inversion; (2) an overdetermined spline inverstion; (3) a generalized underdetermined total inverse which allows one to tradeoff certain attributes of their model, such as minimum structure (flat models), roughness (smooth models), or length (small models). Moreover, we are exploring various approaches for evaluating the resolution model parameters for the above algorithms. 33 refs.

Hermance, J.F.

1989-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

386

The Douglas Factors  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Douglas Factors Douglas Factors The Merit Systems Protection Board in its landmark decision, Douglas vs. Veterans Administration, 5 MSPR 280, established criteria that supervisors must consider in determining an appropriate penalty to impose for an act of employee misconduct. These twelve factors are commonly referred to as "Douglas Factors: (1) The nature and seriousness of the offense, and its relation to the employee's duties, position, and responsibilities, including whether the offense was intentional or technical or inadvertent, or was committed maliciously or for gain, or was frequently repeated; (2) the employee's job level and type of employment, including supervisory or fiduciary role,

387

Pesticide use in banana and plantain production and risk perception among local actors in Talamanca, Costa Rica  

SciTech Connect

The Talamanca County in Costa Rica has large-scale banana and small-scale plantain production, probably causing pesticide exposure in indigenous children. We explored to what extent different community actors are aware of children's pesticide hazards and how their awareness related to socio-economical and cultural conditions. Methods comprised eight focus groups with fathers and mothers separately, 27 semi-structured interviews to key actors, and field observations. As a whole, the indigenous plantain farmers and banana plantation workers had some general knowledge of pesticides concerning crop protection, but little on acute health effects, and hardly any on exposure routes and pathways, and chronic effects. People expressed vague ideas about pesticide risks. Inter-community differences were related to pesticide technologies used in banana and plantain production, employment status on a multinational plantation versus smallholder status, and gender. Compared to formalized practices on transnational company plantations, where workers reported to feel protected, pesticide handling by plantain smallholders was not perceived as hazardous and therefore no safety precautions were applied. Large-scale monoculture was perceived as one of the most important problems leading to pesticide risks in Talamanca on banana plantations, and also on neighboring small plantain farms extending into large areas. Plantain farmers have adopted use of highly toxic pesticides following banana production, but in conditions of extreme poverty. Aerial spraying in banana plantations was considered by most social actors a major determinant of exposure for the population living nearby these plantations, including vulnerable children. We observed violations of legally established aerial spraying distances. Economic considerations were most mentioned as the underlying reason for the pesticide use: economic needs to obtain the production quantity and quality, and pressure to use pesticides by other economic agents such as middlemen. Risk perceptions were modulated by factors such as people's tasks and positions in the production process, gender, and people's possibilities to define their own social conditions (more fatalistic perceptions among banana workers). The challenge for the future is to combine these insights into improved health risk assessment and management that is culturally adequate for each particular community and agricultural context. - Research highlights: {yields} A first study on pesticide risk perception in Costa Rica. {yields} One of the few studies performed in the indigenous populations in Talamanca. {yields} Economic considerations prevailed above health risks in both communities. {yields} Our findings provide valuable information for multiple social actors.

Barraza, Douglas, E-mail: dbarraza@una.ac.cr [Central American Institute for Studies on Toxic Substances, Universidad Nacional, Heredia (Costa Rica) [Central American Institute for Studies on Toxic Substances, Universidad Nacional, Heredia (Costa Rica); Technology and Agrarian Development Group, Wageningen University (Netherlands); Jansen, Kees [Technology and Agrarian Development Group, Wageningen University (Netherlands)] [Technology and Agrarian Development Group, Wageningen University (Netherlands); Wendel de Joode, Berna van; Wesseling, Catharina [Central American Institute for Studies on Toxic Substances, Universidad Nacional, Heredia (Costa Rica)] [Central American Institute for Studies on Toxic Substances, Universidad Nacional, Heredia (Costa Rica)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

388

Table SH3. Total Consumption for Space Heating by Major Fuels Used ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas (billion cf) Major Fuels Used 4 (physical units) Table SH3. Total Consumption for Space Heating by Major Fuels Used, 2005 Physical Units

389

An application of agribusiness strategic planning under risk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agriculture entered a new era with the passage of the 1996 FAIR Act. This new era will likely be associated with increasing risk factors that agribusiness managers must consider in developing appropriate management strategies. Managers who can anticipate the changes in the economic environment and correctly alter their decisions to maximize returns, given an acceptable level of risk will likely improve the agribusiness's chances of success. The objective of this research is to evaluate an agribusiness's strategic plan in a risky economic environment. A firm level, financial risk analysis model (FRAN) will be used to quantify the probabilistic economic outcomes resulting from alternative equity management decisions. The analysis will provide the decision-makers with a tool to evaluate alternative equity management plans of action. Managers will be able to evaluate the likelihood of adverse risk and the benefits of transferring risk to other parties. This case study was applied to a multi-divisional cooperative on the high plains of Texas to validate the model's ability to reasonably reflect the economic activity of the cooperative. Alternative equity management strategies were analyzed and presented to the board of trustees and manager. These decision-makers found the risk management assessment to be valuable in their decision making process.

Laughlin, Charles Tudor

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

10 CFR 830 Major Modification Determination for Replacement of ATR Primary Coolant Pumps and Motors  

SciTech Connect

The continued safe and reliable operation of the ATR is critical to the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) mission. While ATR is safely fulfilling current mission requirements, a variety of aging and obsolescence issues challenge ATR engineering and maintenance personnel’s capability to sustain ATR over the long term. First documented in a series of independent assessments, beginning with an OA Environmental Safety and Health Assessment conducted in 2003, the issues were validated in a detailed Material Condition Assessment (MCA) conducted as a part of the ATR Life Extension Program in 2007.Accordingly, near term replacement of aging and obsolescent original ATR equipment has become important to ensure ATR capability in support of NE’s long term national missions. To that end, a mission needs statement has been prepared for a non-major system acquisition which is comprised of three interdependent subprojects. The first project will replace the existent diesel-electrical bus (E-3), switchgear, and the 50-year-old obsolescent marine diesels with commercial power that is backed with safety related emergency diesel generators, switchgear, and uninterruptible power supply (UPS). The second project, the subject of this major modification determination, will replace the four, obsolete, original primary coolant pumps (PCPs) and motors. Completion of this and the two other age-related projects (replacement of the ATR diesel bus [E-3] and switchgear and replacement of the existent emergency firewater injection system) will resolve major age-related operational issues plus make a significant contribution in sustaining the ATR safety and reliability profile. The major modification criteria evaluation of the project pre-conceptual design identified several issues that lead to the conclusion that the project is a major modification: 1. Evaluation Criteria #3 (Change of existing process). The proposed strategy for equipping the replacement PCPs with VFDs and having the PCPs also function as ECPs will require significant safety basis changes requiring DOE approval. 2. Evaluation Criteria #4 (Use of new technology). The use of VFD and VFD “pump catcher” technology for the PCPs is not currently in use and has not been previously formally reviewed/approved by DOE for ATR. It is noted that VFD technology has several decades of commercial use and experience. However, the ATR probabilistic risk assessment will have to be updated, reflecting the changes for supplying ECP flows including VFD reliability, to confirm that the proposed activity maintains or reduces the CDF for the ATR. 3. Evaluation Criteria #5 (Create the need for new or revised safety SSCs). It is expected that the proposed activity will result in a revised list of safety-related SSCs. Specifically, as currently proposed, the existing ECPs will be deleted from the list. The PCPs and their associated components, picking up the ECP function, will be classified as safety-related active Seismic Category I.

Noel Duckwitz

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Analysis of Haplotype Structure in the Bovine Major Histocompatibility Complex  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to identify and characterize polymorphic markers spanning regions of the bovine major histocompatibility complex (BoLA) to analyze patterns of genetic variation and haplotype structure across diverse cattle breeds with various breed histories and selection pressures. Genetic markers that demonstrated sufficient levels of polymorphism, locus specificity, Mendelian inheritance, and the accurate typing of alleles across diverse haplotypes were chosen to define separate haplotype structures for the BoLA IIb and BoLA IIa-III-I regions and to evaluate breakpoints in linkage disequilibrium within the regions surrounding BoLA IIa-III-I. A total of 23 microsatellites, two SNPSTRs, 62 SNPs, and the alleles of three class IIa genes were selected for use in this study. These markers revealed eleven recombination events, low levels of recombination in BoLA IIa-III-I, a sharp break in haplotype structure in the region centromeric to class IIa, prolonged linkage disequilibrium in the extended class I region, strong conservation of BoLA IIa-III-I haplotype structure, BoLA IIa-III-I homozygous haplotype identity across seven different breeds of cattle, and a small number of common BoLA IIa-III-I haplotypes within the Angus and Holstein breeds. This work demonstrated that 52 SNPs from the Illumina 50K SNPchip could accurately predict BoLA IIa-III-I haplotypes. These 52 SNPs represent tagSNPs that can predict BoLA IIa-III-I genetic variation and could offer a cost-effective means for screening large sample sizes for haplotype/disease association studies in the future.

Fritz, Krista L.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Risk information in support of cost estimates for the Baseline Environmental Management Report (BEMR). Section 1  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL)(1) effort on the overall Baseline Environmental Management Report (BEMR) project consists of four installation-specific work components performed in succession. These components include (1) development of source terms, 92) collection of data and preparation of environmental settings reports, (3) calculation of unit risk factors, and (4) utilization of the unit risk factors in Automated Remedial Action Methodology (ARAM) for computation of target concentrations and cost estimates. This report documents work completed for the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, for components 2 and 3. The product of this phase of the BEMR project is the development of unit factors (i.e., unit transport factors, unit exposure factors, and unit risk factors). Thousands of these unit factors are gene rated and fill approximately one megabyte of computer information per installation. The final unit risk factors (URF) are transmitted electronically to BEMR-Cost task personnel as input to a computer program (ARAM). Abstracted files and exhibits of the URF information are included in this report. These visual formats are intended to provide a sample of the final task deliverable (the URF files) which can be easily read without a computer.

Gelston, G.M.; Jarvis, M.F.; Warren, B.R. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Von Berg, R. [ICF Kaiser Engineers, Inc., Oakland, CA (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Capital Requirements, Risk Measures and Comonotonicity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we examine and summarize properties of several well-known risk measures, with special attention given to the class of distortion risk measures. We investigate the relationship between these risk measures and theories of choice under risk. We also consider the problem of evaluating risk measures for sums of nonindependent random variables and propose approximations based on the concept of comonotonicity.

Jan Dhaene; Steven Vanduffel; Qihe Tang; Marc J. Goovaerts; Rob Kaas; David Vyncke; Robkaas Davidvyncke

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Financial risk measurement with imprecise probabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although financial risk measurement is a largely investigated research area, its relationship with imprecise probabilities has been mostly overlooked. However, risk measures can be viewed as instances of upper (or lower) previsions, thus letting us apply ... Keywords: Coherent and convex risk measures, Dilation, Envelope theorems, Imprecise previsions, Natural extension, Risk measures, Shortfall, Value-at-Risk (VaR)

Paolo Vicig

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Profiling risk sensibility through association rules  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the last recent years several approaches to risk assessment and risk management have been adopted to reduce the potential for specific risks in working environments. A safety culture has also developed to let workers acquire knowledge and understanding ... Keywords: Association rules, Frequent patterns, Risk perception, Risk propensity

Beatrice Lazzerini; Francesco Pistolesi

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Airport risk assessment: a probabilistic approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Risk reduction is one of the key objectives pursued by transport safety policies. Particularly, the formulation and implementation of transport safety policies needs the systematic assessment of the risks, the specification of residual risk targets and ... Keywords: risk assessment methodology, risk management, safety civil aviation

L. Guerra; T. Murino; E. Romano

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Security risk assessment: toward a comprehensive practical risk management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper introduces a unique approach to a more integrated security risk assessment SRA. This is formalised based on the proven mathematical methods described in various articles in the literature and combined with the work developed by the author. ...

Danilo Valeros Bernardo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Risk-Based Production Optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the pilot application of a risk-informed approach to production optimization at fossil power plants. In this project, EPRI worked with a U.S. utility to develop risk profiles for plant components at two of the utilitys coal-fired generating units. The information was then used as a basis for identifying timing strategies for performing outage-based maintenance. The primary objective was to apply a risk-informed approach to identifying an optimal sequence of outage intervals and scop...

2011-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

399

Buying electricity: Bounding the risks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dr. Berry`s article draws upon his review of dozens of electrical contracts while he was with the staff of the Arizona Corporation Commission. He presents risk management strategies for commercial and industrial consumers of power as electric markets become more competitive. Seven risk management tools are discussed: get more information about market prices; seek or make credible commitments; try to retain flexibility; seek to share, transfer, or spread risks; use incentives to help improve or offset poor performance; manage the use of electricity; and build trust with the supplier.

Berry, D. [Resource Management International, Inc., Sacramento, CA (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

LED traffic lights: New technology signals major energy savings  

SciTech Connect

Using light-emitting diode technology to replace incandescent lamps in traffic signals promises energy savings upwards of 60 percent for each of the estimated quarter of a million controlled intersections in the United States. LED units use only 9 to 25 watts instead of the 67 to 150 watts used by each incandescent lamp. Though their first cost is relatively high, energy savings result in paybacks of 1 to 5 years. LED retrofit kits are available for red signal disks and arrows, and installations in several states have proven successful, although minor improvements are addressing concerns about varying light output and controller circuitry. Retrofitting green lamps is not yet feasible, because color standards of the Institute of Traffic Engineers cannot be met with existing LED technology. Yellow lamps have such low duty factors (they`re on only 3 percent of the time) that retrofitting with LED signals is not cost-effective. LEDs last much longer than incandescents, allowing municipalities to not only reduce their electricity bills, but to save on maintenance costs as well. As further incentive, some utilities are beginning to implement rebate programs for LED traffic signal retrofits. Full approval of LED units is still awaited from the Institute of Traffic Engineers (ITE), the standard-setting body for traffic safety devices. Local and state governments ultimately decide what specifications to require for traffic lights, and the growing body of successful field experience with LEDs appears to be raising their comfort level with the technology. The California Department of Transportation is developing an LED traffic light specification, and two California utilities, Southern California Edison and Pacific Gas and Electric, have provided rebates for some pilot installations.

Houghton, D.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "major risk factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Conversion factors for energy equivalents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Conversion factors for energy equivalents, For your convenience, you may convert energies online below. Or display factors as: ...

402

BCL2 major breakpoint region (mbr) may specify an origin of replication  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have described a minisatellite consensus signal, GC[A/T]GG[A/T]GG, which resembles the prokaryotic activator of recombination, {chi}. The consensus appears frequently at the breakpoints of oncogene translocations, especially those in which the V(D)J recombinase has been implicated. We have investigated this relationship by examining the breakpoint positions and DNA sequence of many mbr translations from human follicular lymphomas. Breakpoints occur in three, evenly-spaced clusters 14-18 bp wide and 50 bp apart; the first cluster begins at the first base 3{prime} to the {chi} signal. At the end of cluster 3, translocations abruptly decline in frequency. We now report that this region is characterized by multiple binding sites for both single- and double-strand DNA binding proteins. Furthermore, the binding sites immediately flank clusters 1 and 3, thus defining the region at risk for translocation. The two single-strand binding proteins, one each for the sense and anti-sense strand of BCL2, bind the {chi} signal that marks the onset of translocation. The second binding site, which begins at the 3{prime} flank of cluster 3, extends a further 80 bp downstream and is absolutely required for the interaction of the mbr with factor(s) which can denature the target DNA in a cell-specific fashion. This process requires energy, as complex formation is inhibited by ATP{gamma}S. One of the two ssDNA binding proteins and, possibly, the helicase activity are expressed in a cell-cycle-dependent fashion. Finally, helical stability studies of the helicase binding region yield a profile comparable to those previously defined for several viral, yeast, and bacterial origins of replication. These studies indicate that BCL2 translocation may reflect (1) a requirement for removing a replication origin from the gene to promote lymphomagenesis and/or (2) the recombinogenic nature of such structures.

DiCroce, P.A.; Bailey, S.; Hagins, W.C. [Tufts-New England Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States)] [and others

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Legal factors affecting the financing of small scale hydroelectric projects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An introduction to the major business organizational options open to small-scale hydroelectric (SSH) projects is given. The major federal income tax treatments of these options are compared. Significant general federal income tax factors affecting SSH projects are reintroduced and explained. Some of the special federal income tax problem areas in SSH development are isolated. Tax benefit flow through or transfer mechanisms are discussed. Tax exempt financing opportunities for private SSH projects are reviewed. (MHR)

Wilson, W.H.; Ringo, M.J.; Forgione, N.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Risk Aversion in Inventory Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Traditional inventory models focus on risk-neutral decision makers, i.e., characterizing replenishment strategies that maximize expected total profit, or equivalently, minimize expected total cost over a planning horizon. ...

Chen, Xin

405

Risk View Software Functional Specification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report defines the functional requirements for a new Risk View software product to be developed as part of the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI's) Operations and Maintenance Excellence (OMX) initiative. plant information sources.

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

406

Hanford Site cleanup and transition: Risk data needs for decision making (Hanford risk data gap analysis decision guide)  

SciTech Connect

Given the broad array of environmental problems, technical alternatives, and outcomes desired by different stakeholders at Hanford, DOE will have to make difficult resource allocations over the next few decades. Although some of these allocations will be driven purely by legal requirements, almost all of the major objectives of the cleanup and economic transition missions involve choices among alternative pathways. This study examined the following questions: what risk information is needed to make good decisions at Hanford; how do those data needs compare to the set(s) of risk data that will be generated by regulatory compliance activities and various non-compliance studies that are also concerned with risk? This analysis examined the Hanford Site missions, the Hanford Strategic Plan, known stakeholder values, and the most important decisions that have to be made at Hanford to determine a minimum domain of risk information required to make good decisions that will withstand legal, political, and technical scrutiny. The primary risk categories include (1) public health, (2) occupational health and safety, (3) ecological integrity, (4) cultural-religious welfare, and (5) socio-economic welfare.

Gajewski, S.; Glantz, C.; Harper, B.; Bilyard, G.; Miller, P.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Risk-Informed Asset Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains business requirements for Risk-Informed Asset Management (RIAM) software. The requirements pertain to both a full-blown version of RIAM (including uncertainty analysis of the economic and safety risk of a proposed equipment improvement project) and for RIAM Level 1 project screening software. The RIAM Level 1 analysis is a bounding process intended to estimate the most optimistic effect that the proposed investment would have on plant safety, cost, and revenue. The optimistic assumpt...

2006-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

408

Demand Response and Risk Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For several decades, power companies have deployed various types of demand response (DR), such as interruptible contracts, and there is substantial ongoing research and development on sophisticated mechanisms for triggering DR. In this white paper, EPRI discusses the increasing use of electricity DR in the power industry and how this will affect the practice of energy risk management. This paper outlines 1) characteristics of a common approach to energy risk management, 2) the variety of types of DR impl...

2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

409

A Risk-Based Sensor Placement Methodology  

SciTech Connect

A sensor placement methodology is proposed to solve the problem of optimal location of sensors or detectors to protect population against the exposure to and effects of known and/or postulated chemical, biological, and/or radiological threats. Historical meteorological data are used to characterize weather conditions as wind speed and direction pairs with the percentage of occurrence of the pairs over the historical period. The meteorological data drive atmospheric transport and dispersion modeling of the threats, the results of which are used to calculate population at risk against standard exposure levels. Sensor locations are determined via a dynamic programming algorithm where threats captured or detected by sensors placed in prior stages are removed from consideration in subsequent stages. Moreover, the proposed methodology provides a quantification of the marginal utility of each additional sensor or detector. Thus, the criterion for halting the iterative process can be the number of detectors available, a threshold marginal utility value, or the cumulative detection of a minimum factor of the total risk value represented by all threats.

Lee, Ronald W [ORNL; Kulesz, James J [ORNL

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Heavy Water Components Test Reactor Decommissioning - Major Component Removal  

SciTech Connect

The Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR) facility (Figure 1) was built in 1961, operated from 1962 to 1964, and is located in the northwest quadrant of the Savannah River Site (SRS) approximately three miles from the site boundary. The HWCTR facility is on high, well-drained ground, about 30 meters above the water table. The HWCTR was a pressurized heavy water test reactor used to develop candidate fuel designs for heavy water power reactors. It was not a defense-related facility like the materials production reactors at SRS. The reactor was moderated with heavy water and was rated at 50 megawatts thermal power. In December of 1964, operations were terminated and the facility was placed in a standby condition as a result of the decision by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission to redirect research and development work on heavy water power reactors to reactors cooled with organic materials. For about one year, site personnel maintained the facility in a standby status, and then retired the reactor in place. In 1965, fuel assemblies were removed, systems that contained heavy water were drained, fluid piping systems were drained, deenergized and disconnected and the spent fuel basin was drained and dried. The doors of the reactor facility were shut and it wasn't until 10 years later that decommissioning plans were considered and ultimately postponed due to budget constraints. In the early 1990s, DOE began planning to decommission HWCTR again. Yet, in the face of new budget constraints, DOE deferred dismantlement and placed HWCTR in an extended surveillance and maintenance mode. The doors of the reactor facility were welded shut to protect workers and discourage intruders. The $1.6 billion allocation from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to SRS for site clean up at SRS has opened the doors to the HWCTR again - this time for final decommissioning. During the lifetime of HWCTR, 36 different fuel assemblies were tested in the facility. Ten of these experienced cladding failures as operational capabilities of the different designs were being established. In addition, numerous spills of heavy water occurred within the facility. Currently, radiation and radioactive contamination levels are low within HWCTR with most of the radioactivity contained within the reactor vessel. There are no known insults to the environment, however with the increasing deterioration of the facility, the possibility exists that contamination could spread outside the facility if it is not decommissioned. An interior panoramic view of the ground floor elevation taken in August 2009 is shown in Figure 2. The foreground shows the transfer coffin followed by the reactor vessel and control rod drive platform in the center. Behind the reactor vessel is the fuel pool. Above the ground level are the polar crane and the emergency deluge tank at the top of the dome. Note the considerable rust and degradation of the components and the interior of the containment building. Alternative studies have concluded that the most environmentally safe, cost effective option for final decommissioning is to remove the reactor vessel, steam generators, and all equipment above grade including the dome. Characterization studies along with transport models have concluded that the remaining below grade equipment that is left in place including the transfer coffin will not contribute any significant contamination to the environment in the future. The below grade space will be grouted in place. A concrete cover will be placed over the remaining footprint and the groundwater will be monitored for an indefinite period to ensure compliance with environmental regulations. The schedule for completion of decommissioning is late FY2011. This paper describes the concepts planned in order to remove the major components including the dome, the reactor vessel (RV), the two steam generators (SG), and relocating the transfer coffin (TC).

Austin, W.; Brinkley, D.

2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

411

Heavy Water Components Test Reactor Decommissioning - Major Component Removal  

SciTech Connect

The Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR) facility (Figure 1) was built in 1961, operated from 1962 to 1964, and is located in the northwest quadrant of the Savannah River Site (SRS) approximately three miles from the site boundary. The HWCTR facility is on high, well-drained ground, about 30 meters above the water table. The HWCTR was a pressurized heavy water test reactor used to develop candidate fuel designs for heavy water power reactors. It was not a defense-related facility like the materials production reactors at SRS. The reactor was moderated with heavy water and was rated at 50 megawatts thermal power. In December of 1964, operations were terminated and the facility was placed in a standby condition as a result of the decision by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission to redirect research and development work on heavy water power reactors to reactors cooled with organic materials. For about one year, site personnel maintained the facility in a standby status, and then retired the reactor in place. In 1965, fuel assemblies were removed, systems that contained heavy water were drained, fluid piping systems were drained, deenergized and disconnected and the spent fuel basin was drained and dried. The doors of the reactor facility were shut and it wasn't until 10 years later that decommissioning plans were considered and ultimately postponed due to budget constraints. In the early 1990s, DOE began planning to decommission HWCTR again. Yet, in the face of new budget constraints, DOE deferred dismantlement and placed HWCTR in an extended surveillance and maintenance mode. The doors of the reactor facility were welded shut to protect workers and discourage intruders. The $1.6 billion allocation from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to SRS for site clean up at SRS has opened the doors to the HWCTR again - this time for final decommissioning. During the lifetime of HWCTR, 36 different fuel assemblies were tested in the facility. Ten of these experienced cladding failures as operational capabilities of the different designs were being established. In addition, numerous spills of heavy water occurred within the facility. Currently, radiation and radioactive contamination levels are low within HWCTR with most of the radioactivity contained within the reactor vessel. There are no known insults to the environment, however with the increasing deterioration of the facility, the possibility exists that contamination could spread outside the facility if it is not decommissioned. An interior panoramic view of the ground floor elevation taken in August 2009 is shown in Figure 2. The foreground shows the transfer coffin followed by the reactor vessel and control rod drive platform in the center. Behind the reactor vessel is the fuel pool. Above the ground level are the polar crane and the emergency deluge tank at the top of the dome. Note the considerable rust and degradation of the components and the interior of the containment building. Alternative studies have concluded that the most environmentally safe, cost effective option for final decommissioning is to remove the reactor vessel, steam generators, and all equipment above grade including the dome. Characterization studies along with transport models have concluded that the remaining below grade equipment that is left in place including the transfer coffin will not contribute any significant contamination to the environment in the future. The below grade space will be grouted in place. A concrete cover will be placed over the remaining footprint and the groundwater will be monitored for an indefinite period to ensure compliance with environmental regulations. The schedule for completion of decommissioning is late FY2011. This paper describes the concepts planned in order to remove the major components including the dome, the reactor vessel (RV), the two steam generators (SG), and relocating the transfer coffin (TC).

Austin, W.; Brinkley, D.

2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

412

Qualitative methods for assessing risk  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy`s (DOE) non-nuclear facilities generally require only a qualitative accident analysis to assess facility risks in accordance with DOE Order 5481.1B, Safety Analysis and Review System. Achieving a meaningful qualitative assessment of risk necessarily requires the use of suitable non-numerical assessment criteria. Typically, the methods and criteria for assigning facility-specific accident scenarios to the qualitative severity and likelihood classification system in the DOE order requires significant judgment in many applications. Systematic methods for more consistently assigning the total accident scenario frequency and associated consequences are required to substantiate and enhance future risk ranking between various activities at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). SNL`s Risk Management and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Department has developed an improved methodology for performing qualitative risk assessments in accordance wi the DOE order requirements. Products of this effort are an improved set of qualitative description that permit (1) definition of the severity for both technical and programmatic consequences that may result from a variety of accident scenarios, and (2) qualitative representation of the likelihood of occurrence. These sets of descriptions are intended to facilitate proper application of DOE criteria for assessing facility risks.

Mahn, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hannaman, G.W. [Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (United States); Kryska, P. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Electrical and Production Load Factors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Load factors are an important simplification of electrical energy use data and depend on the ratio of average demand to peak demand. Based on operating hours of a facility they serve as an important benchmarking tool for the industrial sector. The operating hours of small and medium sized manufacturing facilities are analyzed to identify the most common operating hour or shift work patterns. About 75% of manufacturing facilities fall into expected operating hour patterns with operating hours near 40, 80, 120 and 168 hours/week. Two types of load factors, electrical and production are computed for each shift classification within major industry categories in the U.S. The load factor based on monthly billing hours (ELF) increases with operating hours from about 0.4 for a nominal one shift operation, to about 0.7 for around-the-clock operation. On the other hand, the load factor based on production hours (PLF) shows an inverse trend, varying from about 1.4 for one shift operation to 0.7 for around-the-clock operation. When used as a diagnostic tool, if the PLF exceeds unity, then unnecessary energy consumption may be taking place. For plants operating at 40 hours per week, the ELF value was found to greater than the theoretical maximum, while the PLF value was greater than one, suggesting that these facilities may have significant energy usage outside production hours. The data for the PLF however, is more scattered for plants operating less than 80 hours per week, indicating that grouping PLF data based on operating hours may not be a reasonable approach to benchmarking energy use in industries. This analysis uses annual electricity consumption and demand along with operating hour data of manufacturing plants available in the U.S. Department of Energy’s Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) database. The annual values are used because more desirable monthly data are not available. Monthly data are preferred as they capture the load profile of the facility more accurately. The data there come from Industrial Assessment Centers which employ university engineering students, faculty and staff to perform energy assessments for small to medium-sized manufacturing plants. The nation-wide IAC program is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy.

Sen, Tapajyoti

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

factors | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

36 36 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142253836 Varnish cache server factors Dataset Summary Description This dataset is from the report Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature (J. Macknick, R. Newmark, G. Heath and K.C. Hallett) and provides estimates of operational water withdrawal and water consumption factors for electricity generating technologies in the United States. Estimates of water factors were collected from published primary literature and were not modified except for unit conversions. Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released August 28th, 2012 (2 years ago)

415

Pursuing Energy Efficiency as a Hedge Against Carbon Regulatory Risks  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pursuing Energy Efficiency as a Hedge Against Carbon Regulatory Risks Pursuing Energy Efficiency as a Hedge Against Carbon Regulatory Risks Current Resource Planning Practices in the West Title Pursuing Energy Efficiency as a Hedge Against Carbon Regulatory Risks Current Resource Planning Practices in the West Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2008 Authors Barbose, Galen L., Ryan H. Wiser, Amol Phadke, and Charles A. Goldman Pagination 12 Date Published 08/2008 Publisher LBNL City Berkeley Keywords electric utilities, electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, energy efficiency, power system planning Abstract Uncertainty surrounding the nature and timing of future carbon regulations poses a fundamental and far-reaching financial risk for electric utilities and their ratepayers. Long-term resource planning provides a potential framework within which utilities can assess carbon regulatory risk and evaluate options for mitigating exposure to this risk through investments in energy efficiency and other low-carbon resources. In this paper, we examine current resource planning practices related to managing carbon regulatory risk, based on a comparative analysis of the most-recent long-term resource plans filed by fifteen major utilities in the Western U.S. First, we compare the assumptions and methods used by utilities to assess carbon regulatory risk and to evaluate energy efficiency as a risk mitigation option. Although most utilities have made important strides in beginning to address carbon regulatory risk within their resource plan, we also identify a number of opportunities for improvement and offer recommendations for resource planners and state regulators to consider. We also summarize the composition and carbon intensity of the preferred resource portfolios selected by the fifteen Western utilities, highlighting the contribution of energy efficiency and its impact on the carbon intensity of utilities' proposed resource strategies. Energy efficiency and renewables are the dominant low-carbon resources included in utilities' preferred portfolios. Across the fifteen utilities, energy efficiency constitutes anywhere from 6% to almost 50% of the preferred portfolio energy resources, and represents 22% of all incremental resources in aggregate.

416

Problem Formulations for Ecological Risk Assessments Conducted...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- deformities, fin erosion, lesions, and tumors ERA - ecological risk assessment HHRA - human health risk assessments ow K - octanol-water partition coefficients oc K - organic...

417

Environmental Risks of Depleted UF6 Disposal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Depleted UF6 Environmental Risks line line Storage Conversion Manufacturing Disposal Environmental Risks of Depleted UF6 Disposal A discussion of the environmental impacts...

418

Risk Management Tool Attributes: | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management Tool Attributes: More Documents & Publications Software Development Risk Assessment Risk Management RM Categorizing Threat Building and Using a Generic Threat Matrix...

419

Risk communication: Uncertainties and the numbers game  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The science of risk assessment seeks to characterize the potential risk in situations that may pose hazards to human health or the environment. However, the conclusions reached by the scientists and engineers are not an end in themselves - they are passed on to the involved companies, government agencies, legislators, and the public. All interested parties must then decide what to do with the information. Risk communication is a type of technical communication that involves some unique challenges. This paper first defines the relationships between risk assessment, risk management, and risk communication and then explores two issues in risk communication: addressing uncertainty and putting risk number into perspective.

Ortigara, M. [ed.

1995-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

420

Interactive graphics for communicating health risks.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Materials for consumer informatics, patient decision support, and health promotion frequently incorporate quantitative risks such as percentages, rates, or proportions. These risks are frequently… (more)

Ancker, Jessica S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "major risk factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Market risk analysis of coal liquefaction.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study addresses the risks associated with coal liquefaction using a market risk simulation approach. The study can be divided into four phases: (i) identify… (more)

Mei, Huan.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Arsenic Cancer Risk Assessment: Recent Advances & Next Steps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, there has been an on-going debate on the appropriate regulatory approach for evaluating the carcinogenicity of inorganic arsenic compounds, specifically in the best methods and data sources for establishing a cancer potency, or cancer slope factor (CSF). The CSF is applied to the development of environmental standards, regulation and risk assessments under a variety of federal and state programs. Currently, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) continues to rely on chemical non-...

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

423

Price risk management: Electric power vs. natural gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As deregulation continues, will electricity resemble gas as a commodity, when it comes to futures markets and forward deals? Overall, yes; the signs are there. But differences will remain-in volatility, the prominence of regional factors, and the importance of shortrun engineering fundamentals. This article examines these differences and concludes that engineering and economic analyses will prove more important in the future in assessing risk in the electric power commodity market than in the gas industry.

Rose, J.; Mann, C. [ICF Kaiser International, Inc., Fairfax, VA (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

FGF growth factor analogs  

SciTech Connect

The present invention provides a fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the formula: ##STR00001## where R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4, R.sub.5, X, Y and Z are as defined, pharmaceutical compositions, coating compositions and medical devices including the fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the foregoing formula, and methods and uses thereof.

Zamora, Paul O. (Gaithersburg, MD); Pena, Louis A. (Poquott, NY); Lin, Xinhua (Plainview, NY); Takahashi, Kazuyuki (Germantown, MD)

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

425

Optimizing Power Factor Correction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The optimal investment for power factor correcting capacitors for Kansas Power and Light Company large power contract customers is studied. Since the billing capacity is determined by dividing the real demand by the power factor (the minimum billing capacity is based on 80 percent of the summer peak billing capacity) and the billing capacity is used to determine the number of kilowatt-hours billed at each pricing tier, the power factor affects both the demand and the energy charge. There is almost no information available in the literature concerning recommended power factor corrections for this situation. The general advice commonly given in the past has been that power factor should be corrected to above 0.9 if it is below that value to begin with, but that does not take into account the facts of the situation studied here. Calculations relevant to a commercial consumer of electricity were made for demands of 200, 400, 800, 1,600, 3,200, and 6,400 kW and monthly energy consumption periods of 100, 150, 200, 300, 400, and 500 hours for several capacitor purchase and installation costs. The results are displayed in a series of graphs that enable annual cost savings and payback periods to be readily determined over a range of commonly encountered parameter values. It is found that it is often economically advantageous to correct a power factor to near unity.

Phillips, R. K.; Burmeister, L. C.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Accelerated cleanup risk reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is no proven technology for remediating contaminant plume source regions in a heterogeneous subsurface. This project is an interdisciplinary effort to develop the requisite new technologies so that will be rapidly accepted by the remediation community. Our technology focus is hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation (HPO) which is a novel in situ thermal technique. We have expanded this core technology to leverage the action of steam injection and place an in situ microbial filter downstream to intercept and destroy the accelerated movement of contaminated groundwater. Most contaminant plume source regions, including the chlorinated solvent plume at LLNL, are in subsurface media characterized by a wide range in hydraulic conductivity. At LLNL, the main conduits for contaminant transport are buried stream channels composed of gravels and sands; these have a hydraulic conductivity in the range of 10{sup -1} to 10{sup -2} cm/s. Clay and silt units with a hydraulic conductivity of 10{sup -1} to 10{sup -6} cm/s bound these buried channels; these are barriers to groundwater movement and contain the highest contaminant concentrations in the source region. New remediation technologies are required because the current ones preferentially access the high conductivity units. HPO is an innovative process for the in situ destruction of contaminants in the entire subsurface. It operates by the injection of steam. We have demonstrated in laboratory experiments that many contaminants rapidly oxidize to harmless compounds at temperatures easily achieved by injecting steam, provided sufficient dissolved oxygen is present. One important challenge in a heterogeneous source region is getting heat, contaminants, and an oxidizing agent in the same place at the same time. We have used the NUFT computer program to simulate the cyclic injection of steam into a contaminated aquifer for design of a field demonstration. We used an 8 hour, steam/oxygen injection cycle followed by a 56 hour relaxation period in which the well was `capped`. Our results show the formation of an inclined gas phase during injection and a fast collapse of the steam zone within an hour of terminating steam injection. The majority of destruction occurs during the collapse phase, when contaminant laden water is drawn back towards the well. Little to no noncondensible gasses are created in this process, removing any possibility of sparging processes interfering with contaminant destruction. Our models suggest that the thermal region should be as hot and as large as possible. To have HPO accepted, we need to demonstrate the in situ destruction of contaminants. This requires the ability to inexpensively sample at depth and under high temperatures. We proved the ability to implies monitoring points at depths exceeding 150 feet in highly heterogeneous soils by use of cone penetrometry. In addition, an extractive system has been developed for sampling fluids and measuring their chemistry under the range of extreme conditions expected. We conducted a collaborative field test of HPO at a Superfund site in southern California where the contaminant is mainly creosote and pentachlorophenol. Field results confirm the destruction of contaminants by HPO, validate our field design from simulations, demonstrate that accurate field measurements of the critical fluid parameters can be obtained using existing monitoring wells (and minimal capital cost) and yield reliable cost estimates for future commercial application. We also tested the in situ microbial filter technology as a means to intercept and destroy the accelerated flow of contaminants caused by the injection of steam. A series of laboratory and field tests revealed that the selected bacterial species effectively degrades trichloroethene in LLNL Groundwater and under LLNL site conditions. In addition, it was demonstrated that the bacteria effectively attach to the LLNL subsurface media. An in-well treatability study indicated that the bacteria initially degrade greater than 99% of the contaminant, to concentrations less than regulatory limit

Knapp, R.B.; Aines, R.M.; Blake, R.G.; Copeland, A.B.; Newmark, R.L.; Tompson, A.F.B.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

SC Introduction to Risk Management | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

are here Home SC Introduction to Risk Management SC Introduction to Risk Management SC Introduction to Risk Management More Documents & Publications LPP Risk Management Plan...

428

Reliability based investigation of design factors  

SciTech Connect

Second-moment probabilistic techniques are used to formulate structural resistances and loads and to derive reliability-based safety, load, and strength factors for design. Existing concepts of the second-moment reliability theory have been extended to the practical case of multiple load combinations. This development consistently includes the stochastic character of loads and the unpredictable nature of their combinations. For this purpose, a new technique for the evaluation of load combinations is presented, whereby the moments of the extreme of combined loads is obtained in terms of the moments of individual loads and parameters describing their random fluctuations in time. Reliability-based safety, load, and strength factors are derived in terms of the acceptable level of risk, the coefficients of variation of the loads and resistance, uncertainties associated with errors in modeling and estimation, and a set of parameters describing the stochastic nature of loads and their combinations.

1978-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

429

Risk Management Process Overview | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

» Risk Management Process Overview » Risk Management Process Overview Risk Management Process Overview figure depicting three tier risk management process The cybersecurity risk management process explained in the Electricity Sector Cybersecurity Risk Management Process (RMP) Guideline has two primary components: the risk management model and the the risk management cycle. The risk management model reflects the organization as a three-tiered structure and provides a comprehensive view for the electricity sector organization and how risk management activities are undertaken across the organization. This structure is simple enough that it can be applied to any electricity sector organization regardless of size or operations. The three tiers of the risk management model are: Tier 1: Organization

430

Stage I-IIA Non-Bulky Hodgkin's Lymphoma. Is Further Distinction Based on Prognostic Factors Useful? The Stanford Experience  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: In the United States, early-stage Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) is defined as asymptomatic stage I/II non-bulky disease. European groups stratify patients to more intense treatment by considering additional unfavorable factors, such as age, number of nodal sites, sedimentation rate, extranodal disease, and elements of the international prognostic score for advanced HL. We sought to determine the prognostic significance of these factors in patients with early-stage disease treated at Stanford University Medical Center. Methods and Materials: This study was a retrospective analysis of 101 patients treated with abbreviated Stanford V chemotherapy (8 weeks) and 30-Gy (n = 84 patients) or 20-Gy (n = 17 patients) radiotherapy to involved sites. Outcomes were assessed after applying European risk factors. Results: At a median follow-up of 8.5 years, freedom from progression (FFP) and overall survival (OS) rates were 94% and 97%, respectively. From 33% to 60% of our patients were unfavorable per European criteria (i.e., German Hodgkin Study Group [GHSG], n = 55%; European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, n = 33%; and Groupe d'Etudes des Lymphomes de l'Adulte, n = 61%). Differences in FFP rates between favorable and unfavorable patients were significant only for GHSG criteria (p = 0.02) with there were no differences in OS rates for any criteria. Five of 6 patients who relapsed were successfully salvaged. Conclusions: The majority of our patients deemed unfavorable had an excellent outcome despite undergoing a significantly abbreviated regimen. Application of factors used by the GHSG defined a less favorable subset for FFP but with no impact on OS. As therapy for early-stage disease moves to further reductions in therapy, these factors take on added importance in the interpretation of current trial results and design of future studies.

Advani, Ranjana H., E-mail: radvani@stanford.edu [Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California (United States); Hoppe, Richard T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California (United States); Maeda, Lauren S. [Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California (United States); Baer, David M. [Northern California Kaiser Permanente, Oakland, California (United States); Mason, Joseph [Northern California Kaiser Permanente, San Jose, California (United States); Rosenberg, Saul A.; Horning, Sandra J. [Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California (United States)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Risk analysis for tunneling projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tunnel construction is increasing world wide. Although the majority of tunnel construction projects have been completed safely, there have been several incidents that have resulted in delays, cost overruns, and sometimes ...

Sousa. Rita L

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Radiocesium discharges and subsequent environmental transport at the major US weapons production facilities  

SciTech Connect

Radiocesium is one of the more prevalent radionuclides in the environment as a result of weapons production-related atomic projects in the USA and the former Soviet Union. Radiocesium discharges during the 1950s account for a large fraction of the historical releases from US weapons production facilities. Releases of radiocesium to terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems during the early years of nuclear weapons production provided the opportunity to conduct multidisciplinary studies on the transport mechanisms of this potentially hazardous radionuclide. The major US Department of Energy facilities (Oak Ridge Reservation in Tennessee, Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, and Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina, USA) are located in regions of the country that have different geographical characteristics. The facility siting provided diverse backgrounds for the development of an understanding of environmental factors contributing to the fate and transport of radiocesium. In this paper, we summarize the significant environmental releases of radiocesium in the early years of weapons production and then discuss the historically significant transport mechanisms for {sup 137}Cs at the three facilities that were part of the US nuclear weapons complex.

Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Hamby, D. M. [Oregon State University; Schreckhise, R. G. [Washington State University

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Radiocesium Discharges and Subsequent Environmental Transport at the Major U.S. Weapons Production Facilities  

SciTech Connect

Radiocesium is one of the more prevalent radionuclides in the environment as a result of weapons production related atomic projects in the United States and the former Soviet Union. Radiocesium discharges during the 1950's account for a large fraction of the historical releases from U.S. weapons production facilities. Releases of radiocesium to terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems during the early ,years of nuclear weapons production provided the opportunity to conduct multidisciplinary studies on the transport mechanisms of this potentially hazardous radionuclide. The major U.S. Department of Energy facilities (Oak Ridge Reservation in Tennessee, Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, and Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina) are located in regions of the country that have different geographical characteristics. The facility siting provided diverse backgrounds for the development of an understanding of environmental factors contributing to the fate and transport of radiocesium. In this paper, we summarize the significant environmental releases of radiocesium in the early -years of weapons production and then discuss the historically significant transport mechanisms for r37Cs at the three facilities that were part of the U.S. nuclear weapons complex.

Garten, Jr. C.T.; Hamby, D.M.; Schreckhise, R.G.

1999-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

434

Climate change risk and response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on context-specific factors. Desalination remains a backstopexpects the use of desalination to increase from currentby 2030 (DWR, 2005). 6 Desalination, while a useful pressure

Kahrl, Fredrich; Roland-Holst, David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

011B. Office of Research and Development, Washington, D.C. 1992. Exposure Factors Handbook. EPA6008- 89043. Office of Health and Environmental Assessment, Washington, D.C....

436

Risk identification and assessment for build-operate-transfer projects: A fuzzy multi attribute decision making model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, BOT approach has provided an increasingly popular project financing to move toward infrastructure development in Asian countries such as Iran. There are many complexities in projects because of the variety of factors in project's trend ... Keywords: BOT projects, FMADM, Risk identification, Risk ranking

Sadoullah Ebrahimnejad; Seyed Meysam Mousavi; Hamed Seyrafianpour

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

A total risk assessment methodology for security assessment.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories performed a two-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development project to develop a new collaborative risk assessment method to enable decision makers to fully consider the interrelationships between threat, vulnerability, and consequence. A five-step Total Risk Assessment Methodology was developed to enable interdisciplinary collaborative risk assessment by experts from these disciplines. The objective of this process is promote effective risk management by enabling analysts to identify scenarios that are simultaneously achievable by an adversary, desirable to the adversary, and of concern to the system owner or to society. The basic steps are risk identification, collaborative scenario refinement and evaluation, scenario cohort identification and risk ranking, threat chain mitigation analysis, and residual risk assessment. The method is highly iterative, especially with regard to scenario refinement and evaluation. The Total Risk Assessment Methodology includes objective consideration of relative attack likelihood instead of subjective expert judgment. The 'probability of attack' is not computed, but the relative likelihood for each scenario is assessed through identifying and analyzing scenario cohort groups, which are groups of scenarios with comparable qualities to the scenario being analyzed at both this and other targets. Scenarios for the target under consideration and other targets are placed into cohort groups under an established ranking process that reflects the following three factors: known targeting, achievable consequences, and the resources required for an adversary to have a high likelihood of success. The development of these target cohort groups implements, mathematically, the idea that adversaries are actively choosing among possible attack scenarios and avoiding scenarios that would be significantly suboptimal to their objectives. An adversary who can choose among only a few comparable targets and scenarios (a small comparable target cohort group) is more likely to choose to attack the specific target under analysis because he perceives it to be a relatively unique attack opportunity. The opposite is also true. Thus, total risk is related to the number of targets that exist in each scenario cohort group. This paper describes the Total Risk Assessment Methodology and illustrates it through an example.

Aguilar, Richard; Pless, Daniel J.; Kaplan, Paul Garry; Silva, Consuelo Juanita; Rhea, Ronald Edward; Wyss, Gregory Dane; Conrad, Stephen Hamilton

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

China's trade in major forest products dips in first half of 2009 China's trade in major forest products dips in first half of 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

China's trade in major forest products dips in first half of 2009 China's trade in major forest products dips in first half of 2009 21/08/2009 - 08:27 Affected by the global financial crisis, China from customs agencies shows the total trade value of forest products in China reached about USD26

439

A competing risks approach for time estimation of household WEEE disposal  

SciTech Connect

The recent growth in the number of electrical and electronic devices is viewed as one the priority waste streams in European Union waste management policy. This paper presents the findings of a survey to study domestic habits with respect to Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) in Spain. A specific problem when performing this estimation arises from the fact that consumers quite often store old appliances at home when they are no longer used. Focusing on four different types of appliance, survival analysis (SA) is used to study both the usage span and the reasons for no longer using each device. The time that the discarded products were kept at home before being disposed of was studied using competing risks (CR) analysis. The results of the analysis provide information on the distribution of the studied variables for the different outcomes as well as the influence exerted by the socio-demographic variables considered. Relations between these characteristics and the storage time of the appliances before disposal emerge based on survey data. For instance, the CR model finds that the storage time of the some appliances (i.e. refrigerator) is related to these social-demographics factors. However, other appliances (i.e. microwave oven) are less influenced by these factors. The attitude and motivation of the respondents to the survey as regards the End-of-Life of appliances were also analysed. A majority of respondents do not store discarded appliances at home. The first reason for storing appliances at home is the possibility of it being useful in the future and the second that the respondents did not know what to do with them.

Gutierrez, E., E-mail: egm@esi.us.e [Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros, Universidad de Sevilla, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Adenso-Diaz, B. [Escuela Politecnica Superior de Ingenieria, Universidad de Oviedo, 33204 Gijon (Spain); Lozano, S. [Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros, Universidad de Sevilla, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Gonzalez-Torre, P. [Escuela Politecnica Superior de Ingenieria, Universidad de Oviedo, 33204 Gijon (Spain)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

440

Seismic Probabilistic Risk Assessment Implementation Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BackgroundThis report provides updates to the guidelines and approaches for seismic probabilistic risk assessments (SPRAs) that were published in the initial Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) report Seismic Probabilistic Risk Assessment Implementation Guide (1002989) in 2003. It provides practical guidelines for SPRA development to support a variety of uses, including risk-informed applications.It is intended that a probabilistic risk ...

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "major risk factors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

New Approaches to Managing Transmission Project Risk  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses the growing risks associated with transmission development and the importance of managing or hedging these risks. It presents case studies to illustrate the risks and categorizes approaches to managing them. It describes two EPRI tools that may be useful in managing transmission development risks, suggests how these tools might be further developed, and identifies other useful areas of research.

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

442

Risk Analysis & Security Rule Compliance Activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Risk Analysis & Security Rule Compliance Activities Marissa Gordon- Nguyen, JD, MPH Health Information Privacy Specialist ...

2010-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

443

Guidelines for Ecological Risk Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5/002F 5/002F April 1998 Guidelines for Ecological Risk Assessment (Published on May 14, 1998, Federal Register 63(93):26846-26924) Risk Assessment Forum U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC DISCLAIMER This document has been reviewed in accordance with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency policy and approved for publication. Mention of trade names or commercial products does not constitute endorsement or recommendation for use. NOTICE This report contains the full text of the Guidelines for Ecological Risk Assessment. However, the format of this version differs from the Federal Register version, as follows: text boxes that are included in this document at their point of reference were instead listed at the end of the Federal Register document as text notes, due to format limitations for Federal Register documents.

444

SC Introduction to Risk Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OF OF SCIENCE Office of Science Risk Management November 4, 2009 Ray Won Office of Project Assessment Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy http://www.science.doe.gov/opa/ 2 AGENDA AGENDA Wednesday, November 4, 2009, Building 2714, Oak Ridge 2:15 p.m. Introduction to SC Risk Management 2:25 p.m. Spallation Neutron Source 2:40 p.m. ORNL Risk Management Process 2:55 p.m. National Synchrotron Light Source II 3:10 p.m. Questions 3:30 p.m. End OFFICE OF SCIENCE 3 DOE Organization DOE Organization OFFICE OF SCIENCE Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Office of the Under Secretary for Nuclear Security/ Administrator for National Nuclear Security Administration Thomas P. D'Agostino Chief of Staff *The Deputy Secretary also serves as the Chief Operating Officer.

445

NIST Atomic Form Factors: Form factors and standard ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 2. Form Factors and Standard Definitions. ... with ? in, eg, Ångstroms; the "anomalous" scattering factor f? (depending on x-ray energy E and the ...

446

Spent Fuel Transportation Risk Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Transportation Risk Assessment Fuel Transportation Risk Assessment (SFTRA) Draft NUREG-2125 Overview for National Transportation Stakeholders Forum John Cook Division of Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation 1 SFTRA Overview Contents * Project and review teams * Purpose and goals * Basic methodology * Improvements relative to previous studies * Draft NUREG structure and format * Routine shipment analysis and results * Accident condition analysis and results * Findings and conclusions * Schedule 2 SFTRA Research and Review Teams * Sandia National Laboratory Research Team [$1.8M; 9/06-9/12] - Doug Ammerman - principal investigator - Carlos Lopez - thermal - Ruth Weiner - RADTRAN * NRC's SFTRA Technical Review Team - Gordon Bjorkman - structural

447

Initial Decision and Risk Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Decision and Risk Analysis capabilities will be developed for industry consideration and possible adoption within Year 1. These tools will provide a methodology for merging qualitative ranking of technology maturity and acknowledged risk contributors with quantitative metrics that drive investment decision processes. Methods and tools will be initially introduced as applications to the A650.1 case study, but modular spreadsheets and analysis routines will be offered to industry collaborators as soon as possible to stimulate user feedback and co-development opportunities.

Engel, David W.

2012-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

448

Analysis of Potential Hydrogen Risk in the PWR Containment  

SciTech Connect

Various studies have shown that hydrogen combustion is one of major risk contributors to threaten the integrity of the containment in a nuclear power plant. That hydrogen risk should be considered in severe accident strategies in current and future NPPs has been emphasized in the latest policies issued by the National Nuclear Safety Administration of China (NNSA). According to a deterministic approach, three typical severe accident sequences for a PWR large dry containment, such as the large break loss-of-coolant (LLOCA), the station blackout (SBO), and the small break loss-of-coolant (SLOCA) are analyzed in this paper with MELCOR code. Hydrogen concentrations in different compartments are observed to evaluate the potential hydrogen risk. The results show that there is a great amount